WorldWideScience

Sample records for detector performance monitoring

  1. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration and Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground

  2. A comparison of the performance of compact neutrino detector designs for nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyna, D. E.; McKeown, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the monitoring of nuclear fuel for power reactors by detecting the anti-neutrinos produced during operation. Small liquid scintillator detectors have already demonstrated sensitivity to operational power levels, but more sensitive monitoring requires improvements in the efficiency and uniformity of these detectors. In this work, we use a montecarlo simulation to investigate the detector performance of four different detector configurations. Based on the analysis of neutron detection efficiency and positron energy response, we find that the optimal detector design will depend on the goals and restrictions of the specific installation or application. We have attempted to present the relevant information so that future detector development can proceed in a profitable direction

  3. A performance evaluation study of three types of alpha-track detector radon monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, W.M.; Lucas, R.M.; Daum, K.A.; Sensintaffar, E.; Poppell, S.; Feldt, L.; Clarkin, M.

    1991-01-01

    Three models of alpha-track detector (ATD) Rn monitors were exposed in Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Rn chambers to obtain estimates of precision and bias for the National Residential Radon Survey (NRRS). Exposures in this study ranged from 37 to 740 Bq y m-3 (1 to 20 pCi y L-1), plus blanks. These exposures correspond to the range expected in most U.S. residences. All detectors were purchased through a Rn mitigation firm to assure that the vendors did not give special attention to the ATDs used in this study. Ten ATDs of each model were studied at 12 exposures. The mean and standard deviation of the reported values for each model were calculated and compared with the continuously monitored chamber concentrations to determine the bias and precision at each exposure. Results of this analysis were discussed with the vendors, who took corrective actions. Changes in track counting procedures and calibrations improved detector performance. Readings of one detector were adjusted based on a regression of the monitored values on the reported values

  4. The Performance Assessment of the Detector for the Portable Environmental Radiation Distribution Monitoring System with Rapid Nuclide Recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Uk Jae; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2015-01-01

    The environment radiation distribution monitoring system measures the radiation using a portable detector and display the overall radiation distribution. Bluetooth and RS-232 communications are used for constructing monitoring system. However RS-232 serial communication is known to be more stable than Bluetooth and also it can use the detector's raw data which will be used for getting the activity of each artificial nuclide. In the present study, the detection and communication performance of the developed detector with RS-232 method is assessed by using standard sources for the real application to the urban or rural environment. Assessment of the detector for the portable environmental radiation distribution monitoring system with rapid nuclide recognition was carried out. It was understood that the raw data of detector could be effectively treated by using RS-232 method and the measurement showed a good agreement with the calculation within the relative error of 0.4 % in maximum

  5. The Performance Assessment of the Detector for the Portable Environmental Radiation Distribution Monitoring System with Rapid Nuclide Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Uk Jae; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The environment radiation distribution monitoring system measures the radiation using a portable detector and display the overall radiation distribution. Bluetooth and RS-232 communications are used for constructing monitoring system. However RS-232 serial communication is known to be more stable than Bluetooth and also it can use the detector's raw data which will be used for getting the activity of each artificial nuclide. In the present study, the detection and communication performance of the developed detector with RS-232 method is assessed by using standard sources for the real application to the urban or rural environment. Assessment of the detector for the portable environmental radiation distribution monitoring system with rapid nuclide recognition was carried out. It was understood that the raw data of detector could be effectively treated by using RS-232 method and the measurement showed a good agreement with the calculation within the relative error of 0.4 % in maximum.

  6. Performance of the RASNIK Optical Alignment Monitoring System for the LHCb Outer Tracker Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Szczekowski, Marek; Ukleja, Artur; Pellegrino, Antonio; Hart, Robert; Syryczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    We present the results collected by an optical system for position control of the Outer Tracker detector stations in the LHCb experiment. This system has been constructed using the RASNIK three-point alignment monitors. The measurements are based on data taken in Run 2 of LHC.

  7. Design and performance of a lead fluoride detector as a luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Benito, R.; Khaneft, D.; O'Connor, C.; Capozza, L.; Diefenbach, J.; Gläser, B.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.

    2016-01-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of Møller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  8. Design and performance of a lead fluoride detector as a luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Benito, R.; Khaneft, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); O' Connor, C., E-mail: colton@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Capozza, L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); Diefenbach, J. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Gläser, B.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of Møller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  9. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-03-05

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  10. LHCb detector performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinol, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are

  11. Detector module for gas monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to radioactive source detector module for use in a gas monitor. It is adapted to contain the source and other detector components to allow sealed coupling of those components with other portions of the gas monitor. It is particularly concerned with the use of radioactive materials used as electron sources in gas monitors. The module is used to detect changes in electron flow caused by partial absorption of the electron capture gas flowing between two electrodes. The assembly includes a gas flow source, a gas receiver and an electronic assembly for receiving a signal from the detector. The radioactive source and electrodes are housed so that they are connected to the gas flow source so as to prevent accidental or undesired disconnection. It is designed so that the detector module may be removed or replaced into the gas monitor assemblies by untrained personnel so as to prevent exposure to the radioactive material. Full details are given. (U.K.)

  12. Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) proposes to use personnel dosimetry radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for safeguards purposes. It plans to place these YES/NO monitors at barrier penetration points declared closed under IAEA safeguards to detect the passage of plutonium-bearing nuclear material, usually spent fuel. For this application, commercially available dosimeters were surveyed as well as other radiation detectors that appeared suitable and likely to be marketed in the near future. No primary advantage was found in a particular detector type because in this application backgrounds vary during long counting intervals. Secondary considerations specify that the monitor be inexpensive and easy to tamper-proof, interrogate, and maintain. On this basis radiophotoluminescent, thermoluminescent, and electronic dosimeters were selected as possible routine monitors; the latter two may prove useful for data-base acquisition

  13. In-core monitoring detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitelman, M.G.

    2001-01-01

    The main task of in-core monitoring consists in securing observability of the reactor installation in all possible operation modes (normal, transient, accident and post-accident). Operation safety at acceptable cost can be achieved by optimized measurement errors. The range of sensors applied as in-core detectors for operative measurements in the industry is very limited in number. Among them might be cited self powered neutron detectors (SPND) and thermocouples. Sensors are incorporated in the in-core detectors assemblies (SVRD). The presentation makes an effort to touch upon the problems of assuring and increasing quality of in-core on-line measurements. So we do not consider systems using movable detectors, as the latter do not assure on-line measurements. (Authors)

  14. The performance of ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is an apparatus of unprecedented complexity, designed to probe physics in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV. It was installed in its underground cavern at the LHC during the period 2004 to 2008. Testing of individual subsystems began immediately with calibration systems and cosmic rays, and by 2008 full detector systems could be operated with the planned infrastructure, readout, and monitoring systems. Several commissioning runs of the full detector were organized in 2008 and 2009. During these runs the detector was operated continuously for several months with its readout triggered by cosmic ray muons. At the same time, regular calibrations of individual detector systems were made. In the course of these runs, signals from tens of millions of cosmic ray events were recorded. These commissioning runs continued until the first beam-beam collisions in late 2009. This volume is a collection of seven performance papers based on d...

  15. WFC3 UVIS Detector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Heather C.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; MacKenty, John W.; Anderson, Jay; WFC3 Team

    2015-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) in May 2000. WFC3 has two observational channels, UV/visible (UVIS) and infrared (IR); both have been performing well on-orbit. Since installation, the WFC3 team has been diligent in monitoring the performance of both detectors. The UVIS channel consists of two e2v, backside illuminated, 2Kx4K CCDs arranged in a 2x1 mosaic. We present results from some of the monitoring programs used to check various aspects of the UVIS detector. We discuss the growth trend of hot pixels and the efficacy of regular anneals in controlling the hot pixel population. We detail a pixel population with lowered-sensitivity that evolves during the time between anneals, and is largely reset by each anneal procedure. We discuss the stability of the post-flash LED lamp, used and recommended for CTE mitigation in observations with less than 12 e-/pixel backgrounds. Finally, we summarize long-term photometric trends of the UVIS detector, as well as the absolute gain measurement, used as a proxy for the on-orbit evolution of the UVIS channel.

  16. Tracking the NOvA Detectors' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psihas, Fernanda; NOvA Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The NOvA experiment measures long baseline νμ -->νe oscillations in Fermilab's NuMI beam. We employ two detectors equipped with over 10 thousand sets of data-taking electronics; avalanche photo diodes and front end boards which collect and process the scintillation signal from particle interactions within the detectors. These sets of electronics -as well as the systems which power and cool them- must be monitored and maintained at precise working conditions to ensure maximal data-taking uptime, good data quality and a lasting life for our detectors. This poster describes the automated systems used on NOvA to simultaneously monitor our data quality, diagnose hardware issues, track our performance and coordinate maintenance for the detectors.

  17. ACCESS: Detector Control and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (companion poster, Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been selected and integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been successfully performed. Further improvements to the flight controller housing have been made. A cryogenic ground test system has been built. Dark current and read noise tests have been performed, yielding results consistent with the initial characterization tests of the detector performed by Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL). Detector control software has been developed and implemented for ground testing. Performance and integration of the detector and controller with the flight software will be presented. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  18. Performance of the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falaleev, V P; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Karyukhin, A N; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Perevozchikov, V; Pernegger, H; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Belokopytov, Yu; Charpentier, Ph; Gavillet, Ph; Gouz, Yu; Jarlskog, Ch

    1996-01-01

    DELPHI (DEtector with Lepton, Photon and Hadron Identification) is a detector for e^+e^- physics, designed to provide high granularity over a 4\\pi solid angle, allowing an effective particle identification. It has been operating at the LEP (Large Electron-Positron) collider at CERN since 1989. This article reviews its performance.

  19. MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Bergmann, Benedikt; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Ashba, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Bekhouche, Khaled [Biskra University (Algeria); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Lipniacka, Anna [Bergen University (Norway)

    2016-07-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s) =8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX luminosity measurements are below 0.3% for one minute intervals.

  20. MPX Detectors as LHC Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; Asbah, Nedaa; Bergmann, Benedikt; Bekhouche, Khaled; Caforio, Davide; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik; Leroy, Claude; Lipniacka, Anna; Nessi, Marzio; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Soueid, Paul; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX lum...

  1. Monitor for reactor neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakami, Hisayuki; Shibata, Masatoshi

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges as to whether a neutron detector is normal or not while considering the change of indication value depending on the power change of a reactor core. That is, the device of the present invention comprises a standard value setting device for setting the standard value for calibrating the neutron detector and an abnormality judging device for comparing the standard value with a measured value of the neutron detector and judging the abnormality when the difference is greater than a predetermined value. The measured value upon initialization of each of the neutron detectors is determined as a quasi-standard value. An average value of the difference between the measured value and the quasi-standard value of a plurality of effective neutron detectors at a same level for the height of the reactor core is multiplied to a power rate based on the reactor core power at a position where the neutron detector is disposed upon calibration. The value obtained by adding the multiplied value and the quasi-standard value is determined as a standard value. The abnormality judging device compares the standard value with the measured value of the neutron detector and, if the difference is greater than a predetermined value, the neutron detector is determined as abnormal. As a result, judgement can be conducted more accurately than conventional cases. (I.S.)

  2. Radiation portal monitor with {sup 10}B+ZnS(Ag) neutron detector performance for the detection of special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.; Ibanez F, S. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, ETSI Industriales, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Gonzalez, J. A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Laboratorio de Ingenieria Nuclear, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, C. Prof. Aranguren 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Mendez, R., E-mail: ingkarenguzman@gmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Laboratorio de Patrones Neutronicos, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    In homeland security, neutron detection is used to prevent the smuggling of special nuclear materials. Thermal neutrons are normally detected with {sup 3}He proportional counters, in the radiation portal monitors, Rpms, however due to the {sup 3}He shortage new procedures are being studied. In this work Monte Carlo methods, using the MCNP6 code, have been used to study the neutron detection features of a {sup 10}B+ZnS(Ag) under real conditions inside of a Rpm. The performance for neutron detection was carried out for {sup 252}Cf, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu under different conditions. In order to mimic an actual situation occurring at border areas, a sample of SNM sited inside a vehicle was simulated and the Rpm with {sup 10}B+ZnS(Ag) response was calculated. At 200 cm the {sup 10}B+ZnS(Ag) on Rpm response is close to 2.5 cps-ng {sup 252}Cf, when the {sup 252}Cf neutron source is shielded with 0.5 cm-thick lead and 2.5 cm-thick polyethylene fulfilling the ANSI recommendations. Three different geometries of neutron detectors of {sup 10}B+ZnS(Ag) in a neutron detection system in Rpm were modeled. Therefore, the {sup 10}B+ZnS(Ag) detectors are an innovative and viable replacement for the {sup 3}He detectors in the Rpm. (Author)

  3. Radiation portal monitor with "1"0B+ZnS(Ag) neutron detector performance for the detection of special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.; Ibanez F, S.; Vega C, H. R.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Mendez, R.

    2016-10-01

    In homeland security, neutron detection is used to prevent the smuggling of special nuclear materials. Thermal neutrons are normally detected with "3He proportional counters, in the radiation portal monitors, Rpms, however due to the "3He shortage new procedures are being studied. In this work Monte Carlo methods, using the MCNP6 code, have been used to study the neutron detection features of a "1"0B+ZnS(Ag) under real conditions inside of a Rpm. The performance for neutron detection was carried out for "2"5"2Cf, "2"3"8U and "2"3"9Pu under different conditions. In order to mimic an actual situation occurring at border areas, a sample of SNM sited inside a vehicle was simulated and the Rpm with "1"0B+ZnS(Ag) response was calculated. At 200 cm the "1"0B+ZnS(Ag) on Rpm response is close to 2.5 cps-ng "2"5"2Cf, when the "2"5"2Cf neutron source is shielded with 0.5 cm-thick lead and 2.5 cm-thick polyethylene fulfilling the ANSI recommendations. Three different geometries of neutron detectors of "1"0B+ZnS(Ag) in a neutron detection system in Rpm were modeled. Therefore, the "1"0B+ZnS(Ag) detectors are an innovative and viable replacement for the "3He detectors in the Rpm. (Author)

  4. CNGS beam monitor with the LVD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Ghia, P.L.; Giusti, P.; Kemp, E.; Malguin, A.S.; Menghetti, H.; Pesci, A.; Pless, I.A.; Porta, A.; Ryasny, V.G.; Ryazhskaya, O.G.; Saavedra, O.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M.; Vigorito, C.; Votano, L.; Yakushev, V.F.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Zichichi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of an adequate CNGS beam monitor at the Gran Sasso Laboratory has been stressed in many papers. Since the number of internal ν μ CC and NC interactions in the various detectors will not allow to collect statistics rapidly, one should also be able to detect the ν μ CC interactions in the upstream rock. In this study, we have investigated the performances of the LVD detector as a monitor for the CNGS neutrino beam. Thanks to its wide area (13x11 m 2 orthogonal to the beam direction) LVD can detect about 120 muons per day originated by ν μ CC interactions in the rock. The LVD total mass is ∼2 kt. This allows to get 30 more CNGS events per day as internal (NC+CC) ν μ interactions, for a total of ∼150 events/day. A 3% statistical error can be reached in 7 days. Taking into account the time characteristics of the CNGS beam, the cosmic muon background can be reduced to a negligible level, of the order of 1.5 events/day

  5. Neutron detector with monitoring elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.

    1976-01-01

    To check the reliable reading of a neutron detector the signal of which results from (n,e) processes and which is used for neutron flux supervision in the reactor core of pressurized-water reactors, a circuit is given which makes it possible to record the isolation resistivity of the cable connected to the input of the current amplifier and of the neutron detector, this resistivity determining, among others, the output signal. For supervision, the input offset voltage of the current amplifier is modulated by a low-frequency ac voltage and a filter is assigned to the output of an op amplifier, this filter feeding a limiting value recorder. (ORU) [de

  6. Performance of the Microwire Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeva, B.; Gomez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Labbe, J.C.; Pazos, A.; Plo, M.; Rodriguez, X.M.; Vazquez, P.

    2001-01-01

    We present here the performance of a new micropattern proportional gas detector, developed by kapton etching technique. Several geometries have been tested under high-intensity beams at PSI (presence of HIPs), including amplification gaps of 50 and 125 μm. Performance results are reported under various operating conditions

  7. Performance of the Microwire Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeva, B.; Gomez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Labbe, J.C.; Pazos, A.; Plo, M.; Rodriguez, X.M.; Vazquez, P. E-mail: fpvazquez@usc.es

    2001-04-01

    We present here the performance of a new micropattern proportional gas detector, developed by kapton etching technique. Several geometries have been tested under high-intensity beams at PSI (presence of HIPs), including amplification gaps of 50 and 125 {mu}m. Performance results are reported under various operating conditions.

  8. Photoconducting positions monitor and imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    2000-01-01

    A photoconductive, high energy photon beam detector/monitor for detecting x-rays and gamma radiation, having a thin, disk-shaped diamond substrate with a first and second surface, and electrically conductive coatings, or electrodes, of a predetermined configuration or pattern, disposed on the surfaces of the substrate. A voltage source and a current amplifier is connected to the electrodes to provide a voltage bias to the electrodes and to amplify signals from the detector.

  9. Extracts from the 1995/96 European intercomparison of in vivo monitoring systems - a means of comparing the performance of Nal detectors with Ge detectors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, E.L.; Thieme, M.; Koenig, K.; Schmitt-Hannig, A.; Goedde, R.; Ruehm, W. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene

    1997-12-01

    Between August 1995 and July 1996 a Europeanwide intercomparison of 44 whole body counters took place with a number of 42 participating institutions from 19 European countries. A tissue-equivalent whole body phantom containing the radionuclides potassium-40, cobalt-57, cobalt-60 and caesium-137 with activities between 1 to 4 kBq was transported by a representative of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (German Federal Office of Radiation Protection) to each of the participating laboratories. The phantom was there treated like a human subject during routine measurement and the participants were asked to identify the incorporated radionuclides and quantify their respective activities. The paper describes the measurement programme and the phantom used. The results are discussed with respect to detector type. (orig.)

  10. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    The commissioning effort is presently addressing two main areas: the commissioning of the hardware components at the pit and the coordination of the activities of the newly constituted Detector Performance groups (DPGs). At point 5, a plan regarding the service cavern and the commissioning of the connections of the off-detector electronics (for the data collection line and trigger primitive generation) to the central DAQ and the central Trigger has been defined. This activity was started early February and will continue until May. It began with Tracker electronics followed so far by HCAL and CSC. The goal is to have by May every detector commission, as much as possible, their data transfer paths from FED to Central DAQ as well as their trigger setups between TPGs and Global Level 1 trigger. The next focus is on connections of front-ends to the service cavern. This depends strongly on the installations of services. Presently the only detector which has its link fibers connected to the off-detector electr...

  11. Performance of ATLAS tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lacuesta, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The track and vertex reconstruction algorithms of the ATLAS Inner Detector have demonstrated excellent performance in the early data from the LHC. However, the rapidly increas- ing number of interactions per bunch crossing introduces new challenges both in computational aspects and physics performance. The combination of both silicon and gas based detectors provides high precision impact parameter and momentum measurement of charged particles, with high efficiency and small fake rate. Vertex reconstruction is used to identify with high efficiency the hard scattering process and to measure the amount of pile-up interactions, both aspects are cru- cial for many physics analyses. The performance of track and vertex reconstruction efficiency and resolution achieved in the 2011 and 2012 data-taking period are presented.

  12. Luminosity Monitoring in ATLAS with MPX Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086061

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV proton-proton collisions.

  13. The design of intelligentized nuclear radiation monitoring detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yan; Fang Zongliang; Wen Qilin; Li Lirong; Hu Jiewei; Peng Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduced an intelligentized nuclear radiation monitoring detector. The detector contains GM tubes, high voltage power supply and MCU circuit. The detector connect terminal via reformative serial port to provide power, accept the data and sent the command. (authors)

  14. Monitoring radiation damage in the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schorlemmer, André Lukas; Quadt, Arnulf; Große-Knetter, Jörn; Rembser, Christoph; Di Girolamo, Beniamino

    2014-11-05

    Radiation hardness is one of the most important features of the ATLAS pixel detector in order to ensure a good performance and a long lifetime. Monitoring of radiation damage is crucial in order to assess and predict the expected performance of the detector. Key values for the assessment of radiation damage in silicon, such as the depletion voltage and depletion depth in the sensors, are measured on a regular basis during operations. This thesis summarises the monitoring program that is conducted in order to assess the impact of radiation damage and compares it to model predictions. In addition, the physics performance of the ATLAS detector highly depends on the amount of disabled modules in the ATLAS pixel detector. A worrying amount of module failures was observed during run I. Thus it was decided to recover repairable modules during the long shutdown (LS1) by extracting the pixel detector. The impact of the module repairs and module failures on the detector performance is analysed in this thesis.

  15. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Document Server

    T. Camporesi

    P5 Commissioning activities The commissioning effort at the pit has made major progress since the last CMS week concerning the installation and operation of the off-detector electronics in USC. The progress has been much slower in the experi¬mental cavern due to the delay in the deployment of the infrastructure which should eventually allow safe powering-up of the front ends. Nevertheless, temporary power connections have allowed operation of slices of subdetectors at any given time. HF, HE, ECAL, DTs, RPCs and CSCs have carried out local commissioning tests with these temporary services. The status of hardware deployment in USC and on the towers/balconies is represented in the detailed table below.   Table 1: Status of installation of off-detector electronics. FEDs are detector dependent hardware modules which perform the first ‘colla¬tion’ of front-end data and send it to Central-data for event building. Tracker, ECAL, HCAL have their front end electronics mo...

  16. 2011 ATLAS Detector Performance - ID and Forward detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Davies‎, E; The ATLAS collaboration; Abdel Khalek, S

    2012-01-01

    This poster describes the performance of 2 parts of ATLAS: - The Inner Detector which consists of 3 subdetectors: the Pixel detector, the SemiConductor Tracker (or SCT) and the Transition Radiation Tracker (or TRT). Here, we report on Pixel detector and SCT performance over 2011. - ALFA detector which will determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at the ATLAS Interaction Point (IP), and the total proton-proton cross section, by tracking elastically scattered protons at very small angles in the limit of the Coulomb Nuclear interference region.

  17. Indigenous development of diamond detectors for monitoring neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Arvind; Amit Kumar; Topkar, Anita; Pithawa, C.K.

    2013-01-01

    High purity synthetic chemically vapor deposited (CVD) diamond has several outstanding characteristics that make it as an important material for detector applications specifically for extreme environmental conditions like high temperature, high radiation, and highly corrosive environments. Diamond detectors are especially considered promising for monitoring fast neutrons produced by the D-T nuclear fusion reactions in next generation fusion facilities such as ITER. When fast neutrons interact with carbon, elastic, inelastic and (n,α) type reactions can occur. These reactions can be employed for the detection of fast neutrons using diamond. We have initiated the development of diamond detectors based on synthetic CVD substrates. In this paper, the first test of a polycrystalline CVD diamond detector with fast neutrons is reported. The test results demonstrate that this detector can be used for monitoring fast neutrons. The diamond detectors have been fabricated using 5 mm x 5 mm, 300 μm polycrystalline diamond substrates. Aluminum metallization has been used on both sides of the detector to provide electrical contacts. The performance of fabricated detectors was first evaluated using current and capacitance measurements. The leakage current was observed to be stable and about a few pAs for voltages up to 300V. The capacitance-voltage characteristics showed a constant capacitance which is as expected. To confirm the response of the detector to charged particles, the pulse height spectrum (PHS) was obtained using 238 Pu- 239 Pu dual α- source. The PHS showed a continuum without any peak due to polycrystalline nature of diamond film. The response of the detector to fast neutrons has been studied using the fast neutron facility at NXF, BARC. The PHS obtained for a neutron yield of 4 x 10 8 n/s is shown. The average counts per second (cps) measured for diamond detector for different neutron yields is shown. The plot shows linearity with coefficient of determination R

  18. Threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVert, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    A study of a threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a nuclear reactor power monitor was conducted. Measurements were performed to ascertain whether certain detector material arrangements could be used to obtain significant discrimination against low energy gammas. Results indicating agreement between detector response and reactor power output are presented. Evidence of rejection of low energy gammas by the detector is presented. The simplicity of construction and ruggedness of the detector are also discussed

  19. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    The global commissioning campaign begins this year with a series of weekly two-day global runs of limited participation until mid-March. The aim of these runs varies week-to-week, but includes the commissioning the calorimeter triggers, the muon track-finder triggers in the DT/CSC overlap, the PLL locking ranges, and generally accumulating data either for HCAL noise characterization or detector studies with cosmic muons. In mid-March a full Global Run is scheduled with all components participating, followed in April by a Cosmic Run with the aim of collecting statistics over a couple weeks with the installed Tracker and other subsystems. The ultimate milestone is the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla (CRAFT), with a completed CMS closed and the solenoid energized for data-taking during June. The Detector Performance Groups start the year with the focus to prepare for LHC collisions, and the associated challenges (CSA08) and global commissioning exercises (CRAFT) along the way. New this year is the addition of the Tri...

  20. Design, calibration, and performance of the MINERvA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, L. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima, Perú (Peru); Bagby, L.; Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Baumbaugh, A. [Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima, Perú (Peru); Bodek, A.; Bradford, R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Brooks, W.K. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avda. España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Boehnlein, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Boyd, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Budd, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Butkevich, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Castromonte, C.M. [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Christy, M.E. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota – Duluth, Duluth, MN 55812 (United States); Chvojka, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Motta, H. da [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil); and others

    2014-04-11

    The MINERvA experiment is designed to perform precision studies of neutrino-nucleus scattering using ν{sub μ} and ν{sup ¯}{sub μ} neutrinos incident at 1–20 GeV in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. This article presents a detailed description of the MINERvA detector and describes the ex situ and in situ techniques employed to characterize the detector and monitor its performance. The detector is composed of a finely segmented scintillator-based inner tracking region surrounded by electromagnetic and hadronic sampling calorimetry. The upstream portion of the detector includes planes of graphite, iron and lead interleaved between tracking planes to facilitate the study of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Observations concerning the detector response over sustained periods of running are reported. The detector design and methods of operation have relevance to future neutrino experiments in which segmented scintillator tracking is utilized.

  1. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    The pace of activity is high for the Detector Performance Groups now that the CMS experiment is complete for 2008 and LHC beams are imminent. This includes refinement of the data quality monitoring tools (including prompt offline analyses), triggers, reconstruction code, and calibration and alignment conditions. Notable since the last CMS Week has been the inclusion of the strip tracker into the global running in July and the inclusion of the pixel systems and ECAL endcaps in August. The following describes the highlights from each group. During the CRUZET3 global run in July (the third installment of the Cosmic Run at Zero Tesla exercise) the Silicon Strip tracker recorded data with all barrel detectors and one side of the end-cap wheels. The week-long data-taking period delivered about 300k tracks good for detector alignment and was an extremely valuable experience to test the reconstruction, calibration and alignment workflows in their final configuration. Events with tracks were selected in real-time at ...

  2. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McGuigan, M; Spiletic, J; Fine, V; Nevski, P

    2001-01-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactiv...

  3. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to suppress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will describ...

  4. Status of radiation detector and neutron monitor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y K; Ha, J H; Han, S H; Hong, S B; Hwang, I K; Lee, W G; Moon, B S; Park, S H; Song, M H

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we describe the current states of the radiation detection technology, detectors for industrial application, and neutron monitors. We also survey the new technologies being applied to this field. The method to detect radiation is the measurement of the observable secondary effect from the interaction between incident radiation and detector material, such as ionization, excitation, fluorescence, and chemical reaction. The radiation detectors can be categorized into gas detectors, scintillation detectors, and semiconductor detectors according to major effects and main applications. This report contains the current status and operational principles of these detectors. The application fields of radiation detectors are industrial measurement system, in-core neutron monitor, medical radiation diagnostic device, nondestructive inspection device, environmental radiation monitoring, cosmic-ray measurement, security system, fundamental science experiment, and radiation measurement standardization. The st...

  5. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuigan, Michael; Smith, Gordon; Spiletic, John; Fine, Valeri; Nevski, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactive control, including the ability to slice, search and mark areas of the detector. We incorporate the ability to make a high quality still image of a view of the detector and the ability to generate animations and a fly through of the detector and output these to MPEG or VRML models. We develop data compression hardware and software so that remote interactive visualization will be possible among dispersed collaborators. We obtain real time visual display for events accumulated during simulations

  6. Precision of MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Benes, Petr; Bergmann, Benedikt; Biskup, Bartolomej; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Asbah, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Kladiva, Edward [IEP SAS Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-07-01

    A network consisting of MPX detectors based on Medipix2 silicon pixel devices were originally adapted for measuring the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. We demonstrate that the MPX network, which consists of 16 MPX detectors, is a self-contained luminosity monitor system. As the MPX detectors are collecting data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with good precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s)=8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The variations of the MPX luminosity measurements around the fitted curve lead to a relative uncertainty on the luminosity measurement below 0.3% for one minute time intervals.

  7. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Gayde, J. Ch; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-01-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM)

  8. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Document Server

    T. Camporesi

    The major progress made during the last months has been in the consolidation of services for the +endcaps and three barrel wheels (YB+2, YB+1 and YB0): all subdetectors have now final power connections (including Detector Safety protection), the gas systems have been commissioned for all gas detectors (the recirculation is not yet activated for the RPC though) and detector cooling has also been commissioned. Their integration with final services is the necessary condition for being able to operate larger fractions the detector. Recent weeks have seen full HCAL, more than 50% of EB and full wheels of DTs and CSC being operated using final services. This has not yet translated into major progress of global integration due to major interruptions of central services, which have not allowed the necessary debugging and commissioning time to all the subdetec¬tors and central activities like DAQ and trigger. Moreover the running in of the final central services has introduced instabilities related to the co...

  9. Performance of irradiated silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catacchini, E.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, M.; Meschini, M.; Parrini, G.; Pieri, M.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon microstrip devices to be installed in Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tracking detectors will have to operate in a high radiation environment. We report on performance studies of silicon microstrip detectors irradiated with neutrons or protons, up to fluences comparable to the first ten years of running at LHC. Obtained results show that irradiated detectors can still be operated with satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio,and in the case of inhomogeneously type inverted detector a very good position resolution is achieved regardless of the zone crossed by the particle

  10. Neuropharmacology of performance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocham, Gerhard; Ullsperger, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive, goal-directed behavior requires that organisms evaluate their actions in terms of their outcomes. Neuroimaging studies show that unfavorable outcomes or situations with high level of conflict engage the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC). Recording of event-related potentials revealed that these situations are accompanied by a negative deflection, the so-called error-related negativity (ERN), which appears after an erroneous response or after negative feedback. Both activation of the pMFC and the ERN are thought to represent a signal that indicates the need for behavioral adjustment, and to recruit other brain regions that implement these adjustments. While many fMRI and EEG studies have shed light on the anatomical structures and the cognitive processes involved in performance monitoring, only very recently have researchers begun to investigate the underlying neurochemical mechanisms. Drawing on the putative involvement of dopamine (DA) neurons in coding a reward prediction error, an influential theory has ascribed a pivotal role to DA in performance monitoring. However, although important, DA is certainly not the only neuromodulator involved. Recent studies point to a role for serotonin, norepinephrine and GABA, but also for adenosine in performance monitoring. Here, we review the evidence for neurotransmitter effects on this function in humans. In this light, we critically discuss currently debated models of performance monitoring and potential alternatives.

  11. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  12. The LUCID detector ATLAS luminosity monitor and its electronic system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00378808; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Starting from 2015 LHC is performing a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side-A-side-C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  13. Development of water radiocontamination monitor using a plastic scintillator detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, C.H. de; Madi Filho, T.; Hamada, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    An alpha, beta and gamma radiation water monitor was developed using a plastic scintillator detector with a sensitivity level of 15 bplastic scintillator detector with a sensitivity level of 15 Bq.L -1 and a counting efficiency of 25% for 131 I. It was proposed to be used in the radiation monitoring program of the research reactor swimming-pool of Sao Paulo. A simplified design and some properties of this monitor are presented. (author) [pt

  14. A review of the developments of radioxenon detectors for nuclear explosion monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivels, Ciara B.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Theodore W.; Kalinowski, Martin B.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-09-27

    Developments in radioxenon monitoring since the implementation of the International Monitoring System are reviewed with emphasis on the most current technologies to improve detector sensitivity and resolution. The nuclear detectors reviewed include combinations of plastic and NaI(Tl) detectors, high purity germanium detectors, silicon detectors, and phoswich detectors. The minimum detectable activity and calibration methods for the various detectors are also discussed.

  15. Gamma-ray detectors for intelligent, hand-held radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    Small radiation detectors based on HgI 2 , bismuth germanate (BGO), plastic, or NaI(Tl) detector materials were evaluated for use in small, lighweight radiation monitors. The two denser materials, HgI 2 and BGO, had poor resolution at low-energy and thus performed less well than NaI(Tl) in detecting low-energy gamma rays from bare, enriched uranium. The plastic scintillator, a Compton recoil detector, also performed less well at low gamma-ray energy. Two small NaI(Tl) detectors were suitable for detecting bare uranium and sheilded plutonium. One became part of a new lightweight hand-held monitor and the other found uses as a pole-mounted detector for monitoring hard-to-reach locations

  16. The use of GaSe semiconductor detectors for monitoring high energy muon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, A M; Murri, R; Quirini, A; Rizzo, A; Vasanelli, L

    1976-01-01

    GaSe semiconductor detectors have been successfully tested during one year for monitoring muon beams in the GeV range in the neutrino experiment at CERN. Their performances are comparable with those of commercial Si surface barrier detectors for this particular application. Crystal growth, detector fabrication and characterization are briefly described. Various advantages (cost, ruggedness, resistance to radiation damage, manufacturing simplicity, etc.) are discussed. (8 refs).

  17. The CMS RPC detector performance during Run-2 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment, located at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, has a redundant muon system composed by three different detector technologies Cathode Strip Chambers (in the forward regions), Drift Tubes (in the central region), and Resistive Plate Chambers (both in the central and forward regions). The RPCs are designed mainly as a trigger detector but they contribute also to the muon reconstruction. Thus the monitoring and the analysis of the system performance are necessary and essential for the final data quality. The main detector characteristics and the hit efficiency and cluster size will be presented in the paper. The stability of the system in the conditions of high instantaneous luminosity and high number of PU events will be presented in a view of history monitoring and stable trend.

  18. Development of an advanced antineutrino detector for reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, T., E-mail: classen2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ho, A.; Jonkmans, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Kogler, L.; Reyna, D. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-01-21

    Here we present the development of a compact antineutrino detector for the purpose of nuclear reactor monitoring, improving upon a previously successful design. This paper will describe the design improvements of the detector which increases the antineutrino detection efficiency threefold over the previous effort. There are two main design improvements over previous generations of detectors for nuclear reactor monitoring: dual-ended optical readout and single volume detection mass. The dual-ended optical readout eliminates the need for fiducialization and increases the uniformity of the detector's optical response. The containment of the detection mass in a single active volume provides more target mass per detector footprint, a key design criteria for operating within a nuclear power plant. This technology could allow for real-time monitoring of the evolution of a nuclear reactor core, independent of reactor operator declarations of fuel inventories, and may be of interest to the safeguards community.

  19. Performance in space of the AMS-02 RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovacchini, F., E-mail: francesca.giovacchini@cern.ch

    2014-12-01

    AMS-02 was successfully installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in May 2011, to perform precise measurements of galactic cosmic rays in the 100 MV to few TV magnetic rigidity range. Among several specialized sub-detectors, AMS-02 includes a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), which provides a precise measurement of the particle charge and velocity. The Cherenkov light is produced in a radiator made of silica aerogel and sodium fluoride and collected by means of an array of photomultiplier tubes. Since its launch to space, the detector has been taking data without failures; its functionality and data integrity are monitored and show stable response. In order to achieve the optimal detector performance, calibrations have been performed to account for the dependence of the photodetectors response on temperature and for effective non-uniformities in the detector. The knowledge gathered of the photon yield at the percent level resulted in a charge resolution of 0.3 charge units for He and 0.5 charge units for Si ions. The required precision in the measurements of the particle velocity at the per mil level demanded a more accurate determination of the aerogel refractive index. A map of the aerogel radiator refractive index has been directly inferred from in-flight high statistics data with a precision of Δn/n<2×10{sup −5} on average and its stability with time has also been checked. Finally, a velocity resolution of ∼0.8×10{sup −3} for He and ∼0.5×10{sup −3} for Z>5 ions has been obtained. - Highlights: • AMS-02 RICH detector is fully operational in space and monitored from ground. • Detector calibration for t-dependent and t-independent effects is performed. • Aerogel refractive index fine map has been obtained and its stability checked. • Charge and velocity resolution fulfill design requirements.

  20. Criticality monitoring with digital systems and solid state neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhoite, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    A commercially available system for criticality monitoring combines the well established technology of digital radiation monitoring with state-of-the art detector systems capable of detecting criticality excursions of varying length and intensity with a high degree of confidence. The field microcomputer servicing the detector clusters contains hardware and software to acquire detector information in both the digital count rate and bit sensing modes supported by the criticality detectors. In both cases special criticality logic in the field microcomputer is used to determine the validity of the criticality event. The solid-state neutron detector consists of a 6 LiF wafer coupled to a diffused-junction charged particle detector. Alpha particles resulting from (n,α) interactions within the lithium wafer produce a pulsed signal corresponding to neutron intensity. Special detector circuitry causes the setting of a criticality bit recognizable by the microcomputer should neutron field intensities either exceed a hardware selectable frequency or saturate the detector resulting in a high current condition. These two modes of criticality sensing, in combination with the standard method of comparing an operator selectable alarm setpoint with the detector count rate, results in a criticality system capable of effective operation under the most demanding criticality monitoring conditions

  1. Thermoexoemission detectors for monitoring radioactive contamination of industrial waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obukhov, V.T.; Sobolev, I.A.; Khomchik, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Detectors on base of BeO(Na) monocrystals with thermoemission to be used for monitoring radioactive contamination of industrial waste waters are suggested. The detectors advantages are sensitivity to α and low-ehergy β radiations, high mechanical strength and wide range of measurements. The main disadvantage is the necessity of working in red light

  2. Radon detectors for continuous environmental monitoring applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisoutham, O.; Werczynski, S.; Chambers, S.; Zahorowski, W.

    2003-01-01

    The two-filter method is presently the best technique available for real-time low-level counting of atmospheric 222 Rn. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has developed and deployed a range of dual flow loop, two-filter radon detectors around the world for various applications. The detectors have a response time of 45 minutes, and can be custom built for specific purposes. The largest detectors have a lower limit of detection of ∼10 mBq m -3

  3. Quantitative performance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    In the recently published update of NUREG/CR 3883, it was shown that Japanese plants of size and design similar to those in the US have significantly fewer trips in a given year of operation. One way to reduce such imbalance is the efficient use of available plant data. Since plant data are recorded and monitored continuously for management feedback and timely resolution of problems, this data should be actively used to increase the efficiency of operations and, ultimately, for a reduction of plant trips in power plants. A great deal of information is lost, however, if the analytical tools available for the data evaluation are misapplied or not adopted at all. This paper deals with a program developed to use quantitative techniques to monitor personnel performance in an operating power plant. Visual comparisons of ongoing performance with predetermined quantitative performance goals are made. A continuous feedback is provided to management for early detection of adverse trends and timely resolution of problems. Ultimately, costs are reduced through effective resource management and timely decision making

  4. Modular Software Performance Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Kruse, D F

    2011-01-01

    CPU clock frequency is not likely to be increased significantly in the coming years, and data analysis speed can be improved by using more processors or buying new machines, only if one is willing to change the paradigm to a parallel one. Therefore, performance monitoring procedures and tools are needed to help programmers to optimize existing software running on current and future hardware. Low level information from hardware performance counters is vital to spot specific performance problems slowing program execution. HEP software is often huge and complex, and existing tools are unable to give results with the required granularity. We will report on the approach we have chose to solve this problem that involves decomposing the application into parts and monitoring each of them separately. Both counting and sampling methods are used to allow an analysis with the required custom granularity: from global level, up to the function level. A set of tools (based on perfmon2 – a software interface to hardware co...

  5. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, A.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ajboston@liv.ac.uk; Dimmock, M.R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jones, M.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Slee, M. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray detectors based on high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe) are one of the key workhorses of experimental nuclear science. The technical development of such detector technology has been dramatic in recent years. Large volume, high-granularity, electrically segmented HPGe detectors have been realised and a methodology to improve position sensitivity using pulse-shape analysis coupled with the novel technique of gamma-ray tracking has been developed. Collaborations have been established in Europe (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA)) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) [C.W. Beausang, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003)] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well-defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  6. A robust detector for rolling element bearing condition monitoring based on the modulation signal bispectrum and its performance evaluation against the Kurtogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiange; Xi Gu, James; Rehab, Ibrahim; Abdalla, Gaballa M.; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, A. D.

    2018-02-01

    Envelope analysis is a widely used method for rolling element bearing fault detection. To obtain high detection accuracy, it is critical to determine an optimal frequency narrowband for the envelope demodulation. However, many of the schemes which are used for the narrowband selection, such as the Kurtogram, can produce poor detection results because they are sensitive to random noise and aperiodic impulses which normally occur in practical applications. To achieve the purposes of denoising and frequency band optimisation, this paper proposes a novel modulation signal bispectrum (MSB) based robust detector for bearing fault detection. Because of its inherent noise suppression capability, the MSB allows effective suppression of both stationary random noise and discrete aperiodic noise. The high magnitude features that result from the use of the MSB also enhance the modulation effects of a bearing fault and can be used to provide optimal frequency bands for fault detection. The Kurtogram is generally accepted as a powerful means of selecting the most appropriate frequency band for envelope analysis, and as such it has been used as the benchmark comparator for performance evaluation in this paper. Both simulated and experimental data analysis results show that the proposed method produces more accurate and robust detection results than Kurtogram based approaches for common bearing faults under a range of representative scenarios.

  7. Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1980-10-01

    Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development

  8. Low level neutron monitoring using high pressure 3He detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszona, S.

    1995-01-01

    Three detectors, two spherical proportional counters and an ionisation chamber, all filled with 3 He to pressures of 160 kPa, 325 kPa and 1 MPa respectively have been experimentally studied with respect to their use for low level neutron monitoring. The ambient dose equivalent responses and the energy resolutions of these detectors have been determined. It is shown that spectral analysis of the signals from these detectors not only gives high sensitivity with regard to ambient dose equivalent but also improves the quality of the measurements. A special instrumentation for low level neutron monitoring is described in which a quality control method has been implemented. (Author)

  9. Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1980-10-01

    Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development.

  10. Optical fiber Cherenkov detector for beam current monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pishchulin, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.G.; Romashkin, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained in calculation of an optical fiber Cherenkov detector for accelerated beam current monitoring are presented. The technique of beam parameters monitoring is based on Cherenkov radiation excitation by accelerated electrons in the optical fiber. The formulas for calculations of optical power and time dependence of Cherenkov radiation pulse are given. The detector sensitivity and time resolution dependence on the fiber material characteristics are investigated. Parameters of a 10μm one-mode quartz optical fiber detector for the free electron laser photoinjector are calculated. The structure of a monitoring system with the optical fiber Cherenkov detector is considered. Possible applications of this technique are discussed and some recommendations are given

  11. Performance of the Analog Moving Window Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, V. Gregers

    1970-01-01

    A type of analog integrating moving window detector for use with a scanning pulse radar is examined. A performance analysis is carried out, which takes into account both the radiation pattern of the antenna and the dynamic character of the detection process due to the angular scanning...

  12. Performance of B-10 based detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, Mathieu; Anderson, Tom; Johnson, Nathan; Mckinny, Kevin; Mcpheeters, Matthew [GE Measurement and Control - Reuter-Stokes, Twinsburg, Ohio (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Helium-3 gas-filled detectors have been used in nuclear safeguards applications, in homeland security neutron detection modules and in research for over 30 years. With the current shortage of {sup 3}He gas, GE's Reuter-Stokes business developed a {sup 10}B lined proportional counter and a {sup 10}B hybrid detector, in which a small amount of {sup 3}He is added to a 10B detector to enhance the neutron sensitivity. In 2010, GE's Reuter-Stokes successfully developed a commercial alternative to 3He gas-filled detectors for homeland security neutron detection modules based on 10B lined proportional counters. We will present the concept behind the {sup 10}B neutron detection modules, as drop-in replacement to existing 3He neutron detection modules deployed, and the timeline and development needed to get a fully commercial application. To ensure the highest quality, each {sup 10}B neutron detection unit is put through a series of tests: temperature cycles from -40 deg. C to +55 deg. C, vibration testing at levels up to 2.5 g from 10 Hz to 50 Hz in every direction, neutron sensitivity reaching up to 4.5 cps/(ng {sup 252}CF at 2 m), and gamma insensitivity with field reaching 1 Sv/hr. In 2013, GE's Reuter-Stokes developed the B10Plus+{sup R} detector, in which a small amount of {sup 3}He is added to a {sup 10}B lined proportional counter. Depending on the amount of {sup 3}He added, the B10Plus+{sup R} can more than double the neutron sensitivity compared to a {sup 10}B lined proportional counter. {sup 10}B lined proportional counters and B10Plus+{sup R} have excellent gamma rejection and excellent performance even at very high neutron flux. The gamma rejection and high neutron flux performance of these detectors are comparable, if not better, than traditional {sup 3}He proportional counters. GE's Reuter-Stokes business modelled, designed, built and tested prototype coincidence counters using the {sup 10}B lined detectors and the {sup 10}B hybrid

  13. The performance of the CDF luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Mitselmakher, G; Necula, V; Nomerotski, A; Pronko, A; Sukhanov, A; Safonov, A; Tsybychev, D; Wang, S M; Wong, M

    2002-01-01

    We describe the initial performance of the detector used for the luminosity measurement in the CDF experiment in Run II at the Tevatron. The detector consists of low-mass gaseous Cherenkov counters with high light yield (approx 100 photoelectrons) and monitors the process of inelastic pp-bar scattering. It allows for several methods of precise luminosity measurements at peak instantaneous luminosities of 2x10 sup 3 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 , corresponding to an average of six pp-bar interactions per bunch crossing.

  14. Long-range alpha detector for contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; McAtee, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Historically, alpha detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity, even if the particles are intercepted. Of necessity, these detectors are operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. In our new long-range alpha detector (LRAD), alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of about 30,000 ion pairs per MeV of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The LRAD-based monitor is more sensitive and more thorough than conventional monitors. We present current LRAD sensitivity limits and results, practical monitor designs, and proposed uses for LRAD monitors. 4 refs., 6 figs

  15. Lower bounds on scintillation detector timing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Rogers, W.L.; Hero, A.O. III.; Petrick, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental method-independent limits on the timing performance of scintillation detectors are useful for identifying regimes in which either present timing methods are nearly optimal or where a considerable performance gain might be realized using better pulse processing techniques. Several types of lower bounds on mean-squared timing error (MSE) performance have been developed and applied to scintillation detectors. The simple Cramer-Rao (CR) bound can be useful in determining the limiting MSE for scintillators having a relatively high rate of photon problction such as BaF 2 and NaI(Tl); however, it tends to overestimate the achievalbe performance for scintillators with lower rates such as BGO. For this reason, alternative bounds have been developed using rate-distortion theory or by assuming that the conversion of energy to scintillation light must pass through excited states which have exponential lifetime densities. The bounds are functions of the mean scintillation pulse shape, the scintillation intensity, and photodetector characteristics; they are simple to evaluate and can be used to conveniently assess the limiting timing performance of scintillation detectors. (orig.)

  16. Monitoring the Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5x10^{33} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented.

  17. Monitoring the radiation damage of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, M.

    2013-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost charged particle tracking component employed by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC, now routinely in excess of 5×10 33 cm −2 s −1 , results in a rapidly increasing accumulated radiation dose to the detector. Methods based on the sensor depletion properties and leakage current are used to monitor the evolution of the radiation damage, and results from the 2011 run are presented

  18. Integrated nuclear radiation detector and monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehl, B.L.; Lieberman, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    A battery powered device which can continuously monitor and detect nuclear radiation utilizing fully integrated circuitry and which is provided with an alarm which alerts persons when the radiation level exceeds a predetermined threshold

  19. Performance of GERDA phase II BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. GERDA uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. The experiment proceeds in two phases. In Phase I a background index of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached and a new lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 95% C.L.). In Phase II the background index will be lowered by an order of magnitude and a sensitivity of 10{sup 26} yr will be reached. In order to achieve this goal 30 new custom-made broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors and a liquid argon scintillation light veto will be deployed. Five BEGe detectors have been operated successfully in Phase I and demonstrated their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. Special designed electronics will further improve energy resolution and PSD performance. The first results from commissioning of the new BEGe detectors are presented in this talk.

  20. The ATLAS Pixel Detector operation and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately $80 imes 10^6$~electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region. The complete Pixel Detector has been taking part in cosmic-ray data-taking since 2008. Since November 2009 it has been operated with LHC colliding beams at $sqrt{s}=900$~GeV, 2.36~TeV and 7 TeV. The detector operated with an active fraction of 97.2% at a threshold of 3500~$e$, showing a noise occupancy rate better than $10^{-9}$~hit/pixel/BC and a track association efficiency of 99%. The Lorentz angle for electrons in silicon is measured to be $ heta_mathrm{L}=12.11^circ pm 0.09^circ$ and its temperature dependence has been verified. The pulse height information from the time-over-threshold technique allows to improve the point resolution using charge sharing and to perform parti...

  1. Energy response of neutron area monitor with silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kaihara, Akihisa; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype neutron area monitor with a silicon semiconductor detector has been developed which has the energy response of 1 cm dose equivalent recommended by the ICRP-26. Boron and proton radiators are coated on the surface of the silicon semiconductor detector. The detector is set at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. This moderator is covered by a porous cadmium board which serves as the thermal neutron absorber. Neutrons are detected as α-particles generated by the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li and as recoil protons generated by the interaction of fast neutrons with hydrogen. The neutron energy response of the monitor was measured using thermal neutrons and monoenergetic fast neutrons generated by an accelerator. The response was consistent with the 1 cm dose equivalent response required for the monitor within ±34% in the range of 0.025 - 15 Mev. (author)

  2. Performance of the INTPIX6 SOI pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Y.; Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Miyoshi, T.; Turala, M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the monolithic pixel detector INPTIX6, designed at KEK and fabricated in Lapis 0.2 μ m Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology, was performed. The INTPIX6 comprises a large area of 1408 × 896 integrating type squared pixels of 12 micron pitch. In this work the performance and measurement results of the prototypes produced on lower resistivity Czochralski type (CZ-n) and high resistivity floating zone (FZ-n) sensor wafers are presented. Using 241Am radioactive source the noise of INTPIX6 was measured, showing the ENC (Equivalent Noise Charge) of about 70 e-. The resolution calculated from the FWHM of the Iron-55 X-ray peak was about 100 e-. The radiation hardness of the SOI pixel detector was also investigated. The CZ-n type INTPIX6 received a dose of 60 krad and its performance has been continuously monitored during the irradiation.

  3. Cerenkov Detectors for Fission Product Monitoring in Reactor Coolant Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O

    1967-09-15

    The expected properties of Cerenkov detectors when used for fission product monitoring in water cooled reactors and test loops are discussed from the point of view of the knowledge of the sensitivity of these detectors to some beta emitting isotopes. The basic theory for calculation of the detector response is presented, taking the optical transmission in the sample container and the properties of the photomultiplier tube into account. Special attention is paid to the energy resolution of this type of Cerenkov detector. For the design of practical detectors the results from several investigations of various window and reflector materials are given, and the selection of photomultiplier tubes is briefly discussed. In the case of optical reflectors and photomultiplier tubes reference is made to two previous reports by the author. The influence of the size and geometry of the sample container on the energy resolution follows from a separate investigation, as well as the relative merits of sample containers with transparent inner walls. Provided that the energy resolution of the Cerenkov detector is sufficiently high, there are several reasons for using this detector type for failed-fuel-element detection. It seems possible to attain the desired energy resolution by careful detector design.

  4. An assesment of the characteristics of the GM detectors and iodine remote detectors of the Paks environmental monitoring system based on the data measured from 1982 to 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gy.; Lang, Edit; Deme, S.; Feher, I.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements performed at the GM detectors and iodine remote detectors of the continuous environmental monitoring system of the Paks NPP can be used for estimating the effect of atmospheric releases. Based on the investigations carried out from Sep. 1982 to July 1985, a good correlation between the signals and the background radioactivity levels could be established. It was further stated that radon fallout during raining was responsible for significant signal changes of both types of detectors. (V.N.)

  5. Triple GEM gas detectors as real time fast neutron beam monitors for spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtas, F; Claps, G; Croci, G; Tardocchi, M; Pietropaolo, A; Cippo, E Perelli; Rebai, M; Gorini, G; Frost, C D; Raspino, D; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M

    2012-01-01

    A fast neutron beam monitor based on a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector was developed and tested for the ISIS spallation neutron source in U.K. The test on beam was performed at the VESUVIO beam line operating at ISIS. The 2D fast neutron beam footprint was recorded in real time with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters thanks to the patterned detector readout.

  6. Results from multipoint alignment monitoring using the new generation of amorphous silicon position detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-University of Cantabria Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2008-08-11

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of large sensitive area (28x28 mm{sup 2}) semitransparent amorphous silicon position detector sensors. More than 100 units have been characterized. They show a very high performance. To illustrate a multipoint application, we present results from the monitoring of five sensors placed in a 5.5-m-long light path.

  7. Results from multipoint alignment monitoring using the new generation of amorphous silicon position detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of large sensitive area (28x28 mm 2 ) semitransparent amorphous silicon position detector sensors. More than 100 units have been characterized. They show a very high performance. To illustrate a multipoint application, we present results from the monitoring of five sensors placed in a 5.5-m-long light path

  8. The Sentinel-4 detectors: architecture and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skegg, Michael P.; Hermsen, Markus; Hohn, Rüdiger; Williges, Christian; Woffinden, Charles; Levillain, Yves; Reulke, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    The Sentinel-4 instrument is an imaging spectrometer, developed by Airbus under ESA contract in the frame of the joint European Union (EU)/ESA COPERNICUS program. SENTINEL-4 will provide accurate measurements of trace gases from geostationary orbit, including key atmospheric constituents such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, as well as aerosol and cloud properties. Key to achieving these atmospheric measurements are the two CCD detectors, covering the wavelengths in the ranges 305 nm to 500 nm (UVVIS) and 750 to 775 nm (NIR) respectively. The paper describes the architecture, and operation of these two CCD detectors, which have an unusually high full-well capacity and a very specific architecture and read-out sequence to match the requirements of the Sentinel- 4 instrument. The key performance aspects and their verification through measurement are presented, with a focus on an unusual, bi-modal dark signal generation rate observed during test.

  9. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Chiosso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciliberti, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Denisov, O. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Duic, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Ferrero, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gayde, J.Ch. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Maggiora, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Martin, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Menon, G. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Panzieri, D. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); and others

    2014-12-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM) photogrammetry-based method has been implemented to measure the alignment of individual mirrors which can be characterized by the center of curvature. The mirror wall reflects a regular grid of retroreflective strips placed inside the detector vessel. Then, the position of each mirror is determined from the image of the grid reflection. The images are collected by four cameras. Any small mirror misalignment results in changes of the grid lines’ positions in the image. The accuracy limits of the CLAM method were checked by laser interferometry and are below 0.1 mrad.

  10. Pulse to pulse monitoring of the SLD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, J.; Huffer, M.; Russell, J.

    1993-04-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider produces bunches of positrons and polarized electrons which collide at 120 hertz inside the SLD detector. A limited amount of information is collected for each pulse in the modules which do real-time data acquisition. Buffers of approximately ten seconds' worth of this monitor data are periodically delivered to a VAX. The generation and uses of the monitor data will be discussed

  11. RF Power Detector/Monitor Upgrade for the 500MHz Systems at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptiste, K.

    2003-01-01

    Several systems rely on the accurate and linear detection of 500 MHz signals, (the fundamental frequency of both the Booster Ring and Storage Ring) over a dynamic range in excess of 25dB. Prior to this upgrade, the detector/monitor was diode based and though this type of detector could handle the dynamic range requirement it could not do so in an accurate and linear manner. In order to meet the requirements (dynamic range greater than or equal to 25dB, accurate and linear to +-0.25dB over the range, and additional circuitry to interface to the legacy control system and interlocks), a new RF Power Detector/Monitor has been developed using two AD8361, Analog Devices Tru RMS Detectors and a fuzzy comparator, which extends the overall detector's range to twice that of the AD8361. Further information is available [www.analogedevices.com/]. Details of the design requirements and the detector/monitor's circuit as well as the performance of the detector will be presented

  12. Performance of the first ANTARES detector line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruijn, R.; Kooijman, P.; Lim, G.; De Wolf, E. [Univ Amsterdam, Inst Hoge Energiefys, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam, (Netherlands); Ageron, M.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Dornic, D.; Escoffier, S.; Hallewell, G.; Lambard, G.; Lavalle, J.; Lelaizant, G.; Louis, F.; Melissas, M.; Payre, P.; Reed, C. [CPPM, CNRS, IN2P3, F-13288 Marseille 9, (France); Ageron, M.; Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Dornic, D.; Escoffier, S.; Hallewell, G.; Lambard, G.; Lavalle, J.; Lelaizant, G.; Louis, F.; Melissas, M.; Payre, P.; Reed, C. [Univ Aix Marseille 2, F-13288 Marseille 9, (France); Aguilar, J.A.; Bigongiari, C.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Salesa, F.; Toscano, S.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [Univ Valencia, CSIC, IFIC Inst Fis Corpuscular, Edificios Invest Paterna, Valencia 46071, (Spain); Albert, A.; Castel, D.; Drouhin, D.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Guillard, G. [Univ Houte Alsace, GRPHE, F-68093 Mulhouse, (France); Anton, G.; Auer, R.; Eberl, T.; Fehr, F.; Graf, K.; Hossl, J.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kopper, C.; Kretschmer, W.; Kuch, S.; Lahmann, R.; Laschinsky, H.; Loucatos, S.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Ostasch, R.; Richardt, C.; Schoeck, F.; Shanidze, R. [Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Inst Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, (Germany); Anvar, S.; Druillole, F.; Lamare, P.; Le Provost, H. [CEA Saclay, Direct Sci Mat, Inst Rech Fondamentales Univers, Serv Elect Detecteurs et Informat, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we report on the data recorded with the first Antares detector line. The line was deployed on 14 February 2006 and was connected to the readout 2 weeks later. Environmental data for one and a half years of running are shown. Measurements of atmospheric muons from data taken from selected runs during the first 6 months of operation are presented. Performance figures in terms of time residuals and angular resolution are given. Finally the angular distribution of atmospheric muons is presented and from this the depth profile of the muon intensity is derived. (authors)

  13. CASTOR detector. Model, objectives and simulated performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, A. L. S.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Aslanoglou, X.; Nicolis, N.; Lobanov, M.; Erine, S.; Kharlov, Y. V.; Bogolyubsky, M. Y.; Kurepin, A. B.; Chileev, K.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    2001-01-01

    It is presented a phenomenological model describing the formation and evolution of a Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich region in nucleus-nucleus interactions in the upper atmosphere and at the LHC. The small particle multiplicity and imbalance of electromagnetic and hadronic content characterizing a Centauro event and also the strongly penetrating particles (assumed to be strangelets) frequently accompanying them can be naturally explained. It is described the CASTOR calorimeter, a sub detector of the ALICE experiment dedicated to the search for Centauro in the very forward, baryon-rich region of central Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. The basic characteristics and simulated performance of the calorimeter are presented

  14. Run 2 ATLAS Trigger and Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyanov, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in June 2015 with a proton-proton centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV. During the years 2016 and 2017, LHC delivered an unprecedented amount of luminosity under the ever-increasing challenging conditions in terms of peak luminosity, pile-up and trigger rates. In this talk, the LHC running conditions and the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment in the course of Run 2 will be discussed, and the latest ATLAS detector and ATLAS trigger performance results from the Run 2 will be presented.

  15. Run-2 ATLAS Trigger and Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Winklmeier, Frank; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in June 2015 with a pp centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV, and ATLAS has taken first data at this new energy. In this talk the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment during the 2-year shutdown 2013/2014 will be discussed, and first detector and trigger performance results from the Run-2 will be shown. In general, reconstruction algorithms of tracks, e/gamma, muons, taus, jets and flavour tag- ging have been improved for Run-2. The new reconstruction algorithms and their performance measured using the data taken in 2015 at sqrt(s)=13 TeV will be discussed. Reconstruction efficiency, isolation performance, transverse momentum resolution and momentum scales are measured in various regions of the detector and in momentum intervals enlarged with respect to those measured in the Run-1. This presentation will also give an overview of the upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system that have been implemented during the LHC shutdown in order to deal with the increased trigger rates (fact...

  16. Data quality monitoring of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benucci, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Physics and Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) framework aims at providing a homogeneous monitoring environment across various applications related to data taking at the CMS experiment. In this contribution, the DQM system for the Silicon Strip Tracker will be introduced. The set of elements to assess the status of detector will be mentioned, along with the way to identify problems and trace them to specific tracker elements. Monitoring tools, user interfaces and automated software will be briefly described. The system was used during extensive cosmic data taking of CMS in Autumn 2008, where it demonstrated to have a flexible and robust implementation and has been essential to improve the understanding of the detector. CMS Collaboration believes that this tool is now mature to face the forthcoming data-taking era.

  17. Calibration, monitoring, and control of complex detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, M.

    1981-01-01

    LEP detectors will probably be complex devices having tens of subsystems; some subsystems having perhaps tens of thousands of channels. Reasonable design goals for such a detector will include economic use of money and people, rapid and reliable calibration and monitoring of the detector, and simple control and operation of the device. The synchronous operation of an e + e - storage ring, coupled with its relatively low interaction rate, allow the design of simple circuits for time and charge measurements. These circuits, and more importantly, the basic detector channels, can usually be tested and calibrated by signal injection into the detector. Present detectors utilize semi-autonomous controllers which collect such calibration data and calculate statistics as well as control sparse data scans. Straightforward improvements in programming technology should move the entire calibration into these local controllers, so that calibration and testing time will be a constant independent of the number of channels in a system. Considerable programming effort may be saved by emphasizing the similarities of the subsystems, so that the subsystems can be described by a reasonable database and general purpose calibration and test routines can be used. Monitoring of the apparatus will probably continue to be of two classes: 'passive' histogramming of channel occupancies and other more complex combinations of the data; and 'active' injection of test patterns and calibration signals during a run. The relative importance of active monitoring will increase for the low data rates expected off resonances at high s. Experience at SPEAR and PEP is used to illustrate these approaches. (Auth.)

  18. Calibration, Monitoring, and Control of Complex Detector Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, M.

    1981-04-01

    LEP Detectors will probably be complex devices having tens of subsystems; some subsystems having perhaps tens of thousands of channels. Reasonable design goals for such a detector will include economic use of money and people, rapid and reliable calibration and monitoring of the detector, and simple control and operation of the device. The synchronous operation of an e+e- storage ring, coupled with its relatively low interaction rate, allow the design of simple circuits for time and charge measurements. These circuits, and more importantly, the basic detector channels, can usually be tested and calibrated by signal injection into the detector. Present detectors utilize semi-autonomous controllers which collect such calibration data and calculate statistics as well as control sparse data scans. Straightforward improvements in programming technology should move the entire calibration into these local controllers, so that calibration and testing time will be a constant independent of the number of channels in a system. Considerable programming effort may be saved by emphasizing the similarities of the subsystems, so that the subsystems can be described by a reasonable database and general purpose calibration and test routines can be used. Monitoring of the apparatus will probably continue to be of two classes: "passive" histogramming of channel occupancies and other more complex combinations of the data; and "active" injection of test patterns and calibration signals during a run. The relative importance of active monitoring will increase for the low data rates expected off resonances at high s. Experience at SPEAR and PEP is used to illustrate these approaches.

  19. Development of an inconel self powered neutron detector for in-core reactor monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, M.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.

    2007-04-01

    The paper describes the development and testing of an Inconel600 (2 mm diameter×21 cm long) self-powered neutron detector for in-core neutron monitoring. The detector has 3.5 mm overall diameter and 22 cm length and is integrally coupled to a 12 m long mineral insulated cable. The performance of the detector was compared with cobalt and platinum detectors of similar dimensions. Gamma sensitivity measurements performed at the 60Co irradiation facility in 14 MR/h gamma field showed values of -4.4×10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-9.3×10 -24 A/ γ/cm 2-s/cm), -5.2×10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-1.133×10 -23 A/ γ/cm 2-s/cm) and 34×10 -18 A/R/h/cm (7.14×10 -23 A/ γ/cm 2-s/cm) for the Inconel, Co and Pt detectors, respectively. The detectors together with a miniature gamma ion chamber and fission chamber were tested in the in-core Apsara Swimming Pool type reactor. The ion chambers were used to estimate the neutron and gamma fields. With an effective neutron cross-section of 4b, the Inconel detector has a total sensitivity of 6×10 -23 A/nv/cm while the corresponding sensitivities for the platinum and cobalt detectors were 1.69×10 -22 and 2.64×10 -22 A/nv/cm. The linearity of the detector responses at power levels ranging from 100 to 200 kW was within ±5%. The response of the detectors to reactor scram showed that the prompt response of the Inconel detector was 0.95 while it was 0.7 and 0.95 for the platinum and cobalt self-powered detectors, respectively. The detector was also installed in the horizontal flux unit of 540 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The neutron flux at the detector location was calculated by Triveni code. The detector response was measured from 0.02% to 0.07% of full power and showed good correlation between power level and detector signals. Long-term tests and the dynamic response of the detector to shut down in PHWR are in progress.

  20. Development of an inconel self powered neutron detector for in-core reactor monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, M.; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the development and testing of an Inconel600 (2 mm diameterx21 cm long) self-powered neutron detector for in-core neutron monitoring. The detector has 3.5 mm overall diameter and 22 cm length and is integrally coupled to a 12 m long mineral insulated cable. The performance of the detector was compared with cobalt and platinum detectors of similar dimensions. Gamma sensitivity measurements performed at the 60 Co irradiation facility in 14 MR/h gamma field showed values of -4.4x10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-9.3x10 -24 A/γ/cm 2 -s/cm), -5.2x10 -18 A/R/h/cm (-1.133x10 -23 A/γ/cm 2 -s/cm) and 34x10 -18 A/R/h/cm (7.14x10 -23 A/γ/cm 2 -s/cm) for the Inconel, Co and Pt detectors, respectively. The detectors together with a miniature gamma ion chamber and fission chamber were tested in the in-core Apsara Swimming Pool type reactor. The ion chambers were used to estimate the neutron and gamma fields. With an effective neutron cross-section of 4b, the Inconel detector has a total sensitivity of 6x10 -23 A/nv/cm while the corresponding sensitivities for the platinum and cobalt detectors were 1.69x10 -22 and 2.64x10 -22 A/nv/cm. The linearity of the detector responses at power levels ranging from 100 to 200 kW was within ±5%. The response of the detectors to reactor scram showed that the prompt response of the Inconel detector was 0.95 while it was 0.7 and 0.95 for the platinum and cobalt self-powered detectors, respectively. The detector was also installed in the horizontal flux unit of 540 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The neutron flux at the detector location was calculated by Triveni code. The detector response was measured from 0.02% to 0.07% of full power and showed good correlation between power level and detector signals. Long-term tests and the dynamic response of the detector to shut down in PHWR are in progress

  1. Development of an inconel self powered neutron detector for in-core reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex, M. [Electronics Division, BARC, Mumbai (India)]. E-mail: maryalex@barc.gov.in; Ghodgaonkar, M.D. [Electronics Division, BARC, Mumbai (India)

    2007-04-21

    The paper describes the development and testing of an Inconel600 (2 mm diameterx21 cm long) self-powered neutron detector for in-core neutron monitoring. The detector has 3.5 mm overall diameter and 22 cm length and is integrally coupled to a 12 m long mineral insulated cable. The performance of the detector was compared with cobalt and platinum detectors of similar dimensions. Gamma sensitivity measurements performed at the {sup 60}Co irradiation facility in 14 MR/h gamma field showed values of -4.4x10{sup -18} A/R/h/cm (-9.3x10{sup -24} A/{gamma}/cm{sup 2}-s/cm), -5.2x10{sup -18} A/R/h/cm (-1.133x10{sup -23} A/{gamma}/cm{sup 2}-s/cm) and 34x10{sup -18} A/R/h/cm (7.14x10{sup -23} A/{gamma}/cm{sup 2}-s/cm) for the Inconel, Co and Pt detectors, respectively. The detectors together with a miniature gamma ion chamber and fission chamber were tested in the in-core Apsara Swimming Pool type reactor. The ion chambers were used to estimate the neutron and gamma fields. With an effective neutron cross-section of 4b, the Inconel detector has a total sensitivity of 6x10{sup -23} A/nv/cm while the corresponding sensitivities for the platinum and cobalt detectors were 1.69x10{sup -22} and 2.64x10{sup -22} A/nv/cm. The linearity of the detector responses at power levels ranging from 100 to 200 kW was within {+-}5%. The response of the detectors to reactor scram showed that the prompt response of the Inconel detector was 0.95 while it was 0.7 and 0.95 for the platinum and cobalt self-powered detectors, respectively. The detector was also installed in the horizontal flux unit of 540 MW Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The neutron flux at the detector location was calculated by Triveni code. The detector response was measured from 0.02% to 0.07% of full power and showed good correlation between power level and detector signals. Long-term tests and the dynamic response of the detector to shut down in PHWR are in progress.

  2. Performance of the LHCb RICH detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N.H.; Coombes, M.; Hampson, T.; Rademacker, J.H.; Solomin, A.; Voong, D. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Aglieri Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; D' Ambrosio, C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Kanaya, N.; Koblitz, S.; Mollen, A.; Morant, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Storaci, B.; Ullaland, O.; Vervink, K.; Wyllie, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Fanchini, E.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Kucharczyk, M.; Maino, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Perego, D.L.; Pessina, G. [Sezione INFN di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Benson, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Kim, Y.M.; Lambert, D.; Main, A.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Sparkes, A.; Young, R. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Blake, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Blanks, C.; Cameron, B.; Carson, L.; Egede, U.; Owen, P.; Patel, M.; Plackett, R.; Savidge, T.; Sepp, I.; Soomro, F.; Websdale, D. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Brisbane, S.; Contu, A.; Gandini, P.; Gao, R.; Harnew, N.; Hill, D.; Hunt, P.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Malde, S.; Muresan, R.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Wilkinson, G.; Xing, F. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Cardinale, R.; Fontanelli, F.; Mini' , G.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M. [Sezione INFN di Genova, Genova (Italy); Easo, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Garra Tico, J.; Gibson, V.; Gregson, S.; Haines, S.C.; Jones, C.R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Mangiafave, N.; Rogers, G.J.; Sigurdsson, S.; Wotton, S.A. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mountain, R. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Morris, J.V.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G.N.; Ricciardi, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sail, P.; Soler, F.J.P.; Spradlin, P. [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2013-05-15

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN since the end of 2009. One of its key detector components is the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. This provides charged particle identification over a wide momentum range, from 2-100 GeV/c. The operation and control, software, and online monitoring of the RICH system are described. The particle identification performance is presented, as measured using data from the LHC. Excellent separation of hadronic particle types ({pi}, K, p) is achieved. (orig.)

  3. Detector performance tests for the CBM TRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, Martin [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed target heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR accelerator facility. The CBM Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is one of the key detectors to provide electron identification and charged particle tracking. With the construction phase of the detector nearing, we will present results of the detector obtained with a close to final prototype. These results were achieved in measurements at CERN PS in 2014 and SPS in 2015.

  4. Performance Monitoring of Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Vinther

    is used as input to the system and by comparing model and ship behaviour, an index describing the ship’s performance is generated. The work in this thesis is based on data logged through the automation system on board a PostPanmax container ship where data have been logged through a year. A routine...... in the models have been identified. The models used in this work are based on empirical relations or based on regression analyses of model tests and full-scale trials. In order to achieve valid results the conditions where performance is estimated have to be inside the boundaries of the model. Filters have been......The purpose of the research project is to establish a reliable index in the performance evaluation of ships. During operation the ship will experience added resistance due to fouling of hull and propeller. The added resistance will lead to increased fuel consumption and thus increased emissions...

  5. Ionisation detectors as monitors of toxic compounds in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Beta particles cause ionisation in gas mixtures. The ions produced provide information on the concentration and identity of trace compounds in ambient air. Modern ionisation detectors use ion mobilities to monitor toxic compounds. Chemical solvent, phosphororganic compounds, PCB and many other toxins can be detected using ion mobility detectors (IMD) in the ppb range or lower. Ion mobility detectors have large potential in industry and research because of their sensitivity, specificity, fast response and relatively low cost. Portable devices and fixed installations are possible. The paper discusses the following topics: (1) ionisation sources in IMD: 63 Ni, 3 H, photoionization and corona discharge, (2) basic principles of ion production, (3) ion collection in IMD, (4) design, gas supply, automatic identification and quantification of IMD data, and (5) selected applications. Advantages and problems with this new type of nuclear analytical instrument are also discussed. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Detector performance of the ALICE silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cavicchioli, C

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). It consists of two barrel layers of hybrid silicon pixel detectors at radii of 39 and 76 mm. The physics targets of the ALICE experiment require that the material budget of the SPD is kept within approximate to 1\\%X(0) per layer. This has set some stringent constraints on the design and construction of the SPD. A unique feature of the ALICE SPD is that it is capable of providing a prompt trigger signal, called Fast-OR, which contributes to the L0 trigger decision. The pixel trigger system allows to apply a set of algorithms for the trigger selection, and its output is sent to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). The detector has been installed in the experiment in summer 2007. During the first injection tests in June 2008 the SPD was able to record the very first sign of life of the LHC by registering secondary particles from the beam dumped upstream the ALICE experiment. In the following months the...

  7. Detector and front-end electronics of a fissile mass flow monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, M.J.; Uckan, T.; Lenarduzzi, R.; Mullens, J.A.; Castleberry, K.N.; McMillan, D.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    A detector and front-end electronics unit with secure data transmission has been designed and implemented for a fissile mass flow monitoring system for fissile mass flow of gases and liquids in a pipe. The unit consists of 4 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors, pulse-shaping and counting electronics, local temperature sensors, and on-board local area network nodes which locally acquire data and report to the master computer via a secure network link. The signal gain of the pulse-shaping circuitry and energy windows of the pulse-counting circuitry are periodicially self calibrated and self adjusted in situ using a characteristic line in the fissile material pulse height spectrum as a reference point to compensate for drift such as in the detector gain due to PM tube aging. The temperature- dependent signal amplitude variations due to the intrinsic temperature coefficients of the PM tube gain and BGO scintillation efficiency have been characterized and real-time gain corrections introduced. The detector and electronics design, measured intrinsic performance of the detectors and electronics, and the performance of the detector and electronics within the fissile mass flow monitoring system are described

  8. Characterization of a diamond detector to be used as neutron yield monitor during the in-vessel calibration of JET neutron detectors in preparation of the DT experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillon, Mario; Angelone, Maurizio; Batistoni, Paola; Loreti, Stefano; Milocco, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A diamond detector has been characterized for use as neutron yield monitor of a portable 14 MeV neutron generator. • The system will be used for the 14 MeV calibration of JET neutron detector. • The results and the performances of the monitor are very satisfactory in term of accuracy and reliability. - Abstract: A new Deuterium-Tritium (DT) campaign is planned at JET. An accurate calibration for the 14 MeV neutron yield monitors is necessary. In order to perform the calibration a 14 MeV Neutron Generator with suitable intensity (∼10 8 n/s) will be used. Due to the intensity change during the Neutron Generator lifetime it would be necessary to monitor continuously the neutron emission intensity during the calibration using a compact detector attached to it. A high quality diamond detector has been chosen as one of the monitors. This detector has been fully characterized at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator facility. The characterization procedure and the resulting 14 MeV neutron response of the detector are described in this paper together with the obtained uncertainties.

  9. GPS Civil Monitoring Performance Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-10

    This Civil Monitoring Performance Specification (CMPS) is published and maintained at : the direction of the Program Manager for Civil Applications, Global Positioning Systems : Wing (GPSW). The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive ...

  10. Scintillator materials for x-ray detectors and beam monitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martin, T.; Koch, A.; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2017), s. 451-456 ISSN 0883-7694 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-15569S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * X-ray detector * beam monitor * synchrotron * thin film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 5.199, year: 2016

  11. Performance Optimization of the ATLAS Detector Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091018

    In the thesis at hand the current performance of the ATLAS detector simulation, part of the Athena framework, is analyzed and possible optimizations are examined. For this purpose the event based sampling profiler VTune Amplifier by Intel is utilized. As the most important metric to measure improvements, the total execution time of the simulation of $t\\bar{t}$ events is also considered. All efforts are focused on structural changes, which do not influence the simulation output and can be attributed to CPU specific issues, especially front end stalls and vectorization. The most promising change is the activation of profile guided optimization for Geant4, which is a critical external dependency of the simulation. Profile guided optimization gives an average improvement of $8.9\\%$ and $10.0\\%$ for the two considered cases at the cost of one additional compilation (instrumented binaries) and execution (training to obtain profiling data) at build time.

  12. Heat exchanger performance monitoring guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, N.; Closser, W. Jr.; Mollerus, F.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fouling can occur in many heat exchanger applications in a way that impedes heat transfer and fluid flow and reduces the heat transfer or performance capability of the heat exchanger. Fouling may be significant for heat exchanger surfaces and flow paths in contact with plant service water. This report presents guidelines for performance monitoring of heat exchangers subject to fouling. Guidelines include selection of heat exchangers to monitor based on system function, safety function and system configuration. Five monitoring methods are discussed: the heat transfer, temperature monitoring, temperature effectiveness, delta P and periodic maintenance methods. Guidelines are included for selecting the appropriate monitoring methods and for implementing the selected methods. The report also includes a bibliography, example calculations, and technical notes applicable to the heat transfer method

  13. The remote monitoring system of BESⅢ detector based on web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yining; Ye Mei; Zhao Shujun

    2011-01-01

    It designed a remote monitoring system of BESⅢ experiment based on web. The software of the system is mainly based on module programming. The Ajax technology and the MVC pattern is used in system framework construction. The function of selecting multiple tables is realized by structural checkbox tree using jstree library. Data chart is plotted by High Charts library. The updating of data curve is realized by the method of calculating the time span between the real data record to measure the http request. The system design can be used by detector monitoring system like BESⅢ. (authors)

  14. Radiation damage monitoring in the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to an integrated luminosity 5.6 fb −1 is presented along with a comparison to a model. -- Highlights: ► Radiation damage monitoring via silicon leakage current is implemented in the ATLAS (LHC) pixel detector. ► Leakage currents measured are consistent with the Hamburg/Dortmund model. ► This information can be used to validate the ATLAS simulation model.

  15. Radiation detectors for personnel monitoring - current developments and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, S.

    2003-01-01

    The radiation detectors for personnel monitoring range from the conventional passive dosimeters like the film badge and the TLD, to sophisticated active dosimeters for integrated gamma, beta and neutron dose measurement. With the availability of high accuracy active dosimeters, the process of personnel monitoring, acceptability among radiation workers, record keeping and dose control have become more simplified. However the high level of sophistication in the active dosimeter has its own inevitable price tag and the new breed of active dosimeters are prohibitively costly. The silver lining, in the otherwise dark cost scenario of these dosimeters is the potential for cost reduction at least in some of the dosimeters in the near future

  16. Measurement of Detector Efficiency for the CZT Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kang Hwa; Kon, Kang Seo; Kim, Jeongin [KHNP, Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Evaluation method of using CZT have been being attempted in various places such as AEP(American Electronic Power) etc since EDF(Electricite de France) had apply to the project named 'Source Term Reduction'. CZT can measure source terms on various places in nuclear power plants because it is available at room temperature unless a seperate device and portability is good. Consequently, CZT show good result from analysis of source terms in nuclear power plants. This study found out efficiency of CZT detector that is now researched in CZT Monitoring System for measure source terms on RCS system of domestic old and new nuclear power plants and verified measured efficiency values by comparing to reference efficiency we already know. This study was carried out for finding out detector's efficiency depending on necessary energy in order to save quantitative radioactivity value of source terms. Eventually, this study is to develope CZT Monitoring System measuring CRUD in domestic PWRs primary system or piping system by carrying out in-vivo. Considering error ratio ±20% on radioactivity value of CRM used in measuring and verifying efficiency, measurement of detector Efficiency for the CZT Monitoring System is good. But more various tests is needed than now for an accurate measurement.

  17. A beam monitor based on MPGD detectors for hadron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altieri P. R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable scientific and technological progress during the last years has led to the construction of accelerator based facilities dedicated to hadron therapy. This kind of technology requires precise and continuous control of position, intensity and shape of the ions or protons used to irradiate cancers. Patient safety, accelerator operation and dose delivery should be optimized by a real time monitoring of beam intensity and profile during the treatment, by using non-destructive, high spatial resolution detectors. In the framework of AMIDERHA (AMIDERHA - Enhanced Radiotherapy with HAdron project funded by the Ministero dell’Istruzione, dell’Università e della Ricerca (Italian Ministry of Education and Research the authors are studying and developing an innovative beam monitor based on Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPDGs characterized by a high spatial resolution and rate capability. The Monte Carlo simulation of the beam monitor prototype was carried out to optimize the geometrical set up and to predict the behavior of the detector. A first prototype has been constructed and successfully tested using 55Fe, 90Sr and also an X-ray tube. Preliminary results on both simulations and tests will be presented.

  18. Nuclear Reactor Power Monitoring Using Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas Blue; Don Miller

    2008-01-01

    To provide a perspective for our accomplishments, all of the sub-tasks in Task 1 (as they were identified in the proposal) are listed, and a brief description of the subtasks is given. Task 1--Define Generation IV Reactor Power Monitoring Requirements. Task 1.1--The power monitoring requirements for the IRIS and GT-MHR will be evaluated. Parameters considered will include maximum power level uncertainty, response time, etc. Task 1.2--The optimum locations for power monitors will be selected for both the IRIS and GT-MHR. Factors to be considered will include the power monitoring requirements defined in Task 1.1 as well as expected detector sensitivity and the presence of gamma ray background. Task 1.3--Other applications and opportunities offered by SiC power monitors will be evaluated. The prospects for on-line fault identification and diagnosis using pulse height and pulse shape analysis will be explored. The use of miniature SiC detectors to define axial, azimuthal, and radial flux profiles will be investigated

  19. A novel method for assessing position-sensitive detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Rogers, W.L.; Shao, L.; Hero, A.O. III; Koral, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    A marked point process model of a position-sensitive detector is developed which includes the effects of detector efficiency, spatial response, energy response, and source statistics. The average mutual information between the incident distribution of γ rays and the detector response is derived and used as a performance index for detector optimization. A brief example is presented which uses this figure-of-merit for optimization of light guide dimensions for a modular scintillation camera

  20. Instruments for calibration and monitoring of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this Ph. D. thesis is the study and the development of the instruments needed to monitor and calibrate the Muon Detector of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment. LHCb is currently under installation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and will start to take data during 2007. The experiment will study B mesons decays to achieve a profound understanding of favour physics in the Standard Model framework and to search signs of new physics beyond. Muons can be found in the final states of many B-decays which are sensitive to CP violation. The Muon Detector has the crucial role to identify the muon particles generated by the b-hadron decays through a measurement of their transverse momentum, already at the first trigger level (Level-0). A 95% effciency in events selection is required for the Muon Trigger, which operates at the Level-0. 1380 detectors are used to equip the whole Muon System and the corresponding 122,112 readout channels must be time aligned and monitored with a resol...

  1. Plastic scintillation detectors for dose monitoring in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, J.; Machado, J.; Peralta, L.; Matela, N.

    2018-01-01

    Plastic scintillators detectors (PSDs) have been studied as dosimeters, since they provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional ionization chambers. Measurement and analysis of energy dependency were performed on a Siemens Mammomat tomograph for two different peak kilovoltages: 26 kV and 35 kV. Both PSD displayed good linearity for each energy considered and almost no energy dependence.

  2. Geiger Muller (GM) detector as online monitor: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayan, M.P.; Pawar, V.J.; Krishnakumar, P.; Sureshkumar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the inadvertent release of radioactivity into otherwise inactive liquid streams is a common requirement in nuclear industry. In addition to conventional off-line sampling and measurement methods, nuclear facilities usually uses online methods to get real-time detection of activity contents in process cooling water lines and steam condensate lines. Due to its simplicity, ruggedness and cost effectiveness, Geiger Muller counter is obviously the first choice for online application. Though GM based monitors for such online application were in industrial use for a long time, practical data on the response of the detector with respect low level activities in the effluents is scarce in literature. This work was carried out to fill this information gap. The data generated in these experiments may be useful in giving a realistic interpretation of the response of the existing monitors and setting up their alarm limits

  3. A passive monitor for radon using electrochemical track etch detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massera, G.E.; Hassib, G.M.; Piesch, E.

    1980-01-01

    A passive monitor for radon and its decay products based on the electrochemical etching (ECE) of α-particle tracks on Makrofol is described. The monitor has been constructed in such a way that radon and radon daughters attached to aerosols can easily pass through a chamber while dust, heavy particles and water droplets are collected outside. The decay products are accumulated on the bottom of the chamber and a Makrofol detector foil is fixed on the top to register alpha particles. The ECE condition was maintained to detect alpha particles coming mainly from radon daughters trapped on the bottom of the chamber. The response of the monitor was determined at different exposure conditions and compared with those of some active techniques such as working level meters. The merits of this system are low cost, good sensitivity, portability and reliable, unattended operation. (author)

  4. Evaluation of a GEM and CAT-based detector for radiation therapy beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.; Danielsson, M.; Iacobaeus, C.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.; Wallmark, M.

    2000-01-01

    We are developing a radiation therapy beam monitor for the Karolinska Institute. This monitor will consist of two consecutive detectors confined in one gas chamber: a 'keV-photon detector', which will allow diagnostic quality visualization of the patient, and a 'MeV-photon detector', that will measure the absolute intensity of the therapy beam and its position with respect to the patient. Both detectors are based on highly radiation resistant gas and solid photon to electron converters, combined with GEMs and a CAT as amplification structures. We have performed systematic studies of the high-rate characteristics of the GEM and the CAT, as well as tested the electron transfer through these electron multipliers and various types of converters. The tests show that the GEM and the CAT satisfy all requirements for the beam monitoring system. As a result of these studies we successfully developed and tested a full section of the beam monitor equipped with a MeV-photon converter placed between the GEM and the CAT

  5. Performance of the INTPIX6 SOI pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Y.; Miyoshi, T.; Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Turala, M.; Kucewicz, W.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the monolithic pixel detector INPTIX6, designed at KEK and fabricated in Lapis 0.2 μ  m Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology, was performed. The INTPIX6 comprises a large area of 1408 × 896 integrating type squared pixels of 12 micron pitch. In this work the performance and measurement results of the prototypes produced on lower resistivity Czochralski type (CZ-n) and high resistivity floating zone (FZ-n) sensor wafers are presented. Using 241 Am radioactive source the noise of INTPIX6 was measured, showing the ENC (Equivalent Noise Charge) of about 70 e − . The resolution calculated from the FWHM of the Iron-55 X-ray peak was about 100 e − . The radiation hardness of the SOI pixel detector was also investigated. The CZ-n type INTPIX6 received a dose of 60 krad and its performance has been continuously monitored during the irradiation.

  6. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The period since the last CMS week has witnessed the start of the LHC as a 'physics' machine. The excitement of the first collisions at 7 TeV on March 30 will be remembered for a long time! The preparation for the event was meticulous. The LHC was pushed to deliver non-colliding stable beams prior to the real collisions, which allowed CMS teams to use the few beam gas interactions within the length of the pixel detector to verify that the beams would indeed collide once both beams were circulating and the separation bump was collapsed. In passing, this exercise allowed us to catch some last minute features of the system, which could have affected our performance on the day! The first collisions were detected practically simultaneously around the ring. Within tens of minutes not only event displays, but also some physics distributions were delivered to the audience of the press conference. A plan of work had been carefully defined on how to use the first collisions following the first hour of excitement. I...

  7. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Malgeri

    2010-01-01

    The last six months have been very intense for run coordination as this period corresponds to the time most of the LHC luminosity has been delivered. The pace imposed by the LHC has marked the operation of the CMS detector and data logging: the luminosity has on average doubled every 10 days. Sometimes, this has strained our activities: the trigger teams, both Level-1 and HLT, have been in the trenches to cope with the spectacular LHC performance in order to keep the thresholds as low as possible for e/γs and jet triggers in order to make the physics community profit as much as possible from the data delivered. The constant effort to stay at the edge of our possibilities (essentially stay at or below 70 kHz for the first level trigger rates and below 600 Hz logging rates) has paid off in the end. Examples are the beautiful di-muon and di-electron invariant mass distributions where we are able, for instance, to detect low mass resonance like the h in the di-muon decay channel which has branching rat...

  8. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Malgeri

    2011-01-01

    As the technical interventions were finishing up and services restored at P5 we started central operations again in 2011. We started operations with a reduced shift crew, Shift leader and DCS shifter, on 24th January. We had a first mid-week global run on 2nd and 3rd February followed by cosmic data-taking between 10th and 20th February. Due to delays with cooling for the strip tracker the useful cosmic data-taking with the strip tracker was reduced to about four days. On 20th February, the LHC started beam commissioning, and cosmic data-taking with the full CMS detector was stopped. The machine availability has been much higher during the 2011 beam commissioning than during the comparable time period in 2010. This has given us few opportunities to turn on the tracker for further cosmic data-taking. Many changes and upgrades were performed during the winter shutdown. Among them was an upgrade to running the central DAQ on 64 bit. All of these upgrades have now b...

  9. Performance monitoring of safeguards equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirisena, K.; Peltoranta, M.; Goussarov, V.; Vodrazka, P.

    1999-01-01

    SGTCS is responsible for monitoring and reporting the performance of the SG equipment. Performance monitoring (PM) has been implemented in most important safeguards equipment operating unattended in nuclear facilities. Inspectors acquire equipment performance data in facilities. After inspection, the data package is submitted to SGTCS for processing and analysis. The performance data is used for identification of systems or components, which should be changed in the field and for identification of modules which, should be diagnosed at HQ in order to determine the cause of failure. Moreover, the performance data is used for preventive maintenance and spares distribution planning, and to provide statistics for official reports and management decision making. An important part of the performance monitoring is reporting. Equipment performance reports contain information about equipment inventory, utilization, failure types, failure distribution, and reliability. Trends in performance are given in graphical form in cases, where past data is available. Reliability estimates such as expected times between failures are provided. The automated reporting tools are obtainable through EMIS database application. (author)

  10. Thermal performance monitoring and optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Svein; Berg; Oeyvind

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of the thermal efficiency of nuclear power plants is expected to become increasingly important as energy-market liberalisation exposes plants to increasing availability requirements and fiercer competition. The general goal in thermal performance monitoring is straightforward: to maximise the ratio of profit to cost under the constraints of safe operation. One may perceive this goal to be pursued in two ways, one oriented towards fault detection and cost-optimal predictive maintenance, and another determined at optimising target values of parameters in response to any component degradation detected, changes in ambient conditions, or the like. Annual savings associated with effective thermal-performance monitoring are expected to be in the order of $ 100 000 for power plants of representative size. A literature review shows that a number of computer systems for thermal-performance monitoring exists, either as prototypes or commercially available. The characteristics and needs of power plants may vary widely, however, and decisions concerning the exact scope, content and configuration of a thermal-performance monitor may well follow a heuristic approach. Furthermore, re-use of existing software modules may be desirable. Therefore, we suggest here the design of a flexible workbench for easy assembly of an experimental thermal-performance monitor at the Halden Project. The suggested design draws heavily on our extended experience in implementing control-room systems featured by assets like high levels of customisation, flexibility in configuration and modularity in structure, and on a number of relevant adjoining activities. The design includes a multi-computer communication system and a graphical user's interface, and aims at a system adaptable to any combination of in-house or end user's modules, as well as commercially available software. (author)

  11. Long radiation detector system for beam loss monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balsamo, J.; Fewell, N.M.; Klein, J.D.; Witkover, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Long Radiation Monitor (LRM) system installed at the 200 MeV linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. This system allows observation of both the spatial and temporal character of the losses in the linac and its transport lines. An array of large diameter gas filled coaxial cables are used as extended ion chambers to detect the losses. The output signals are available as a histogram, video waveforms, and numerical data via the computer. A fast beam interrupt is also provided. The detector characteristics and details of the processing electronics are presented. Results of studies of longitudinal, steering and focusing losses are described

  12. Long radiation detector system for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsamo, J.; Fewell, N.M.; Klein, J.D.; Witkover, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Long Radiation Monitor (LRM) system installed at the 200 MeV linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. This system allows observation of both the spatial and temporal character of the losses in the linac and its transport lines. An array of large diameter gas filled coaxial cables are used as extended ion chambers to detect the losses. The output signals are available as a histogram, video waveforms, and numerical data via the computer. A fast beam interrupt is also provided. The detector characteristics and details of the processing electronics are presented. Results of studies of longitudinal, steering and focusing losses are described.

  13. Condenser performance monitoring and cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walden, J.V.

    1998-01-01

    The main condenser at Ginna Station was retubed from admiralty brass to 316 stainless steel. A condenser performance monitoring spreadsheet was developed using EPRI guidelines after fouling was discovered. PEPSE computer models were used to determine the power loss and confirm the spreadsheet results. Cleaning of the condenser was performed using plastic scrubbers. Condenser performance improved dramatically following the cleaning. PEPSE, condenser spreadsheet performance, and actual observed plant data correlated well together. The fouling mechanism was determined to be a common lake bacteria and fungus growth which was combined with silt. Chlorination of the circulating water system at the allowable limits is keeping the biofouling under control

  14. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peer, Siegfried; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Peer, Regina; Gassner, Eva; Steingruber, Iris; Jaschke, Werner

    2003-01-01

    With the introduction of digital flat-panel detector systems into clinical practice, the still unresolved question of resolution requirements for picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation monitors has gained new momentum. This contrast detail analysis was thus performed to define the differences in observer performance in the detection of small low-contrast objects on clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstations. Images of the CDRAD 2.0 phantom were acquired at varying exposures on an indirect-type digital flat-panel detector. Three observers evaluated a total of 15 images each with respect to the threshold contrast for each detail size. The numbers of correctly identified objects were determined for all image subsets. No significant difference in the correct detection ratio was detected among the observers; however, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K vs 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. Slight but statistically significant differences exist in the detection of low-contrast nodular details visualized on 1K- and 2K-monitor workstations. Further work is needed to see if this result holds true also for comparison of clinical flat-panel detector images and may, for example, exert an influence on the diagnostic accuracy of chest X-ray readings. (orig.)

  15. Capillary-discharge-based portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yixiang; Su Yongxuan; Jin Zhe

    2003-01-01

    Conventional portable instruments for sensing chemical vapors have certain limitations for on-site use. In this article, we develop a genuinely portable detector that is sensitive, powerful, rugged, of simple design, and with very low power needs. Such a detector is based on a dry-cell battery-powered, capillary-discharge-based, microplasma source with optical emission detection. The microscale plasma source has very special features such as low thermal temperature and very low power needs. These features make it possible for the plasma source to be powered with a small dry-cell battery. A specially designed discharge chamber with minielectrodes can be configured to enhance the plasma stability and the system performance. A very small amount of inert gas can be used as sample carrier and plasma supporting gas. Inert gases possess high excitation potentials and produce high-energy metastable particles in the plasma. These particles provide sufficient energy to excite chemical species through Penning ionization and/or energy transfer from metastable species. A molecular emission spectrum can be collected with a palm-sized spectrometer through a collimated optical fiber. The spectrum can be displayed on a notebook computer. With this design and arrangement, the new detector provides high sensitivity for organic chemical species. The advantages and features of the newly developed detector include high sensitivity, simple structure, low cost, universal response, very low power consumption, compact volume with field portable capability, and ease of operation

  16. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    Tiziano Camporesi

    Pit commissioning activities The last 4 months have seen various major achievements in hardware commissioning, global data taking, readiness of the DPGs to deal with LHC data flows and alignment and calibration workflows. Since February, the global commissioning has been characterized on the one side by more and more of the final CMS detector becoming available for global readout and triggering and on the other side by consolidation of many of the central software infrastructure and of most of the services infrastructure. The reliability of services like cooling, power, gas has markedly improved with respect to what we observed in the second half of 2007.   Of particular note are the delivery of all low voltage power supplies, the commissioning of the final power distribution, the progressive commissioning ( still ongoing)  of the Detector Safety System and of the associated DCS early warning and alarm system. On the detector side, while already we are used to seeing all of HCAL being exe...

  17. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: construction, operation, and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Adam, Jaroslav; Ahmad, Nazeer; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Bhom, Jihyun

    2018-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 G...

  18. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, L.

    2008-01-01

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution

  19. Prototype performance of novel muon telescope detector at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, L.; Ames, V.

    2011-01-01

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution. (author)

  20. Modelling of performance of the ATLAS SCT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ATLAS detector being built at LHC will use the SCT (semiconductor tracking) module for particle tracking in the inner core of the detector. An analytical/numerical model of the discriminator threshold dependence and the temperature dependence of the SCT module was derived. Measurements were conducted on the performance of the SCT module versus temperature and these results were compared with the predictions made by the model. The affect of radiation damage of the SCT detector was also investigated. The detector will operate for approximately 10 years so a study was carried out on the effects of the 10 years of radiation exposure to the SCT

  1. Recent upgrades and performance of the CACTUS detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M.

    1998-03-01

    The SCANDITRONIX MC-35 cyclotron laboratory, including the Oslo Cyclotron, has been in operation since 1980. The main auxiliary equipment consists of the multi-detector system CACTUS. During the last years, new, high efficiency Ge(HP) detectors were purchased and integrated in the CACTUS detector array. In this connection, the electronical setup was revised and altered. Several drawbacks of the old setup could be pointed out and eliminated. A test of the performance of all detector array elements was made with high accuracy. 27 refs

  2. Online calibrations and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 M electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. The talk will give an overview of the calibration and performance of both the detector and its optical readout. The most basic parameter to be tuned and calibrated for the detector electronics is the readout threshold of the individual pixel channels. These need to be carefully tuned to optimise position resolution a...

  3. The BaBar detector: Upgrades, operation and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Gaillard, J. -M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Garra Tico, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Clark, A. R.; Day, C. T.; Furman, M.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Merchant, A. M.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Suzuki, A.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zisman, M.; Barrett, M.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; O' Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Smith, D.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Fella, A.; Antonioli, E.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Walker, D.; Abe, K.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Randle-Conde, A.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Telnov, V. I.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Atmacan, H.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Wang, K.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, L.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Echenard, B.; Erwin, R. J.; Fang, F.; Flood, K.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Narsky, I.; Oyang, J.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Antillon, E. A.; Barillari, T.; Becker, J.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Clifton, Z. C.; Derrington, I. M.; Destree, J.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Gilman, J. D.; Hachtel, J.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Wagner, S. R.; West, C. G.; Zhang, J.; Ayad, R.; Blouw, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q. L.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kaiser, S.; Kobel, M. J.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Mader, W. F.; Maly, E.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Dohou, F.; Ferrag, S.; Latour, E.; Mathieu, A.; Renard, C.; Schrenk, S.; T' Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Clark, P. J.; Lavin, D. R.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Swain, J. E.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Landi, L.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Negrini, M.; Padoan, C.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Sarti, A.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; de Sangro, R.; Santoni, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musico, P.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Adametz, A.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Taylor, G. P.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Grenier, G. J.; Hamilton, R.; Lee, S. -J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Fischer, P. -A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Schott, G.; Albert, J. N.; Arnaud, N.; Beigbeder, C.; Breton, D.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Dû, S.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Nief, J. Y.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Tocut, V.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wang, L. L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Bellodi, G.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; Cormack, C. M.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dixon, P.; George, K. A.; Menges, W.; Potter, R. J. L.; Sacco, R.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Sigamani, M.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Allison, J.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Jackson, G.; Kelly, M. P.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Naisbit, M. T.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; West, T. J.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S. Y.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Koeneke, K.; Lang, M. I.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yi, M.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; Klemetti, M.; Lindemann, D.; Mangeol, D. J. J.; Mclachlin, S. E.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Cerizza, G.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Pellegrini, R.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Godang, R.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Brau, B.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Smith, D. S.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Iwasaki, M.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Borsato, E.; Castelli, G.; Colecchia, F.; Crescente, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Fanin, C.; Furano, F.; Gagliardi, N.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Solagna, P.; Stevanato, E.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Akar, S.; Bailly, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Lebbolo, H.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Marchiori, G.; Martin, L.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Pivk, M.; Prendki, J.; Roos, L.; Sitt, S.; Stark, J.; Thérin, G.; Vallereau, A.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Pennazzi, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Fernholz, R. E.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Sands, W. R.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Bulfon, C.; Buccheri, E.; Cavoto, G.; D' Orazio, A.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Li Gioi, L.; Lunadei, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; del Re, D.; Renga, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Bünger, C.; Christ, S.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Condurache, C.; De Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Ricciardi, S.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Bourgeois, P.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P. -F.; Georgette, Z.; Graziani, G.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Akre, R.; Aston, D.; Azemoon, T.; Bard, D. J.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Becla, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Berger, N.; Bertsche, K.; Boeheim, C. T.; Bouldin, K.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Browne, M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Burgess, W.; Cai, Y.; Cartaro, C.; Ceseracciu, A.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Craddock, W. W.; Crane, G.; Cristinziani, M.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F. J.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Donald, M.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gaponenko, I.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, J.; Hanushevsky, A.; Hasan, A.; Hast, C.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Hryn' ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Iverson, R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kharakh, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Krasnykh, A.; Krebs, J.; Kroeger, W.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lüth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; McCulloch, M.; McDonald, J.; Melen, R.; Menke, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Messner, R.; Moss, L. J.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nelson, S.; Nordby, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; O' Grady, C. P.; O' Neill, F. G.; Ofte, I.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Piemontese, M.; Pierson, S.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Ratkovsky, S.; Reif, R.; Rivetta, C.; Rodriguez, R.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwarz, H.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Smith, D.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stanek, M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Teytelman, D.; Thompson, J. M.; Tinslay, J. S.; Trunov, A.; Turner, J.; van Bakel, N.; van Winkle, D.; Va' vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Weber, T.; West, C. A.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wittmer, W.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yan, Y.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Yocky, G.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Meyer, T. I.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Liu, J.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.; Soffer, A.; De Silva, A.; Lund, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Rashevskaya, I.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Agarwal, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Brown, C. M.; Choi, H. H. F.; Fortin, D.; Fransham, K. B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hollar, J. J.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Tan, P.; Vuosalo, C. O.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Greene, M. G.; Kordich, T. M. B.

    2013-11-01

    The BaBar detector operated successfully at the PEP-II asymmetric e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from 1999 to 2008. This report covers upgrades, operation, and performance of the collider and the detector systems, as well as the trigger, online and offline computing, and aspects of event reconstruction since the beginning of data taking.

  4. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  5. The Detector Control Unit An ASIC for the monitoring of the CMS silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Magazzù, G; Moreira, P

    2004-01-01

    The Detector Control Unit (DCU) is an ASIC developed as the central building block of a monitoring system for the CMS Tracker. Leakage currents in the Silicon detectors, power supply voltages of the readout electronics and local temperatures will be monitored in order to guarantee safe operating conditions during the 10-years lifetime in the LHC environment. All these measurements can be performed by an A/D converter preceded by an analog multiplexer and properly interfaced to the central control system. The requirements in terms of radiation tolerance, low-power dissipation and integration with the rest of the system led to the design of a custom integrated circuit. Its structure and characteristics are described in this paper. (6 refs).

  6. Radioactivity Portal Monitor: An actual application and its unconventional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izraelevitch, F.; Matatagui, E.; Regueiro Veiga, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    A Radioactivity Portal Monitor is an instrument designed to be used at traffic check points to detect the presence of ionizing radiation in goods, vehicles, people, in critical places such as those at border road crossing, airports and seaports, the entrance at nuclear facilities etc. and alert the officer to the presence of radioactive and nuclear material. We have developed and built, and is in operation a Radioactivity Portal Monitor for gamma radiation. The detector and the associated electronics does not follow a conventional design concept and is based on a pressurized ionization chamber with a very large sensitive volume (60 liters) and a very large length (2 meters), and a very low level DC electronics (fAmp). The System is simple, and its operational characteristics are excellent. The reference radiation level is the background radiation, which is continuously measured, and compared with the radiation level measured when a subject (vehicle, person, good) goes trough the Monitor. The system automatically takes a decision, and alert the officer with an alarm signal if the detected radiation level is larger than the reference (dynamical) level. We will describe the designed system and some of its characterization results will be shown (author)

  7. Performance of a Small Anode Germanium Well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adekola, A.S.; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector [1] has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, on the end cap or in Marinelli beakers. The SAGe Well is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology. The detector has similar energy resolution performance to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the Coaxial and existing Well detectors. Resolution performance of 0.75 keV Full Width at Half Maxiumum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0–2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. This paper reports the counting performance of SAGe Well detector for range of sample sizes and geometries and how it compares to other detector types

  8. Performance of a Small Anode Germanium Well detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adekola, A.S., E-mail: aderemi.adekola@canberra.com; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.

    2015-06-01

    The performance of Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector [1] has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, on the end cap or in Marinelli beakers. The SAGe Well is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology. The detector has similar energy resolution performance to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the Coaxial and existing Well detectors. Resolution performance of 0.75 keV Full Width at Half Maxiumum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0–2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. This paper reports the counting performance of SAGe Well detector for range of sample sizes and geometries and how it compares to other detector types.

  9. A passive monitor for radon using electrochemical track etch detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massera, G.E.; Hassib, G.M.; Piesch, E.

    1980-01-01

    A passive, inexpensive monitor for radon detection and dosimetry is described in detail. It consists of a Makrofoil track etch detector inside a diffusion chamber which is sealed by a fibreglass filter through which radon may diffuse while radon daughters and aerosols are retained on the surface of the filter. The α-particle tracks are revealed by etching the Makrofoil in KOH. The lower detection limit of the radon dosimeter is equivalent to a mean dose in the lung of 130 mrem. After an exposure period of 3 months, a mean radon concentration of 0.3 pCi/l can be detected. The instrument is intended for use in a study to measure the long-term radon exposure in buildings in West Germany. (UK)

  10. Rhodium self-powered detector for monitoring neutron fluence, energy production, and isotopic composition of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.P.; Pochivalin, G.P.; Shipovskikh, Yu.M.; Garusov, Yu.V.; Chernikov, O.G.; Shevchenko, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of self-powered detectors (SPDs) with a rhodium emitter customarily involves monitoring of neutron fields in the core of a nuclear reactor. Since current in an SPD is generated primarily because of the neutron flux, which is responsible for the dynamics of particular nuclear transformations, including fission reactions of heavy isotopes, the detector signal can be attributed unambiguously to energy release at the location of the detector. Computation modeling performed with the KOMDPS package of programs of the current formation in a rhodium SPD along with the neutron-physical processes that occur in the reactor core makes it possible to take account of the effect of the principal factors characterizing the operating conditions and the design features of the fuel channel and the detector, reveal quantitative relations between the generated signal and individual physical parameters, and determine the metrological parameters of the detector. The formation and transport of changed particles in the sensitive part of the SPC is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The emitter activation, neutron transport, and dynamics of the isotopic composition in the fuel channel containing the SPD are determined by solving the kinetic equation in the multigroup representation of the neutron spectrum, using the discrete ordinate method. In this work the authors consider the operation of a rhodium SPD in a bundle of 49 fuel channels of the RBMK-1000 reactor with a fuel enrichment of 2.4% from the time it is inserted into a fresh channel

  11. Long-lived Hybrid Incore Detector for Core Monitoring and Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Kyoon Ho [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The signal production mechanism in a rhodium (Rh) fixed in-core detector emitter relies primarily on the beta particles resulting from neutron absorptions in either of two Rh isotopes to produce an electric current. As the neutron transmutation process depletes the Rh isotopes, the signal output per unit neutron flux from an Rh detector emitter will decrease. A vanadium detector is primarily sensitive to neutrons, but with a somewhat slower reaction time as that of a Rh detector. The benefit of vanadium over rhodium is its low depletion rate, which is a factor of 7 times less than that of rhodium. Platinum detectors are very sensitive to gamma flux, but only mildly sensitive to neutron flux. Because the depletion rate of platinum is very small, it can be neglected. Generally, both gamma and neutron signals are proportional to the assembly power. The characteristics of a new detector are the long life time due to the low depletion of emitter materials and the capability of reactor protection as well as reactor monitoring. The new detector uses vanadium and platinum as the emitter materials to meet the long life time and reactor protection capability. Vanadium detector is used for reactor monitoring and platinum detector is used for reactor protection. To determine the number of emitter strings, a comparative study of the power peaking factor monitoring accuracy for various self-powered fixed in-core detector geometries was made, and the configuration of the optimal detector design was also established and verified. The design of a new detector consists of five-string vanadium detector elements, and three-string platinum detector elements. The detector assembly also contains a background wire for compensation of noise signal and a thermocouple for use in the post-accident monitoring system. This new hybrid detector can be used for both reactor Monitoring And reactor Protection (MAP)

  12. New generation detector for monitoring using remote-controlled ground-based and airborne systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cespirova, Irena; Gryc, Lubomir; Helebrant, Jan; Sladek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    A new generation detector for monitoring with the use of remote-controlled ground (UAG, robotic rovers) or aircraft (UAV, drones) means was developed and tested within a security project. The main characteristics of the detector and the results of field tests with the detector placed on unmanned aerial means (drones) are described. (orig.)

  13. Resistive gaseous detectors designs, performance, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, Marcello; Peskov, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    This first book to critically summarize the latest achievements and emerging applications within this interdisciplinary topic focuses on one of the most important types of detectors for elementary particles and photons: resistive plate chambers (RPCs). In the first part, the outstanding, international team of authors comprehensively describes and presents the features and design of single and double-layer RPCs before covering more advanced multi-layer RPCs. The second part then focuses on the application of RPCs in high energy physics, materials science, medicine and security. Throughout, the experienced authors adopt a didactic approach, with each subject presented in a simple way, increasing in complexity step by step.

  14. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Christopher Blake; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of $1.3\\times10^{34}\\text{cm}^{{-2}}\\text{s}^{{-1}}$ recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarized, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  15. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Christopher Blake; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on its 4-layer Pixel Detector, that has undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered by the Large Hadron Collider, with record breaking instantaneous luminosities of 1.3 x 10^34 cm-2 s-1 recently surpassed. The key status and performance metrics of the ATLAS Pixel Detector are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described, with special emphasis to radiation damage experience.

  16. Operational Experience and Performance with the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hongtao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In this presentation, I will discuss the operation of ATLAS Pixel Detector during Run 2 proton-proton data-taking at √s=13 TeV in 2017. The topics to be covered include 1) the bandwidth issue and how it is mitigated through readout upgrade and threshold adjustment; 2) the auto-corrective actions; 3) monitoring of radiation effects.

  17. Performance of fully instrumented detector planes of the forward calorimeter of a Linear Collider detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H.; Afanaciev, K.; Aguilar, J.; Alvarez, E.; Avila, D.; Benhammou, Y.; Bortko, L.; Borysov, O.; Bergholz, M.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Castro, E.; Chelkov, G.; Coca, C.; Daniluk, W.; Dumitru, L.; Elsener, K.; Fadeyev, V.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Ghenescu, V.; Gostkin, M.; Henschel, H.; Idzik, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Kananov, S.; Kollowa, S.; Kotov, S.; Kotula, J.; Kozhevnikov, D.; Kruchonok, V.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, Sz.; Lange, W.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Lukic, S.; Milke, C.; Moron, J.; Moszczynski, A.; Neagu, A.T.; Novgorodova, O.; Oliwa, K.; Orlandea, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Pawlik, B.; Preda, T.; Przyborowski, D.; Rosenblat, O.; Sailer, A.; Sato, Y.; Schumm, B.; Schuwalow, S.; Smiljanic, I.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Swientek, K.; Teodorescu, E.; Terlecki, P.; Wierba, W.; Wojton, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.S.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Detector-plane prototypes of the very forward calorimetry of a future detector at an $e^+e^-$ collider have been built and their performance was measured in an electron beam. The detector plane comprises silicon or GaAs pad sensors, dedicated front-end and ADC ASICs, and an FPGA for data concentration. Measurements of the signal-to-noise ratio for different feedback schemes and the response as a function of the position of the sensor are presented. A deconvolution method is successfully applied, and a comparison of the measured shower shape as a function of the absorber depth with a Monte-Carlo simulation is given.

  18. Performance of a prototype water Cherenkov detector for LHAASO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Q.; Bai, Y.X.; Bi, X.J.; Cao, Z.; Cao, Zhe; Chang, J.F.; Chen, G.; Chen, L.H.; Chen, M.J.; Chen, T.L.; Chen, Y.T.; Cui, S.W.; Dai, B.Z.; Danzengluobu; Feng, C.F.; Gao, B.; Gu, M.H.; Hao, X.J.; He, H.H.; Hu, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    A large high-altitude air shower observatory is to be built at Yang-Ba-Jing, Tibet, China. One of its main purposes is to survey the northern sky for very-high-energy (above 100 GeV) gamma ray sources via its ground-based water Cherenkov detector array. To gain full knowledge of water Cherenkov technique in detecting air showers, a prototype water Cherenkov detector is built at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing. The performance of the prototype water Cherenkov detector is studied by measuring its response to cosmic muons. The results are compared with those from a full Monte Carlo simulation to provide a series of information regarding the prototype detector in guiding electronics design and detector optimization.

  19. Online Calibration and Performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 million electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. This paper describes the tuning and calibration of the optical links and the detector modules, including measurements of threshold, noise, charge measurement, timing performance and the sensor leakage current.

  20. Status of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC and its performance after three years of operation

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit ...

  1. Development of fluctuation monitor type sodium ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Sato, Yoshihiko; Ibe, Eishi; Suzuoki, Akira

    1986-01-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity and the reliability of the sodium leak detection system used in the fast breeder reactors, a new type SID (sodium ionization detector) has been developed, in which the monitored signal is only the fluctuating component of the current between the filament and the ion collector. The fluctuating component was extracted by a band pass filter and its root mean square value was calculated as the SID signal. Fluctuation characteristics of the output current were studied by its frequency spectrum. The results revealed that the current spectrum was affected by the particle size distribution of the aerosol and was most clearly distinguished from that of the background current in the frequency region of 0.5 ∼ 10 Hz. Output characteristics of the fluctuation monitor type SID (FM-SID) were obtained as a function of sodium concentration in the gas. The FM-SID sensitivity was lowered by impurities in the gas, such as oxygen and water vapor. Finally, in comparisons with the conventional DC-SIDs, the background noise level of the FM-SID was much lower and S/N ratio was greatly improved. The detectable sodium concentration level was ten times lower than that of the DC-SID. (author)

  2. Performance Test for Neutron Detector and Associated System using Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seongwoo; Park, Sung Jae; Cho, Man Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Se Hyun [USERS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Cheol [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    SPND (Self-Powered Neutron Detector) has been developed to extend its lifespan. ENFMS (Ex-Core Flux Monitoring System) of pressurized water reactor has been also improved. After the development and improvement, their performance must be verified under the neutron irradiation environment. We used a research reactor for the performance verification of neutron detector and associated system because the research reactor can meet the neutron flux level of commercial nuclear reactor. In this paper, we report the performance verification method and result for the SPND and ENFMS using the research reactor. The performance tests for the SPND and ENFMS were conducted using UCI TRIGA reactor. The test environment of commercial reactor’s neutron flux level must be required. However, it is difficult to perform the test in the commercial rector due to the constraint of time and space. The research reactor can be good alternative neutron source for the test of neutron detectors and associated system.

  3. Performance of gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S. H.; Moon, B. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Chung, C. E.; Kang, H. D.; Cho, H. S.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated in detail the operating properties of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors with a double conical and a cylindrical structure in a wide range of external fields and GEM voltages. With the double conical GEM, the gain gradually increased with time by 10%; whereas this surface charging was eliminated with the cylindrical GEM. Effective gains above 1000 were easily observed over a wide range of collection field strengths in a gas mixture of Ar/CO 2 (70/30). The transparency and electron collection efficiency were found to depend on the ratio of external field and the applied GEM voltage; the mutual influence of both drift and collection fields was found to be trivial

  4. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ryd and T. Camporesi

    2010-01-01

    Commissioning and Run Coordination activities After the successful conclusion of the LHC pilot run commissioning in 2009 activities at the experiment restarted only late in January due to the cooling and detector maintenance. As usual we got going with weekly exercises used to deploy, debug, and validate improvements in firmware and software. A debriefing workshop aimed at analyzing the operational aspects of the 2009 pilot run was held on Jan. 15, 2009, to define a list of improvements (and relative priorities) to be planned. In the last month, most of the objectives set in the debriefing workshop have been attained. The major achievements/improvements obtained are the following: - Consolidation of the firmware for both readout and trigger for ECAL - Software implementation of procedures for raising the bias voltage of the silicon tracker and pixel driven by LHC mode changes with automatic propagation of the state changes from the DCS to the DAQ. The improvements in the software and firmware allow suppress...

  5. Studies of the performance of the ATLAS detector using cosmic-ray muons

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Ay, C.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Pedrosa, F.Baltasar Dos Santos; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.Barreiro; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S.Behar; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S.Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E.Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Boldea, V.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Urban, S.Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Garrido, M.D.M.Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Montoya, G.D.Carrillo; Montero, S.Carron; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; El Moursli, R.Cherkaoui; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M.V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Muino, P.Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Donszelmann, T.Cuhadar; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; Vivie De Regie, J.B.De; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Yagci, K.Dindar; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Vale, M.A.B.do; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.D.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H.Duran; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Curull, X.Espinal; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Fopma, J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E.Fullana; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Navarro, J.E.Garcia; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; 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Quayle, W.B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A.M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A.L.; Rebuzzi, D.M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R.R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Romero, D.A.Roa; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.E.M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Santos, D.Roda Dos; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Maltrana, D.Romero; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Tehrani, F.Safai; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sansoni, A.; Rios, C.Santamarina; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schoning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjolin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Camillocci, E.Solfaroli; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R.D.St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tani, K.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, W.; Castanheira, M.Teixeira Dias; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Kate, H.Ten; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Aires Viegas, F.J.Tique; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Pastor, E.Torro; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Cakir, I.Turk; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Gallego, E.Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J.A.Valls; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T.Vu; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G.Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.

    2011-01-01

    Muons from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere provide a high-statistics source of particles that can be used to study the performance and calibration of the ATLAS detector. Cosmic-ray muons can penetrate to the cavern and deposit energy in all detector subsystems. Such events have played an important role in the commissioning of the detector since the start of the installation phase in 2005 and were particularly important for understanding the detector performance in the time prior to the arrival of the first LHC beams. Global cosmic-ray runs were undertaken in both 2008 and 2009 and these data have been used through to the early phases of collision data-taking as a tool for calibration, alignment and detector monitoring. These large datasets have also been used for detector performance studies, including investigations that rely on the combined performance of different subsystems. This paper presents the results of performance studies related to combined tracking, lepton identification and the reconst...

  6. Electromagnetic noise studies in a silicon strip detector, used as part of a luminosity monitor at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødegaard, Trygve; Tafjord, Harald; Buran, Torleiv

    1995-02-01

    As part of the luminosity monitor, SAT, in the DELPHI [1] experiment at CERN's Large Electron Positron collider, a tracking detector constructed from silicon strip detector elements was installed in front of an electromagnetic calorimeter. The luminosity was measured by counting the number of Bhabha events at the interaction point of the electron and the positron beans. The tracking detector reconstructs from the interaction point and the calorimeter measures the corresponding particles' energies. The SAT Tracker [2] consists of 504 silicon strip detectors. The strips are DC-coupled to CMOS VLSI-chips, baptized Balder [3,4]. The chip performs amplification, zero-suppression, digitalisation, and multiplexing. The requirements of good space resolution and high efficiency put strong requirements on noise control. A short description of the geometry and the relevant circuit layout is given. We describe the efforts made to minimise the electromagnetic noise in the detector and present some numbers of the noise level using various techniques.

  7. Air alpha monitoring device and system for the calibration of the track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danis, A; Oncescu, M.; Ciubotariu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The radon measurement plays a critical role: - in monitoring the human health and safety, due to radon destructive health effects. Sustained exposures of humans to high concentration of radon, in fact to high concentrations of its decay products, can produce lung cancer; - in a variety of geophysical, geochemical, hydrological and atmospheric investigations, such as exploring resources of uranium or hydrocarbons. The transport of radon within the earth, waters and atmosphere makes it a useful tracer in these purposes. in both cases, the reliable long-term measurements are required because usual short-term variations in concentration need to be averaged. These variations are caused by factors such as relative humidity, temperature, atmospheric pressure and their seasonal variations, moisture content in the air, or ventilation in the dwelling or working places. The integrating measurement methods meet these requirements. Among them, the alpha track method is one of the adequate and useful method and it is used by authors in radon measurements in dwelling and working places including mines and house cellars. The best etched track alpha detector for radon measurements proved to be the detector CR-39 due to: - its sensitivity to alpha particles emitted by radon decay products; - its stability against various environmental factors; - its high degree of optical clarity, was used in a proper device for alpha monitoring in air. Its calibration for radon measurements was performed in the proper calibration system. The general descriptions and specifications were given previously. Only some characteristics of these devices are given here. For air alpha monitoring device: i) equipped with filter, during alpha exposure, the alpha particles of radon are registered in the etched track detector mounted inside (ρ Rn - track density); ii) without filter, the alpha particles emitted by radon + its alpha decay products/their aerosols are registered in the detector (ρ tot - track

  8. The design and performance of the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polini, A.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.

    2007-08-01

    In order to extend the tracking acceptance, to improve the primary and secondary vertex reconstruction and thus enhancing the tagging capabilities for short lived particles, the ZEUS experiment at the HERA Collider at DESY installed a silicon strip vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector is a 63 cm long cylinder with silicon sensors arranged around an elliptical beampipe. The forward part consists of four circular shaped disks. In total just over 200k channels are read out using 2.9 m 2 of silicon. In this report a detailed overview of the design and construction of the detector is given and the performance of the completed system is reviewed. (orig.)

  9. Design and performance of a cesium iodide detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.; Bishop, J.M.; Cady, R. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    The design, construction, and performance of a 198-element CsI detector built for Brookhaven experiment E852 is described. Design considerations for the array included such factors as rate, magnetic field, sensitivity and acceptance. Signals were obtained with a photodiode/preamplifier combination using PIN photodiodes. Data were taken over the course of two runs during the summers of 1993 and 1994. A calibration procedure using halo muons is described. The gain, energy resolution, and position resolution of the detector are discussed. Finally, the ability of the detector to be used as a low energy photon veto is illustrated using the data. (orig.).

  10. On Performance of Linear Multiuser Detectors for Wireless Multimedia Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rekha; Reddy, B. V. R.; Bindu, E.; Nayak, Pinki

    In this paper, performance of different multi-rate schemes in DS-CDMA system is evaluated. The analysis of multirate linear multiuser detectors with multiprocessing gain is analyzed for synchronous Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) systems. Variable data rate is achieved by varying the processing gain. Our conclusion is that bit error rate for multirate and single rate systems can be made same with a tradeoff with number of users in linear multiuser detectors.

  11. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    Since the last CMS week we have continued the regular mid week global runs and conducted the first CRUZET this year at the beginning of June. The fact that the tracker was not available yet due to the cooling plant refurbishing has limited the scope of these global runs. The focus has been on verifying the robustness of the various subsystem data acquisition chains under realistic LHC-like trigger conditions. In the last few weeks we have been able to take runs of many hours at a Level-1 trigger rate of 90 kHz with less than 10% deadtime. As usual a lot of issues have been found and dealt with, and the firmware of the various subsystems have all been upgraded/fixed. Worth reporting is the fact that now both endcaps are read-out completely (including the RPC on the negative side) and the local commissioning of the preshower detector has been steadily progressing, with the last firmware fixes in hand to be able to join the global run campaign. The Pixel system has been part of 3 global runs already and has pr...

  12. Development of an area monitor for neutrons using solid state nuclear track detector; Desenvolvimento de um monitor de area para neutrons utilizando detector solido de tracos nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, G.S.

    1994-12-31

    An area monitor for neutrons composed of the solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) Makrofol DE, together with a (n,{alpha}) converter, in the center of a 25 cm diameter polyethylene sphere, is developed. The optimal electrochemical etching conditions for the detection of thermal neutrons by the Makrofol DE using the BN converter are studied, leading to the choice of 55 min, at 30{sup 0} C, under a 44,2 kV.cm{sup -1} electric field with oscillation frequency of 2,0 khz. The response of this system to thermal neutrons, in the optimal conditions, is of 2,76(10)x 10{sup -3} tr/n. Changing from the BN converter to a 2,73(3)g compressed boric acid tablet this value lowers to 3,88(17)x 10{sup -4} tr/n. The performance of the whole monitor in the detection of fast neutrons is examined using the BN converter and neutrons from a {sup 241} Am Be source, with a response of 4,4(2)x 10{sup 3} tr.mSv{sup -1}.cm{sup -2} and operational limits between 7(3){mu}Sv and 5,6(2)mSv. The result of the monitoring of the control room of the IPEN Cyclotron accelerator are also presented as a final test for the viability of the practical use of the monitor. (author). 34 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs, 1 app.

  13. Muon borehole detector development for use in four-dimensional tomographic density monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Joshua

    The increase of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and the correlated temperature rise has initiated research into methods of carbon sequestration. One promising possibility is to store CO2 in subsurface reservoirs of porous rock. After injection, the monitoring of the injected CO2 is of paramount importance because the CO2 plume, if escaped, poses health and environmental risks. Traditionally, seismic reflection methods are the chosen method of determining changes in the reservoir density due to CO2 injection, but this is expensive and not continuous. A potential and promising alternative is to use cosmic muon tomography to determine density changes in the reservoir over a period of time. The work I have completed was the development of a muon detector that will be capable of being deployed in boreholes and perform long-term tomography of the reservoir of interest. The detector has the required dimensions, an angular resolution of approximately 2 degrees, and is robust enough to survive the caustic nature of the fluids in boreholes, as well as temperature and pressure fluctuations. The detector design is based on polystyrene scintillating rods arrayed in alternating layers. The layers, as arranged, can provide four-dimensional (4D) tomographic data to detect small changes in density at depths up to approximately 2 kilometers. Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation code, was used to develop and optimize the detector design. Additionally, I developed a method of determining the muon flux at depth, including CO2 saturation changes in subsurface reservoirs. Preliminary experiments were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This thesis will show the simulations I performed to determine the angular resolution and background discrimination required of the detector, the experiments to determine light transport through the polystyrene scintillating rods and fibers, and the method developed to predict muon flux changes at depth expected after injection.

  14. Evaluation of indigenously developed plastic scintillator sheet detector for surface radioactive contamination monitoring application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahani, R.M.; Chaudhary, H.S.; Mahala, V.K.; Senwar, K.R.; Meena, J.P.

    2018-01-01

    Radioactive contamination may be caused by release of radioactivity in the environment due to accident at nuclear plant/reactor or spillage of loose radioactive materials in a laboratory. The protection of workers from potentially hazardous radiations emitted by the contaminants is a matter of prime concern. The detection of such radiations requires a monitoring system capable of measuring the level of radioactivity at the contaminated site. Plastic scintillators are widely used for large area radiation monitoring due to the ease of preparation in different shape and sizes. These detectors are sensitive to beta and gamma radiation therefore can be used for monitoring of beta and gamma contamination. In this paper, performance results of indigenously developed plastic scintillator sheet of area 800 cm 2 are reported

  15. A new temperature threshold detector - Application to missile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coston, C. J.; Higgins, E. V.

    Comprehensive thermal surveys within the case of solid propellant ballistic missile flight motors are highly desirable. For example, a problem involving motor failures due to insulator cracking at motor ignition, which took several years to solve, could have been identified immediately on the basis of a suitable thermal survey. Using conventional point measurements, such as those utilizing typical thermocouples, for such a survey on a full scale motor is not feasible because of the great number of sensors and measurements required. An alternate approach recognizes that temperatures below a threshold (which depends on the material being monitored) are acceptable, but higher temperatures exceed design margins. In this case hot spots can be located by a grid of wire-like sensors which are sensitive to temperature above the threshold anywhere along the sensor. A new type of temperature threshold detector is being developed for flight missile use. The considered device consists of KNO3 separating copper and Constantan metals. Above the KNO3 MP, galvanic action provides a voltage output of a few tenths of a volt.

  16. Multi-detector system approach for unattended uranium enrichment monitoring at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Lombardi, M.; MacArthur, D. W.; McCluskey, C.; Moss, C. E.; Paffett, M. T.; Ianakiev, K. D.

    2018-01-01

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants while reducing the inspection effort is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One requirement of such a monitor is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from 235U. The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe, which can be obtained by a transmission or pressure measurement. We describe our research to develop such a passive measurement system. Unfortunately, a complication arises in the interpretation of the gamma measurements, from the contribution of uranium deposits on the wall of the pipe to the 186-keV peak. A multi-detector approach to address this complication is presented where two measurements, one with signal primarily from gas and one with signal primarily from deposits, are performed simultaneously with different detectors and geometries. This allows a correction to be made to the 186-keV peak for the contribution from the deposit. We present the design of the multi-detector system and the results of the experimental calibration of the proof-of-principle prototype built at LANL.

  17. Multi-detector system approach for unattended uranium enrichment monitoring at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, A.; Lombardi, M.; MacArthur, D. W.; McCluskey, C.; Moss, C. E.

    2017-01-01

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants while reducing the inspection effort is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One requirement of such a monitor is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from 235 U. The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe, which can be obtained by a transmission or pressure measurement. Here, we describe our research to develop such a passive measurement system. Unfortunately, a complication arises in the interpretation of the gamma measurements, from the contribution of uranium deposits on the wall of the pipe to the 186-keV peak. A multi-detector approach to address this complication is presented where two measurements, one with signal primarily from gas and one with signal primarily from deposits, are performed simultaneously with different detectors and geometries. This allows a correction to be made to the 186-keV peak for the contribution from the deposit. Finally, we present the design of the multi-detector system and the results of the experimental calibration of the proof-of-principle prototype built at LANL.

  18. Performance verification of the CMS Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veszpremi, V.

    2017-12-01

    The CMS tracker consists of two tracking systems utilizing semiconductor technology: the inner pixel and the outer strip detectors. The tracker detectors occupy the volume around the beam interaction region between 3 cm and 110 cm in radius and up to 280 cm along the beam axis. The pixel detector consists of 124 million pixels, corresponding to about 2 m 2 total area. It plays a vital role in the seeding of the track reconstruction algorithms and in the reconstruction of primary interactions and secondary decay vertices. It is surrounded by the strip tracker with 10 million read-out channels, corresponding to 200 m 2 total area. The tracker is operated in a high-occupancy and high-radiation environment established by particle collisions in the LHC . The current strip detector continues to perform very well. The pixel detector that has been used in Run 1 and in the first half of Run 2 was, however, replaced with the so-called Phase-1 Upgrade detector. The new system is better suited to match the increased instantaneous luminosity the LHC would reach before 2023. It was built to operate at an instantaneous luminosity of around 2×1034 cm-2s-1. The detector's new layout has an additional inner layer with respect to the previous one; it allows for more efficient tracking with smaller fake rate at higher event pile-up. The paper focuses on the first results obtained during the commissioning of the new detector. It also includes challenges faced during the first data taking to reach the optimal measurement efficiency. Details will be given on the performance at high occupancy with respect to observables such as data-rate, hit reconstruction efficiency, and resolution.

  19. Performance overview of the Euclid infrared focal plane detector subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waczynski, A.; Barbier, R.; Cagiano, S.; Chen, J.; Cheung, S.; Cho, H.; Cillis, A.; Clémens, J.-C.; Dawson, O.; Delo, G.; Farris, M.; Feizi, A.; Foltz, R.; Hickey, M.; Holmes, W.; Hwang, T.; Israelsson, U.; Jhabvala, M.; Kahle, D.; Kan, Em.; Kan, Er.; Loose, M.; Lotkin, G.; Miko, L.; Nguyen, L.; Piquette, E.; Powers, T.; Pravdo, S.; Runkle, A.; Seiffert, M.; Strada, P.; Tucker, C.; Turck, K.; Wang, F.; Weber, C.; Williams, J.

    2016-07-01

    In support of the European space agency (ESA) Euclid mission, NASA is responsible for the evaluation of the H2RG mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detectors and electronics assemblies fabricated by Teledyne imaging systems. The detector evaluation is performed in the detector characterization laboratory (DCL) at the NASA Goddard space flight center (GSFC) in close collaboration with engineers and scientists from the jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) and the Euclid project. The Euclid near infrared spectrometer and imaging photometer (NISP) will perform large area optical and spectroscopic sky surveys in the 0.9-2.02 μm infrared (IR) region. The NISP instrument will contain sixteen detector arrays each coupled to a Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The focal plane will operate at 100K and the SIDECAR ASIC will be in close proximity operating at a slightly higher temperature of 137K. This paper will describe the test configuration, performance tests and results of the latest engineering run, also known as pilot run 3 (PR3), consisting of four H2RG detectors operating simultaneously. Performance data will be presented on; noise, spectral quantum efficiency, dark current, persistence, pixel yield, pixel to pixel uniformity, linearity, inter pixel crosstalk, full well and dynamic range, power dissipation, thermal response and unit cell input sensitivity.

  20. Charge-coupled-device X-ray detector performance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, M. W.; Berman, G. E.; Doty, J. P.; Ricker, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    A model that predicts the performance characteristics of CCD detectors being developed for use in X-ray imaging is presented. The model accounts for the interactions of both X-rays and charged particles with the CCD and simulates the transport and loss of charge in the detector. Predicted performance parameters include detective and net quantum efficiencies, split-event probability, and a parameter characterizing the effective thickness presented by the detector to cosmic-ray protons. The predicted performance of two CCDs of different epitaxial layer thicknesses is compared. The model predicts that in each device incomplete recovery of the charge liberated by a photon of energy between 0.1 and 10 keV is very likely to be accompanied by charge splitting between adjacent pixels. The implications of the model predictions for CCD data processing algorithms are briefly discussed.

  1. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Malgeri

    2011-01-01

    General Figure 2: Integrated luminosity delivered by LHC and recorded by CMS in 2010 and 2011. Since the last CMS Bulletin, an enormous amount of progress has been made. The LHC has been increasing the number of bunches stored in the machine to the record of 1236 bunches. On the way there they have achieved a peak instantaneous luminosity of 1.27x1033 cm-2s-1 making the LHC by far the highest luminosity hadron collider. The LHC has now delivered over 1 fb-1 to CMS. Figure 2 shows the delivered and recorded luminosity in the 2010 and 2011 run. In Figure 3 is shown the daily delivered and recorded luminosity during the 2011 run until mid-June. The LHC has now delivered over 50 pb-1 in one day.   Figure 3: The daily delivered and recorded luminosities during the 2011 run. Tracker The data collected by the Tracker is of very good quality, and is being constantly monitored offline by our Offline shift crew and our DQM team. These teams are also certifying the data, and it is seen that 99% of the da...

  2. Development of three methods for control rod position monitoring based on fixed in-core neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Xingjie; Li, Qing; Wang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Three methods are utilized separately to unfold the control rod position from the fixed in-core neutron detector measurements. • Fixed in-core neutron detector measurements are simulated by neutronics code SMART. • Numerical results show that all these methods can unfold the control rod position accurately. • Two correction strategies are proposed to correct the simulated fixed in-core detector signals. - Abstract: Nuclear reactor core power distribution on-line monitoring system is very important in core surveillance, and this system should have the ability to indicate some abnormal conditions, such as the unacceptable control rod misalignment. In this study, the methodologies of radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), group method of data handling (GMDH) and Levenberg–Marquardt (LM) algorithm are utilized separately to unfold the control rod position from the fixed in-core neutron detector measurements. For using these methods, a large number of in-core detector signals corresponding to various known rod positions are needed. These data can be generated by an advanced core calculation code. In this study, the neutronics code SMART was used. The simulation results show that all these methods can unfold the control rod position accurately, and the performance comparison shows that the regularized RBFNN performs best. Two correction strategies are proposed to correct the simulated fixed in-core detector signals and improve the rod position monitoring accuracy when there are mismatches between actual physical factors and modeled physical factors

  3. Status and trends of solid state track detector use in radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristic properties of solid state track detectors allow them to be used for determining the radiation fields of charged and uncharged particles and, consequently, for solving some problems involved in radiation protection monitoring. Aptitude of various detector materials is investigated on the basis of the track formation mechanism taking into account the properties of the particles to be detected. Use of these detectors in radiation protection monitoring presumes appropriate methods of intensifying the latent tracks, which are discussed as a function of various physical parameters. Readout methods of solid state track detectors are based on variations in detector properties determined by number and size of particle tracks in the detector. The choice of a special readout method, among other things, depends on the purpose, detector material, and pretreatment of the detectors. The most prospective methods are described and investigated with respect to their possible use in various fields of radiation protection monitoring. The trends of development of the application of solid state track detectors in radiation protection monitoring are discussed, using some typical applications as examples. (author)

  4. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Yuki [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Izaki, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-11-11

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM.

  5. ''In situ'' electronic testing method of a neutron detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.M.; Levai, F.

    1987-01-01

    The method allows detection of any important change in the electrical characteristics of a neutron sensor channel. It checks the response signal produced by an electronic detector circuit when a pulse generator is connected as input signal in the high voltage supply. The electronic circuit compares the detector capacitance value, previously measured, against a reference value, which is adjusted in a window type comparator electronic circuit to detect any important degrading condition of the capacitance value in a detector-cable system. The ''in-situ'' electronic testing method of neutron detector performance has been verified in a laboratory atmosphere to be a potential method to detect any significant change in the capacitance value of a nuclear sensor and its connecting cable, also checking: detector disconnections, cable disconnections, length changes of the connecting cable, electric short-opened circuits in the sensor channel, and any electrical trouble in the detector-connector-cable system. The experimental practices were carried out by simulation of several electric changes in a nuclear sensor-cable system from a linear D.C. channel which measures reactor power during nuclear reactor operation. It was made at the Training Reactor Electronic Laboratory. The results and conclusions obtained at the Laboratory were proved, satisfactorily, in the Electronic Instrumentation of Budapest Technical University Training Reactor, Hungary

  6. Infrared Illuminated CdZnTe detectors with improved performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.; Loutchanski, A.; Dorogov, P.; Khinoverov, S.

    2013-06-01

    It was found that IR illumination of a properly chosen wavelength and intensity can significantly improve spectrometric characteristics of CdZnTe quasi-hemispherical detectors [1]. Improving of the spectrometric characteristics is due to improvement of uniformity of charge collection by the detector volume. For operation at room temperature the optimal wavelength of IR illumination is about 940 nm, but for operation at lower temperature of -20 deg. C the optimal wavelengths of IR illumination is about 1050 nm. Infrared illumination can be performed using conventional low-power IR LEDs. Application of SMD LEDs allows produce miniature detection probes with IR illuminated CdZnTe detectors. We have fabricated and tested a variety of detection probes with CdZnTe quasi-hemispherical detectors from the smallest with volumes of 1-5 mm 3 to larger with volumes of 1.5 cm 3 and 4.0 cm 3 . The use of IR illumination significantly improves spectrometric characteristics of the probes operating at room temperature, especially probes with detectors of large volumes. The probe with the detector of 4 cm 3 without IR illumination had energy resolution of 24.2 keV at 662 keV and of 12.5 keV with IR illumination. (authors)

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Detector using First Collision Data

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, P.F.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, S.R.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger, G.A.N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanch, O.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Bonino, R.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C.N.; Booth, P.S.L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J.R.A.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozhko, N.I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Braccini, S.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Bravo, S.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N.D.; Bright-Thomas, P.G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N.J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E.J.; Bujor, F.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S.A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Charron, S.; Chatterjii, S.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clements, D.; Clifft, R.W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C.D.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P.V.M.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Dalmau, J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J.P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, D.W.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J.W.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D.V.; Defay, P.O.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Dennis, C.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diaz Gomez, M.M.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M.A.B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O.B.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Domingo, E.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Dowell, J.D.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J.G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Dur, H.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eremin, V.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; 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Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V.G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo.K.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P.F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A.V.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V.V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    More than half a million minimum-bias events of LHC collision data were collected by the ATLAS experiment in December 2009 at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 TeV and 2.36 TeV. This paper reports on studies of the initial performance of the ATLAS detector from these data. Comparisons between data and Monte Carlo predictions are shown for distributions of several track- and calorimeter-based quantities. The good performance of the ATLAS detector in these first data gives confidence for successful running at higher energies.

  8. Expected performance of the ATLAS experiment detector, trigger and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.A.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; 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Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.J.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nomoto, H.; Nordberg, M.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozicka, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neale, S.W.; O'Neil, D.C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F.G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Odaka, S.; Odino, G.A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S.H.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A.G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliver Garcia, E.O.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onea, A.; Onofre, A.; Oram, C.J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M.J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.O.; Orr, R.S.; Ortega, E.O.; Osculati, B.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Oye, O.K.; Ozcan, V.E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Pal, A.; Palestini, S.; Palla, J.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y.B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; 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Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.P.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D.M.; Pommes, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B.G.; Popescu, R.; Popovic, D.S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G.E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I.N.; Potter, C.J.; Potter, C.T.; Potter, K.P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L.E.; Price, M.J.; Prichard, P.M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Perez Garcia-Estan, M.T.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D.R.; Quayle, W.B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A.M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rajek, S.; Ratoff, P.N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; 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Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybin, A.M.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sanchis Lozano, M.A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, D.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.; Schamov, A.G.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J.L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M.P.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroers, M.S.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.S.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.S.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.S.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shan, L.; Shank, J.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.S.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siebel, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, D.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjolin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.S.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T.D.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Strong, J.A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S.I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Sviridov, Yu.M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szczygiel, R.R.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taffard, A.T.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Tali, B.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G.P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.T.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Tevlin, C.M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, J.P.; Thomas, T.L.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Tovey, S.N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D.G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; VanBerg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J.J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, D.; Ventura, S.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A.P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.C.; Wang, S.M.W.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.W.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Wheeler-Ellis, S.J.; Whitaker, S.P.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, H.H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.W.; Winton, L.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P.F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A.V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinna, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V.V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector. The reconstruction of tracks, leptons, photons, missing energy and jets is investigated, together with the performance of b-tagging and the trigger. The physics potential for a variety of interesting physics processes, within the Standard Model and beyond, is examined. The study comprises a series of notes based on simulations of the detector and physics processes, with particular emphasis given to the data expected from the first years of operation of the LHC at CERN.

  9. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, H; Baker, M D; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Decowski, M P; García, E; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Holynski, R; Hofman, D J; Holzman, B; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Lin, W T; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Michalowski, J; Mignerey, A; Mülmenstädt, J; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Skulski, W; Steadman, S G; Stephans, G S F; Steinberg, P; Stodulski, M; Sukhanov, A; Tang, J L; Teng, R; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Verdier, R; Wadsworth, B; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B

    2001-01-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s radical = 65 GeV and 130 GeV/nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  10. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, H.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2001-11-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s nn=65 GeV and 130 GeV/ nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  11. Emerging technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Chee Leong; Mohseni Hooman

    2018-01-01

    Infrared photodetectors (IRPDs) have become important devices in various applications such as night vision, military missile tracking, medical imaging, industry defect imaging, environmental sensing, and exoplanet exploration. Mature semiconductor technologies such as mercury cadmium telluride and III–V material-based photodetectors have been dominating the industry. However, in the last few decades, significant funding and research has been focused to improve the performance of IRPDs such as...

  12. Performance characterization of the EarthCARE BBR Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, C.; Allard, M.; Pope, T.; Tremblay, B.; Williamson, F.; Julien, C.; Larouche, C.; Delderfield, J.; Parker, D.

    2017-11-01

    The Broadband Radiometer (BBR) is an instrument being developed for the ESA EarthCARE satellite. The BBR instrument objective is to provide measurements of the reflected short-wave (0.25-4.0 μm) and emitted long-wave (4.0-50 μm) top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiance over three along-track views (forward, nadir and backward). The instrument has three fixed telescopes, one for each view, each containing a broadband detector. The BBR instrument is led by SEA in the UK with RAL responsible for the BBR optics unit (OU) while EADS Astrium is the EarthCARE prime contractor. A detailed description of the instrument is provided in [1]. The BBR detectors consist in three dedicated assemblies under the responsibility of INO. The detectors development started in 2008 and led to the design and implementation of a new gold black deposition facility at INO [2], in parallel with the preliminary and detailed design phases of the detector assemblies. As of today, two breadboard models and one engineering model have been delivered to RAL. In the BBR OU each detector mechanically interfaces with the telescope and electrically with the front-end electronics (FEE). The detectors' development is now at the Critical Design Review (CDR) level. This paper first provides a description of the detector design along with its principles of operation. It further presents and discusses measurement and analysis results for the performance characterization of the engineering model in the context of the applicable requirements. Detector-level qualification planning is finally discussed.

  13. 5 CFR 430.306 - Monitoring performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring performance. 430.306 Section 430.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.306 Monitoring performance. (a) Supervisors must...

  14. ATLAS detector performance in Run1: Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Burghgrave, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS operated with an excellent efficiency during the Run 1 data taking period, recording respectively in 2011 and 2012 an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 at √s = 7 TeV and 21.6 fb-1 at √s = 8TeV. The Liquid Argon and Tile Calorimeter contributed to this effort by operating with a good data quality efficiency, improving over the whole Run 1. This poster presents the Run 1 overall status and performance, LS1 works and Preparations for Run 2.

  15. Characteristics of Fabricated SiC Neutron Detectors for Neutron Flux Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Soo; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Se Hwan; Lee, Kyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    An SPND (Self-powered Neutron Detector) is commonly used for neutron detection in NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) by virtue of un-reactivity for gamma-rays. But it has a drawback, which is that it cannot detect neutrons in real time due to beta emissions (about > 48 s) after reactions between neutrons and {sup 103}Rh in an SPND. And Generation IV reactors such as MSR (Molten-salt reactor), SFR (Sodium-cooled fast reactor), and GFR (Gas-cooled fast reactor) are designed to compact size and integration type. For GEN IV reactor, neutron monitor also must be compact-sized to apply such reactor easily and much more reliable. The wide band-gap semiconductors such as SiC, AlN, and diamond make them an attractive alternative in applications in harsh environments by virtue of the lower operating voltage, faster charge-collection times compared with gas-filled detectors, and compact size.1) In this study, two PIN-type SiC semiconductor neutron detectors, which are for fast neutron detection by elastic and inelastic scattering SiC atoms and for thermal neutron detection by charged particle emissions of 6LiF reaction, were designed and fabricated for NPP-related applications. Preliminary tests such as I-V and alpha response were performed and neutron responses at ENF in HANARO research reactor were also addressed. The application feasibility of the fabricated SiC neutron detector as an in-core neutron monitor was discussed

  16. Performances of photodiode detectors for top and bottom counting detectors of ISS-CREAM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, H.J. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Anderson, T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Angelaszek, D. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Baek, S.J. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Copley, M. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Coutu, S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Han, J.H.; Huh, H.G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Hwang, Y.S. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Im, S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jeon, H.B.; Kah, D.H.; Kang, K.H.; Kim, H.J. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.C.; Kwashnak, K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Lee, J. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M.H. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Link, J.T. [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); CRESST(USRA), Columbia, MD 21044 (United States); Lutz, L. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); and others

    2015-07-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) experiment at the International Space Station (ISS) aims to elucidate the source and acceleration mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays by measuring the energy spectra from protons to iron. The instrument is planned for launch in 2015 at the ISS, and it comprises a silicon charge detector, a carbon target, top and bottom counting detectors, a calorimeter, and a boronated scintillator detector. The top and bottom counting detectors are developed for separating the electrons from the protons, and each of them comprises a plastic scintillator and a 20×20 silicon photodiode array. Each photodiode is 2.3 cm×2.3 cm in size and exhibits good electrical characteristics. The leakage current is measured to be less than 20 nA/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage. The signal-to-noise ratio is measured to be better than 70 using commercial electronics, and the radiation hardness is tested using a proton beam. A signal from the photodiode is amplified by VLSI (very-large-scale integration) charge amp/hold circuits, the VA-TA viking chip. Environmental tests are performed using whole assembled photodiode detectors of a flight version. Herein, we present the characteristics of the developed photodiode along with the results of the environmental tests.

  17. Performances of photodiode detectors for top and bottom counting detectors of ISS-CREAM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, H.J.; Anderson, T.; Angelaszek, D.; Baek, S.J.; Copley, M.; Coutu, S.; Han, J.H.; Huh, H.G.; Hwang, Y.S.; Im, S.; Jeon, H.B.; Kah, D.H.; Kang, K.H.; Kim, H.J.; Kim, K.C.; Kwashnak, K.; Lee, J.; Lee, M.H.; Link, J.T.; Lutz, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) experiment at the International Space Station (ISS) aims to elucidate the source and acceleration mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays by measuring the energy spectra from protons to iron. The instrument is planned for launch in 2015 at the ISS, and it comprises a silicon charge detector, a carbon target, top and bottom counting detectors, a calorimeter, and a boronated scintillator detector. The top and bottom counting detectors are developed for separating the electrons from the protons, and each of them comprises a plastic scintillator and a 20×20 silicon photodiode array. Each photodiode is 2.3 cm×2.3 cm in size and exhibits good electrical characteristics. The leakage current is measured to be less than 20 nA/cm 2 at an operating voltage. The signal-to-noise ratio is measured to be better than 70 using commercial electronics, and the radiation hardness is tested using a proton beam. A signal from the photodiode is amplified by VLSI (very-large-scale integration) charge amp/hold circuits, the VA-TA viking chip. Environmental tests are performed using whole assembled photodiode detectors of a flight version. Herein, we present the characteristics of the developed photodiode along with the results of the environmental tests

  18. Performance study of hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaya, N; Gys, Thierry; Piedigrossi, D; Wyllie, K

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study CP violation and rare phenomena of B mesons with very high accuracy. The LHCb RICH detectors are essential for positive kaon identification, and several strict demands are required of its photon detectors to achieve excellent particle identification performance. In particular, they should have good single photon sensitivity for visible and UV wavelengths and large coverage with fine granularity. HPDs have been developed to meet these requirements in collaboration with industry. They have now been chosen as the photon detector for LHCb, and pre-series tubes are under test prior to mass production. At the same time, more detailed studies are on-going to understand more deeply their characteristics. The result of various performance tests of these tubes as well as the fraction of light reflection in the HPD are described in this paper.

  19. Research and development of a beta skin-dose monitor using silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Manho.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop improved ways to computer and measure the beta skin dose. Beta spectra for the various sources were calculated based on the Fermi beta decay theory. The calculated average energies of the spectra agreed with the literature values within 6%. Monte Carlo electron transport codes have been developed for use on microcomputers. The one-dimensional code ZEBRA has been converted to a microcomputer version called Eltran2 which runs on the Macintosh or any IBM compatible microcomputers. Eltran2 has then been modified into a two-dimensional program called Eltran3. Using Eltran2 and Eltran3, different source distributions and the hot particle dose have been studied. It has been found that the VARSKIN code overestimates the skin dose from hot particles by about 10 to 40% in comparison with Eltran3 calculations, because the VARSKIN code is based on the data tables for an unbounded medium. An ion-implanted silicon detector was selected because of its small size, high sensitivity, and low leakage current. To cover a wide range of dose rate, both the pulse and current mode operations of the silicon detector were used, with an overlap of one order of magnitude in the measurable dose rate ranges. By using a gradient shield of about 7 mg/cm 2 on the detector, dose gradient measurements have been performed. Five 60 Co hot particles received from GPU Nuclear Corporation have been measured by the silicon detector and the measurements agreed well with Eltran3 calculations. In the pulse mode, variation of the depletion depth of the silicon detector due to the changes of bias voltage was confirmed. Based on this research, a prototype beta skin dose monitor has been constructed. The device includes an 8-bit analogue-to-digital converter and a Z-80 microprocessor with a machine-coded program, to calculate the skin dose

  20. An automatic monitoring system of leak current for testing TGC detectors based on LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Cunfeng; Lu Taiguo; Yan Zhen; Wang Suojie; Zhu Chengguang; Sun Yansheng; He Mao

    2005-01-01

    An automatic monitoring system of leak current for testing TGC detectors with high voltage was set up by using the graphic LabVIEW platform and NI 4351 data acquisition card. The leak current was automatically monitored and recorded with this system, the time and the value of the leak current were showed instantly. Good efficiency and precision of monitoring were obtained. (authors)

  1. The CMS ECAL database services for detector control and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcidiacono, Roberta; Marone, Matteo; Badgett, William

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we give a description of the database services for the control and monitoring of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC. After a general description of the software infrastructure, we present the organization of the tables in the database, that has been designed in order to simplify the development of software interfaces. This feature is achieved including in the database the description of each relevant table. We also give some estimation about the final size and performance of the system.

  2. Emerging technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Leong; Mohseni, Hooman

    2018-01-01

    Infrared photodetectors (IRPDs) have become important devices in various applications such as night vision, military missile tracking, medical imaging, industry defect imaging, environmental sensing, and exoplanet exploration. Mature semiconductor technologies such as mercury cadmium telluride and III-V material-based photodetectors have been dominating the industry. However, in the last few decades, significant funding and research has been focused to improve the performance of IRPDs such as lowering the fabrication cost, simplifying the fabrication processes, increasing the production yield, and increasing the operating temperature by making use of advances in nanofabrication and nanotechnology. We will first review the nanomaterial with suitable electronic and mechanical properties, such as two-dimensional material, graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and metal oxides. We compare these with more traditional low-dimensional material such as quantum well, quantum dot, quantum dot in well, semiconductor superlattice, nanowires, nanotube, and colloid quantum dot. We will also review the nanostructures used for enhanced light-matter interaction to boost the IRPD sensitivity. These include nanostructured antireflection coatings, optical antennas, plasmonic, and metamaterials.

  3. Emerging technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chee Leong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared photodetectors (IRPDs have become important devices in various applications such as night vision, military missile tracking, medical imaging, industry defect imaging, environmental sensing, and exoplanet exploration. Mature semiconductor technologies such as mercury cadmium telluride and III–V material-based photodetectors have been dominating the industry. However, in the last few decades, significant funding and research has been focused to improve the performance of IRPDs such as lowering the fabrication cost, simplifying the fabrication processes, increasing the production yield, and increasing the operating temperature by making use of advances in nanofabrication and nanotechnology. We will first review the nanomaterial with suitable electronic and mechanical properties, such as two-dimensional material, graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and metal oxides. We compare these with more traditional low-dimensional material such as quantum well, quantum dot, quantum dot in well, semiconductor superlattice, nanowires, nanotube, and colloid quantum dot. We will also review the nanostructures used for enhanced light-matter interaction to boost the IRPD sensitivity. These include nanostructured antireflection coatings, optical antennas, plasmonic, and metamaterials.

  4. Development of neutron-monitor detectors applicable for energies up to 100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Kim, Eunjoo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakamura, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    For the purpose of monitoring of neutron doses in high energy accelerator facilities, we have been developing neutron detectors which are applicable for neutron energies up to 100 MeV. The present paper reports characteristics of a phoswitch-type neutron detector which is composed of a liquid organic scintillator and {sup 6}Li+ZnS(Ag) sheets. (author)

  5. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  6. Solid state detectors for neutron radiation monitoring in fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Ros, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to summarize the main solid state based detectors proposed for neutron diagnostic in fusion applications and their applicability under the required harsh conditions in terms of intense radiation, high temperature and available space restrictions. Activation systems, semiconductor based detectors, luminescent materials and Cerenkov fibre optics sensors (C-FOS) are the main devices that are described. - Highlights: • A state-of-the-art summary of solid state based detectors are described. • Conditions and restrictions for their applicability are described. • A list of the 38 more relevant references has been included

  7. Performance of the ATLAS detector using first collision data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aad, G.; et al., [Unknown; Bentvelsen, S.; Colijn, A.P.; de Jong, P.; Doxiadis, A.; Garitaonandia, H.; Gosselink, M.; Kayl, M.S.; Koffeman, E.; Lee, H.; Mechnich, J.; Mussche, I.; Ottersbach, J.P.; Rijpstra, M.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Tsiakiris, M.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vreeswijk, M.

    2010-01-01

    More than half a million minimum-bias events of LHC collision data were collected by the ATLAS experiment in December 2009 at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 TeV and 2.36 TeV. This paper reports on studies of the initial performance of the ATLAS detector from these data. Comparisons between data and

  8. Performance of the E771 RPC muon detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldi, G.; Creti, P.; Elia, V.; Fiore, G.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pinto, C.; Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P.; Corti, G.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of resistive plate counters, equipped with pad readout instead of strips, has been successfully used for the first time in a high rate environment. The performance of the muon detector of E771, based on this technique, is illustrated in detail, including the dependence of the efficiency on the local rate of incident particles. (orig.)

  9. Performance of the CDF Silicon VerteX detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, O.

    1992-11-01

    The current status of the online and offline performance of the CDF Silicon VerteX detector is presented. So far, at low radiation dose, the device delivers good quality data. After the latest alignment using collision data, a spatial resolution of 13 pm is achieved in the transverse plane, demonstrating that CDF has a powerful tool to detect b decay vertices

  10. Fast beam condition monitor for CMS. Performance and upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Jessica L.; Bell, Alan; Burtowy, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The CMS beam and radiation monitoring subsystem BCM1F (Fast Beam Condition Monitor) consists of 8 individual diamond sensors situated around the beam pipe within the pixel detector volume, for the purpose of fast bunch-by-bunch monitoring of beam background and collision products. In addition, effort is ongoing to use BCM1F as an online luminosity monitor. BCM1F will be running whenever there is beam in LHC, and its data acquisition is independent from the data acquisition of the CMS detector, hence it delivers luminosity even when CMS is not taking data. A report is given on the performance of BCM1F during LHC run I, including results of the van der Meer scan and on-line luminosity monitoring done in 2012. In order to match the requirements due to higher luminosity and 25 ns bunch spacing, several changes to the system must be implemented during the upcoming shutdown, including upgraded electronics and precise gain monitoring. First results from Run II preparation are shown.

  11. Fast Beam Condition Monitor for CMS: performance and upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00009152; Bell, Alan; Burtowy, Piotr; Dabrowski, Anne; Hempel, Maria; Henschel, Hans; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Odell, Nathaniel; Penno, Marek; Pollack, Brian; Przyborowski, Dominik; Ryjov, Vladimir; Stickland, David; Walsh, Roberval; Warzycha, Weronika; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka

    2014-11-21

    The CMS beam and radiation monitoring subsystem BCM1F (Fast Beam Condition Monitor) consists of 8 individual diamond sensors situated around the beam pipe within the pixel detector volume, for the purpose of fast bunch-by-bunch monitoring of beam background and collision products. In addition, effort is ongoing to use BCM1F as an online luminosity monitor. BCM1F will be running whenever there is beam in LHC, and its data acquisition is independent from the data acquisition of the CMS detector, hence it delivers luminosity even when CMS is not taking data. A report is given on the performance of BCM1F during LHC run I, including results of the van der Meer scan and on-line luminosity monitoring done in 2012. In order to match the requirements due to higher luminosity and 25 ns bunch spacing, several changes to the system must be implemented during the upcoming shutdown, including upgraded electronics and precise gain monitoring. First results from Run II preparation are shown.

  12. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  13. Design and Performance of the CMS Pixel Detector Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Kästli, H C; Erdmann, W; Hörmann, C; Horisberger, R P; Kotlinski, D; Meier, B; Hoermann, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The readout chip for the CMS pixel detector has to deal with an enormous data rate. On-chip zero suppression is inevitable and hit data must be buffered locally during the latency of the first level trigger. Dead-time must be kept at a minimum. It is dominated by contributions coming from the readout. To keep it low an analog readout scheme has been adopted where pixel addresses are analog coded. We present the architecture of the final CMS pixel detector readout chip with special emphasis on the analog readout chain. Measurements of its performance are discussed.

  14. Performance evaluation of PFBR wire type sodium leak detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, G.; Rajan, K.K.; Nashine, B.K.; Chandramouli, S.; Madhusoodanan, K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Performance evaluation of wire type leak detectors was conducted in LEENA facility by creating sodium leaks. → The lowest leak rate of 214 g/h was detected in 50 min and the highest detection time was 6 h for a leak rate of 222 g/h. → Factors affecting the leak detection time are packing density of thermal insulation, layout of heater, temperature, etc. → Relationship between leak rate and detection time was established and a leak rate of 100 g/h is likely to be detected in 11.1 h. → Contact resistance of leaked sodium increased to 3.5 kilo ohms in 20 h. - Abstract: Wire type leak detectors working on conductivity principle are used for detecting sodium leak in the secondary sodium circuits of fast breeder reactors. It is required to assess the performance of these detectors and confirm that they are meeting the requirements. A test facility by name LEENA was constructed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam to test the wire type leak detector lay out by simulating different sodium leak rates. This test facility consists of a sodium dump tank, a test vessel, interconnecting pipelines with valves, micro filter and test section with leak simulators. There are three different test sections in the test set up of length 1000 mm each. These test sections simulate piping of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) secondary circuit and the wire type leak detector layout in full scale. All test sections are provided with leak simulators. A leak simulator consists of a hole of size one mm drilled in the test section and closed with a tapered pin. The tapered pin position in the hole is adjusted by a screw mechanism and there by the annular gap of flow area is varied for getting different leak rates. Various experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the leak detectors by creating different sodium leak rates. This paper deals with the details of wire type leak detector layout for the secondary sodium circuit of

  15. Operation, optimisation, and performance of the DELPHI RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Battaglia, Marco; Bloch, D; Boudinov, E; Brunet, J M; Carrié, P; Cavalli, P; Christophel, E; Davenport, M; Dracos, M; Eklund, L; Erzen, B; Fischer, P A; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Gracco, Valerio; Hallgren, A; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P M; Lenzen, G; Liko, D; Mahon, J R; Maltezos, S; Markou, A; Neufeld, N; Nielsen, B S; Petrolini, A; Podobnik, T; Polok, G; Sajot, G; Sannino, M; Schyns, E; Strub, R; Tegenfeldt, F; Thadome, J; Tristram, G; Ullaland, O; Vulpen, I V

    1999-01-01

    The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of DELPHI represent a large-scale particle identification system which covers almost the full angular acceptance of DELPHI. The combination of liquid and gas radiators (C sub 4 F sub 1 sub 0 , C sub 5 F sub 1 sub 2 , and C sub 6 F sub 1 sub 4) provides particle identification over the whole secondary particle momentum spectrum at LEP I and LEP II. Continuing optimisation on the hardware as well as on the online and offline software level have resulted in a stable operation of the complete detector system for more than five years at full physics performance.

  16. Influence of Cell Phone Waves on the Performance of HPGe Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.A.; Hassan, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Hand phone mobile waves search systems, constructed with high resolution germanium (HPGe) detectors, are currently being installed at locations worldwide. This reflects a general desire for improved performance and a reduction in the time to make a good decision in interdiction cases. An integrated gamma-ray spectrometer, incorporating a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector, digital signal processing electronics, MCA, and communications has been developed to meet the detection and environmental needs of these systems. The HPGe detectors are designed to have good low- and medium-energy detection efficiency and excellent spectral peak resolution in order to eliminate peak overlaps and thereby remove problems by common industrial and medical radionuclides found in all types of hand phone mobile. Systems using detectors with inferior resolution, regardless of efficiency, are unable to separate the radiation signals from NORM and illicit nuclides. The absolute full-energy peak efficiency of the detector and background count-rate in the peak energy region determine the signal-to-noise ratio. Measurements presented show the impact of shielding and masking on the performance of the hand phone mobile. The results illustrate applicability of the design to a variety of monitoring situations for the detection of illicit material. In the present work we studied the effects of different types of hand phone waves on the performance of 70% HPGe X and Gamma-ray detector. The detected interference has an energy range 30-100 keV. A correction battues was estimated as a function of time verses cell phone type.The measurement quality of the measurer gamma-spectra can be corrected at low X-ray region. The effect of these waves was also studied on the performance of the main detector amplifier. The results were obtained for Etesalat, Vodafone and Mobinile stations. The introduced method can be simulated for other devices having the same interference effect.

  17. Assessment of an Anomaly Detector for Jet Engine Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Borguet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimation is considered as an appropriate solution to this deficiency. This paper reports the evaluation of the detection capability of an adaptive diagnosis tool on the basis of simulated scenarios that may be encountered during the operation of a commercial turbofan engine. The diagnosis tool combines a Kalman filter and a secondary system that monitors the residuals. This auxiliary component implements a generalised likelihood ratio test in order to detect abrupt events.

  18. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-01-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr 3 ) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr 3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R 2 =0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant

  19. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ye [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Tang, Xiao-Bin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-10-11

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr{sub 3} detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R{sup 2}=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant.

  20. Performance of BEGe detectors for GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    After the end of the data-taking for GERDA Phase I, the apparatus has been upgraded to fulfill the requirements of the second phase. Phase II sensitivity will be driven by 30 custom made BEGe detectors. This detectors are now available and can be operated in phaseII configuration in the GERDA cryostat together with the liquid argon scintillation veto. The performances of BEGe detectors in liquid argon are presented in this talk. Besides the spectroscopy capability, the focus will be placed on the expectations in terms of background rejection via pulse shape discrimination (PSD). In particular the main goal the BEGe's pulse shape analysis is to discriminate surface events produced by beta emitters (e.g. {sup 42}K) present in the liquid Ar.

  1. The design and performance of the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, A. [Bologna Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN Bologna (Italy); Brock, I.; Goers, S. [Bonn Univ. (DE). Physikalisches Institut] (and others)

    2007-08-15

    In order to extend the tracking acceptance, to improve the primary and secondary vertex reconstruction and thus enhancing the tagging capabilities for short lived particles, the ZEUS experiment at the HERA Collider at DESY installed a silicon strip vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector is a 63 cm long cylinder with silicon sensors arranged around an elliptical beampipe. The forward part consists of four circular shaped disks. In total just over 200k channels are read out using 2.9 m{sup 2} of silicon. In this report a detailed overview of the design and construction of the detector is given and the performance of the completed system is reviewed. (orig.)

  2. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 GeV/ c in p-Pb collisions and the resolution at high transverse momentum improves by about 40% when including the TRD information in track reconstruction. The triggering capability is demonstrated both for jet, light nuclei, and electron selection.

  3. Performance of the CMS Phase 1 Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akgun, Bora

    2018-01-01

    It is anticipated that the LHC accelerator will reach and exceed the luminosity of L = 2$\\times$10$^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ during the LHC Run 2 period until 2023. At this higher luminosity and increased hit occupancies the CMS phase-0 pixel detector would have been subjected to severe dead time and inefficiencies introduced by limited buffers in the analog read-out chip and effects of radiation damage in the sensors. Therefore a new pixel detector has been built and replaced the phase-0 detector in the 2016/17 LHC extended year-end technical stop. The CMS phase-1 pixel detector features four central barrel layers and three end-cap disks in forward and backward direction for robust tracking performance, and a significantly reduced overall material budget including new cooling and powering schemes. The design of the new front-end readout chip comprises larger data buffers, an increased transmission bandwidth, and low-threshold comparators. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve t...

  4. Study of the performance of Micromegas detectors in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222923; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) detectors have been chosen by the ATLAS collaboration at LHC for the high luminosity upgrade, due to their capability to maintain full efficiency and high spatial resolution at high occupancy, for tracking muons in the forward region of the detector. The Inner Muon Station, in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW), will be composed of micromegas detectors that will have to maintain good performance in the presence of magnetic field of up to about 0.3 T. The response of micromegas detectors is affected by the magnetic field, where the deflection of the drift electrons is described by the Lorentz angle, resulting in a bias in the reconstructed track position. Several test-beam campaigns have been performed to test the behaviour of small size resistive micromegas prototypes ($10 \\times 10 \\text{cm}^2$) in magnetic fields up to 1 T, using high momentum muon and hadron beams at CERN. These studies are performed in order to validate the cap...

  5. Performance and quality control of Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro; Da Silva, Jose C.; Trindade, Andreia; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a dedicated PET scanner for breast and axilla cancer diagnosis, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The camera consists of two planar detector heads with active dimensions 16.0x14.5 cm 2 . Each head has 96 Clear-PEM detector modules consisting of 32 LYSO:Ce pixels with dimensions 2x2x20 mm 3 packed in a 4x8 BaSO 4 reflector matrix compressed between two Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays in a double-readout configuration for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) determination. The modules are individually measured and characterized before being grouped into Supermodules (comprised of 24 modules). Measured properties include photo-peak position, relative gain dispersion, energy resolution, cross-talk and DoI resolution. Optical inspection of matrices was also performed with the aid of a microscope, to search for pixel misalignments and matrix defects. Modules' performance was thoroughly evaluated with a 511 keV collimated beam to exactly determine DoI resolution. In addition, a fast quality control (QC) procedure using flood irradiations from a 137 Cs source was applied systematically. The overall performance of the 24 detector modules complies with the design goals of the Clear-PEM detector, showing energy resolution around 15%, DoI resolution of about 2 mm and gain dispersion among pixels of 15%

  6. Performance characteristics of CdTe drift ring detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Veeramani, P.; Kazemi, S.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2014-03-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe material is an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high energy X-ray spectroscopic detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The main material limitation is associated with the poor charge transport properties of holes. The motivation of this work is to investigate the performance characteristics of a detector fabricated with a drift ring geometry that is insensitive to the transport of holes. The performance of a prototype Ohmic CdTe drift ring detector fabricated by Acrorad with 3 drift rings is reported; measurements include room temperature current voltage characteristics (IV) and spectroscopic performance. The data shows that the energy resolution of the detector is limited by leakage current which is a combination of bulk and surface leakage currents. The energy resolution was studied as a function of incident X-ray position with an X-ray microbeam at the Diamond Light Source. Different ring biasing schemes were investigated and the results show that by increasing the lateral field (i.e. the bias gradient across the rings) the active area, evaluated by the detected count rate, increased significantly.

  7. The time-of-flight TOFW detector of the HARP experiment: construction and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Barichello, G.; Bobisut, F.; Bonesini, M.; De Min, A.; Ferri, A.F.; Gibin, D.; Guglielmi, A.; Laveder, M.; Menegolli, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Paganoni, M.; Paleari, F.; Pepato, A.; Tonazzo, A.; Vascon, M.

    2004-01-01

    The construction and performance of a large area scintillator-based time-of-flight detector for the HARP experiment at CERN are reported. An intrinsic counter time resolution of ∼160 ps was achieved. The precision on the time calibration and monitoring of the detector was maintained at better than 100 ps by using dedicated cosmic rays runs, a fast laser-based system and calibrations with beam particles. The detector was operated on the T9 PS beamline during 2001 and 2002. A time-of-flight resolution of ∼200 ps was obtained, providing π/p discrimination at more than 3σ up to 4.0 GeV/c momentum

  8. LHCb detector and trigger performance in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Dordei

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of b- and c- hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events into two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  9. Scintillating fiber detector performance, detector geometries, trigger, and electronics issues for scintillating fiber tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbaugh, A.E.

    1994-06-01

    Scintillating Fiber tracking technology has made great advances and has demonstrated great potential for high speed charged particle tracking and triggering. The small detector sizes and fast scintillation fluors available make them very promising for use at high luminosity experiments at today's and tomorrow's colliding and fixed target experiments where high rate capability is essential. This talk will discuss the current state of Scintillating fiber performance and current Visual Light Photon Counter (VLPC) characteristics. The primary topic will be some of the system design and integration issues which should be considered by anyone attempting to design a scintillating fiber tracking system which includes a high speed tracking trigger. Design. constraints placed upon the detector system by the electronics and mechanical sub-systems will be discussed. Seemingly simple and unrelated decisions can have far reaching effects on overall system performance. SDC and DO example system designs will be discussed

  10. Design and performance of vacuum capable detector electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, R.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Funk, L.L.; Clonts, L.G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors. The eight tube assembly requires 10 W of power and can be controlled via digital communication links. The electronics can be used without modification in vacuum. Using a transimpedance amplifier and gated integration, we achieve a highly linear system with coefficient of determinations of 0.9999 or better. Typical resolution is one percent of tube length.

  11. Design and performance of vacuum capable detector electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, R.A., E-mail: riedelra@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Cooper, R.G.; Funk, L.L.; Clonts, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We describe the design and performance of electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors. The eight tube assembly requires 10 W of power and can be controlled via digital communication links. The electronics can be used without modification in vacuum. Using a transimpedance amplifier and gated integration, we achieve a highly linear system with coefficient of determinations of 0.9999 or better. Typical resolution is one percent of tube length.

  12. Performance, operation and detector studies with the ATLAS Resistive Plate Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aielli, G; Bindi, M; Polini, A

    2013-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers provide the barrel region of the ATLAS detector with an independent muon trigger and a two-coordinate measurement. The chambers, arranged in three concentric double layers, are operated in a strong magnetic toroidal field and cover a surface area of about 4000 m 2 . During 2011 the LHC has provided proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV in the center-of-mass frame with a steady increase in instantaneous luminosity, summing up to about 5 fb −1 . The operational experience for this running period is presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of luminosity, environmental conditions and working point settings. Non-event based information including in particular the large number of gas gap currents, individually monitored with nA accuracy, have been used to study the detector behavior with growing luminosity and beam currents. These data are shown to provide, when calibrated, an independent luminosity measurement and a crucial handle for understanding the ATLAS backgrounds well beyond the scope of muon triggering and detection. The measurements presented here allow to plan a strategy for the data taking in the next years and make some predictions about the detector performance at higher luminosities. They also improve the knowledge on RPC detector physics.

  13. Recent operational performance of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsimon, R.J.; Flower, P.S.; Freeston, K.A.

    1985-10-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the Time Projection chambers (TPCs) of the Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH). Details are given of the TPC high voltage system and its monitoring and control. In addition, the operation and monitoring of the readout is described together with results of tests on the performance of the front end amplifiers. The operation of the RICH TPCs and electronics during the first data run of WA69, in 1984, is discussed together with relevant results from laboratory tests. Results from the preliminary analysis of a sample of data from the 1984 run are also presented

  14. A resonant beam detector for TEVATRON tune monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.; Fellenz, B.; Hood, C.; Johnson, M.; Shafer, R.; Siemann, R.; Zurawski, J.

    1989-03-01

    An inductively resonated, balanced stripline pickup has been constructed for observing tune spectra. The device is a sensitive betatron oscillation and Schottky noise pickup, providing 25 dB gain over untuned detectors of like geometry. The electrodes are motorized so the device center and aperture may be remotely adjusted. To tune the resonator onto the 21.4 MHz operating frequency, a motorized capacitor is employed. Quadrature signals from a pair of detectors has enabled observation of individual p and p coherent motions to nanometer levels. 8 refs., 5 figs

  15. Development of an area monitor for neutrons using solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    An area monitor for neutrons composed of the solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) Makrofol DE, together with a (n,α) converter, in the center of a 25 cm diameter polyethylene sphere, is developed. The optimal electrochemical etching conditions for the detection of thermal neutrons by the Makrofol DE using the BN converter are studied, leading to the choice of 55 min, at 30 0 C, under a 44,2 kV.cm -1 electric field with oscillation frequency of 2,0 khz. The response of this system to thermal neutrons, in the optimal conditions, is of 2,76(10)x 10 -3 tr/n. Changing from the BN converter to a 2,73(3)g compressed boric acid tablet this value lowers to 3,88(17)x 10 -4 tr/n. The performance of the whole monitor in the detection of fast neutrons is examined using the BN converter and neutrons from a 241 Am Be source, with a response of 4,4(2)x 10 3 tr.mSv -1 .cm -2 and operational limits between 7(3)μSv and 5,6(2)mSv. The result of the monitoring of the control room of the IPEN Cyclotron accelerator are also presented as a final test for the viability of the practical use of the monitor. (author). 34 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs, 1 app

  16. Optimization of the thermal performances of the Alpine Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhan; Di Ciaccio, Lucia

    The ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) detector is the largest detector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). One of the most important goals of ATLAS was to search for the missing piece of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson that had been found in 2012. In order to keep looking for the unknowns, it is planned to upgrade the LHC. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is a novel configuration of the accelerator, aiming at increasing the luminosity by a factor five or more above the nominal LHC design. In parallel with the accelerator upgrade also the ATLAS will be upgraded to cope with detector aging and to achieve the same or better performance under increased event rate and radiation dose expected at the HL-LHC. This thesis discusses a novel design for the ATLAS Pixel Detector called the "Alpine" layout for the HL-LHC. To support this design, a local support structure is proposed, optimized and tested with an advanced CO2 evaporative cooling system. A numerical program called “CoBra” simulating the twophase heat ...

  17. Monitoring of spent nuclear fuel with antineutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran

    2017-09-01

    We put forward the possibility of employing antineutrino detectors in order to control the amounts of spent nuclear fuel in repositories or, alternatively, to precisely localize the underground sources of nuclear material. For instance, we discuss the applicability in determining a possible leakage of stored nuclear material which would aid in preventing environmental problems. The long-term storage facilities are also addressed.

  18. Improved network monitoring using UTC detector data 'RAID'

    OpenAIRE

    Cherrett, Tom; Waterson, Ben; McDonald, Mike; Clarke, Russell; Bangert, Alex; Morris, Ray

    2002-01-01

    As part of the 5th Framework PRIME project1 (Prediction Of Congestion And Incidents In Real Time, For Intelligent Incident Management And Emergency Traffic Management), a new incident detection algorithm has been developed using the 250-ms digital data produced by UTC detectors. The contributors to this part of the project were the University of Southampton, Southampton City Council and Siemens Traffic Controls.

  19. On analyzing colour constancy approach for improving SURF detector performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkiey, Mohd Asyraf; Zaki, Wan Mimi Diyana Wan; Hussain, Aini; Mustafa, Mohd. Marzuki

    2012-04-01

    Robust key point detector plays a crucial role in obtaining a good tracking feature. The main challenge in outdoor tracking is the illumination change due to various reasons such as weather fluctuation and occlusion. This paper approaches the illumination change problem by transforming the input image through colour constancy algorithm before applying the SURF detector. Masked grey world approach is chosen because of its ability to perform well under local as well as global illumination change. Every image is transformed to imitate the canonical illuminant and Gaussian distribution is used to model the global change. The simulation results show that the average number of detected key points have increased by 69.92%. Moreover, the average of improved performance cases far out weight the degradation case where the former is improved by 215.23%. The approach is suitable for tracking implementation where sudden illumination occurs frequently and robust key point detection is needed.

  20. Analysis of the performance capability of an infrared interior intrusion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Component performances are required by the LLL assessment procedure for material control and accounting (MC and A) systems. Monitors are an example of an MC and A component whose functions are to process measurements or observations for purposes of detecting abnormalities. This report develops a methodology for characterizing the performance of a class of infrared (IR) interior intrusion monitors or detectors. The methodology is developed around a specific commercial IR detector, the InfrAlarm, manufactured by Barnes Engineering Company (Models 19-124 and 19-115A). Statistical detection models for computing probabilities of detection and false alarms were derived, and the performance capability of the InfrAlarm IR detector was shown using these measures. The results obtained in the performance analysis show that the detection capability of the InfrAlarm is excellent (approx. 1), with very low false alarm rates, for a wide range in target characteristics. These results should be representative and particularly for non-hostile environments

  1. Muon reconstruction performance of the ATLAS detector in 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Marchese, Luigi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Muons are of key importance to study some of the most interesting physics topics at the LHC. We show the status of the performance of the muon reconstruction in the analysis of proton-proton collisions at the LHC, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2016. Reconstruction efficiency and momentum resolution have been measured using "$J/\\psi$" and "$Z$" decays for different classes of reconstructed muons.

  2. The performance and development of the ATLAS Inner Detector Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washbrook, A

    2014-01-01

    A description of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) software trigger algorithms and the performance of the ID trigger for LHC Run 1 are presented, as well as prospects for a redesign of the tracking algorithms in Run 2. The ID trigger HLT algorithms are essential for a large number of signatures within the ATLAS trigger. During the shutdown, modifications are being made to the LHC machine, to increase both the beam energy and luminosity. This in turn poses significant challenges for the trigger algorithms both in terms of execution time and physics performance. To meet these challenges the ATLAS HLT software is being restructured to run as a single stage rather than in the two distinct levels present during the Run 1 operation. This is allowing the tracking algorithms to be redesigned to make optimal use of the CPU resources available and to integrate new detector systems being added to ATLAS for post-shutdown running. Expected future improvements in the timing and efficiencies of the Inner Detector triggers are also discussed. In addition, potential improvements in the algorithm performance resulting from the additional spacepoint information from the new Insertable B-Layer are presented

  3. Performance Monitoring Applied to System Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertille Somon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, automation is present in every aspect of our daily life and has some benefits. Nonetheless, empirical data suggest that traditional automation has many negative performance and safety consequences as it changed task performers into task supervisors. In this context, we propose to use recent insights into the anatomical and neurophysiological substrates of action monitoring in humans, to help further characterize performance monitoring during system supervision. Error monitoring is critical for humans to learn from the consequences of their actions. A wide variety of studies have shown that the error monitoring system is involved not only in our own errors, but also in the errors of others. We hypothesize that the neurobiological correlates of the self-performance monitoring activity can be applied to system supervision. At a larger scale, a better understanding of system supervision may allow its negative effects to be anticipated or even countered. This review is divided into three main parts. First, we assess the neurophysiological correlates of self-performance monitoring and their characteristics during error execution. Then, we extend these results to include performance monitoring and error observation of others or of systems. Finally, we provide further directions in the study of system supervision and assess the limits preventing us from studying a well-known phenomenon: the Out-Of-the-Loop (OOL performance problem.

  4. Study of the performance of Micromegas detectors in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios, Sampsonidis

    2018-02-01

    Resistive Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) detectors have been chosen by the ATLAS collaboration at LHC for the high luminosity upgrade, due to their capability to maintain full efficiency and high spatial resolution at high occupancy, for tracking muons in the forward region of the detector. The Inner Muon Station, in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW), will be composed of micromegas detectors that will have to maintain good performance in the presence of magnetic field of up to about 0.3 T. The response of micromegas detectors is affected by the magnetic field, where the deflection of the drift electrons is described by the Lorentz angle, resulting in a bias in the reconstructed track position. Several test-beam campaigns have been performed to test the behaviour of small size resistive micromegas prototypes (10×10 cm2) in magnetic fields up to 1 T, using high momentum muon and hadron beams at CERN. These studies are performed in order to validate the capability of the chambers to provide unbiased tracks in the NSW conditions. Measurements of the Lorentz angle and drift velocity as a function of the magnetic field are presented and both are compared to expectations based on Garfield-Magboltz simulations. Several methods to correct the position bias are applied, based on the chamber configuration or on the knowledge of the local value of the magnetic field. The results of these studies are presented together with an overall discussion of the Micromegas tracking capability in magnetic field.

  5. Study of the performance of Micromegas detectors in magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Sampsonidis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistive Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure detectors have been chosen by the ATLAS collaboration at LHC for the high luminosity upgrade, due to their capability to maintain full efficiency and high spatial resolution at high occupancy, for tracking muons in the forward region of the detector. The Inner Muon Station, in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW, will be composed of micromegas detectors that will have to maintain good performance in the presence of magnetic field of up to about 0.3 T. The response of micromegas detectors is affected by the magnetic field, where the deflection of the drift electrons is described by the Lorentz angle, resulting in a bias in the reconstructed track position. Several test-beam campaigns have been performed to test the behaviour of small size resistive micromegas prototypes (10×10 cm2 in magnetic fields up to 1 T, using high momentum muon and hadron beams at CERN. These studies are performed in order to validate the capability of the chambers to provide unbiased tracks in the NSW conditions. Measurements of the Lorentz angle and drift velocity as a function of the magnetic field are presented and both are compared to expectations based on Garfield-Magboltz simulations. Several methods to correct the position bias are applied, based on the chamber configuration or on the knowledge of the local value of the magnetic field. The results of these studies are presented together with an overall discussion of the Micromegas tracking capability in magnetic field.

  6. Development and operational performance of a single calibration chamber for radon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Coto, I.; Bolivar, J.P.; Mas, J.L.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vargas, A.

    2007-01-01

    This work shows the design, setup and performance of a new single radon detector calibration chamber developed at the University of Huelva (Environmental Radioactivity Group). This system is based on a certified radon source and a traceable reference radon detector, which allows radon concentrations inside the chamber radon to be obtained in steady-state conditions within a range of 400-22 000 Bq m -3 with associated uncertainties in the range of 4%. In addition, the development of a new ad hoc calibration protocol (UHU-RC/01/06 'Rachel'), which is based on the modelling of radon concentration within the chamber, allows it to be used without the reference detector. To do that, a complete characterization and calibration of the different leakage constants and the flow meter reading have been performed. The accuracy and general performance of both working methods for the same chamber (i.e., with and without the reference detector) have been tested by means of their participation in an intercomparison exercise involving five active radon monitors

  7. Long-term performance of the CANDU-type of vanadium self-powered neutron detectors in NRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: leungt@aecl.ca

    2007-07-01

    The CANDU-type of in-core vanadium self-powered neutron flux detectors have been installed in NRU to monitor the axial neutron flux distributions adjacent to the loop fuel test sites since 1996. This paper describes how the thermal neutron fluxes were measured at two monitoring sites, and presents a method of correcting the vanadium burn-up effect, which can be up to 2 to 3% per year, depending on the detector locations in the reactor. It also presents the results of measurements from neutron flux detectors that have operated for over eight-years in NRU. There is good agreement between the measured and simulated neutron fluxes, to within {+-} 6.5%, and the long-term performance of the CANDU-type of vanadium neutron flux detectors in NRU is satisfactory. (author)

  8. Monitoring on board spacecraft by means of passive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozova, I.; Brabcova, K.; Spurny, F.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Kartsev, I. S.; Tolochek, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the radiation risk of astronauts during space missions, it is necessary to measure dose characteristics in various compartments of the spacecraft; this knowledge can be further used for estimating the health hazard in planned missions. This contribution presents results obtained during several missions on board the International Space Station (ISS) during 2005-09. A combination of thermoluminescent and plastic nuclear track detectors was used to measure the absorbed dose and dose equivalent. These passive detectors have several advantages, especially small dimensions, which enabled their placement at various locations in different compartments inside the ISS or inside the phantom. Variation of dosimetric quantities with the phase of the solar cycle and the position inside the ISS is discussed. (authors)

  9. Data displays for multi-detector monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.C.M.

    1978-03-01

    Extensive installations of sensors are used for environmental surveillance of radiological hazards, fire, etc. The data from such arrays of detectors can be collected by data processing systems which generate appropriate supervisory displays and records. This paper reviews facilities and physical configurations of computer-based display systems, with particular reference to radiological protection schemes. The general principles are relevant to other fields of application. (author)

  10. Development of a Compact Gamma-ray Detector for a Neural-Network Radiation Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. H.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. H. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Radiation monitoring is very important to secure safety in nuclear-related facilities and against nuclear terrorism. For wide range of radiation monitoring, neutral network system of radiation detection is most efficient way. Thus, a compact radiation detector is useful to install in wide range to be concerned. A compact gamma-ray detector was fabricated by using a CsI(Tl) scintillator, which was matched with the formerly developed PIN photodiode, for a neural network radiation monitoring. At room temperature, the fabricated compact gamma-ray detector demonstrates an energy resolution of 13.3 % for 662 keV 6.9% for 1330 keV. The compactness, the low-voltage power consumption and the physical hardness are very useful features for a neural network radiation monitoring. In this study, characteristics of a fabricated compact gamma-ray detector were presented. An important aspect to consider in a neural-network radiation monitoring such as reaction probability of the fabricated compact detector for angle of incident gamma-ray was also addressed.

  11. Testing and assessment of a large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, E.R. van der; Rigollet, C.; Maleka, P.P.; Jones, D.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/NGD), and other companies, to test their most sensitive system. This paper presents the results of trials in a specially created test facility at UKAEA Harwell with a large BGO detector. The detector's size and weight mean that it would be suitable for vehicle deployment but would be too large and heavy to carry in areas that could not be accessed by a vehicle. However, it would be possible to use the same methodology that is described here with a smaller detector capable of being carried in a backpack, albeit with reduced sensitivity for particle detection. The approach that we present is also applicable, with modifications, to the detection of offshore particles using a towed seabed detector

  12. Report on long range alpha detector (LRAD) performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hirohide; Unno, Motoyoshi; Ishikawa, Hisashi; Yoshida, Tadayoshi

    2002-10-01

    At present, alpha contamination measurement on objects is conducted with ZnS scintillation survey meter (direct method) and smear test (indirect method). But it is difficult to measure large and complicated objects by direct method. Long Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) was produced as a solution for this problem. We carried out performance tests of this LRAD. As a result of the performance tests, we confirmed the linear relation between the measurement values of LRAD and alpha-radioactivity on the surface of objects. (author)

  13. RPC Detector Performance Results for 2016 and 2017

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This note presents the summary of the RPC detector performance during 2017 and the comparison with 2016. A part of the performance results have been obtained with the tracker tracks extrapolation method, explained here. The data driven predictions of the RPC rates and integrated charge to the HL-LHC conditions have been presented as well. The results after the detailed background study of the effect of the newly installed shielding are shown. The history of the efficiency and cluster size vs time and instantaneous luminosity have been presented, as well.

  14. Advanced Modular Software Performance Monitoring

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb software is based on the Gaudi framework, on top of which are built several large and complex software applications. The LHCb experiment is now in the active phase of collecting and analyzing data and significant performance problems arise in the Gaudi based software beginning from High Level Trigger (HLT) programs and ending with data analysis frameworks (DaVinci). It’s not easy to find hot spots in the code - only special tools can help to understand where CPU or memory usage is not reasonable. There exist many performance analyzing tools, but the main problem is that they show reports in terms of class and function names and such information usually is not very useful - the majority of algorithm developers use the Gaudi framework abstractions and usually do not know about functions which lie at the lower level. We will show a new approach which adds to performance reports a higher abstraction level based on knowledge of framework architecture and run-time object properties. A set of profiling to...

  15. Advanced modular software performance monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mazurov, A

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb software is based on the Gaudi framework, on top of which are built several large and complex software applications. As the LHCb experiment is now in the active phase of collecting and analyzing data, performance problems arise in various parts of the software, from the High Level Trigger (HLT) programs to data analysis frameworks. It is not easy to find hotspots in the code - only specialized tools can help to understand where CPU or memory usage are not reasonable. There exist many performance analyzing tools, but the main problem is that they show reports in terms of class and function names and such information usually is not very useful - the majority of algorithm developers use the Gaudi framework abstractions and usually do not know about functions which lie at the lower level. We will show a new approach which adds to performance reports a higher abstraction level based on knowledge of framework architecture and run-time object properties. A set of profiling tools (based on Intel VTune Amplif...

  16. Performance of a thermal imager employing a hybrid pyroelectric detector array with MOSFET readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watton, R.; Mansi, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal imager employing a two-dimensional hybrid array of pyroelectric detectors with MOSFET readout has been built. The design and theoretical performance of the detector are discussed, and the results of performance measurements are presented. 8 references

  17. Silicon PIN diode based electron-gamma coincidence detector system for Noble Gases monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, K; Popov, V Yu; Popov, Yu S

    2017-08-01

    We present a new second generation SiPIN based electron-photon coincidence detector system developed by Lares Ltd. for use in the Noble Gas measurement systems of the International Monitoring System and the On-site Inspection verification regimes of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The SiPIN provide superior energy resolution for electrons. Our work describes the improvements made in the second generation detector cells and the potential use of such detector systems for other applications such as In-Situ Kr-85 measurements for non-proliferation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask and Storage Monitoring with {sup 4}He Scintillation Fast Neutron Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee jun; Kelley, Ryan P; Jordan, Kelly A [Univ. of Florida, Florida (United States); Lee, Wanno [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    With this increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at nuclear plants across S. Korea, the demand exists for building a long-term disposal facility. However, the Korean government first requires a detailed plan for the monitoring and certification of spent fuel. Several techniques have been developed and applied for the purpose of spent fuel monitoring, including the digital Cerenkov viewing device (DCVD), spent fuel attribute tester (SFAT), and FORK detector. Conventional gamma measurement methods, however, suffer from a lack of nuclear data and interfering background radiation. To date, the primary method of neutron detection for spent fuel monitoring has been through the use of thermal neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He and BF{sub 3} proportional counters. Unfolding the neutron spectrum becomes extremely complicated. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, a new fast neutron measurement system is currently being developed at the University of Florida. This system is based on the {sup 4}He scintillation detector invented by Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd. These detectors are a relatively new technological development and take advantage of the high {sup 4}He cross-section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. This novel {sup 4}He scintillation neutron detector is characterized by its low electron density, leading to excellent gamma rejection. This detector also has a fast response time on the order of nanoseconds and most importantly, preserves some neutron energy information since no moderator is required. Additionally, these detectors rely on naturally abundant {sup 4}He as the fill gas. This study proposes a new technique using the neutron spectroscopy features of {sup 4}He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This research will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation

  19. 5 CFR 430.207 - Monitoring performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring performance. 430.207 Section 430.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal for General Schedule, Prevailing Rate, and Certain Other Employees § 430.207...

  20. High-Rate Performance of Muon Drift Tube Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are stud...

  1. Refinement of a thoron insensitive alpha track detector for environmental radon monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Olympic Dam Operations, a Copper/Uranium mine in the north of South Australia, currently monitors environmental radon (Rn 222) concentrations at a total of 17 sites in the area surrounding the mining lease and Roxby Downs township. During 1990 a commercial alpha track radon detector service was replaced with an on-site system resulting in lower costs, greater confidence in detector calibration, and reduction in processing time. Alpha track detectors (ATD's) are placed in triplicate at each of the 17 sites. Flow-through scintillation cell continuous radon monitors are also operated at two of these sites. Comparison of results from the two different types of monitor has raised the question of a possible thoron (Rn 220) contribution in the alpha track detectors. Laboratory experiments revealed that the diffusion membranes used in the ATD's were in fact 'transparent' to thoron. A new membrane was tested which effectively excluded thoron from the detector cup without affecting the sensitivity to radon. Field comparisons of the different membranes revealed that the thoron component was significant. Since there is only a very minor Rn220 emission from the mining operation, it is important that the monitoring be specific only to Rn222, the primary source term. The use of the new membrane will result in more accurate measurements of Rn222. 4 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  2. Design and performance of the focusing DIRC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, B. [University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Borsato, M.; Arnaud, N. [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Leith, D.W.G.S.; Nishimura, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Roberts, D.A. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. (United States); Ratcliff, B.N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Varner, G. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. (United States); Va' vra, J., E-mail: jjv@slac.stanford.edu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present the final results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a full-scale prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment [1], and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage, with partial photodetector and electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope which provided 3D tracking of cosmic muons with an angular resolution of ~1.5 mrad, a position resolution of 4–5 mm, a start time resolution of 70 ps, and muon tracks above ~2 GeV tagged using an iron range stack. The fused silica focusing photon camera was coupled to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and was read out, over part of the full coverage, by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 multi-anode photomultipliers (MaPMTs) providing 768 pixels. We used waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We give a detailed description of our data analysis methods and point out limitations on the present performance. We present results that demonstrate some basic performance characteristics of this design, including (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which primarily consists of ambiguities of the possible photon paths from emission along the track to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOP{sub measured} – TOP{sub expected} resolutions (with TOP being the photon Time-of-Propagation in fused silica), and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds.

  3. A novel straightness measurement system applied to the position monitoring of large Particle Physics Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Goudard, R; Ribeiro, R; Klumb, F

    1999-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, CMS, is one of the two general purpose experiments foreseen to operate at the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The experiment aims to study very high energy collisions of proton beams. Investigation of the most fundamental properties of matter, in particular the study of the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking and the origin of mass, is the experiment scope. The central Tracking System, a six meter long cylinder with 2.4 m diameter, will play a major role in all physics searches of the CMS experiment. Its performance depends upon the intrinsic detector performance, on the stability of the supporting structure and on the overall survey, alignment and position monitoring system. The proposed position monitoring system is based on a novel lens-less laser straightness measurement method able to detect deviations from a nominal position of all structural elements of the Central Tracking system. It is based on the recipr...

  4. Multi-detector environmental radiation monitor with multichannel data communication for Indian Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network (IERMON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.D.; Ratheesh, M.P.; Prakasha, M.S.; Salunkhe, S.S.; Vinod Kumar, A.; Puranik, V.D.; Nair, C.K.G.

    2011-01-01

    A solar powered system for online monitoring of environmental radiation with multiple detectors has been designed, developed and produced. Multiple GM tube detectors have been used to extend the range of measurement from 50 nano Gy/hr to 20 Gy/hr and to enhance the reliability of the system. Online data communication using GSM based and direct LAN based communication has been incorporated. Options for use of power supply from mains powered and battery powered have been enabled. Care has been taken to make it weather-proof, compact, elegant and reliable. The development is a part of the ongoing program of country-wide deployment of radiation monitors under 'Indian Environmental Radiation MOnitoring Network' (IERMON). (author)

  5. Construction and performance of silicon detectors for the small angle spectrometers of the collider detector of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Bellettini, G.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Cervelli, F.; Del Fabbro, R.; Dell'Orso, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Sestini, P.; Stefanini, A.; Tonelli, G.; Zetti, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; Curatolo, M.; Dulach, B.; Esposito, B.; Giromini, P.; Miscetti, S.; Sansoni, A.

    1987-01-01

    The manufacturing process of a series of position sensitive silicon detectors is described together with the tests performed to optimize the performance of the detectors. The detectors are Schottky diodes with strips on the ohmic contact which allow to determine the position of the incoming ionizing particles by charge partition. Four detectors were assembled in a telescope and tested inside the vacuum pipe of the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. The system is a prototype of the Small Angle Silicon Spectrometer, designed primarily to study p-anti p elastic and diffractive cross sections, and is a part of the Collider Detector of Fermilab (CDF). Several tests were performed to check the efficiency and the linearity of response of various regions of the detectors. Scans of the beam halo were also done in high and low β optics to check how close to the beam the detectors could be operated. Finally, the dependence of the detector response on temperature and integrated radiation dose was investigated. (orig.)

  6. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2012-07-24

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU comprises: a plurality of performance counters each for counting signals representing occurrences of events from one or more the plurality of processor units in the multiprocessor system; and, a plurality of input devices for receiving the event signals from one or more processor devices of the plurality of processor units, the plurality of input devices programmable to select event signals for receipt by one or more of the plurality of performance counters for counting, wherein the PMU is shared between multiple processing units, or within a group of processors in the multiprocessing system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  7. Radiation Damage Monitoring in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, S

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to integrated luminosity 5.6 fb$^{-1}$ is presented along with a comparison to the theoretical model.

  8. Electromagnetic noise studies in a silicon strip detector, used as part of a luminosity monitor at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedegaard, T.; Tafjord, H.; Buran, T.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the luminosity monitor SAT in the DELPHI experiment at CERN's Large Electron Positron collider, a tracking detector constructed from silicon strip detector elements was installed in front of an electromagnetic calorimeter. The luminosity was measured by counting the number of Bhabha events at the interaction point of the electron and the positron beams. The tracking detector reconstructs tracks from the interaction point and the calorimeter measures the corresponding particles' energies.The SAT Tracker consists of 504 silicon strip detectors. The strips are DC-coupled to CMOS VLSI-chips, baptized Balder. The chip performs amplification, zero-suppression, digitalisation, and multiplexing. The requirements of good space resolution and high efficiency put strong requirements on noise control. A short description of the geometry and the relevant circuit layout is given. The authors describe the efforts made to minimise the electromagnetic noise in the detector and present some numbers of the noise level using various techniques. 11 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Monitor and control systems for the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Boston Univ., MA; California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA; Cincinnati Univ., OH; Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ; Tohoku Univ., Sendai

    1989-10-01

    To help ensure the stable long-term operation of a Cherenkov Ring Detector at high efficiency, a comprehensive monitor and control system is being developed. This system will continuously monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor of the pressures, flows, mixing, and purity of the various fluids. In addition the velocities and trajectories of Cherenkov photoelectrons drifting within the imaging chambers will be measured using a pulsed uv lamp and a fiberoptic light injection system. 9 refs., 6 figs

  10. Hybrid Modeling Improves Health and Performance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Scientific Monitoring Inc. was awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to create a new, simplified health-monitoring approach for flight vehicles and flight equipment. The project developed a hybrid physical model concept that provided a structured approach to simplifying complex design models for use in health monitoring, allowing the output or performance of the equipment to be compared to what the design models predicted, so that deterioration or impending failure could be detected before there would be an impact on the equipment's operational capability. Based on the original modeling technology, Scientific Monitoring released I-Trend, a commercial health- and performance-monitoring software product named for its intelligent trending, diagnostics, and prognostics capabilities, as part of the company's complete ICEMS (Intelligent Condition-based Equipment Management System) suite of monitoring and advanced alerting software. I-Trend uses the hybrid physical model to better characterize the nature of health or performance alarms that result in "no fault found" false alarms. Additionally, the use of physical principles helps I-Trend identify problems sooner. I-Trend technology is currently in use in several commercial aviation programs, and the U.S. Air Force recently tapped Scientific Monitoring to develop next-generation engine health-management software for monitoring its fleet of jet engines. Scientific Monitoring has continued the original NASA work, this time under a Phase III SBIR contract with a joint NASA-Pratt & Whitney aviation security program on propulsion-controlled aircraft under missile-damaged aircraft conditions.

  11. Nuclear electronic equipment for control and monitoring panel. Specifications and methods for testing radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roguin, Andre.

    1976-02-01

    This document will be of interest to users and makers of neutron and gamma radiations detectors in the field of nuclear reactor control and protection. Information is given which will enable users to optimize their choice and methods of using equipment, and makers to optimize their methods of fabrication. It should also serve as a model from which official specifications, technical instructions and test methods for these detectors, could be established. A detailed description is given of the appropriate parameters, terminology and notations. General specifications, operating conditions and test methods are indicated. The following detectors are studied: in-core detectors: fission ionization chambers, self powered neutron detectors (S.P.N.D.); out-core detectors: boron ionization chambers (for monitoring), boron trifluoride proportional counter tubes, boron lined proportional counter tubes, helium-3 proportional counter tubes. The devices described in the document are intended for industrial radiation monitoring applications and not for calibration standards (dosimetry) or for health physics measurement purposes. They are characterized by their fidelity, fast response, reliability and long lifetimes [fr

  12. Assessment of applicability of portable HPGe detector with in situ object counting system based on performance evaluation of thyroid radiobioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Seok; Kwon, Tae Eun; Pak, Min Jung; Park, Se Young; Ha, Wi Ho; Jin, Young Woo [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Different cases exist in the measurement of thyroid radiobioassays owing to the individual characteristics of the subjects, especially the potential variation in the counting efficiency. An In situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) was developed to perform an efficiency calibration based on the Monte Carlo calculation, as an alternative to conventional calibration methods. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of ISOCS to thyroid radiobioassays by comparison with a conventional thyroid monitoring system. The efficiency calibration of a portable high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was performed using ISOCS software. In contrast, the conventional efficiency calibration, which needed a radioactive material, was applied to a scintillator-based thyroid monitor. Four radioiodine samples that contained 125I and 131I in both aqueous solution and gel forms were measured to evaluate radioactivity in the thyroid. ANSI/HPS N13.30 performance criteria, which included the relative bias, relative precision, and root-mean-squared error, were applied to evaluate the performance of the measurement system. The portable HPGe detector could measure both radioiodines with ISOCS but the thyroid monitor could not measure 125I because of the limited energy resolution of the NaI(Tl) scintillator. The 131I results from both detectors agreed to within 5% with the certified results. Moreover, the 125I results from the portable HPGe detector agreed to within 10% with the certified results. All measurement results complied with the ANSI/HPS N13.30 performance criteria. The results of the intercomparison program indicated the feasibility of applying ISOCS software to direct thyroid radiobioassays. The portable HPGe detector with ISOCS software can provide the convenience of efficiency calibration and higher energy resolution for identifying photopeaks, compared with a conventional thyroid monitor with a NaI(Tl) scintillator. The application of ISOCS software in a radiation

  13. Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2007-06-27

    In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to 3.5% within 7 days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

  14. Development of silicon detectors for Beam Loss Monitoring at HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Zabrodskii, A.; Bogdanov, A.; Shepelev, A.; Dehning, B.; Bartosik, M. R.; Alexopoulos, A.; Glaser, M.; Ravotti, F.; Sapinski, M.; Härkönen, J.; Egorov, N.; Galkin, A.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon detectors were proposed as novel Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) for the control of the radiation environment in the vicinity of the superconductive magnets of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The present work is aimed at enhancing the BLM sensitivity and therefore the capability of triggering the beam abort system before a critical radiation load hits the superconductive coils. We report here the results of three in situ irradiation tests of Si detectors carried out at the CERN PS at 1.9-4.2 K. The main experimental result is that all silicon detectors survived irradiation up to 1.22× 1016 p/cm2. The third test, focused on the detailed characterization of the detectors with standard (300 μm) and reduced (100 μm) thicknesses, showed only a marginal difference in the sensitivity of thinned detectors in the entire fluence range and a smaller rate of signal degradation that promotes their use as BLMs. The irradiation campaigns produced new information on radiation damage and carrier transport in Si detectors irradiated at the temperatures of 1.9-4.2 K. The results were encouraging and permitted to initiate the production of the first BLM prototype modules which were installed at the end of the vessel containing the superconductive coil of a LHC magnet immersed in superfluid helium to be able to test the silicon detectors in real operational conditions.

  15. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  16. A liquid-nitrogen monitor for lithium-drifted germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andeweg, A.H.

    1977-11-01

    An instrument has been developed that makes use of a load cell to monitor the liquid nitrogen in the Dewar flask of a lithium-drifted germaniun detector. The contents are recorded on a chart recorder, and an alarm is sounded when the previously set content has been reached. A signal switches off the high-voltage power supply 30 minutes after the alarm is triggered. The calibration of the load-cell monitor is described in an appendix [af

  17. Destruction of coherence in nondemolition monitoring: quantum 'watchdog effect' in gravity wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurek, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    The author shows that nondemolition monitoring of a Weber bar may prevent changes of the number of phonons, and thus influence the sensitivity of quantum-counting gravity wave detectors. This effect is similar to the Watchdog Effect which is predicted to delay decays of the monitored, unstable quantum system. Relations between watchdog effect and Environment-Induced Superselection Rules as well as its connections to the fundamental questions of the quantum theory of measurement are briefly considered. (Auth.)

  18. Monitoring and control of the muon detector in the L3 experiment at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.

    1990-01-01

    In this report the monitoring system of the muon spectrometer of the L3 detector in LEP at CERN is presented. The system is based on a network of VME's using the OS9 operating system. The design guiding lines and the present system configuration are described both from the hardware and the software point of view. In addition, the report contains the description of the monitored parameters showing typical data collected durintg the first months of LEP operation. (Author)

  19. Performance and perspectives of the diamond based Beam Condition Monitor for beam loss monitoring at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080862

    2015-01-01

    At CMS, a beam loss monitoring system is operated to protect the silicon detectors from high particle rates, arising from intense beam loss events. As detectors, poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are placed around the beam pipe at several locations inside CMS. In case of extremely high detector currents, the LHC beams are automatically extracted from the LHC rings.Diamond is the detector material of choice due to its radiation hardness. Predictions of the detector lifetime were made based on FLUKA monte-carlo simulations and irradiation test results from the RD42 collaboration, which attested no significant radiation damage over several years.During the LHC operational Run1 (2010 â?? 2013), the detector efficiencies were monitored. A signal decrease of about 50 times stronger than expectations was observed in the in-situ radiation environment. Electric field deformations due to charge carriers, trapped in radiation induced lattice defects, are responsible for this signal decrease. This so-called polarizat...

  20. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodnett, M; Zeqiri, B [National Physical Laboratory, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies ({<=} 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  1. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodnett, M; Zeqiri, B

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (≤ 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media

  2. Plant performance monitoring program at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, B.; Kavsek, D.

    2004-01-01

    A high level of nuclear safety and plant reliability results from the complex interaction of a good design, operational safety and human performance. This is the reason for establishing a set of operational plant safety performance indicators, to enable monitoring of both plant performance and progress. Performance indicators are also used for setting challenging targets and goals for improvement, to gain additional perspective on performance relative to other plants and to provide an indication of a potential need to adjust priorities and resources to achieve improved overall plant performance. A specific indicator trend over a certain period can provide an early warning to plant management to evaluate the causes behind the observed changes. In addition to monitoring the changes and trends, it is also necessary to compare the indicators with identified targets and goals to evaluate performance strengths and weaknesses. Plant Performance Monitoring Program at Krsko NPP defines and ensures consistent collection, processing, analysis and use of predefined relevant plant operational data, providing a quantitative indication of nuclear power plant performance. When the program was developed, the conceptual framework described in IAEA TECDOC-1141 Operational Safety Performance Indicators for Nuclear Power Plants was used as its basis in order to secure that a reasonable set of quantitative indications of operational safety performance would be established. Safe, conservative, cautious and reliable operation of the Krsko NPP is a common goal for all plant personnel. It is provided by continuous assurance of both health and safety of the public and employees according to the plant policy stated in program MD-1 Notranje usmeritve in cilji NEK, which is the top plant program. Establishing a program of monitoring and assessing operational plant safety performance indicators represents effective safety culture of plant personnel.(author)

  3. WiMAX network performance monitoring & optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qi; Dam, H

    2008-01-01

    frequency reuse, capacity planning, proper network dimensioning, multi-class data services and so on. Furthermore, as a small operator we also want to reduce the demand for sophisticated technicians and man labour hours. To meet these critical demands, we design a generic integrated network performance......In this paper we present our WiMAX (worldwide interoperability for microwave access) network performance monitoring and optimization solution. As a new and small WiMAX network operator, there are many demanding issues that we have to deal with, such as limited available frequency resource, tight...... this integrated network performance monitoring and optimization system in our WiMAX networks. This integrated monitoring and optimization system has such good flexibility and scalability that individual function component can be used by other operators with special needs and more advanced function components can...

  4. Construction and performance of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emschermann, David

    2010-01-20

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to identify electrons in the pion dominated background of heavy-ions collisions. As electrons do not interact strongly, they allow to probe the early phase of the interaction. As trigger on high-p{sub t} e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs within 6.5 {mu}s after collision, the TRD can initiate the readout of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TRD is composed of 18 super modules arranged in a barrel geometry in the central part of the ALICE detector. It offers almost 1.2 million readout channels on a total area of close to 700 m{sup 2}. The particle detection properties of the TRD depend crucially on details in the design of the cathode pad readout plane. The design parameters of the TRD readout pad plane are introduced and analysed regarding their physical properties. The noise patterns observed in the detector can be directly linked to the static pad capacitance distribution and corrected for it. A summary is then given of the TRD services infrastructure at CERN: a 70 kW low voltage system, a 1080 channel 2.5 kV high voltage setup and the Ethernet network serving more than 600 nodes. Two beam tests were conducted at the CERN PS accelerator in 2004 and 2007 using full sized TRD chambers from series production. Details on the setups are presented with particular emphasis on the custom tailored data acquisition systems. Finally the performance of the TRD is studied, focusing on the pion rejection capability and the excellent position resolution. (orig.)

  5. Construction and performance of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emschermann, David

    2010-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) has been designed to identify electrons in the pion dominated background of heavy-ions collisions. As electrons do not interact strongly, they allow to probe the early phase of the interaction. As trigger on high-p t e + e - pairs within 6.5 μs after collision, the TRD can initiate the readout of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TRD is composed of 18 super modules arranged in a barrel geometry in the central part of the ALICE detector. It offers almost 1.2 million readout channels on a total area of close to 700 m 2 . The particle detection properties of the TRD depend crucially on details in the design of the cathode pad readout plane. The design parameters of the TRD readout pad plane are introduced and analysed regarding their physical properties. The noise patterns observed in the detector can be directly linked to the static pad capacitance distribution and corrected for it. A summary is then given of the TRD services infrastructure at CERN: a 70 kW low voltage system, a 1080 channel 2.5 kV high voltage setup and the Ethernet network serving more than 600 nodes. Two beam tests were conducted at the CERN PS accelerator in 2004 and 2007 using full sized TRD chambers from series production. Details on the setups are presented with particular emphasis on the custom tailored data acquisition systems. Finally the performance of the TRD is studied, focusing on the pion rejection capability and the excellent position resolution. (orig.)

  6. High-rate performance of muon drift tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are studied. The resolution and efficiency of sMDT chambers at high γ-ray and proton irradiation rates well beyond the ones expected at HL-LHC have been measured and the irradiation effects understood using detailed simulations. The sMDT chambers offer an about an order of magnitude better rate capability and are an ideal replacement for the MDT chambers because of compatibility of services and read-out. The limitations of the sMDT chambers are now in the read-out electronics, taken from the MDT chambers, to which improvements for even higher rate capability are proposed.

  7. CMS detector tracking performance in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Brondolin, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of Run-II in June 2015, LHC has delivered pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 13TeV and with a bunch time separation of 25 ns. On avarage, more than 25 inelastic collisions are superimposed on the event of interest. Under these new conditions, the CMS collaboration has re-calibrated and verified the performance of the whole detector. In particular, the CMS tracking performance has been measured both directly and indirectly. Direct measurements are, among others, the beam spot determination, the vertex resolution and the muon reconstruction efficiency with the tag and probe technique. An indirect assessment can be given by the pion reconstruction efficiency and the low-mass resonance parameters as a function of different single track kinematics.

  8. Missing transverse energy performance of the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2011-09-01

    During 2010 the LHC delivered pp collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In this paper, the results of comprehensive studies of missing transverse energy as measured by the CMS detector are presented. The results cover the measurements of the scale and resolution for missing transverse energy, and the effects of multiple pp interactions within the same bunch crossings on the scale and resolution. Anomalous measurements of missing transverse energy are studied, and algorithms for their identification are described. The performances of several reconstruction algorithms for calculating missing transverse energy are compared. An algorithm, called missing-transverse-energy significance, which estimates the compatibility of the reconstructed missing transverse energy with zero, is described, and its performance is demonstrated.

  9. Missing transverse energy performance of the CMS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    During 2010 the LHC delivered pp collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In this paper, the results of comprehensive studies of missing transverse energy as measured by the CMS detector are presented. The results cover the measurements of the scale and resolution for missing transverse energy, and the effects of multiple pp interactions within the same bunch crossings on the scale and resolution. Anomalous measurements of missing transverse energy are studied, and algorithms for their identification are described. The performance of several reconstruction algorithms for calculating missing transverse energy are compared. An algorithm, called missing-transverse-energy significance, which estimates the compatibility of the reconstructed missing transverse energy with zero, is described, and its performance is demonstrated.

  10. Use of Automatic Interaction Detector in Monitoring Faculty Salaries. AIR 1983 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Margaret E.

    A university's use of the Automatic Interaction Detector (AID) to monitor faculty salary data is described. The first step consists of examining a tree diagram and summary table produced by AID. The tree is used to identify the characteristics of faculty at different salary levels. The table is used to determine the explanatory power of the…

  11. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  12. Design, development and calibration of a radioactive gas (85Kr) detector for continuous environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; John, Jacob; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B.; Gopalan, C.S.; Menezes, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    Design, development and calibration of a scintillation type detector for environmental monitoring of low levels of 85 Kr activity in off-line effluents or plant areas in presence of gamma background are reported. Calibration of the system was done using NBS 85 Kr standard. (author)

  13. Design, development and calibration of a radioactive gas (/sup 85/Kr) detector for continuous environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; John, J.; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.); Gopalan, C.S.; Menezes, C.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Electronics Div.)

    Design, development and calibration of a scintillation type detector for environmental monitoring of low levels of /sup 85/Kr activity in off-line effluents or plant areas in presence of gamma background are reported. Calibration of the system was done using NBS /sup 85/Kr standard.

  14. Performance of the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of radiation hard synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes for a direction sensitive measurement. The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few ns resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and received data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is readout by IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed i...

  15. Development of neutron personnel monitoring system based on CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massand, O.P.; Kundu, H.K.; Marathe, P.K.; Supe, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Personnel neutron monitoring aims at providing a method to evaluate the magnitude of the detrimental effects on the personnel exposed to neutrons. Neutron monitoring is done for a small though growing number of personnel working with neutrons in a wide range of situations. Over the years, many solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) have been tried for neutron personnel monitoring. CR-39 SSNTD is a proton sensitive polymer and offers a lot of promise for neutron personnel monitoring due to its high sensitivity and lower energy threshold for neutron detection. This report presents the mechanism of track formation in this polymer, the development of this neutron personnel monitoring system in our laboratory, its various characteristics and its promise as a routine personnel neutron monitor. (author). 1 tab., 7 figs

  16. Tracking Detector Performance and Data Quality in the NOvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Biswaranjan [Fermilab

    2017-10-10

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It uses the NuMI beam from Fermilab and two sampling calorimeter detectors located off-axis from the beam. The NOvA experiment measures the rate of electron-neutrino appearance in the almost pure muon-neutrino NuMI beam, with the data measured at the Near Detector being used to accurately determine the expected rate at the Far Detector. It is very important to have automated and accurate monitoring of the data recorded by the detectors so any hardware, DAQ or beam issues arising in the 344k (20k) channels of the Far (Near) detector which could affect the quality of the data taking are determined. This paper will cover the techniques and detector monitoring systems in various stages of data taking.

  17. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors: A luminosity monitor for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Placidia, M.; Schmicklera, H.

    2003-01-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimization of the collision parameters and the beam optics. At both sides of the interaction points absorbers are installed to protect the super-conducting accelerator elements from quenches caused by the deposited energy of collision products. The luminosity detectors will be installed in the copper core of these absorbers to measure the electromagnetic and hadronic showers caused by neutral particles that are produced at the proton-proton collision in the interaction points. The detectors have to withstand extreme radiation levels (108 Gy/yr at the design luminosity) and their long-term operation has to be assured without requiring human intervention. In addition the demand for bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurements, i.e. 40 MHz detection speed, puts severe constraints on the detectors. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors have a high potential to fulfill the requirements and are considered as LHC luminosity monitors. In this paper the interaction region is shown and the characteristics of the CdTe detectors are presented

  18. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors: A luminosity monitor for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Placidia, M.; Schmicklera, H.

    2003-09-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimization of the collision parameters and the beam optics. At both sides of the interaction points absorbers are installed to protect the super-conducting accelerator elements from quenches caused by the deposited energy of collision products. The luminosity detectors will be installed in the copper core of these absorbers to measure the electromagnetic and hadronic showers caused by neutral particles that are produced at the proton-proton collision in the interaction points. The detectors have to withstand extreme radiation levels (108 Gy/yr at the design luminosity) and their long-term operation has to be assured without requiring human intervention. In addition the demand for bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurements, i.e. 40 MHz detection speed, puts severe constraints on the detectors. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors have a high potential to fulfill the requirements and are considered as LHC luminosity monitors. In this paper the interaction region is shown and the characteristics of the CdTe detectors are presented.

  19. Performance of hybrid photon detector prototypes with encapsulated silicon pixel detector and readout for the RICH counters of LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, M.; George, K.A.; Girone, M.; Gys, T.; Jolly, S.; Piedigrossi, D.; Riedler, P.; Rozema, P.; Snoeys, W.; Wyllie, K.

    2003-01-01

    These proceedings report on the performance of the latest prototype pixel hybrid photon detector in preparation for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors. The prototype encapsulates a silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a binary read-out chip with short (25 ns) peaking time and low ( - ) detection threshold. A brief description of the prototype is given, followed by the preliminary results of the characterisation of the prototype behaviour when tested using a low intensity pulsed light emitting diode. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained using previous prototypes. The proceedings conclude with a summary of the current status and future plans

  20. Performance of Boosted W Boson Identification with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This note presents the performance of a variety of techniques used to identify highly- boosted hadronically-decaying $W$ bosons. The studies presented here are divided into two parts: the first is based on Monte Carlo simulation, and the second compares the simulations to 20.3$\\pm$0.6 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-–proton collisions data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. Various tagging approaches and different grooming algorithms are compared in simulation, using a signal of large-$R$ jets containing a highly boosted $W$ boson and a background of large-$R$ jets originating from high-momentum light quarks or gluons. These techniques could also be utilised to identify hadronic decays of boosted $Z$ and Higgs bosons. A sample enriched in $t\\bar{t}\\to (W^+b)(W^-\\bar{b}) \\to (q\\bar{q}b)(\\mu \\bar{\

  1. Fabrication of advanced military radiation detector sensor and performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sin Yang

    2010-02-01

    Recently, our country is facing a continuous nuclear weapons threat. Therefore, we must have a high-level nuclear weapons protection system. The best protection against nuclear weapons is detecting their use to reduce casualties in our country to a minimum. That means, the development of a military radiation detector is a very important issue. The Korea army is using the 'PDR - 1K portable military radiation surveymeter' in NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical warfare) operations. The PDR - 1K military detector can measure beta and gamma rays only but it cannot detect alpha particles. Because of its characteristics, the Korea army has weaknesses in tactical operations. The PDR - 1K sensor is based on a GM - tube sensor system. For the mechanical structure, detectors utilizing a GM-tube sensor do not work on a high - radiation battlefield and they do not carry out nuclide analysis for fixed electron signal output. In the meantime, the United States of America and Germany are using 'AN/PDR - 77' and 'SVG - 2' that were made from scintillator sensors. They have excellent physical qualities and radiation responses for military use. Also, nuclide analysis is available. Therefore, in this study we fabricated a military - grade scintillator radiation sensor that is able to detect alpha, beta, and gamma - rays to overcome PDR - 1K's weaknesses. Also, physical characteristics and radiation response evaluation for the fabricated sensors was carried out. The alpha - particle sensor and beta - ray sensor were fabricated using a ZnS(Ag) powder state scintillator, and a Saint - Gobain organic plastic scintillator BC-408 panel, respectively. The gamma ray sensor was manufactured using a 10 x 10 x 10 mm 3 CsI(Tl) inorganic scintillator crystal. A detailed explanation follows. The alpha particle sensor was fabricated by using air - brushing method to Zns(Ag) powder scintillator spreading. The ZnS(Ag) layer thickness was 35 μm (detection efficiency: 41%). This alpha - particle sensor

  2. Fast polycrystalline CdTe detectors for bunch-by-bunch luminosity monitoring in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brambilla, A; Jolliot, M; Bravin, E

    2008-01-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimisation of beam parameters. Polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors have previously been tested, showing their high potential to fulfil the requirements of luminosity measurement in the severe environment of the LHC interaction regions. Further, the large signal yield and the fast response time should allow bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity at 40 MHz with high accuracy. Four luminosity monitors with two rows of five polycrystalline CdTe detectors each have been fabricated and will be installed at both sides of the low-luminosity interaction points ALICE and LHC-b. A detector housing was specially designed to meet the mechanical constraints in the LHC. A series of elementary CdTe detectors were fabricated and tested, of which 40 were selected for the luminosity monitors. A sensitivity of 104 electrons per minimum ioni...

  3. Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron detector performance characterization & reactor power tracking capability experiments performed in ZED-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFontaine, M.W., E-mail: physics@execulink.com [LaFontaine Consulting, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada); Zeller, M.B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Nielsen, K. [Royal Military College of Canada, SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium-emitter self-powered thermal neutron flux detectors (SPDs), are typically used for flux monitoring and control applications in low temperature, test reactors such as the SLOWPOKE-2. A collaborative program between Atomic Energy of Canada, academia (Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC)) and industry (LaFontaine Consulting) was initiated to characterize the incore performance of a typical Cd-emitter SPD; and to obtain a definitive measure of the capability of the detector to track changes in reactor power in real time. Prior to starting the experiment proper, Chalk River Laboratories' ZED-2 was operated at low power (5 watts nominal) to verify the predicted moderator critical height. Test measurements were then performed with the vertical center of the SPD emitter positioned at the vertical mid-plane of the ZED-2 reactor core. Measurements were taken with the SPD located at lattice position L0 (near center), and repeated at lattice position P0 (in D{sub 2}O reflector). An ionization chamber (part of the ZED-2 control instrumentation) monitored reactor power at a position located on the south side of the outside wall of the reactor's calandria. These experiments facilitated measurement of the absolute thermal neutron sensitivity of the subject Cd-emitter SPD, and validated the power tracking capability of said SPD. Procedural details of the experiments, data, calculations and associated graphs, are presented and discussed. (author)

  4. Abnormal condition detector for a local power range monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takao.

    1976-01-01

    Object: to permit determination of abnormal condition by a number of local power range monitors (LPRM) to be quickly made through precise estimation of the ratio between the true rate of change in neutron flux and true change in the neutron flux by making use of the fact that the status of the neutron distribution does not widely change with a change in the core flow rate for a short period of time. Structure: While carrying out power control according to the core flow rate, detection values from LPRM which are disposed in a three-dimensional fashion within the reactor core are indicated on an indicator. The average value of rates of change in the indicated values for a group of LPRM under substantially the same fluid dynamic condition as that for each LPRM is determined while measuring time-wise change rate in the indicated value of each of the LPRM. The average value is successively divided by the rate of change in the indicated value for each LPRM and the amplifier gain thereof to obtain the reference value. When the difference between the average value and reference value obtained in this way exceeds a prescribed value, the corresponding LPRM is determined to be defective. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Online monitoring of the Osiris reactor with the Nucifer neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, G.; Bouvet, L.; Collin, A. P.; Coulloux, G.; Cribier, M.; Deschamp, H.; Durand, V.; Fechner, M.; Fischer, V.; Gaffiot, J.; Gérard Castaing, N.; Granelli, R.; Kato, Y.; Lasserre, T.; Latron, L.; Legou, P.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Mention, G.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nghiem, T.-A.; Pedrol, N.; Pelzer, J.; Pequignot, M.; Piret, Y.; Prono, G.; Scola, L.; Starzinski, P.; Vivier, M.; Dumonteil, E.; Mancusi, D.; Varignon, C.; Buck, C.; Lindner, M.; Bazoma, J.; Bouvier, S.; Bui, V. M.; Communeau, V.; Cucoanes, A.; Fallot, M.; Gautier, M.; Giot, L.; Guilloux, G.; Lenoir, M.; Martino, J.; Mercier, G.; Milleto, T.; Peuvrel, N.; Porta, A.; Le Quéré, N.; Renard, C.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Roy, D.; Vilajosana, T.; Yermia, F.; Nucifer Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Originally designed as a new nuclear reactor monitoring device, the Nucifer detector has successfully detected its first neutrinos. We provide the second-shortest baseline measurement of the reactor neutrino flux. The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products, combined with reactor core simulations, provides a new tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core and could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy to enhance the safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. Deployed at only 7.2 m away from the compact Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, the experiment also exhibits a well-suited configuration to search for a new short baseline oscillation. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment, describing the performances of the ˜0.85 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to ˜12 m of water and under intense background radiation conditions. Based on 145 (106) days of data with the reactor on (off), leading to the detection of an estimated 40760 ν¯ e , the mean number of detected antineutrinos is 281 ±7 (stat )±18 (syst )ν¯ e/day , in agreement with the prediction of 277 ±23 ν¯ e/day . Because of the large background, no conclusive results on the existence of light sterile neutrinos could be derived, however. As a first societal application we quantify how antineutrinos could be used for the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.

  6. Activity on improving performance of time-of-flight detector at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzione, A.; Cerri, C.; Vataga, E.; Prokoshin, F.; Tokar, S.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes activity on improving the time resolution of the Time-of-Flight detector at CDF. The main goal of the detector is the identification of kaons and pions for b-quark (B-meson) flavour tagging. Construction of the detector has been described as well as proposals on detector design changes to improve its time resolution. Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response to MIP was performed. The results of the simulation showed that the proposed modifications (at least with currently available materials) bring modest or no improvement of the detector time resolution. An automated set-up was assembled to test and check out the changes in the electronic readout system of the detector. Sophisticated software has been developed for this set-up to provide control of the system as well as processing and presentation of data from the detector. This software can perform various tests using different implementations of the hardware set-up

  7. Tracking performance of the ATLAS inner detector and observation of known hadrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayl, M.; Trischuk, W.

    2010-01-01

    The inner detector is the central tracking device of the ATLAS detector. In these proceedings the tracking performance of the inner detector is presented on collision data recorded at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The identification of resonances like $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$ baryons in cascade decays

  8. Radon-film-badges by solid radiators to complement track detector-based radon monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommasino, L.; Tommasino, M.C.; Viola, P.

    2009-01-01

    Existing passive radon monitors, based on track detectors, present many shortcomings, such as a limited response sensitivity for one-week-indoor measurements and a limited response linearity for the assessment of large radon exposures indoors, in thermal spa, in caves, and in soil. Moreover, for in-soil measurements these monitors are too bulky and are often conducive to wrong results. For what concerns the radon-in-water measurements, they are just not suitable. A new generation of passive radon monitors is introduced in this paper, which are very similar to the compact badges used in neutron- and gamma-dosimetry and will be referred to as radon-film-badges. These film-badges are formed by thin-film radiators with suitable radon-sorption characteristics, facing track detectors. The key strategy adopted for these radiators is to exploit an equilibrium type of radon sorption in solids. Even though this new generation of passive monitors is at its infancy, it appears already clear that said monitors make it finally possible to overcome most of the shortcomings of existing passive radon monitors. These devices are uniquely simple and can be easily acquired by any existing radon service to complement their presently used passive radon monitors with little or no effort.

  9. Two-photon physics and online beam monitoring using the DELPHI detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjarne, J.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis is based on work done during 1989-1993 using the DELPHI detector at LEP, which is summarized in five articles. It consists of three main parts. The first part describes the Very Small Angle Tagger (VSAT), which is a sub-detector of the DELPHI detector at LEP. It consists of four silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter modules having a silicon strip planes for position determination. The modules are placed adjacent to the beam pipe, at ±7.7 m from the interaction point and after superconducting quadrupole magnets, allowing the detection of electrons in a polar angle range of 4 to 13 mrad. The second part is devoted to two-photon physics at DELPHI, with strong emphasis on a VSAT single-tagged event analysis. Here is shown, for the first time, evidence of hard scattering processes in single-tagged two-photon collisions. A QCD Resolved Photon Contribution (QCD-RPC) model is introduced. Data is then seen to be well described by a full VDM+(QCD-RPC) model. Different parton density functions are compared with data. The third part first describes the system for online monitoring of LEP beam background and luminosity at the DELPHI interaction point. Details are given of contributing sub-detector signals and program structure. Then follows a description of the VSAT online monitoring program (VSAT-MONITOR). A good agreement is found between the VSAT-MONITOR estimates of luminosity and beam spot and those of other detectors. Finally, results are presented of VSAT measurements of a LEP beam separation scan. 75 refs, figs

  10. Detector Control System and Efficiency Performance for CMS RPC at GIF++

    CERN Document Server

    Gul, Muhammad; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Fagot, A; Rios, A A O; Tytgat, M; Zaganidis, N; Aly, S; Assran, Y; Radi, A; Sayed, A; Singh, G; Abbrescia, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, M; Pugliese, G; Verwilligen, P; Doninck, W V; Colafranceschi, S; Sharma, A; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Piccolo, D; Primavera, F; Bhatnagar, V; Kumari, R; Mehta, A; Singh, J; Ahmad, A; Asghar, M I; Muhammad, S; Awan, I A; Hoorani, H R; Ahmed, W; Shahzad, H; Shah, M A; Cho, S W; Choi, S Y; Hong, B; Kang, M H; Lee, K S; Lim, J H; Park, S K; Kim, M; Goutzvitz, M; Grenier, G; Lagarde, F; Estrada, C U; Pedraza, I; Severiano, C B; Carrillo Moreno, S; Vazquez Valencia, F; Pant, L M; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Esposito, M; Fabozzi, F; Lanza, G; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Orso, I; Paolucci, P; Thyssen, F; Braghieri, A; Magnani, A; Montagna, P; Riccardi, C; Salvini, P; Vai, I; Vitulo, P; Ban, Y; Qian, S J; Choi, M; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Kim, D; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Lomidze, D; Bagaturia, I; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Sanabria, J C; Crotty, I; Vaitkus, J

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the High Luminosity LHC upgrade program, the CMS muon group built several different RPC prototypes that are now under test at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). A dedicated Detector Control System has been developed using the WinCC-OA tool to control and monitor these prototype detectors and to store the measured parameters data.

  11. A compendium of results from long-range alpha detector soil surface monitoring: June 1992--May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, S.E.; Bounds, J.A.; Allander, K.S.; Johnson, J.D.; MacArthur, D.W.; Caress, R.W.

    1994-11-01

    Soil surface monitors based on long-range alpha detector (LRAD) technology are being used to monitor alpha contamination at various sites in the Department of Energy complex. These monitors, the large soil-surface monitor (LSSM) and the small soil-surface monitor (SSSM), were used to help characterize sites at Fernald, Ohio, and active or inactive firing sites at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Monitoring results are presented herein in chronological order

  12. Who can monitor the court interpreter's performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    and the conflict about her competence was negotiated. Because of this unusual constellation, combined with a multi-method approach, this single case study can shed some light on the question of the participants' ability to monitor the interpreter's performance. Legal professional users of interpreters tend......  Who can monitor the court interpreter's performance? Results of a case study This paper presents the results of a case study of an unusual interpreting event in a Danish courtroom setting. During the trial, the interpreter's non-normative performance was explicitly criticised by the audience...... are far less transparent for the legal participants than they normally assume. This problem, in turn, stresses the importance of a) the interpreter's competence and self-awareness and b) the use of check interpreters.  ...

  13. Performance of CaSO4:Dy detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setti, M.C.; Silva, G.R.; Pela, C.A.; Bruco, J.L.; Borges, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    CaSO 4 :Dy detectors have been used in personal dosimetry. The MRA company recently entered into the market of these detectors. Searching to assure a product quality level that would satisfy its customs most expectancies, MRA programmed several tests to qualify and quantify these detectors main characteristics, before their definitive insertion in the market. Preliminary tests furnished a value of 29,5 ± 1,2 nC for homogeneity and a maximum dispersion of 3 % for linearity . (author)

  14. Study of the performance of Micromegas detectors in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sampsonidis, Dimos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas (Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors have been chosen by the ATLAS collaboration at LHC for the high luminosity upgrade due to their capability to maintain full efficiency and high spatial resolution at high rates. Operation in the Inner Muon Station of the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) requires also these performances to be maintened in magnetic fields up to about 0.3 T. The response of Micromegas chambers is affected by the magnetic field where the deflection of the drift electrons is described by the Lorentz angle, resulting in a bias in the reconstructed position. Several test-beam campaigns have been performed to test the behaviour of small size resistive micromegas prototypes (10x10cm2) in magnetic fields up to 1 T using high momentum muon and hadron beams at CERN. These studies are performed in order to validate the capability to operate these chambers to get unbiased tracks in the NSW conditions. Measurements of the Lorentz angle and drift velocity ...

  15. The GBT-SCA, a radiation tolerant ASIC for detector control and monitoring applications in HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caratelli, A.; Bonacini, S.; Kloukinas, K.; Marchioro, A.; Moreira, P.; Oliveira, R. De; Paillard, C.

    2015-01-01

    The future upgrades of the LHC experiments will increase the beam luminosity leading to a corresponding growth of the amounts of data to be treated by the data acquisition systems. To address these needs, the GBT (Giga-Bit Transceiver optical link [1,2]) architecture was developed to provide the simultaneous transfer of readout data, timing and trigger signals as well as slow control and monitoring data. The GBT-SCA ASIC, part of the GBT chip-set, has the purpose to distribute control and monitoring signals to the on-detector front-end electronics and perform monitoring operations of detector environmental parameters. In order to meet the requirements of different front-end ASICs used in the experiments, it provides various user-configurable interfaces capable to perform simultaneous operations. It is designed employing radiation tolerant design techniques to ensure robustness against SEUs and TID radiation effects and is implemented in a commercial 130 nm CMOS technology. This work presents the GBT-SCA architecture, the ASIC interfaces, the data transfer protocol, and its integration with the GBT optical link

  16. Monitoring of garbage with a 5x5NaI (Tl) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.; Angeles C, A.

    1991-12-01

    So far in that is carried out the first reload of nuclear fuel in the LVC, the monitoring of garbage has been carried out using monitors trade mark Eberline model RM 14. The procedure consists in manually monitoring each object and to separate of the considered 'clean' garbage the objects considered as contaminated, which register greater or equal counts to 100 cpm. This way to process was adequate under normal operation conditions, but not in the operation rhythm that implies a bigger maintenance since the time required for monitoring from 5 to 10 kg. of garbage is of the order of 0.5 hours and the production rhythm of this it ends up being a lot but high. Due to this necessity it was thought about the problem of looking by a more efficient monitoring method. In this work a method that uses a detector of NaI (Tl) of 5 x 5 inches is discussed. (Author)

  17. Development and performance of a hand-held CZT detector for in-situ measurements at the emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Young Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Kim, Chang Jong; Lee, Wan No; Choi, Geun Sik; Kang, Mun Ja [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jin [SI Detection Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A hand-held detector for an emergency response was developed for nuclide identification and to estimate the information of the ambient dose rate in the scene of an accident as well as the radioactivity of the contaminants. To achieve this, the most suitable sensor was first selected as a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor and the signal processing unit from a sensor and the signal discrimination and storage unit were successfully manufactured on a printed circuit board. The performance of the developed signal processing unit was then evaluated to have an energy resolution of about 14 keV at 662 keV. The system control unit was also designed to operate the CZT detector, monitor the detector, battery, and interface status, and check and transmit the measured results of the ambient dose rate and radioactivity. In addition, a collimator, which can control the inner radius, and the airborne dust sampler, which consists of an air filter and charcoal filter, were developed and mounted to the developed CZT detector for the quick and efficient response of a nuclear accident. The hand-held CZT detector was developed to make the in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry and its performance was checked to have a good energy resolution. In addition, the collimator and the airborne dust sampler were developed and mounted to the developed CZT detector for a quick and efficient response to a nuclear accident.

  18. The RASNIK real-time relative alignment monitor for the CDF inner tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, David; Saltzberg, David

    2003-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of the RASNIK optical relative alignment system designed for and installed on the CDF inner tracking detectors. The system provides low-cost minute-by-minute alignment monitoring with submicron precision. To reduce ambiguities, we modified the original three-element RASNIK design to a two-element one. Since the RASNIKs are located within 10-40 cm of the beam line, the systems were built from low-mass and radiation-hard components and are operated in a mode which reduces damage from radiation. We describe the data-acquisition system, which has been running without interruption since before the CDF detector was rolled into its collision hall in March 2001. We evaluate what has been learned about sources of detector motion from almost 2 years of RASNIK data and discuss possible improvements to the system

  19. Pin Diode Detector For Radiation Field Monitoring In A Current Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.; Wengrowicz, U.; Kadmon, Y.; Tirosh, D.; Osovizky, A.; Vulasky, E.; Tal, N.

    1999-01-01

    Thus paper presents calculations and tests made for a detector based on a bare Pin diode and a Pin diode coupled to a plastic scintillator. These configurations have a variety of applications in radiation field monitoring. For example, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology which becomes an established diagnostic imaging modality. Flour-18 is one of the major isotopes being used by PET imaging. The PET method utilizes short half life β + radioisotopes which, by annihilation, produce a pair of high energy photons (511 keV). Fluoro-deoxyglucose producers are required to meet federal regulations and licensing requirements. Some of the regulations are related to the production in chemistry modules regarding measuring the Start Of Synthesis (SOS) activity and verifying the process repeatability. Locating a radiation detector based on Pin diode inside the chemistry modules is suitable for this purpose. The dimensions of a Pin diode based detector can be small, with expected linearity over several scale decades

  20. Diamond pad detector telescope for beam conditions and luminosity monitoring in ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuz, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: Marko.Mikuz@ijs.si; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Frais-Koelbl, H. [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt and Fotec, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gorisek, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt and Fotec, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Kagan, H. [Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Niegl, M. [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt and Fotec, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pernegger, H. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Trischuk, W. [University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Weilhammer, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Zavrtanik, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-09-01

    Beam conditions and the potential detector damage resulting from their anomalies have pushed the LHC experiments to plan their own monitoring devices in addition to those provided by the machine. ATLAS decided to build a telescope composed of two stations with four diamond pad detector modules each, placed symmetrically around the interaction point at z={+-}183.8cm and r{approx}55mm ({eta}{approx}4.2). Equipped with fast electronics it allows time-of-flight separation of events resulting from beam anomalies from normally occurring p-p interactions. In addition it will provide a coarse measurement of the LHC luminosity in ATLAS. Ten detector modules have been assembled and subjected to tests, from characterization of bare diamonds to source and beam tests. Preliminary results of beam test in the CERN PS indicate a signal-to-noise ratio of 14{+-}2.

  1. Diamond pad detector telescope for beam conditions and luminosity monitoring in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikuz, M.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Gorisek, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Kagan, H.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Niegl, M.; Pernegger, H.; Trischuk, W.; Weilhammer, P.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2007-01-01

    Beam conditions and the potential detector damage resulting from their anomalies have pushed the LHC experiments to plan their own monitoring devices in addition to those provided by the machine. ATLAS decided to build a telescope composed of two stations with four diamond pad detector modules each, placed symmetrically around the interaction point at z=±183.8cm and r∼55mm (η∼4.2). Equipped with fast electronics it allows time-of-flight separation of events resulting from beam anomalies from normally occurring p-p interactions. In addition it will provide a coarse measurement of the LHC luminosity in ATLAS. Ten detector modules have been assembled and subjected to tests, from characterization of bare diamonds to source and beam tests. Preliminary results of beam test in the CERN PS indicate a signal-to-noise ratio of 14±2

  2. Performance audit procedures for opacity monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaisance, S.J.; Peeler, J.W.

    1987-04-01

    This manual contains monitor-specific performance audit procedures and data forms for use in conducting audits of installed opacity continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS). General auditing procedures and acceptance limits for various audit criteria are discussed. Practical considerations and common problems encountered in conducting audits are delineated, and recommendations are included to optimize the successful completion of performance audits. Performance audit procedures and field-data forms were developed for six common opacity CEMS: (1) Lear Siegler, Inc. Model RM-41; (2) Lear Siegler, Inc. Model RM-4; (3) Dynatron Model 1100; (4) Thermo Electron, Inc. Model 400; (5) Thermo Electron, Inc. Model 1000A; and (6) Enviroplan Model D-R280 AV. Generic audit procedures are included for use in evaluating opacity CEMS with multiple transmissometers and combiner devices. In addition, several approaches for evaluating the zero-alignment or clear-path zero response are described. The zero-alignment procedures are included since the factor is fundamental to the accuracy of opacity monitoring data, even though the zero-alignment checks cannot usually be conducted during a performance audit

  3. Performance of the upgraded NSLS beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Keane, J.

    1997-01-01

    The design and initial performance of the original NSLS beam position monitor were described by J. Bittner and R. Biscardi in 1989. The receiver, which processes signals from four button type pick-up electrodes by time-division multiplexing, operates at the third harmonic of the ring rf frequency (158.66 MHz). It has an output bandwidth of about 2 kHz and a dynamic signal range of approximately 36 dB. A total of 92 receivers have been installed in the NSLS X-ray and VUV storage rings for orbit monitoring and for real time feedback. As part of a continuous effort to improve the NSLS storage ring performance, the BPMs as well as other instrumentation systems have also been undergoing upgrades over the past two years to improve their performance. In the BPM, the front end has been modified to prevent saturation of the rf multiplexing switch, the detector operating point was changed to improve output signal linearity, the dynamic range was increased to over 60 dB, and the gain calibration was standardized to 0.5 volts/mm (i.e. 2 microm/mV). This paper describes the BPM modifications and presents some performance data and measurements on stored beam

  4. History plotting tool for Data Quality Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, D.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Pierro, A.; De Mattia, M.

    2010-01-01

    The size and complexity of the CMS detector makes the Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) system very challenging. Given the high granularity of the CMS sub-detectors, several approaches and tools have been developed to monitor the detector performance closely. We describe here the History DQM, a tool allowing the detector performance monitoring over time.

  5. Introduction of virtual detectors for core monitoring system of korean standard nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, Ki Lee.; Yong, Hee Kim.; Jybe, Ho Cha.; Moon, Ghu Park.

    2000-01-01

    A novel algorithm known as the virtual detector method (VDM) is introduced to reconstruct the axial power shape (APS) for the on-line core monitoring system of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP). A pure statistical method (SM) is also introduced and the results are compared with the currently implemented five-mode Fourier fitting method (FFM). VDM adopts nine virtual detector informations coupled with a regression model based on the Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm. VDM uses Fourier fitting with the information of nine virtual detectors expanded from the currently implemented FFM, which uses five-level detector information. By introducing virtual detectors, we can increase the number of axial detectors, and thus expect the computational errors of APS to be reduced. The two methods (SM and VDM) are applied to in-core mapping data from six cycles of Yong Gwang nuclear power plant Units 3 and 4. For ∼ 3500 cases of APSs extracted from a cycle of operation which is simulated by a three-dimensional nodal code, the accuracy of the three methods (SM, VDM, FFM) is compared. The average root mean square (RMS) error and average of axial peaking error of SM and VDM resulted in reduction of more than 50 % and 70 %, respectively, relative to FFM. VDM and SM also show more realistic axial profiles and predict more accurate axial peaking than FFM. These improvements can contribute to a larger thermal margin. SM shows the most accurate results for all cases. VDM can almost obtain the same results as SM, and using far fewer computation steps. VDM can be a useful tool for precisely reconstructing axial power shapes in a core monitoring system. (authors)

  6. Vanadium Beta Emission Detectors for Reactor In-Core Neutron Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I Oe; Soederlund, B

    1969-06-15

    In-core flux measurements are becoming increasingly important in both power reactors and test reactors. In particular power distribution measurements in large power reactors have to be performed with a great number of neutron detectors capable of withstanding high integrated flux values. This report presents a summary of the development and application of a new type of nuclear radiation sensor, a beta emission detector, for measurements at high neutron flux levels. The work has been carried out at the Section for Instrumentation and has been the basis for a type of neutron detector employed in the Marviken in-core system as well as for other types. The report describes the design and principle of operation, experiments and tests. Also included are the results and comments from a long-term irradiation of some detectors in the Halden reactor.

  7. Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettsome, Annette K.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface

  8. Instrument performance and simulation verification of the POLAR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, M.; Li, Z. H.; Produit, N.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zhang, J.; Zwolinska, A.; Bao, T. W.; Bernasconi, T.; Cadoux, F.; Feng, M. Z.; Gauvin, N.; Hajdas, W.; Kong, S. W.; Li, H. C.; Li, L.; Liu, X.; Marcinkowski, R.; Orsi, S.; Pohl, M.; Rybka, D.; Sun, J. C.; Song, L. M.; Szabelski, J.; Wang, R. J.; Wang, Y. H.; Wen, X.; Wu, B. B.; Wu, X.; Xiao, H. L.; Xiong, S. L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, X. F.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-11-01

    POLAR is a new satellite-born detector aiming to measure the polarization of an unprecedented number of Gamma-Ray Bursts in the 50-500 keV energy range. The instrument, launched on-board the Tiangong-2 Chinese Space lab on the 15th of September 2016, is designed to measure the polarization of the hard X-ray flux by measuring the distribution of the azimuthal scattering angles of the incoming photons. A detailed understanding of the polarimeter and specifically of the systematic effects induced by the instrument's non-uniformity are required for this purpose. In order to study the instrument's response to polarization, POLAR underwent a beam test at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France. In this paper both the beam test and the instrument performance will be described. This is followed by an overview of the Monte Carlo simulation tools developed for the instrument. Finally a comparison of the measured and simulated instrument performance will be provided and the instrument response to polarization will be presented.

  9. The proposed monitoring system for the Fermilab D0 colliding beams detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robert; Florian, Robert; Johnson, Marvin; Jones, Alan; Shea, Mike

    1986-06-01

    The Fermilab D0 Detector is a collaborative effort that includes seventeen universities and national laboratories. The monitoring and control system for this detector will be separate from the online detector data system. A distributed, stand-alone, microprocessor-based system is being designed to allow monitoring and control functions to be available to the collaborators at their home institutions during the design, fabrication, and testing phases of the project. Individual stations are VMEbus-based 68000 systems that are networked together during installation using an ARCnet (by Datapoint Corporation) Local Area Network. One station, perhaps a MicroVAX, would have a hard disk to store a backup copy of the distributed database located in non-volatile RAM in the local stations. This station would also serve as a gateway to the online system, so that data from the control system will be available for logging with the detector data. Apple Macintosh personal computers are being developed for use as the local control consoles. Each would be interfaced to ARCnet to provide access to all control system data. Through the use of bit-mapped graphics with multiple windows and pull-down menus, a cost effective, flexible display system can be provided, taking advantage of familiar modern software tools to support the operator interface.

  10. Use of self-powered detectors of near containment gamma monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, J.; LaFontaine, M.; Sharma, H.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted during the period April to May 1988, to select a self-powered detector (SPD) with an appropriate emitter for measuring the gamma radiation dose rate in near-containment. The selected SPD would be used in the containment monitoring systems for the Ringhals and Forsmark reactors in Sweden. In-containment gamma radiation (81 keV to ∼3 MeV energy range) could result from the release of gaseous fission-product nuclides of bromine, krypton, iodine and xenon. Associated dose rates can range from 10 to 10 6 Gy/h. Tests were performed on platinum and vanadium emitter SPDs 1 using 60 Co, 192 Ir and X-ray gamma/photon sources. A gamma energy dependent polarity change in the signal from the Pt SPD (signal goes from positive to negative as energy drops below 100 keV), coupled with a non-linear response, eliminated that design from further study in this application. The vanadium SPDs produced a linear, negative signal irrespective of the impingent gamma energy level. The gamma sensitivity of the 18 V SPDs tested in the program, ranged from -1.07 x 10 -14 A/Gy/h to -1.87 x 10 -14 A/Gy/h per metre emitter length. (author)

  11. LUCID A Cherenkov Tube Based Detector for Monitoring the ATLAS Experiment Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Sbrizzi, A

    2007-01-01

    The LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) apparatus is composed by two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. The purpose of this detector, which will be installed in january 2008, is to monitor the luminosity delivered by the LHC machine to the ATLAS experiment. An absolute luminosity calibration is needed and it will be provided by a Roman Pot type detector with the two arms placed at about 240 m from the interaction point. Each arm of the LUCID detector is based on an aluminum vessel containing 20 Cherenkov tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, filled with C4F10 radiator gas at 1.5 bar. The Cherenkov light generated by charged particles above the threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. The challenging aspect of this detector is its readout in an environment characterized by the high dose of radiation (about 0.7 Mrad/year at 10^33cm^2 s^-1) it must withstand. In order to fulfill these radiation hardness requirem...

  12. Real-time monitoring of single-photon detectors against eavesdropping in quantum key distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Thiago Ferreira; Xavier, Guilherme B; Temporão, Guilherme P; von der Weid, Jean Pierre

    2012-08-13

    By employing real-time monitoring of single-photon avalanche photodiodes we demonstrate how two types of practical eavesdropping strategies, the after-gate and time-shift attacks, may be detected. Both attacks are identified with the detectors operating without any special modifications, making this proposal well suited for real-world applications. The monitoring system is based on accumulating statistics of the times between consecutive detection events, and extracting the afterpulse and overall efficiency of the detectors in real-time using mathematical models fit to the measured data. We are able to directly observe changes in the afterpulse probabilities generated from the after-gate and faint after-gate attacks, as well as different timing signatures in the time-shift attack. We also discuss the applicability of our scheme to other general blinding attacks.

  13. Systematic survey for monitor signals to reduce fake burst events in a gravitational-wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishidoshiro, Koji; Ando, Masaki; Tsubono, Kimio

    2006-01-01

    We present methods and results to reduce fake burst events induced by nonstationary noises. To reduce these fake events, we systematically surveyed monitor signals recorded with a main (or gravitational-wave) signal of a gravitational-wave detector so as to watch the detector. Our survey was to check whether or not there was a coincidence between the main and monitor signals when we found a burst event from the main signal. If there was a coincidence, we rejected this event as a fake event induced by nonstationary noises, regarding the main signal as being dominated by nonstationary noises. As a result, we succeeded to reject about 90% of the burst events of which the SNR values were larger than 10 as fake events, with an accidental probability of about 5% to reject burst-gravitational-wave candidates

  14. PRD3000: A novel Personnel Radiation Detector with Radiation Exposure Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Micou, C.; Schulcz, F.; Fellinger, J.

    2015-01-01

    PRD3000 TM is a novel Personal Radiation Detector (PRD) with personnel radiation dose exposure monitoring. It is intended for First Responders, Law Enforcement, Customs Inspectors protecting critical infrastructures for detecting unexpected radioactive sources, who also need real time Hp(10) dose equivalent information. Traditional PRD devices use scintillator materials instrumented through either a photomultiplier tube or a photodiode photodetector. While the former is bulky and sensitive to magnetic fields, the latter has to compromise radiation sensitivity and energy threshold given its current noise per unit of photo-detection surface. Recently, solid state photodetectors (SiPM), based on arrays of Geiger operated diodes, have emerged as a scalable digital photodetector for photon counting. Their strong breakdown voltage temperature dependence (on the order of tens of milli-volts per K) has however limited their use for portable instruments where strong temperature gradients can be experienced, and limited power is available to temperature stabilize. The PRD3000 is based on the industry standard DMC3000 active dosimeter that complies with IEC 61526 Ed. 3 and ANSI 42.20 for direct reading personal dose equivalent meters and active personnel radiation monitors. An extension module is based on a CsI(Tl) scintillator readout by a temperature compensated SiPM. Preliminary nuclear tests combined with a measured continuous operation in excess of 240 hours from a single AAA battery cell indicate that the PRD3000 complies with the IEC 62401 Ed.2 and ANSI 42.32 without sacrificing battery life time. We present a summary of the device test results, starting with performance stability over a temperature range of - 20 deg. C to 50 deg. C, false alarm rates and dynamic response time. (authors)

  15. PRD3000: A novel Personnel Radiation Detector with Radiation Exposure Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Micou, C.; Schulcz, F.; Fellinger, J. [Mirion Technologies - MGPI SA (France)

    2015-07-01

    PRD3000{sup TM} is a novel Personal Radiation Detector (PRD) with personnel radiation dose exposure monitoring. It is intended for First Responders, Law Enforcement, Customs Inspectors protecting critical infrastructures for detecting unexpected radioactive sources, who also need real time Hp(10) dose equivalent information. Traditional PRD devices use scintillator materials instrumented through either a photomultiplier tube or a photodiode photodetector. While the former is bulky and sensitive to magnetic fields, the latter has to compromise radiation sensitivity and energy threshold given its current noise per unit of photo-detection surface. Recently, solid state photodetectors (SiPM), based on arrays of Geiger operated diodes, have emerged as a scalable digital photodetector for photon counting. Their strong breakdown voltage temperature dependence (on the order of tens of milli-volts per K) has however limited their use for portable instruments where strong temperature gradients can be experienced, and limited power is available to temperature stabilize. The PRD3000 is based on the industry standard DMC3000 active dosimeter that complies with IEC 61526 Ed. 3 and ANSI 42.20 for direct reading personal dose equivalent meters and active personnel radiation monitors. An extension module is based on a CsI(Tl) scintillator readout by a temperature compensated SiPM. Preliminary nuclear tests combined with a measured continuous operation in excess of 240 hours from a single AAA battery cell indicate that the PRD3000 complies with the IEC 62401 Ed.2 and ANSI 42.32 without sacrificing battery life time. We present a summary of the device test results, starting with performance stability over a temperature range of - 20 deg. C to 50 deg. C, false alarm rates and dynamic response time. (authors)

  16. Performance evaluation of BGO block detectors used in positron emission tomography and a coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Choi, Y.; Lim, K. C.; Lee, M. Y.; Woo, S. K.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the basic performances of the BGO block detectors, which is used in the GE Advance positron emission tomography. The block detector is composed of 36 small BGO crystals coupled to two 2-channel photomultiplier tubes. In this study, we measured the crystal map and the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector. The coincidence signals between the detectors were also obtained using F-18. The intrinsic energy resolution of the block detector was 69% FWHM at 140 keV and 33% FWHM at 511 keV. High quality crystal map and the coincidence signals between the detectors were successfully obtained. The timing resolution of the detectors are being measured. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of developing high performance positron emission tomography

  17. Fabrication of advanced military radiation detector sensor and performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sin Yang

    2010-02-15

    Recently, our country is facing a continuous nuclear weapons threat. Therefore, we must have a high-level nuclear weapons protection system. The best protection against nuclear weapons is detecting their use to reduce casualties in our country to a minimum. That means, the development of a military radiation detector is a very important issue. The Korea army is using the 'PDR - 1K portable military radiation surveymeter' in NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical warfare) operations. The PDR - 1K military detector can measure beta and gamma rays only but it cannot detect alpha particles. Because of its characteristics, the Korea army has weaknesses in tactical operations. The PDR - 1K sensor is based on a GM - tube sensor system. For the mechanical structure, detectors utilizing a GM-tube sensor do not work on a high - radiation battlefield and they do not carry out nuclide analysis for fixed electron signal output. In the meantime, the United States of America and Germany are using 'AN/PDR - 77' and 'SVG - 2' that were made from scintillator sensors. They have excellent physical qualities and radiation responses for military use. Also, nuclide analysis is available. Therefore, in this study we fabricated a military - grade scintillator radiation sensor that is able to detect alpha, beta, and gamma - rays to overcome PDR - 1K's weaknesses. Also, physical characteristics and radiation response evaluation for the fabricated sensors was carried out. The alpha - particle sensor and beta - ray sensor were fabricated using a ZnS(Ag) powder state scintillator, and a Saint - Gobain organic plastic scintillator BC-408 panel, respectively. The gamma ray sensor was manufactured using a 10 x 10 x 10 mm{sup 3} CsI(Tl) inorganic scintillator crystal. A detailed explanation follows. The alpha particle sensor was fabricated by using air - brushing method to Zns(Ag) powder scintillator spreading. The ZnS(Ag) layer thickness was 35 {mu}m (detection

  18. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Alignment performance monitoring for ASML systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woong-Jae; Temchenko, Vlad; Hauck, Tarja; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2006-03-01

    In today's semiconductor industry downscaling of the IC design puts a stringent requirement on pattern overlay control. Tighter overlay requirements lead to exceedingly higher rework rates, meaning additional costs to manufacturing. Better alignment control became a target of engineering efforts to decrease rework rate for high-end technologies. Overlay performance is influenced by known parameters such as "Shift, Scaling, Rotation, etc", and unknown parameters defined as "Process Induced Variation", which are difficult to control by means of a process automation system. In reality, this process-induced variation leads to a strong wafer to wafer, or lot to lot variation, which are not easy to detect in the mass-production environment which uses sampling overlay measurements for only several wafers in a lot. An engineering task of finding and correcting a root cause for Process Induced Variations of overlay performance will be greatly simplified if the unknown parameters could be tracked for each wafer. This paper introduces an alignment performance monitoring method based on analysis of automatically generated "AWE" files for ASML scanner systems. Because "AWE" files include alignment results for each aligned wafer, it is possible to use them for monitoring, controlling and correcting the causes of "process induced" overlay performance without requiring extra measurement time. Since "AWE" files include alignment information for different alignment marks, it is also possible to select and optimize the best alignment recipe for each alignment strategy. Several case studies provided in our paper will demonstrate how AWE file analysis can be used to assist engineer in interpreting pattern alignment data. Since implementing our alignment data monitoring method, we were able to achieve significant improvement of alignment and overlay performance without additional overlay measurement time. We also noticed that the rework rate coming from alignment went down and

  20. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  1. Influence of material and geometry on the performance of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Henrich, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors offer the capability to detect electromagnetic waves on a single photon level in a wavelength range that far exceeds that of alternative detector types. However, above a certain threshold wavelength, the efficiency of those detectors decreases stronlgy, leading to a poor performance in the far-infrared range. Influences on this threshold are studied and approaches for improvement are verified experimentally by measurement of the device performance.

  2. Characteristic Performance Evaluation of a new SAGe Well Detector for Small and Large Sample Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adekola, A.S.; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Jaederstroem, H.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.; Carmichael, K.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental scientific research requires a detector that has sensitivity low enough to reveal the presence of any contaminant in the sample at a reasonable counting time. Canberra developed the germanium detector geometry called Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector, which is now available commercially. The SAGe Well detector is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology capable of advancing many environmental scientific research applications. The performance of this detector has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, and on the end cap of the detector. The detector has energy resolution performance similar to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the existing coaxial and Well detectors. Energy resolution performance of 750 eV Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0 - 2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed for detector volumes up to 425 cm 3 . The SAGe Well detector offers an optional 28 mm well diameter with the same energy resolution as the standard 16 mm well. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. The detector is compatible with electric coolers without any sacrifice in performance and supports the Canberra Mathematical efficiency calibration method (In situ Object Calibration Software or ISOCS, and Laboratory Source-less Calibration Software or LABSOCS). In addition, the SAGe Well detector supports true coincidence summing available in the ISOCS/LABSOCS framework. The improved resolution performance greatly enhances detection sensitivity of this new detector for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well. This results in lower minimum detectable

  3. Characteristic Performance Evaluation of a new SAGe Well Detector for Small and Large Sample Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adekola, A.S.; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Jaederstroem, H.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.; Carmichael, K. [Canberra Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Environmental scientific research requires a detector that has sensitivity low enough to reveal the presence of any contaminant in the sample at a reasonable counting time. Canberra developed the germanium detector geometry called Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector, which is now available commercially. The SAGe Well detector is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology capable of advancing many environmental scientific research applications. The performance of this detector has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, and on the end cap of the detector. The detector has energy resolution performance similar to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the existing coaxial and Well detectors. Energy resolution performance of 750 eV Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0 - 2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed for detector volumes up to 425 cm{sup 3}. The SAGe Well detector offers an optional 28 mm well diameter with the same energy resolution as the standard 16 mm well. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. The detector is compatible with electric coolers without any sacrifice in performance and supports the Canberra Mathematical efficiency calibration method (In situ Object Calibration Software or ISOCS, and Laboratory Source-less Calibration Software or LABSOCS). In addition, the SAGe Well detector supports true coincidence summing available in the ISOCS/LABSOCS framework. The improved resolution performance greatly enhances detection sensitivity of this new detector for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well. This results in lower minimum detectable

  4. SiC detectors to monitor ionizing radiations emitted from nuclear events and plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cannavò, A.

    2016-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor detectors are increasingly employed in Nuclear Physics for their advantages with respect to traditional silicon (Si). Such detectors show an energy resolution, charge mobility, response velocity and detection efficiency similar to Si detectors. However, the higher band gap (3.26 eV), the lower leakage current (∼10 pA) maintained also at room temperature, the higher radiation hardness and the higher density with respect to Si represent some indisputable advantages characterizing such detectors. The devices can be employed at high temperatures, at high absorbed doses and in the case of high visible light intensities, for example, in plasma, for limited exposition times without damage. Generally SiC Schottky diodes are employed in reverse polarization with an active region depth of the order of 100 µm, purity below 1014 cm-3 and an active area lower than 1 cm2. Measurements in the regime of proportionality with the radiation energy released in the active region and measurements in time-of-flight configuration are employed for nuclear emission events produced at both low and high fluences. Alpha spectra demonstrated an energy resolution of about 1.3% at 5.8 MeV. Radiation emission from laser-generated plasma can be monitored in terms of detected photons, electrons and ions, using the laser pulse as a start signal and the radiation detection as a stop signal, enabling to measure the ion velocity by knowing the target-detector flight distance. SiC spectra acquired in the Messina University laboratories using radioactive ion sources and at the PALS laboratory facility in Prague (Czech Republic) are presented. A preliminary study of the use of SiC detectors, embedded in a water equivalent polymer, as a dosimeter is presented and discussed.

  5. Modeling indirect detectors for performance optimization of a digital mammographic detector for dual energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, N; Koukou, V; Sotiropoulou, P; Nikiforidis, G; Kalyvas, N; Michail, C; Valais, I; Kandarakis, I; Fountos, G; Bakas, A

    2015-01-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. The advent of two X-ray energies (low and high) requires a suitable detector. The scope of this work is to determine optimum detector parameters for dual energy applications. The detector was modeled through the linear cascaded (LCS) theory. It was assumed that a phosphor material was coupled to a CMOS photodetector (indirect detection). The pixel size was 22.5 μm. The phosphor thickness was allowed to vary between 20mg/cm 2 and 160mg/cm 2 The phosphor materials examined where Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb and Gd 2 O 2 S:Eu. Two Tungsten (W) anode X-ray spectra at 35 kV (filtered with 100 μm Palladium (Pd)) and 70 kV (filtered with 800 pm Ytterbium (Yb)), corresponding to low and high energy respectively, were considered to be incident on the detector. For each combination the contrast- to-noise ratio (CNR) and the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector, were calculated. The 40 mg/cm 2 and 70 mg/cm 2 Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb exhibited the higher DOG values for the low and high energy correspondingly. Higher CNR between microcalcification and mammary gland exhibited the 70mg/cm 2 and the 100mg/cm 2 Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb for the low and the high energy correspondingly

  6. Pulse shape discrimination performance of inverted coaxial Ge detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domula, A.; Hult, M.; Kermaïdic, Y.; Marissens, G.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Wester, T.; Zuber, K.

    2018-05-01

    We report on the characterization of two inverted coaxial Ge detectors in the context of being employed in future 76Ge neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay experiments. It is an advantage that such detectors can be produced with bigger Ge mass as compared to the planar Broad Energy Ge (BEGe) or p-type Point Contact (PPC) detectors that are currently used in the GERDA and MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR 0 νββ decay experiments respectively. This will result in a lower background for the search of 0 νββ decay due to a reduction of detector surface to volume ratio, cables, electronics and holders which are dominating nearby radioactive sources. The measured resolution near the 76Ge Q-value at 2039 keV is 2.3 keV FWHM and their pulse-shape discrimination of background events are similar to BEGe and PPC detectors. It is concluded that this type of Ge-detector is suitable for usage in 76Ge 0 νββ decay experiments.

  7. Performance of silicon drift detectors in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Gatti, E.; Manzari, V.; Rehak, P.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the properties of silicon drift detectors in a magnetic field was carried out. A silicon drift detector with 41 anodes, providing unambiguous x and y position information, was used for measurements. Studies were done in three principal orientations of the detector relative to the direction of the magnetic field. The magnetic field was varied between 0 and 0.7 T and the drift field between 300 and 600 V/cm. Basic agreement with the theory of electron transport in semiconductors in a magnetic field was found. The transport properties of electrons in a magnetic field can be described by a mobility matrix. The components of the matrix depend on the electron mobility, Hall mobility and on the vector of the magnetic field. The precision of measurement was better than 0.2% for most of the parameters. For the electric field of a silicon drift detector, there is a first-order effect of the magnetic field only in one out of three principal directions. In this direction, the plane of the detector is perpendicular to the magnetic field and electrons drift at an angle α relative to the direction of the drift field. In two other principal directions, which are more important for tracking of the particles with drift detectors, there are no first-order magnetic effects. (orig.)

  8. Performance Monitoring Techniques Supporting Cognitive Optical Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Borkowski, Robert; Zibar, Darko

    2013-01-01

    High degree of heterogeneity of future optical networks, such as services with different quality-of-transmission requirements, modulation formats and switching techniques, will pose a challenge for the control and optimization of different parameters. Incorporation of cognitive techniques can help...... to solve this issue by realizing a network that can observe, act, learn and optimize its performance, taking into account end-to-end goals. In this letter we present the approach of cognition applied to heterogeneous optical networks developed in the framework of the EU project CHRON: Cognitive...... Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical Network. We focus on the approaches developed in the project for optical performance monitoring, which enable the feedback from the physical layer to the cognitive decision system by providing accurate description of the performance of the established lightpaths....

  9. On-line generation of three-dimensional core power distribution using incore detector signals to monitor safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bog; Na, Man Gyun; Lee, Yoon Joon

    2004-01-01

    It is essential in commercial reactors that the safety limits imposed on the fuel pellets and fuel clad barriers, such as the Linear Power Density (LPD) and the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR), are not violated during reactor operations. In order to accurately monitor the safety limits of current reactor states, a detailed three-dimensional (3D) core power distribution should be estimated from the in-core detector signals. In this paper, we propose a calculation methodology for detailed 3D core power distribution, using in-core detector signals and core monitoring constants such as the 3D Coupling Coefficients (3DCC), node power fraction, and pin-to-node factors. Also, the calculation method for several core safety parameters is introduced. The core monitoring constants for the real core state are promptly provided by the core design code and on-line MASTER(Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors), coupled with the core monitoring program. Through the plant computer, core state variables, which include reactor thermal power, control rod bank position, boron concentration, inlet moderator temperature, and flow rate, are supplied as input data for MASTER. MASTER performs the core calculation based on the neutron balance equation and generates several core monitoring constants corresponding to the real core state in addition to the expected core power distribution. The accuracy of the developed method is verified through a comparison with the current CECOR method. Because in all the verification calculation cases the proposed method shows a more conservative value than the best estimated value and a less conservative one than the current CECOR and COLSS methods, it is also confirmed that this method secures a greater operating margin through the simulation of the YGN-3 cycle-1 core from the viewpoint of the power peaking factor for the LPD and the pseudo hot pin axial power distribution for the DNBR calculation

  10. Monitoring of performance and training in rowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäestu, Jarek; Jürimäe, Jaak; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2005-01-01

    Rowing is a strength-endurance type of sport and competition performance depends on factors such as aerobic and anaerobic power, physical power, rowing technique and tactics. Therefore, a rower has to develop several capacities in order to be successful and a valid testing battery of a rower has to include parameters that are highly related to rowing performance. Endurance training is the mainstay in rowing. For the 2000 m race, power training at high velocities should be preferred to resistance training at low velocities in order to train more specifically during the off-season. The specific training of the international rower has to be approximately 70% of the whole training time. Several studies have reported different biochemical parameters for monitoring the training of rowers. There is some evidence that plasma leptin is more sensitive to training volume changes than specific stress hormones (e.g. cortisol, testosterone, growth hormone). In rowing, the stress hormone reactions to training volume and/or intensity changes are controversial. The Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes measures both stress and recovery, and may therefore be more effective than the previously used Borg ratio scale or the Profile of Mood States, which both focus mainly on the stress component. In the future, probably the most effective way to evaluate the training of rowers is to monitor both stress and recovery components at the same time, using both psychometric data together with the biochemical and performance parameters.

  11. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh self powered neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juna, Byung Jin; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun; Jung, Hoan Sung

    2012-01-01

    Rhodium (Rh) self powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) are widely used for on line monitoring of local neutron flux. Its signal is slower than the actual variation of neutron flux owing to a delayed β decay of the Rh activation product, but real time monitoring is possible by solving equations between the neutron reaction rate in the detector and its signal. While the measuring system is highly reliable, the accuracy depends on the method solving the equations and accuracy of the parameters in the equations. The uncertain parameters are the contribution of gamma rays to the signal, and the branching ratios of Rh 104 and Rh 104m after the neutron absorption of Rh 103. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh SPNDs has been quite successful for neutron transmutation doping (NTD) at HANARO. We revisited the initial data used for the verification of a real time monitoring system, to refine algorithm for a better solution and to check the parameters for correctness. As a result, we suggest an effective way to determine the prompt parameter

  12. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh self powered neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juna, Byung Jin; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Sang Jun; Jung, Hoan Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Rhodium (Rh) self powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) are widely used for on line monitoring of local neutron flux. Its signal is slower than the actual variation of neutron flux owing to a delayed {beta} decay of the Rh activation product, but real time monitoring is possible by solving equations between the neutron reaction rate in the detector and its signal. While the measuring system is highly reliable, the accuracy depends on the method solving the equations and accuracy of the parameters in the equations. The uncertain parameters are the contribution of gamma rays to the signal, and the branching ratios of Rh 104 and Rh 104m after the neutron absorption of Rh 103. Real time neutron flux monitoring using Rh SPNDs has been quite successful for neutron transmutation doping (NTD) at HANARO. We revisited the initial data used for the verification of a real time monitoring system, to refine algorithm for a better solution and to check the parameters for correctness. As a result, we suggest an effective way to determine the prompt parameter.

  13. Indicators to monitor NPP operational safety performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Cobo, Ana

    2002-01-01

    Since December 1995 the IAEA activities on safety performance indicators focused on the elaboration of a framework for the establishment of an operational safety performance indicator programme. The development of this framework began with the consideration of the concept of NPP operational safety performance and the identification of operational safety attributes. For each operational safety attribute, overall indicators, envisioned as providing an overall evaluation of relevant aspects of safety performance, were established. Associated with each overall indicator is a level of strategic indicators intended to provide a bridge from overall to specific indicators. Finally each strategic indicator was supported by a set of specific indicators, which represent quantifiable measures of performance. The programme development was enhanced by pilot plant studies, conducted over a 15 month period from January 1998 to March 1999. The result of all this work is compiled in the IAEA-TECDOC-1141, to be published shortly. This paper presents a summary of this IAEA TECDOC. It describes the operational safety performance indicator framework proposed and discusses the results of and lessons learned from the pilot studies. Despite the efforts described, it is clear that additional research is still necessary in areas such as plant-specific adaptation of proposed frameworks in order to suit individual data collection systems and plant characteristics, indicator selection, indicator definition, goal setting, action thresholds, analysis of trends, indicator display systems, analysis of overall safety performance (i.e., aggregation or combination of indicators), safety culture indicators, qualitative indicators, and use of additional indicators to address issues such as industrial safety attitude and performance, staff welfare, and environmental compliance. This is the rationale for a new IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Development and application of indicators to monitor NPP

  14. Polycrystalline CdTe Detectors A Luminosity Monitor for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Schmickler, Hermann

    2003-01-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimization of the collision parameters and the beam optics. At both sides of the interaction points absorbers are installed to protect the super-conducting accelerator elements from quenches causes by the deposited energy of collision products. The luminosity detectors will be installed in the copper core of these absorbers to measure the electromagnetic and hadronic showers caused by neutral particles that are produced at the proton-proton collision in the interaction points. The detectors have to withstand extreme radiation levels (10^8 Gy/yr at the design luminosity) and their long-term operation has to be assured without requiring humain intervention. In addition the demand for bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurements, i.e. 40MHz detection speed, puts severe constraints on the detectors. Polycrystalline CdTe detectors have a high potential to fu...

  15. Radon monitoring using long-range alpha detector-based technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) technology is being studied for monitoring radon gas concentrations. LRAD-based instruments collect and measure the ionization produced in air by alpha decays. These ions can be moved to a collection grid via electrostatic ion-transport design collected approximately 95% of the radon produced ions, while instruments using an airflow transport design collected from 44% to 77% of these ions, depending on detector geometry. The current produced by collecting this ionization is linear with respect to 222 Rn concentration over the available test range of 0.07 to 820 pCi/L. In the absence of statistical limitations due to low radon concentrations, the speed of response of LRAD-based instruments is determined by the air exchange rate, and therefore changes in radon concentration can be detected in just a few seconds. Recent tests show that at radon concentrations below 20 pCi/L current pulses produced by individual alpha decays can be counted, thus improving detector sensitivity and stability even further. Because these detectors are simple, rugged, and do not consume much power, they are natural candidates for portable, battery operation

  16. B-physics performance with Initial and Complete Inner detector layouts in Data Challenge-1

    CERN Document Server

    Benekos, N C; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Epp, B; Ghete, V M; Jones, R; Kartvelishvili, V G; Lagouri, T; Laporte, J F; Nairz, A; Nikitine, N; Reznicek, P; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Smizanska, M; Testa, M; Toms, K

    2004-01-01

    The B-physics performance for the Initial and the Complete Inner Detector layouts is presented. Selected types of B-physics events were simulated, reconstructed and analyzed using the software tools of ATLAS Data Challenge-1 (DC1). The results were compared to those obtained with an older ATLAS detector design the so-called TDR layout. Within the limitations of the DC1 software tools an attempt was made to evaluate the performance loss due to missing detector parts in the Initial layout in comparison with the Complete detector.

  17. The performance of prototype position-sensitive neutron detectors on SXD at ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.C.

    1989-02-01

    The performance of two position-sensitive neutron detector designed for use on the single crystal diffractometer (SXD) at ISIS is assessed. The two detectors examined were the Anger camera 6 Li-glass scintillator PSD and a prototype fibre-optic encoded PSD based on 6 Li-doped ZnS plastic scintillator. The latter detector is found to be both simpler to fabricate and to produce better results on the evidence to date. A summary of some of the expected science from SXD and the performance of the detectors with respect to this is also given. (author)

  18. Experimental results from a reactor monitoring experiment with a cubic meter scale antineutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, A.

    2007-01-01

    Cubic meter scale antineutrino detectors can stably and no intrusively monitor both plutonium content and reactor power at the few percent level, at a standoff of a few tens of meters. Our Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratories collaboration has deployed a detector to demonstrate this capability at a 3 GWt pressurized water reactor in Southern California, operating 25 meters from the core center, and acquiring data over an approximate one year period. Such monitoring may be useful for tracking power output and plutonium buildup in nuclear reactors, constraining the fissile content and providing the earliest possible measurement of the amount of plutonium in the reactor core. We present our antineutrino event sample, and show that the observed change in antineutrino rate recorded in our detector over the reactor cycle correlates with plutonium ingrowth according to predictions. We present our current precision and estimate the attainable precision of the method, and discuss the benefits this technology may have for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or other safeguards regimes

  19. Performance of an LPD prototype detector at MHz frame rates under Synchrotron and FEL radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A.; Hart, M.; Nicholls, T.; Angelsen, C.; Coughlan, J.; French, M.; Hauf, S.; Kuster, M.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Turcato, M.; Carini, G. A.; Chollet, M.; Herrmann, S. C.; Lemke, H. T.; Nelson, S.; Song, S.; Weaver, M.; Zhu, D.; Meents, A.; Fischer, P.

    2013-11-01

    A MHz frame rate X-ray area detector (LPD — Large Pixel Detector) is under development by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for the European XFEL. The detector will have 1 million pixels and allows analogue storage of 512 images taken at 4.5 MHz in the detector front end. The LPD detector has 500 μm thick silicon sensor tiles that are bump bonded to a readout ASIC. The ASIC's preamplifier provides relatively low noise at high speed which results in a high dynamic range of 105 photons over an energy range of 5-20 keV. Small scale prototypes of 32 × 256 pixels (LPD 2-Tile detector) and 256 × 256 pixels (LPD supermodule detector) are now available for X-ray tests. The performance of prototypes of the detector is reported for first tests under synchrotron radiation (PETRA III at DESY) and Free-Electron-Laser radiation (LCLS at SLAC). The initial performance of the detector in terms of signal range and noise, radiation hardness and spatial and temporal response are reported. The main result is that the 4.5 MHz sampling detection chain is reliably working, including the analogue on-chip memory concept. The detector is at least radiation hard up to 5 MGy at 12 keV. In addition the multiple gain concept has been demonstrated over a dynamic range to 104 at 12 keV with a readout noise equivalent to < 1 photon rms in its most sensitive mode.

  20. Single Wire Detector Performance Over One Year of Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hervas Aguilar, David Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract When ionizing radiation passes through gas chambers in single wire detectors gas molecules separate into ions and electrons. By applying a strong localized electric field near the single wire an avalanche of electrons is created and it can be collected. The current produced in the wire is then proportional to the energy of the particle detected. Nevertheless, many factors can contribute to detector aging effects which are visible in a loss of gain caused by deposition of contaminants on the collecting wire. This study consists on novel data analysis techniques used to process large amounts of data produced by two simultaneously running single wire detectors. Aging effects are analyzed while environmental fluctuations are corrected for. A series of scripts carry out data filtering, data matching, corrections, and finally trend plotting by using ROOT’s extensive libraries developed at CERN.

  1. Personal neutron monitoring using TLD albedo combined with etched tracks detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, N.; Momose, T. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Ibarakiken (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The albedo dosimetry has been carried out in personal neutron monitoring in the MOX fuel plant of JNC Tokai Works, however, it has shortcomings mainly due to the inherently poor energy response. This paper describes our efforts to overcome these difficulties in practical use of albedo dosemeters. The following four subjects are presented: (1) the neutron energy response functions of albedo TLD obtained from the mono-energetic neutron irradiation experiments and the Monte-Carlo calculations, (2) the location- dependent correction factors calculated from the response functions and neutron energy spectra measured in the workplaces, (3) the results of the international personal neutron dosimetry intercomparison program, and (4) the operational comparison program of TLD albedo and etched tracks detector worn by workers engaged in the fabrication process of the MOX fuel plant. Finally, the characteristics of the combination neutron dosemeter using TLD albedo and solid state etched track detector are summarized.

  2. A multi-detector continuous monitor for assessment of 222Rn in the coastal ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulaiova, H.; Peterson, R.; Burnett, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    Radon-222 is a good natural tracer of groundwater discharge and other physical processes in the coastal ocean. Unfortunately, its usefulness is limited by the time consuming nature of collecting individual samples and traditional analysis schemes. An automated multi-detector system is demonstrated that can be used in a continuous survey basis to assess radon activities in coastal ocean waters. The system analyses 222 Rn from a constant stream of water delivered by a submersible pump to an air-water exchanger where radon in the water phase equilibrates with radon in a closed air loop. The air stream is fed to 3 commercial radon-in-air monitors connected in parallel to determine the activity of 222 Rn. By running the detectors out of phase, it is possible to obtain as many as 6 readings per hour with a precision of approximately ±5-15% for typical coastal seawater concentrations. (author)

  3. Monitoring nuclear reactors with anti-neutrino detectors: the ANGRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimenti, Pietro; Leigui, Marcelo Augusto [UFABC - Universidade Federal do ABC. Rua Santa Adelia, 166. Bairro Bangu. Santo Andre - SP (Brazil); Anjos, Joao; Azzi, Gabriel; Rafael, Gama; Ademarlaudo, Barbosa; Lima, Herman; VAZ, Mario; Villar, Arthur [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 22290-180 (Brazil); Gonzales, Luis Fernando; Bezerra, Thiago; Kemp, Ernesto [Unicamp, State University of Campinas, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , Barao Geraldo - Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Pontifical Catholic University - PUC, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22451-900 Gavea - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Guedes, Germano; Faria, Paulo Cesar [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Avenida Transnordestina, Novo Horizonte (Brazil); Pepe, Iuri [Universidade Federal da Bahia - UFBA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    We describe the status of the ANGRA Project, aimed at developing an anti-neutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactors. Indeed the detection of anti-neutrinos provides a unique handle for non-invasive measurements of the nuclear fuel. This kind of measurements are of deep interest for developing new safeguards tools which may help in nuclear non-proliferation programs. The ANGRA experiment, placed at about 30 m from the core of the 4 GW Brazilian nuclear power reactor ANGRA II, is based on a water Cherenkov detector with about one ton target mass. A few thousand antineutrino interactions per day are expected. The latest results from simulations and the status of the construction are presented. (authors)

  4. PMT Dark Noise Monitoring System for Neutrino Detector Borexino Based on the Devicenet Protocol and WEB-Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepurnov, A.S.; Orekhov, D.I.; Maimistov, D.A.; Sabelnikov, A.A.; Etenko, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of PMT dark noise in a neutrino detector BOREXINO is a procedure that indicates condition of the detector. Based on CAN industrial network, top level DeviceNet protocol and WEB visualization, the dark noise monitoring system having 256 channels for the internal detector and for the external muon veto was created. The system is composed as a set of controllers, converting the PMT signals to frequency and transmitting them over Can network. The software is the stack of the DeviceNet protocols, providing the data collecting and transporting. Server-side scripts build web pages of user interface and graphical visualization of data

  5. Timing performances and edge effects of detectors worked from 6-in. silicon slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl.; De Filippo, E.; Di Pietro, A.; Femino, S.; Geraci, M.; Giustolisi, F.; Guazzoni, P.; Iacono Manno, M.; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; Lo Nigro, S.; Musumarra, A.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.; Zetta, L.

    1997-01-01

    Prototypes of new passivated implanted planar silicon detectors, obtained for the first time from 6 in. silicon slices, have been tested. The time and energy resolutions have been studied as a function of the type and energy of the detected particles, in order to test the performances of these detectors for time of flight measurements in the Chimera project. Some problems arising from edge effects observed in double-pad detectors have been solved by using a guard ring. (orig.)

  6. The physics benchmark processes for the detector performance studies used in CLIC CDR Volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.J.; Desch, K.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G.; Grefe, C.; Kraml, S.; Lastovicka, T.; Linssen, L.; Marschall, J.; Martin, S.P.; Muennich, A.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Simon, F.; Strube, J.; Thomson, M.; Wells, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    This note describes the detector benchmark processes used in volume 3 of the CLIC conceptual design report (CDR), which explores a staged construction and operation of the CLIC accelerator. The goal of the detector benchmark studies is to assess the performance of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts for different physics processes and at a few CLIC centre-of-mass energies.

  7. Performance of GEM detectors in high intensity particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmann, S; Ketzer, B; Deutel, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Bondar, A E; Buzulutskov, A F; Shekhtman, L I; Sokolov, A; Tatarinov, A A; Vasilev, A; Kappler, S; Schulte, E C

    2001-01-01

    We describe extensive tests of Double GEM and Triple GEM detectors, including full size prototypes for the COMPASS experiment, exposed to high intensity muon, proton and pion beams at the Paul~Scherrer Institute and at CERN. The measurements aim at detecting problems possible under these operation conditions, the main concern being the occurrence of discharges induced by beam particles. Results on the dependence of the probability for induced discharges on the experimental environment are presented and discussed. Implications for the application of GEM~detectors in experiments at high luminosity colliders are illustrated.

  8. Monitoring and Evaluating Government Performance in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Botlhale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In an era characterised by fiscal stress in the post-global recession era, clichés such as ‘bang for the buck’ are commonplace. Governments are under increasing pressure to spend limited public resources in efficient and  effective ways. Efficient and  effective governments are a necessary, though not sufficient, condition for economic development. Hence, governments have adopted performance-improving interventions such as New Public Management. Botswana jumped into the bandwagon of public sector reforms in the 1990s through interventions such as Performance-based Management Systems. The focus was almost entirely on performance enhancement to the neglect of performance measurement through a result-based Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E framework. However, in 2009, the government decided to mainstream M&E into the development planning regime. Since the M&E tool is still in draft form, Botswana is very favourably circumstanced to learn from others. Meanwhile essentials to do are: attitudinal change, shared vision on M&E, stakeholder management and demand and use of M&E information by policy-makers such as Members of Parliament.

  9. SU-G-JeP1-13: Innovative Tracking Detector for Dose Monitoring in Hadron Therapy: Realization and Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucinski, A; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Paramatti, R; Pinci, D; Russomando, A; Voena, C; Rucinski, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Rome, Rome (Italy); Battistoni, G; Muraro, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Milano, Milano, Milano (Italy); Collamati, F; Faccini, R; Camillocci, E Solfaroli [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Italy, Dipartiment, Rome, Rome (Italy); Collini, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Pisa (Italy); De Lucia, E; Piersanti, L; Toppi, M [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (rome), Rome (Italy); Frallicciardi, P [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, Rome, Rome (Italy); Marafini, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Museo Storico dell, Rome, Rome (Italy); Patera, V; Sciubba, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Sc, Rome, Rome (Italy); and others

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Development of strategies to monitor range uncertainties is necessary to improve treatment planning in Charged Particle Therapy (CPT) and fully exploit the advantages of ion beams. Our group developed (within the framework of the INSIDE project funded by the Italian research ministry) and is currently building a compact detector Dose Profiler (DP) able to backtrack charged secondary particles produced in the patient during the irradiation. Furthermore we are studying monitoring strategy exploiting charged secondary emission profiles to control the range of the ion beam. Methods: This contribution reports on the DP detector design and construction status. The detector consists of a charged secondary tracker composed of scintillating fiber layers and a LYSO calorimeter for particles energy measurement.The detector layout has been optimized using the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software. The simulation of a 220 MeV Carbon beam impinging on a PMMA target has been performed to study the detector response, exploiting previous secondary radiation measurements performed by our group. The emission profile of charged secondary particles was reconstructed backtracking the particles to their generation point to benchmark the DP performances. Results: The DP construction status, including the technological details will be presented. The feasibility of range monitoring with DP will be demonstrated by means of MC studies. The correlation of the charged secondary particles emission shape with the position of the Bragg peak (BP) will be shown, as well as the spatial resolution achievable on the BP position estimation (less than 3 mm) in the clinical like conditions. Conclusion: The simulation studies supported the feasibility of an accurate range monitoring technique exploiting the use of charged secondary fragments emitted during the particle therapy treatment. The DP experimental tests are foreseen in 2016, at CNAO particle therapy center in Pavia.

  10. SU-G-JeP1-13: Innovative Tracking Detector for Dose Monitoring in Hadron Therapy: Realization and Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, A; Mancini-Terracciano, C; Paramatti, R; Pinci, D; Russomando, A; Voena, C; Rucinski, A; Battistoni, G; Muraro, S; Collamati, F; Faccini, R; Camillocci, E Solfaroli; Collini, F; De Lucia, E; Piersanti, L; Toppi, M; Frallicciardi, P; Marafini, M; Patera, V; Sciubba, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Development of strategies to monitor range uncertainties is necessary to improve treatment planning in Charged Particle Therapy (CPT) and fully exploit the advantages of ion beams. Our group developed (within the framework of the INSIDE project funded by the Italian research ministry) and is currently building a compact detector Dose Profiler (DP) able to backtrack charged secondary particles produced in the patient during the irradiation. Furthermore we are studying monitoring strategy exploiting charged secondary emission profiles to control the range of the ion beam. Methods: This contribution reports on the DP detector design and construction status. The detector consists of a charged secondary tracker composed of scintillating fiber layers and a LYSO calorimeter for particles energy measurement.The detector layout has been optimized using the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software. The simulation of a 220 MeV Carbon beam impinging on a PMMA target has been performed to study the detector response, exploiting previous secondary radiation measurements performed by our group. The emission profile of charged secondary particles was reconstructed backtracking the particles to their generation point to benchmark the DP performances. Results: The DP construction status, including the technological details will be presented. The feasibility of range monitoring with DP will be demonstrated by means of MC studies. The correlation of the charged secondary particles emission shape with the position of the Bragg peak (BP) will be shown, as well as the spatial resolution achievable on the BP position estimation (less than 3 mm) in the clinical like conditions. Conclusion: The simulation studies supported the feasibility of an accurate range monitoring technique exploiting the use of charged secondary fragments emitted during the particle therapy treatment. The DP experimental tests are foreseen in 2016, at CNAO particle therapy center in Pavia.

  11. Performance of New and Upgraded Detectors for Luminosity and Beam Condition Measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The beam monitoring and luminosity systems of the CMS experiment are enhanced by several new and upgraded sub-detectors to match the challenges of the LHC operation and physics program at increased energy and higher luminosity. A dedicated pixelated luminosity telescope is installed for a fast and precise luminosity measurement. This detector measures coincidences between several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. An upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using single crystalline diamond sensors. It is equipped with a dedicated front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background, thus serving as online luminosity measurement. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light from fused silica to provide direction sensitivity and excellent time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles....

  12. Performance-Optimization Studies for the CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085406; Roloff, Philipp

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a mutli-TeV linear e+e- collider currently under development at CERN. In the post-LHC era, CLIC will allow to explore a great number of searches for New Physics such as the precise measurements of the Higgs boson. In this master thesis, we mainly focus on the development and the improvement of the vertex detector. The vertex detector requires excellent spatial resolution, low mass, geometrical coverage down to low polar angles, high rate readout for the sensors and new cooling technologies for heat removal. Considering such requirements, the CLIC vertex detector technology is far more advanced in comparison to the technologies currently used in particle physics. This project consists of two main parts. In the first part, we study the vertex detector and optimize its geometry for the use of airflow cooling techniques and also for flavor tagging. In the second part, we implement a decoder which can respect the timing constraints for the CLICpix chip, a silicon pixel detect...

  13. Performance of HPGe detectors in high magnetic fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lorente, A.S.; Achenbach, P.; Agnello, M.; Majling, Lubomír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 573, č. 3 (2007), s. 410-417 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2142 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : hypernuclear gamma-spectroscopy * HPGe detectors Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.114, year: 2007

  14. Hadron-therapy beam monitoring: Towards a new generation of ultra-thin p-type silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouterfa, M.; Aouadi, K.; Bertrand, D.; Olbrechts, B.; Delamare, R.; Raskin, J. P.; Gil, E. C.; Flandre, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hadron-therapy has gained increasing interest for cancer treatment especially within the last decade. System commissioning and quality assurance procedures impose to monitor the particle beam using 2D dose measurements. Nowadays, several monitoring systems exist for hadron-therapy but all show a relatively high influence on the beam properties: indeed, most devices consist of several layers of materials that degrade the beam through scattering and energy losses. For precise treatment purposes, ultra-thin silicon strip detectors are investigated in order to reduce this beam scattering. We assess the beam size increase provoked by the Multiple Coulomb Scattering when passing through Si, to derive a target thickness. Monte-Carlo based simulations show a characteristic scattering opening angle lower than 1 mrad for thicknesses below 20 μm. We then evaluated the fabrication process feasibility. We successfully thinned down silicon wafers to thicknesses lower than 10 μm over areas of several cm 2 . Strip detectors are presently being processed and they will tentatively be thinned down to 20 μm. Moreover, two-dimensional TCAD simulations were carried out to investigate the beam detector performances on p-type Si substrates. Additionally, thick and thin substrates have been compared thanks to electrical simulations. Reducing the pitch between the strips increases breakdown voltage, whereas leakage current is quite insensitive to strips geometrical configuration. The samples are to be characterized as soon as possible in one of the IBA hadron-therapy facilities. For hadron-therapy, this would represent a considerable step forward in terms of treatment precision. (authors)

  15. Performance of thallium bromide semiconductor detectors produced by repeated Bridgman method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Robinson Alves dos; Costa, Fabio Eduardo da; Martins, Joao Francisco Trencher; Hamada, Margarida M.

    2009-01-01

    TlBr crystals have been grown by the Repeated Bridgman method from commercial TlBr materials and characterized to be used as radiation detectors. We have shown that the Repeated Bridgman is effective to reduce the concentration of impurities in TlBr. It was observed that detectors fabricated from higher purity crystal exhibit significant improvement in performance compared to those produced from low purity crystals. However, problems still exist in TlBr detectors, due to the low charge carrier collection efficiency, which is probably caused by additional impurities or defects incorporated during crystal growth and detector fabrication processes. (author)

  16. Performances and ageing study of resistive-anodes Micromegas detectors for HL-LHC environment

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneau, F; Attié, D; Boyer, M; Derré, J; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; Gazis, E; Geralis, T; Giganon, A; Giomataris, I; Herlant, S; Manjarrés, J; Ntomari, E; Schune, Ph; Titov, M; Tsipolitis, G

    2012-01-01

    With the tenfold luminosity increase envisaged at the HL-LHC, the background (photons, neutrons, ...) and the event pile-up probability are expected to increase in proportion in the different experiments, especially in the forward regions like, for instance, the muons chambers of the ATLAS detector. Detectors based on the Micromegas principle should be good alternatives for the detector upgrade in the HL-LHC framework because of a good spatial ( 98%) can be achieved with resistive-anode micromegas detector. An X-rays irradiation has been also performed, showing no ageing effect after more than 21 days exposure and an integrated charge of almost 1C.

  17. Operation and performance of the silicon vertex detector (SVX') at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.P.

    1994-10-01

    The authors describe the operation and performance of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX'), which replaced the CDF SVX detector for run lb of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The new features of the SVX' include AC coupled readout, Field OXide Field Effect Transistor (FOXFET) biasing and radiation hard front end electronics. The authors expect the detector to survive beyond the 100 pb -1 of data taking anticipated for the present CDF physics run. Preliminary results from the collider data show that the detector has a resolution of about 12 μm. This provides a powerful tool to do top and bottom physics

  18. Development of self-powered neutron detectors for neutron flux monitoring in HCLL and HCPB ITER-TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelone, M.; Klix, A.; Pillon, M.; Batistoni, P.; Fischer, U.; Santagata, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Self powered neutron detector (SPND) is attractive neutron monitor for TBM in ITER. •In hard neutron spectra (e.g. TBM) there is the need to optimize their response. •Three state-of-the-art SPNDs were tested using fast and 14 MeV neutrons. •The response of SPNDs is much lower than in thermal neutron flux. •FISPACT calculations performed to find out candidate materials in hard spectra. -- Abstract: Self powered neutron detectors (SPND) have a number of interesting properties (e.g. small dimensions, capability to operate in harsh environments, absence of external bias), so they are attractive neutron monitors for TBM in ITER. However, commercially available SPNDs are optimized for operation in a thermal nuclear reactor where the neutron spectrum is much softer than that expected in a TBM. This fact can limit the use of SPND in a TBM since the effective cross sections for the production of beta emitters are much lower in a fast neutron spectrum. This work represents the first attempt to study SPNDs as neutron flux monitors for TBM. Three state-of-the-art SPND available on the market were bought and tested using fast neutrons at TAPIRO fast neutron source of ENEA Casaccia and with 14 MeV neutrons at the Frascati neutron generator (FNG). The results clearly indicate that in fast neutron spectra, the response of SPNDs is much lower than in thermal neutron flux. Activation calculations were performed using the FISPACT code to find out possible material candidates for SPND suitable for operation in TBM neutron spectra

  19. Development of self-powered neutron detectors for neutron flux monitoring in HCLL and HCPB ITER-TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelone, M., E-mail: maurizio.angelone@enea.it [Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla FusioneENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Klix, A. [Association KIT-EURATOM, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pillon, M.; Batistoni, P. [Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla FusioneENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Fischer, U. [Association KIT-EURATOM, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Santagata, A. [ENEA C.R. Casaccia, via Anguillarese Km. 1,300, 00100 Roma (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Self powered neutron detector (SPND) is attractive neutron monitor for TBM in ITER. •In hard neutron spectra (e.g. TBM) there is the need to optimize their response. •Three state-of-the-art SPNDs were tested using fast and 14 MeV neutrons. •The response of SPNDs is much lower than in thermal neutron flux. •FISPACT calculations performed to find out candidate materials in hard spectra. -- Abstract: Self powered neutron detectors (SPND) have a number of interesting properties (e.g. small dimensions, capability to operate in harsh environments, absence of external bias), so they are attractive neutron monitors for TBM in ITER. However, commercially available SPNDs are optimized for operation in a thermal nuclear reactor where the neutron spectrum is much softer than that expected in a TBM. This fact can limit the use of SPND in a TBM since the effective cross sections for the production of beta emitters are much lower in a fast neutron spectrum. This work represents the first attempt to study SPNDs as neutron flux monitors for TBM. Three state-of-the-art SPND available on the market were bought and tested using fast neutrons at TAPIRO fast neutron source of ENEA Casaccia and with 14 MeV neutrons at the Frascati neutron generator (FNG). The results clearly indicate that in fast neutron spectra, the response of SPNDs is much lower than in thermal neutron flux. Activation calculations were performed using the FISPACT code to find out possible material candidates for SPND suitable for operation in TBM neutron spectra.

  20. Microstrip silicon detectors of the monitoring and triggering systems in the E-161 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubskij, M.Yu.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Moiseev, A.M.; Semenov, P.A.; Leflat, A.K.; Sekhniaidze, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A monitoring and triggering system based on microstrip silicon detectors (MSD) and fast-response low-noise electronics with the number of the readout channels equal to 896, is described. The PMS noise is ENC=25x10 3 e - with the signal integration time of 50 ns. The probability of registering a noise pulse by one channel during data readout cycle is not more than 2.5x10 -6 . The time resolution (FWHM) is (16±3) ns. 17 refs.; 7 figs

  1. Analysis and comparison of the breakdown performance of semi- insulator and dielectric passivated Si strip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Kirti; Chatterji, S; Srivastava-Ajay, K; Shivpuri, R K

    2002-01-01

    The harsh radiation environment in future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments like LHC provides a challenging task to the performance of Si microstrip detectors. Normal operating condition for silicon detectors in HEP experiments are in most cases not as favourable as for experiments in nuclear physics. In HEP experiments the detector may be exposed to moisture and other adverse atmospheric environment. It is therefore utmost important to protect the sensitive surfaces against such poisonous effects. These instabilities can be nearly eliminated and the performance of Si detectors can be improved by implementing suitably passivated metal-overhang structures. This paper presents the influence of the relative permittivity of the passivant on the breakdown performance of the Si detectors using computer simulations. The semi-insulator and the dielectric passivated metal-overhang structures are compared under optimal conditions. The influence of various parameters such as passivation layer thickness, junction dep...

  2. High performance p-i-n CdTe and CdZnTe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Khusainov, A K; Ilves, A G; Morozov, V F; Pustovoit, A K; Arlt, R D

    1999-01-01

    A breakthrough in the performance of p-i-n CdTe and CdZnTe detectors is reported. The detector stability has been significantly improved, allowing their use in precise gamma and XRF applications. Detectors with energy resolution close to Si and Ge were produced operating with only -30--35 deg. C cooling (by a Peltier cooler of 15x15x10 mm size and a consumed power less than 5 W). Presently detectors with volume of up to 300 mm sup 3 are available. In terms of photoelectric effect efficiency it corresponds to HPGe detectors with volumes of about 1.5 cm sup 3. The possibilities of further improvement of CdTe and CdZnTe detector characteristics are discussed in this paper.

  3. Performance simulation and structure design of Binode CdZnTe gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Libo; Li Yulan; Fu Jianqiang; Jiang Hao; Zhang Lan; He Bin; Li Yuanjing

    2014-01-01

    A new electrode structure CdZnTe (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) detector named Binode CdZnTe has been pro- posed in this paper. Together with the softwares of MAXWELL, GEANT4, and ROOT, the charge collection process and its gamma spectrum of the detector have been simulated and the detector structure has been optimized. In order to improve its performance further, Compton scattering effect correction has been used. The simulation results demonstrate that with refined design and Compton scattering effect correction, Binode CdZnTe detectors is capable of achieving 3.92% FWHM at 122 keV, and 1.27% FWHM at 662 keV. Com- pared with other single-polarity (electron-only) detector configurations, Binode CdZnTe detector offers a cost effective and simple structure alternative with comparable energy resolution. (authors)

  4. Features and performance of a large gas Cherenkov detector with threshold regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Alvarez-Taviel, J.; Asenjo, L.; Colino, N.; Diez-Hedo. F.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Hernandez, J.J.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Marquina, M.A.

    1988-01-15

    We present here the development, main features and calibration procedures for a new type of gas Cherenkov detector, based upon the ability to control its threshold by regulating the temperature of the gas used as radiator. We also include the performance of this detector in particle identification.

  5. arXiv Performance of the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00531272

    The ALICE Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector at LHC is based on the Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs). The TOF performance during LHC Run 2 is here reported. Particular attention is given to the improved time resolution reached by TOF detector of $56$ ps, with the consequently improved particle identification capabilities.

  6. The recent performance of the Omega RICH detector in experiment WA89 at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Beusch, W [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Boss, M [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Engelfried, J [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Gerassimov, S G [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Klempt, W [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Lennert, P [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Martens, K [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Newbold, D [Department of Physics, Univ., Bristol (United Kingdom); Rieseberg, H [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Siebert, H W [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Smith, V J [Department of Physics, Univ., Bristol (United Kingdom); Thilmann, O [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Waelder, G [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    1996-03-01

    The hyperon beam experiment WA89 at CERN uses the upgraded Omega RICH detector for identification of {pi}, K and p/p from {Sigma}{sup -}-N reactions. Cherenkov photons from a 5 m long nitrogen radiator are detected in drift chambers with TMAE-loaded ethane. Recent results on the performance of the detector are presented. (orig.).

  7. Performance of CdZnTe coplanar-grid gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, P.N.; Eissler, E.E.

    1995-11-01

    CdZnTe crystals grown using the high-pressure Bridgman method exhibit many properties that are desirable for radiation detector fabrication, such as high resistivity, stable operation, relative ease of processing, and the availability of large volume crystals. However, as is common with other compound semi-conductor materials, currently available CdZnTe crystals have poor charge transport characteristics. This seriously the spectral performance of detectors, especially in gamma-ray detection. The coplanar-grid detection technique was recently developed to address such charge collection problems. This technique was first demonstrated using a 5 mm cube CdZnTe detector, and a dramatic improvement in spectral response has been achieved. These early results verified the effectiveness of this technique and suggested that large-volume gamma-ray detectors with high energy resolution can be realized. To further the development of such detectors, it is important to understand the various factors that affect detector performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of material properties on the spectral performance of CdZnTe coplanar-grid detectors. Theoretical spectral response is to show the level of performance that can be achieved given the typical carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) properties of present-day materials. Nonuniformity in the charge transport properties of the material, which could limit the energy resolution of the detectors, has been studied experimentally and some of the results are presented here

  8. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  9. Charge collection performance of a segmented planar high-purity germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: R.Cooper@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dobson, J. [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston PR2 9HT (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-01

    High-precision scans of a segmented planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector have been performed with a range of finely collimated gamma ray beams allowing the response as a function of gamma ray interaction position to be quantified. This has allowed the development of parametric pulse shape analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in performance. In this paper we report on the performance of this detector, designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) development system.

  10. Performance of fine grained photon position detector using proportional tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemiev, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gordeev, A.; Gorodkov, Y.; Kamishkov, Y.; Lubimov, V.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Shevchenko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Bamberger, A.; Fuchs, M.; Giesen, G.; Heck, W.; Ludwig, J.; Marx, R.; Mocken, T.; Runge, K.; Skodzek, E.; Weber, H.C.; Weltin, A.; Wuelker, M.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the NA24 experiment at the CERN-SPS a photon position detector serves to separate direct photons from abundantly produced π 0 decay photons: electromagnetic showers are measured with an energy- and position-resolution sufficiently good to give a two-gamma resolving power of 1.2 cm. The shower detector covers 3 x 3 m 2 and consists of 12 layers of triangular proportional tubes (7.73 mm pitch) sandwiched with lead (altogether 9.6 X 0 ). For eight layers the analog information is provided by an ADC system. Ambiguities are resolved by the digital information of four additional layers inclined by 45 0 . Prototypes were built in order to test gas mixtures and electronics. The electromagnetic shower development in the PPD and the prototypes are reproduced by Monte Carlo calculations. The homogeneity of the PPD has been checked by calibration measurements. (orig.)

  11. Development and performance of double sided silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batignani, G.; Forti, F.; Moneta, L.; Triggiani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Focardi, E.; Giorgi, M.A.; Parrini, G.; Tonelli, G.

    1991-01-01

    Microstrip silicon detectors with orthogonal readout on opposite sides have been designed and fabricated. The active area of each device is 25 cm 2 and the strip pitch is 25 μm on the junction side and 50 μm on the opposite ohmic side. A space resolution of 15 μm on the junction side (100 μm readout pitch) and 24 μm on the ohmic side (200 μm readout pitch) has been measured. We also report on AC-coupling chips, designed and fabricated in order to allow AC connection of the strips to the amplifiers. These chips are 6.4x5.0 mm 2 and have 100 μm pitch. Both AC-couplers and detectors have been installed as part of the ALEPH minivertex. (orig.)

  12. Performance of the micromegas detector in the CAST experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer Ribas, E.; Geralis, T.; Giganon, A.; Giomataris, Y.; Irastorza, I.G.; Kousouris, K.; Zachariadou, K.

    2007-01-01

    The gaseous micromegas detector designed for the CERN Axion search experiment CAST, operated smoothly during Phase-I, which included the 2003 and 2004 running periods. It exhibited linear response in the energy range of interest (1-10 keV), good spatial sensitivity and energy resolution (15-19% FWHM at 5.9 keV) as well as remarkable stability. The detector's upgrade for the 2004 run, supported by the development of advanced offline analysis tools, improved the background rejection capability, leading to an average rate 5x10 -5 counts/s/cm 2 /keV with 94% cut efficiency. Also, the origin of the detected background was studied with a Monte-Carlo simulation, using the GEANT4 package

  13. High-Performance γ spectrometry Using Ge(Li) Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brethon, J.; Libs, G.; Detourne, G.; Legrand, J.; Boulanger, J.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes a high resolution gamma spectrometer design which use Ge-Li detectors, a cooled field effect transistor preamplifier, and a spectrum stabiliser. The obtained resolution and the 122 keV gamma ray of the 57 Co is 0.96 keV, and 239 Pu, 233 Pa and 95 Zr + 95 Nb spectra are shown for the example. (authors) [fr

  14. Monitoring complex detectors: the uSOP approach in the Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capua, F. Di; Aloisio, A.; Giordano, R.; Ameli, F.; Anastasio, A.; Izzo, V.; Tortone, G.; Branchini, P.

    2017-01-01

    uSOP is a general purpose single board computer designed for deep embedded applications in control and monitoring of detectors, sensors and complex laboratory equipments. It is based on the AM3358 (1 GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor), equipped with USB and Ethernet interfaces. On-board RAM and solid state storage allows hosting a full LINUX distribution. In this paper we discuss the main aspects of the hardware and software design and the expandable peripheral architecture built around field busses. We report on several applications of uSOP system in the Belle II experiment, presently under construction at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). In particular we will report the deployment of uSOP in the monitoring system framework of the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter.

  15. Monitoring complex detectors: the uSOP approach in the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, F.; Aloisio, A.; Ameli, F.; Anastasio, A.; Branchini, P.; Giordano, R.; Izzo, V.; Tortone, G.

    2017-08-01

    uSOP is a general purpose single board computer designed for deep embedded applications in control and monitoring of detectors, sensors and complex laboratory equipments. It is based on the AM3358 (1 GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor), equipped with USB and Ethernet interfaces. On-board RAM and solid state storage allows hosting a full LINUX distribution. In this paper we discuss the main aspects of the hardware and software design and the expandable peripheral architecture built around field busses. We report on several applications of uSOP system in the Belle II experiment, presently under construction at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). In particular we will report the deployment of uSOP in the monitoring system framework of the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter.

  16. Performance of microstrip and microgap gas detectors at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, F.A.F.; Fraga, M.M.F.R.; Marques, R.F.; Margato, L.M.S.; Goncalo, J.R.; Policarpo, A.J.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the operation of microstrip and microgap detectors at various gas pressures up to 6 bar with Kr-CO 2 , Xe-CO 2 and Xe-CH 4 is presented. The data were collected with a microstrip (1000 μm pitch) and a microgap (200 μm pitch) detector using a clean chamber and gas system. It is shown that maximum gain is strongly dependent on pressure and gains as high as 9 x 10 3 were obtained with Kr-CO 2 at 6 bar with a MSGC. With the smaller-pitch MGC we could get a gain of 180 with Xe-CH 4 at 6 bar; the typical energy resolution at 22 keV being about 15%. From the present work one can conclude that microstructures can operate at high pressure and that their application in high-efficiency, low-granularity X-ray detectors with an energy range up to a few tens of keV can be seriously considered. (orig.)

  17. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  18. Detector Control System for the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) is a forward detector using a Roman Pot technique, recently installed in the LHC tunnel. It is aiming at registering protons that were diffractively or electromagnetically scattered in soft and hard processes. Infrastructure of the detector consists of hardware placed both in the tunnel and in the control room USA15 (about 330 meters from the Roman Pots). AFP detector, like the other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, uses the Detector Control System (DCS) to supervise the detector and to ensure its safe and coherent operation, since the incorrect detector performance may influence the physics results. The DCS continuously monitors the detector parameters, subset of which is stored in data bases. Crucial parameters are guarded by alarm system. A detector representation as a hierarchical tree-like structure of well-defined subsystems built with the use of the Finite State Machine (FSM) toolkit allows for overall detector operation and visualization. Every node in the hierarchy is...

  19. Design, characterization and beam test performance of different silicon microstrip detector geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catacchini, E.; Ciampolini, L.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, M.; Meschini, M.; Parrini, G.; Pieri, M.

    1998-01-01

    During the last few years a large number of silicon microstrip detectors has been especially designed and tested in order to study and optimize the performances of the tracking devices to be used in the forward-backward part of the CMS (technical proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-38 LHCC/Pl, 15 December 1994) experiment. Both single and double sided silicon detectors of a trapezoidal ('wedge') shape and with different strip configurations, including prototypes produced with double metal technology, were characterized in the laboratory and tested using high-energy beams. Furthermore, due to the high-radiation environment where the detectors should operate, particular care was devoted to the study of the characteristics of heavily irradiated detectors. The main results of detector performances (charge response, signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution etc.) will be reviewed and discussed. (author)

  20. Performance And Radiation Hardness Of The Atlas/sct Detector Module

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, L

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a general purpose experiment being constructed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at FERN, Geneva. ATLAS is designed to exploit the full physics potential of LHC, in particular to study topics concerning the Higgs mechanism, Super-symmetry and CP violation. The cross sections for the processes under study are extremely small, requiring very high luminosity colliding beams. The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) is an essential part of the Inner Detector tracking system of ATLAS. The active elements of the SCT is 4088 detector modules, tiled on four barrel cylinders and eighteen endcap disks. As a consequence of the high luminosity, the detector modules will operate in a harsh radiation environment. This thesis describes work concerning radiation hardness, beam test performance and methods for production testing of detector modules. The radiation hardness studies have been focused on the electrical performance of the front-end ASIC and the detector module. The results have identified features ...

  1. Simulated minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) for a real-time UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring system with HPGe and LaBr_3 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-01-01

    An automatic real-time UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring system with high-purity germanium (HPGe) and lanthanum bromide (LaBr_3) detectors (NH-UAV) was developed to precisely obtain small-scope nuclide information in major nuclear accidents. The specific minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) calculation method for NH-UAV in the atmospheric environment was deduced in this study for a priori evaluation and quantification of the suitability of NH-UAV in the Fukushima nuclear accident, where the MDAC values of this new equipment were calculated based on Monte Carlo simulation. The effects of radioactive source term size and activity concentration on the MDAC values were analyzed to assess the detection performance of NH-UAV in more realistic environments. Finally, the MDAC values were calculated at different shielding thicknesses of the HPGe detector to improve the detection capabilities of the HPGe detector, and the relationship between the MDAC and the acquisition time of the system was deduced. The MDAC calculation method and data results in this study may be used as a reference for in-situ radioactivity measurement of NH-UAV. - Highlights: • A real-time UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring system (NH-UAV) was developed. • The efficiency calculations and MDAC values are given. • NH-UAV is able to monitor major nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima accident. • The source term size can influence the detection sensitivity of the system. • The HPGe detector possesses measurement thresholds on activity concentration.

  2. Performance of the new high precision luminosity monitor of DELPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Giordano, V.; Guerzoni, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Perrotta, A.; Camporesi, T.; Obraztsov, V.; Paganoni, M.; Vallazza, E.; Bozzo, M.; Cereseto, R.; Barreira, G.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Maio, A.; Onofre, A.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Tome, B.; Carling, H.; Falk, E.; Hedberg, V.; Jarlskog, G.; Kronkvist, I.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Ferrari, P.; Gumenyuk, S.; Leoni, R.; Mazza, R.; Negri, P.; Petrovykh, L.; Terranova, F.; Dharmasiri, D.R.; Nossum, B.; Read, A.L.; Skaali, B.; Rohne, O.; Castellani, L.; Pegoraro, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Ivanyushenkov, I.; Karyukhin, A.; Konopliannikov, A.; Shalanda, N.; Sen'ko, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zaitsev, A.; Bigi, M.; Cassio, V.; Gamba, D.; Gouz, I.; Migliore, E.; Romero, A.; Simonetti, L.; Trapani, P.P.; Bari, M.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.

    1997-01-01

    The STIC calorimeter was installed in the DELPHI detector in 1994. The main goal is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The calorimeter was built using the ''Shashlik'' technique. The light is collected by wavelength shifting fibers and readout by phototetrodes that can operate inside the magnetic field. The detector performance during the 1994-1995 data taking is presented. The different contributions to the systematic error on the luminosity measurement are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Performance and operation experience of the Atlas Semiconductor Tracker and Pixel Detector at the LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Stanecka, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    After more than 3 years of successful operation at the LHC, we report on the operation and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector and Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) functioning in a high luminosity, high radiation environment.

  4. Instrument Performance and Simulation Verification of the POLAR Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Kole, M.; Li, Z. H.; Produit, N.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zhang, J.; Zwolinska, A.; Bao, T. W.; Bernasconi, T.; Cadoux, F.; Feng, M. Z.; Gauvin, N.; Hajdas, W.; Kong, S. W.; Li, H. C.; Li, L.

    2017-01-01

    POLAR is a new satellite-born detector aiming to measure the polarization of an unprecedented number of Gamma-Ray Bursts in the 50-500 keV energy range. The instrument, launched on-board the Tiangong-2 Chinese Space lab on the 15th of September 2016, is designed to measure the polarization of the hard X-ray flux by measuring the distribution of the azimuthal scattering angles of the incoming photons. A detailed understanding of the polarimeter and specifically of the systematic effects induce...

  5. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: Construction, operation, and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acharya, S.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Horák, D.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Kushpil, Svetlana; Lavička, R.; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Šumbera, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 881, č. 2 (2018), s. 88-127 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : fibre/foam sendwich radiator * transition radiation detector * multi-wire proportional drift chamber * Xenon-based gas micture * tracking * lonisation energy loss Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics ; Particles and field physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2016

  6. Performance of the AMS-02 Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P.; Karpinski, W.; Kirn, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Orboeck, J.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Wallraff, W.; Becker, U.; Burger, J.; Henning, R.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Wyatt, J.

    2006-01-01

    For cosmic particle spectroscopy on the International Space Station the AMS experiment will be equipped with a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) to improve particle identification. The TRD has 20 layers of fleece radiator with Xe/CO2 proportional mode straw tube chambers. They are supported in a conically shaped octagon structure made of CFC-Al-honeycomb. For low power consumption VA analog multiplexers are used as front-end readout. A 20 layer prototype built from final design components has achieved proton rejections from 100 to 2000 at 90% electron efficiency for proton beam energies up to 250 GeV with cluster counting, likelihood and neural net selection algorithms.

  7. Lightweight energetic particle detector EPONA and its performance on Giotto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Kirsch, E.; Thompson, A.; O' Sullivan, D.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1987-06-01

    A lightweight energetic particle detector system (EPONA/EPA) is described which was designed to operate in those novel environmental conditions (i) characterised by the varying solar aspect angles and temperatures pertaining during the cruise phase of the Giotto spacecraft and (ii) during the dust bombardment characterising closest approach (approx. 600 km) to the nucleus of comet Halley. Representative data, illustrating the functioning of EPONA during both the Giotto cruise phase and at comet encounter, are represented. The instrument has a wide range of applications to other space experiments where reliable plasma diagnostics are required.

  8. Monitoring of garbage with a 5 x 5 NaI (Tl) detector; Monitoreo de basura con un detector de NaI (Tl) de 5 x 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.; Angeles C, A

    1991-12-15

    So far in that is carried out the first reload of nuclear fuel in the LVC, the monitoring of garbage has been carried out using monitors trade mark Eberline model RM 14. The procedure consists in manually monitoring each object and to separate of the considered 'clean' garbage the objects considered as contaminated, which register greater or equal counts to 100 cpm. This way to process was adequate under normal operation conditions, but not in the operation rhythm that implies a bigger maintenance since the time required for monitoring from 5 to 10 kg. of garbage is of the order of 0.5 hours and the production rhythm of this it ends up being a lot but high. Due to this necessity it was thought about the problem of looking by a more efficient monitoring method. In this work a method that uses a detector of NaI (Tl) of 5 x 5 inches is discussed. (Author)

  9. Monitoring of garbage with a 5 x 5 NaI (Tl) detector; Monitoreo de basura con un detector de NaI (Tl) de 5 x 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes P, A; Becerril V, A; Angeles C, A

    1991-12-15

    So far in that is carried out the first reload of nuclear fuel in the LVC, the monitoring of garbage has been carried out using monitors trade mark Eberline model RM 14. The procedure consists in manually monitoring each object and to separate of the considered 'clean' garbage the objects considered as contaminated, which register greater or equal counts to 100 cpm. This way to process was adequate under normal operation conditions, but not in the operation rhythm that implies a bigger maintenance since the time required for monitoring from 5 to 10 kg. of garbage is of the order of 0.5 hours and the production rhythm of this it ends up being a lot but high. Due to this necessity it was thought about the problem of looking by a more efficient monitoring method. In this work a method that uses a detector of NaI (Tl) of 5 x 5 inches is discussed. (Author)

  10. GEM detector performance with innovative micro-TPC readout in high magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garzia I.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas detector development is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD, allowed to overcome several problems related to other types of commonly used detectors, like drift chamber and micro strips detectors, reducing the rate of discharges and providing better radiation tolerance. Among the most used MPGDs are the Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs. Invented by Sauli in 1997, nowadays GEMs have become an important reality for particle detectors in high energy physics. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness make them also suitable as tracking detectors. The readout scheme is one of the most important features in tracking technology. Analog readout based on the calculation of the center of gravity technique allows to overcome the limit imposed by digital pads, whose spatial resolution is limited by the pitch dimensions. However, the presence of high external magnetic fields can distort the electronic cloud and affect the performance. The development of the micro-TPC reconstruction method brings GEM detectors into a new prospective, improving significantly the spatial resolutionin presence of high magnetic fields. This innovative technique allows to reconstruct the 3-dimensional particle position, as Time Projection Chamber, but within a drift gap of a few millimeters. In these report, the charge centroid and micro-TPC methods are described in details. We discuss the results of several test beams performed with planar chambers in magnetic field. These results are one of the first developments of micro-TPC technique for GEM detectors, which allows to reach unprecedented performance in a high magnetic field of 1 T.

  11. GEM detector performance with innovative micro-TPC readout in high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzia, I.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Calcaterra, A.; Canale, N.; Capodiferro, M.; Cassariti, V.; Cerioni, S.; Chai, J. Y.; Chiozzi, S.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Dong, J.; Evangelisti, F.; Evangelisti, F.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Felici, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Gatta, M.; Greco, M.; Lavezzi, L.; Leng, C. Y.; Li, H.; Maggiora, M.; Malaguti, R.; Marcello, S.; Melchiorri, M.; Mezzadri, G.; Mignone, M.; Morello, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pellegrino, J.; Pelosi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Savrié, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Soldani, E.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Tskhadadze, E.; Verma, S.; Wheadon, R.; Yan, L.

    2018-01-01

    Gas detector development is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD), allowed to overcome several problems related to other types of commonly used detectors, like drift chamber and micro strips detectors, reducing the rate of discharges and providing better radiation tolerance. Among the most used MPGDs are the Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Invented by Sauli in 1997, nowadays GEMs have become an important reality for particle detectors in high energy physics. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness make them also suitable as tracking detectors. The readout scheme is one of the most important features in tracking technology. Analog readout based on the calculation of the center of gravity technique allows to overcome the limit imposed by digital pads, whose spatial resolution is limited by the pitch dimensions. However, the presence of high external magnetic fields can distort the electronic cloud and affect the performance. The development of the micro-TPC reconstruction method brings GEM detectors into a new prospective, improving significantly the spatial resolutionin presence of high magnetic fields. This innovative technique allows to reconstruct the 3-dimensional particle position, as Time Projection Chamber, but within a drift gap of a few millimeters. In these report, the charge centroid and micro-TPC methods are described in details. We discuss the results of several test beams performed with planar chambers in magnetic field. These results are one of the first developments of micro-TPC technique for GEM detectors, which allows to reach unprecedented performance in a high magnetic field of 1 T.

  12. Safety performance monitoring of autonomous marine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, Christoph A.; Utne, Ingrid B.

    2017-01-01

    The marine environment is vast, harsh, and challenging. Unanticipated faults and events might lead to loss of vessels, transported goods, collected scientific data, and business reputation. Hence, systems have to be in place that monitor the safety performance of operation and indicate if it drifts into an intolerable safety level. This article proposes a process for developing safety indicators for the operation of autonomous marine systems (AMS). The condition of safety barriers and resilience engineering form the basis for the development of safety indicators, synthesizing and further adjusting the dual assurance and the resilience based early warning indicator (REWI) approaches. The article locates the process for developing safety indicators in the system life cycle emphasizing a timely implementation of the safety indicators. The resulting safety indicators reflect safety in AMS operation and can assist in planning of operations, in daily operational decision-making, and identification of improvements. Operation of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) exemplifies the process for developing safety indicators and their implementation. The case study shows that the proposed process leads to a comprehensive set of safety indicators. It is expected that application of the resulting safety indicators consequently will contribute to safer operation of current and future AMS. - Highlights: • Process for developing safety indicators for autonomous marine systems. • Safety indicators based on safety barriers and resilience thinking. • Location of the development process in the system lifecycle. • Case study on AUV demonstrating applicability of the process.

  13. Performance and calibration of wave length shifting fibers for K2K SciBar detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Taichi

    2004-01-01

    The wave length shifting (WLS) fibers (Kuraray Y11 (200) MS) are used for light collection from scintillators in the SciBar detector. The performance of WLS fibers was measured before installation. Because the number of WLS fibers is about 15,000, it is necessary to make a system to measure attenuation length of WLS fibers efficiently. I will report the pre-calibration method for measurement and the performance of the WLS fibers in SciBar detector. (author)

  14. Performance Evaluation of New Generation CdZnTe Detectors for Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovs, V.; Mintcheva, J.; Berlizov, A.; Lebrun, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride detectors (CdZnTe) have found a wide application in nondestructive assay measurements in the IAEA's verification practice. It is because of their form factor, usability, sensitivity and good spectral characteristics that they are extensively used for fresh and spent fuel attribute test measurements. Until now, the series of CdZnTe detectors utilized in the IAEA have covered the range of 5 mm 3 , 20 mm 3 , 60 mm 3 and 500mm 3 of sensitive volume. Recently, new CdZnTe detectors with improved spectroscopic characteristics and significantly bigger active volume have become available, owing to advances in crystal and detector manufacturing and signal processing technologies. The distinctive feature of this new technological development is the application of a low-intensity monochromatic optical stimulation with infrared (IR) light. The use of IR illumination with a properly chosen wavelength close to the absorption edge of the CdZnTe can significantly improve the performance of the detectors. Recognizing potential benefits of these detectors in safeguards applications, the IAEA has performed an evaluation of their performance characteristics. Under evaluation were several new detectors with sensitive volumes of 500 mm 3 , 1500 mm 3 and 4000 mm 3 , as well as all-in-one 60 mm 3 , 500 mm 3 and 1500 mm 3 integrated micro-spectrometers available from RITEC, Latvia. In addition to the standard performance characteristics, such as energy resolution, peak shape, efficiency, linearity, throughput and temperature stability, the potential use of the detectors for safeguards specific measurements, such as uranium enrichment with infinite thickness method, was of particular interest. The paper will describe the advances in the CdZnTe detector technology and present the results of their performance evaluation. (author)

  15. Absorption of scintillation light in a 100l liquid xenon γ-ray detector and expected detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Doke, T.; Grassi, M.; Grebenuk, A.A.; Grigoriev, D.N.; Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Kikuchi, J.; Maki, A.; Mashimo, T.; Mihara, S.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Mori, T.; Nicolo, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Ootani, W.; Ozone, K.; Papa, A.; Pazzi, R.; Ritt, S.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Suzuki, S.; Terasawa, K.; Yamashita, M.; Yamashita, S.; Yoshimura, T.; Yuri, Yu.

    2005-01-01

    An 800l liquid xenon scintillation γ-ray detector is being developed for the MEG experiment which will search for μ + ->e + γdecay at the Paul Scherrer Institut. Absorption of scintillation light of xenon by impurities might possibly limit the performance of such a detector. We used a 100l prototype with an active volume of 372x372x496mm 3 to study the scintillation light absorption. We have developed a method to evaluate the light absorption, separately from elastic scattering of light, by measuring cosmic rays and α sources. By using a suitable purification technique, an absorption length longer than 100cm has been achieved. The effects of the light absorption on the energy resolution are estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

  16. Using two detectors concurrently to monitor ambient dose equivalent rates in vehicle surveys of radiocesium contaminated land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Minoru; Shibamichi, Masaru; Malins, Alex; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Mitsuhiro; Saegusa, Jun; Yoneya, Masayuki

    2017-10-01

    In response to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), vehicle-borne monitoring was used to map radiation levels for radiological protection of the public. By convention measurements from vehicle-borne surveys are converted to the ambient dose equivalent rate at 1 m height in the absence of the vehicle. This allows for comparison with results from other types of survey, including surveys with hand-held or airborne instruments. To improve the accuracy of the converted results from vehicle-borne surveys, we investigated combining measurements from two detectors mounted on the vehicle at different heights above the ground. A dual-detector setup was added to a JAEA monitoring car and compared against hand-held survey meter measurements in Fukushima Prefecture. The results obtained by combining measurements from two detectors were within ±20% of the hand-held reference measurements. The mean absolute percentage deviation from the reference measurements was 7.2%. The combined results from the two detectors were more accurate than those from either the roof-mounted detector, or the detector inside the vehicle, taken alone. One issue with vehicle-borne surveys is that ambient dose equivalent rates above roads are not necessarily representative of adjacent areas. This is because radiocesium is often deficient on asphalt surfaces, as it is easily scrubbed off by rain, wind and vehicle tires. To tackle this issue, we investigated mounting heights for vehicle-borne detectors using Monte Carlo gamma-ray simulations. When radiocesium is deficient on a road compared to the adjacent land, mounting detectors high on vehicles yields results closer to the values adjacent to the road. The ratio of ambient dose equivalent rates reported by detectors mounted at different heights in a dual-detector setup indicates whether radiocesium is deficient on the road compared to the adjacent land. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  17. A computer programme to monitor the performance of an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpolo, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    A BASIC computer programme has been developed that measures the long- and short-term stability of an X-ray spectrometer and operational errors (and compares them with the limits specified by the manufacturer) and the dead time of the associated detectors. The programme also carries out checks on the spectrometer with regard to the performance of different combinations of the crystals, the detectors, the collimators, the sin 2 THETA angles, the apertures, the tracking of the sin 2 THETA amplifier, the operation of the second-order spectrum circuits, the operation of the automatic pulse-height analyser, the condition of the detectors, the condition of the X-ray tube, spectral contamination by the tube spectrum, and physical contamination by analytical specimens. Although the measurements take 15 hours, there is no disruption to normal, routine laboratory work since the measurements can be made automatically after routine work has been completed. Only four sample positions are required for this monitoring programme

  18. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M.R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, E., E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Egorov, N. [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-05-11

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage. - Highlights: • Silicon and diamond detectors are proposed for beam loss monitoring at LHC. • The first in situ radiation test of Si and diamond detectors at 1.9 K is described. • Both diamond and silicon detectors survived after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation at 1.9 K. • The rate of Si detectors degradation depends on bias polarity and is larger at V{sub forw}. • Sensitivity of Si detectors irradiated to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} is independent on resistivity.

  19. BEGe detectors in GERDA Phase I - performance, physics analysis and surface events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The Phase I of the Gerda experiment, which has concluded its data taking in Summer 2013, was based on coaxial HPGe detectors already used for IGEX and HdM experiments. In the upcoming Phase II customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will provide the major contribution to the total exposure. The first set of BEGe detectors has been deployed in Gerda since June 2012. The data collected in Phase I show the performance achieved in terms of spectroscopy and pulse shape discrimination. In particular the strongest background source, the {sup 42}K beta decay from the liquid argon surrounding the detectors, has been effectively rejected. The signals due to beta decay on the detector surface are indeed characterized by a longer charge collection time. This talk focuses on this key feature of the BEGe-PSD.

  20. Status of the ATLAS Pixel Detector and its performance after three years of operation

    CERN Document Server

    Favareto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is very important for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. The detector performance is excellent: ~96 % of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, and a good alignment allows high quality track resolution

  1. Status of the ATLAS Pixel Detector and its performance after three years of operation

    CERN Document Server

    Favareto, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is very important for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. The detector performance is excellent: ~96% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, and a good alignment allows high quality track resolution.

  2. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  3. Performance of self-powered neutron detectors in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, H.D.; Bozarch, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    A typical Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactor (PWR) contains 364 rhodium self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and 52 background detectors. The detectors are inserted into the reactor core in 52 dry, multidetector assemblies. Each assembly contains seven SPNDs and one background detector. By mid-1977, eight B and W PWRs, each fitted with SPNDs, were in operation. Many of the SPNDs have operated successfully for more than four years. This paper describes the operational performance of the SPNDs and special tests conducted to improve that performance. Topics included are (1) insulation performance versus neutron dose to the SPND, (2) background signals in the leadwire region of the SPND, and (3) depletion of the SPND emitter versus absorbed neutron dose

  4. Shot-Noise-Limited Dual-Beam Detector for Atmospheric Trace-Gas Monitoring with Near-Infrared Diode Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durry, Georges; Pouchet, Ivan; Amarouche, Nadir; Danguy, Théodore; Megie, Gerard

    2000-10-01

    A dual-beam detector is used to measure atmospheric trace species by differential absorption spectroscopy with commercial near-infrared InGaAs laser diodes. It is implemented on the Spectrom tre Diodes Laser Accordables, a balloonborne tunable diode laser spectrometer devoted to the in situ monitoring of CH 4 and H 2 O. The dual-beam detector is made of simple analogical subtractor circuits combined with InGaAs photodiodes. The detection strategy consists in taking the balanced analogical difference between the reference and the sample signals detected at the input and the output of an open optical multipass cell to apply the full dynamic range of the measurements (16 digits) to the weak molecular absorption information. The obtained sensitivity approaches the shot-noise limit. With a 56-m optical cell, the detection limit obtained when the spectra is recorded within 8 ms is 10 4 (expressed in absorbance units). The design and performances of both a simple substractor and an upgraded feedback substractor circuit are discussed with regard to atmospheric in situ CH 4 absorption spectra measured in the 1.653- m region. Mixing ratios are obtained from the absorption spectra by application of a nonlinear least-squares fit to the full molecular line shape in conjunction with in situ P and T measurements.

  5. Performance of low-cost X-ray area detectors with consumer digital cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panna, A.; Gomella, A.A.; Harmon, K.J.; Chen, P.; Miao, H.; Bennett, E.E.; Wen, H.

    2015-01-01

    We constructed X-ray detectors using consumer-grade digital cameras coupled to commercial X-ray phosphors. Several detector configurations were tested against the Varian PaxScan 3024M (Varian 3024M) digital flat panel detector. These include consumer cameras (Nikon D800, Nikon D700, and Nikon D3X) coupled to a green emission phosphor in a back-lit, normal incidence geometry, and in a front-lit, oblique incidence geometry. We used the photon transfer method to evaluate detector sensitivity and dark noise, and the edge test method to evaluate their spatial resolution. The essential specifications provided by our evaluation include discrete charge events captured per mm 2 per unit exposure surface dose, dark noise in equivalents of charge events per pixel, and spatial resolution in terms of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the detector's line spread function (LSF). Measurements were performed using a tungsten anode X-ray tube at 50 kVp. The results show that the home-built detectors provide better sensitivity and lower noise than the commercial flat panel detector, and some have better spatial resolution. The trade-off is substantially smaller imaging areas. Given their much lower costs, these home-built detectors are attractive options for prototype development of low-dose imaging applications

  6. Performance of the Totem Detectors at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00062364; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Cecchi, R.; Covault, C.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Deile, M.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Karev, A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Lokajíček, M.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodríguez, F.; Macrí, M.; Mäki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Thys, A.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vítek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The TOTEM Experiment is designed to measure the total proton-proton cross-section with the luminosity-independent method and to study elastic and diffractive pp scattering at the LHC. To achieve optimum forward coverage for charged particles emitted by the pp collisions in the interaction point IP5, two tracking telescopes, T1 and T2, are installed on each side of the IP in the pseudorapidity region 3.1 $\\le |\\eta| \\le $6.5, and special movable beam-pipe insertions – called Roman Pots (RP) – are placed at distances of ±147m and ±220m from IP5. This article describes in detail the working of the TOTEM detector to produce physics results in the first three years of operation and data taking at the LHC.

  7. Enhancing the performance of cooperative face detector by NFGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesugade, Snehal; Dave, Palak; Srivastava, Srinkhala; Das, Apurba

    2015-07-01

    Computerized human face detection is an important task of deformable pattern recognition in today's world. Especially in cooperative authentication scenarios like ATM fraud detection, attendance recording, video tracking and video surveillance, the accuracy of the face detection engine in terms of accuracy, memory utilization and speed have been active areas of research for the last decade. The Haar based face detection or SIFT and EBGM based face recognition systems are fairly reliable in this regard. But, there the features are extracted in terms of gray textures. When the input is a high resolution online video with a fairly large viewing area, Haar needs to search for face everywhere (say 352×250 pixels) and every time (e.g., 30 FPS capture all the time). In the current paper we have proposed to address both the aforementioned scenarios by a neuro-visually inspired method of figure-ground segregation (NFGS) [5] to result in a two-dimensional binary array from gray face image. The NFGS would identify the reference video frame in a low sampling rate and updates the same with significant change of environment like illumination. The proposed algorithm would trigger the face detector only when appearance of a new entity is encountered into the viewing area. To address the detection accuracy, classical face detector would be enabled only in a narrowed down region of interest (RoI) as fed by the NFGS. The act of updating the RoI would be done in each frame online with respect to the moving entity which in turn would improve both FR (False Rejection) and FA (False Acceptance) of the face detection system.

  8. Fast synchrotron and FEL beam monitors based on single-crystal diamond detectors and InGaAs/InAlAs quantum well devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Carrato, S.; Cautero, G.; Menk, R. H.; Jark, W. H.; Ganbold, T.; Biasiol, G.; Callegari, C.; Coreno, M.; De Sio, A.; Pace, E.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous photon-beam position and intensity monitoring is becoming of increasing importance for new-generation synchrotron radiation sources and free-electron lasers (FEL). Thus, novel concepts of beam diagnostics are required in order to keep such beams under control. From this perspective diamond is a promising material for the production of semitransparent in situ photon beam monitors, which can withstand the high dose rates occurring in such radiation facilities. Here, we report on the development of freestanding, single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond detectors with segmented electrodes. Due to their direct, low-energy band gap, InGaAs quantum well devices operated at room temperature may also be used as fast detectors for photons ranging from visible to X-ray. These features are valuable in low-energy and time-resolved FEL applications. In particular, a novel segmented InGaAs/InAlAs device has been developed and will be discussed. Dedicated measurements carried out on both these devices at the Elettra Synchrotron show their capability to monitor the position and the intensity of the photon beam with bunch-by-bunch temporal performances. Furthermore, preliminary tests have been performed on diamond detectors at the Fermi FEL, extracting quantitative intensity and position information for 100-fs-wide FEL pulses with a photon energy of 28.8 eV.

  9. Hydrologic Monitoring in the Deep Subsurface to Support Repository Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, J. M.; Heath, G. L.; Scott, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    The INL has installed and operated several vadose and ground water monitoring systems in arid and humid sites to depths of about 200m. Some of these systems have been in continuous operation for over 12 years. It is important that the systems be physically robust, simple, yet versatile enough that it can operate for extended time periods with little or no maintenance. Monitoring instruments are frequently installed and run to characterize the site, collect data during site operation, and continue to run for long-term stewardship, necessitating sensors that can be maintained or serviced. Sensors are carefully chosen based on the perceived data requirements over the life of the site. An emphasis is given on direct measurements such as tensiometers (portable and advanced), neutron probe, drain gauge, temperature, wells or sampling for fluids and gases. Other complementary data can include using TDR/capacitance, radiation detectors, and larger scale geophysical techniques (3-d resistivity and EM) for volumetric measurements. Commercially available instruments may have to be modified for their use at greater depths, to allow multiple instruments in a single borehole or to perform the intended monitoring function. Access tubes (some open at the bottom) can be placed to allow insertion of multiple sensors (radiation, neutron and portable sensors/samplers), future drilling/sampling and to install new instruments at a later time. The installation techniques and backfill materials must be chosen and the measurement technique tested to ensure representative data collection for the parameters of interest. The data collection system can be linked to climatic data (precipitation, barometric pressure, snow depth, runoff, surface water sources) that may influence the site's subsurface hydrology. The instruments are then connected to a real-time automated data collection system that collect, stores, and provides access to the data. These systems have been developed that allow easy

  10. Construction process and read-out electronics of amorphous silicon position detectors for multipoint alignment monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C.; Schubert, M.B.; Lutz, B.; Werner, J.H. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M.G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria IFCA/CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-09-01

    We describe the construction process of large-area high-performance transparent amorphous silicon position detecting sensors. Details about the characteristics of the associated local electronic board (LEB), specially designed for these sensors, are given. In addition we report on the performance of a multipoint alignment monitoring application of 12 sensors in a 13 m long light path.

  11. Performance revaluation of a N-type coaxial HPGe detector with front edges crystal using MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azli, Tarek; Chaoui, Zine-El-Abidine

    2015-01-01

    The MCNPX code was used to determine the efficiency of a N-type HPGe detector after two decades of operation. Accounting for the roundedness of the crystal's front edges and an inhomogeneous description of the detector's dead layers were shown to achieve better agreement between measurements and simulation efficiency determination. The calculations were experimentally verified using point sources in the energy range from 50 keV to 1400 keV, and an overall uncertainty less than 2% was achieved. In order to use the detector for different matrices and geometries in radioactivity, the suggested model was validated by changing the counting geometry and by using multi-gamma disc sources. The introduced simulation approach permitted the revaluation of the performance of an HPGe detector in comparison of its initial condition, which is a useful tool for precise determination of the thickness of the inhomogeneous dead layer. - Highlights: • Monte Carlo (MCNPX) simulation of an HPGe detector performance after more than two decades in use. • Investigating influence of detector rounded front edges of crystal. • Achieving good matching between Monte Carlo simulation and experiments by inhomogeneous description of detector dead layers

  12. The EUROBALL neutron wall - design and performance tests of neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Skeppstedt, Ö; Lindström, L; Wadsworth, R; Hibbert, I; Kelsall, N; Jenkins, D; Grawe, H; aGórska, M; Moszynski, M; Sujkowski, Z; Wolski, D; Kapusta, M; Hellström, M; Kalogeropoulos, S; Oner, D; Johnson, A; Cederkäll, J; Klamra, W; Nyberg, J; Weiszflog, M; Kay, J; Griffiths, R; Garces-Narro, J; Pearson, C; Eberth, J

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical design of the EUROBALL neutron wall and neutron detectors, and their performance measured with a sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 sup , sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm fission source are described. The array consists of 15 pseudohexaconical detector units subdivided into three, 149 mm high, hermetically separated segments and a smaller central pentagonal unit subdivided into five segments. The detectors are filled with Bicron BC501A liquid scintillator. Each section of the hexaconical detectors is viewed by a 130 mm diameter Philips XP4512PA photomultiplier while the sections of pentagonal detectors are viewed by Philips XP4312B PMTs. The tests of n-gamma discrimination performed by zero-crossing and time-of-flight methods show a full separation of gamma- and neutron events down to 50 keV recoil electron energy. These tests demonstrate the excellent timing properties of the detectors and an average time resolution of 1.56 ns. The factors determining the efficiency of neutron detectors are discussed. The total efficiency...

  13. Real-time performance monitoring and management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhraja, Vikram S [Los Angeles, CA; Dyer, James D [La Mirada, CA; Martinez Morales, Carlos A [Upland, CA

    2007-06-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  14. Fuel performance evaluation through iodine activity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantharaman, K.; Chandra, R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the failed fuel detection system is to keep a watch on fuel behaviour during operation. This paper describes the evaluation of fuel behaviour by monitoring the activities of various isotopes of iodine both during steady state and during a reactor shutdown. The limitations of this approach also has been explained. The monitoring of tramp uranium for different types of release, namely fixed contamination and continuous release from fuel, is also presented. (author)

  15. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C.J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E.

    2003-01-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25*25 cm 2 . The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification

  16. Innovative thin silicon detectors for monitoring of therapeutic proton beams: preliminary beam tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, A.; Monaco, V.; Attili, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Donetti, M.; Fadavi Mazinani, M.; Fausti, F.; Ferrero, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Hammad Ali, O.; Mandurrino, M.; Manganaro, L.; Mazza, G.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Staiano, A.; Cirio, R.; Boscardin, M.; Paternoster, G.; Ficorella, F.

    2017-12-01

    To fully exploit the physics potentials of particle therapy in delivering dose with high accuracy and selectivity, charged particle therapy needs further improvement. To this scope, a multidisciplinary project (MoVeIT) of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) aims at translating research in charged particle therapy into clinical outcome. New models in the treatment planning system are being developed and validated, using dedicated devices for beam characterization and monitoring in radiobiological and clinical irradiations. Innovative silicon detectors with internal gain layer (LGAD) represent a promising option, overcoming the limits of currently used ionization chambers. Two devices are being developed: one to directly count individual protons at high rates, exploiting the large signal-to-noise ratio and fast collection time in small thicknesses (1 ns in 50 μm) of LGADs, the second to measure the beam energy with time-of-flight techniques, using LGADs optimized for excellent time resolutions (Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors, UFSDs). The preliminary results of first beam tests with therapeutic beam will be presented and discussed.

  17. A 32-channel front-end ASIC for GEM detectors used in beam monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciriello, F.; Altieri, P. R.; Corsi, F.; De Robertis, G.; Felici, G.; Loddo, F.; Lorusso, L.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Stamerra, A.

    2017-11-01

    A multichannel, mixed-signal, front-end ASIC for GEM detectors, intended for beam monitoring in hadron therapy applications, has been designed and prototyped in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The analog channels are based on the classic CSA + shaper processing chain, followed by a peak detector which can work as an analog memory, to simplifiy the analog-to-digital conversion of the peak voltage of the output pulse, proportional to the energy of the detected event. The available hardware resources include an 8-bit A/D converter and a standard-cell digital part, which manages the read-out procedure, in sparse or serial mode. The ASIC is self-triggered and transfers energy and address data to the external DAQ via a fast 100 MHz LVDS link. Preliminary characterization results show that the non-linearity error is limited to 5% for a maximum input charge of about 70 fC, the measured ENC is about 1400e- and the time jitter of the trigger signal generated in response to an injected charge of 60 fC is close to 200 ps.

  18. Analysis of changes in environmental radiation, and three types of environmental radiation detector performance comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H; Seo, J.H; Park, S.M; Yu, B.N; Park, J.H; Joo, K.S

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure ion chamber (GE Reuter-Stokes, HPIC), accuracy is high but the high price and do not have the ability nuclide analysis is a disadvantage. NaI(Tl) and PMT scintillation detector of radioactive materials can be divided. Environmental radiation measurements using a semiconductor with SiPM detector PMT to replace the value of the results were compared. SiPM detector using radiation environment were measured in the field to verify the accuracy and energy resolution. SiPMs performance as environmental radiation measurement equipment and radioactive material distinction as a personal dosimeter based technology, using the above results were prepared. The interest on the environmental radiation due to the Fukushima power plant crisis in Japan has been growing concern about the radiation environment of the relatively close proximity Korea is a very heightened state. Could be confirmed in the radiation environment of nuclear power plants around the analysis and performance of the next generation of environmental radiation meter. Fukushima power plants accident after 2 years, the equipment installed by this analysis meets the performance as a radiation detector could be confirmed as follows. CANA Inc. developed by radionuclides classification of using man-made and natural radionuclides and man-made radionuclides separated, ensure the value of the results were analyzed. Could be and alternative to the conventional detector energy resolution ( 137 CS<15%) and linearity (<15%) to satisfy the performance requirements of the measurement result of environmental radiation detector is considered. SiPM radiation environment changes and HPIC and NaI(TI) scintillation detector installed in Korea of the Fukushima power plant after the accident, radiation environment using a small alternative was to verify the accuracy of the measuring equipment. A big difference in performance as invisible by comparison with the large detector Assay miniaturization rough as a personal

  19. The performance of the ATLAS initial detector layout for B-physics channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epp, B.; Ghete, V.M.; Kuhn, D.; Zhang, Y.J.

    2004-01-01

    At the start-up of LHC one expects parts of the ATLAS detector to be missing. This layout is called initial layout, whereas the fully staged detector is called complete layout. B-physics channels were simulated, reconstructed and analyzed using the software tools of ATLAS data challenge-1 (DC1). The performance of the detector with respect to quantities relevant to the analysis of the B s → D s π channel and the validation of the full chain generation-simulation-reconstruction-analysis were evaluated for the initial and complete layout. (author)

  20. Detector block based on arrays of 144 SiPMs and monolithic scintillators: A performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Iborra, A.; Aguilar, A.; Bellido, P.; García-Olcina, R.; Hernández, L.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J.P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A.; Torres, J.; Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a detector block composed by a monolithic LYSO scintillator coupled to a custom made 12×12 SiPMs array. The design is mainly focused to applications such as Positron Emission Tomography. The readout electronics is based on 3 identical and scalable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). We have determined the main performance of the detector block namely spatial, energy, and time resolution but also the system capability to determine the photon depth of interaction, for different crystal surface treatments. Intrinsic detector spatial resolution values as good as 1.7 mm FWHM and energies of 15% for black painted crystals were measured

  1. Improving the Security and Performance of the BaBar Detector Controls System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotturi, Karen D.

    2003-01-01

    It starts out innocently enough--users want to monitor Online data and so run their own copies of the detector control GUIs in their offices and at home. But over time, the number of processes making requests for values to display on GUIs, webpages and stripcharts can grow, and affect the performance of an Input/Output Controller (IOC) such that it is unable to respond to requests from requests critical to data-taking. At worst, an IOC can hang, its CPU having been allocated 100% to responding to network requests. For the BaBar Online Detector Control System, we were able to eliminate this problem and make great gains in security by moving all of the IOCs to a non-routed, virtual LAN and by enlisting a workstation with two network interface cards to act as the interface between the virtual LAN and the public BaBar network. On the interface machine, we run the Experimental Physics Industrial Control System (EPICS) Channel Access (CA) gateway software (originating from Advanced Photon Source). This software accepts as inputs, all the channels which are loaded into the EPICS databases on all the IOCs. It polls them to update its copy of the values. It answers requests from applications by sending them the currently cached value. We adopted the requirement that data-taking would be independent of the gateway, so that, in the event of a gateway failure, data-taking would be uninterrupted. In this way, we avoided introducing any new risk elements to data-taking. Security rules already in use by the IOC were propagated to the gateway's own security rules and the security of the IOCs themselves was improved by removing them from the public BaBar network

  2. Timing performances of diamond detectors with Charge Sensitive Amplifier readout

    CERN Document Server

    Berretti, M; Minafra, N

    2015-01-01

    Research on particle detector based on synthetic diamonds has always been limited by the cost, quality and availability of the sensitive material. Moreover, the read-out electronics requires particular care due to the small number of electron/hole pairs generated by the passage of a minimum ionizing particle. However, high radiation hardness, low leakage currents and high mobility of the electron/hole pairs make them an attractive solution for the time of flight measurements and the beam monitoring of new high energy physics experiments where the severe radiation environment is a limitation for most of the technologies commonly used in particle detection. In this work we report the results on the timing performance of a 4.5x4.5 mm$^{2}$ scCVD sensor read-out using a charge sensitive amplifier. Both sensors and amplifiers have been purchased from CIVIDEC Instrumentation. The measurement have been performed on minimum ionizing pions in two beam tests at the PSI and CERN-PS facilities with two different detec...

  3. Characterization of dual layer phoswich detector performance for small animal PET using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Choi, Yong; Cho, Gyuseong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2004-01-01

    A positron emission tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging should have high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and dual layer scintillators have been developed for this purpose. In this study, simulations were performed to optimize the order and the length of each crystal of a dual layer phoswich detector, and to evaluate the possibility of measuring signals from each layer of the phoswich detector. A simulation tool GATE was used to estimate the sensitivity and resolution of a small PET scanner. The proposed scanner is based on dual layer phoswich detector modules arranged in a ring of 10 cm diameter. Each module is composed of 8 x 8 arrays of phoswich detectors consisting of LSO and LuYAP with a 2 mm x 2 mm sensitive area coupled to a Hamamatsu R7600-00-M64 PSPMT. The length of the front layer of the phoswich detector varied from 0 to 10 mm at 1 mm intervals, and the total length (LSO + LuYAP) was fixed at 20 mm. The order of the crystal layers of the phoswich detector was also changed. Radial resolutions were kept below 3.4 mm and 3.7 mm over 8 cm FOV, and sensitivities were 7.4% and 8.0% for LSO 5 mm-LuYAP 15 mm, and LuYAP 6 mm-LSO 14 mm phoswich detectors, respectively. Whereas, high and uniform resolutions were achieved by using the LSO front layer, higher sensitivities were obtained by changing the crystal order. The feasibilities for applying crystal identification methods to phoswich detectors consisting of LSO and LuYAP were investigated using simulation and experimentally derived measurements of the light outputs from each layer of the phoswich detector. In this study, the optimal order and lengths of the dual layer phoswich detector were derived in order to achieve high sensitivity and high and uniform radial resolution

  4. The Borexino Thermal Monitoring & Management System and simulations of the fluid-dynamics of the Borexino detector under asymmetrical, changing boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Berguño, D.; Mereu, R.; Cavalcante, P.; Carlini, M.; Ianni, A.; Goretti, A.; Gabriele, F.; Wright, T.; Yokley, Z.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Calaprice, F.; Inzoli, F.

    2018-03-01

    A comprehensive monitoring system for the thermal environment inside the Borexino neutrino detector was developed and installed in order to reduce uncertainties in determining temperatures throughout the detector. A complementary thermal management system limits undesirable thermal couplings between the environment and Borexino's active sections. This strategy is bringing improved radioactive background conditions to the region of interest for the physics signal thanks to reduced fluid mixing induced in the liquid scintillator. Although fluid-dynamical equilibrium has not yet been fully reached, and thermal fine-tuning is possible, the system has proven extremely effective at stabilizing the detector's thermal conditions while offering precise insights into its mechanisms of internal thermal transport. Furthermore, a Computational Fluid-Dynamics analysis has been performed, based on the empirical measurements provided by the thermal monitoring system, and providing information into present and future thermal trends. A two-dimensional modeling approach was implemented in order to achieve a proper understanding of the thermal and fluid-dynamics in Borexino. It was optimized for different regions and periods of interest, focusing on the most critical effects that were identified as influencing background concentrations. Literature experimental case studies were reproduced to benchmark the method and settings, and a Borexino-specific benchmark was implemented in order to validate the modeling approach for thermal transport. Finally, fully-convective models were applied to understand general and specific fluid motions impacting the detector's Active Volume.

  5. Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS Inner Detector with the first beam and cosmic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreazza, A., E-mail: attilio.andreazza@mi.infn.i [Universita degli Studi di Milano and I.N.F.N., Milano (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started data-taking in Autumn 2008 with the inauguration of the LHC. The Inner Detector is a tracking system for charged particles based on three technologies: silicon pixels, silicon micro-strips and drift tubes. The detector was commissioned and calibrated in the ATLAS cavern. Cosmic muons data are used for timing the different components of the system, measuring detector performance on particles and cross-checking the calibration results. Cosmic ray data serve also to align the detector prior to the LHC start up, exercising the alignment procedure to be repeated during the accelerator's operation. Tracking performance after this early alignment is suitable for initial LHC collisions.

  6. LHCb: Detector Module Design, Construction and Performance for the LHCb SciFi Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Ekelhof, R

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker for the LHCb Upgrade (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15) is based on 2.5 m long multi-layered ribbons from 10,000 km of scintillating fibre over 12 planes covering 350 m2. The planes are separated into modular detectors, each with cooled silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays for photo-readout. In this talk, we will present the construction and performance of this novel detector, including the intricacies of scintillating fibre ribbon production, constructing precision detector planes with a rigid and light module design, and the integration of the readout components for this detector. The complexities and issues regarding this active part of the SciFi Tracker will be emphasised along with the current solutions and measured performances.

  7. Enhancing the Responsivity of Uncooled Infrared Detectors Using Plasmonics for High-Performance Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Shebl Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A lead zirconate titanate (PZT;Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 layer embedded infrared (IR detector decorated with wavelength-selective plasmonic crystals has been investigated for high-performance non-dispersive infrared (NDIR spectroscopy. A plasmonic IR detector with an enhanced IR absorption band has been designed based on numerical simulations, fabricated by conventional microfabrication techniques, and characterized with a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser. The enhanced responsivity of the plasmonic IR detector at specific wavelength band has improved the performance of NDIR spectroscopy and pushed the limit of detection (LOD by an order of magnitude. In this paper, a 13-fold enhancement in the LOD of a methane gas sensing using NDIR spectroscopy is demonstrated with the plasmonic IR detector.

  8. Development and testing of the detector for monitoring radon double-filter method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevcik, P.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of physics in the study of radon transport processes in the atmosphere and of testing of atmospheric transport models require sensitive detection devices with low maintenance requirements. The most precise devices involved in the worldwide monitoring program of the atmosphere (GAW) determine volume activity of radon from a variety of daughter products of 222 Rn, resulting in a working volume of the detector (double-filter method). The purpose of this work was to explore theoretically and experimentally the possibilities and limits of a particular simple implementation of this procedure. Tested apparatus consists of a 200 dm 3 chamber (metal drum), where are developed transformation products of radon and semiconductor detector with surface barrier, which registers α particles from the conversion of daughter products 222 Rn collected on a filter at the outlet of the chamber. Testing of the apparatus takes place in the atmosphere with higher concentrations of radon. The measured variations of volume activities 222 Rn have the same character as the variations of radon concentration in the air in laboratory. Minimum detectable activity at 95% signific