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Sample records for detector efficiency calibration

  1. Calibration of detector efficiency of neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hongsheng; He Xijun; Xu Rongkun; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    BF 3 neutron detector has been set up. Detector efficiency is calibrated by associated particle technique. It is about 3.17 x 10 -4 (1 +- 18%). Neutron yield of neutron generator per pulse (10 7 /pulse) is measured by using the detector

  2. New approach for calibration the efficiency of HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnour, I.A.; Wagiran, H.; Suhaimi Hamzah; Siong, W.B.; Mohd Suhaimi Elias

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: This work evaluates the efficiency calibrating of HPGe detector coupled with Canberra GC3018 with Genie 2000 software and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C with Gamma Vision software; available at Neutron activation analysis laboratory in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The efficiency calibration curve was constructed from measurement of an IAEA, standard gamma point sources set composed by 214 Am, 57 Co, 133 Ba, 152 Eu, 137 Cs and 60 Co. The efficiency calibrations were performed for three different geometries: 5, 10 and 15 cm distances from the end cap detector. The polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points. The efficiency equation was established from the known fitted parameters which allow for the efficiency evaluation at particular energy of interest. The study shows that significant deviations in the efficiency, depending on the source-detector distance and photon energy. (author)

  3. Detector characterization for efficiency calibration in different measurement geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, M.; Dinescu, L.; Sima, O.

    2005-01-01

    In order to perform an accurate efficiency calibration for different measurement geometries a good knowledge of the detector characteristics is required. The Monte Carlo simulation program GESPECOR is applied. The detector characterization required for Monte Carlo simulation is achieved using the efficiency values obtained from measuring a point source. The point source was measured in two significant geometries: the source placed in a vertical plane containing the vertical symmetry axis of the detector and in a horizontal plane containing the centre of the active volume of the detector. The measurements were made using gamma spectrometry technique. (authors)

  4. Absolute efficiency calibration of HPGe detector by simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayani, K.; Pant, Amar D.; Verma, Amit K.; Bhosale, N.A.; Anilkumar, S.

    2018-01-01

    High resolution gamma ray spectrometry by HPGe detectors is a powerful radio analytical technique for estimation of activity of various radionuclides. In the present work absolute efficiency calibration of the HPGe detector was carried out using Monte Carlo simulation technique and results are compared with those obtained by experiment using standard radionuclides of 152 Eu and 133 Ba. The coincidence summing correction factors for the measurement of these nuclides were also calculated

  5. High precision efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J.C.; Iacob, V.E.; Helmer, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Many experiments involving measurements of γ rays require a very precise efficiency calibration. Since γ-ray detection and identification also requires good energy resolution, the most commonly used detectors are of the coaxial HPGe type. We have calibrated our 70% HPGe to ∼ 0.2% precision, motivated by the measurement of precise branching ratios (BR) in superallowed 0 + → 0 + β decays. These BRs are essential ingredients in extracting ft-values needed to test the Standard Model via the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, a test that it currently fails by more than two standard deviations. To achieve the required high precision in our efficiency calibration, we measured 17 radioactive sources at a source-detector distance of 15 cm. Some of these were commercial 'standard' sources but we achieved the highest relative precision with 'home-made' sources selected because they have simple decay schemes with negligible side feeding, thus providing exactly matched γ-ray intensities. These latter sources were produced by us at Texas A and M by n-activation or by nuclear reactions. Another critical source among the 17 was a 60 Co source produced by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany: its absolute activity was quoted to better than 0.06%. We used it to establish our absolute efficiency, while all the other sources were used to determine relative efficiencies, extending our calibration over a large energy range (40-3500 keV). Efficiencies were also determined with Monte Carlo calculations performed with the CYLTRAN code. The physical parameters of the Ge crystal were independently determined and only two (unmeasurable) dead-layers were adjusted, within physically reasonable limits, to achieve precise absolute agreement with our measured efficiencies. The combination of measured efficiencies at more than 60 individual energies and Monte Carlo calculations to interpolate between them allows us to quote the efficiency of our

  6. Soucreless efficiency calibration for HPGe detector based on medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chaobin; She Ruogu; Xiao Gang; Zuo Li

    2012-01-01

    Digital phantom of patient and region of interest (supposed to be filled with isotropy volume source) are built from medical CT images. They are used to calculate the detection efficiency of HPGe detectors located outside of human body by sourceless calibration method based on a fast integral technique and MCNP code respectively, and the results from two codes are in good accord besides a max difference about 5% at intermediate energy region. The software produced in this work are in better behavior than Monte Carlo code not only in time consume but also in complexity of problem to solve. (authors)

  7. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucott, Timothy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, Alexander [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  8. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, B., E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I. [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Thomas, J.C. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 CAEN Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-03-11

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  9. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurman, B.; Erlandsson, B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes problems concerning the calibration of germanium detectors for the measurement of gamma-radiation from environmental samples. It also contains a brief description of some ways of reducing the uncertainties concerning the activity determination. These uncertainties have many sources, such as counting statistics, full energy peak efficiency determination, density correction and radionuclide specific-coincidence effects, when environmental samples are investigated at close source-to-detector distances

  10. Absolute efficiency calibration of 6LiF-based solid state thermal neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, Paolo; Cosentino, Luigi; Lo Meo, Sergio; Nolte, Ralf; Radeck, Desiree

    2018-03-01

    The demand for new thermal neutron detectors as an alternative to 3He tubes in research, industrial, safety and homeland security applications, is growing. These needs have triggered research and development activities about new generations of thermal neutron detectors, characterized by reasonable efficiency and gamma rejection comparable to 3He tubes. In this paper we show the state of the art of a promising low-cost technique, based on commercial solid state silicon detectors coupled with thin neutron converter layers of 6LiF deposited onto carbon fiber substrates. A few configurations were studied with the GEANT4 simulation code, and the intrinsic efficiency of the corresponding detectors was calibrated at the PTB Thermal Neutron Calibration Facility. The results show that the measured intrinsic detection efficiency is well reproduced by the simulations, therefore validating the simulation tool in view of new designs. These neutron detectors have also been tested at neutron beam facilities like ISIS (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) and n_TOF (CERN) where a few samples are already in operation for beam flux and 2D profile measurements. Forthcoming applications are foreseen for the online monitoring of spent nuclear fuel casks in interim storage sites.

  11. Least square methods and covariance matrix applied to the relative efficiency calibration of a Ge(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, L.P.; Smith, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The methodology of covariance matrix and square methods have been applied in the relative efficiency calibration for a Ge(Li) detector apllied in the relative efficiency calibration for a Ge(Li) detector. Procedures employed to generate, manipulate and test covariance matrices which serve to properly represent uncertainties of experimental data are discussed. Calibration data fitting using least square methods has been performed for a particular experimental data set. (author) [pt

  12. Study of Efficiency Calibrations of HPGe Detectors for Radioactivity Measurements of Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, S.; Salahel Din, K.; Abbady, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of calibrating of efficiency of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry of bulk environmental samples (Tea, crops, water, and soil) is a significant part of the environmental radioactivity measurements. Here we will discuss the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of three HPGe detectors it as a consequence, it is essential that the efficiency is determined for each set-up employed. Besides to take full advantage at gamma-ray spectrometry, a set of efficiency at several energies which covers the wide the range in energy, the large the number of radionuclides whose concentration can be determined to measure the main natural gamma-ray emitters, the efficiency should be known at least from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y). Radioactive sources were prepared from two different standards, a first mixed standard QC Y 40 containing 210 Pb, 241 Am, 109 Cd, and Co 57 , and the second QC Y 48 containing 241 Am, 109 Cd, 57 Co, 139 Ce, 113 Sn, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 88 Y, and 60 Co is necessary in order to calculate the activity of the different radionuclides contained in a sample. In this work, we will study the efficiency calibration as a function of different parameters as:- Energy of gamma ray from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y), three different detectors A, B, and C, geometry of containers (point source, marinelli beaker, and cylindrical bottle 1 L), height of standard soil samples in bottle 250 ml, and density of standard environmental samples. These standard environmental sample must be measured before added standard solution because we will use the same environmental samples in order to consider the self absorption especially and composition in the case of volume samples.

  13. Efficiency calibration of x-ray HPGe detectors for photons with energies above the Ge K binding energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidana, Nora L., E-mail: nmaidana@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vanin, Vito R.; Jahnke, Viktor [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernández-Varea, José M. [Facultat de Física (ECM and ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martins, Marcos N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brualla, Lorenzo [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    We report on the efficiency calibration of a HPGe x-ray detector using radioactive sources and an analytical expression taken from the literature, in two different arrangements, with and without a broad-angle collimator. The frontal surface of the Ge crystal was scanned with pencil beams of photons. The Ge dead layer was found to be nonuniform, with central and intermediate regions that have thin (μm range) and thick (mm range) dead layers, respectively, surrounded by an insensitive ring. We discuss how this fact explains the observed efficiency curves and generalize the adopted model. We show that changes in the thickness of the Ge-crystal dead layer affect the efficiency of x-ray detectors, but the use of an appropriate broad-beam external collimator limiting the photon flux to the thin dead layer in the central region leads to the expected efficiency dependence with energy and renders the calibration simpler.

  14. Ninth degree polynomial fit function for calculation of efficiency calibrations for Ge(Li) and HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uosif, M.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new 9 th degree polynomial fit function has been constructed to calculate the absolute γ-ray detection efficiencies (ηth) of Ge(Li) and HPGe Detectors, for calculating the absolute efficiency at any interesting γ-energy in the energy range between 25 and 2000 keV and distance between 6 and 148 cm. The total absolute γ -ray detection efficiencies have been calculated for six detectors, three of them are Ge(Li) and three HPGe at different distances. The absolute efficiency of the different detectors was calculated at the specific energy of the standard sources for each measuring distances. In this calculation, experimental (η e xp) and fitting (η f it) efficiency have been calculated. Seven calibrated point sources Am-241, Ba-133, Co-57, Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152 and Ra-226 were used. The uncertainties of efficiency calibration have been calculated also for quality control. The measured (η e xp) and (η f it) calculated efficiency values were compared with efficiency, which calculated, by Gray fit function (time)- The results obtained on the basis of (η e xp)and (η f it) seem to be in very good agreement

  15. On the efficiency calibration of Si(Li) detector in the low-energy region using thick-target bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Z. E-mail: anzhu@scu.edu.cn; Liu, M.T

    2002-10-01

    In this paper, the efficiency calibration of a Si(Li) detector in the low-energy region down to 0.58 keV has been performed using thick-carbon-target bremsstrahlung by 19 keV electron impact. The shape of the efficiency calibration curve was determined from the thick-carbon-target bremsstrahlung spectrum, and the absolute value for the efficiency calibration was obtained from the use of {sup 241}Am radioactive standard source. The modified Wentzel's formula for thick-target bremsstrahlung was employed and it was also compared with the most recently developed theoretical model based upon the doubly differential cross-sections for bremsstrahlung of Kissel, Quarles and Pratt. In the present calculation of theoretical bremsstrahlung, the self-absorption correction and the convolution of detector's response function with the bremsstrahlung spectrum have simultaneously been taken into account. The accuracy for the efficiency calibration in the low-energy region with the method described here was estimated to be about 6%. Moreover, the self-absorption correction calculation based upon the prescription of Wolters et al. has also been presented as an analytical factor with the accuracy of {approx}1%.

  16. Efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector for [18F] FDG activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de; Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa

    2013-01-01

    The radionuclide 18 F, in the form of flurodeoxyglucose (FDG), is the most used radiopharmaceutical for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Due to [ 18 F]FDG increasing demand, it is important to ensure high quality activity measurements in the nuclear medicine practice. Therefore, standardized reference sources are necessary to calibrate of 18 F measuring systems. Usually, the activity measurements are performed in re-entrant ionization chambers, also known as radionuclide calibrators. Among the existing alternatives for the standardization of radioactive sources, the method known as gamma spectrometry is widely used for short-lived radionuclides, since it is essential to minimize source preparation time. The purpose of this work was to perform the standardization of the [ 18 F]FDG solution by gamma spectrometry. In addition, the reference sources calibrated by this method can be used to calibrate and test the radionuclide calibrators from the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA) of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE). Standard sources of 152 Eu, 137 Cs and 68 Ge were used for the efficiency calibration of the spectrometer system. As a result, the efficiency curve as a function of energy was determined in wide energy range from 122 to 1408 keV. Reference sources obtained by this method can be used in [ 18 F]FDG activity measurements comparison programs for PET services localized in the Brazilian Northeast region. (author)

  17. CREPT-MCNP code for efficiency calibration of HPGe detectors with the representative point method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The representative point method for the efficiency calibration of volume samples has been previously proposed. For smoothly implementing the method, a calculation code named CREPT-MCNP has been developed. The code estimates the position of a representative point which is intrinsic to each shape of volume sample. The self-absorption correction factors are also given to make correction on the efficiencies measured at the representative point with a standard point source. Features of the CREPT-MCNP code are presented.

  18. A fitting algorithm based on simulated annealing techniques for efficiency calibration of HPGe detectors using different mathematical functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, S. [Servicio de Radioisotopos, Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: shurtado@us.es; Garcia-Leon, M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Aptd. 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, E.T.S.A. Universidad de Sevilla, Avda, Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-09-11

    In this work several mathematical functions are compared in order to perform the full-energy peak efficiency calibration of HPGe detectors using a 126cm{sup 3} HPGe coaxial detector and gamma-ray energies ranging from 36 to 1460 keV. Statistical tests and Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the performance of the fitting curve equations. Furthermore the fitting procedure of these complex functional forms to experimental data is a non-linear multi-parameter minimization problem. In gamma-ray spectrometry usually non-linear least-squares fitting algorithms (Levenberg-Marquardt method) provide a fast convergence while minimizing {chi}{sub R}{sup 2}, however, sometimes reaching only local minima. In order to overcome that shortcoming a hybrid algorithm based on simulated annealing (HSA) techniques is proposed. Additionally a new function is suggested that models the efficiency curve of germanium detectors in gamma-ray spectrometry.

  19. SU-F-T-368: Improved HPGe Detector Precise Efficiency Calibration with Monte Carlo Simulations and Radioactive Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y. John [Vanderbilt University, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain an improved precise gamma efficiency calibration curve of HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector with a new comprehensive approach. Methods: Both of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation (CYLTRAN) are used to determine HPGe gamma efficiency for energy range of 0–8 MeV. The HPGe is a GMX coaxial 280 cm{sup 3} N-type 70% gamma detector. Using Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS) at the K500 superconducting cyclotron of Texas A&M University, the radioactive nucleus {sup 24} Al was produced and separated. This nucleus has positron decays followed by gamma transitions up to 8 MeV from {sup 24} Mg excited states which is used to do HPGe efficiency calibration. Results: With {sup 24} Al gamma energy spectrum up to 8MeV, the efficiency for γ ray 7.07 MeV at 4.9 cm distance away from the radioactive source {sup 24} Al was obtained at a value of 0.194(4)%, by carefully considering various factors such as positron annihilation, peak summing effect, beta detector efficiency and internal conversion effect. The Monte Carlo simulation (CYLTRAN) gave a value of 0.189%, which was in agreement with the experimental measurements. Applying to different energy points, then a precise efficiency calibration curve of HPGe detector up to 7.07 MeV at 4.9 cm distance away from the source {sup 24} Al was obtained. Using the same data analysis procedure, the efficiency for the 7.07 MeV gamma ray at 15.1 cm from the source {sup 24} Al was obtained at a value of 0.0387(6)%. MC simulation got a similar value of 0.0395%. This discrepancy led us to assign an uncertainty of 3% to the efficiency at 15.1 cm up to 7.07 MeV. The MC calculations also reproduced the intensity of observed single-and double-escape peaks, providing that the effects of positron annihilation-in-flight were incorporated. Conclusion: The precision improved gamma efficiency calibration curve provides more accurate radiation detection and dose calculation for cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  20. Calibration efficiency of HPGe detector in the 50-1800 KeV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, Luzia

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of an HPGe detector in the 50 - 1800 keV energy range, for two geometries for water measurements: Marinelli breaker (850 ml) and a polyethylene flask (100 ml). The experimental data were corrected for the summing effect and fitted to a continuous, differentiable and energy dependent function given by 1n(ε)=b 0 +b 1 .1n(E/E 0 )+ β.1n(E/E 0 ) 2 , where β = b 2 if E>E 0 and β =a 2 if E ≤E 0 ; ε = the full absorption peak efficiency; E is the gamma-ray energy and {b 0 , b 1 , b 2 , a 2 , E 0 } is the parameter set to be fitted. (author)

  1. Validation of an efficiency calibration procedure for a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector used for the measurement of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morera-Gómez, Yasser, E-mail: ymore24@gamail.com [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos, AP 5. Ciudad Nuclear, CP 59350 Cienfuegos (Cuba); Departamento de Química y Edafología, Universidad de Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, Pamplona 31009, Navarra (Spain); Cartas-Aguila, Héctor A.; Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Nuñez-Duartes, Carlos [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos, AP 5. Ciudad Nuclear, CP 59350 Cienfuegos (Cuba)

    2016-05-11

    To obtain reliable measurements of the environmental radionuclide activity using HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detectors, the knowledge of the absolute peak efficiency is required. This work presents a practical procedure for efficiency calibration of a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. The method was performed in an energy range from 40 to 1460 keV and it can be used for both, solid and liquid environmental samples. The calibration was initially verified measuring several reference materials provided by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Finally, through the participation in two Proficiency Tests organized by IAEA for the members of the ALMERA network (Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity) the validity of the developed procedure was confirmed. The validation also showed that measurement of {sup 226}Ra should be conducted using coaxial n-type HPGe detector in order to minimize the true coincidence summing effect. - Highlights: • An efficiency calibration for a coaxial and a well-type HPGe detector was performed. • The calibration was made using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. • The procedure was verified measuring several reference materials provided by IAEA. • Calibrations were validated through the participation in 2 ALMERA Proficiency Tests.

  2. Application of the Monte Carlo method for the efficiency calibration of CsI and NaI detectors for gamma-ray measurements from terrestrial samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccouche, S.; Al-Azmi, D.; Karunakara, N.; Trabelsi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray measurements in terrestrial/environmental samples require the use of high efficient detectors because of the low level of the radionuclide activity concentrations in the samples; thus scintillators are suitable for this purpose. Two scintillation detectors were studied in this work; CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) with identical size for measurement of terrestrial samples for performance study. This work describes a Monte Carlo method for making the full-energy efficiency calibration curves for both detectors using gamma-ray energies associated with the decay of naturally occurring radionuclides 137 Cs (661 keV), 40 K (1460 keV), 238 U ( 214 Bi, 1764 keV) and 232 Th ( 208 Tl, 2614 keV), which are found in terrestrial samples. The magnitude of the coincidence summing effect occurring for the 2614 keV emission of 208 Tl is assessed by simulation. The method provides an efficient tool to make the full-energy efficiency calibration curve for scintillation detectors for any samples geometry and volume in order to determine accurate activity concentrations in terrestrial samples. - Highlights: ► CsI (Tl) and NaI (Tl) detectors were studied for the measurement of terrestrial samples. ► Monte Carlo method was used for efficiency calibration using natural gamma emitting terrestrial radionuclides. ► The coincidence summing effect occurring for the 2614 keV emission of 208 Tl is assessed by simulation.

  3. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debertin, K.

    1983-01-01

    The process of determining the energy-dependent detection probability with measurements using Ge (Li) and high-grade germanium detectors is described. The paper explains which standards are best for a given purpose and given requirements as to accuracy, and how to assess measuring geometry variations and summation corrections. (DG) [de

  4. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  5. Relative efficiency calibration between two silicon drift detectors performed with a monochromatized X-ray generator over the 0.1-1.5 keV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, S.; Boubault, F.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we present the first X-ray calibration performed over the 0.1-1.5 keV spectral range by means of a soft X-ray Manson source and the monochromator SYMPAX. This monochromator, based on a classical Rowland geometry, presents the novelty to be able to board simultaneously two detectors and move them under vacuum in front of the exit slit of the monochromatizing stage. This provides the great advantage to perform radiometric measurements of the monochromatic X-ray photon flux with one reference detector while calibrating another X-ray detector. To achieve this, at least one secondary standard must be operated with SYMPAX. This paper presents thereby an efficiency transfer experiment between a secondary standard silicon drift detector (SDD), previously calibrated on BESSY II synchrotron Facility, and another one ("unknown" SDD), devoted to be used permanently with SYMPAX. The associated calibration process is described as well as corresponding results. Comparison with calibrated measurements performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Radiometric Laboratory shows a very good agreement between the secondary standard and the unknown SDD.

  6. Development of a technique for the efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector for the off gas samples of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sarbjit; Agarwal, Chhavi; Ramaswami, A.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2007-01-01

    Regular monitoring of off gases released to the environment from a nuclear reactor is mandatory. The gaseous fission products are estimated by gamma ray spectrometry using a HPGe detector coupled to a multichannel analyser. In view of the lack of availability of gaseous fission products standards, an indirect method based on the charcoal absorption technique was developed for the efficiency calibration of HPGe detector system using 133B a and 152E u standards. The known activities of 133B a and 152E u are uniformly distributed in a vial having activated charcoal and counted on the HPGe detector system at liquid nitrogen temperature to determine the gamma ray efficiency for the vial having activated charcoal. The ratio of the gamma ray efficiencies of off gas present in the normal vial and the vial having activated charcoal at liquid nitrogen temperature are used to determine the gamma ray efficiency of off gas present in the normal vial. (author)

  7. Ground calibration of the spatial response and quantum efficiency of the CdZnTe hard x-ray detectors for NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Bhalerao, Varun; Cook, W. Rick; Harrison, Fiona A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Rana, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    Pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are currently flying on the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) NASA Astrophysics Small Explorer. While the pixel pitch of the detectors is ≍ 605 μm, we can leverage the detector readout architecture to determine the interaction location of an individual photon to much higher spatial accuracy. The sub-pixel spatial location allows us to finely oversample the point spread function of the optics and reduces imaging artifacts due to pixelation. In this paper we demonstrate how the sub-pixel information is obtained, how the detectors were calibrated, and provide ground verification of the quantum efficiency of our Monte Carlo model of the detector response.

  8. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anil Kumar, G.; Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, 60 Co, 46 Sc, 94 Nb and 24 Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. . The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of 137 Cs and 60 Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  9. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anil Kumar, G., E-mail: anilg@tifr.res.i [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D.A. [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2009-11-21

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, {sup 60}Co, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 94}Nb and {sup 24}Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. . The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  10. Calibration of Nuclear Track Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, J.B; Antanasijevic, R.; Novakovic, V.; Tasic, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we compare some of our preliminary results relating to the calibration Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) with corresponding results obtained from other participants at the First International Intercomparison of Image Analyzers (III 97/98). Thirteen laboratories from Algeria, China, Czech Rep., France. Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia and Yugoslavia participated in the III A 97/98. The NTD was 'Tustrack', Bristol. This type of CR-39 detector was etched by the organizer (J.Paltarey of al, Atomic Energy Research Institute, HPD, Budapest, Hungary). Etching condition was: 6N NaOH, 70 0C . Seven series detectors were exposed with the sources: B(n,a)Li, Am-241, Pu-Be(n,p), Radon and Am-Cm-Pu. Following parameters of exposed detectors were measured: track density of different sorts of tracks (circular, elliptical, track overlapping, their diameters, major and minor axis and other). (authors)

  11. Application of the Monte Carlo method for the efficiency calibration of CsI and NaI detectors for gamma-ray measurements from terrestrial samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baccouche, S., E-mail: souad.baccouche@cnstn.rnrt.tn [UR-MDTN, National Center for Nuclear Sciences and Technology, Technopole Sidi Thabet, 2020 Sidi Thabet (Tunisia); Al-Azmi, D., E-mail: ds.alazmi@paaet.edu.kw [Department of Applied Sciences, College of Technological Studies, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training, Shuwaikh, P.O. Box 42325, Code 70654 (Kuwait); Karunakara, N., E-mail: karunakara_n@yahoo.com [University Science Instrumentation Centre, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri 574199 (India); Trabelsi, A., E-mail: adel.trabelsi@fst.rnu.tn [UR-MDTN, National Center for Nuclear Sciences and Technology, Technopole Sidi Thabet, 2020 Sidi Thabet (Tunisia); UR-UPNHE, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, El-Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2012-01-15

    Gamma-ray measurements in terrestrial/environmental samples require the use of high efficient detectors because of the low level of the radionuclide activity concentrations in the samples; thus scintillators are suitable for this purpose. Two scintillation detectors were studied in this work; CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) with identical size for measurement of terrestrial samples for performance study. This work describes a Monte Carlo method for making the full-energy efficiency calibration curves for both detectors using gamma-ray energies associated with the decay of naturally occurring radionuclides {sup 137}Cs (661 keV), {sup 40}K (1460 keV), {sup 238}U ({sup 214}Bi, 1764 keV) and {sup 232}Th ({sup 208}Tl, 2614 keV), which are found in terrestrial samples. The magnitude of the coincidence summing effect occurring for the 2614 keV emission of {sup 208}Tl is assessed by simulation. The method provides an efficient tool to make the full-energy efficiency calibration curve for scintillation detectors for any samples geometry and volume in order to determine accurate activity concentrations in terrestrial samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CsI (Tl) and NaI (Tl) detectors were studied for the measurement of terrestrial samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monte Carlo method was used for efficiency calibration using natural gamma emitting terrestrial radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coincidence summing effect occurring for the 2614 keV emission of {sup 208}Tl is assessed by simulation.

  12. In situ calibration of TFTR neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Palladino, R.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Diesso, M.; Felt, J.S.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Ku, L.; Liu, Q.P.; Motley, R.W.; Murphy, H.B.; Murphy, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Roberts, J.A.; Saito, T.; Strachan, J.D.; Waszazak, R.J.; Young, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    We report results of the TFTR fission detector calibration performed in December 1988. A NBS-traceable, remotely controlled 252 Cf neutron source was moved toroidally through the TFTR vacuum vessel. Detection efficiencies for two 235 U detectors were measured for 930 locations of the neutron point source in toroidal scans at 16 different major radii and vertical heights. These scans effectively simulated the volume-distributed plasma neutron source and the volume-integrated detection efficiency was found to be insensitive to plasma position. The Campbell mode is useful due to its large overlap with the count rate mode and large dynamic range. The resulting absolute plasma neutron source calibration has an uncertainty of ±13%

  13. A novel iterative energy calibration method for composite germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    An automatic method for energy calibration of the observed experimental spectrum has been developed. The method presented is based on an iterative algorithm and presents an efficient way to perform energy calibrations after establishing the weights of the calibration data. An application of this novel technique for data acquired using composite detectors in an in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiment is presented

  14. A novel iterative energy calibration method for composite germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S. E-mail: ssg@alpha.iuc.res.in

    2004-07-01

    An automatic method for energy calibration of the observed experimental spectrum has been developed. The method presented is based on an iterative algorithm and presents an efficient way to perform energy calibrations after establishing the weights of the calibration data. An application of this novel technique for data acquired using composite detectors in an in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiment is presented.

  15. Detector calibration measurements in CRESST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: westphal@ph.tum.de; Coppi, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Isaila, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jagemann, T. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut I, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Jochum, J. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut I, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Koenig, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lachenmaier, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lanfranchi, J.-C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Potzel, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rau, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Stark, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wernicke, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); VeriCold Technologies GmbH, Bahnhofstrasse 21, D-85737 Ismaning (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    The CRESST dark matter experiment uses the simultaneous measurement of the scintillation light and the heat signal of a CaWO{sub 4} crystal to discriminate between background electron recoil and nuclear recoil events. At the Technical University of Munich calibration measurements have been performed to characterize the detectors. These measurements include the determination of the light output and scintillation time constants of CaWO{sub 4} at temperatures below 50 mK. The setup used in these measurements consist of a CaWO{sub 4} crystal, which is mounted in a reflective housing together with a silicon light detector carrying an Ir/Au transition edge sensor (TES) evaporated directly onto it.

  16. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos, F.Santos Pedrosa; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Guimara, J.Barreiro; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Urban, S.Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernadez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El, R.Moursli; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Muino, P.Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro, P.E.Faria Salgado; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira, M.Branco; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, D.J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Vale, M.A.B.do; Do Valle, A.Wemans; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Y.S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Navarro, J.E.Garcia; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E.N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M.H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S.M.; Gilbert, L.M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gingrich, D.M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F.M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P.F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K.W.; Glonti, G.L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L.S.; Goncalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J.J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H.A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorisek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M.I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.P.; Goussiou, A.G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H.M.; Gray, J.A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Gregor, I.M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A.A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; 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Robertson, S.H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.E.M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos, D.Santos; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sanchis Lozano, M.A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schonig, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R.D.St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires, F.J.Viegas; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Pastor, E.Torro; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G.Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data- taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1+/-0.9 {\\mu}m and a relative momentum resolution {\\sigma}p/p = (4.83+/-0.16)...

  17. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Paul S. [Somerville College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by ~ 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  18. Improvement of the Ca determination accuracy with k (0)-INAA using an HPGe coaxial detector with extended energy range efficiency calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Kubešová, Marie; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 315, č. 3 (2018), s. 671-675 ISSN 0236-5731. [7th International K0-Users Workshop. Montreal, 03.09.2017-08.09.2017] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : k(0)-INAA * Ca determination * HPGe detector * High-energy efficiency calibration * Co-56 activity standard Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  19. IAEA research coordination meeting on X- and gamma-ray standards for detector efficiency calibration, Braunschweig, FRG, 31 May - 2 June 1989. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christmas, P.; Nichols, A.L.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1989-07-01

    The final official meeting of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the Measurement and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Efficiency Calibration was held in Braunschweig from 31 May to 2 June 1989. Work undertaken by the participants was reviewed in detail, and actions were agreed to resolve specific issues and problems. Initial steps were also made to establish a format and procedure for the preparation by mid-1990 of an IAEA Technical Reports Series booklet; the measurements and recommended data will be listed, and an IAEA data file established for issue to all interested organisations. (author). 3 tabs

  20. Calibration of the Super-Kamiokande detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Hayato, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Iida, T.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kishimoto, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Koshio, Y., E-mail: koshio@fphy.hep.okayama-u.ac.jp [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Marti, Ll.; Miura, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Obayashi, Y.; Sekiya, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Tanaka, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); and others

    2014-02-11

    Procedures and results on hardware-level detector calibration in Super-Kamiokande (SK) are presented in this paper. In particular, we report improvements made in our calibration methods for the experimental phase IV in which new readout electronics have been operating since 2008. The topics are separated into two parts. The first part describes the determination of constants needed to interpret the digitized output of our electronics so that we can obtain physical numbers such as photon counts and their arrival times for each photomultiplier tube (PMT). In this context, we developed an in situ procedure to determine high-voltage settings for PMTs in large detectors like SK, as well as a new method for measuring PMT quantum efficiency and gain in such a detector. The second part describes modeling of the detector in Monte Carlo simulations, including, in particular, the optical properties of the water target and their variability over time. Detailed studies on water quality are also presented. As a result of this work, we have achieved a precision sufficient for physics analyses over a wide energy range (from a few MeV to above 1 TeV). For example, charge determination was at the level of 1%, and the timing resolution was 2.1 ns at the one-photoelectron charge level and 0.5 ns at the 100-photoelectron charge level.

  1. Calibration of pressure gauge for Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saponjic, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Solartron/Hamilton pressure gauges are used to monitor the gas pressure in the particle beam detectors installed in the experimental areas. Here is description of the test bench for the calibration of these gauges in Labview.

  2. A calibration method for phoswich detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gawlikowicz, W; Schröder, W U

    2002-01-01

    A new method of particle identification and energy calibration is proposed for phoswich detectors consisting of a fast plastic scintillator optically coupled to a CsI(Tl) crystal. In this method, functional relationships between integrated yields of three properly selected portions of the observed composite light output signal are parameterized in terms of three physical components (overlapping in time) of this signal. Then, a complete set of calibration constants is derived, linking these integrated partial yields to particle atomic numbers (Z) and energies (E). The calibration is based on the correlations between partial yields observed in actual data from the physics or 'production' runs, and energy deposits calculated for detector elements. The method is found suitable for a wide range of incident particle species and energies, largely eliminating the need for costly and time-consuming conventional calibration experiments with a variety of beams, targets, and bombarding energies.

  3. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1985-10-01

    The proceeedings are reported of a Consultants' Meeting on Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration, held at the CEN, Grenoble in France, from 30-31 May 1985. The meeting provided a forum to assess the requirements for a suitable file to be used internationally for the calibration of X- and gamma-ray detectors. A provisional list of nuclides was drawn up, and an initial assessment of the status of the required data was agreed to be performed by the participants before the end of 1985. (author)

  4. Calibration of the ALLEGRO resonant detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Martin P [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Johnson, Warren W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hamilton, William O [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hanson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Heng, Ik Siong [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); McNeese, Daniel [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Miller, Phillip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Nettles, Damon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Weaver, Jordan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Zhang Ping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2005-09-21

    We describe a method for calibrating the ALLEGRO resonant detector. The resulting response function can be used to transform the observed data backwards to gravitational strain data. These data are the input to a cross-correlation analysis to search for stochastic gravitational waves.

  5. Calibration of the ALLEGRO resonant detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, Martin P; Johnson, Warren W; Hamilton, William O; Hanson, Jonathan; Heng, Ik Siong; McNeese, Daniel; Miller, Phillip; Nettles, Damon; Weaver, Jordan; Zhang Ping

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method for calibrating the ALLEGRO resonant detector. The resulting response function can be used to transform the observed data backwards to gravitational strain data. These data are the input to a cross-correlation analysis to search for stochastic gravitational waves

  6. Measurements for the energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdowicz, K.; Hoek, M.; Aronsson, D.

    1990-05-01

    The report describes measurements performed for the energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors (two arrays of 16 detectors each one). The calibration procedure determines four calibration parameters for each detector. Results of the calibration measurements are given and test measurements are presented. A relation of the neutron detector calibration parameters to producer's data for the photomulipliers is analysed. Also the tests necessary during normal operation of the TANSY neutron spectrometer are elaborated (passive and active tests). A method how to quickly get the calibration parameters for a spare detector in an array of the neutron detectors is included

  7. Calibration of a single hexagonal NaI(Tl) detector using a new numerical method based on the efficiency transfer method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Mahmoud I., E-mail: mabbas@physicist.net [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511 Alexandria (Egypt); Badawi, M.S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511 Alexandria (Egypt); Ruskov, I.N. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); El-Khatib, A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511 Alexandria (Egypt); Grozdanov, D.N. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Thabet, A.A. [Department of Medical Equipment Technology, Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences, Pharos University in Alexandria (Egypt); Kopatch, Yu.N. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Gouda, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21511 Alexandria (Egypt); Skoy, V.R. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-21

    Gamma-ray detector systems are important instruments in a broad range of science and new setup are continually developing. The most recent step in the evolution of detectors for nuclear spectroscopy is the construction of large arrays of detectors of different forms (for example, conical, pentagonal, hexagonal, etc.) and sizes, where the performance and the efficiency can be increased. In this work, a new direct numerical method (NAM), in an integral form and based on the efficiency transfer (ET) method, is used to calculate the full-energy peak efficiency of a single hexagonal NaI(Tl) detector. The algorithms and the calculations of the effective solid angle ratios for a point (isotropic irradiating) gamma-source situated coaxially at different distances from the detector front-end surface, taking into account the attenuation of the gamma-rays in the detector's material, end-cap and the other materials in-between the gamma-source and the detector, are considered as the core of this (ET) method. The calculated full-energy peak efficiency values by the (NAM) are found to be in a good agreement with the measured experimental data.

  8. Calibration of SSNDT detectors for radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Laura C.; Santos, Talita O.; Pinheiro, Rose Mary M.; Rocha, Zildete

    2017-01-01

    The methods and instrumentation used to measure the concentration of radon need to be calibrated to obtain accurate results. The Nuclear Track Detector is considered the main method of analysis of radon research. Thus, the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG, Brazil) uses the detector CR-39 (Landauer) to measure the concentration of radon in homes, workplaces, underground mines, soils and in environment. Epidemiological studies reveal the strong relationship between lung cancer and radon exposure. Therefore, it is important to monitor this gas and its progeny in order to assess the radiological risk. The alpha particles emitted by radon and its progeny leave traces on CR-39 due to Coulombian interactions with the atoms of the material. The liquid density of traces is converted to radon concentration by means of a calibration factor obtained in calibrated systems. This work aims to determine the LRN / CDTN calibration factor. To do so, the CR-39 detectors were placed inside the calibration chambers, along with two AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) detectors and Ra-266 sources with activities of 3,379 kBq or 0.483 kBq, referenced by NIST. From this, six levels of exposure were obtained, which were: 44 kBq.d.m 3 , 4 kBq.d.m 3 , 3 kBq.d.m 3 , 15 kBq.d.m 3 , 30 kBq.d.m 3 , 26 kBq.d.m 3 . The conversion factor between the liquid density of traces and the total exposure time obtained was K = 52.028 ± 0.752 [(trace density.cm -2 ) / (kBq.d.m -3 )]. After the determination of the conversion factor, it was used to measure the concentration of radon in underground mines, obtaining concentration results between 122 ± 24 and 7384 ± 517 kBq.m -3

  9. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christmas, P.; Nichols, A.L.; Lorenz, A.

    1987-09-01

    The first official meeting of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the Measurement and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration was held in Rome from 11 to 13 June 1987. Work undertaken by the CRP members was reviewed in detail: specific problems in the evaluations were identified and actions placed on the participants to resolve these issues. (author). 3 tabs

  10. Modeling the Efficiency of a Germanium Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Keith; Prewitt, Michelle; Quarles, C. A.

    2006-10-01

    We are using the Monte Carlo Program PENELOPE and the cylindrical geometry program PENCYL to develop a model of the detector efficiency of a planar Ge detector. The detector is used for x-ray measurements in an ongoing experiment to measure electron bremsstrahlung. While we are mainly interested in the efficiency up to 60 keV, the model ranges from 10.1 keV (below the Ge absorption edge at 11.1 keV) to 800 keV. Measurements of the detector efficiency have been made in a well-defined geometry with calibrated radioactive sources: Co-57, Se-75, Ba-133, Am-241 and Bi-207. The model is compared with the experimental measurements and is expected to provide a better interpolation formula for the detector efficiency than simply using x-ray absorption coefficients for the major constituents of the detector. Using PENELOPE, we will discuss several factors, such as Ge dead layer, surface ice layer and angular divergence of the source, that influence the efficiency of the detector.

  11. Experimental Validation of an Efficient Fan-Beam Calibration Procedure for k-Nearest Neighbor Position Estimation in Monolithic Scintillator Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Seifert, Stefan; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2015-02-01

    Monolithic scintillator detectors can achieve excellent spatial resolution and coincidence resolving time. However, their practical use for positron emission tomography (PET) and other applications in the medical imaging field is still limited due to drawbacks of the different methods used to estimate the position of interaction. Common statistical methods for example require the collection of an extensive dataset of reference events with a narrow pencil beam aimed at a fine grid of reference positions. Such procedures are time consuming and not straightforwardly implemented in systems composed of many detectors. Here, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a new calibration procedure for k-nearest neighbor ( k-NN) position estimation that utilizes reference data acquired with a fan beam. The procedure is tested on two detectors consisting of 16 mm ×16 mm ×10 mm and 16 mm ×16 mm ×20 mm monolithic, Ca-codoped LSO:Ce crystals and digital photon counter (DPC) arrays. For both detectors, the spatial resolution and the bias obtained with the new method are found to be practically the same as those obtained with the previously used method based on pencil-beam irradiation, while the calibration time is reduced by a factor of 20. Specifically, a FWHM of 1.1 mm and a FWTM of 2.7 mm were obtained using the fan-beam method with the 10 mm crystal, whereas a FWHM of 1.5 mm and a FWTM of 6 mm were achieved with the 20 mm crystal. Using a fan beam made with a 4.5 MBq 22Na point-source and a tungsten slit collimator with 0.5 mm aperture, the total measurement time needed to acquire the reference dataset was 3 hours for the thinner crystal and 2 hours for the thicker one.

  12. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, J., E-mail: jnikolic@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinča, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Puzovic, J. [University of Belgrade Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 6, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M. [University of Belgrade Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinča, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  13. High efficiency scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a scintillation detector, usually a crystal scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube which converts photons to electrical pulses is described. The photomultiplier pulses are measured to provide information on impinging radiation. In inorganic crystal scintillation detectors to achieve maximum density, optical transparency and uniform activation, it has been necessary heretofore to prepare the scintillator as a single crystal. Crystal pieces fail to give a single composite response. Means are provided herein for obtaining such a response with crystal pieces, such means comprising the combination of crystal pieces and liquid or solid organic scintillator matrices having a cyclic molecular structure favorable to fluorescence. 8 claims, 6 drawing figures

  14. Calibration of a detector for pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeser, L.R.; Hemmendinger, A.; Shunk, E.R.

    1978-02-01

    A plastic scintillator detector for measuring the strength of a pulsed neutron source is described and the problems of calibration and discrimination against x-ray background for both pulsed and steady-state detectors are discussed

  15. The characteristic calibration of the plastic scintillation detector for neutron diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Hong Su

    2002-01-01

    The author presents the characteristic of the plastic scintillation detector used for pulse neutron diagnostic. The detection efficiency and sensitivity of the detector to DT neutron have been calibrated by the K-400 accelerator and by the pulse neutron tube, separately. The detection efficiency from the experiment is in agreement with that from calculation in the range of experimental errors

  16. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 ±0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of ±0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  17. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tulane University, 1415 Tulane Ave, HC65, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 {+-}0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of {+-}0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  18. Calibration of a plastic detector PVT of large dimensions for the detection gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenteros Carmona, J. C.; Suarez navarro, M. J.; Gonzalez-gonzalez, J. A.; Pujol, L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development work on the porch Rad Sentry Canberra brand that uses 2 plastic scintillation detectors PVT large (172 x 32 x 4 cm). In this paper we present the different calibration necessary for the proper functioning of equipment: channel-energy calibration, energy resolution, and efficiency-energy.

  19. On the efficiency calibration of a drum waste assay system

    CERN Document Server

    Dinescu, L; Cazan, I L; Macrin, R; Caragheorgheopol, G; Rotarescu, G

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency calibration of a gamma spectroscopy waste assay system, constructed by IFIN-HH, was performed. The calibration technique was based on the assumption of a uniform distribution of the source activity in the drum and also a uniform sample matrix. A collimated detector (HPGe--20% relative efficiency) placed at 30 cm from the drum was used. The detection limit for sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co is approximately 45 Bq/kg for a sample of about 400 kg and a counting time of 10 min. A total measurement uncertainty of -70% to +40% was estimated.

  20. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aad, G.; et al., [Unknown; Bentvelsen, S.; Colijn, A.P.; de Jong, P.; Doxiadis, A.; Garitaonandia, H.; Gosselink, M.; Kayl, M.S.; Koffeman, E.; Lee, H.; Mechnich, J.; Mussche, I.; Ottersbach, J.P.; Rijpstra, M.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Tsiakiris, M.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vreeswijk, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data-taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation,

  1. Online calibrations and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 M electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. The talk will give an overview of the calibration and performance of both the detector and its optical readout. The most basic parameter to be tuned and calibrated for the detector electronics is the readout threshold of the individual pixel channels. These need to be carefully tuned to optimise position resolution a...

  2. Energy calibration of a multilayer photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The job of energy calibration was broken into three parts: gain normalization of all equivalent elements; determination of the functions for conversion of pulse height to energy; and gain stabilization. It is found that calorimeter experiments are no better than their calibration systems - calibration errors will be the major source of error at high energies. Redundance is found to be necessary - the system should be designed such that every element could be replaced during the life of the experiment. It is found to be important to have enough data taken during calibration runs and during the experiment to be able to sort out where the calibration problems were after the experiment is over. Each layer was normalized independently with electrons, and then the pulse height to energy conversion was determined with photons. The primary method of gain stabilization used the light flasher system

  3. Calibration efficiency of HPGe detector in the 50-1800 KeV energy range; Calibracao em eficiencia de um detector HPGe na faixa de energias 50 - 1800KeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, Luzia [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Monitoracao Ambiental

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of an HPGe detector in the 50 - 1800 keV energy range, for two geometries for water measurements: Marinelli breaker (850 ml) and a polyethylene flask (100 ml). The experimental data were corrected for the summing effect and fitted to a continuous, differentiable and energy dependent function given by 1n({epsilon})=b{sub 0}+b{sub 1}.1n(E/E{sub 0})+ {beta}.1n(E/E{sub 0}){sup 2}, where {beta} = b{sub 2} if E>E{sub 0} and {beta} =a{sub 2} if E {<=}E{sub 0}; {epsilon} = the full absorption peak efficiency; E is the gamma-ray energy and {l_brace}b{sub 0}, b{sub 1}, b{sub 2}, a{sub 2}, E{sub 0} {r_brace} is the parameter set to be fitted. (author)

  4. Study of the calibration potential of HELYCON detectors with ANTARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Tsirigotis, Apostolos; Tzamarias, Spyros

    2009-01-01

    The 'HEllenic LYceum Cosmic Observatories Network' (HELYCON) Collaboration is constructing a network of detector stations dedicated to the study of Extensive Air Showers. The use of HELYCON detectors is also envisaged for the calibration of a cubic kilometer scale Mediterranean neutrino telescope by means of an array of these detectors at the sea surface. The ANTARES framework is well suited to perform a first test of the principle: a feasibility study is on-going and a test in real conditions is foreseen. In this paper the requirements for evaluating the calibration potential of a surface array in the ANTARES context are discussed.

  5. Study of the calibration potential of HELYCON detectors with ANTARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre [Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F68100 Mulhouse (France)], E-mail: ernenwein@cppm.in2p3.fr; Tsirigotis, Apostolos; Tzamarias, Spyros [School of Science and Technology, Hellenic Open University, Tsamadou 13-15 and Aghiou Andrea, Patras 26222 (Greece)

    2009-04-11

    The 'HEllenic LYceum Cosmic Observatories Network' (HELYCON) Collaboration is constructing a network of detector stations dedicated to the study of Extensive Air Showers. The use of HELYCON detectors is also envisaged for the calibration of a cubic kilometer scale Mediterranean neutrino telescope by means of an array of these detectors at the sea surface. The ANTARES framework is well suited to perform a first test of the principle: a feasibility study is on-going and a test in real conditions is foreseen. In this paper the requirements for evaluating the calibration potential of a surface array in the ANTARES context are discussed.

  6. Whole-body detector calibrating with a modular phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minev, L.; Boshkova, T.; Uzunov, P.

    1995-01-01

    Human body models (phantoms) of various size and weight are produced in order to calibrate gamma spectrometers for accurate activity measurement. The phantoms are built of separate modules with mass of 0.5 kg and size 20 x 14 x 2 cm. There are modules with standard Eu-152 and Am-241 radioactivity designed for homogenous radioactivity imitating and critical organs moulding, as well as 'zero' -phantom modules without activity imitating a standard human body. Human organs are modelled by 11 x 9 x 0.5 cm modules with 0.16 kg mass. The phantoms have been used to obtain calibration curves and absolute efficiencies for selected energies of radionuclides expected to be found in the Kozloduy NPP staff. It is shown that the efficiency depends not only on the mass but on the geometric size of the measured object. Scanning of phantoms has been carried out and a profile of activity obtained. The profile consists of an abrupt rising of the sum of pulses (measuring time - 20 s) when the detector passes from neck to chest, a plateau when it moves over the head or the trunk and gradual decrease over the legs. Profiles of activity in organs are best obtained with a lead collimator. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Whole-body detector calibrating with a modular phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minev, L; Boshkova, T; Uzunov, P [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-12-31

    Human body models (phantoms) of various size and weight are produced in order to calibrate gamma spectrometers for accurate activity measurement. The phantoms are built of separate modules with mass of 0.5 kg and size 20 x 14 x 2 cm. There are modules with standard Eu-152 and Am-241 radioactivity designed for homogenous radioactivity imitating and critical organs moulding, as well as `zero` -phantom modules without activity imitating a standard human body. Human organs are modelled by 11 x 9 x 0.5 cm modules with 0.16 kg mass. The phantoms have been used to obtain calibration curves and absolute efficiencies for selected energies of radionuclides expected to be found in the Kozloduy NPP staff. It is shown that the efficiency depends not only on the mass but on the geometric size of the measured object. Scanning of phantoms has been carried out and a profile of activity obtained. The profile consists of an abrupt rising of the sum of pulses (measuring time - 20 s) when the detector passes from neck to chest, a plateau when it moves over the head or the trunk and gradual decrease over the legs. Profiles of activity in organs are best obtained with a lead collimator. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Calibration Analysis Software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00372086; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The calibration of the ATLAS Pixel detector at LHC fulfils two main purposes: to tune the front-end configuration parameters for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel detector scans and analyses is called Calibration Console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new Front End-I4 Chips, required an update the Console architecture. It now handles scans and scans analyses applied together to chips with different characteristics. An overview of the newly developed Calibration Analysis Software will be presented, together with some preliminary result.

  9. LET calibration for CR-39 detectors in different oxygen environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D.; Semones, E.; Weyland, M.; Benton, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    High LET (linear energy transfer) radiation is the main contributor to the radiation field in low Earth orbit (LEO) in terms of dose equivalent. CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) can measure the LET spectrum and charge spectrum for the complicated radiation field in space. Previous research indicated that the sensitivity of CR-39 is different for CR-39 PNTDs working in different oxygen environments. LET calibration for CR-39 detectors in different oxygen environments is needed. Almost all the previous LET calibration work was carried out for CR-39 detectors in good-oxygen condition, LET calibration work for CR-39 in poor-oxygen condition has not been conducted until our work. Systematic LET calibrations were carried out by JSC-SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group) for CR-39 detectors working in different oxygen environments and abundant results of LET calibrations were obtained. This paper introduces the method for CR-39 LET calibration, presents and discusses the calibration results and some applications

  10. Tests and calibration of NIF neutron time of flight detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Z A; Glebov, V Yu; Cruz, M; Duffy, T; Stoeckl, C; Roberts, S; Sangster, T C; Tommasini, R; Throop, A; Moran, M; Dauffy, L; Horsefield, C

    2008-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutron time of flight (NTOF) diagnostic will measure neutron yield and ion temperature in all NIF campaigns in DD, DT, and THD(*) implosions. The NIF NTOF diagnostic is designed to measure neutron yield from 1x10(9) to 2x10(19). The NTOF consists of several detectors of varying sensitivity located on the NIF at about 5 and 20 m from the target. Production, testing, and calibration of the NIF NTOF detectors have begun at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Operational tests of the NTOF detectors were performed on several facilities including the OMEGA laser at LLE and the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Neutron calibrations were carried out on the OMEGA laser. Results of the NTOF detector tests and calibration will be presented.

  11. Calibration, monitoring, and control of complex detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, M.

    1981-01-01

    LEP detectors will probably be complex devices having tens of subsystems; some subsystems having perhaps tens of thousands of channels. Reasonable design goals for such a detector will include economic use of money and people, rapid and reliable calibration and monitoring of the detector, and simple control and operation of the device. The synchronous operation of an e + e - storage ring, coupled with its relatively low interaction rate, allow the design of simple circuits for time and charge measurements. These circuits, and more importantly, the basic detector channels, can usually be tested and calibrated by signal injection into the detector. Present detectors utilize semi-autonomous controllers which collect such calibration data and calculate statistics as well as control sparse data scans. Straightforward improvements in programming technology should move the entire calibration into these local controllers, so that calibration and testing time will be a constant independent of the number of channels in a system. Considerable programming effort may be saved by emphasizing the similarities of the subsystems, so that the subsystems can be described by a reasonable database and general purpose calibration and test routines can be used. Monitoring of the apparatus will probably continue to be of two classes: 'passive' histogramming of channel occupancies and other more complex combinations of the data; and 'active' injection of test patterns and calibration signals during a run. The relative importance of active monitoring will increase for the low data rates expected off resonances at high s. Experience at SPEAR and PEP is used to illustrate these approaches. (Auth.)

  12. Calibration, Monitoring, and Control of Complex Detector Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, M.

    1981-04-01

    LEP Detectors will probably be complex devices having tens of subsystems; some subsystems having perhaps tens of thousands of channels. Reasonable design goals for such a detector will include economic use of money and people, rapid and reliable calibration and monitoring of the detector, and simple control and operation of the device. The synchronous operation of an e+e- storage ring, coupled with its relatively low interaction rate, allow the design of simple circuits for time and charge measurements. These circuits, and more importantly, the basic detector channels, can usually be tested and calibrated by signal injection into the detector. Present detectors utilize semi-autonomous controllers which collect such calibration data and calculate statistics as well as control sparse data scans. Straightforward improvements in programming technology should move the entire calibration into these local controllers, so that calibration and testing time will be a constant independent of the number of channels in a system. Considerable programming effort may be saved by emphasizing the similarities of the subsystems, so that the subsystems can be described by a reasonable database and general purpose calibration and test routines can be used. Monitoring of the apparatus will probably continue to be of two classes: "passive" histogramming of channel occupancies and other more complex combinations of the data; and "active" injection of test patterns and calibration signals during a run. The relative importance of active monitoring will increase for the low data rates expected off resonances at high s. Experience at SPEAR and PEP is used to illustrate these approaches.

  13. Calibration of the solar neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccianiga, Barbara; Re, Alessandra Carlotta [Universita degli Studi Milano (Italy); INFN, Milano (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Calibrations have been crucial for the success of solar neutrino experiments. In this contribution we review the calibration strategies adopted by different solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we will emphasize their common critical aspects and their main differences. In order to do so, we will schematically divide the solar neutrino experiments in two groups: those based on radiochemical techniques, i.e. Homestake, Gallex/GNO, SAGE and those based on real-time techniques i.e. Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, Borexino and KamLAND. (orig.)

  14. Reconstructing the calibrated strain signal in the Advanced LIGO detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, A. D.; Wade, M.; Urban, A. L.; Kandhasamy, S.; Betzwieser, J.; Brown, Duncan A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Cahillane, C.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Karki, S.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Savage, R. L.; Siemens, X.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Weinstein, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Advanced LIGO’s raw detector output needs to be calibrated to compute dimensionless strain h(t) . Calibrated strain data is produced in the time domain using both a low-latency, online procedure and a high-latency, offline procedure. The low-latency h(t) data stream is produced in two stages, the first of which is performed on the same computers that operate the detector’s feedback control system. This stage, referred to as the front-end calibration, uses infinite impulse response (IIR) filtering and performs all operations at a 16 384 Hz digital sampling rate. Due to several limitations, this procedure currently introduces certain systematic errors in the calibrated strain data, motivating the second stage of the low-latency procedure, known as the low-latency gstlal calibration pipeline. The gstlal calibration pipeline uses finite impulse response (FIR) filtering to apply corrections to the output of the front-end calibration. It applies time-dependent correction factors to the sensing and actuation components of the calibrated strain to reduce systematic errors. The gstlal calibration pipeline is also used in high latency to recalibrate the data, which is necessary due mainly to online dropouts in the calibrated data and identified improvements to the calibration models or filters.

  15. Performance and calibration of wave length shifting fibers for K2K SciBar detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Taichi

    2004-01-01

    The wave length shifting (WLS) fibers (Kuraray Y11 (200) MS) are used for light collection from scintillators in the SciBar detector. The performance of WLS fibers was measured before installation. Because the number of WLS fibers is about 15,000, it is necessary to make a system to measure attenuation length of WLS fibers efficiently. I will report the pre-calibration method for measurement and the performance of the WLS fibers in SciBar detector. (author)

  16. Method of calibration for portable detectors of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Carlos; Carrizales, Lila; Guacaran, Douglas; Moreno, Ailed; Duran, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The LSCD is beginning a process of accreditation by the national authority of Venezuela (CENCAMER), so we felt the need to modify existing protocols calibration, suggested by the IAEA (Technical Reports Series No 133) to be adjusted in accordance with international standards of ISO 17025 EA-4/02 and Mexican standard NOM-021-NUCL-2002, adapting the calibration procedure of portable radiation detectors to those standards. The procedure used in the LSCD, conducts an intercomparison between measures between the standard reference and to calibrate the instrument, thus verifying the correct operation of the equipment and its usefulness to the individual or environmental radiation monitoring, not to exceed the limits primary for the public and occupationally Staff Exposed (POE), and propose a simple way to perform this calibration procedure and comply with the standard international and national standards, ensuring the proper functioning of the instruments calibrated. One of the calculations that has proven to be a useful tool in the verification of the conditions of operating the same, it is uncertainty, this procedure allows to characterize the response of individual detector, depending on the constraints specified by the manufacturer, to optimize the calibration is necessary to consider the multiple factors that can affect the measure and evaluate the response of the same, so it is vitally important estimating the typical uncertainty associated with the calibration technique employed, but this calculation is not trivial, depends on the type of detector found usually between 5% to 20%, both in uncertainty as the linearity, which are the parameters that are set to consider an instrument in good or bad condition. Typical are calibrated are: monitors air Geiger-Muller, Ionization cameras, detector of Neutron's, Proportional Counter, Personal dosimeters. (author)

  17. First full dynamic range calibration of the JUNGFRAU photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, S.; Andrä, M.; Barten, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruat, M.; Ruder, C.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Vetter, S.; Zhang, J.

    2018-01-01

    The JUNGFRAU detector is a charge integrating hybrid silicon pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut for photon science applications, in particular for the upcoming free electron laser SwissFEL. With a high dynamic range, analogue readout, low noise and three automatically switching gains, JUNGFRAU promises excellent performance not only at XFELs but also at synchrotrons in areas such as protein crystallography, ptychography, pump-probe and time resolved measurements. To achieve its full potential, the detector must be calibrated on a pixel-by-pixel basis. This contribution presents the current status of the JUNGFRAU calibration project, in which a variety of input charge sources are used to parametrise the energy response of the detector across four orders of magnitude of dynamic range. Building on preliminary studies, the first full calibration procedure of a JUNGFRAU 0.5 Mpixel module is described. The calibration is validated using alternative sources of charge deposition, including laboratory experiments and measurements at ESRF and LCLS. The findings from these measurements are presented. Calibrated modules have already been used in proof-of-principle style protein crystallography experiments at the SLS. A first look at selected results is shown. Aspects such as the conversion of charge to number of photons, treatment of multi-size pixels and the origin of non-linear response are also discussed.

  18. Calibration of a NE213 detector for neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazquez Martinez, J.; Butragueno Casado, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    This work describes the experimental way followed for getting the calibration of a NE213 detector with a beam of neutrons from the J.E.N. 2 MeV Van de Graaff and using at once pulse shape discrimination. Detector has been used for measuring the spectrum of the fast reactor CORAL-1. There is also included an experimental method in order to get with precision where the Compton edge is placed on the electron spectrum. (Author) 9 refs

  19. Application of imitation for energy calibration of silicon semiconductor detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aivazyan, G M; Mikaelyan, M A

    2003-01-01

    An effective method is described for energy calibration of semiconductor detectors (SCD) with different thickness. The method is based on imitating the charge on the input of the preamplifier deposited in SCD by known energy ionizing particles, the imitation being performed by a pulser with a partial with use of alpha-active sources. The results of laboratory studies of the described method are given with detectors of either large, 50-1000 mu m, or small, 18-20 mu m, thickness

  20. Mathematical calibration of Ge detectors, and the instruments that use them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, F.L.; Young, B. [Canberra Industries, Meriden, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Efficiency calibrations for Ge detectors are typically done with the use of multiple energy calibrations sources which are added to a bulk matrix intended to simulate the measurement sample, and then deposited in the sample container. This is rather easy for common laboratory samples. Bu, even there, for many environmental samples, waste assay samples, and operational health physics samples, accurate calibrations are difficult. For these situations, various mathematical corrections or direct calibration techniques are used at Canberra. EML has pioneered the use of mathematical calibrations following source-based detector characterization measurements for in situ measurements of environmental fallout. Canberra has expanded this by the use of MCNP for the source measurements required in EML. For other calibration situations, MCNP was used directly, as the primary calibration method. This is demonstrated to be at least as accurate as source based measurements, and probably better. Recently, a new method [ISOCS] has been developed and is nearing completion. This promises to be an easy to use calibration software that can be used by the customer for in situ gamma spectroscopy to accurately measure many large sized samples, such as boxes, drums, pipes, or to calibrate small laboratory-type samples. 8 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Mathematical calibration of Ge detectors, and the instruments that use them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, F.L.; Young, B.

    1997-01-01

    Efficiency calibrations for Ge detectors are typically done with the use of multiple energy calibrations sources which are added to a bulk matrix intended to simulate the measurement sample, and then deposited in the sample container. This is rather easy for common laboratory samples. Bu, even there, for many environmental samples, waste assay samples, and operational health physics samples, accurate calibrations are difficult. For these situations, various mathematical corrections or direct calibration techniques are used at Canberra. EML has pioneered the use of mathematical calibrations following source-based detector characterization measurements for in situ measurements of environmental fallout. Canberra has expanded this by the use of MCNP for the source measurements required in EML. For other calibration situations, MCNP was used directly, as the primary calibration method. This is demonstrated to be at least as accurate as source based measurements, and probably better. Recently, a new method [ISOCS] has been developed and is nearing completion. This promises to be an easy to use calibration software that can be used by the customer for in situ gamma spectroscopy to accurately measure many large sized samples, such as boxes, drums, pipes, or to calibrate small laboratory-type samples. 8 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Online Calibration and Performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 million electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. This paper describes the tuning and calibration of the optical links and the detector modules, including measurements of threshold, noise, charge measurement, timing performance and the sensor leakage current.

  3. The detector calibration system for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, Jeremy S., E-mail: jeremy.cushman@yale.edu [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Dally, Adam [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Davis, Christopher J. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Ejzak, Larissa; Lenz, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lim, Kyungeun E. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Heeger, Karsten M., E-mail: karsten.heeger@yale.edu [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Maruyama, Reina H. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Nucciotti, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano I-20126 (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano I-20126 (Italy); Sangiorgio, Samuele [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wise, Thomas [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 130}Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO{sub 2} bolometers operated underground at 10 mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning, and performance of this novel source calibration deployment system for ultra-low-temperature environments.

  4. Extrapolated HPGe efficiency estimates based on a single calibration measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopists often must analyze samples with geometries for which their detectors are not calibrated. The effort to experimentally recalibrate a detector for a new geometry can be quite time consuming, causing delay in reporting useful results. Such concerns have motivated development of a method for extrapolating HPGe efficiency estimates from an existing single measured efficiency. Overall, the method provides useful preliminary results for analyses that do not require exceptional accuracy, while reliably bracketing the credible range. The estimated efficiency element-of for a uniform sample in a geometry with volume V is extrapolated from the measured element-of 0 of the base sample of volume V 0 . Assuming all samples are centered atop the detector for maximum efficiency, element-of decreases monotonically as V increases about V 0 , and vice versa. Extrapolation of high and low efficiency estimates element-of h and element-of L provides an average estimate of element-of = 1/2 [element-of h + element-of L ] ± 1/2 [element-of h - element-of L ] (general) where an uncertainty D element-of = 1/2 (element-of h - element-of L ] brackets limits for a maximum possible error. The element-of h and element-of L both diverge from element-of 0 as V deviates from V 0 , causing D element-of to increase accordingly. The above concepts guided development of both conservative and refined estimates for element-of

  5. The SISWICH, a detector telescope with intrinsic calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Koerener, H.J.; Reinhold, J.; Peter, M.; Maier, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    Phoswich counters have gained widespread popularity as detectors for medium energy charged particles. They provide adequate energy resolution and particle identification up to atomic numbers Z = 20. However, the question of calibration has not been resolved satisfactorily. To overcome this difficulty we have built a Silicon-Scintillator SandWICH (SISWICH). This detector consists of a silicon PIN photo diode glued to the front of a CsI (T ell) scintillator crystal. The signal coming from the PIN diode contains the energy loss of the particle in the silicon, which is fast (nuclear counter effect), and the light output of the scintillator which is slow. The component coming from the nuclear counter effect can be calibrated with a pulser. Therefore, since the energy loss of a particle with known Z has been measured, its energy is known, and this can be used to calibrate the signal from the scintillator. Results will be shown

  6. Method of energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Aronsson, D.

    1990-03-01

    A method to calibrate an array of scintillation neutron detectors, using a γ source, is presented. The count rate is measured as a function of high voltage at a given discrimination level. The obtained distribution is differentiated and a maximum value is determined which corresponds to the voltage at which the gamma peak passes through the discrimination level. By repeating the measurement at different discrimination levels the experimental dependence between the discrimination level and the high voltage is found as a straight line in a log-log diagram. Two calibration parameter for each detector are determined from a fit of these straight lines. A recalculation from the energy of the used γ source to any other energy is then possible and the obtained relation can be used to calculate discrimination levels and high voltages for each detector. Verification procedures are described. (authors)

  7. Calibration of Single High Purity Germanium Detector for Whole Body Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Morsi, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new Accuscan II single germanium detector for whole body counter was installed in NRC (Egypt). The current paper concerned on calibration of single high purity germanium detector for whole body counter. Physical parameters affecting on performance of whole body counter such as linearity, minimum detectable activity and source detector distance, SDD were investigated. Counting efficiencies for the detector have been investigated in rear wall, fixed diagnostic position in air. Counting efficiencies for organ compartments such as thyroid, lung, upper and lower gastrointestinal tract have been investigated using transfer phantom in fixed diagnostic and screening positions respectively. The organ compartment efficiencies in screening geometry were higher than that value of diagnostic geometry by a factor of three. The committed dose equivalents of I-131 in thyroid were ranged from 0.073 ± 0.004 to 1.73±0.09 mSv and in lung was 0.02±0.001 mSv

  8. Fast method for geometric calibration of detectors and matching testing between two detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechenova, O.Yu.

    2002-01-01

    A fast method of geometric calibration of detectors has been proposed. The main idea of this method is to determine offsets by fitting the real data distribution by analytic functions which describe the motion of one detector relative to the other one. This method can be applicable to offsets determination for one detector relative to the other detector or for one part of the detector relative to its other part. The detectors should be placed perpendicular to the beam axis. The form of analytic functions depends on the geometry of the experiment and direction of the coordinate axes. The analytic functions have been obtained using the rotation matrices. This method can be applied to the matching testing between two detectors

  9. Calibration and survey of AMANDA with the SPASE detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, J; Barwick, S W; Bay, R C; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, E; Binon, F; Biron, A; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Bouhali, O; Burgess, T; Carius, S; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; Davour, A; De Clercq, C; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Dickinson, E; Doksus, P; Ekstrom, P; Engel, R; Evenson, P; Feser, T; Gaisser, T K; Ganugapati, R; Gaug, M; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hauschildt, T; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hinton, J A; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Karle, A; Kim, J; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kühn, K; Lamoureux, J I; Leich, H; Leuthold, M; Lindahl, P; Liubarsky, I; Lloyd Evans, J; Madsen, J; Mandli, K; Marciniewski, P; Martello, D; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Messarius, T; Miller, T C; Minaeva, Y; Miocinovic, P; Mock, P C; Morse, R; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Perez de los Heros, C; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rochester, K; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Romenesko, P; Ross, D; Sander, H G; Schinarakis, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Tilav, S; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Wang, Y R; Watson, A A; Weinheimer, C; Wiebusch, C; Wiedemann, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Wu, W; Yodh, G; Young, S; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.12.007

    2004-01-01

    We report on the analysis of air showers observed in coincidence by the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino detector array (AMANDA-B10) and the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE-1 and SPASE-2). We discuss the use of coincident events for calibration and survey of the deep AMANDA detector as well as the response of AMANDA to muon bundles. This analysis uses data taken during 1997 when both SPASE-1 and SPASE-2 were in operation to provide a stereo view of AMANDA.

  10. Application of imitation for energy calibration of silicon semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aivazyan, G.M.; Badalyan, H.V.; Mikaelyan, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    An effective method is described for energy calibration of semiconductor detectors (SCD) with different thickness. The method is based on imitating the charge on the input of the preamplifier deposited in SCD by known energy ionizing particles, the imitation being performed by a pulser with a partial with use of α-active sources. The results of laboratory studies of the described method are given with detectors of either large, 50-1000μm, or small, 18-20 μm, thickness

  11. Development of pre-critical excore detector linear subchannel calibration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoo Sun; Goo, Bon Seung; Cha, Kyun Ho; Lee, Chang Seop; Kim, Yong Hee; Ahn, Chul Soo; Kim, Man Soo

    2001-01-01

    The improved pre-critical excore detector linear subchannel calibration method has been developed to improve the applicability of pre-critical calibration method. The existing calibration method does not always guarantee the accuracy of pre-critical calibration because the calibration results of the previous cycle are not reflected into the current cycle calibration. The developed method has a desirable feature that calibration error would not be propagated in the following cycles since the calibration data determined in previous cycle is incorporated in the current cycle calibration. The pre-critical excore detector linear calibration is tested for YGN unit 3 and UCN unit 3 to evaluate its characteristics and accuracy

  12. Results of monte Carlo calibrations of a low energy germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettner-Messler, R.; Brettner-Messler, R.; Maringer, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Normally, measurements of the peak efficiency of a gamma ray detector are performed with calibrated samples which are prepared to match the measured ones in all important characteristics like its volume, chemical composition and density. Another way to determine the peak efficiency is to calculate it with special monte Carlo programs. In principle the program 'Pencyl' from the source code 'P.E.N.E.L.O.P.E. 2003' can be used for peak efficiency calibration of a cylinder symmetric detector however exact data for the geometries and the materials is needed. The interpretation of the simulation results is not clear but we found a way to convert the data into values which can be compared to our measurement results. It is possible to find other simulation parameters which perform the same or better results. Further improvements can be expected by longer simulation times and more simulations in the questionable ranges of densities and filling heights. (N.C.)

  13. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector Control and Calibration Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Calì, Ivan Amos; Manzari, Vito; Stefanini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was carried out in the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) group of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The SPD is the innermost part (two cylindrical layers of silicon pixel detec- tors) of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). During the last three years I have been strongly involved in the SPD hardware and software development, construction and commissioning. This thesis is focused on the design, development and commissioning of the SPD Control and Calibration Systems. I started this project from scratch. After a prototyping phase now a stable version of the control and calibration systems is operative. These systems allowed the detector sectors and half-barrels test, integration and commissioning as well as the SPD commissioning in the experiment. The integration of the systems with the ALICE Experiment Control System (ECS), DAQ and Trigger system has been accomplished and the SPD participated in the experimental December 2007 commissioning run. The complex...

  14. Relative efficiency calculation of a HPGe detector using MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Lopes, Jose M.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2015-01-01

    High-purity germanium detectors (HPGe) are mandatory tools for spectrometry because of their excellent energy resolution. The efficiency of such detectors, quoted in the list of specifications by the manufacturer, frequently refers to the relative full-energy peak efficiency, related to the absolute full-energy peak efficiency of a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm (diameter x height) NaI(Tl) crystal, based on the 1.33 MeV peak of a 60 Co source positioned 25 cm from the detector. In this study, we used MCNPX code to simulate a HPGe detector (Canberra GC3020), from Real-Time Neutrongraphy Laboratory of UFRJ, to survey the spectrum of a 60 Co source located 25 cm from the detector in order to calculate and confirm the efficiency declared by the manufacturer. Agreement between experimental and simulated data was achieved. The model under development will be used for calculating and comparison purposes with the detector calibration curve from software Genie2000™, also serving as a reference for future studies. (author)

  15. Development of high efficiency neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Menlove, H.O.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have designed a novel neutron detector system using conventional 3 He detector tubes and composites of polyethylene and graphite. At this time the design consists entirely of MCNP simulations of different detector configurations and materials. These detectors are applicable to low-level passive and active neutron assay systems such as the passive add-a-source and the 252 Cf shuffler. Monte Carlo simulations of these neutron detector designs achieved efficiencies of over 35% for assay chambers that can accommodate 55-gal. drums. Only slight increases in the number of detector tubes and helium pressure are required. The detectors also have reduced die-away times. Potential applications are coincident and multiplicity neutron counting for waste disposal and safeguards. The authors will present the general design philosophy, underlying physics, calculation mechanics, and results

  16. A novel enhanced calibration method for DSSSD detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Levent; Vogt, Andreas; Reiter, Peter; Birkenbach, Benedikt; Hirsch, Rouven; Seidlitz, Michael; Warr, Nigel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSD) are employed for the detection of charged particles in low-energy nuclear physics providing position and energy information for the impinging particle. Intersecting areas of both p- and n-side strips form individual pixel segments allowing for a high detector granularity. However, due to limitation in fabrication and the response of readout electronics, the performance of different channels may vary. In order to achieve best energy information, a calibration of each p- and n-side strip with a very high precision is mandatory. DSSSD responses are analyzed employing energy correlation matrices between adjacent strips in order to determine charge-sharing and energy-loss effects. A novel calibration method is based on the fact that each event is registered simultaneously on the p- and n-side strips. A two-dimensional calibration procedure allows for a significant enhancement of the energy resolution. In this way, the performance of DSSSDs with position-dependent radiation damage is improved clearly by excluding locally damaged detector areas without losing the information of complete p- or n-side strips.

  17. Charge exchange reactions and the efficiency of solar neutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, S.M.; Anantaraman, N.; Love, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The efficiencies of solar neutrino detectors are often based in part on weak interaction strengths determined by (p,n) and other charge exchange reactions. Although the (p,n) determinations are surprisingly good, it is shown that they may be inaccurate for important Gamow-Teller transitions whose strengths are a small fraction of the sum rule limit. This emphasizes the importance of direct calibration with ν sources for detectors such as 127 I and 115 In where direct β-decay information cannot be obtained. It may also bear on recent attempts to compare charge exchange and beta decay in the mass-37 system

  18. Calibration and alignment of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoye, M.

    2007-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will dominate the high energy physics program in the coming decade. The discovery of the standard model Higgs boson and the discovery of super-symmetric particles are within the reach at the energy scale explored by the LHC. However, the high luminosity and the high energy of the colliding protons lead to challenging demands on the detectors. The hostile radiation environment requires irradiation hard detectors, where the innermost subdetectors, consisting of silicon modules, are most affected. This thesis is devoted to the calibration and alignment of the silicon tracking detector. Electron test beam data, taken at DESY, have been used to investigate the performance of detector modules which previously were irradiated with protons up to a dose expected after 10 years of operation. The irradiated sensors turned out to be still better than required. The performance of the inner tracking systems will be dominated by the degree to which the positions of the sensors can be determined. Only a track based alignment procedure can reach the required precision. Such an alignment procedure is a major challenge given that about 50000 geometry constants need to be measured. Making use of the novel χ 2 minimization program Millepede II an alignment strategy has been developed in which all detector components are aligned simultaneously, as many sources of information as possible are used, and all correlations between the position parameters of the detectors are taken into account. Utilizing simulated data, a proof of concept of the alignment strategy is shown. (orig.)

  19. Calibration and alignment of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoye, M.

    2007-07-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will dominate the high energy physics program in the coming decade. The discovery of the standard model Higgs boson and the discovery of super-symmetric particles are within the reach at the energy scale explored by the LHC. However, the high luminosity and the high energy of the colliding protons lead to challenging demands on the detectors. The hostile radiation environment requires irradiation hard detectors, where the innermost subdetectors, consisting of silicon modules, are most affected. This thesis is devoted to the calibration and alignment of the silicon tracking detector. Electron test beam data, taken at DESY, have been used to investigate the performance of detector modules which previously were irradiated with protons up to a dose expected after 10 years of operation. The irradiated sensors turned out to be still better than required. The performance of the inner tracking systems will be dominated by the degree to which the positions of the sensors can be determined. Only a track based alignment procedure can reach the required precision. Such an alignment procedure is a major challenge given that about 50000 geometry constants need to be measured. Making use of the novel {chi}{sup 2} minimization program Millepede II an alignment strategy has been developed in which all detector components are aligned simultaneously, as many sources of information as possible are used, and all correlations between the position parameters of the detectors are taken into account. Utilizing simulated data, a proof of concept of the alignment strategy is shown. (orig.)

  20. Radially dependent photopeak efficiency model for Si(Li) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D D [Australian Inst. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Lucas Heights

    1980-12-15

    A simple five parameter model for the efficiency of a Si(Li) detector has been developed. It was found necessary to include a radially dependent efficiency even for small detectors. The model is an extension of the pioneering work of Hansen et al. but correction factors include more up to date data and explicit equations for the mass attenuation coefficients over a wide range of photons energies. Four of the five parameters needed are generally supplied by most commercial manufacturers of Si(Li) detectors. /sup 54/Mn and /sup 241/Am sources have been used to calibrate a Si(Li) to approx. +-3% over the energy range 3-60 keV.

  1. In-situ calibration of TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Palladino, R.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Diesso, M.; Felt, J.S.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Ku, L.P.; Liu, Q.P.; Motley, R.W.; Murphy, H.B.; Murphy, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Roberts, J.A.; Saito, T.; Strachan, J.D.; Waszazak, R.J.; Young, K.

    1990-03-01

    We report results of the TFTR fission detector calibration performed in December 1988. A NBS-traceable, remotely controlled 252 Cf neutron source was moved toroidally through the TFTR vacuum vessel. Detection efficiencies for two 235 U detectors were measured for 930 locations of the neutron point source in toroidal scans at 16 different major radii and vertical heights. These scans effectively simulated the volume-distributed plasma neutron source, and the volume-integrated detection efficiency was found to be insensitive to plasma position. The Campbell mode is useful due to its large overlap with the count rate mode and large dynamic range. The resulting absolute plasma neutron source calibration has an uncertainty of ± 13%. 21 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Energy calibration for LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detector in the region of 1-10 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhua; Zhu Chengsheng; Zeng Jun; Ding Ge; Xiang Qingpei; Liu Zhao; Yang Chaowen

    2013-01-01

    Background: LaBr 3 (Ce) detector has played an important role in detecting explosive, contraband and landmine because of its high y detection efficiency and good energy resolution etc. Purpose: To calibrate detector in wide energy region. Methods: The gamma spectra of NH 4 Cl and C 3 H 6 N 6 induced by 252 Cf neutron source were measured. Results: Comparing their gamma spectra, characteristic gamma lines can be located and the energy calibration curve was obtained. Conclusions: Radio nuclides can be identified by the calibration curve fitted with quadratic or cubic polynomial. (authors)

  3. Calibration and performance of the MARK II drift chamber vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrett, D.; Ford, W.T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Weber, P.

    1990-05-01

    We have calibrated and studied the performance of the MARK II drift chamber vertex detector with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber inside the MARK II detector at the SLC. The chamber achieves 30 μm impact parameter resolution and 500 μm track-pair resolution using CO 2 /C 2 H 6 H 6 (92/8) at 2 atmospheres pressure. The chamber has successfully recorded Z 0 decays at the SLC, and resolved tracks in dense hadronic jets with good efficiency and high accuracy. 5 refs., 13 figs

  4. Calibration Improvements in the Detector-to-Detector Differences for the MODIS Ocean Color Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghong; Angal, Amit; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Link, Daniel; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a major instrument within NASAs Earth Observation System missions, has operated for over 16 and 14 years onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, respectively. Its reflective solar bands (RSB) covering a spectral range from 0.4 to 2.1 micrometers are primarily calibrated using the on-board solar diffuser(SD), with its on-orbit degradation monitored using the Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor. RSB calibrations are supplemented by near-monthly lunar measurements acquired from the instruments space-view port. Nine bands (bands 8-16) in the visible to near infrared spectral range from 0.412 to 0.866 micrometers are primarily used for ocean color observations.During a recent reprocessing of ocean color products, performed by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group, detector-to-detector differences of up to 1.5% were observed in bands 13-16 of Terra MODIS. This paper provides an overview of the current approach to characterize the MODIS detector-to-detector differences. An alternative methodology was developed to mitigate the observed impacts for bands 13-16. The results indicated an improvement in the detector residuals and in turn are expected to improve the MODIS ocean color products. This paper also discusses the limitations,subsequent enhancements, and the improvements planned for future MODIS calibration collections.

  5. X-ray and gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Measurements and Evaluation of X- and Gamma-Ray Standards for Detector Efficiency Calibration in 1986 with the aim of alleviating the generation of such discrepancies. Within the framework of this CRP, representatives of nine research groups from six Member States and one international organization performed a number of precise measurements and systematic in-depth evaluations of the required decay data. They have also contributed to the development of evaluation methodology and measurement techniques, and stimulated a number of such studies at laboratories not directly involved in the IAEA project. The results of the work of the CRP, which was finished in 1990, are presented in this report. Recommended values of half-lives and photon emission probabilities are given for a carefully selected set of radionuclides that are suitable for detector efficiency calibration (X-rays from 5 to 90 keV and gamma-rays from 30 to about 3000 keV). Detector efficiency calibration for higher gamma-ray energies (up to 14 MeV) is also considered. The evaluation procedures used to obtain the recommended values and their estimated uncertainties are reported, and a summary of the remaining discrepancies is given. Refs and tabs

  6. Offline calibration procedure of the CMS Drift Tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G; Battilana, C; Cavallo, F R; Giunta, M; Guiducci, L; Amapane, N; Bolognesi, S; Cerminara, G; Bellan, R; Biallass, P; Frangenheim, J; Biasotto, M; Tazon, A Calderon; Cepeda, M; Cruz, B De La; Pardos, C Diez; Bedoya, C Fernandez; Iglesias, M C Fouz; Menendez, J Fernandez; Gresele, A

    2009-01-01

    The barrel region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is instrumented with Drift Tube (DT) detectors. This paper describes in full details the calibration of the DT hit reconstruction algorithm. After inter-channel synchronization has been verified through the appropriate hardware procedure, the time pedestals are extracted directly from the distribution of the recorded times. Further corrections for time-of-flight and time of signal propagation are applied as soon as the three-dimensional hit position within the DT chamber is known. The different effects of the time pedestal miscalibration on the two main hit reconstruction algorithms are shown. The drift velocity calibration algorithm is based on the meantimer technique. Different meantimer relations for different track angles and patterns of hit cells are used. This algorithm can also be used to determine the uncertainty on the reconstructed hit position.

  7. Hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors with high detection efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, A.; Grenadier, S. J.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron detectors fabricated from 10B enriched hexagonal boron nitride (h-10BN or h-BN) epilayers have demonstrated the highest thermal neutron detection efficiency among solid-state neutron detectors to date at about 53%. In this work, photoconductive-like vertical detectors with a detection area of 1 × 1 mm2 were fabricated from 50 μm thick free-standing h-BN epilayers using Ni/Au and Ti/Al bilayers as ohmic contacts. Leakage currents, mobility-lifetime (μτ) products under UV photoexcitation, and neutron detection efficiencies have been measured for a total of 16 different device configurations. The results have unambiguously identified that detectors incorporating the Ni/Au bilayer on both surfaces as ohmic contacts and using the negatively biased top surface for neutron irradiation are the most desired device configurations. It was noted that high growth temperatures of h-10BN epilayers on sapphire substrates tend to yield a higher concentration of oxygen impurities near the bottom surface, leading to a better device performance by the chosen top surface for irradiation than by the bottom. Preferential scattering of oxygen donors tends to reduce the mobility of holes more than that of electrons, making the biasing scheme with the ability of rapidly extracting holes at the irradiated surface while leaving the electrons to travel a large average distance inside the detector at a preferred choice. When measured against a calibrated 6LiF filled micro-structured semiconductor neutron detector, it was shown that the optimized configuration has pushed the detection efficiency of h-BN neutron detectors to 58%. These detailed studies also provided a better understanding of growth-mediated impurities in h-BN epilayers and their effects on the charge collection and neutron detection efficiencies.

  8. The influence of the calibration standard and the chemical composition of the water samples residue in the counting efficiency of proportional detectors for gross alpha and beta counting. Application on the radiologic control of the IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Cecilia Martins

    2003-01-01

    In this work the efficiency calibration curves of thin-window and low background gas-flow proportional counters were determined for calibration standards with different energies and different absorber thicknesses. For the gross alpha counting we have used 241 Am and natural uranium standards and for the gross beta counting we have used 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 137 Cs standards in residue thicknesses ranging from 0 to approximately 18 mg/cm 2 . These sample thicknesses were increased with a previously determined salted solution prepared simulating the chemical composition of the underground water of IPEN The counting efficiency for alpha emitters ranged from 0,273 +- 0,038 for a weightless residue to only 0,015 +- 0,002 in a planchet containing 15 mg/cm 2 of residue for 241 Am standard. For natural uranium standard the efficiency ranged from 0,322 +- 0,030 for a weightless residue to 0,023 +- 0,003 in a planchet containing 14,5 mg/cm 2 of residue. The counting efficiency for beta emitters ranged from 0,430 +- 0,036 for a weightless residue to 0,247 +- 0,020 in a planchet containing 17 mg/cm 2 of residue for 137 Cs standard. For 90 Sr/ 90 Y standard the efficiency ranged from 0,489 +- 0,041 for a weightless residue to 0,323 +- 0,026 in a planchet containing 18 mg/cm 2 of residue. Results make evident the counting efficiency variation with the alpha or beta emitters energies and the thickness of the water samples residue. So, the calibration standard, the thickness and the chemical composition of the residue must always be considered in the gross alpha and beta radioactivity determination in water samples. (author)

  9. Final results for the neutron detector efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zuying; Tang Hongqing; Qi Bujia; Du Yanfeng; Zhou Chenwei; Xia Haihong; Chen Zemin; Chen Zhenpeng; Chen Yingtang

    1998-01-01

    Final results for neutron detector efficiencies of a liquid organic scintillator are presented. The comparisons of efficiency results to calculations with discrimination against γ-rays and without n-γ discrimination are shown out and discussed. The measured relative neutron detection efficiency of a liquid organic scintillator with the PSD constraint active is in good agreement with SCINFUL calculations from 9 to 40 Mev and NEFF7 calculations from 9 to 20 Mev, the upper limit of the latter code

  10. Dose Calibration of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument has been fabricated by Southwest Research Institute and delivered to NASA for flight to the ISS in late 2015 or early 2016. ISS-RAD is essentially two instruments that share a common interface to ISS. The two instruments are the Charged Particle Detector (CPD), which is very similar to the MSL-RAD detector on Mars, and the Fast Neutron Detector (FND), which is a boron-loaded plastic scintillator with readout optimized for the 0.5 to 10 MeV energy range. As the FND is completely new, it has been necessary to develop methodology to allow it to be used to measure the neutron dose and dose equivalent. This talk will focus on the methods developed and their implementation using calibration data obtained in quasi-monoenergetic (QMN) neutron fields at the PTB facility in Braunschweig, Germany. The QMN data allow us to determine an approximate response function, from which we estimate dose and dose equivalent contributions per detected neutron as a function of the pulse height. We refer to these as the "pSv per count" curves for dose equivalent and the "pGy per count" curves for dose. The FND is required to provide a dose equivalent measurement with an accuracy of ?10% of the known value in a calibrated AmBe field. Four variants of the analysis method were developed, corresponding to two different approximations of the pSv per count curve, and two different implementations, one for real-time analysis onboard ISS and one for ground analysis. We will show that the preferred method, when applied in either real-time or ground analysis, yields good accuracy for the AmBe field. We find that the real-time algorithm is more susceptible to chance-coincidence background than is the algorithm used in ground analysis, so that the best estimates will come from the latter.

  11. Instruments for calibration and monitoring of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this Ph. D. thesis is the study and the development of the instruments needed to monitor and calibrate the Muon Detector of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment. LHCb is currently under installation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and will start to take data during 2007. The experiment will study B mesons decays to achieve a profound understanding of favour physics in the Standard Model framework and to search signs of new physics beyond. Muons can be found in the final states of many B-decays which are sensitive to CP violation. The Muon Detector has the crucial role to identify the muon particles generated by the b-hadron decays through a measurement of their transverse momentum, already at the first trigger level (Level-0). A 95% effciency in events selection is required for the Muon Trigger, which operates at the Level-0. 1380 detectors are used to equip the whole Muon System and the corresponding 122,112 readout channels must be time aligned and monitored with a resol...

  12. Calibration of radon-222 detectors using closed circuit radium-226 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, Allan Felipe Nunes; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Del Claro, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the calibration of the Radon-222 detectors used by the Laboratories specializing in measuring natural radiation from this gas. The research was conducted in collaboration between UTFPR, CDTN/CNEN, UFRN and IRD/CNEN. During the calibration the detectors were exposed in isolated chambers with radioactive calibrated sources. The calibration procedure was supported with four instant radon monitors AlphaGUARD (SAPHYMO Co.) responsible for radon activity measurements in the experimental chamber. The calibration procedure resulted an equation that relates the number of tracks found in solid-state detector CR-39 (Track-Etch detector) with the concentration of radon in the atmosphere. Obtained results are compatible with previously performed calibration at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan) using high activity levels of radon in air. Present results of calibration give the possibility to expand the calibration curve of CR-39 for medium and low activity levels of radon. (author)

  13. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Losel, Philipp Jonathan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resisitve strip Micromegas detectors behave discharge tolerant. They have been tested extensively as smaller detectors of about 10 x 10 cm$^2$ in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100\\,kHz/cm$^2$ and above. Tracking resolutions well below 100\\,$\\mu$m have been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3\\,m$^2$ in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1\\,m$^2$ detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 $\\mu$m was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Facility (CRF) using two 4 $\\times$ 2.2 m$^2$ large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. Segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6\\,mm x 95\\,mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by 11 95\\,mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips.\\\\ This allows for mapping of homogenity in pulse height and efficiency, deter...

  14. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00389527; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Resistive strip Micromegas detectors are discharge tolerant. They have been tested extensively as small detectors of about 10 x 10 cm$^2$ in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100 kHz/cm$^2$ and above. Tracking resolution well below 100 $\\mu$m has been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3 m$^2$ in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1 m$^2$ detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 $\\mu$m was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility (CRMF) using two 4 $\\times$ 2.2 m$^2$ large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. A segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6 mm x 93 mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by eleven 93 mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips. This allows for mapping of homogeneity in pulse height and efficiency, d...

  15. True coincidence summing correction and mathematical efficiency modeling of a well detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäderström, H., E-mail: henrik.jaderstrom@canberra.com [CANBERRA Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States); Mueller, W.F. [CANBERRA Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States); Atrashkevich, V. [Stroitely St 4-4-52, Moscow (Russian Federation); Adekola, A.S. [CANBERRA Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    True coincidence summing (TCS) occurs when two or more photons are emitted from the same decay of a radioactive nuclide and are detected within the resolving time of the gamma ray detector. TCS changes the net peak areas of the affected full energy peaks in the spectrum and the nuclide activity is rendered inaccurate if no correction is performed. TCS is independent of the count rate, but it is strongly dependent on the peak and total efficiency, as well as the characteristics of a given nuclear decay. The TCS effects are very prominent for well detectors because of the high efficiencies, and make accounting for TCS a necessity. For CANBERRA's recently released Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) well detector, an extension to CANBERRA's mathematical efficiency calibration method (In Situ Object Calibration Software or ISOCS, and Laboratory SOurceless Calibration Software or LabSOCS) has been developed that allows for calculation of peak and total efficiencies for SAGe well detectors. The extension also makes it possible to calculate TCS corrections for well detectors using the standard algorithm provided with CANBERRAS's Spectroscopy software Genie 2000. The peak and total efficiencies from ISOCS/LabSOCS have been compared to MCNP with agreements within 3% for peak efficiencies and 10% for total efficiencies for energies above 30 keV. A sample containing Ra-226 daughters has been measured within the well and analyzed with and without TCS correction and applying the correction factor shows significant improvement of the activity determination for the energy range 46–2447 keV. The implementation of ISOCS/LabSOCS for well detectors offers a powerful tool for efficiency calibration for these detectors. The automated algorithm to correct for TCS effects in well detectors makes nuclide specific calibration unnecessary and offers flexibility in carrying out gamma spectral analysis.

  16. Calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greacen, E.L.; Correll, R.L.; Cunningham, R.B.; Johns, G.G.; Nicolls, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures common to different methods of calibration of neutron moisture meters are outlined and laboratory and field calibration methods compared. Gross errors which arise from faulty calibration techniques are described. The count rate can be affected by the dry bulk density of the soil, the volumetric content of constitutional hydrogen and other chemical components of the soil and soil solution. Calibration is further complicated by the fact that the neutron meter responds more strongly to the soil properties close to the detector and source. The differences in slope of calibration curves for different soils can be as much as 40%

  17. Calibration of a HPGe detector for Marinelli vessel geometry for measurement of gaseous 41Ar activity using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, T.; Narasimhanath, V.; Sunil, C.N.; Kumaravel, S.; Ramakrishna, V.; Prashanth Kumar, M.; Nair, B.S.K.; Purohit, R.G.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out measurement of 41 Ar gaseous activity an attempt is made to calibrate the detector (HPGe) for Standard Measuring Flask (SMF) and Marinelli vessel geometry and compare their efficiencies. As standard gaseous source of 41 Ar is not available the calibration is done using liquid standard source of 22 Na (having 1274.5 KeV gamma energy close to the 1293.6 KeV gamma energy of 41 Ar). The HPGe detector and both the geometries are simulated and efficiencies for Full Energy Peak (FEP) are obtained using MCNP. The correction factor for energy and sample matrix is obtained from simulated efficiencies. By applying these correction factors the calibration is done. (author)

  18. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  19. MD#1182: Calibration of diamond particle detectors in IP6

    CERN Document Server

    Valette, Matthieu; Lindstrom, Bjorn Hans Filip; Wiesner, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In case of an asynchronous beam dump with a fully filled LHC machine it is expected that all standard ionisation chamber Beam Loss Monitors (IC BLM) around the LHC dumping region in IP6 will be saturated. Diamond Beam Loss Monitors (dBLM) were therefore installed next to the movable dump protection absorber (TCDQ) downstream of the extraction kickers. These detectors allow resolving losses at a nanosecond timescale and with an dynamic range of several orders of magnitude; thus, allowing to know the number of nominal bunches impacting the TCDQ. After a first series of calibrations using asynchronous beam dump tests, an experiment was conducted during MD#1182 to demonstrate the possibility of resolving a nominal bunch hitting the TCDQ. The impact parameter of the bunches on the TCDQ was first scanned using probe bunches with lower intensity then tests were done with nominal bunches (1.1e11 p/bunch) at injection energy. High energy calibration of the losses was also attempted unsuccessfully. Due to different beh...

  20. The peak efficiency calibration of volume source using 152Eu point source in computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Tingyun; Qian Jianfu; Nan Qinliang; Zhou Yanguo

    1997-01-01

    The author describes the method of the peak efficiency calibration of volume source by means of 152 Eu point source for HPGe γ spectrometer. The peak efficiency can be computed by Monte Carlo simulation, after inputting parameter of detector. The computation results are in agreement with the experimental results with an error of +-3.8%, with an exception one is about +-7.4%

  1. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z., E-mail: zhirui.xu@epfl.ch; Tobin, M.

    2016-07-11

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  2. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086132; Tobin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  3. On site calibration for new fluorescence detectors of the telescope array experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuno, H.; Murano, Y.; Kawana, S.; Tameda, Y.; Taketa, A.; Ikeda, D.; Udo, S.; Ogio, S.; Fukushima, M.; Azuma, R.; Fukuda, M.; Inoue, N.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Shibata, T.; Takeda, M.; Tsunesada, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The Telescope Array experiment is searching for the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using a ground array of particle detectors and three fluorescence telescope stations. The precise calibration of the fluorescence detectors is important for small systematic errors in shower reconstruction. This paper details the process of calibrating cameras for two of the fluorescence telescope stations. This paper provides the operational results of these camera calibrations.

  4. Euromet action 428: transfer of ge detectors efficiency calibration from point source geometry to other geometries; Action euromet 428: transfert de l'etalonnage en rendement de detecteurs au germanium pour une source ponctuelle vers d'autres geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepy, M.Ch

    2000-07-01

    The EUROMET project 428 examines efficiency transfer computation for Ge gamma-ray spectrometers when the efficiency is known for a reference point source geometry in the 60 keV to 2 MeV energy range. For this, different methods are used, such as Monte Carlo simulation or semi-empirical computation. The exercise compares the application of these methods to the same selected experimental cases to determine the usage limitations versus the requested accuracy. For carefully examining these results and trying to derive information for improving the computation codes, this study was limited to a few simple cases, from an experimental efficiency calibration for point source at 10-cm source-to-detector distance. The first part concerns the simplest case of geometry transfer, i.e., using point sources for 3 source-to-detector distances: 2,5 and 20 cm; the second part deals with transfer from point source geometry to cylindrical geometry with three different matrices. The general results show that the deviations between the computed results and the measured efficiencies are for the most part within 10%. The quality of the results is rather inhomogeneous and shows that these codes cannot be used directly for metrological purposes. However, most of them are operational for routine measurements when efficiency uncertainties of 5-10% can be sufficient. (author)

  5. Initial absolute calibration factors for some neutron sensitive self-powered detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Self-powered flux detectors have found extensive use as monitoring devices in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) cores and CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) type power reactors. The detectors measure fuel power distributions and indicate trip parameters for reactor control and safety requirements. Both applications demand accurate absolute initial calibration factors. Experimental results obtained in calibrating some neutron sensitive self-powered detectors is presented. (author)

  6. Model calibration for building energy efficiency simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafaraj, Giorgio; Marini, Dashamir; Costa, Andrea; Keane, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Developing a 3D model relating to building architecture, occupancy and HVAC operation. • Two calibration stages developed, final model providing accurate results. • Using an onsite weather station for generating the weather data file in EnergyPlus. • Predicting thermal behaviour of underfloor heating, heat pump and natural ventilation. • Monthly energy saving opportunities related to heat pump of 20–27% was identified. - Abstract: This research work deals with an Environmental Research Institute (ERI) building where an underfloor heating system and natural ventilation are the main systems used to maintain comfort condition throughout 80% of the building areas. Firstly, this work involved developing a 3D model relating to building architecture, occupancy and HVAC operation. Secondly, the calibration methodology, which consists of two levels, was then applied in order to insure accuracy and reduce the likelihood of errors. To further improve the accuracy of calibration a historical weather data file related to year 2011, was created from the on-site local weather station of ERI building. After applying the second level of calibration process, the values of Mean bias Error (MBE) and Cumulative Variation of Root Mean Squared Error (CV(RMSE)) on hourly based analysis for heat pump electricity consumption varied within the following ranges: (MBE) hourly from −5.6% to 7.5% and CV(RMSE) hourly from 7.3% to 25.1%. Finally, the building was simulated with EnergyPlus to identify further possibilities of energy savings supplied by a water to water heat pump to underfloor heating system. It found that electricity consumption savings from the heat pump can vary between 20% and 27% on monthly bases

  7. A mathematical method to calculate efficiency of BF3 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Fenni; Hu Qingyuan; Peng Taiping

    2009-01-01

    In order to calculate absolute efficiency of the BF 3 detector, MCNP/4C code is applied to calculate relative efficiency of the BF 3 detector first, and then absolute efficiency is figured out through mathematical techniques. Finally an energy response curve of the BF 3 detector for 1-20 MeV neutrons is derived. It turns out that efficiency of BF 3 detector are relatively uniform for 2-16 MeV neutrons. (authors)

  8. Efficiency calibration of solid track spark auto counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Wen Zhongwei; Lin Jufang; Liu Rong; Jiang Li; Lu Xinxin; Zhu Tonghua

    2008-01-01

    The factors influencing detection efficiency of solid track spark auto counter were analyzed, and the best etch condition and parameters of charge were also reconfirmed. With small plate fission ionization chamber, the efficiency of solid track spark auto counter at various experiment assemblies was re-calibrated. The efficiency of solid track spark auto counter at various experimental conditions was obtained. (authors)

  9. Study on efficiency calibration of tritium in liquid scintillation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Xiufang; Wang Yaoqin; Li Weiping; Liang Wei; Xu Hui; Zhang Ruirong

    2014-01-01

    The method for efficiency calibration of tritium sample in liquid scintillation spectrometry was presented. The quenching effects from different chemical quenchers (Acidbase, CH_3NO_2, CCl_4, CH_3COCH_3) and color quencher (Na_2CrO_4) were studied. For each quencher, the methods of sample channel ratio (SCR), spectrum index of the sample (SIS) and spectral quenching parameter of the external standard (SQP (E)) were used for efficiency calibration respectively, and three methods were compared. The results show that the quenching from the various chemical quencher can be unified for one chemical quenching for efficiency calibration. There is great difference in the correction curves of chemical quenching and color quenching, and the fact is independent of the used efficiency calibration method. The SCR method is not advantageous for the tritium sample with low radioactivity or strong quenching. The SQP (E) method is independent of the sample count rate, and it is especially suitable for the efficiency calibration of low radioactivity tritium. The SIS method can be used for samples with high radioactivity. The accurate efficiency calibration for various quenching can be carried out by combining the SIS method and the SQP (E) method. (authors)

  10. A photon pressure calibrator for the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossavi, K.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Seifert, F.; Weiland, U.; Smith, J.R.; Lueck, H.; Grote, H.; Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.

    2006-01-01

    Interferometer mirror displacement induced by radiation pressure is used to demonstrate an alternative calibration method for the GEO 600 detector. The photon calibrator utilizes an amplitude modulated laser diode with up to 1.4 W output power at a wavelength of 1035 nm. The achieved accuracy of the strain amplitude calibration is dominated by the laser power calibration error, which is in the range of ±4% for the measurements presented in this Letter

  11. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Clarke, R. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt,Germany (Germany); Morrison, J. T. [Propulsion Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Lab, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H. [Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Norreys, P. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Oliver, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Helmholtz Institut Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  12. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Krygier, A. G.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Clarke, R.; Freeman, R. R.; Fuchs, J.; Jung, D.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Roth, M.; Vassura, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  13. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil

  14. A neutrino detector: its efficiency and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, G.

    1979-01-01

    A new experimental counter for the detection of reactor anti-νsub(e) by the reaction anti-νsub(e)+p→n+e + has been studied in order to test the conservation law of separate leptonic numbers. Measurements were done with a prototype detector of smaller dimensions in order to identify the origin of background events among those of capture. The measurements of the internal activity in the part of the detector constituted by the 3 He proportional counters permitted the selection of the less radioactive materials and thus to have a background as low as possible. As concerns the external backgrounds due to reactor and cosmic rays, measurements have shown that they can be reduced to an acceptable level by surrounding the detector with shields of lead and polyethylene and by the use of a 4π anti-coincidence system. An important work of neutronic simulation on a computer has permitted to foresee the detection efficiency and to estimate the neutronic properties of each part. An exploratory study has shown that with a modification of target material, it will be possible to measure neutral currents with the reactions anti-νsub(e)+d→n+p+anti-νsub(e) [fr

  15. Calibration with MCNP of NaI detector for the determination of natural radioactivity levels in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Giorgia; Tositti, Laura; Mostacci, Domiziano; Baré, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    In view of assessing natural radioactivity with on-site quantitative gamma spectrometry, efficiency calibration of NaI(Tl) detectors is investigated. A calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation of detector response is proposed, to render reliable quantitative analysis practicable in field campaigns. The method is developed with reference to contact geometry, in which measurements are taken placing the NaI(Tl) probe directly against the solid source to be analyzed. The Monte Carlo code used for the simulations was MCNP. Experimental verification of the calibration goodness is obtained by comparison with appropriate standards, as reported. On-site measurements yield a quick quantitative assessment of natural radioactivity levels present ((40)K, (238)U and (232)Th). On-site gamma spectrometry can prove particularly useful insofar as it provides information on materials from which samples cannot be taken. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Germanium detector calibration according to the standard NF M 60-810 without using radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, J. M.; Garell, I.; Losset, Y.; Vichot, L. [CEA de Valduc, Service de Protection Contre Les Rayonnements, 21110 Is sur Tille (France); Chazalet, J.; Tauvel, Y.; Poulet, F. [IUP Genie des Systemes Industriels, Universite Blaise Pascal, Departement de Physique, 24 avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    In-situ gamma ray spectrometry is used to determine the specific activities of natural and artificial radioactive nuclides in the soil with a good accuracy. This method is very interesting for environmental measurements and leads to soil determination activity. It is a cheaper method than analysis of great amounts of soil samples in the laboratory. As there is no standard soil, detection efficiency can be estimated using either statistical tools or combination of radioactive point sources calibration thanks to mathematical models of NF-M-60-810 standard representing the radionuclide distribution in soil. Experimental determination of detection efficiency requires a large number of operations involving the handling of radioactive standards in the energy range from 0.06 - 2 MeV. For these reasons, detection efficiency model has been determined without using radioactive sources. In order to reduce analytical time and to simplify the efficiency detector calibration, it is possible to associate numerical and deterministic methods and to get a relative accuracy below 25 per cent

  17. Energy and resolution calibration of detectors for noble gas β-γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Huaimao; Wang Shilian; Li Qi; Wang Jun; Zhao Yungang; Zhang Xinjun; Fan Yuanqing

    2010-01-01

    The β-γ coincidence technique is a kind of important method to detect radioactive xenon isotopes for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty(CTBT). The energy and resolution calibration of detectors is the first key technique. This paper describes in detail the energy and resolution calibration methods of NaI (Tl) and plastic scintillator detectors for the noble gas β-γ coincidence system SAUNA II-Lab. NaI (Tl) detector's energy and resolution for γ-ray were calibrated with γ radioactive point sources. Plastic scintillator detector's energy and resolution for β-ray were calibrated by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs 661.66 keV γ-ray. And the results of β-ray energy resolution calibrated by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs were compared with the results of conversion electron of 131 Xe m . In conclusion,it is an easy and feasible method of calibrating plastic scintillator detector's energy by Compton scattering electrons of 137 Cs,but detector's resolution calibrated by Compton scattering electrons is higher than factual result. (authors)

  18. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors and application to radon sampling in dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero C, M.E.; Colmenero S, L.; Villalba, L.; Saenz P, J.; Cano J, A.; Moreno B, A.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E.F. [Cento de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, (Mexico); Cruz G, S. De la [Facultad de Enfermeria y Nutriologia, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Av. Politecnico Nacional 2714, Chihuahua, (Mexico); Lopez M, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Some calibration conditions of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A series of functional expressions and graphs were developed to describe relationship between radon concentration in air and the activity adsorbed in DBCC, when placed in small chambers. A semi-empirical expression for the DBCC calibration was obtained, based on the detector integration time and the adsorption coefficient of radon on activated charcoal. Both, the integration time for 10 % of DBCC of the same batch, and the adsorption coefficient of radon for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were experimentally determined. Using these values as the calibration parameters, a semi-empirical calibration function was used for the interpretation of the radon activities in the detectors used for sampling more than 200 dwellings in the major cities of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico. (Author)

  19. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors and application to radon sampling in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero C, M.E.; Colmenero S, L.; Villalba, L.; Saenz P, J.; Cano J, A.; Moreno B, A.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E.F.; Cruz G, S. De la; Lopez M, A.

    2003-01-01

    Some calibration conditions of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A series of functional expressions and graphs were developed to describe relationship between radon concentration in air and the activity adsorbed in DBCC, when placed in small chambers. A semi-empirical expression for the DBCC calibration was obtained, based on the detector integration time and the adsorption coefficient of radon on activated charcoal. Both, the integration time for 10 % of DBCC of the same batch, and the adsorption coefficient of radon for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were experimentally determined. Using these values as the calibration parameters, a semi-empirical calibration function was used for the interpretation of the radon activities in the detectors used for sampling more than 200 dwellings in the major cities of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico. (Author)

  20. The calibration of the solid state nuclear track detector LR 115 for radon measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, C; Jönsson, G; Freyer, K; Treutler, H C; Enge, W

    1999-01-01

    An experimental calibration of indoor room and outdoor soil detector devices which are based on LR 115 as sensitive element has taken place at the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute in Stockholm (Sweden) in 1994 and 1996, at the Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig (Germany) in 1997 and at the Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany) in 1997. Special properties of the used solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) material LR 115 have been measured to define the application of the experimental calibration.

  1. Design, calibration, and performance of the MINERvA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, L. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima, Perú (Peru); Bagby, L.; Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Baumbaugh, A. [Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima, Perú (Peru); Bodek, A.; Bradford, R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Brooks, W.K. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avda. España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Boehnlein, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Boyd, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Budd, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Butkevich, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Castromonte, C.M. [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Christy, M.E. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota – Duluth, Duluth, MN 55812 (United States); Chvojka, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Motta, H. da [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil); and others

    2014-04-11

    The MINERvA experiment is designed to perform precision studies of neutrino-nucleus scattering using ν{sub μ} and ν{sup ¯}{sub μ} neutrinos incident at 1–20 GeV in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. This article presents a detailed description of the MINERvA detector and describes the ex situ and in situ techniques employed to characterize the detector and monitor its performance. The detector is composed of a finely segmented scintillator-based inner tracking region surrounded by electromagnetic and hadronic sampling calorimetry. The upstream portion of the detector includes planes of graphite, iron and lead interleaved between tracking planes to facilitate the study of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Observations concerning the detector response over sustained periods of running are reported. The detector design and methods of operation have relevance to future neutrino experiments in which segmented scintillator tracking is utilized.

  2. Design, development and calibration of a radioactive gas (85Kr) detector for continuous environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; John, Jacob; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B.; Gopalan, C.S.; Menezes, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    Design, development and calibration of a scintillation type detector for environmental monitoring of low levels of 85 Kr activity in off-line effluents or plant areas in presence of gamma background are reported. Calibration of the system was done using NBS 85 Kr standard. (author)

  3. Design, development and calibration of a radioactive gas (/sup 85/Kr) detector for continuous environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; John, J.; Kutty, K.N.; Wattamwar, S.B. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.); Gopalan, C.S.; Menezes, C.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Electronics Div.)

    Design, development and calibration of a scintillation type detector for environmental monitoring of low levels of /sup 85/Kr activity in off-line effluents or plant areas in presence of gamma background are reported. Calibration of the system was done using NBS /sup 85/Kr standard.

  4. Calibration of neutron detectors on the Joint European Torus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, Paola; Popovichev, S; Conroy, S; Lengar, I; Čufar, A; Abhangi, M; Snoj, L; Horton, L

    2017-10-01

    The present paper describes the findings of the calibration of the neutron yield monitors on the Joint European Torus (JET) performed in 2013 using a 252 Cf source deployed inside the torus by the remote handling system, with particular regard to the calibration of fission chambers which provide the time resolved neutron yield from JET plasmas. The experimental data obtained in toroidal, radial, and vertical scans are presented. These data are first analysed following an analytical approach adopted in the previous neutron calibrations at JET. In this way, a calibration function for the volumetric plasma source is derived which allows us to understand the importance of the different plasma regions and of different spatial profiles of neutron emissivity on fission chamber response. Neutronics analyses have also been performed to calculate the correction factors needed to derive the plasma calibration factors taking into account the different energy spectrum and angular emission distribution of the calibrating (point) 252 Cf source, the discrete positions compared to the plasma volumetric source, and the calibration circumstances. All correction factors are presented and discussed. We discuss also the lessons learnt which are the basis for the on-going 14 MeV neutron calibration at JET and for ITER.

  5. Calibration of a NE213 detector for neutron spectroscopy; Calibracion de un detector de NE213 para espectroscopia de neutrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez Martinez, J; Butragueno Casado, J L

    1974-07-01

    This work describes the experimental way followed for getting the calibration of a NE213 detector with a beam of neutrons from the J.E.N. 2 MeV Van de Graaff and using at once pulse shape discrimination. Detector has been used for measuring the spectrum of the fast reactor CORAL-1. There is also included an experimental method in order to get with precision where the Compton edge is placed on the electron spectrum. (Author) 9 refs.

  6. Energy calibration of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisenkov, A.V.; Aulchenko, V.M.; Bashtovoy, N.S.; Bondar, A.E.; Grebenuk, A.A.; Epifanov, D.A.; Epshteyn, L.B.; Erofeev, A.L.; Kovalenko, O.A.; Kozyrev, A.N.; Kuzmin, A.S.; Mikhailov, K.Yu.; Logashenko, I.B.; Razuvaev, G.P.; Ruban, A.A.; Shebalin, V.E.; Shwartz, B.A.; Talyshev, A.A.; Titov, V.M.; Yudin, Yu.V.

    2017-01-01

    The VEPP-2000 e + e − collider has been operated in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics since 2010. Experiments are carried out with two detectors CMD-3 and SND. The calorimetry at the CMD-3 detector is based on three subsystems, two coaxial barrel calorimeters—Liquid Xenon calorimeter and crystal CsI calorimeter, and end cap calorimeter with BGO crystals. This paper describes the procedures of the energy calibration of the combined barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector.

  7. Depth of interaction calibration for PET detectors with dual-ended readout by PSAPDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongfeng; Qi Jinyi; Wu Yibao; St James, Sara; Cherry, Simon R; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Shah, Kanai S

    2009-01-01

    Many laboratories develop depth-encoding detectors to improve the trade-off between spatial resolution and sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. One challenge in implementing these detectors is the need to calibrate the depth of interaction (DOI) response for the large numbers of detector elements in a scanner. In this work, we evaluate two different methods, a linear detector calibration and a linear crystal calibration, for determining DOI calibration parameters. Both methods can use measurements from any source distribution and location, or even the intrinsic lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) background activity, and are therefore well suited for use in a depth-encoding PET scanner. The methods were evaluated by measuring detector and crystal DOI responses for all eight detectors in a prototype depth-encoding PET scanner. The detectors utilize dual-ended readout of LSO scintillator arrays with position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). The LSO arrays have 7 x 7 elements, with a crystal size of 0.92 x 0.92 x 20 mm 3 and pitch of 1.0 mm. The arrays are read out by two 8 x 8 mm 2 area PSAPDs placed at opposite ends of the arrays. DOI is measured by the ratio of the amplitude of the total energy signals measured by the two PSAPDs. Small variations were observed in the DOI responses of different crystals within an array as well as DOI responses for different arrays. A slightly nonlinear dependence of the DOI ratio on depth was observed and the nonlinearity was larger for the corner and edge crystals. The DOI calibration parameters were obtained from the DOI responses measured in a singles mode. The average error between the calibrated DOI and the known DOI was 0.8 mm if a linear detector DOI calibration was used and 0.5 mm if a linear crystal DOI calibration was used. A line source phantom and a hot rod phantom were scanned on the prototype PET scanner. DOI measurement significantly improved the image spatial resolution no matter which DOI

  8. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements for efficiency determination of lead shielded plastic scintillator detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Zafar; Negoita, Florin; Tabbassum, Sana; Borcea, Ruxandra; Kisyov, Stanimir

    2017-12-01

    The plastic scintillators are used in different areas of science and technology. One of the use of these scintillator detectors is as beam loss monitors (BLM) for new generation of high intensity heavy ion in superconducting linear accelerators. Operated in pulse counting mode with rather high thresholds and shielded by few centimeters of lead in order to cope with radiofrequency noise and X-ray background emitted by accelerator cavities, they preserve high efficiency for high energy gamma ray and neutrons produced in the nuclear reactions of lost beam particles with accelerator components. Efficiency calculation and calibration of detectors is very important before their practical usage. In the present work, the efficiency of plastic scintillator detectors is simulated using FLUKA for different gamma and neutron sources like, 60Co, 137Cs and 238Pu-Be. The sources are placed at different positions around the detector. Calculated values are compared with the measured values and a reasonable agreement is observed.

  9. Fusion neutron detector calibration using a table-top laser generated plasma neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartke, R.; Symes, D.R.; Buersgens, F.; Ruggles, L.E.; Porter, J.L.; Ditmire, T.

    2005-01-01

    Using a high intensity, femtosecond laser driven neutron source, a high-sensitivity neutron detector was calibrated. This detector is designed for observing fusion neutrons at the Z accelerator in Sandia National Laboratories. Nuclear fusion from laser driven deuterium cluster explosions was used to generate a clean source of nearly monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at a well-defined time. This source can run at 10 Hz and was used to build up a clean pulse-height spectrum on scintillating neutron detectors giving a very accurate calibration for neutron yields at 2.45 MeV

  10. Detection efficiency of the neutron detector BELEN-48 measured at the PTB Braunschweig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, Michele [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Agramunt, Jorge; Tain, Jose Luis [IFIC-CSIC University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Caballero-Folch, Roger; Cortes, Guillem; Riego, Albert [INTE-DFEN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Dillmann, Iris [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen (Germany); TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Erhard, Martin; Giesen, Ulrich; Nolte, Ralf; Roettger, Stefan [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany); Fraile, Luis M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The BEta-deLayEd Neutron detector BELEN-48 is a highly efficient detector of β-delayed neutrons, for nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and reactor studies. It consists of 48 {sup 3}He proportional counters arranged in a polyethylene matrix in a way that the detection efficiency remains constant for neutron energies from thermal up to a few MeV. In order to validate MCNPX simulations, the detection efficiency has been calibrated with well-known (p,n) and (α,n) reactions on {sup 7}Li, {sup 13}C and {sup 51}V producing neutrons with energies between 0.1 and 5 MeV. The experiment has been performed at the neutron metrology facility of PTB, which allowed the measurement of yields and angular distributions with a calibrated monitor. The new results indicate anisotropies, which are not reported in literature and have been taken into account to obtain the experimental efficiencies for BELEN.

  11. Calibration of Ge(Li) semiconductor detector by method using agar volume source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Kasai, Atsushi

    1979-12-01

    The Ge(Li) semiconductor detector was calibrated for measurements of environmental samples. The radioisotopes used for standard sources are 22 Na, 51 Cr, 56 Co, 57 Co, 133 Ba, 137 Cs, 144 Ce and 241 Am. These are mixed with hot agar aqueous solution and fixed uniformly in a cylindrical plastic case in cooling. The agar volume source is advantageous in handling over the fluid aqueous source. The prepared cylindrical standard sources are in diameters 6 and 8 cm and thicknesses 1, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm (only for 8 cm diameter). The radioactivities of prepared standard sources are between 0.03 μCi and 0.2 μCi. It takes only a week to make the calibration except data processing. The obtained full energy peak efficiency curves include 5 - 10% error due to preparation of agar source, reference radioactivity data of purchased standard solutions, reference data of branching ratio of gamma-ray and sum effect. The efficiency curves, however, are sufficient for quantitative analysis of environmental samples. (author)

  12. A method for calibration and test of the time-of-flight detectors for DELPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlloch, J.M.; Castillo, M.V.; Ferrer, A.; Fuster, J.; Higon, E.; Lozano, J.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchis, E.; Cuevas, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a method for calibration and test of large-area TOF counters using cosmic radiation. We applied the method to the time-of-flight system of the DELPHI detector at the LEP e + e - storage ring, made of scintillation (NE110) counters (20x350 cm 2 ). The photomultipliers used (EMI 9902KB) reach an average gain of 5x10 8 at 1700 V and the time resolution achieved is 1.2 ns. Using this method we measured the counter efficiencies as a function of the position; we obtained 135 cm for the effective attenuation length and 40 photoelectrons for a minimum-ionizing particle crossing the center of the counter. (orig.)

  13. Calibration of the identiFINDER detector for the iodine measurement in thyroid using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos M, D.; Yera S, Y.; Lopez B, G. M.; Acosta R, N.; Vergara G, A.

    2014-08-01

    This work is based on the determination of the detection efficiency of 125 I and 131 I in thyroid of the identiFINDER detector using the Monte Carlo method. The suitability of the calibration method is analyzed, when comparing the results of the direct Monte Carlo method with the corrected, choosing the latter because the differences with the real efficiency stayed below 10%. To simulate the detector their geometric parameters were optimized using a tomographic study, what allowed the uncertainties minimization of the estimates. Finally were obtained the simulations of the detector geometry-point source to find the correction factors to 5 cm, 15 cm and 25 cm, and those corresponding to the detector-simulator arrangement for the method validation and final calculation of the efficiency, demonstrating that in the Monte Carlo method implementation if simulates at a greater distance than the used in the Laboratory measurements an efficiency overestimation can be obtained, while if simulates at a shorter distance this will be underestimated, so should be simulated at the same distance to which will be measured in the reality. Also, is achieved the obtaining of the efficiency curves and minimum detectable activity for the measurement of 131 I and 125 I. In general is achieved the implementation of the Monte Carlo methodology for the identiFINDER calibration with the purpose of estimating the measured activity of iodine in thyroid. This method represents an ideal way to replace the lack of patterns solutions and simulators assuring the capacities of the Internal Contamination Laboratory of the Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones are always calibrated for the iodine measurement in thyroid. (author)

  14. Semi-empirical approach for calibration of CR-39 detectors in diffusion chambers for radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra A, P.; Lopez H, M. E. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel Lima 32 (Peru); Palacios F, D.; Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 89000 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Valdivia, P., E-mail: ppereyr@pucp.edu.pe [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru)

    2016-10-15

    Simulated and measured calibration of PADC detectors is given for cylindrical diffusion chambers employed in environmental radon measurements. The method is based on determining the minimum alpha energy (E{sub min}), average critical angle (<Θ{sub c}>), and fraction of {sup 218}Po atoms; the volume of the chamber (f{sub 1}), are compared to commercially available devices. Radon concentration for exposed detectors is obtained from induced track densities and the well-established calibration coefficient for NRPB monitor. Calibration coefficient of a PADC detector in a cylindrical diffusion chamber of any size is determined under the same chemical etching conditions and track analysis methodology. In this study the results of numerical examples and comparison between experimental calibration coefficients and simulation purpose made code. Results show that the developed method is applicable when uncertainties of 10% are acceptable. (Author)

  15. Semi-empirical approach for calibration of CR-39 detectors in diffusion chambers for radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereyra A, P.; Lopez H, M. E.; Palacios F, D.; Sajo B, L.; Valdivia, P.

    2016-10-01

    Simulated and measured calibration of PADC detectors is given for cylindrical diffusion chambers employed in environmental radon measurements. The method is based on determining the minimum alpha energy (E min ), average critical angle (<Θ c >), and fraction of 218 Po atoms; the volume of the chamber (f 1 ), are compared to commercially available devices. Radon concentration for exposed detectors is obtained from induced track densities and the well-established calibration coefficient for NRPB monitor. Calibration coefficient of a PADC detector in a cylindrical diffusion chamber of any size is determined under the same chemical etching conditions and track analysis methodology. In this study the results of numerical examples and comparison between experimental calibration coefficients and simulation purpose made code. Results show that the developed method is applicable when uncertainties of 10% are acceptable. (Author)

  16. Tests and Calibration of the NIF Neutron Time of Flight Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Z.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Cruz, M.; Duffy, T.; Stoeckl, C.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Tommasini, R.; Throop, A; Moran, M.; Dauffy, L.; Horsefield, C.

    2008-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Neutron Time of Flight (NTOF) diagnostic will measure neutron yield and ion temperature in all NIF campaigns in DD, DT, and THD (D = deuterium, T = tritium, H = hydrogen) implosions. The NIF NTOF diagnostic is designed to measure neutron yield from 10 9 to 2 x 10 19 . The NTOF consists of several detectors of varying sensitivity located on the NIF at about 5 m and 20 m from the target. Production, testing, and calibration of the NIF NTOF detectors have begun at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Operational tests of the NTOF detectors were performed on several facilities including the OMEGA laser at LLE and the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Neutron calibrations were carried out on the OMEGA laser. Results of the NTOF detectors tests and calibration will be presented

  17. Position calibration of silicon strip detector using quasi-elastic scattering of 16O+197Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Wenqi; Hu Hailong; Zhang Gaolong

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elastic scattering is induced by weakly unstable nuclei. Generally, a good angular resolution for angular distribution of elastic scattering is needed. The silicon strip detector is often used for this kind of experiment. Purpose: In order to use silicon strip detector to study the elastic scattering of weakly unbound nuclei, it is important to get the information of its position calibration. It is well known that the elastic scattering of stable nuclei has a good angular distribution and many experimental data have been obtained. Methods: So the scattering of stable nuclei can be used to calibrate the position information of silicon strip detector. In this experiment, the positions of silicon strip detectors are calibrated using 101 MeV and 59 MeV 16 O scattering on the 197 Au target. Results: The quasi-elastic peaks can be observed in the silicon strip detectors and the counts of quasi-elastic 16 O can be obtained. The solid angles of the silicon strip detectors are calibrated by using alpha source which has three alpha energy values. The angular distribution of quasi-elastic scattering of 16 O+ 197 Au is obtained at these two energy values. Conclusions: The experimental data of angular distribution are reasonable and fit for the principle of angular distribution of elastic scattering. It is concluded that in the experiment these silicon strip detectors can accurately give the position information and can be used for the elastic scattering experiment. (authors)

  18. Implantation of a 4πγ, with well type Nal(Tl) detector, for calibration of gamma emitters radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Douglas Cisneiros de

    2001-04-01

    Among the absolute calibration methods for activity quantity of radionuclides the most used in the metrology laboratories are: the 4πβγ coincidence counting), defined solid angle counting, sum-peak (or γ-γ coincidence) and 4π γ method. The 4πγ method is appropriate to measure the activity of radionuclides with complex decay scheme and its implementation at Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, commissioned by INMETRO from 1989, will provide to the expansion of the jobs to supply the users by standard radioactive sources. The determination of activity can be made using calibration factor and/or the efficiency curve. For the implantation of this calibration method at LNMRI, after the selection of the detector and the electronic instrumentation, the attainment of the efficiency curve in function of gamma rays energy, standard sources with one or two peaks each were used. The method is based in ε Τ = Πι (1 - ε ΤΕ ι) where ΕΤ is the total efficiency for each radionuclide and eTi is the efficiency for each gamma transition of this radionuclide. The detector selected was a 8 x 8'' well type Nal(Tl), with well dimensions 6'' deep and 3'' of diameter, from Harshaw The standards sources used are: Am-241, Pb- 210, Mn-54, Co-57, Cd-109, Ce-139, Co-60, Na-22, Y-88 and Zn-65. The preliminary results are consistent with the literature. (author)

  19. Calibration of the hard x-ray detectors for the FOXSI solar sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Bergstedt, Kendra; Vievering, Juliana; Musset, Sophie; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Courtade, Sasha; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Säm.; Goetz, Keith; Monson, Steven

    2017-08-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment conducts direct imaging and spectral observation of the Sun in hard X-rays, in the energy range 4 to 20 keV. These high-sensitivity observations are used to study particle acceleration and coronal heating. FOXSI is designed with seven grazing incidence optics modules that focus X-rays onto seven focal plane detectors kept at a 2m distance. FOXSI-1 was flown with seven Double-sided Si Strip Detectors (DSSD), and two of them were replaced with CdTe detectors for FOXSI-2. The upcoming FOXSI-3 flight will carry DSSD and CdTe detectors with upgraded optics for enhanced sensitivity. The detectors are calibrated using various radioactive sources. The detector's spectral response matrix was constructed with diagonal elements using a Gaussian approximation with a spread (sigma) that accounts for the energy resolution of the detector. Spectroscopic studies of past FOXSI flight data suggest that the inclusion of lower energy X-rays could better constrain the spectral modeling to yield a more precise temperature estimation of the hot plasma. This motivates us to carry out an improved calibration to better understand the finer-order effects on the spectral response, especially at lower energies. Here we report our improved calibration of FOXSI detectors using experiments and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  20. Study of method of efficiency transference using detectors NaI(Ti)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Thiago L.; Salgado, César M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors for measurements implies the determination of the detection efficiency as a function of the energy of the incident photons. The efficiency curve can be obtained experimentally with the use of several mono-energy sources calibrated with emission energies covering the whole range of interest or using the Monte Carlo method. The Institute of Nuclear Engineering develops several methodologies using these detectors as they are robust, inexpensive and do not need cooling for their use. The assembly of an experimental arrangement is usually complex, since several factors influence the result affecting reproducibility in measurements, such as: parallelism between source and detector, alignment between source and detector, and accuracy of source-detector distance. In view of such difficulties, an automated positioning system was developed for the source-detector set controlled by a micro controller based on the ARDUINO language in order to guarantee the reproducibility in the experimental arrangements. In the initial phase of this study, a mathematical model was developed in the MCNP-X code using a NaI (Tl) detector. A theoretical validation using the Efficiency Transfer Method was performed at three different positions on the detector's axial axis (10.6 cm, 11.3 cm and 12.0 cm). This method is based on the ratio of effective solid angles. The experimental validation presented maximum relative errors of 7.74% for the position 11.3 cm

  1. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector for the measurements of volumic activity of Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAKAM, O.K.; LFERDE, M.; BERRADA, M.

    1994-01-01

    Time - integrated measurements of environmental radiation activity are commonly carried out using solid state nuclear track detectors ( SSNTD ). These detectors should be calibrated of volumic activity of radon. This paper reports the results of experiments conducted to calibrate cellulose nitrate films LR - 115 type II used for measurements of volumic activity of radon in indoor air in dwellings and enclosed work areas in Morocco. Calibration measurements were made in laboratory using a calibration chamber and a radon source. The calibration chamber is a cylindric box ( 2613,6 cm sup 3)which we have manufactured of aluminium. The radon source is a natural sample rich of aluminium (17,29 + 0 ,12) Bq/g. The films are placed in detector holder with membrane and exposed inside the calibration chamber to varying concentrations of radon. Following the exposure, the films were chemically etched in sodium hydroxide (2,5 N) at 60 C for 120 minutes. The number of registered alpha particle tracks were counted with an optical microscope. In the used etching conditions, the removed mean thickness is in the order of 6 micro m. Therefore, we have normalized the track density to this value . We obtained a calibration factor of 0, 58 tracks . cm sup -2/ K Bq . h . m sup -3 . 1 tab.; 1 fig.; 2 refs. (author)

  2. Calibration comparative results for X - and gamma ray spectrometry with HPGe and BEGe detectors for a radon reference chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoran, Maria; Paul, Annette; Arnold, Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Inhaled decay products of 222 Rn are the dominant components of the natural radiation exposure being responsible for about 30% of the whole human radioactive exposure. Field instruments for 222 Rn and his progeny monitoring are calibrated in 'radon climate rooms', where it is possible to vary and monitor 222 Rn and the indoor air parameters ( temperature, humidity, ventilation rate, aerosol concentration). German radon reference chamber used was developed and installed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in order to serve as a metrological standard for radon and his progeny calibration of active and passive, indoor and outdoor radon monitoring devices in air climate. The basic parts of experimental setup for this γ and X -ray spectrometry analysis consists of a γ-X ray source in a lead shield/collimator, the detectors, the electronics necessary for pulse-height analysis (PHA) to obtain energy spectra. For calibrating system with 226 Ra standard sources (multienergy X ray and gamma emitters), two germanium detectors HPGe (12.5 nominal efficiency) and BEGe (22.5 nominal efficiency) were used. Germanium detectors are semiconductor diodes having a P-I-N structure in which the Intrinsic (I) region is sensitive to ionizing radiation, particularly X-rays and gamma rays. The BEGe is designed with an electrode structure that enhances low energy resolution and is fabricated from selected germanium having an impurity profile that improves charge collection (thus resolution and peak shape) at high energies which is really important in analysis of the complex spectra for uranium and finally for 226 Ra. MAESTRO MCA software and GNUPLOT program were used for spectra acquisition and spectra analysis, respectively . The main aim of this paper was to do a comparatively analysis of the detector performances for this radon chamber spectrometric chain. The calibration data analysis includes energy calibrations for both detection systems as well as comparative X and gamma

  3. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  4. Calibration factor determination for solid nuclear track detectors CR-39 type exposed to Rn-222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazula, Camila Dias; Campos, Marcia Pires de; Mazzilli, Barbara Paci

    2014-01-01

    In the detection method with solid nuclear track detector, when a heavy particle rests on the detector surface, causes a breakdown in their molecular structure forming a trace. One of the typical applications of these detectors is the measurement of the concentration of Rn -222 in air, a noble radioactive gas, part of the U-238 series, emitting alpha particles and important in epidemiological studies to protect individuals from natural radiation. To determine the concentration of Rn -222 in the air in a room is necessary to know the density of lines (traces / cm 2 ) on the detector surface, the exposure time and the calibration factor. The determination of the calibration factor for CR-39 detectors was taken from the exposure of these to a known concentration of Rn-222. Therefore, the detectors were placed inside a cell of Lucas adapted and subsequently exposed to a concentration of Rn-222 15 kBq / m 3 , by means of the apparatus RN-150 Pylon Electronics Incorporation, which has a source of Ra-226 and releases known concentrations of Rn-222. Six calibration factor determinations were performed, the average value obtained was 0.0534 ±0.0021 (traces / cm 2 per Bq / m 3 day). The results are consistent with literature values for the same type of detector and showed good reproducibility

  5. Calibration and Characterization of the UNCB and Nab Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeck, Bryan; UCNB Collaboration; Nab Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The UCNB and Nab experiments are designed to produce precision measurements of the free neutron decay angular correlations B, a, and b. Measurements of B and a require a coincident detection of the proton and electron produced in neutron decay, while for b, which manifests as a subtle shift in the electron energy spectrum, energy resolution better than 3 keV is desired and excellent fidelity for energy reconstruction is required, including characterization of non-linearity to the 10-4 level. To this end, a thick segmented silicon detector with a 100 nm dead layer and a 100 cm active area has been extensively characterized at LANL. The thin dead layer allows protons accelerated to 30 keV to deposit energy above threshold in the active volume of the detector, and the paired amplifer chain, developed at LANL, has a risetime of approximately 40 ns. Comparison of simulation to experiment reveals a detector resolution better than σ = 2.5 keV. A complete characterization of the detector will be presented. This work has been supported by Grants from the US National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  6. The energetic NeUtral Atom Detector Unit (NUADU) for China's Double Star Mission and its calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan E-mail: stil@may.ie; Balaz, Jan; Strharsky, Igor; Barabash, Stas; Brinkfeldt, Klas; Li Lu; Shen Chao; Shi Jiankui; Zong Qingang; Kudela, Karel; Fu Suiyan; Roelof, E.C.; Brandt, Pontus C. son; Dandouras, Iannis

    2004-09-11

    An account is provided of an advanced Energetic NeUtral Atom Detector Unit (NUADU) designed for China's Double Star Mission. Special emphasis is given to describing the detector head of the instrument and its calibration.

  7. 37Ar based neutron source for calibration of the iodine solar neutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurashitov, D.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Yants, V.Eh.; Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Wildenhain, P.; Khomyakov, Yu.S.

    2001-01-01

    The methodology of the creation of a compact neutrino source based on the 37 Ar isotope as well as the technique of calibration of an iodine detector of solar neutrinos is described. An important overall expected result is the creation of a prototype of the source with the intensity up to 400 kCi, delivery of this source to the Baksan neutrino observatory and the test calibration of the single module of the iodine detector. Simulation shows that at least 45-70 127 Xe atoms will be detected in the irradiation of ∼40 tons of methylene iodide by the source leading to ∼19% of the error on the measured production rate. This result should be considered as a test of the developed technology and will verify overall technical readiness for the creation of a full scale neutrino source and the full scale calibration of the iodine detector

  8. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb has a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  9. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  10. Establishing a standard calibration methodology for MOSFET detectors in computed tomography dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, S. L.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors for patient dosimetry has increased by ∼25% since 2005. Despite this increase, no standard calibration methodology has been identified nor calibration uncertainty quantified for the use of MOSFET dosimetry in CT. This work compares three MOSFET calibration methodologies proposed in the literature, and additionally investigates questions relating to optimal time for signal equilibration and exposure levels for maximum calibration precision. Methods: The calibration methodologies tested were (1) free in-air (FIA) with radiographic x-ray tube, (2) FIA with stationary CT x-ray tube, and (3) within scatter phantom with rotational CT x-ray tube. Each calibration was performed at absorbed dose levels of 10, 23, and 35 mGy. Times of 0 min or 5 min were investigated for signal equilibration before or after signal read out. Results: Calibration precision was measured to be better than 5%–7%, 3%–5%, and 2%–4% for the 10, 23, and 35 mGy respective dose levels, and independent of calibration methodology. No correlation was demonstrated for precision and signal equilibration time when allowing 5 min before or after signal read out. Differences in average calibration coefficients were demonstrated between the FIA with CT calibration methodology 26.7 ± 1.1 mV cGy −1 versus the CT scatter phantom 29.2 ± 1.0 mV cGy −1 and FIA with x-ray 29.9 ± 1.1 mV cGy −1 methodologies. A decrease in MOSFET sensitivity was seen at an average change in read out voltage of ∼3000 mV. Conclusions: The best measured calibration precision was obtained by exposing the MOSFET detectors to 23 mGy. No signal equilibration time is necessary to improve calibration precision. A significant difference between calibration outcomes was demonstrated for FIA with CT compared to the other two methodologies. If the FIA with a CT calibration methodology was used to create calibration coefficients for the

  11. Establishing a standard calibration methodology for MOSFET detectors in computed tomography dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, S L; Kaufman, R A

    2012-06-01

    The use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors for patient dosimetry has increased by ~25% since 2005. Despite this increase, no standard calibration methodology has been identified nor calibration uncertainty quantified for the use of MOSFET dosimetry in CT. This work compares three MOSFET calibration methodologies proposed in the literature, and additionally investigates questions relating to optimal time for signal equilibration and exposure levels for maximum calibration precision. The calibration methodologies tested were (1) free in-air (FIA) with radiographic x-ray tube, (2) FIA with stationary CT x-ray tube, and (3) within scatter phantom with rotational CT x-ray tube. Each calibration was performed at absorbed dose levels of 10, 23, and 35 mGy. Times of 0 min or 5 min were investigated for signal equilibration before or after signal read out. Calibration precision was measured to be better than 5%-7%, 3%-5%, and 2%-4% for the 10, 23, and 35 mGy respective dose levels, and independent of calibration methodology. No correlation was demonstrated for precision and signal equilibration time when allowing 5 min before or after signal read out. Differences in average calibration coefficients were demonstrated between the FIA with CT calibration methodology 26.7 ± 1.1 mV cGy(-1) versus the CT scatter phantom 29.2 ± 1.0 mV cGy(-1) and FIA with x-ray 29.9 ± 1.1 mV cGy(-1) methodologies. A decrease in MOSFET sensitivity was seen at an average change in read out voltage of ~3000 mV. The best measured calibration precision was obtained by exposing the MOSFET detectors to 23 mGy. No signal equilibration time is necessary to improve calibration precision. A significant difference between calibration outcomes was demonstrated for FIA with CT compared to the other two methodologies. If the FIA with a CT calibration methodology was used to create calibration coefficients for the eventual use for phantom dosimetry, a measurement error ~12

  12. LHCb : Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run2

    CERN Multimedia

    Tobin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run 2. Data collected at the start of the fill will be processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants will be evaluated for each run. This procedure will improve the quality of the online alignment. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam collisions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new realtime alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the RICH detectors at the trigger level. T...

  13. On the calibration of a single channel cosmic ray particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, A. H.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Alotaibi, R.; Almutari, M. M.; Garawi, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    Cosmic Ray (CR) variation measurements have been extensively conducted using different type of detectors sensing different components of CR and at different locations around the world. We have constructed and, operated a single channel muon detector in the central part of Saudi Arabia. The main goal of this detector is to record the intensity of cosmic rays on different time scales and investigate their correlations with environment parameters. This detector is expected to fill the gap between neutron monitors and muon telescopes that exist around the world. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. Calibration procedures conducted to characterize and improve its performance will be detailed. These include the effect of the detector geometry and the internal surface coating.

  14. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  15. Calibration service of radiation detectors and dosemeters at IPEN/ Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potiens, M.P.A.; Caldas, L.V.E. [IPEN, CNEN/SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN, has already over 25 years been calibrating instruments used in radiation protection and therapy measurements and belonging to hospitals, industries, clinics and other users located in Sao Paulo and in other parts of Brazil. At the present time, the Calibration Laboratory is part of the Radiation Metrology Center and it acts in the Radiation Protection, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology areas, using special set-ups with gamma and beta radiation sealed sources, alpha and beta radiation plane sources and low and intermediate energies of X radiation. Moreover, it has reference instruments for each calibration area with traceability to the Brazilian National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (secondary standards) and international laboratories (primary standards). The number of tested instruments is increasing annually (from 170 in 1980 to 1871 in 2005), and for the development of new techniques and radiation detectors the continuous improvement of the existing calibration methods is necessary, as well as the establishment of new calibration services to be offered by the Calibration Laboratory for Brazilian and South American users. The objective of this study is to show the evolution of the calibration service developed at IPEN, describing the applied methods and the calibrated instruments types. The quality system implantation process following the basis of the NBR IEC/ISO 17025 standard is also presented with some tools used in the calibration procedures. (Author)

  16. Calibration service of radiation detectors and dosemeters at IPEN/ Sao Paulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potiens, M.P.A.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2006-01-01

    The Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN, has already over 25 years been calibrating instruments used in radiation protection and therapy measurements and belonging to hospitals, industries, clinics and other users located in Sao Paulo and in other parts of Brazil. At the present time, the Calibration Laboratory is part of the Radiation Metrology Center and it acts in the Radiation Protection, Radiation Therapy, Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology areas, using special set-ups with gamma and beta radiation sealed sources, alpha and beta radiation plane sources and low and intermediate energies of X radiation. Moreover, it has reference instruments for each calibration area with traceability to the Brazilian National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (secondary standards) and international laboratories (primary standards). The number of tested instruments is increasing annually (from 170 in 1980 to 1871 in 2005), and for the development of new techniques and radiation detectors the continuous improvement of the existing calibration methods is necessary, as well as the establishment of new calibration services to be offered by the Calibration Laboratory for Brazilian and South American users. The objective of this study is to show the evolution of the calibration service developed at IPEN, describing the applied methods and the calibrated instruments types. The quality system implantation process following the basis of the NBR IEC/ISO 17025 standard is also presented with some tools used in the calibration procedures. (Author)

  17. Calibration method for a in vivo measurement system using mathematical simulation of the radiation source and the detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, John

    1998-01-01

    A Monte Carlo program which uses a voxel phantom has been developed to simulate in vivo measurement systems for calibration purposes. The calibration method presented here employs a mathematical phantom, produced in the form of volume elements (voxels), obtained through Magnetic Resonance Images of the human body. The calibration method uses the Monte Carlo technique to simulate the tissue contamination, the transport of the photons through the tissues and the detection of the radiation. The program simulates the transport and detection of photons between 0.035 and 2 MeV and uses, for the body representation, a voxel phantom with a format of 871 slices each of 277 x 148 picture elements. The Monte Carlo code was applied to the calibration of in vivo systems and to estimate differences in counting efficiencies between homogeneous and non-homogeneous radionuclide distributions in the lung. Calculations show a factor of 20 between deposition of 241 Am at the back compared with the front of the lung. The program was also used to estimate the 137 Cs body burden of an internally contaminated individual, counted with an 8 x 4 Nal (TI) detector and an 241 Am body burden of an internally contaminated individual, who was counted using a planar germanium detector. (author)

  18. Determination of relative efficiency of a detector using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, M.P.C.; Rebello, W.F.; Lopes, J.M.; Silva, A.X.

    2015-01-01

    High-purity germanium detectors (HPGe) are mandatory tools for spectrometry because of their excellent energy resolution. The efficiency of such detectors, quoted in the list of specifications by the manufacturer, frequently refers to the relative full-energy peak efficiency, related to the absolute full-energy peak efficiency of a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm (diameter x height) NaI(Tl) crystal, based on the 1.33 MeV peak of a 60 Co source positioned 25 cm from the detector. In this study, we used MCNPX code to simulate an HPGe detector (Canberra GC3020), from Real-Time Neutrongraphy Laboratory of UFRJ, to survey the spectrum of a 60 Co source located 25 cm from the detector in order to calculate and confirm the efficiency declared by the manufacturer. Agreement between experimental and simulated data was achieved. The model under development will be used for calculating and comparison purposes with the detector calibration curve from software Genie2000™, also serving as a reference for future studies. (author)

  19. The calibration system of the GERDA muon veto Cherenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, Florian; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Freund, Kai; Grabmayr, Peter; Jochum, Josef; Knapp, Markus; Meierhofer, Georg; Shaibonov, Bator

    2010-01-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ). To achieve a sensitivity of 10 -3 counts/(keVkgy) or better within a specific region of interest (ROI), a good background identification is needed. Therefore GERDA is located in the LNGS (Laboratori Nationali del Gran Sasso) underground facility. In addition to the good rejection of cosmic muons due to the surrounding bedrocks, a dual muon veto system has to be used. For calibration and monitoring of the muon veto, two separate systems have been developed.

  20. Synchrotron radiation calibration for soft X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Jiamin; Guo, Cun; Xu, Rongkun; Jiang, Shilun; Xu, Zeping; Chen, Jinchuan; Xia, Guangxin; Xue, Feibiao; Qin, Yi

    2009-04-01

    The calibration experiments were carried out to X-ray film, scintillator and transmission grating by employing the soft X-ray station at 3W1B beam-line in Beijing synchrotron Radiation Facility. The experiments presented the black intensity curve and energy response curve of soft X-ray film. And the experimental results can be used in diagnosis of X-ray radiation characterization of Z-pinch, such as in the measurement of soft X-ray Power Meter, grating spectrometer, pinhole camera and one-dimension imaging system which can ensure precision of Z-pinch results. (authors)

  1. Inspection of feasible calibration conditions for UV radiometer detectors with the KI/KIO3 actinometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zhimin; Li, Wentao; Li, Mengkai; Bolton, James R; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    UV radiometers are widely employed for irradiance measurements, but their periodical calibrations not only induce an extra cost but also are time-consuming. In this study, the KI/KIO3 actinometer was applied to calibrate UV radiometer detectors at 254 nm with a quasi-collimated beam apparatus equipped with a low-pressure UV lamp, and feasible calibration conditions were identified. Results indicate that a washer constraining the UV light was indispensable, while the size (10 or 50 mL) of a beaker containing the actinometer solution had little influence when a proper washer was used. The absorption or reflection of UV light by the internal beaker wall led to an underestimation or overestimation of the irradiance determined by the KI/KIO3 actinometer, respectively. The proper range of the washer internal diameter could be obtained via mathematical analysis. A radiometer with a longer service time showed a greater calibration factor. To minimize the interference from the inner wall reflection of the collimating tube, calibrations should be conducted at positions far enough away from the tube bottom. This study demonstrates that after the feasible calibration conditions are identified, the KI/KIO3 actinometer can be applied readily to calibrate UV radiometer detectors at 254 nm. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Calibration of sodium iodide crystal (NaI) gamma ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azwah Jaafar; Juhari Yusof

    2005-01-01

    Sodium Iodide crystal gamma ray detector are widely used to detect leak in the pipeline linkage study, the complete mixing substances in of industrial processes, to measure the river and stream discharges and other usage in estuary and coastal sediment studies. These instruments are more sensitive as compared to other types of counters like Geiger Muller or plastic scintillation component. This calibration is to ensure the correct voltage for each detector. The characteristics of detector are different from each other. Once the operating voltage (HV) is determined it can be used effectively to measure the radiation in the application of nuclear techniques. (Author)

  3. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, C. J., E-mail: cjwaugh@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  4. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  5. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, C. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule

  6. Orion, a high efficiency 4π neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, E.; Piasecki, E.; Wang, X.M.; Doubre, H.; Galin, J.; Guerreau, D.; Pouthas, J.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    1990-01-01

    In intermediate energy heavy ion collisions the multiplicity of emitted neutrons is strongly connected to energy dissipation and to impact parameter. We present the 4π detector ORION, a high efficiency liquid scintillator detector which permits to get information on the multiplicity of neutrons measured event-wise and on the spatial distribution of these neutrons [fr

  7. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 10 (2014), "3071-1"-"3071-48" ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon * energy * calibration * detector * resolution * showers * electromagnetic * electron * transverse energy * CERN LHC Coll * calorimeter Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2014

  8. Towards a global network of gamma-ray detector calibration facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijs, Marco; Koomans, Ronald; Limburg, Han

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray logging tools are applied worldwide. At various locations, calibration facilities are used to calibrate these gamma-ray logging systems. Several attempts have been made to cross-correlate well known calibration pits, but this cross-correlation does not include calibration facilities in Europe or private company calibration facilities. Our aim is to set-up a framework that gives the possibility to interlink all calibration facilities worldwide by using `tools of opportunity' - tools that have been calibrated in different calibration facilities, whether this usage was on a coordinated basis or by coincidence. To compare the measurement of different tools, it is important to understand the behaviour of the tools in the different calibration pits. Borehole properties, such as diameter, fluid, casing and probe diameter strongly influence the outcome of gamma-ray borehole logging. Logs need to be properly calibrated and compensated for these borehole properties in order to obtain in-situ grades or to do cross-hole correlation. Some tool providers provide tool-specific correction curves for this purpose. Others rely on reference measurements against sources of known radionuclide concentration and geometry. In this article, we present an attempt to set-up a framework for transferring `local' calibrations to be applied `globally'. This framework includes corrections for any geometry and detector size to give absolute concentrations of radionuclides from borehole measurements. This model is used to compare measurements in the calibration pits of Grand Junction, located in the USA; Adelaide (previously known as AMDEL), located in Adelaide Australia; and Stonehenge, located at Medusa Explorations BV in the Netherlands.

  9. Calibration of LHCb RICH detectors with \\Lambda \\to p\\pi decay using data

    CERN Multimedia

    Popovici, Bogdan

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb physics programme will focus on high precision studies of CP violation and rare phenomena in B hadron decays. The RICH detectors of LHCb will provide hadron identification over the wide momentum range 1 to 100 GeV/c, and are central to the physics goals of the experiment. An excellent understanding of the hadron identification performance of the RICH detectors is essential. To achieve this goal, calibration strategies have been devised that will enable the performance to be measured from the data themselves. The decay chain $\\Lambda \\to p \\pi$ can be cleanly selected, based on its kinematic signature, without the use of RICH information. These events can be used as an unbiased sample for calibrating the RICH particle identification performance of pions and protons. In this way, the calibration method using the high purity samples of $\\Lambda$'s will be described.

  10. High voltage calibration of the TANSY-KM5 neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosshoeg, G.; Belle, P. van; Wilson, D.

    1996-11-01

    We have developed a procedure for the high voltage calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors. The procedure is based on the work done during the construction of the spectrometer. A program is written for the measurement of the sensitivity of the neutron detectors as a function of the high voltage. The data are transferred to a PC for evaluation. We use a Cobalt source for the calibration. With the PC the voltage corresponding to the effective Compton edge is found. The voltage settings for the neutron detectors are calculated and stored in a file suitable for input to a program that is used to control the instrument. A measurement is reported that shows that the reproducibility of the measurement is good. 4 refs

  11. Assessing the efficiency position sensitive gaseous X-rays detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines Silvani; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The efficiency of gaseous X-ray detectors can be evaluated from tabulated data, but this approach assumes that the whole detector volume is permeated by the electrostatic field produced by the anode-cathode. Indeed, the usual detectors are comprised by a cylindrical hull acting as cathode containing a wire at its axis as anode, a configuration which foods the space between them with the electrostatic field. Some specially designed detectors, however, as Position Sensitive Detectors, contain regions which are not submitted to the electrostatic field, and hence, their efficiency could not be assessed from the tabulated data. Direct measurements of this efficiency would require a mono-chromator or set of pure mono-energetic X-rays sources. As only very few of them are really mono-energetic, the detector response to a given energy would be spoiled by to the concomitant contribution of other energies. Yet, the information would not be completely lost, but only concealed due to the convolution carried out by the detector. Therefore, a proper unfolding would be capable to recover the information, yielding the individual detector efficiency for each of the contributing energies. The degraded information is retrieved in this work through a proper mathematical unfolding of the detector response, when exposed to Bremsstrahlung spectra from an X-ray tube submitted to different voltages. For this purpose, Lorentzian functions have been fitted to these spectra - obtained with a NaI(Tl) spectrometer - in order to characterize them with proper parameters. The mathematical convolution of these functions with a theoretical detector efficiency curve yields, after integration, values which, confronted with those experimentally measured, allow the determination of the parameters of the efficiency curve. As some parameters of this curve are well known, it is possible to represent it by proper functions. For argon-filled detectors, for instance, this efficiency has a

  12. Mathematical efficiency calibration with uncertain source geometries using smart optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaa, N.; Bosko, A.; Bronson, F.; Venkataraman, R.; Russ, W. R.; Mueller, W.; Nizhnik, V.; Mirolo, L.

    2011-01-01

    The In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS), a mathematical method developed by CANBERRA, is a well established technique for computing High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector efficiencies for a wide variety of source shapes and sizes. In the ISOCS method, the user needs to input the geometry related parameters such as: the source dimensions, matrix composition and density, along with the source-to-detector distance. In many applications, the source dimensions, the matrix material and density may not be well known. Under such circumstances, the efficiencies may not be very accurate since the modeled source geometry may not be very representative of the measured geometry. CANBERRA developed an efficiency optimization software known as 'Advanced ISOCS' that varies the not well known parameters within user specified intervals and determines the optimal efficiency shape and magnitude based on available benchmarks in the measured spectra. The benchmarks could be results from isotopic codes such as MGAU, MGA, IGA, or FRAM, activities from multi-line nuclides, and multiple counts of the same item taken in different geometries (from the side, bottom, top etc). The efficiency optimization is carried out using either a random search based on standard probability distributions, or using numerical techniques that carry out a more directed (referred to as 'smart' in this paper) search. Measurements were carried out using representative source geometries and radionuclide distributions. The radionuclide activities were determined using the optimum efficiency and compared against the true activities. The 'Advanced ISOCS' method has many applications among which are: Safeguards, Decommissioning and Decontamination, Non-Destructive Assay systems and Nuclear reactor outages maintenance. (authors)

  13. HST/WFC3: new capabilities, improved IR detector calibrations, and long-term performance stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenty, John W.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Brammer, Gabriel; Hilbert, Bryan; Long, Knox S.; McCullough, Peter; Riess, Adam G.

    2014-08-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is the most used instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Providing a broad range of high quality imaging capabilities from 200 to 1700mn using Silicon CCD and HgCdTe IR detectors, WFC3 is fulfilling both our expectations and its formal requirements. With the re-establishment of the observatory level "spatial scan" capability, we have extended the scientific potential ofWFC3 in multiple directions. These controlled scans, often in combination with low resolution slit-less spectroscopy, enable extremely high precision differential photometric measurements of transiting exo-planets and direct measurement of sources considerably brighter than originally anticipated. In addition, long scans permit the measurement of the separation of star images to accuracies approaching 25 micro-arc seconds (a factor of 10 better than prior FGS or imaging measurements) enables direct parallax observations out to 4 kilo-parsecs. In addition, we have employed this spatial scan capability to both assess and improve the mid­ spatial frequency flat field calibrations. WFC3 uses a Teledyne HgCdTe 1014xl014 pixel Hawaii-lR infrared detector array developed for this mission. One aspect of this detector with implications for many types of science observations is the localized trapping of charge. This manifests itself as both image persistence lasting several hours and as an apparent response variation with photon arrival rate over a large dynamic range. Beyond a generally adopted observing strategy of obtaining multiple observations with small spatial offsets, we have developed a multi-parameter model that accounts for source flux, accumulated signal level, and decay time to predict image persistence at the pixel level. Using a running window through the entirety of the acquired data, we now provide observers with predictions for each individual exposure within several days of its acquisition. Ongoing characterization of the sources on infrared background and

  14. Comparative evaluations of surface contamination detectors calibration with radioactive sources - used in the Goiania accident, and standard sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, P.H.B.; Marecha, M.H.H.

    1997-01-01

    The construction of Cs-137 standard flat sources for calibration of surface contamination detectors, used in the Goiania accident in 1987, is described and the procedures adopted are reported. At that time, standard sources were not available. Nowadays the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria has standard sources acquired from Amersham which are used as calibration standards for surface contamination detectors. Comparative evaluations between the standard flat sources constructed for the accident and the calibrated ones are presented

  15. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, R. M., E-mail: rmagee@trialphaenergy.com; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 10{sup 7} n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  16. Calibration of the 46Sc sand tracer detector and it's application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhangsu; Du Xiaoyun

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the process and result for the calibration of radioactive 46 Sc detector in details. The calibration was carried out under the hydrological conditions similar to the field test. The relation between the intensity of the scattered γ-rays and the various water depths was studied by using a 46 Sc plane source. The purpose of calibration of the detector with the plane source is to determine both the detector sensitivity factor and the γ-ray absorption coefficient for san/water mixture in order to calculate the thickness of the mobile water layer by means of the count rate balance method. The relation curve between the various thicknesses of the mobile layers and count rates was studied in detailed in details by using a slab source and the uniformly mixed layers with 46 Sc glass. The curve is used as the calibration curve for determining the recovery of tracking radioactive tracer in situ. The recovery of tracer shows whether the field tracer data can be used to calculate the transport sediment rate or the in fill rate of sediment

  17. Absolute calibration of TFTR neutron detectors for D-T plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1995-03-01

    The two most sensitive TFTR fission-chamber detectors were absolutely calibrated in situ by a D-T neutron generator (∼5 x 10 7 n/s) rotated once around the torus in each direction, with data taken at about 45 positions. The combined uncertainty for determining fusion neutron rates, including the uncertainty in the total neutron generator output (±9%), counting statistics, the effect of coil coolant, detector stability, cross-calibration to the current mode or log Campbell mode and to other fission chambers, and plasma position variation, is about ±13%. The NE-451 (ZnS) scintillators and 4 He proportional counters that view the plasma in up to 10 collimated sightlines were calibrated by scanning. the neutron generator radially and toroidally in the horizontal midplane across the flight tubes of 7 cm diameter. Spatial integration of the detector responses using the calibrated signal per unit chord-integrated neutron emission gives the global neutron source strength with an overall uncertainty of ±14% for the scintillators and ±15% for the 4 He counters

  18. Development and operational performance of a single calibration chamber for radon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Coto, I.; Bolivar, J.P.; Mas, J.L.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vargas, A.

    2007-01-01

    This work shows the design, setup and performance of a new single radon detector calibration chamber developed at the University of Huelva (Environmental Radioactivity Group). This system is based on a certified radon source and a traceable reference radon detector, which allows radon concentrations inside the chamber radon to be obtained in steady-state conditions within a range of 400-22 000 Bq m -3 with associated uncertainties in the range of 4%. In addition, the development of a new ad hoc calibration protocol (UHU-RC/01/06 'Rachel'), which is based on the modelling of radon concentration within the chamber, allows it to be used without the reference detector. To do that, a complete characterization and calibration of the different leakage constants and the flow meter reading have been performed. The accuracy and general performance of both working methods for the same chamber (i.e., with and without the reference detector) have been tested by means of their participation in an intercomparison exercise involving five active radon monitors

  19. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.B., E-mail: prose6@gatech.edu; Erickson, A.S., E-mail: anna.erickson@me.gatech.edu

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in {sup 11}B(d,n-γ){sup 12}C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example {sup 232}Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  20. Algorithms for spectral calibration of energy-resolving small-pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuffham, J; Veale, M C; Wilson, M D; Seller, P

    2013-01-01

    Small pixel Cd(Zn)Te detectors often suffer from inter-pixel variations in gain, resulting in shifts in the individual energy spectra. These gain variations are mainly caused by inclusions and defects within the crystal structure, which affect the charge transport within the material causing a decrease in the signal pulse height. In imaging applications, spectra are commonly integrated over a particular peak of interest. This means that the individual pixels must be accurately calibrated to ensure that the same portion of the spectrum is integrated in every pixel. The development of large-area detectors with fine pixel pitch necessitates automated algorithms for this spectral calibration, due to the very large number of pixels. Algorithms for automatic spectral calibration require accurate determination of characteristic x-ray or photopeak positions on a pixelwise basis. In this study, we compare two peak searching spectral calibration algorithms for a small-pixel CdTe detector in gamma spectroscopic imaging. The first algorithm uses rigid search ranges to identify peaks in each pixel spectrum, based on the average peak positions across all pixels. The second algorithm scales the search ranges on the basis of the position of the highest-energy peak relative to the average across all pixels. In test spectra acquired with Tc-99m, we found that the rigid search algorithm failed to correctly identify the target calibraton peaks in up to 4% of pixels. In contrast, the scaled search algorithm failed in only 0.16% of pixels. Failures in the scaled search algorithm were attributed to the presence of noise events above the main photopeak, and possible non-linearities in the spectral response in a small number of pixels. We conclude that a peak searching algorithm based on scaling known peak spacings is simple to implement and performs well for the spectral calibration of pixellated radiation detectors

  1. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm 2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm 2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ E  = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency

  2. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castellano, M. G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Tomei, C. [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  3. Virtual point detector: On the interpolation and extrapolation of scintillation detectors counting efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presler, Oren; German, Uzi; Pushkarsky, Vitaly; Alfassi, Zeev B.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of transforming the detector volume to a virtual point detector, in order to facilitate efficiency evaluations for different source locations, was proposed in the past for HPGe and Ge(Li) detectors. The validity of this model for NaI(Tl) and BGO scintillation detectors was studied in the present work. It was found that for both scintillation detectors, the point detector model does not seem to fit too well to the experimental data, for the whole range of source-to-detector distances; however, for source-to-detector cap distances larger than 4 cm, the accuracy was found to be high. A two-parameter polynomial expression describing the dependence of the normalized count rate versus the source-to-detector distance was fitted to the experimental data. For this fit, the maximum deviations are up to about 12%. These deviations are much smaller than the values obtained by applying the virtual point concept, even for distances greater than 4 cm, thus the polynomial fitting is to be preferred for scintillation detectors

  4. K-edge energy-based calibration method for photon counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, potential applications of energy-resolved photon counting detectors (PCDs) in the x-ray medical imaging field have been actively investigated. Unlike conventional x-ray energy integration detectors, PCDs count the number of incident x-ray photons within certain energy windows. For PCDs, the interactions between x-ray photons and photoconductor generate electronic voltage pulse signals. The pulse height of each signal is proportional to the energy of the incident photons. By comparing the pulse height with the preset energy threshold values, x-ray photons with specific energies are recorded and sorted into different energy bins. To quantitatively understand the meaning of the energy threshold values, and thus to assign an absolute energy value to each energy bin, energy calibration is needed to establish the quantitative relationship between the threshold values and the corresponding effective photon energies. In practice, the energy calibration is not always easy, due to the lack of well-calibrated energy references for the working energy range of the PCDs. In this paper, a new method was developed to use the precise knowledge of the characteristic K-edge energy of materials to perform energy calibration. The proposed method was demonstrated using experimental data acquired from three K-edge materials (viz., iodine, gadolinium, and gold) on two different PCDs (Hydra and Flite, XCounter, Sweden). Finally, the proposed energy calibration method was further validated using a radioactive isotope (Am-241) with a known decay energy spectrum.

  5. Energy calibration for the forward detector at WASA-at-COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmich, Kay; Bergmann, Florian; Huesemann, Patrice; Huesken, Nils; Taeschner, Alexander; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: WASA-at-COSY-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Studies on rare and forbidden decays of light mesons are one main aspect of the WASA-at-COSY physics program. In this context a large data set of η mesons has been produced in proton proton scattering in order to investigate the decay properties of this meson. This high statistic measurement allows, e.g., for the search for the C parity violating reaction η → π{sup 0} + e{sup +} + e{sup -}, for which only an upper limit for the relative branching ratio of 4 x 10{sup -5} is quoted by the particle data group. The analysis of this forbidden decay channel relies on an effective separation of the physical background which is mainly caused by the direct pion production. To handle this background a missing mass analysis and kinematic fitting will be applied. Since both methods rely on a high energy resolution of the forward detector this detector, which measures the proton energies, has to be calibrated very carefully. In this contribution, a new calibration software is presented which has been developed especially for proton-proton measurements, and which allows for a precise determination of the calibration parameters by the mean of a graphical user interface and a dedicated fitting algorithm. Moreover, with this tool a run-by-run calibration can be realised. First results of the improved calibration are presented.

  6. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system`s overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  7. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system's overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  8. Calibrating the CsI(Tl) detectors of the GARFIELD apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Abbondanno, U; Casini, G; Cavaletti, R; Cavallaro, S; Chiari, M; D'Agostino, M; Gramegna, F; Lanchais, A; Margagliotti, G V; Mastinu, P F; Milazzo, P M; Moroni, A; Nannini, A; Ordine, A; Vannini, G; Vannucci, L

    2002-01-01

    The energy and charge dependence of the light output of the CsI(Tl) detectors of the GARFIELD apparatus has been investigated for heavy ions with 5<=Z<=16 in the energy range from 2.2 to 8.3 A MeV. The results have been compared to an analytical expression successfully used in previous calibration procedures at higher energies, and a rather good agreement was obtained between measured and calculated quantities. The resulting parameter set was successfully applied to another set of experimental data. The overall result demonstrates the validity of the above mentioned calibration procedure in a wide range of incident ion energies and masses.

  9. Optimization of the n-type HPGe detector parameters to theoretical determination of efficiency curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, A.; Correa-Alfonso, C.M.; Lopez-Pino, N.; Padilla-Cabal, F.; D'Alessandro, K.; Corrales, Y.; Garcia-Alvarez, J. A.; Perez-Mellor, A.; Baly-Gil, L.; Machado, A.

    2011-01-01

    A highly detailed characterization of a 130 cm 3 n-type HPGe detector, employed in low - background gamma spectrometry measurements, was done. Precise measured data and several Monte Carlo (MC) calculations have been combined to optimize the detector parameters. HPGe crystal location inside the Aluminum end-cap as well as its dimensions, including the borehole radius and height, were determined from frontal and lateral scans. Additionally, X-ray radiography and Computed Axial Tomography (CT) studies were carried out to complement the information about detector features. Using seven calibrated point sources ( 241 Am, 133 Ba, 57,60 Co, 137 Cs, 22 Na and 152 Eu), photo-peak efficiency curves at three different source - detector distances (SDD) were obtained. Taking into account the experimental values, an optimization procedure by means of MC simulations (MCNPX 2.6 code) were performed. MC efficiency curves were calculated specifying the optimized detector parameters in the MCNPX input files. Efficiency calculation results agree with empirical data, showing relative deviations lesser 10%. (Author)

  10. Tow efficiency correction functions of source self-absorption of an HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zheng; Ma Yusheng; Luo Jianghua; Chen Luning

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency correction function of source absorption of an HPGe γ detector is determined by experiment in energy range from 59.5 keV to 1408 keV and density range from 0.3 g/cm 3 to 2.0 g/cm 3 . Fit Polynomial and fit Sigmoidal are compared. The results show that fit Sigmoidal is better than fit polynomial, and the detection efficiency at any points of energy and density could be conveniently calculated with it in calibrated range. (authors)

  11. Calibration of activation detectors in a monoenergetic neutron beam. Contribution to criticality dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoutie, Martine.

    1981-05-01

    Activation detectors have been calibrated for critical dosimetry applications. Measurements are made using a monoenergetic neutron flux. 14 MeV neutrons obtained par (D-T) reaction are produced by 150 kV accelerator. Neutron flux determined by different methods leads us to obtain an accuracy better than 6%. The present dosimetric system (Activation Neutron Spectrometer - SNAC) gives few informations in the (10 keV - 2 MeV) energetic range. The system has been improved and modified so that SNAC detectors must be read out by gamma spectrometer [fr

  12. The laser calibration system for the STACEE ground-based gamma ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the laser system used for calibration monitoring of components of the STACEE detector. STACEE is a ground based gamma ray detector which uses the heliostats of a solar power facility to collect and focus Cherenkov light onto a system of secondary optics and photomultiplier tubes. To monitor the gain and check the linearity and timing properties of the phototubes and associated electronics, a system based on a dye laser, neutral density filters and optical fibres has been developed. In this paper we describe the system and present some results from initial tests made with it.

  13. Evaluation of detector efficiency through GUPIXWIN H value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, F.; Niekraszewicz, L. A. B.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2018-02-01

    In this work we explore the capabilities of the GUPIXWIN software to introduce a simple and straightforward way to obtain the efficiency of X-ray detectors commonly used in PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission) experiments. To that end, all geometrical parameters of the experimental setup including details of the detector used to detect X-rays must be well known in order to calculate the solid angle subtended by the detector's crystal. The solid angle is calculated through a Monte Carlo program developed by Taylor and co-workers which is included in the GUPIXWIN software package. The H values are obtained from a set of experiments using standards. The results for the intrinsic efficiency of a Si(Li) detector are in good agreement with those obtained from Monte Carlo calculations and are compatible with a simple exponential law.

  14. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla Cabal, Fatima, E-mail: fpadilla@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba); Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Luis Bernal-Castillo, Jose; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D' Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba)

    2010-12-15

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ({sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 152}Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized.

  15. Offline Calibration of b-Jet Identification Efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    Lowette, Steven; Heyninck, Jan; Vanlaer, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    A new method to calibrate b-tagging algorithms can be exploited at the LHC, due to the high energy and luminosity of the accelerator. The abundantly produced ttbar pairs can be used to isolate jet samples with a highly enriched b-jet content, on which the b-jet identification algorithms can be calibrated. Two methods are described to extract a b-enriched jet sample in ttbar events, using the semileptonic and the fully leptonic decay modes. The selection of jets is based on a likelihood ratio method. On the selected b-jet enriched jet samples the b-tagging performance is measured, taking into account the impurities of the samples. The most important contributions to the systematic uncertainties are evaluated, resulting in an estimate of the expected precision on the measurement of the b-jet identification performance. For 1 fb-1 (10 fb-1) of integrated luminosity the relative accuracy on the b-jet identification efficiency is expected to be about 6% (4%) in the barrel region and about 10% (5%) in the endcaps.

  16. Air alpha monitoring device and system for the calibration of the track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danis, A; Oncescu, M.; Ciubotariu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The radon measurement plays a critical role: - in monitoring the human health and safety, due to radon destructive health effects. Sustained exposures of humans to high concentration of radon, in fact to high concentrations of its decay products, can produce lung cancer; - in a variety of geophysical, geochemical, hydrological and atmospheric investigations, such as exploring resources of uranium or hydrocarbons. The transport of radon within the earth, waters and atmosphere makes it a useful tracer in these purposes. in both cases, the reliable long-term measurements are required because usual short-term variations in concentration need to be averaged. These variations are caused by factors such as relative humidity, temperature, atmospheric pressure and their seasonal variations, moisture content in the air, or ventilation in the dwelling or working places. The integrating measurement methods meet these requirements. Among them, the alpha track method is one of the adequate and useful method and it is used by authors in radon measurements in dwelling and working places including mines and house cellars. The best etched track alpha detector for radon measurements proved to be the detector CR-39 due to: - its sensitivity to alpha particles emitted by radon decay products; - its stability against various environmental factors; - its high degree of optical clarity, was used in a proper device for alpha monitoring in air. Its calibration for radon measurements was performed in the proper calibration system. The general descriptions and specifications were given previously. Only some characteristics of these devices are given here. For air alpha monitoring device: i) equipped with filter, during alpha exposure, the alpha particles of radon are registered in the etched track detector mounted inside (ρ Rn - track density); ii) without filter, the alpha particles emitted by radon + its alpha decay products/their aerosols are registered in the detector (ρ tot - track

  17. Dosimetric calibration of solid state detectors with low energy β sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Pia Toni, Maria; Capote, Roberto; Pena, Juan; Pasciuti, Katia; Bovi, Maurizio; Perrone, Franco; Azario, Luigi; Lazzeri, Mauro; Gaudino, Diego; Piermattei, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    A PTW Optidos plastic scintillation and a PTW natural diamond detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water with β fields produced by 90 Sr + 90 Y and 85 Kr reference sources. Each source was characterized at the Italian National Metrological Institute - the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of ENEA (ENEA-INMRI) - for two different series, 1 and 2, of ISO reference β-particle radiation fields. Beam flattening filters were used for the series 1 β fields to give uniform absorbed dose rates over a large area at a source-to-reference plane distance of 30 cm. The series 2 β fields were produced at source-to-reference plane distance of 10 cm, without the beam flattening filters, in order to obtain higher absorbed dose rates. The reference absorbed dose rate values were directly determined by the Italian national standard for β-particle dosimetry (a PTW extrapolation ionization chamber) for the series 1 β fields and by a calibrated transfer standard chamber, (a Capintec thin fixed-volume parallel plate ionization chamber) for the series 2 β fields. Finally the two solid state detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water with the series 2 β field. The expanded uncertainties of the calibration coefficients obtained for the plastic scintillation dosimeter were 10% and 12% (2SD) for the 90 Sr + 90 Y and the 85 Kr sources, respectively. The expanded uncertainties obtained for the diamond dosimeter were 10% (2SD) and 16% (2SD) for the 90 Sr + 90 Y and the 85 Kr sources, respectively. The good results obtained with the 90 Sr + 90 Y and the 85 Kr β sources encourage to implement this procedure to calibrate this type of detectors at shorter distances and with other β sources of interest in brachytherapy, for example the 106 Ru source

  18. Energy Calibration of a Silicon Detector Using Pure Beta-Emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.; Arcos, J. M. los

    1992-01-01

    Energy calibration of SI detectors used in electron spectroscopy 13 commonly performed with conversion electron sources or monoenergetic electrons beams, which are preferred against beta emitters due to the problems arising from their continuous spectra. This paper presents a simple calibration procedure for a PIP-type silicon detector, using 14C, 147Pm, 99 T c and 45Ca sources, that is based on the correspondence between the average channel observed in the experimental spectrum and the mean energy evaluated from the theoretical Fermi distribution for each nuclide. First, a method for evaluating the average channel in the experimental spectrum distorted by the electronic noise is described and its uncertainty estimated. Then, the channel-energy relation ship is established by least squares fitting modified to account for uncertainties in both variables.The calibration has been successfully verified with 147Pm and '09cd sources, showing discrepaneles not greater than 2.5%, within the uncertainties due to the detector resolution and the sources features. (Author)

  19. Energy calibration of a silicon detector using pure beta-emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.; Los Arcos, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Energy calibration of Si detectors used in electron spectroscopy is commonly performed with conversion electron sources or monoenergetic electrons beams, which are preferred against beta emitters due to the problems arising from their continuous spectra. This paper presents a simple calibration procedure for a PIP-type silicon detector, using 1 4C, 1 47m, 9 9Tc and 4 5Ca, that is based on the correspondence between the average channel observed in the experimental spectrum and the mean energy evaluated from the theoretical Fermi distribution for each nuclide. First, a method for evaluating the average channel in the experimental spectrum distorted by the electronic noise is described and its uncertainty estimated. Then, the channel-energy relation ship is established by least squares fitting modified to account for uncertainties in both variables. The calibration has been successfully verified with 147Pm and 109Cs source, showing discrepancies not greater than 2.5%, within the uncertainties due to the detector resolution and the sources features. (author)

  20. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myong-Seop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affect the SPND current response are analyzed using the Monte Carlo simulation for various irradiation conditions in HANARO. It is confirmed that the effect of the external gamma-rays to the SPND current is dependent on the reactor characteristics, and that it is affected by materials around the detector. The current signals due to the external gamma-rays can be either positive or negative, in that the net flow of the current may be either in the same or the opposite direction as the neutron-induced current by the rhodium emitter. From the above procedure, the effective calibration methodology of multiple SPNDs using the large hole of HANARO is developed. It could be useful for the calibration experiment of the neutron detectors in the research reactors.

  1. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Park, Byung-Gun; Kang, Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affect the SPND current response are analyzed using the Monte Carlo simulation for various irradiation conditions in HANARO. It is confirmed that the effect of the external gamma-rays to the SPND current is dependent on the reactor characteristics, and that it is affected by materials around the detector. The current signals due to the external gamma-rays can be either positive or negative, in that the net flow of the current may be either in the same or the opposite direction as the neutron-induced current by the rhodium emitter. From the above procedure, the effective calibration methodology of multiple SPNDs using the large hole of HANARO is developed. It could be useful for the calibration experiment of the neutron detectors in the research reactors.

  2. Calibration of the proton detector used for the neutron life time experiment τSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Kim; Haack, Jan; Heil, Werner; Karch, Jan [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Beck, Marcus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In order to measure the lifetime of free neutrons, a decay curve will be measured by detecting the decay products proton and electron. Their energies range up to 750 eV (protons) respectively 780 keV (electrons). The protons are accelerated onto 15 keV, in order to pass the dead layer of the detector and to be distinguishable from electronic noise. For the measurement a silicon drift detector is used which needs to be calibrated. This is achieved with a {sup 133}Ba source mounted on three source holders of different materials in a vacuum chamber. Thus not only four of the characteristic lines of the {sup 133}Ba source were measured but also the characteristic lines of the three source holders which yield four more calibration lines in the area of the proton energy in the spectrum. We report the implementation and results of the calibration of the silicon drift detector used for the neutron lifetime measurement τSPECT.

  3. Energy Calibration of the Pixels of Spectral X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have deve...

  4. Characterization of responses and comparison of calibration factor for commercial MOSFET detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharanidharan, Ganesan; Manigandan, Durai; Devan, Krishnamurthy; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Gopishankar, Natanasabapathi; Ganesh, Tharmar; Joshi, Rakeshchander; Rath, Gourakishore; Velmurugan, Jagadeesan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2005-01-01

    A commercial metal oxide silicon field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter of model TN502-RD has been characterized for its linearity, reproducibility, field size dependency, dose rate dependency, and angular dependency for Cobalt-60 (60Co), 6-MV, and 15-MV beam energies. The performance of the MOSFET clearly shows that it is highly reproducible, independent of field size and dose rate. Furthermore, MOSFET has a very high degree of linearity, with r-value>0.9 for all 3 energies. The calibration factor for 2 similar MOSFET detectors of model TN502-RD were also estimated and compared for all 3 energies. The calibration factor between the 2 similar MOSFET detectors shows a variation of about 1.8% for 60Co and 15 MV, and for 6 MV it shows variation of about 2.5%, indicating that calibration should be done whenever a new MOSFET is used. However, the detector shows considerable angular dependency of about 8.8% variation. This may be due to the variation in radiation sensitivity between flat and bubble sides of the MOSFET, and indicates that positional care must be taken while using MOSFET for stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetric applications.

  5. Calculation of Si(Li) x-ray detector efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.; Holton, R.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation of detector efficiency functions is an important step in the quantitative analysis of x-ray spectra when approached by a standardless technique. In this regard, it becomes essential that the analyst not only model the physical aspects of the absorption and transmission of the various windows present, but also use the most accurate data available for the mass absorption coefficients required in these calculations. The topic of modeling the size and shape of the windows present is beyond the scope of this paper and the authors instead concentrate on the mass absorption coefficients used in the calculations and their implications to efficiency calculations. For the purposes of this paper, the authors consider that the relative detector efficiency function of a conventional Si(Li) detector can be modeled by a simple expression

  6. The development of an efficient mass balance approach for the purity assignment of organic calibration standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen R; Alamgir, Mahiuddin; Chan, Benjamin K H; Dang, Thao; Jones, Kai; Krishnaswami, Maya; Luo, Yawen; Mitchell, Peter S R; Moawad, Michael; Swan, Hilton; Tarrant, Greg J

    2015-10-01

    The purity determination of organic calibration standards using the traditional mass balance approach is described. Demonstrated examples highlight the potential for bias in each measurement and the need to implement an approach that provides a cross-check for each result, affording fit for purpose purity values in a timely and cost-effective manner. Chromatographic techniques such as gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) and high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV), combined with mass and NMR spectroscopy, provide a detailed impurity profile allowing an efficient conversion of chromatographic peak areas into relative mass fractions, generally avoiding the need to calibrate each impurity present. For samples analysed by GC-FID, a conservative measurement uncertainty budget is described, including a component to cover potential variations in the response of each unidentified impurity. An alternative approach is also detailed in which extensive purification eliminates the detector response factor issue, facilitating the certification of a super-pure calibration standard which can be used to quantify the main component in less-pure candidate materials. This latter approach is particularly useful when applying HPLC analysis with UV detection. Key to the success of this approach is the application of both qualitative and quantitative (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  7. The HERMES recoil detector. Particle identification and determination of detector efficiency of the scintillating fiber tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xianguo

    2009-11-15

    HERMES is a fixed target experiment using the HERA 27.6 GeV polarized electron/positron beams. With the polarized beams and its gas targets, which can be highly polarized, HERMES is dedicated to study the nucleon spin structure. One of its current physics programs is to measure deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). In order to detect the recoiling proton the Recoil Detector was installed in the target region in the winter of 2005, taking data until the HERA-shutdown in the summer of 2007. The Recoil Detector measured energy loss of the traversing particles with its sub-detectors, including the silicon strip detector and the scintillating fiber tracker. This enables particle identification for protons and pions. In this work a systematic particle identification procedure is developed, whose performance is quantified. Another aspect of this work is the determination of the detector efficiency of the scintillating fiber tracker. (orig.)

  8. NEW LENSLET BASED IFS WITH HIGH DETECTOR PIXEL EFFICIENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Three IFS types currently used for optical design are: lenslet array, imager slicer, and lenslet array and fiber combined. Lenslet array based Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is very popular for many astrophysics applications due to its compactness, simplicity, as well as cost and mass savings. The disadvantage of lenslet based IFS is its low detector pixel efficiency. Enough spacing is needed between adjacent spectral traces in cross dispersion direction to avoid wavelength cross-talk, because the same wavelength is not aligned to the same column on detector. Such as on a recent exoplanet coronagraph instrument study to support the coming astrophysics decadal survey (LUVOIR), to cover a 45 λ/D Field of View (FOV) with a spectral resolving power of 200 at shortest wavelength, a 4k x 4k detector array is needed. This large format EMCCD pushes the detector into technology development area with a low TRL. Besides the future mission, it will help WFIRST coronagraph IFS by packing all spectra into a smaller area on detector, which will reduce the chance for electrons to be trapped in pixels, and slow the detector degradation during the mission.The innovation we propose here is to increase the detector packing efficiency by grouping a number of lenslets together to form many mini slits. In other words, a number of spots (Point Spread Function at lenslet focus) are aligned into a line to resemble a mini slit. Therefore, wavelength cross-talk is no longer a concern anymore. This combines the advantage of lenslet array and imager slicer together. The isolation rows between spectral traces in cross dispersion direction can be reduced or removed. So the packing efficiency is greatly increased. Furthermore, the today’s microlithography and etching technique is capable of making such a lenslet array, which will relax the detector demand significantly. It will finally contribute to the habitable exoplanets study to analyzing their spectra from direct images. Detailed theory

  9. Novel Real-time Alignment and Calibration of the LHCb detector in Run2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Maurizio; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run2. Data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment parameters, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This procedure improves the quality of the online reconstruction. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam conditions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline-selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  10. LHCb full-detector real-time alignment and calibration: latest developments and perspective

    CERN Multimedia

    Dziurda, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    A key ingredient of the data taking strategy used by the LHCb experiment at CERN in Run 2 is the novel real-time detector alignment and calibration. Data collected at the start of the fill are processed within minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated hourly. This is one of the key elements which allow the reconstruction quality of the software trigger in Run-II to be as good as the offline quality of Run 1. The most recent developments of the real-time alignment and calibration paradigm enable the fully automated updates of the RICH detectors' mirror alignment and a novel calibration of the calorimeter systems. Both evolutions improve the particle identification performance stability resulting in higher purity selections. The latter leads also to an improvement in the energy measurement of neutral particles, resulting in a 15% better mass resolution of radiative b-hadron decays. A large variety of improvements has been explored for the last year of Run 2 data tak...

  11. Calibrating the radiation detector of the ventilation of a PET radiopharmaceutical production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Marco Aurelio de Sousa; Tavares, Jose Carlos Freitas; Silva, Juliana Batista da

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a new methodology of estimating the calibration factor of the ventilation duct of a PET radiopharmaceutical facility. The proposed methodology was studied to minimize contamination risks for the workers, as well as the uncertainties attributed to the gas sampling. The studied facility was the Development Centre of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It was performed 3 consecutive irradiations with normal water (H 2 16 O) for production of nitrogen-13 to estimate the calibration factor of the detector located in the chimney of the facility. The readings of the detector were registered by the online radiation monitoring system (MEDISMARTS) during the transfer of the irradiated liquid until the count rate decreased for the background (BG) levels. The remaining activity of the water from the vial was measured and the decay corrected to the beginning of the transfer of the activity. The mean calibration factor estimated was (3.6 +- 0.5) kBq . m -3 . cps -1 . The maximum activities registered in the three irradiations were, respectively, 278 s, 370 s and 366 s after transferring of the activity to the hot cell. The conservative assumptions adopted and the values found for the calibration factor, which were close to the manufacturer published data, permit to estimate, safely, the discharges of radioactive gases in the installation. (author)

  12. Characterization and calibration of radiation-damaged double-sided silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, L. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Vogt, A., E-mail: andreas.vogt@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Hirsch, R.; Arnswald, K.; Hess, H.; Seidlitz, M.; Steinbach, T.; Warr, N.; Wolf, K. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Stahl, C.; Pietralla, N. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Limböck, T.; Meerholz, K. [Physikalische Chemie, Universität zu Köln, D-50939 Köln (Germany); Lutter, R. [Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-21

    Double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSSD) are commonly used for event-by-event identification of charged particles as well as the reconstruction of particle trajectories in nuclear physics experiments with stable and radioactive beams. Intersecting areas of both p- and n-doped front- and back-side segments form individual virtual pixel segments allowing for a high detector granularity. DSSSDs are employed in demanding experimental environments and have to withstand high count rates of impinging nuclei. The illumination of the detector is often not homogeneous. Consequently, radiation damage of the detector is distributed non-uniformly. Position-dependent incomplete charge collection due to radiation damage limits the performance and lifetime of the detectors, the response of different channels may vary drastically. Position-resolved charge-collection losses between front- and back-side segments are investigated in an in-beam experiment and by performing radioactive source measurements. A novel position-resolved calibration method based on mutual consistency of p-side and n-side charges yields a significant enhancement of the energy resolution and the performance of radiation-damaged parts of the detector.

  13. Calibration of track detectors and measurement of radon exhalation rate from solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ajay Kumar; Jojo, P.J.; Prasad, Rajendra; Khan, A.J.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    CR-39 and LR-115 type II track detectors to be used for radon exhalation measurements have been calibrated. The configurations fitted with detectors in Can technique in the open cup mode are cylindrical plastic cup (PC) and conical plastic cup (CPC). The experiment was performed in radon exposure chamber having monodisperse aerosols of 0.2 μm size, to find the relationship between track density and the radon concentration. The calibration factors for PC and CPC type dosimeters with LR-115 type II detector were found to be 0.056 and 0.083 tracks cm -2 d -1 (Bqm -3 ) -1 respectively, while with CR-39 detector the values were 0.149 and 0.150 tracks cm -2 d -1 (Bq m -3 ) -1 . Employing the Can technique, measurements of exhalation rates from solid samples used as construction materials, are undertaken. Radon exhalation rate is found to be minimum in cement samples while in fly ash it is not enhanced as compared to coal samples. (author)

  14. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  15. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; 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Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Struebig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the electron and photon energy calibration achieved with the ATLAS detector using about 25 fb$^{-1}$ of LHC proton--proton collision data taken at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV. The reconstruction of electron and photon energies is optimised using multivariate algorithms. The response of the calorimeter layers is equalised in data and simulation, and the longitudinal profile of the electromagnetic showers is exploited to estimate the passive material in front of the calorimeter and reoptimise the detector simulation. After all corrections, the $Z$ resonance is used to set the absolute energy scale. For electrons from $Z$ decays, the achieved calibration is typically accurate to 0.05% in most of the detector acceptance, rising to 0.2% in regions with large amounts of passive material. The remaining inaccuracy is less than 0.2-1% for electrons with a transverse energy of 10 GeV, and is on average 0.3% for photons. The detector resolution is determined with a relative in...

  16. Quantum Efficiency of Hybrid Photon Detectors for the LHCb RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, R W

    2008-01-01

    The production of Hybrid Photon Detectors to be used as the single-photon sensors for the RICH detectors of the LHCb experiment has recently finished. We present the quantum efficiency measurements of the entire sample of 550 tubes. The manufacturer has succeeded in consistently improving the quantum efficiency of the employed S20-type multi-alkali photocathode above our expectations, by a relative 27 % integrated over the energy spectrum. We also report measurements of the vacuum quality using the photocurrent of the device as a monitor for possible vacuum degradation.

  17. A calibration method for the measurement of IR detector spectral responses using a FTIR spectrometer equipped with a DTGS reference cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravrand, Olivier; Wlassow, J.; Bonnefond, L.

    2014-07-01

    Various high performance IR detectors are today available on the market from QWIPs to narrow gap semiconductor photodiodes, which exhibit various spectral features. In the astrophysics community, the knowledge of the detector spectral shape is of first importance. This quantity (spectral QE or response) is usually measured by means of a monochromator followed by an integrating sphere and compared to a calibrated reference detector. This approach is usually very efficient in the visible range, where all optical elements are very well known, particularly the reference detector. This setup is also widely used in the near IR (up to 3μm) but as the wavelength increases, it becomes less efficient. For instance, the internal emittance of integrating spheres in the IR, and the bad knowledge of reference detectors for longer wavelengths tend to degrade the measurement reliability. Another approach may therefore be considered, using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer (FTIR). In this case, as opposed to the monochromator, the tested detector is not in low flux condition, the incident light containing a mix of different wavelengths. Therefore, the reference detector has to be to be sensitive (and known) in the whole spectral band of interest, because it will sense all those wavelengths at the same time. A popular detector used in this case is a Deuterated Triglycine Sulfate thermal detector (DTGS). Being a pyro detetector, the spectral response of such a detector is very flat, mainly limited by its window. However, the response of such a detector is very slow, highly depending on the temporal frequency of the input signal. Moreover, being a differential detector, it doesn't work in DC. In commercial FTIR spectrometers, the source luminance is usually continuously modulated by the moving interferometer, and the result is that the interferogram mixes optical spectral information (optical path difference) and temporal variations (temporal frequency) so that the temporal

  18. Status of the laboratory infrastructure for detector calibration and characterization at the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, N.; Ballak, K.-E.; Dietze, T.; Ekmedzič, M.; Hauf, S.; Januschek, F.; Kaukher, A.; Kuster, M.; Lang, P. M.; Münnich, A.; Schmitt, R.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Turcato, M.

    2016-12-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL.EU) will provide unprecedented peak brilliance and ultra-short and spatially coherent X-ray pulses in an energy range of 0.25 to 25 keV . The pulse timing structure is unique with a burst of 2700 pulses of 100 fs length at a temporal distance of 220 ns followed by a 99.4 ms gap. To make optimal use of this timing structure and energy range a great variety of detectors are being developed for use at XFEL.EU, including 2D X-ray imaging cameras that are able to detect images at a rate of 4.5 MHz, provide dynamic ranges up to 105 photons per pulse per pixel under different operating conditions and covering a large range of angular resolution \\cite{requirements,Markus}. In order to characterize, commission and calibrate this variety of detectors and for testing of detector prototypes the XFEL.EU detector group is building up an X-ray test laboratory that allows testing of detectors with X-ray photons under conditions that are as similar to the future beam line conditions at the XFEL.EU as is possible with laboratory sources [1]. A total of four test environments provide the infrastructure for detector tests and calibration: two portable setups that utilize low power X-ray sources and radioactive isotopes, a test environment where a commercial high power X-ray generator is in use, and a pulsed X-ray/electron source which will provide pulses as short as 25 ns in XFEL.EU burst mode combined with target anodes of different materials. The status of the test environments, three of which are already in use while one is in commissioning phase, will be presented as well as first results from performance tests and characterization of the sources.

  19. Charge Collection Efficiency Simulations of Irradiated Silicon Strip Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, T.

    2014-01-01

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. Thus, to upgrade the tracker to required performance level, comprehensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. Essential information of the performance of an irradiated silicon detector is obtained by monitoring its charge collection efficiency (CCE). From the evolution of CCE with fluence, it is possible to directly observe the effect of the radiation induced defects to the ability of the detector to collect charge carriers generated by traversing minimum ionizing particles (mip). In this paper the numerically simulated CCE and CCE loss between the strips of irradiated silicon strip detectors are presented. The simulations based on Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD framework were performed ...

  20. Calibration and energy response of the Bitt RM10/RS02 gamma radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, E. van; Aalbers, A.H.L.

    1990-03-01

    A radiation monitoring network with automatic warning capabilities (LMR) has been established in the Netherlands. For the detection of gamma radiation exposure-rate-meters manufactured by Bitt Technologies are used. These meters consist of a proportional counter tube (type RS 02) and a read-out unit (type RM 10E). The photon energy response of 6 counter tubes was tested at the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection. The measurements were performed with heavy filtered X-rays in the range of 50-250 keV (ISO narrow spectrum series) and with gamma ray beams from cesium-137 (662 keV) and cobalt-60 (1,25 MeV). To determine the energy response, the detector reading was referred to air kerma by means of a transfer ionization chamber. This transfer chamber was directly calibrated against the standard for X-rays. By applying these measurement procedures of a set of calibration factors (N k ) as a function of photon energy was determined. These calibration factors, expressed as the ratio air kerma to reading were converted to ambient dose equivalent calibration factors using appropriate conversion factors taken from Grosswend et al., 1988. From the measurement data an average ambient dose equivalent calibration factor of 10.8 mSv.roentgen -1 was calculated. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs.; 5 tabs

  1. CMOS detectors: lessons learned during the STC stereo channel preflight calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, E.; De Sio, A.; Da Deppo, V.; Naletto, G.; Cremonese, G.

    2017-09-01

    The Stereo Camera (STC), mounted on-board the BepiColombo spacecraft, will acquire in push frame stereo mode the entire surface of Mercury. STC will provide the images for the global three-dimensional reconstruction of the surface of the innermost planet of the Solar System. The launch of BepiColombo is foreseen in 2018. STC has an innovative optical system configuration, which allows good optical performances with a mass and volume reduction of a factor two with respect to classical stereo camera approach. In such a telescope, two different optical paths inclined of +/-20°, with respect to the nadir direction, are merged together in a unique off axis path and focused on a single detector. The focal plane is equipped with a 2k x 2k hybrid Si-PIN detector, based on CMOS technology, combining low read-out noise, high radiation hardness, compactness, lack of parasitic light, capability of snapshot image acquisition and short exposure times (less than 1 ms) and small pixel size (10 μm). During the preflight calibration campaign of STC, some detector spurious effects have been noticed. Analyzing the images taken during the calibration phase, two different signals affecting the background level have been measured. These signals can reduce the detector dynamics down to a factor of 1/4th and they are not due to dark current, stray light or similar effects. In this work we will describe all the features of these unwilled effects, and the calibration procedures we developed to analyze them.

  2. High collection efficiency CVD diamond alpha detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A.; McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond have enabled the routine use of this material for sensor device fabrication, allowing exploitation of its unique combination of physical properties (low temperature susceptibility (> 500 C), high resistance to radiation damage (> 100 Mrad) and to corrosive media). A consequence of CVD diamond growth on silicon is the formation of polycrystalline films which has a profound influence on the physical and electronic properties with respect to those measured on monocrystalline diamond. The authors report the optimization of physical and geometrical device parameters for radiation detection in the counting mode. Sandwich and co-planar electrode geometries are tested and their performances evaluated with regard to the nature of the field profile and drift distances inherent in such devices. The carrier drift length before trapping was measured under alpha particles and values as high as 40% of the overall film thickness are reported. Further, by optimizing the device geometry, they show that a gain in collection efficiency, defined as the induced charge divided by the deposited charge within the material, can be achieved even though lower bias values are used

  3. Study of silicon microstrips detector quantum efficiency using mathematical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva Pernia, Diana; Cabal Rodriguez, Ana Ester; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Fabelo, Antonio Leyva; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Cruz Inclan, Carlos M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows the results from the application of mathematical simulation to study the quantum efficiency of a microstrips crystalline silicon detector, intended for medical imaging and the development of other applications such as authentication and dating of cultural heritage. The effects on the quantum efficiency of some parameters of the system, such as the detector-source geometry, X rays energy and detector dead zone thickness, were evaluated. The simulation results were compared with the theoretical prediction and experimental available data, resulting in a proper correspondence. It was concluded that the use of frontal configuration for incident energies lower than 17 keV is more efficient, however the use of the edge-on configuration for applications requiring the detection of energy above this value is recommended. It was also found that the reduction of the detector dead zone led to a considerable increase in quantum efficiency for any energy value in the interval from 5 to 100 keV.(author)

  4. Using Backscattering to Enhance Efficiency in Neutron Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kittelmann, T.; Kanaki, K.; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2017-01-01

    The principle of using strongly scattering materials to recover efficiency in detectors for neutron instruments, via backscattering of unconverted thermal neutrons, is discussed in general. The feasibility of the method is illustrated through Geant4-based simulations involving thermal neutrons im......, respectively, centimeters and tens of microseconds. Potential mitigation techniques to contain the impact on resolution are investigated and are found to alleviate the issues to some degree, at a cost of reduced gain in efficiency....

  5. Measurement of Detector Efficiency for the CZT Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kang Hwa; Kon, Kang Seo; Kim, Jeongin [KHNP, Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Evaluation method of using CZT have been being attempted in various places such as AEP(American Electronic Power) etc since EDF(Electricite de France) had apply to the project named 'Source Term Reduction'. CZT can measure source terms on various places in nuclear power plants because it is available at room temperature unless a seperate device and portability is good. Consequently, CZT show good result from analysis of source terms in nuclear power plants. This study found out efficiency of CZT detector that is now researched in CZT Monitoring System for measure source terms on RCS system of domestic old and new nuclear power plants and verified measured efficiency values by comparing to reference efficiency we already know. This study was carried out for finding out detector's efficiency depending on necessary energy in order to save quantitative radioactivity value of source terms. Eventually, this study is to develope CZT Monitoring System measuring CRUD in domestic PWRs primary system or piping system by carrying out in-vivo. Considering error ratio ±20% on radioactivity value of CRM used in measuring and verifying efficiency, measurement of detector Efficiency for the CZT Monitoring System is good. But more various tests is needed than now for an accurate measurement.

  6. Operation and calibration of the Silicon Drift Detectors of the ALICE experiment during the 2008 cosmic ray data taking period

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Bala, R; Batigne, G; Beolè, S; Biolcati, E; Bock Garcia, N; Bruna, E; Cerello, P; Coli, S; Corrales Morales, Y; Costa, F; Crescio, E; De Remigis, P; Di Liberto, S; Falchieri, D; Feofilov, G; Ferrarese, W; Gandolfi, E; Garcia, C; Gaudichet, L; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Humanic, T J; Igolkin, S; Idzik, M; Kiprich, S K; Kisiel, A; Kolozhvari, A; Kotov, I; Kral, J; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Lea, R; Lisa, M A; Martinez, M I; Marzari Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masetti, M; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Montano Zetina, L M; Monteno, M; Nilsen, B S; Nouais, D; Padilla Cabal, F; Petrácek, V; Poghosyan, M G; Prino, F; Ramello, L; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L; Rivetti, A S; Senyukov, S; Siciliano, M; Sitta, M; Subieta Vasquez, M A; Sumbera, M L; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Truesdale, D; Urciuoli, G M; Vacchi, A; Vallero, S; Werbrouck, A; Zampa, G; Zinovjev, G

    2010-01-01

    The calibration and performance of the Silicon Drift Detector of the ALICE experiment during the 2008 cosmic ray run will be presented. In particular the procedures to monitor the running parameters (baselines, noise, drift speed) are detailed. Other relevant parameters (SOP delay, time-zero, charge calibration) were also determined.

  7. Efficiency of a concentric matrix track detector surface scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek-Uzarov, Dj.; Nikezic, D.; Kostic, D.; Krstic, D.; Cuknic, O.

    1995-01-01

    Heavy particle ionizing radiation track counting on the surface of a solid state round surface detector is made using the microscope and scanning step by step by a round field of vision. The whole solid state detector surface could not be fully or completely covered by round fields of visions. Therefore detector surface could be divided on the two parts, the larger surface, being under fields of vision, really scanned and no scanned missed or omitted surface. The ratio between omitted and scanned surfaces is so called track scanning efficiency. The knowledge of really counted, or scanned surface is a important value for evaluating the real surface track density an exposed solid state track detector. In the paper a matrix of a concentric field of vision made around the first microscope field of vision placed in center of the round disc of the scanned track detector is proposed. In a such scanning matrix the real scanned surface could be easy calculated and by the microscope scanning made as well. By this way scanned surface is very precisely obtained as well. Precise knowledge of scanned and omitted surface allows to obtain more precise scanning efficiency factor as well as real surface track density, the main parameter in solid state track detection measurements. (author)

  8. Absolute peak detection efficiencies of a Ge(Li) detector for high gamma-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Masaki

    1985-11-01

    Absolute peak detection efficiencies of a Ge(Li) detector for gamma-rays of 3.5 MeV to 12 MeV were measured using four (p,γ) reactions and a (n,γ) reaction. Two-line-method was used to obtaine peak detection efficiencies. The efficiencies with the both cases are agreed very well. Utilization of (n,γ) reaction is, therefore, effective for measuring these efficiencies, because high energy gamma-rays can be generated easily by using a neutron source. These results were applied to calibration of a gamma-ray standard source, emitting 6.13 MeV gamma-rays, and of intensities of 56 Co standard gamma-ray source. (author)

  9. Theoretical calibration of a NaI(Tl) detector for the measurement of 131I in a thyroid phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, Luzia

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical calibration of a NaI(Tl) detector using Monte Carlo Method, for the measurement of 131 I in a thyroid phantom. The thyroid is represented by the region between two concentric cylinders, where the inner one represents the trachea and the outer one represents the neck. 133 Ba was used for experimental calibration. The results shows that the calibration procedure is suitable for 131 I measurements. (author)

  10. Topics in the Measurement of Top Quark Events with ATLAS Pixel Detector Optoelectronics, Track Impact Parameter Calibration, Acceptance Correction Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Sandvoss, Stephan Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents methods, which can be applied especially to the measurement of top quark events with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of CERN. Contributions to three fields were made: installation of the detector and its commissioning, data calibration and first physical analysis.

  11. The sensitivity calibration of the ultra-fast quench plastic scintillation detector for D-T neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Changhuan; Yan Meiqiong; Xie Chaomei

    1998-01-01

    The authors introduce some characteristics of ultra-fast quench plastic scintillation detectors. When the detectors are composed of different scintillators, light guides and microchannel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT), their sensitivities to D-T neutrons are calibrated by a pulse neutron tube with a neutron pulse width about 10 ns

  12. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f 0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f 0 . In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  13. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-04-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  14. An efficient energy response model for liquid scintillator detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebanowski, Logan; Wan, Linyan; Ji, Xiangpan; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2018-05-01

    Liquid scintillator detectors are playing an increasingly important role in low-energy neutrino experiments. In this article, we describe a generic energy response model of liquid scintillator detectors that provides energy estimations of sub-percent accuracy. This model fits a minimal set of physically-motivated parameters that capture the essential characteristics of scintillator response and that can naturally account for changes in scintillator over time, helping to avoid associated biases or systematic uncertainties. The model employs a one-step calculation and look-up tables, yielding an immediate estimation of energy and an efficient framework for quantifying systematic uncertainties and correlations.

  15. Selection and evaluation of gamma decay standards for detector calibration using coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavac, S.

    2000-01-01

    Coincidence method for calibration of gamma detectors using suitable calibration standards with two cascading gamma rays is analyzed. From the list of recommended gamma ray standards currently under reevaluation by the CRP, 14 radionuclides were selected as the potential source candidates for the coincidence method. The following sources were selected 24 Na, 46 Sc, 60 Co, 66 Ga, 75 Se, 88 Y, Nb 94 , 111 In, 123m Te, 133 Ba, 134 Cs, 152 Eu, 154 Eu and 207 Bi. Reaction 11 B (p,γ) 12 C* was also selected as a source of high energy gamma rays. Experimental data on angular correlation coefficients for selected sources were collected from the literature and evaluated according to the recommended procedure. Theoretical angular correlation coefficients were calculated and compared to the evaluated data. (author)

  16. Calibrating an optical scanner for quality assurance of large area radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Hildén, T.; Berdova, M.; Lauhakangas, R.; Heino, J.; Tuominen, E.; Franssila, S.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2014-11-01

    A gas electron multiplier (GEM) is a particle detector used in high-energy physics. Its main component is a thin copper-polymer-copper sandwich that carries Ø =70  ±  5 µm holes. Quality assurance (QA) is needed to guarantee both long operating life and reading fidelity of the GEM. Absence of layer defects and conformity of the holes to specifications is important. Both hole size and shape influence the detector’s gas multiplication factor and hence affect the collected data. For the scanner the required lateral measurement tolerance is ± 5 µm. We calibrated a high aspect ratio optical scanning system (OSS) to allow ensuring the quality of large GEM foils. For the calibration we microfabricated transfer standards, which were imaged with the OSS and which were compared to corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The calibration fulfilled the ISO/IEC 17025 and UKAS M3003 requirements: the calibration factor was 1.01  ±  0.01, determined at 95% confidence level across a 950  ×  950 mm2 area. The proposed large-scale scanning technique can potentially be valuable in other microfabricated products too.

  17. Determination of the efficiency curve for a Si-Li detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldape U, F.; Oliver, A.; Montenegro, E.C.

    1986-02-01

    In this work it is carried out a new calibration method for an X-rays detection system for PIXE analysis. This method it bases on the parametric expression introduced by Gallaher and Cipola in which the efficiency curve is obtained adjusting the parameters that they represent the solid angle, the attenuation in the absorbers of low Z and the absorption in the sensitive region of the detector, starting from calibrated radioactive sources, in those which those ray-X emitted its are in most of E > 10 KeV. In the region E < 10 Kev, the quantity of experimental points is poor and also, due to the absorption problems, its are the points where greater experimental error is made. (Author)

  18. Application of the multisphere technique. Calibration and use of a modified Multiple Probe Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalande, R.

    1966-11-01

    The study concerns the search for a portable, compact device with a great autonomy of operation, able to carry out precise measurements of fast neutrons in exclusion zones. A DSM-type multi-probe detector, which is self-contained and fully transistorized, have been studied; it includes a storage battery with a 30 hour autonomy and a buffering capability, a pulse amplifier, an integrator (sensitivity 4 c / s - 200 c / s - 2000 c / s), a totalizer to carry out counting on 5 mm, and a SNR fast neutron probe equipped with its preamplifier. Slightly modified, this device perfectly fulfills the operating conditions. Designed to precisely define the relationship between the flow and the dose intensity, it allows to calibrate any type of fast neutrons detector (e.g. BF 3 or unmodified DSM) that will respond correctly and will provide routine monitoring at a facility

  19. Characterization of a diamond detector to be used as neutron yield monitor during the in-vessel calibration of JET neutron detectors in preparation of the DT experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillon, Mario; Angelone, Maurizio; Batistoni, Paola; Loreti, Stefano; Milocco, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A diamond detector has been characterized for use as neutron yield monitor of a portable 14 MeV neutron generator. • The system will be used for the 14 MeV calibration of JET neutron detector. • The results and the performances of the monitor are very satisfactory in term of accuracy and reliability. - Abstract: A new Deuterium-Tritium (DT) campaign is planned at JET. An accurate calibration for the 14 MeV neutron yield monitors is necessary. In order to perform the calibration a 14 MeV Neutron Generator with suitable intensity (∼10 8 n/s) will be used. Due to the intensity change during the Neutron Generator lifetime it would be necessary to monitor continuously the neutron emission intensity during the calibration using a compact detector attached to it. A high quality diamond detector has been chosen as one of the monitors. This detector has been fully characterized at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator facility. The characterization procedure and the resulting 14 MeV neutron response of the detector are described in this paper together with the obtained uncertainties.

  20. An energy-efficient failure detector for vehicular cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxi; Wu, Zhibo; Dong, Jian; Wu, Jin; Wen, Dongxin

    2018-01-01

    Failure detectors are one of the fundamental components for maintaining the high availability of vehicular cloud computing. In vehicular cloud computing, lots of RSUs are deployed along the road to improve the connectivity. Many of them are equipped with solar battery due to the unavailability or excess expense of wired electrical power. So it is important to reduce the battery consumption of RSU. However, the existing failure detection algorithms are not designed to save battery consumption RSU. To solve this problem, a new energy-efficient failure detector 2E-FD has been proposed specifically for vehicular cloud computing. 2E-FD does not only provide acceptable failure detection service, but also saves the battery consumption of RSU. Through the comparative experiments, the results show that our failure detector has better performance in terms of speed, accuracy and battery consumption.

  1. A Radon Chamber without Radium Source for Detector Calibration and Radon Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.; Karunakara, N.

    2008-01-01

    A radon chamber of volume 216 liters was designed and constructed for calibration of radon detectors and radon test measurements. The main feature of this chamber is that the active 226 Ra source, to generate the 222 Rn inside the chamber volume, is not required. Instead, 222 Rn from soil gas is utilized for this purpose. The supply of radon comes from the soil gas. Soil gas is drawn from the soil to fill the chamber with high radon concentration levels (∼ 80 kBq/m3). Desired radon concentration levels can be obtained by drawing the soil gas for different time durations and/or flow rate (author)

  2. The calibration and electron energy reconstruction of the BGO ECAL of the DAMPE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Chi; Dong, Jianing; Wei, Yifeng [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (IHEP-USTC), University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wen, Sicheng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210000 (China); Zhang, Yunlong, E-mail: ylzhang@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (IHEP-USTC), University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Zhiying; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Shen, ZhongTao; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Junbin; Wang, Qi; Ma, SiYuan; Yang, Di; Jiang, Di [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (IHEP-USTC), University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chen, Dengyi; Hu, Yiming [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210000 (China); Huang, Guangshun; Wang, Xiaolian [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (IHEP-USTC), University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); and others

    2016-11-11

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a space experiment designed to search for dark matter indirectly by measuring the spectra of photons, electrons, and positrons up to 10 TeV. The BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is its main sub-detector for energy measurement. In this paper, the instrumentation and development of the BGO ECAL is briefly described. The calibration on the ground, including the pedestal, minimum ionizing particle (MIP) peak, dynode ratio, and attenuation length with the cosmic rays and beam particles is discussed in detail. Also, the energy reconstruction results of the electrons from the beam test are presented.

  3. Update of X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Nichols, A.L.

    2002-12-01

    The Third Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and γ-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration and Other Applications was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna from 21 to 24 October 2002. A primary aim of ths meeting was to review progress in the evaluation and recommendation of the specified decay data. CRP participants reviewed the status of their evaluations, as agreed at the previous meetings, and demonstrated that good progress had been made. Details of the content and presentational format of the recommended database were agreed, with an aim of completion by the end of 2002 and publication of the IAEA-TECDOC report in 2003. (author)

  4. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Myong-Seop; Park Byung-Gun; Kang Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affe...

  5. CR-39 nuclear track detector used for neutron dosimetry: system calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint Martin, G.; Lopez, F.; Bernaola, Omar A.

    2009-01-01

    Stacks composed by 1 mm thickness CR-39 foils and polyethylene and PVC films were evaluated to be used as neutron dosemeters. Irradiations were made with a calibrated 241 Am-Be source in a dose range from 0 to 3.1 mSv and the etching conditions were optimized. The measurements of number of tracks per surface unit in the CR-39 detectors showed a good linear behaviour as a function of the dose. The minimum detectable dose equivalent (MDDE) was calculated. (author)

  6. Automated system for calibration and control of the CHSPP-800 multichannel γ detector parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avvakumov, N.A.; Belikov, N.I.; Goncharenko, Yu.M.

    1987-01-01

    An automated system for adjustment, calibration and control of total absorption Cherenkov spectrometer is described. The system comprises a mechanical platform, capable of moving in two mutually perpendicular directions; movement detectors and limit switches; power unit, automation unit with remote control board. The automated system can operate both in manual control regime with coordinate control by a digital indicator, and in operation regime with computer according to special programs. The platform mounting accuracy is ± 0.1 mm. Application of the automated system has increased the rate of the course of the counter adjustment works 3-5 times

  7. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  8. Efficiency measurement of the NeuLAND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toernqvist, Hans; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Holl, Matthias; Horvat, Andrea; Kahlbow, Julian; Miki, Kenjiro; Rossi, Dominic; Scheit, Heiko; Schindler, Fabia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Boretzky, Konstanze; Caesar, Christoph; Simon, Haik [GSI Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Gasparic, Igor [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Collaboration: R3B-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    NeuLAND is the next-generation high-energy and high-efficiency neutron detector currently under construction at GSI/FAIR by the R{sup 3}B collaboration. This detector will be used in a wide variety of experiments, ranging from nuclear-structure measurements of neutron-rich species to the investigation of the equation-of-state of asymmetric nuclear matter. The design goals of the full NeuLAND detector are a >95% detection efficiency for single neutrons, a time resolution of σ{sub t} ≤ 150 ps and a position resolution of σ{sub x,y,z} ≤ 1.5 cm, with a detection volume of 250 x 250 x 300 cm{sup 3}. While still under construction, a set of 4 of the 30 planned NeuLAND double-planes were used for a series of experiments at the SAMURAI setup at RIKEN. In particular, the time resolution and one-neutron efficiency were measured using neutrons from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. The test setup at RIKEN are described, and the resolution and efficiency results are discussed.

  9. Comparison of experimental and theoretical efficiency of HPGe X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, B.P.; Balouria, P.; Garg, M.L.; Nandi, T.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    The low energy high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are being increasingly used for the quantitative estimation of elements using X-ray spectrometric techniques. The softwares used for quantitative estimation normally evaluate model based efficiency of detector using manufacturer supplied detector physical parameters. The present work shows that the manufacturer supplied detector parameters for low energy HPGe detectors need to be verified by comparing model based efficiency with the experimental ones. This is particularly crucial for detectors with ion implanted P type contacts

  10. Calibration of the identiFINDER detector for the iodine measurement in thyroid using the Monte Carlo method; Calibracion del detector identiFINDER para la medicion de yodo en tiroides utilizando el metodo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos M, D.; Yera S, Y.; Lopez B, G. M.; Acosta R, N.; Vergara G, A., E-mail: dayana@cphr.edu.cu [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/ 41 y 47, Playa, 10600 La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    This work is based on the determination of the detection efficiency of {sup 125}I and {sup 131}I in thyroid of the identiFINDER detector using the Monte Carlo method. The suitability of the calibration method is analyzed, when comparing the results of the direct Monte Carlo method with the corrected, choosing the latter because the differences with the real efficiency stayed below 10%. To simulate the detector their geometric parameters were optimized using a tomographic study, what allowed the uncertainties minimization of the estimates. Finally were obtained the simulations of the detector geometry-point source to find the correction factors to 5 cm, 15 cm and 25 cm, and those corresponding to the detector-simulator arrangement for the method validation and final calculation of the efficiency, demonstrating that in the Monte Carlo method implementation if simulates at a greater distance than the used in the Laboratory measurements an efficiency overestimation can be obtained, while if simulates at a shorter distance this will be underestimated, so should be simulated at the same distance to which will be measured in the reality. Also, is achieved the obtaining of the efficiency curves and minimum detectable activity for the measurement of {sup 131}I and {sup 125}I. In general is achieved the implementation of the Monte Carlo methodology for the identiFINDER calibration with the purpose of estimating the measured activity of iodine in thyroid. This method represents an ideal way to replace the lack of patterns solutions and simulators assuring the capacities of the Internal Contamination Laboratory of the Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones are always calibrated for the iodine measurement in thyroid. (author)

  11. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-01-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr_3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. - Highlights: • A small-sized UAV airborne sensor system was developed. • Three radioactive models were chosen to simulate the Fukushima accident. • Both the air and ground radiation were considered in the models. • The efficiency calculations and MDAC values were given. • The sensor system is able to monitor in serious nuclear accidents.

  12. A study of light collection efficiency in scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaoguang, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A group of computer programs was set up to study the light collection efficiency in scintillation detectors with rectangular cross sections. The input conditions can be chosen arbitrarily, including: the size, light attenuation length and refraction index of the scintillator and light guide, the refraction index of the coupling medium, the reflection characteristics of the walls, and the position of light sources. A few examples are discussed in this article. (orig.)

  13. Efficient mass calibration of magnetic sector mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddick, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic sector mass spectrometers used for automatic acquisition of precise isotopic data are usually controlled with Hall probes and software that uses polynomial equations to define and calibrate the mass-field relations required for mass focusing. This procedure requires a number of reference masses and careful tuning to define and maintain an accurate mass calibration. A simplified equation is presented and applied to several different magnetically controlled mass spectrometers. The equation accounts for nonlinearity in typical Hall probe controlled mass-field relations, reduces calibration to a linear fitting procedure, and is sufficiently accurate to permit calibration over a mass range of 2 to 200 amu with only two defining masses. Procedures developed can quickly correct for normal drift in calibrations and compensate for drift during isotopic analysis over a limited mass range such as a single element. The equation is: Field A·Mass 1/2 + B·(Mass) p where A, B, and p are constants. The power value p has a characteristic value for a Hall probe/controller and is insensitive to changing conditions, thus reducing calibration to a linear regression to determine optimum A and B. (author). 1 ref., 1 tab., 6 figs

  14. Efficient mass calibration of magnetic sector mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roddick, J C

    1997-12-31

    Magnetic sector mass spectrometers used for automatic acquisition of precise isotopic data are usually controlled with Hall probes and software that uses polynomial equations to define and calibrate the mass-field relations required for mass focusing. This procedure requires a number of reference masses and careful tuning to define and maintain an accurate mass calibration. A simplified equation is presented and applied to several different magnetically controlled mass spectrometers. The equation accounts for nonlinearity in typical Hall probe controlled mass-field relations, reduces calibration to a linear fitting procedure, and is sufficiently accurate to permit calibration over a mass range of 2 to 200 amu with only two defining masses. Procedures developed can quickly correct for normal drift in calibrations and compensate for drift during isotopic analysis over a limited mass range such as a single element. The equation is: Field A{center_dot}Mass{sup 1/2} + B{center_dot}(Mass){sup p} where A, B, and p are constants. The power value p has a characteristic value for a Hall probe/controller and is insensitive to changing conditions, thus reducing calibration to a linear regression to determine optimum A and B. (author). 1 ref., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  15. Safety analyses in support of neutron detector calibration operations at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankunas, G., E-mail: gediminas@mail.lei.lt [EURATOM-LEI Association, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Breslaujos Str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Syme, D.B.; Popovichev, S. [EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, S. [EURATOM-VR Association, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Batistoni, P. [JET-EFDA Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-ENEA Association, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Neutron calculations to evaluate the dose rate leakage from the shields which contain the neutron source. •The differences on calculated dose rates using different flux-to-dose conversion factors have been investigated. •The experimental values were compared to the MCNPX calculations. -- Abstract: Neutron detectors in fusion devices need to be calibrated to provide the absolute neutron yield and the fusion power produced in fusion reactions. A new in situ calibration of the JET neutron detectors was recently performed using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source with intensity of about 2.7 × 10{sup 8} n/s. The source was delivered to the JET facility within a transport flask and the surface radiation levels must fall within transport regulations. Some contingency scenarios required transfer of the source into special shields: the operational shield and the auxiliary shield. In this paper we describe the neutron calculations that have been carried out to evaluate the dose rate leakage from the shields which may contain the neutron source. The calculations have been performed using accurate modelling of the neutron and gamma ray emission from the {sup 252}Cf source, and from the three shields. The differences on calculated dose rates deriving from the use of different flux-to-dose conversion factors have also been investigated. A comparison of dose rates calculated and measured is presented from the bare source (in cell) and with the source within its transport flask.

  16. Calibration of the NEXT-White Detector using $^{83m}\\mathrm{Kr}$ Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Lema, G.; et al.

    2018-04-05

    The NEXT-White (NEW) detector is currently the largest radio-pure high pressure gas xenon time projection chamber with electroluminescent readout in the world. NEXT-White has been operating at Laboratorio Subterr\\'aneo de Canfranc (LSC) since October 2016. This paper describes the calibrations performed with $^{83m}\\mathrm{Kr}$ decays during a long run taken from March to November 2017 (Run II). Krypton calibrations are used to correct for the finite drift-electron lifetime as well as for the dependence of the measured energy on the event position which is mainly caused by variations in solid angle coverage. After producing calibration maps to correct for both effects we measure an excellent energy resolution for 41.5 keV point-like deposits of (4.55 $\\pm$ 0.01) % FWHM in the full chamber and (3.88 $\\pm$ 0.04) % FWHM in a restricted fiducial volume. Using naive 1/$\\sqrt{E}$ scaling, these values translate into FWHM resolutions of (0.592 $\\pm$ 0.001) % FWHM and (0.504 $\\pm$ 0.005) % at the $Q_{\\beta\\beta}$ energy of xenon double beta decay (2458 keV), well within range of our target value of 1%.

  17. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00144085

    2017-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run2. Data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment parameters, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This procedure improves the quality of the online reconstruction. For example, the vertex locator is retracted and reinserted for stable beam conditions in each fill to be centred on the primary vertex position in the transverse plane. Consequently its position changes on a fill-by-fill basis. Critically, this new real-time alignment and calibration procedure allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline-selected events. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection in the trigger by applying stronger constraints. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructur...

  18. Calibration of a special neutron dosemeter based on solid-state track detectors and fission radiators in various neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Krusche, M.; Schuricht, V.

    1980-01-01

    The calibration of a personnel neutron dosemeter in different neutron fields is described. The badge-like dosemeter contains 5 detectors: polycarbonate foil (10 μm, Makrofol KG), 232 Th, natural uranium, natural uranium with boron, and natural uranium with cadmium. Detector sensitivity and calibration factors have been calculated and measured in radiation fields of 252 Cf fission neutrons, WWR-S reactor neutrons with and without Cd and Fe shielding, 3-MeV (d,t) generator neutrons, and 238 PuBe neutrons. Measurement range and achievable accuracy are discussed from the point of view of applying the dosemeter in routine and emergency uses

  19. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanotubes based neutron generator for calibration of neutrino and dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Ionidi, V. Y.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Kitsyuk, E. P.; Klenin, A. A.; Kubankin, A. S.; Oleinik, A. N.; Pavlov, A. A.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The compact 2.45 MeV fast neutron generator with a reduced supply voltage for calibration of low-background neutrino and dark matter detectors was tested. The generator is based on an array of carbon nanotubes. Neutron generation is carried out by applying a high voltage in the range of +10 to + 25 kV to a nanotube array, which cause an ionization of deuterium molecules with the following acceleration of ions in the direction of the grounded target covered by a deuterated polyethylene film. The d(d,n)3He nuclear reaction happens as the result of ions collisions with the target. The dependences of the neutron yield as functions of the applied voltage were obtained for two different types of carbon nanotubes array. It is shown that the type of nanotubes array does not influence significantly on the neutron yield.

  1. Calibration method for a in vivo measurement system using mathematical simulation of the radiation source and the detector; Metodo de calibracao de um sistema de medida in vivo atraves da simulacao matematica da fonte de radiacao e do detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, John

    1998-12-31

    A Monte Carlo program which uses a voxel phantom has been developed to simulate in vivo measurement systems for calibration purposes. The calibration method presented here employs a mathematical phantom, produced in the form of volume elements (voxels), obtained through Magnetic Resonance Images of the human body. The calibration method uses the Monte Carlo technique to simulate the tissue contamination, the transport of the photons through the tissues and the detection of the radiation. The program simulates the transport and detection of photons between 0.035 and 2 MeV and uses, for the body representation, a voxel phantom with a format of 871 slices each of 277 x 148 picture elements. The Monte Carlo code was applied to the calibration of in vivo systems and to estimate differences in counting efficiencies between homogeneous and non-homogeneous radionuclide distributions in the lung. Calculations show a factor of 20 between deposition of {sup 241} Am at the back compared with the front of the lung. The program was also used to estimate the {sup 137} Cs body burden of an internally contaminated individual, counted with an 8 x 4 Nal (TI) detector and an {sup 241} Am body burden of an internally contaminated individual, who was counted using a planar germanium detector. (author) 24 refs., 38 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. A neutron calibration technique for detectors with low neutron/high photon sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahr, R.; Guldbakke, S.; Cosack, M.; Dietze, G.; Klein, H.

    1978-03-01

    The neutron response of a detector with low neutron-/high photon sensitivity is given by the difference of two terms: the response to the mixed neutron-photon field, measured directly, and the response to the photons, deduced from additional measurements with a photon spectrometer. The technique is particularly suited for use in connection with targets which consist of a thick backing and thin layer of neutron producing material such as T, D, Li nuclei. Then the photon component of the mixed field is very nearly the same as the pure photon field from a 'phantom target', being identical with the neutron producing target except for the missing neutron producing material. Using this technique in connection with a T target (Ti-T-layer on silver backing) and the corresponding phantom target (Ti-layer on silver backing), a GM counter was calibrated at a neutron energy of 2.5 MeV. Possibilities are discussed to subsequently calibrate the GM counter at other neutron energies without the use of the photon spectrometer. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Measurements of cross sections for Higgs boson production and forward jet calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367060

    This thesis presents measurements of inclusive and differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the fiducial and total phase space regions, as well as a calibration of the ATLAS calorimeter response to jets. The fiducial $pp \\rightarrow H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ cross section for $m_{H}=125.4$ GeV was measured at ${\\sqrt{s}=8}$ TeV with 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector. The $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ signal was extracted from the background with a fit to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum, within the fiducial phase space defined by two isolated photons with $|\\eta|<2.37$ and fractional transverse momentum greater than 0.35 and 0.25 relative to the diphoton invariant mass. The signal yields were corrected for inefficiency and resolution of the detector. The $pp \\rightarrow H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ cross section is measured to be $\\sigma_{\\rm fid} = 43.2 \\pm 9.4 \\, ({\\rm stat.}) \\, {}^{+3.2}_{-2.9} \\, ({\\rm syst.}) \\pm 1.2 \\, ({\\rm ...

  4. Quantum efficiency of cesium iodide photocathodes in the 120-220 nm spectral range traceable to a primary detector standard

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G; Friese, J; Gernhäuser, R; Kastenmüller, A; Maier-Komor, P; Zeitelhack, K

    1999-01-01

    Differently prepared CsI samples have been investigated in the 120-220 nm spectral range for their quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity and the effect of radiation aging. The experiments were performed at the PTB radiometry laboratory at the Berlin synchrotron radiation facility BESSY. A calibrated GaAsP Schottky photodiode was used as transfer detector standard to establish traceability to the primary detector standard, because this type of photodiode - unlike silicon p-on-n photodiodes - proved to be of sufficiently stable response when exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The paper reviews the experimental procedures that were employed to characterize and calibrate the GaAsP photodiode and reports the results that were obtained on the investigated CsI photocathodes.

  5. Using lattice tools and unfolding methods for hpge detector efficiency simulation with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Querol, A.; Gallardo, S.; Ródenas, J.; Verdú, G.

    2015-01-01

    In environmental radioactivity measurements, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors are commonly used due to their excellent resolution. Efficiency calibration of detectors is essential to determine activity of radionuclides. The Monte Carlo method has been proved to be a powerful tool to complement efficiency calculations. In aged detectors, efficiency is partially deteriorated due to the dead layer increasing and consequently, the active volume decreasing. The characterization of the radiation transport in the dead layer is essential for a realistic HPGe simulation. In this work, the MCNP5 code is used to calculate the detector efficiency. The F4MESH tally is used to determine the photon and electron fluence in the dead layer and the active volume. The energy deposited in the Ge has been analyzed using the ⁎F8 tally. The F8 tally is used to obtain spectra and to calculate the detector efficiency. When the photon fluence and the energy deposition in the crystal are known, some unfolding methods can be used to estimate the activity of a given source. In this way, the efficiency is obtained and serves to verify the value obtained by other methods. - Highlights: • The MCNP5 code is used to estimate the dead layer thickness of an HPGe detector. • The F4MESH tally is applied to verify where interactions occur into the Ge crystal. • PHD and the energy deposited are obtained with F8 and ⁎F8 tallies, respectively. • An average dead layer between 70 and 80 µm is obtained for the HPGe studied. • The efficiency is calculated applying the TSVD method to the response matrix.

  6. Optimization, evaluation and calibration of a cross-strip DOI detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, F. P.; Kolb, A.; Pichler, B. J.

    2018-02-01

    This study depicts the evaluation of a SiPM detector with depth of interaction (DOI) capability via a dual-sided readout that is suitable for high-resolution positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging. Two different 12  ×  12 pixelated LSO scintillator arrays with a crystal pitch of 1.60 mm are examined. One array is 20 mm-long with a crystal separation by the specular reflector Vikuiti enhanced specular reflector (ESR), and the other one is 18 mm-long and separated by the diffuse reflector Lumirror E60 (E60). An improvement in energy resolution from 22.6% to 15.5% for the scintillator array with the E60 reflector is achieved by taking a nonlinear light collection correction into account. The results are FWHM energy resolutions of 14.0% and 15.5%, average FWHM DOI resolutions of 2.96 mm and 1.83 mm, and FWHM coincidence resolving times of 1.09 ns and 1.48 ns for the scintillator array with the ESR and that with the E60 reflector, respectively. The measured DOI signal ratios need to be assigned to an interaction depth inside the scintillator crystal. A linear and a nonlinear method, using the intrinsic scintillator radiation from lutetium, are implemented for an easy to apply calibration and are compared to the conventional method, which exploits a setup with an externally collimated radiation beam. The deviation between the DOI functions of the linear or nonlinear method and the conventional method is determined. The resulting average of differences in DOI positions is 0.67 mm and 0.45 mm for the nonlinear calibration method for the scintillator array with the ESR and with the E60 reflector, respectively; Whereas the linear calibration method results in 0.51 mm and 0.32 mm for the scintillator array with the ESR and the E60 reflector, respectively; and is, due to its simplicity, also applicable in assembled detector systems.

  7. First determination of the e/π separation efficiency of the ZEUS transition radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengel, S.

    1995-12-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector of the ZEUS experiment at DESY is one of its main instruments for electron identification. It started to operate partly in 1993 and for the first time with its four modules in 1994. One of its main features is a Time Expansion Chamber to detect the transition radiation of electrons together with the ionisation energy loss of the particle tracks. The first data taken under realistic environmental conditions served as tool to find appropriate running conditions and procedures for data treatment. The main aim however was to show that the detector is sensitive to electrons and to evaluate its rejection power. This analysis describes the on-line and off-line data processing required to exploit the information contained in the raw data. Concepts for detector cross channel calibration and signal recombination are presented. The effect of different running conditions is discussed. To determine the rejection power a data selection was performed extracting electrons and hadrons using all means except the TRD. The response of the TRD to these data samples was compared and a clear sensitivity for electrons was found. Using different likelihood methods values for separation power are derived. The hadron suppression obtained at 90% electron efficiency is - for momenta from 1 to 3 GeV/c - between 27% to 10%, which is already close to the design/test chamber results of 9% to 1.7%. As a projection for close-to-optimum running conditions a hadron suppression from 12% to 2% was obtained. (orig.)

  8. An efficient feedback calibration algorithm for direct imaging radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Adam P.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-10-01

    We present the E-field Parallel Imaging Calibration (EPICal) algorithm, which addresses the need for a fast calibration method for direct imaging radio astronomy correlators. Direct imaging involves a spatial fast Fourier transform of antenna signals, alleviating an O(Na ^2) computational bottleneck typical in radio correlators, and yielding a more gentle O(Ng log _2 Ng) scaling, where Na is the number of antennas in the array and Ng is the number of gridpoints in the imaging analysis. This can save orders of magnitude in computation cost for next generation arrays consisting of hundreds or thousands of antennas. However, because antenna signals are mixed in the imaging correlator without creating visibilities, gain correction must be applied prior to imaging, rather than on visibilities post-correlation. We develop the EPICal algorithm to form gain solutions quickly and without ever forming visibilities. This method scales as the number of antennas, and produces results comparable to those from visibilities. We use simulations to demonstrate the EPICal technique and study the noise properties of our gain solutions, showing they are similar to visibility-based solutions in realistic situations. By applying EPICal to 2 s of Long Wavelength Array data, we achieve a 65 per cent dynamic range improvement compared to uncalibrated images, showing this algorithm is a promising solution for next generation instruments.

  9. Calibration of SSNDT detectors for radon measurements; Calibração de detectores SSNDT para medição de radônio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Laura C.; Santos, Talita O.; Pinheiro, Rose Mary M.; Rocha, Zildete, E-mail: lauratakahashi@hotmail.com, E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rosepin@cdtn.br, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The methods and instrumentation used to measure the concentration of radon need to be calibrated to obtain accurate results. The Nuclear Track Detector is considered the main method of analysis of radon research. Thus, the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG, Brazil) uses the detector CR-39 (Landauer) to measure the concentration of radon in homes, workplaces, underground mines, soils and in environment. Epidemiological studies reveal the strong relationship between lung cancer and radon exposure. Therefore, it is important to monitor this gas and its progeny in order to assess the radiological risk. The alpha particles emitted by radon and its progeny leave traces on CR-39 due to Coulombian interactions with the atoms of the material. The liquid density of traces is converted to radon concentration by means of a calibration factor obtained in calibrated systems. This work aims to determine the LRN / CDTN calibration factor. To do so, the CR-39 detectors were placed inside the calibration chambers, along with two AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) detectors and Ra-266 sources with activities of 3,379 kBq or 0.483 kBq, referenced by NIST. From this, six levels of exposure were obtained, which were: 44 kBq.d.m{sup 3}, 4 kBq.d.m{sup 3}, 3 kBq.d.m{sup 3}, 15 kBq.d.m{sup 3}, 30 kBq.d.m{sup 3} , 26 kBq.d.m {sup 3}. The conversion factor between the liquid density of traces and the total exposure time obtained was K = 52.028 ± 0.752 [(trace density.cm{sup -2}) / (kBq.d.m{sup -3})]. After the determination of the conversion factor, it was used to measure the concentration of radon in underground mines, obtaining concentration results between 122 ± 24 and 7384 ± 517 kBq.m{sup -3}.

  10. Calibration of the Advanced LIGO detectors for the discovery of the binary black-hole merger GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Altin, P. A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arun, K. G.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Blair, R. M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Fletcher, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, A.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Green, A. C.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heintze, M. C.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meadors, G. D.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Mukund, K. N.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nitz, A.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Raymond, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tse, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Zanolin, M.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    In Advanced LIGO, detection and astrophysical source parameter estimation of the binary black hole merger GW150914 requires a calibrated estimate of the gravitational-wave strain sensed by the detectors. Producing an estimate from each detector's differential arm length control loop readout signals requires applying time domain filters, which are designed from a frequency domain model of the detector's gravitational-wave response. The gravitational-wave response model is determined by the detector's opto-mechanical response and the properties of its feedback control system. The measurements used to validate the model and characterize its uncertainty are derived primarily from a dedicated photon radiation pressure actuator, with cross-checks provided by optical and radio frequency references. We describe how the gravitational-wave readout signal is calibrated into equivalent gravitational-wave-induced strain and how the statistical uncertainties and systematic errors are assessed. Detector data collected over 38 calendar days, from September 12 to October 20, 2015, contain the event GW150914 and approximately 16 days of coincident data used to estimate the event false alarm probability. The calibration uncertainty is less than 10% in magnitude and 10° in phase across the relevant frequency band, 20 Hz to 1 kHz.

  11. Highly accurate determination of relative gamma-ray detection efficiency for Ge detector and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, H.; Mori, C.; Fleming, R.F.; Dewaraja, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    When quantitative measurements of γ-rays using High-Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors are made for a variety of applications, accurate knowledge of oy-ray detection efficiency is required. The emission rates of γ-rays from sources can be determined quickly in the case that the absolute peak efficiency is calibrated. On the other hand, the relative peak efficiencies can be used for determination of intensity ratios for plural samples and for comparison to the standard source. Thus, both absolute and relative detection efficiencies are important in use of γ-ray detector. The objective of this work is to determine the relative gamma-ray peak detection efficiency for an HPGe detector with the uncertainty approaching 0.1% . We used some nuclides which emit at least two gamma-rays with energies from 700 to 2400 keV for which the relative emission probabilities are known with uncertainties much smaller than 0.1%. The relative peak detection efficiencies were calculated from the measurements of the nuclides, 46 Sc, 48 Sc, 60 Co and 94 Nb, emitting two γ- rays with the emission probabilities of almost unity. It is important that various corrections for the emission probabilities, the cascade summing effect, and the self-absorption are small. A third order polynomial function on both logarithmic scales of energy and efficiency was fitted to the data, and the peak efficiency predicted at certain energy from covariance matrix showed the uncertainty less than 0.5% except for near 700 keV. As an application, the emission probabilities of the 1037.5 and 1212.9 keV γ-rays for 48 Sc were determined using the function of the highly precise relative peak efficiency. Those were 0.9777+0,.00079 and 0.02345+0.00017 for the 1037.5 and 1212.9 keV γ-rays, respectively. The sum of these probabilities is close to unity within the uncertainty which means that the certainties of the results are high and the accuracy has been improved considerably

  12. Calibration of detectors type CR-39 for methodology implementation for Radon-222 determination in CRCN-NE, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Karolayne E.M. da; Santos, Mariana L. de O.; Amaral, Déric S. do; Vilela, Eldice C.; França, Elvis J. de; Hazin, Clovis A.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de

    2017-01-01

    Radon-222 is a radioactive gas, a product of the decay of uranium-238, which emits alpha particles and represents more than 50% of the dose of natural radiation received by the population. Therefore, monitoring of this gas is essential. For indoor measurement, solid state detectors can be used, the most common of which is CR-39. For monitoring using CR-39, alpha particles, generated by radon-222 and the daughter radionuclides, strike the surface of the detector and generate traces. To relate the trace density per exposure area in environments with unknown activity concentration, it is necessary to determine the calibration factor. The objective of this study was to calibrate CR-39 type detectors for the implementation of the radon determination methodology in Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste - CRCN-NE of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN. In order to determine the CR-39 calibration factor, 19 exposures of the detectors were performed in the CRCN-NE calibration chamber (RN1-CRCN) at an activity of 5.00 kBq m -3 , with the exposure time varying from 24 to 850 hours. For the detection of the detectors, sodium hydroxide was used in a thermostat bath at 90 ° C for 5 hours. The count of number of traits per unit of field was performed with the aid of optical microscopy with an increase of 100 times, being read 30 fields per dosimeters. As a result, the calibration factor was obtained, and the linear response of the trace density as a function of exposure was observed. The results allow the use of CR-39 in the determination of radon-222 by CRCN-NE

  13. Pure sources and efficient detectors for optical quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnicki, Kevin

    Over the last sixty years, classical information theory has revolutionized the understanding of the nature of information, and how it can be quantified and manipulated. Quantum information processing extends these lessons to quantum systems, where the properties of intrinsic uncertainty and entanglement fundamentally defy classical explanation. This growing field has many potential applications, including computing, cryptography, communication, and metrology. As inherently mobile quantum particles, photons are likely to play an important role in any mature large-scale quantum information processing system. However, the available methods for producing and detecting complex multi-photon states place practical limits on the feasibility of sophisticated optical quantum information processing experiments. In a typical quantum information protocol, a source first produces an interesting or useful quantum state (or set of states), perhaps involving superposition or entanglement. Then, some manipulations are performed on this state, perhaps involving quantum logic gates which further manipulate or entangle the intial state. Finally, the state must be detected, obtaining some desired measurement result, e.g., for secure communication or computationally efficient factoring. The work presented here concerns the first and last stages of this process as they relate to photons: sources and detectors. Our work on sources is based on the need for optimized non-classical states of light delivered at high rates, particularly of single photons in a pure quantum state. We seek to better understand the properties of spontaneous parameteric downconversion (SPDC) sources of photon pairs, and in doing so, produce such an optimized source. We report an SPDC source which produces pure heralded single photons with little or no spectral filtering, allowing a significant rate enhancement. Our work on detectors is based on the need to reliably measure single-photon states. We have focused on

  14. Field calibration of PADC track etch detectors for local neutron dosimetry in man using different radiation qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haelg, Roger A., E-mail: rhaelg@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Hirslanden Medical Center, Rain 34, CH-5000 Aarau (Switzerland); Besserer, Juergen [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Hirslanden Medical Center, Rain 34, CH-5000 Aarau (Switzerland); Boschung, Markus; Mayer, Sabine [Division for Radiation Safety and Security, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Clasie, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kry, Stephen F. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Uwe [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Hirslanden Medical Center, Rain 34, CH-5000 Aarau (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 204, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-01

    In order to quantify the dose from neutrons to a patient for contemporary radiation treatment techniques, measurements inside phantoms, representing the patient, are necessary. Published reports on neutron dose measurements cover measurements performed free in air or on the surface of phantoms and the doses are expressed in terms of personal dose equivalent or ambient dose equivalent. This study focuses on measurements of local neutron doses inside a radiotherapy phantom and presents a field calibration procedure for PADC track etch detectors. An initial absolute calibration factor in terms of H{sub p}(10) for personal dosimetry is converted into neutron dose equivalent and additional calibration factors are derived to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence for different radiation therapy beam qualities and depths in the phantom. The neutron spectra used for the calculation of the calibration factors are determined in different depths by Monte Carlo simulations for the investigated radiation qualities. These spectra are used together with the energy dependent response function of the PADC detectors to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence. The resulting total calibration factors are 0.76 for a photon beam (in- and out-of-field), 1.00 (in-field) and 0.84 (out-of-field) for an active proton beam and 1.05 (in-field) and 0.91 (out-of-field) for a passive proton beam, respectively. The uncertainty for neutron dose measurements using this field calibration method is less than 40%. The extended calibration procedure presented in this work showed that it is possible to use PADC track etch detectors for measurements of local neutron dose equivalent inside anthropomorphic phantoms by accounting for spectral changes in the neutron fluence.

  15. Detection alpha particles and Cf-252 fission fragments with track solid detectors and with surface barrier detectors: efficiency determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.; Koskinas, M.F.; Andrade, C. de; Vilela, E.C.; Hinostroza, H.; Kaschiny, J.R.A.; Costa, M.S. da; Rizzo, P.; Santos, W.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The technique of particle detection by solid track detectors, types of developing and analysis of results are presented. Efficiency measurements of alpha particle detection with Makrofol e and surface barrier detector are made. Detection of Cf-252 fission fragments is shown. (L.C.)

  16. Detection of alpha particles and Cf-252 fission fragments with solid track detectors and surface barrier detector. Efficiency calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.; Koskinas, M.F.; Andrade, C. de; Vilela, E.C.; Hinostroza, H.; Kaschiny, J.E.A.; Costa, M.S. da; Rizzo, P.; Santos, W.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for particle detection by using track solid detector and also types of revealing and result analysis are presented concerned to Cf-252 fission fragments detection. Measurements of alpha particles detection efficiency using Makrofol E and surface barrier detector are performed. (L.C.J.A.)

  17. Automated calibration system for a high-precision measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 with the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Cai, B.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D.A.; Gu, W.Q.; Li, G.S.; Qian, X.; McKeown, R.D.; Tsang, R.H.M.; Wang, W.; Wu, F.F.; Zhang, C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the automated calibration system for the antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. This system consists of 24 identical units instrumented on 8 identical 20-ton liquid scintillator detectors. Each unit is a fully automated robotic system capable of deploying an LED and various radioactive sources into the detector along given vertical axes. Selected results from performance studies of the calibration system are reported

  18. Automated calibration system for a high-precision measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} with the Daya Bay antineutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J., E-mail: jianglai.liu@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Cai, B.; Carr, R. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Dwyer, D.A. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gu, W.Q.; Li, G.S. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Qian, X. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); McKeown, R.D. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Tsang, R.H.M. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Wang, W. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Wu, F.F. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, C. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We describe the automated calibration system for the antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment. This system consists of 24 identical units instrumented on 8 identical 20-ton liquid scintillator detectors. Each unit is a fully automated robotic system capable of deploying an LED and various radioactive sources into the detector along given vertical axes. Selected results from performance studies of the calibration system are reported.

  19. Experimental and simulated efficiency of a HPGe detector in the energy range of 0.06∼11 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Su; Choi, H. D.; Sun, Gwang Min

    2003-01-01

    The full energy peak efficiency of a Hyper Pure Germanium (HPGe) detector was calibrated in a wide energy range from 0.06 to 11 MeV. Both the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo method were used for the efficiency calibration. The measurement was performed using the standard radioisotopes in the low energy region of 60∼1408 keV, which was further extended up to 11 MeV by using the 14 N(n,γ) and 35 Cl(n,γ) reactions. The GEANT Monte Carlo code was used for efficiency calculation. The calculated efficiency had the same dependency on the γ-ray energy with the measurement, and the discrepancy between the calculation and the measurement was minimized by fine-tuning of the detector geometry. From the calculated result, the efficiency curve of the HPGe detector was reliably determined particularly in the high energy region above several MeV, where the number of measured efficiency points is relatively small despite the wide energy region. The calculated efficiency agreed with the measurement within about 7%. In addition to the efficiency calculation, the origin of the local minimum near 600 keV on the efficiency curve was analyzed as a general characteristics of a HPGe detector

  20. Energy Calibration of a Silicon Detector Using Pure Beta-Emitters; Calibracion Energetica de un Detector de Silicio Mediante Emisores Beta Puros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borras, C; Arcos, J M. los

    1992-07-01

    Energy calibration of SI detectors used in electron spectroscopy 13 commonly performed with conversion electron sources or monoenergetic electrons beams, which are preferred against beta emitters due to the problems arising from their continuous spectra. This paper presents a simple calibration procedure for a PIP-type silicon detector, using 14C, 147Pm, 99{sup T}c and 45Ca sources, that is based on the correspondence between the average channel observed in the experimental spectrum and the mean energy evaluated from the theoretical Fermi distribution for each nuclide. First, a method for evaluating the average channel in the experimental spectrum distorted by the electronic noise is described and its uncertainty estimated. Then, the channel-energy relation ship is established by least squares fitting modified to account for uncertainties in both variables.The calibration has been successfully verified with 147Pm and '09cd sources, showing discrepaneles not greater than 2.5%, within the uncertainties due to the detector resolution and the sources features. (Author)

  1. Energy Calibration of a Silicon Detector Using Pure Beta-Emitters; Calibracion Energetica de un Detector de Silicio Mediante Emisores Beta Puros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borras, C.; Arcos, J. M. los

    1992-07-01

    Energy calibration of SI detectors used in electron spectroscopy 13 commonly performed with conversion electron sources or monoenergetic electrons beams, which are preferred against beta emitters due to the problems arising from their continuous spectra. This paper presents a simple calibration procedure for a PIP-type silicon detector, using 14C, 147Pm, 99{sup T}c and 45Ca sources, that is based on the correspondence between the average channel observed in the experimental spectrum and the mean energy evaluated from the theoretical Fermi distribution for each nuclide. First, a method for evaluating the average channel in the experimental spectrum distorted by the electronic noise is described and its uncertainty estimated. Then, the channel-energy relation ship is established by least squares fitting modified to account for uncertainties in both variables.The calibration has been successfully verified with 147Pm and '09cd sources, showing discrepaneles not greater than 2.5%, within the uncertainties due to the detector resolution and the sources features. (Author)

  2. Position calibration for the future KM3NeT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motz, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Deep-sea neutrino telescopes consist of an array of photomultipliers to detect Cherenkov light emitted by neutrino-induced muons and particle showers in the surrounding sea water, allowing for reconstruction of the neutrino direction from position and timing of the Cherenkov photons. Since the photomultipliers are in most cases mounted on flexible structures, e.g. lines, and move with the sea current, a positioning system is required to determine the precise location of each sensor. The positioning system of the ANTARES neutrino telescope is based on acoustic triangulation using hydrophones mounted along the lines in combination with tiltmeters and compasses and provides centimetre precision alignment. For the future KM3NeT detector an Optical Module with integrated Piezo sensors for position calibration is proposed as a cost-effective solution. The performance of this system is tested with several sensors of the AMADEUS project, which is integrated in ANTARES to study the background for acoustic detection of highest energy neutrinos.

  3. Development of an aerosol chamber for calibration of 220Rn progeny detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes an aerosol chamber system that can be used for calibrations and performance experiments of passive 220Rn progeny detectors. For the purpose of this study, an aerosol generation system using carnauba wax as the aerosol material was mounted into the 220Rn chamber. We used the chamber to measure characteristics of the equilibrium factor (F) of 220Rn and unattached fraction (fp) of 220Rn progeny, which are important parameters for dose estimation. The first experiment showed that continuous and stable generation of the unattached and aerosol-attached 220Rn progeny concentrations was obtained. We observed that the spatial distributions in the chamber of the vertical profiles of the unattached and aerosol-attached 220Rn progeny concentrations were homogeneous, as were the particle number concentration and count median diameter. The values of F and fp and their characteristics observed in this study were in the same range as the values reported from indoor measurements. We found that the characteristics of F and fp were dependent on the aerosol conditions (particle diameter and particle number concentration).

  4. High-accuracy X-ray detector calibration based on cryogenic radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.

    2010-06-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2 %, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3 %. For some silicon photodiodes, the photocurrent is not linear with the incident radiant power.

  5. High-accuracy X-ray detector calibration based on cryogenic radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.

    2010-01-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2 %, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3 %. For some silicon photodiodes, the photocurrent is not linear with the incident radiant power.

  6. Ultralow energy calibration of LUX detector using Xe 127 electron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report an absolute calibration of the ionization yields (Qy ) and fluctuations for electronic recoil events in liquid xenon at discrete energies between 186 eV and 33.2 keV. The average electric field applied across the liquid xenon target is 180 V /cm . The data are obtained using low energy Xe 127 electron capture decay events from the 95.0-day first run from LUX (WS2013) in search of weakly interacting massive particles. The sequence of gamma-ray and x-ray cascades associated with I 127 deexcitations produces clearly identified two-vertex events in the LUX detector. We observe the K-(binding energy, 33.2 keV), L-(5.2 keV), M-(1.1 keV), and N-(186 eV) shell cascade events and verify that the relative ratio of observed events for each shell agrees with calculations. The N-shell cascade analysis includes single extracted electron (SE) events and represents the lowest-energy electronic recoil in situ measurements that have been explored in liquid xenon.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron detection efficiency for NE213 scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Yinyin; Song Yushou; Chen Zhiqiang; Yang Kun; Zhangsu Yalatu; Liu Xingquan

    2013-01-01

    A NE213 liquid scintillation neutron detector was simulated by using the FLUKA code. The light output of the detector was obtained by transforming the secondary particles energy deposition using Birks formula. According to the measurement threshold, detection efficiencies can be calculated by integrating the light output. The light output, central efficiency and the average efficiency as a function of the front surface radius of the detector, were simulated and the results agreed well with experimental results. (authors)

  8. Study of method of efficiency transference using detectors NaI(Ti); Estudo de método de transferência de eficiência usando detectores NaI(Tl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Thiago L.; Salgado, César M., E-mail: thiago_lins-ramos@hotmail.com, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The use of NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors for measurements implies the determination of the detection efficiency as a function of the energy of the incident photons. The efficiency curve can be obtained experimentally with the use of several mono-energy sources calibrated with emission energies covering the whole range of interest or using the Monte Carlo method. The Institute of Nuclear Engineering develops several methodologies using these detectors as they are robust, inexpensive and do not need cooling for their use. The assembly of an experimental arrangement is usually complex, since several factors influence the result affecting reproducibility in measurements, such as: parallelism between source and detector, alignment between source and detector, and accuracy of source-detector distance. In view of such difficulties, an automated positioning system was developed for the source-detector set controlled by a micro controller based on the ARDUINO language in order to guarantee the reproducibility in the experimental arrangements. In the initial phase of this study, a mathematical model was developed in the MCNP-X code using a NaI (Tl) detector. A theoretical validation using the Efficiency Transfer Method was performed at three different positions on the detector's axial axis (10.6 cm, 11.3 cm and 12.0 cm). This method is based on the ratio of effective solid angles. The experimental validation presented maximum relative errors of 7.74% for the position 11.3 cm.

  9. Patient-dependent count-rate adaptive normalization for PET detector efficiency with delayed-window coincidence events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Hongwei; Xia, Ting; Asma, Evren; Gagnon, Daniel; Wang, Wenli; Winkler, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative PET imaging is widely used in clinical diagnosis in oncology and neuroimaging. Accurate normalization correction for the efficiency of each line-of- response is essential for accurate quantitative PET image reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a normalization calibration method by using the delayed-window coincidence events from the scanning phantom or patient. The proposed method could dramatically reduce the ‘ring’ artifacts caused by mismatched system count-rates between the calibration and phantom/patient datasets. Moreover, a modified algorithm for mean detector efficiency estimation is proposed, which could generate crystal efficiency maps with more uniform variance. Both phantom and real patient datasets are used for evaluation. The results show that the proposed method could lead to better uniformity in reconstructed images by removing ring artifacts, and more uniform axial variance profiles, especially around the axial edge slices of the scanner. The proposed method also has the potential benefit to simplify the normalization calibration procedure, since the calibration can be performed using the on-the-fly acquired delayed-window dataset. (paper)

  10. Determination of the detection efficiency of a HPGe detector by means of the MCNP 4A simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, B.

    2004-01-01

    In the majority of the laboratories, the calibration in efficiency of the detector is carried out by means of the standard sources measurement of gamma photons that have a determined activity, or for matrices that contain a variety of radionuclides that can embrace the energy range of interest. Given the experimental importance that has the determination from the curves of efficiency to the effects of establishing the quantitative results, is appealed to the simulation of the response function of the detector used in the Regional Center of Nuclear Studies inside the energy range of 80 keV to 1400 keV varying the density of the matrix, by means of the application of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The adjustment obtained shows an acceptance grade in the range of 100 to 600 keV, with a smaller percentage discrepancy to 5%. (Author)

  11. T2K off-axis near detector νμ flux measurement and absolute momentum scale calibration of the off-axis near detector tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaszczyk, F.

    2011-09-01

    In this thesis we present the results from the ν μ energy spectrum measurement at T2K's near detector and T2K's near detector tracker absolute momentum scale calibration. First we review the main historical steps and the current state of the art of neutrino physics as well as the theoretical framework required to understand the thesis physics analyses presented later on. In particular we focus on the neutrino oscillation parametrization and the neutrino-matter interaction models. We then describe T2K, an off-axis long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan which consists of a muon neutrino beam sent from J-PARC to Super- Kamiokande, with a magnetized near detector located at 280 m from the neutrino production site. T2K's main goals are measuring the last unknown angle of the PMNS matrix θ 13 through the search of ν e appearance in the ν μ beam and measuring precisely the atmospheric parameters through muon neutrino disappearance. We briefly describe the detectors, in particular the near detector tracker and its performance. We then present the analyses tools, such as the reconstruction techniques used and how the neutrino charged current interaction events needed for the energy spectrum measurement are selected. The main goal of the thesis, the muon neutrino energy spectrum measurement done with the first T2K data is explained next. We give the motivations for such measurement, the results obtained with the first T2K data sample, and the different systematic errors studied. Finally, the absolute momentum scale calibration of T2K's near detector tractor, done through the reconstruction of the neutral kaon invariant mass, is explained. (author)

  12. Rapid portal imaging with a high-efficiency, large field-of-view detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Evans, P M; Swindell, W; Symonds-Tayler, J R; Webb, S; Partridge, M

    1998-12-01

    The design, construction, and performance evaluation of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) are described. The EPID has the same imaging geometry as the current mirror-based systems except for the x-ray detection stage, where a two-dimensional (2D) array of 1 cm thick CsI(Tl) detector elements are utilized. The approximately 18% x-ray quantum efficiency of the scintillation detector and its 30 x 40 cm2 field-of-view at the isocenter are greater than other area-imaging EPIDs. The imaging issues addressed are theoretical and measured signal-to-noise ratio, linearity of the imaging chain, influence of frame-summing on image quality and image calibration. Portal images of test objects and a humanoid phantom are used to measure the performance of the system. An image quality similar to the current devices is achieved but with a lower dose. With approximately 1 cGy dose delivered by a 6 MV beam, a 2 mm diam structure of 1.3% contrast and an 18 mm diam object of 0.125% contrast can be resolved without using image-enhancement methods. A spatial resolution of about 2 mm at the isocenter is demonstrated. The capability of the system to perform fast sequential imaging, synchronized with the radiation pulses, makes it suitable for patient motion studies and verification of intensity-modulated beams as well as its application in cone-beam megavoltage computed tomography.

  13. Full energy peak efficiency of composite detectors for high energy gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radioactive beams demand high detection efficiencies. One of the ways to obtain high detection efficiency without deteriorating the energy resolution or timing characteristics is the use of composite detectors which are composed of standard HPGe crystals arranged in a compact way. Two simplest composite detectors are the clover and cluster detectors. The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) comprises of 16 large volume, 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detectors, where each detector is shielded by a 20-fold segmented escape suppression shield (ESS)

  14. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008–2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  15. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, J., E-mail: julianna.szabo@energia.mta.hu [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Palfalvi, J.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Energy Research, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  16. An Improved Nuclear Recoil Calibration in the LUX Detector Using a Pulsed D-D Neutron Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 370 kg (250 kg active mass) two-_phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The first absolute charge (Qy) and light (Ly) measurement performed in situ in the LUX detector with a D-D calibration technique for nuclear recoil spanning 0.7 to 74 keV and 1.1 to 74 keV respectively have been reported in. The D-D calibration has subsequently been further improved by incorporating pulsing technique, i.e. the D-D neutron production is concentrated within narrow pulses (20 us / 250 Hz) with the timing information recorded. This technique allows the suppression of accidental backgrounds in D-D neutron data and also provides increased sensitivity for the lower energy NR calibrations. I will report the improved NR absolute Qy and Ly measurements using the pulsed D-D calibration technique performed in situ in the LUX detector. Brown University, Large Underground Xenon(LUX) Collaboration.

  17. Calibration of a detector by activation with a continuous neutron source used as a transfer standard for measuring pulsed neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Jose; Silva, Patricio; Birstein, Lipo; Soto, Leopoldo

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calibrating activation detectors. These detectors will be used as transfer standard in measuring neutron fluxes produced by pulsed plasma sources. A standard neutron source is used as a secondary standard. The activation detector is being shielded in order to substantially reduce detection of gamma emission coming from the source. The detector's calibration factor is obtained by considering also the standard neutron source as a free source of gamma radiation so that the measurements can be done without quickly withdrawing the neutron source as it is usually done. This will substantially simplify the traditionally established method (JM)

  18. Adjustment of a low energy, X-rays generator (6 kV - 50 mA). Application to X-rays detectors calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legistre, C.

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this memoir is the calibration of an aluminium photocathode X-rays photoelectric detector, in the spectral range 0,5 keV - 1,5 KeV, with a continuous X-ray source. The detectors's calibration consist to measure the detector's sensitivity versus incident energy. In order to produce monochromatic incident beam on the detector, we used a multilayer mirror whose reflectivity was characterized. The measurements are compared to those realized in an other laboratory. (authors). 36 refs., 61 figs., 13 tabs., 2 photos

  19. Hot nuclei studied with high efficiency neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galin, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have shown the invaluable benefit that a high efficiency 4π neutron detector can bring to the study of reaction mechanisms following collisions of heavy nuclei at intermediate energy. Analysis requires Monte-Carlo simulations for comparison between experimental data and any emission model. In systematic measurements with projectiles of velocity corresponding to energies between 27 and 77 MeV/u, where both the influence of beam velocity and mass have been investigated separately, it has been shown that the projectile-target mass asymmetry, much more than velocity, has a decisive influence on energy dissipation. The closer the projectile mass to the target mass, the more energy is dissipated per unit mass of the considered projectile plus target system. The latter presents all the characteristics of a thermalized system, evaporating a copious number of light particles: up to about 40 neutrons (after efficiency correction) and 11 light charged particles in the most dissipative collisions between Kr+Au, and 90 neutrons for Pb+U with a yet unknown number of l.c.p. In the Kr experiment, these particles are isotropically emitted in the frame of a fused system, excited with 1.2 GeV. Moreover, l.c.p. exhibit Maxwellian energy distributions as in any standard evaporation process. We are now eager to better characterize the properties of the Pb+Au (U) systems for which about 1/3 of the neutrons are freed in a rather large fraction of all collisions. The thermalized energy should then approach very closely the total binding energy of the two interacting nuclei

  20. Energy resolution of the CdTe-XPAD detector:calibration and potential for Laue diffractionmeasurements on protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medjoubi K.; Idir M.; Thompson, A.; Berar, J-F.; Clemens, J-C.; Delpierre, P.; Da Silva, P.; Dinkespiler, B.; Itie, J-P.; Legrand, P.; Menneglier, C.; Mercere, P.; Picca, F.; Samama J-P.

    2012-02-02

    The XPAD3S-CdTe, a CdTe photon-counting pixel array detector, has been used to measure the energy and the intensity of the white-beam diffraction from a lysozyme crystal. A method was developed to calibrate the detector in terms of energy, allowing incident photon energy measurement to high resolution (approximately 140 eV), opening up new possibilities in energy-resolved X-ray diffraction. In order to demonstrate this, Laue diffraction experiments were performed on the bending-magnet beamline METROLOGIE at Synchrotron SOLEIL. The X-ray energy spectra of diffracted spots were deduced from the indexed Laue patterns collected with an imaging-plate detector and then measured with both the XPAD3S-CdTe and the XPAD3S-Si, a silicon photon-counting pixel array detector. The predicted and measured energy of selected diffraction spots are in good agreement, demonstrating the reliability of the calibration method. These results open up the way to direct unit-cell parameter determination and the measurement of high-quality Laue data even at low resolution. Based on the success of these measurements, potential applications in X-ray diffraction opened up by this type of technology are discussed.

  1. Search of new resonances decaying into top quark pairs with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and jet calibration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, R.

    2012-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis were performed using data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The ATLAS detector consists of a tracking system in a 2 T solenoid field, providing coverage up to a pseudo-rapidity of |η| -1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011. Secondly and related to this search, performance studies of the Jet Vertex Fraction (JVF) in top-quark pairs topologies are presented too. JVF is a variable that can be used to reduce the pile-up effects to improve the precision and sensitivity of physics analyses at high luminosities. Finally, results regarding the performance, validation in data and associated systematic uncertainty derivation of the Global Sequential (GS) jet calibration are discussed

  2. Efficient Calibration of Distributed Catchment Models Using Perceptual Understanding and Hydrologic Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, C.; Wagener, T.; Freer, J. E.; Duffy, C.; Han, D.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed models offer the potential to resolve catchment systems in more detail, and therefore simulate the hydrological impacts of spatial changes in catchment forcing (e.g. landscape change). Such models may contain a large number of model parameters which are computationally expensive to calibrate. Even when calibration is possible, insufficient data can result in model parameter and structural equifinality. In order to help reduce the space of feasible models and supplement traditional outlet discharge calibration data, semi-quantitative information (e.g. knowledge of relative groundwater levels), may also be used to identify behavioural models when applied to constrain spatially distributed predictions of states and fluxes. The challenge is to combine these different sources of information together to identify a behavioural region of state-space, and efficiently search a large, complex parameter space to identify behavioural parameter sets that produce predictions that fall within this behavioural region. Here we present a methodology to incorporate different sources of data to efficiently calibrate distributed catchment models. Metrics of model performance may be derived from multiple sources of data (e.g. perceptual understanding and measured or regionalised hydrologic signatures). For each metric, an interval or inequality is used to define the behaviour of the catchment system, accounting for data uncertainties. These intervals are then combined to produce a hyper-volume in state space. The state space is then recast as a multi-objective optimisation problem, and the Borg MOEA is applied to first find, and then populate the hyper-volume, thereby identifying acceptable model parameter sets. We apply the methodology to calibrate the PIHM model at Plynlimon, UK by incorporating perceptual and hydrologic data into the calibration problem. Furthermore, we explore how to improve calibration efficiency through search initialisation from shorter model runs.

  3. A novel method to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Yiping; Yao Rutao; Ma Tianyu

    2008-01-01

    The detection of depth-of-interaction (DOI) is a critical detector capability to improve the PET spatial resolution uniformity across the field-of-view and will significantly enhance, in particular, small bore system performance for brain, breast, and small animal imaging. One promising technique of DOI detection is to use dual-ended-scintillator readout that uses two photon sensors to detect scintillation light from both ends of a scintillator array and estimate DOI based on the ratio of signals (similar to Anger logic). This approach needs a careful DOI function calibration to establish accurate relationship between DOI and signal ratios, and to recalibrate if the detection condition is shifted due to the drift of sensor gain, bias variations, or degraded optical coupling, etc. However, the current calibration method that uses coincident events to locate interaction positions inside a single scintillator crystal has severe drawbacks, such as complicated setup, long and repetitive measurements, and being prone to errors from various possible misalignments among the source and detector components. This method is also not practically suitable to calibrate multiple DOI functions of a crystal array. To solve these problems, a new method has been developed that requires only a uniform flood source to irradiate a crystal array without the need to locate the interaction positions, and calculates DOI functions based solely on the uniform probability distribution of interactions over DOI positions without knowledge or assumption of detector responses. Simulation and experiment have been studied to validate the new method, and the results show that the new method, with a simple setup and one single measurement, can provide consistent and accurate DOI functions for the entire array of multiple scintillator crystals. This will enable an accurate, simple, and practical DOI function calibration for the PET detectors based on the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout. In

  4. Calibration by precise charge injection of a sub-detector of CMS; Calibration par injection de charge du calorimetre electromagnetique de CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong-Wook Baek

    2001-01-26

    This thesis was carried out within the framework of the international collaboration which has the responsibility of the experience CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) on LHC, at CERN. The physics of the fundamental particles which will be explored by this experiment is described within the standard model. The configuration of sub-detector of CMS is briefly described, with a particular weight on the read-out chain of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The work carried out to calibrate this chain by a precise charge injection at the input of preamplifiers is described. The 4 integrated circuits CTRL, TPLS, DAC, and injector which will constitute the components of this chain of calibration are described. The circuit of injection, which is the main circuit in this project, was imagined and developed at the laboratory in DMILL technology. This injector generates a signal which has a form identical to the signal of the detector. The measurements on the linearity of the injectors are presented. In order to know its behavior under real conditions (flow of neutrons {approx} 2 x 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}/10 years) where this circuit is installed in detector CMS, we submitted the prototypes of injector to irradiation and the results are summarized. The research and development on this circuit produced an integrated circuit hardened to irradiations, whose variation of slope is lower than 0.25% for an integrated of 2 x 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} and indestructible under 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. This circuit has satisfactory qualities to be assembled on the electronic card which will treat the data of calorimeter ECAL of CMS. (author)

  5. Efficiency measurements for 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.d [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN Trento and Universita di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Koehler, Michael; Kuehn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN Trento and Universita di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Silicon strip detectors are widely used as part of the inner tracking layers in particle physics experiments. For applications at the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the sLHC, silicon detectors with extreme radiation hardness are required. The 3D detector design, where electrodes are processed from underneath the strips into the silicon bulk material, provides a way to enhance the radiation tolerance of standard planar silicon strip detectors. Detectors with several innovative 3D designs that constitute a simpler and more cost-effective processing than the 3D design initially proposed were connected to read-out electronics from LHC experiments and subsequently tested. Results on the amount of charge collected, the noise and the uniformity of charge collection are given.

  6. Study on calibration of neutron efficiency and relative photo-yield of plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Taiping; Zhang Chuanfei; Li Rurong; Zhang Jianhua; Luo Xiaobing; Xia Yijun; Yang Zhihua

    2002-01-01

    A method used for the calibration of neutron efficiency and the relative photo yield of plastic scintillator is studied. T(p, n) and D(d, n) reactions are used as neutron resources. The neutron efficiencies and the relative photo yields of plastic scintillators 1421 (40 mm in diameter and 5 mm in thickness) and determined in the neutron energy range of 0.655-5 MeV

  7. Calibration of CR-39 plastic detectors in various modes and radon measurement in the north-western region of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, G.S.; Islam, M.A.; Haque, A.K.F.

    1998-04-01

    Solid State track detectors have been extensively used for the measurement of time integrated radon levels in dwellings under different conditions. The CR-39 plastic detectors were calibrated for bare as well as cup with membrane mode, along with a mono dispersal aerosol 0.2μm in size in an exposure chamber, to find the relationship between track densities and the radon concentration as well as potential alpha energy concentration (WL) of radon. Measurement of the indoor radon and radon daughter concentrations were performed in houses in the north-western region of Bangladesh. In total 163 detectors were placed for measurement of indoor radon activities and 230 detectors for measurement of radon daughter concentrations. To study the underground radon activity, 114 CR-39 detectors in cylinders were used. The indoor radon activity in Naogaon was, in general, found to be higher than that in Rajshahi. The working levels in the mud-built houses were greater than that in brick-built houses. The underground radon activity of Naogaon was found to be 6 times higher than that of Rajshahi. No direct correlation was observed between the underground and indoor radon activity. The average values of radon activity and the working level for the north-western zone of Bangladesh are found to be 91 Bq. m -3 and 16 mWL respectively. (author)

  8. Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R.

    1994-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of 239 Pu, 187 Re, and 238 U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis

  9. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray total counting efficiency for a Phoswich detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcin, S. [Education Faculty, Kastamonu University, 37200 Kastamonu (Turkey)], E-mail: syalcin@kastamonu.edu.tr; Gurler, O. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Gundogdu, O. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); NCCPM, Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Kaynak, G. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    The LB 1000-PW detector is mainly used for determining total alpha, beta and gamma activity of low activity natural sources such as water, soil, air filters and any other environmental sources. Detector efficiency needs to be known in order to measure the absolute activity of such samples. This paper presents results on the total gamma counting efficiency of a Phoswich detector from point and disk sources. The directions of photons emitted from the source were determined by Monte Carlo techniques and the true path lengths in the detector were determined by analytical equations depending on photon directions. Results are tabulated for various gamma energies.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray total counting efficiency for a Phoswich detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcin, S.; Gurler, O.; Gundogdu, O.; Kaynak, G.

    2009-01-01

    The LB 1000-PW detector is mainly used for determining total alpha, beta and gamma activity of low activity natural sources such as water, soil, air filters and any other environmental sources. Detector efficiency needs to be known in order to measure the absolute activity of such samples. This paper presents results on the total gamma counting efficiency of a Phoswich detector from point and disk sources. The directions of photons emitted from the source were determined by Monte Carlo techniques and the true path lengths in the detector were determined by analytical equations depending on photon directions. Results are tabulated for various gamma energies

  12. Gain and offset calibration reduces variation in exposure-dependent SNR among systems with identical digital flat-panel detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Charles E; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y; Lofton, Brad K; White, R Allen

    2011-07-01

    The conditions under which vendor performance criteria for digital radiography systems are obtained do not adequately simulate the conditions of actual clinical imaging with respect to radiographic technique factors, scatter production, and scatter control. Therefore, the relationship between performance under ideal conditions and performance in clinical practice remains unclear. Using data from a large complement of systems in clinical use, the authors sought to develop a method to establish expected performance criteria for digital flat-panel radiography systems with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) versus detector exposure under clinical conditions for thoracic imaging. The authors made radiographic exposures of a patient-equivalent chest phantom at 125 kVp and 180 cm source-to-image distance. The mAs value was modified to produce exposures above and below the mAs delivered by automatic exposure control. Exposures measured free-in-air were corrected to the imaging plane by the inverse square law, by the attenuation factor of the phantom, and by the Bucky factor of the grid for the phantom, geometry, and kilovolt peak. SNR was evaluated as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation (SD) of a region of interest automatically selected in the center of each unprocessed image. Data were acquired from 18 systems, 14 of which were tested both before and after gain and offset calibration. SNR as a function of detector exposure was interpolated using a double logarithmic function to stratify the data into groups of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mR exposure (1.8, 4.5, 9.0, 18, and 45 microGy air KERMA) to the detector. The mean SNR at each exposure interval after calibration exhibited linear dependence on the mean SNR before calibration (r2=0.9999). The dependence was greater than unity (m = 1.101 +/- 0.006), and the difference from unity was statistically significant (p grid replacement. The nonconformant behavior of the other system was corrected by replacing

  13. Determination of efficiency curves for HPGE detector in different counting geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Josianne L.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Ferreira, Andrea V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental results related to determination of efficiency curves for HPGe detector in different counting geometries. The detector is a GX2520 Canberra belonging to CDTN/CNEN. Efficiency curves for punctual were determined by using a certified set of gamma sources. These curves were determined for three counting geometries. Following that, efficiency curves for non punctual samples were determined by using standard solutions of radionuclides in 500 ml and 1000 ml wash bottle Marinelli

  14. The efficiency calibration and development of environmental correction factors for an in situ high-resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. Absolute efficiency calibration of the GSLS was performed using simple cylindrical borehole geometry. The calibration source incorporated naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) that emitted photons ranging from 186-keV to 2,614-keV. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software. A linear relationship was found between increasing source thickness and relative photon fluence rates at the detector. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, relative photon fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Attenuation effects due to iron, water, PVC, and concrete cylindrical shields were found to agree with previous studies. Regression analyses produced energy-dependent equations for efficiency corrections applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs collected under non-standard borehole conditions

  15. Methodology for calibration of detector of NaI (TI)) 3 ' X 3 ' for in vivo measurements of patients with hyperthyroidism undergoing to radioiodotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Carlaine B.; Lacerda, Isabelle V.B.; Oliveira, Mercia L.; Hazin, Clovis A.; Lima, Fabiana F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the methodology for calibration of the detection system to be used in determining the therapeutic activity of 131 I required to release desired absorbed dose in the thyroid gland . This step is critical to the development of a protocol for individualized doses. The system consists of a detector of NaI (Tl ) 3'x3' coupled to software Genie 2000. We used the calibration sources of 60 Co , 137 Cs and 133 Ba. We obtained the straight calibration system, with sources 60 Co and 137 Cs. Subsequently , the detector was calibrated using a thyroid phantom-neck designed and produced by the IRD / CNEN with known activity of 133 Ba standard solution containing 18.7 kBq (on 09/24/12) evenly distributed. He was also calibrated with other thyroid- neck phantom model 3108 manufactured by Searle Radigraphics Ind., containing a liquid source of 131 I ( 7.7 MBq ). Five measurements were performed during 5 minutes for three different distances detector-simulator and calculated the corresponding calibration factors . The values of the calibration factors found for the simulator made by IRD and Searle Radigraphics Ind. for the distances 20, 25 and 30 cm were 0.35 , 0.24, 0.18, 0.15 , 0.11, 0, 09 , respectively. With the detection system properly calibrated and the calibration factors established, the technique is suitable for the evaluation of diagnostic activities of 131 I incorporated by hyperthyroid patients. (author)

  16. Methodology for calibration of detector of Nal (TI) 3 'X 3' for measurements in vivo of patients with hyperthyroidism undergoing radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Carlaine B.; Lacerda, Isabelle V.B.; Oliveira, Mercia L.; Hazin, Clovis A.; Lima, Fabiana F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the methodology for calibration of the detection system to be used in determining the therapeutic activity of 131 I required to release the desired absorbed dose in the thyroid. This step is critical to the development of a protocol for individualized doses. The system consists of a detector of NaI (Tl ) 3 'x3' coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration sources of 60 CO, 137 Cs and 133 Ba were used. Obtained straight calibration system, with 60 CO and 137 Cs sources. Subsequently, the detector was calibrated using a simulator -neck thyroid designed and produced by the IRD/CNEN with known standard solution containing 18.7 kBq 133 Ba activity (in 12/09/24) evenly distributed. He was also calibrated with other thyroid - neck phantom Model 3108 manufactured by Searle Radigraphics Ind., containing a net source of 131 I ( 7.7 MBq ). Five measurements of five minutes were realized for three different distances detector simulator, and the respective calculated calibration factors was performed to three. The values of the calibration factors found for the simulator manufactured by IRD and the Searle Radigraphics Ind. for the distances 20 , 25 and 30cm were 0.35, 0.24, 0.18, and 0.15, 0.11, 0.09, respectively. With the detection system properly calibrated and the calibration factors established, the technique is suitable for the evaluation of diagnostic activity of 131 I incorporated by hyperthyroidism

  17. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  18. The calculation of the detection efficiency in the calibration of gross alpha-beta systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marian Romeo Calin; Ileana Radulescu; Alexandru Erminiu Druker

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a method for efficiency calibration of a measuring alpha-beta system PROTEAN ORTEC, MPC-2000-DP, using standard radioactive sources. The system is used to measure gross alpha-beta activity concentrations in environmental samples. The calculated efficiencies of detection were subsequently introduced in the system for two working geometries: measuring geometry-gross alpha-beta ε α g = 31,37 ± 0.25 (%)-the alpha efficiency and ε β g 44.94 ± 0.69 (%)-the beta efficiency, where the spillover factor is X talk g = 25.59 ± 0.50 (%) and measuring geometry up alpha-beta ε α u 36.23 ± 0.29 (%)-the alpha efficiency and ε β u = 48.53 ± 0.74 (%)-the beta efficiency, where the spillover factor is X talk u 31.08 ± 0.60 (%). (author)

  19. Calibration of the new composite ''clover'' detector as a Compton polarimeter for the EUROGAM array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.; Beck, F.A.; Butler, P.A.; Duchene, G.; France, G. de; Hannachi, F.; Jones, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The application of a composite Ge detector to the measurement of the linear polarisation of γ-rays has been investigated. The polarisation sensitivity of this device has been determined over the energy range 197-1368 keV. Comparison to a previous design of a similar detector has been made. (orig.)

  20. Calibration and Simulation of the GRB trigger detector of the Ultra Fast Flash Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, M.-H.A.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    The UFFO (Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory) is a GRB detector on board the Lomonosov satellite, to be launched in 2013. The GRB trigger is provided by an X-ray detector, called UBAT (UFFO Burst Alarm & Trigger Telescope), which detects X-rays from the GRB and then triggers to determine the direction ...

  1. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Karpf, E.

    1984-01-01

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  2. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  3. Timing calibration of the trigger system for the drift tube detector of the OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkeit, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The OPERA experiment searches for ν μ → ν τ oscillations in an almost pure ν μ beam. The goal is to observe the oscillations in appearance mode by using a large-scale lead/emulsion target to resolve individual ν τ interactions. Magnetic spectrometers measure the charge and momentum of beam induced muons leaving the target sections. The Precision Tracker, a drift tube detector consisting of almost 10000 drift tubes, provides the tracking information inside the spectrometers. The coordinate measurement in the drift tubes is derived from a time measurement relative to an external trigger signal. In order to reach the required momentum resolution of less than 25 % for particle momenta up to 25 GeV, the uncertainty on the trigger timing must not exceed a value of 5 ns. In this thesis, a procedure for the timing calibration of the trigger system is presented. A step-by-step calibration of the corresponding signal paths is described. Applying all calibration results, a spatial resolution of 255 μm is achieved for the Precision Tracker, meeting the specified requirements. Furthermore, a method using the calibrated trigger system for performing time of flight measurements with atmospheric muons is developed. The average error on the measured flight times is ±4.5 ns.

  4. New generation of efficient high resolution detector for 30-100 keV photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund

    between pores. The potential of the structured scintillator is explored through Monte Carlo simulations. A spatial resolution of 1 µm is obtainable and for scintillators with a resolution between 1 µm and 8 µm the efficiency could be more than 15 times higher than a regular scintillator with corresponding...... detector. This establishes an inverse correlation between the spatial resolution and the detection efficiency which limits the performance of existing x-ray detectors. The purpose of this Ph.D. project is to explore alternative paths of research, to develop x-ray detectors for the 30-100 keV energy range...... with single micrometre resolution without compromising efficiency. A number of detector types have been evaluated for this purpose. Structured scintillators are found to exhibit a high potential in terms of performance and also in terms of realizing an actual detector. The structured scintillator consists...

  5. A method to unfold the efficiency of gaseous detectors exposed to broad X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. de; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2000-01-01

    A method to obtain the efficiency of a gaseous detector exposed to broad energy X-ray spectra was developed. It consists in the de-convolution of the integrated detector response using the shapes of those spectra as a tool to unfold the aimed detector efficiency curve. For this purpose, the spectra emitted by a X-ray tube under several anode voltages, were properly characterized through measurements with a NaI(Tl) spectrometer. A Lorentz function was then fitted to each of the spectra, and their parameters expressed as a function of the anode voltage, by using polynomial and gaussian fittings. The integral of the product of each Lorentz function, by another unknown Lorentz function, expressing the detector efficiency curve, represents the response of the detector for each anode tension, e.g., each X-ray spectrum. The symbolical integration of that product, produces a general function containing the unknown parameters of the unknown efficiency curve. A non-linear fitting of this general function, to the detector response points, as experimentally obtained, generates the aimed parameters for the efficiency curve. The final detector efficiency curve is obtained after normalization procedures. (author)

  6. Experimental evaluation of scattered thermal neutrons from various jig materials for use in fixing detectors for the calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Michio

    2000-05-01

    Some jigs to fix detectors are used when radiation measuring instruments are calibrated or reference fluence rates are measured in thermal neutron irradiation fields. In this case, scattered thermal neutrons from the jigs, in particular, which contain hydrogenous materials, may affect the results of the calibration and measurements. In this study, scattered thermal neutrons were measured and calculated to clarify the characteristics of the thermal neutron scattered from various materials which are frequently used for the jigs. A spherical BF 3 -counter of 2-inches in diameter was used in the experiment. Ratios of the fluence of scattered neutrons to primaries (hereinafter, scattering ratio) were evaluated as a function of thickness and size of the materials, as well as the distance from the surface of the materials. The scattering ratios of the jigs that were actually-used in the calibration were also measured in order to select appropriate materials and thickness for the jigs. It was found that the scattering ratios were saturated with increase of thickness and size of the materials. The higher values were observed in the case of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylates) and paraffin since these materials contain more number of hydrogen atoms than the others. The saturated value was obtained 130% for PMMA and paraffin with the thickness of more than 5 cm and the size of 40 cm x 40 cm. The results for the actually-used jigs show that the thinner plate of styrofoam and aluminum reduces the scattering ratio to the value of less than 1%. The obtained data will be useful to improve the accuracy of the calibration of thermal neutron detectors and the measurement of reference fluence rates in thermal neutron irradiation fields. (author)

  7. Experimental evaluation of scattered thermal neutrons from various jig materials for use in fixing detectors for the calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Michio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nemoto, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Koji [Institute of Radiation Measurement, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Some jigs to fix detectors are used when radiation measuring instruments are calibrated or reference fluence rates are measured in thermal neutron irradiation fields. In this case, scattered thermal neutrons from the jigs, in particular, which contain hydrogenous materials, may affect the results of the calibration and measurements. In this study, scattered thermal neutrons were measured and calculated to clarify the characteristics of the thermal neutron scattered from various materials which are frequently used for the jigs. A spherical BF{sub 3}-counter of 2-inches in diameter was used in the experiment. Ratios of the fluence of scattered neutrons to primaries (hereinafter, scattering ratio) were evaluated as a function of thickness and size of the materials, as well as the distance from the surface of the materials. The scattering ratios of the jigs that were actually-used in the calibration were also measured in order to select appropriate materials and thickness for the jigs. It was found that the scattering ratios were saturated with increase of thickness and size of the materials. The higher values were observed in the case of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylates) and paraffin since these materials contain more number of hydrogen atoms than the others. The saturated value was obtained 130% for PMMA and paraffin with the thickness of more than 5 cm and the size of 40 cm x 40 cm. The results for the actually-used jigs show that the thinner plate of styrofoam and aluminum reduces the scattering ratio to the value of less than 1%. The obtained data will be useful to improve the accuracy of the calibration of thermal neutron detectors and the measurement of reference fluence rates in thermal neutron irradiation fields. (author)

  8. Problems related to the use of annihilation radiation for precision energy calibration of Ge(Li) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransson, K.; Nilsson, A.; Raedt, J. de; Rensfelt, K.G.

    1976-03-01

    The energy of positron annihilation radiation emanating from several materials was measured, using recently established energies of the 198 Au and 192 Ir γ-rays for calibration. Corrections for the binding energy of positrons and electrons were applied. A peak fitting routine was used which took into account both the background step under the peak, and the possibility that only a part of the detector contains charge-carrier traps. The electron rest mass energy (corrected for binding energies) could be reproduced to within +- 10 eV, in some well-behaved metals even to within +- 5 eV. (Auth.)

  9. Calibration method of liquid zone controller using the ex-core detector signal of CANDU 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, D.H.; Lee, E.K.; Shin, H.C.; Bae, S.M.; Hong, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a new LZC calibration method and measurement system. ► Photo-neutron effect, reactor core size, and detector position were evaluated and tested. ► We applied the new method and system to Wolsong NPP Unit 1. ► The LZC calibration test was well completed, and the requirement of the test was satisfied. - Abstract: The Phase-B test (low-power reactor physics test) is one of the commissioning tests for Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors that ensures the safe and reliable operation of the core during the design lifetime. The Phase-B test, which includes the approach to the first criticality at low reactor powers, is performed to verify the feasibility of the reactor’s physics design and to ensure the integrity of the control and protection facilities. The commissioning testing of pressurized heavy water moderated reactors (PHWRs) is usually performed only once (at the initial commissioning after construction). The large-scale facilities of the Wolsong nuclear power plant (NPP) Unit 1 have been gradually improved since May 2009 to extend its lifetime. The refurbishment was completed in April 2011 – then this NPP has been in operation again. We discusses the new methodology and measurement system that uses an ex-core detector signal for liquid zone controller (LZC) calibration of the Phase-B test instead of conventional methods. The inverse kinetic equation in the reactivity calculator is modified to treat the 17 delayed neutron groups including 11 photo-neutron fractions. The signal acquisition resolution of the reactivity calculator was enhanced and installed reactivity calculating module by each channel. The ex-core detector was confirmed to be applicable to a large reactor core, such as the CANDU 6 by comparison with the in-core flux detector signal. A preliminary test was performed in Wolsong NPP Unit 2 to verify the robustness of the reactivity calculator. This test convincingly demonstrated that the reactivity calculator

  10. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-01-01

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology

  11. Automatic modeling using PENELOPE of two HPGe detectors used for measurement of environmental samples by γ-spectrometry from a few sets of experimental efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, J. G.; Rubiano, J. G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A. G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M. A.; Tejera, A.; Mosqueda, F.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J. P.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterize two HPGe gamma-ray detectors used in two different laboratories for environmental radioactivity measurements, so as to perform efficiency calibrations by means of Monte Carlo Simulation. To achieve such an aim, methodologies developed in previous papers have been applied, based on the automatic optimization of the model of detector, so that the differences between computational and reference FEPEs are minimized. In this work, such reference FEPEs have been obtained experimentally from several measurements of the IAEA RGU-1 reference material for specific source-detector arrangements. The models of both detectors built through these methodologies have been validated by comparing with experimental results for several reference materials and different measurement geometries, showing deviations below 10% in most cases.

  12. Efficiency of the collection of aerosol detectors used in EDF nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvel, S.; Gensdarmes, F.; Valendru, N.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report an investigation performed to asses the efficiency of different radioactive aerosol detectors by comparing the mass concentration sampled by the tested detectors with the reference mass concentration. The authors describe the measurement installation and protocol, and discuss the results obtained for different grain sizes and different renewal rates

  13. LHCb: Quantum Efficiency of Hybrid Photon Detectors for the LHCb RICH

    CERN Multimedia

    Lambert, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    The production of 550 hybrid photon detectors to be used within the LHCb RICH detectors has recently finished. Photonis-DEP have succeeded in consistently improving the tube quantum efficiency, by a relative 27,% with respect to preseries and prototype tubes, when integrated over the energy spectrum.

  14. Ibis ground calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T.; Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P.; Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E.; Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A.; Quadrini, E.; Volkmer, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system

  15. The use of cosmic-ray muons in the energy calibration of the Beta-decay Paul Trap silicon-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsh, T. Y.; Perez Galvan, A.; Burkey, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.; Clark, J. A.; Gallant, A.; Heckmaier, E.; Levand, A. F.; Savard, G.

    2018-04-01

    This article presents an approach to calibrate the energy response of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) for low-energy nuclear-science experiments by utilizing cosmic-ray muons. For the 1-mm-thick detectors used with the Beta-decay Paul Trap, the minimum-ionizing peak from these muons provides a stable and time-independent in situ calibration point at around 300 keV, which supplements the calibration data obtained above 3 MeV from sources. The muon-data calibration is achieved by comparing experimental spectra with detailed Monte Carlo simulations performed using GEANT4 and CRY codes. This additional information constrains the calibration at lower energies, resulting in improvements in quality and accuracy.

  16. Total and Differential Efficiencies for a Circular Detector Viewing a Circular Radiator of Finite Thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A; Tollander, B

    1967-08-15

    Total and differential detection efficiencies have been computed for a circular detector viewing a circular radiator of finite thickness. Isotropic, cosines and n-p scattering angular emission distributions of the radiated particles are considered. Tables are given for the total efficiencies as well as for the differential efficiencies in the n-p scattering case.

  17. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm 2 cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used to

  18. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, B.P.; Sakas, G.; Stilla, U.; Groch, W.-D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera sel calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not. (author)

  19. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091576

    2016-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{33}$ cm$^2$ s$^1$ and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance ...

  20. Development of a high-count-rate neutron detector with position sensitivity and high efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-01-01

    While the neutron scattering community is bombarded with hints of new technologies that may deliver detectors with high-count-rate capability, high efficiency, gamma-ray insensitivity, and high resolution across large areas, only the time-tested, gas-filled 3 He and scintillation detectors are in widespread use. Future spallation sources with higher fluxes simply must exploit some of the advanced detector schemes that are as yet unproved as production systems. Technologies indicating promise as neutron detectors include pixel arrays of amorphous silicon, silicon microstrips, microstrips with gas, and new scintillation materials. This project sought to study the competing neutron detector technologies and determine which or what combination will lead to a production detector system well suited for use at a high-intensity neutron scattering source

  1. Monte Carlo efficiency calibration of a neutron generator-based total-body irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shypailo, R.J.; Ellis, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    Many body composition measurement systems are calibrated against a single-sized reference phantom. Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) provides the only direct measure of total body nitrogen (TBN), an index of the body's lean tissue mass. In PGNA systems, body size influences neutron flux attenuation, induced gamma signal distribution, and counting efficiency. Thus, calibration based on a single-sized phantom could result in inaccurate TBN values. We used Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP-5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) in order to map a system's response to the range of body weights (65-160 kg) and body fat distributions (25-60%) in obese humans. Calibration curves were constructed to derive body-size correction factors relative to a standard reference phantom, providing customized adjustments to account for differences in body habitus of obese adults. The use of MCNP-generated calibration curves should allow for a better estimate of the true changes in lean tissue mass that many occur during intervention programs focused only on weight loss. (author)

  2. A novel 3D detector configuration enabling high quantum efficiency, low crosstalk, and low output capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurola, A.; Marochkin, V.; Tuuva, T.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of pixelated planar direct conversion semiconductor radiation detectors comprising a thick fully depleted substrate are that they offer low crosstalk, small output capacitance, and that the planar configuration simplifies manufacturing. In order to provide high quantum efficiency for high energy X-rays and Gamma-rays such a radiation detector should be as thick as possible. The maximum thickness and thus the maximum quantum efficiency has been limited by the substrate doping concentration: the lower the substrate doping the thicker the detector can be before reaching the semiconductor material's electric breakdown field. Thick direct conversion semiconductor detectors comprising vertical three-dimensional electrodes protruding through the substrate have been previously proposed by Sherwood Parker in order to promote rapid detection of radiation. An additional advantage of these detectors is that their thickness is not limited by the substrate doping, i.e., the size of the maximum electric field value in the detector does not depend on detector thickness. However, the thicker the substrate of such three dimensional detectors is the larger the output capacitance is and thus the larger the output noise is. In the novel direct conversion pixelated radiation detector utilizing a novel three dimensional semiconductor architecture, which is proposed in this work, the detector thickness is not limited by the substrate doping and the output capacitance is small and does not depend on the detector thickness. In addition, by incorporating an additional node to the novel three-dimensional semiconductor architecture it can be utilized as a high voltage transistor that can deliver current across high voltages. Furthermore, it is possible to connect a voltage difference of any size to the proposed novel three dimensional semiconductor architecture provided that it is thick enough—this is a novel feature that has not been previously possible for semiconductor

  3. Charge collection efficiency in a semiconductor radiation detector with a non-constant electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, K.S.; Lund, J.C.; Olschner, F.

    1990-01-01

    The development of improved semiconductor radiation detectors would be facilitated by a quantitative model that predicts the performance of these detectors as a function of material characteristics and device operating parameters. An accurate prediction of the pulse height spectrum from a radiation detector can be made if both the noise and the charge collection properties of the detector are understood. The noise characteristics of semiconductor radiation detectors have been extensively studied. The effect of noise can be closely simulated by convoluting the noise-free pulse height spectrum with a Gaussian function. Distortion of semiconductor detector's pulse height spectrum from charge collection effects is more complex than the effects of noise and is more difficult to predict. To compute these distortions it is necessary to know how the charge collection efficiency η varies as a function of position within the detector x. These effects are shown. This problem has been previously solved for planar detectors with a constant electric field, for the case of spherical detectors, and for coaxial detectors. In this paper the authors describe a more general solution to the charge collection problem which includes the case of a non-constant electric field in a planar geometry

  4. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Pierre Auger fluorescence detector. Cross-checking the absolute calibration using a drone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomankova, Lenka [Institute for Nuclear Physics (IKP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre-Auger-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory combines the air shower fluorescence and surface array methods to study ultra-high energy cosmic rays. As the energy scale of the experiment is derived from calorimetric measurements by the fluorescence telescopes, their accurate calibration is of primary importance to all Auger data. We discuss a novel calibration method based on a remotely flown drone equipped with a specially designed light source that mimics a snapshot of an air shower traversing the atmosphere. Several drone measurement campaigns have been performed to study the properties of the Auger fluorescence telescopes and to derive an end-to-end calibration. We give an overview of the measurements and present the basic analysis chain as well as the first results of an independent cross-check of the Auger energy scale.

  6. Low energy response calibration of the BATSE large area detectors onboard the Compton Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, C.E. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Kentucky University, Moore 351, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475-3124 (United States)]. E-mail: Chris.Laird@eku.edu; Harmon, B.A. [XD12 NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Wilson, Colleen A. [XD12 NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Hunter, David [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Kentucky University, Moore 351, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475-3124 (United States); Isaacs, Jason [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Kentucky University, Moore 351, 521 Lancaster Avenue, Richmond, KY 40475-3124 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The low-energy attenuation of the covering material of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) large area detectors (LADs) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory as well as the small-angle response of the LADs have been studied. These effects are shown to be more significant than previously assumed. The LAD entrance window included layers of an aluminum-epoxy composite (hexel) that acted as a collimator for the lowest energy photons entering the detector just above threshold (20-50 keV). Simplifying assumptions made concerning the entrance window materials and the angular response at incident angles near normal to the detector face in the original BATSE response matrix formalism had little effect on {gamma}-ray burst measurements; however, these assumptions created serious errors in measured fluxes of galactic sources, whose emission is strongest near the LAD energy threshold. Careful measurements of the angular and low-energy dependence of the attenuation due to the hexel plates only partially improved the response. A systematic study of Crab Nebula spectra showed the need for additional corrections: an angular-dependent correction for all detectors and an angular-independent correction for each detector. These corrections have been applied as part of an overall energy and angular-dependent correction to the BATSE response matrices.

  7. A novel PET camera calibration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yerian, K.; Hartz, R.K.; Gaeta, J.M.; Marani, S.; Wong, W.H.; Bristow, D.; Mullani, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reconstructed time-of-flight PET images must be corrected for differences in the sensitivity of detector pairs, variations in the TOF gain between groups of detector pairs, and for shifts in the detector-pair timing windows. These calibration values are measured for each detector-pair coincidence line using a positron emitting ring source. The quality of the measured value for a detector pair depends on its statistics. To improve statistics, algorithms are developed which derive individual detector calibration values for efficiency, TOF offsets, and TOF fwhm from the raw detector-pair measurements. For the author's current TOFPET system there are 162,000 detector pairs which are reduced to 720 individual detector values. The data for individual detectors are subsequently recombined, improving the statistical quality of the resultant detector-pair values. In addition, storage requirements are significantly reduced by saving the individual detector values. These parameters are automatically evaluated on a routine basis and problem detectors reported for adjustment or replacement. Decomposing the detector-pair measurements into individual detector values significantly improves the calibration values used to correct camera artifacts in PET imaging

  8. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C G; Fiksel, G; Stoeckl, C; Sinenian, N; Canfield, M J; Graeper, G B; Lombardo, A T; Stillman, C R; Padalino, S J; Mileham, C; Sangster, T C; Frenje, J A

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.

  9. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, C. G.; Canfield, M. J.; Graeper, G. B.; Lombardo, A. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Padalino, S. J. [Physics Department, SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, New York 14454 (United States); Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.

  10. A Fast Calibration System for SiPM Based Scintillator HCAL Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Polak, I

    2015-01-01

    with mid-range a fixed-intensity light pulse. The full SiPM response function is cross-checked by varying the light intensity from zero to the saturation level. In calibration systems we developed, we concentrate especially on the aspect a high dynamic range of pre...

  11. A standard 9MeV γ beam for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troesch-Lasseur, G.; Bermann, F.; Gaulard, M.

    1975-01-01

    A γ capture irradiation device with beam extraction is being developed at Triton. The mean energy in the beam is 9MeV. The beam intensity has been determined from absorbed dose measurements according to ICRU specifications. The maximum dose rate taken as calibration standard is 125+-9rad/h [fr

  12. Note: Fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia,Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania, Italy and INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 42, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed.

  13. Calibration of the ALICE transition radiation detector and a study of Z{sup 0} and heavy quark production in pp colissions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailhache, Raphaelle

    2009-01-28

    The ALICE Experiment is one of the four experiments installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). One of its detector-systems, the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), is a gas detector designed for electron identification and charged particle tracking. The charged particle ionizes the gas along its path and electrons drift in an uniform field of 700 V/cm over 3 cm before being amplified. We implemented procedures to calibrate the drift velocity of the electrons, the time-offset of the signal, the amplification factor and the width of the Pad Response Function (PDF) characterizing the sharing of the deposited charge over adjacent pads. Physics events (pp and PbPb collisions) will be used. The performances of the algorithms were tested on simulated pp collisions at {radical}(s)=14 TeV and on first real data taken with cosmic-rays in the ALICE setup. The calibration software was installed on the Data Acquisition System at CERN and executed continuously during the cosmic-ray data taking in 2008, providing a first determination of the calibration constants. This thesis presents also a study on the capability of the ALICE central barrel to detect the Z{sup 0} boson through the decay Z{sup 0}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} in pp collisions at 14 TeV. We demonstrated that the Z{sup 0}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} is characterized by a very clean signal in the dielectron reconstructed invariant mass spectrum. At such high transverse momentum (about 45 GeV/c), the electrons from Z{sup 0} are identified with the Transition Radiation Detector. The remaining background from misidentified pions and electrons from heavy-flavored decays are rejected by the requirement of two isolated reconstructed tracks. The main challenge comes from the very small production rate. Therefore we estimated the efficiency of a trigger based on a low p{sub T} cut and electron identification with the TRD and showed that about 100 Z{sup 0}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} can be reconstructed per year employing such a

  14. Calibration of the ALICE transition radiation detector and a study of Z0 and heavy quark production in pp collisions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailhache, Raphaelle

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE Experiment is one of the four experiments installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). One of its detector-systems, the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), is a gas detector designed for electron identification and charged particle tracking. The charged particle ionizes the gas along its path and electrons drift in an uniform field of 700 V/cm over 3 cm before being amplified. We implemented procedures to calibrate the drift velocity of the electrons, the time-offset of the signal, the amplification factor and the width of the Pad Response Function (PDF) characterizing the sharing of the deposited charge over adjacent pads. Physics events (pp and PbPb collisions) will be used. The performances of the algorithms were tested on simulated pp collisions at √(s)=14 TeV and on first real data taken with cosmic-rays in the ALICE setup. The calibration software was installed on the Data Acquisition System at CERN and executed continuously during the cosmic-ray data taking in 2008, providing a first determination of the calibration constants. This thesis presents also a study on the capability of the ALICE central barrel to detect the Z 0 boson through the decay Z 0 →e + e - in pp collisions at 14 TeV. We demonstrated that the Z 0 →e + e - is characterized by a very clean signal in the dielectron reconstructed invariant mass spectrum. At such high transverse momentum (about 45 GeV/c), the electrons from Z 0 are identified with the Transition Radiation Detector. The remaining background from misidentified pions and electrons from heavy-flavored decays are rejected by the requirement of two isolated reconstructed tracks. The main challenge comes from the very small production rate. Therefore we estimated the efficiency of a trigger based on a low p T cut and electron identification with the TRD and showed that about 100 Z 0 →e + e - can be reconstructed per year employing such a trigger. Another physics topics investigated in this thesis is the measurement

  15. Determination of absolute detection efficiencies for detectors of interest in homeland security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    The absolute total and absolute peak detection efficiencies of gamma ray detector materials NaI:Tl, CdZnTe, HPGe, HPXe, LaBr 3 :Ce and LaCl 3 :Ce were simulated and compared to that of polyvinyltoluene (PVT). The dimensions of the PVT detector were 188.82 cmx60.96 cmx5.08 cm, which is a typical size for a single-panel portal monitor. The absolute total and peak detection efficiencies for these detector materials for the point, line and spherical source geometries of 60 Co (1332 keV), 137 Cs (662 keV) and 241 Am (59.5 keV) were simulated at various source-to-detector distances using the Monte Carlo N-Particle software (MCNP5-V1.30). The comparison of the absolute total detection efficiencies for a point, line and spherical source geometry of 60 Co and 137 Cs at different source-to-detector distance showed that the absolute detection efficiency for PVT is higher relative to the other detectors of typical dimensions for that material. However, the absolute peak detection efficiency of some of these detectors are higher relative to PVT, for example the absolute peak detection efficiency of NaI:Tl (7.62 cm diameterx7.62 cm long), HPGe (7.62 cm diameterx7.62 cm long), HPXe (11.43 cm diameterx60.96 cm long), and LaCl 3 :Ce (5.08 cm diameterx5.08 cm long) are all greater than that of a 188.82 cmx60.96 cmx5.08 cm PVT detector for 60 Co and 137 Cs for all geometries studied. The absolute total and absolute peak detection efficiencies of a right circular cylinder of NaI:Tl with various diameters and thicknesses were determined for a point source. The effect of changing the solid angle on the NaI:Tl detectors showed that with increasing solid angle and detector thickness, the absolute efficiency increases. This work establishes a common basis for differentiating detector materials for passive portal monitoring of gamma ray radiation

  16. An optical test bench for the precision characterization of absolute quantum efficiency for the TESS CCD detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright stars with Ic ∼< 13. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2018 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission, and is expected to discover a thousand or more planets that are smaller in size than Neptune. TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with a band-pass of 650 nm–1050 nm to detect temporary drops in brightness of stars due to planetary transits. The 1050 nm limit is set by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the CCDs. The detector assembly consists of four back-illuminated MIT Lincoln Laboratory CCID-80 devices. Each CCID-80 device consists of 2048×2048 imaging array and 2048×2048 frame store regions. Very precise on-ground calibration and characterization of CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data obtained in space. The characterization of the absolute QE of the CCD detectors is a crucial part of the characterization process because QE affects the performance of the CCD significantly over the redder wavelengths at which TESS will be operating. An optical test bench with significantly high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise QE measurements. The design of the test setup along with key hardware, methodology, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  17. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 4 (2014), "041113-1"-"041113-4" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon- number resolving detector * twin beams * photon fields Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  18. CALIBRATION OF MODIFIED LIULIN DETECTOR FOR COSMIC RADIATION MEASUREMENTS ON-BOARD AIRCRAFT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselová, Dagmar; Ambrožová, Iva; Krist, Pavel; Kubančák, Ján; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Ploc, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 489-492 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Liulin detector * on-board aircraft * cosmic radiation measurement Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  19. Spatially uniform calibration of a liquid xenon detector at low energies using Kr-83m

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Askin, A.; Baudis, L.; Behrens, A.; Ferella, A.D.; Kish, A.; Lebeda, Ondřej; Santorelli, R.; Vénos, Drahoslav; Vollhardt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2010), 073303/1-073303/8 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA318; GA MŠk LC07050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : DARK -MATTER DETECTOR * NUCLEAR RECOIL * ARGON Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010

  20. Update of X ray and gamma ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. V. 2: Data selection, assessment and evaluation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    Various factors such as source preparation and source detector geometry may affect the quality of measurements made with intrinsic germanium and other γ ray spectrometers. However, the accuracy of such measurements invariably depends on the accuracy of the efficiency versus energy calibration curve and hence on the accuracy of the decay data for the radionuclides from which calibration standard sources are prepared. Both half-lives and X and γ ray emission probabilities need to be known to good accuracy. The recommendations and report of this work are published in two volumes: Volume 1 - Recommended Decay Data, High Energy Gamma Ray Standards and Angular Correlation Coefficients; Volume 2 - Data Selection, Assessment and Evaluation Procedures. Volume 1 is a self-contained assembly of the recommended decay data covering half-lives and the X ray and γ ray emission probabilities of the selected radionuclides, and listings of various high energy γ ray standards and a set of angular correlation coefficients; these data are presented in a concise manner for rapid and easy access. More detailed technical features of the CRP are described in Volume 2, including the evaluation procedures adopted and extensive traceable explanations of the origins of the nuclear data used to produce the recommended values listed in Volume 1. This detail was judged to be essential in order to record and demonstrate the quality of the resulting data files and allow the reader to trace the origins of the nuclear data used to determine the recommended values. All evaluations were based on the available experimental data, supplemented with the judicious use of well established theory. Three types of data (half-lives, energies and emission probabilities) were compiled and evaluated (Annex II). Consideration was also given to the adoption of a number of prompt high energy γ rays from specific nuclear reactions (Annex III), as well as to using the γ-γ coincidence technique for efficiency

  1. A method for the determination of counting efficiencies in γ-spectrometric measurements with HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Leon, M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a general method for γ-ray efficiency calibration is presented. The method takes into account the differences of densities and counting geometry between the real sample and the calibration sample. It is based on the γ-transmission method and gives the correction factor f as a function of E γ , the density and counting geometry. Altough developed for soil samples, its underlying working philosophy is useful for any sample whose geometry can be adequately reproduced. (orig.)

  2. Characterization and determination of efficiency of GM detectors for KCl standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priyal, M.R.; Thilagam, L.; Mohapatra, D.K.

    2018-01-01

    Characterization of Geiger Muller (GM) based beta counters are carried out to determine the main parameters such as plateau slope and efficiency for various slit locations 1 to 10, that are available to keep the sources at different distances away from the detector. Additionally, the disc shaped potassium chloride (KCl) beta standards of various 40 K activities are prepared with variable mass and estimated for the efficiencies of GM tube detectors. The activity of 40K, the counts per second and the efficiency of GM tubes are studied as a function of mass of KCl standards

  3. Efficiency Calibration of Phantom Family for Use in Direct Bioassay of Radionuclide in the Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Seok; Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Hyun Ki; Park, Gyung Deok; Lee, Jai Ki

    2008-01-01

    A major source of uncertainties of in vivo bioassay using a whole body counter calibrated against a body phantom containing known radioactivities is variation of counting geometry caused by the differences in body size of the subject from that of the phantom. Phantoms such as the BOMAB phantom are based on the body size of the reference man and usually single phantom is used in usual calibration of the counter. This is because it is difficult to apply a set of phantoms having different sizes. In order to reduce the potential errors due to variation of counting geometry, use of a set of phantoms having different body-shapes have been attempted. The efficiency files are stored in the computer analyzing the measurement data and a suitable one is retrieved for the specific subject. Experimental or computational approach can be employed in generation of the efficiency files. Carlan et al. demonstrated that Monte Carlo simulations can provide acceptable efficiencies by use of the IGOR phantom family. The body size of the individual subject undergoing in vivo bioassay should be determined by an appropriate method

  4. Quasi-Resonant Absorption for Quantum Efficiency Improvement in Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quasi-resonant absorption has been demonstrated to enhance the quantum efficiency of devices across the spectrum, but specifically it is a challenge in the UV...

  5. Design study of the precision optical calibration module for the PINGU detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenkamp, Joost; Krings, Kai [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department, Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) will measure atmospheric neutrinos with a threshold of a few GeV. The primary goal for this extension is to determine the Neutrino mass hierarchy. A new level of precision is needed in order to reach this. The calibration of the DOM's is an important aspect in raising the precision to the needed level. A better calibration system will enable a better understanding of the ice and will therefore significantly reduce systematic effects. We present the Precision Optical Calibration Module (POCAM). By keeping the outer topology identical to that of the DOM, cost effective construction and deployment is ensured. The design of the POCAM is based on the principle of the integrating sphere. An appropriately placed LED in combination with a diffusive layer on the inside of the sphere results in an isotropic light emission from the apertures in the spherical housing. The output of the LED is controllable and known to high precision, it therefore ensures control over the output from the apertures. We report on the first investigations.

  6. Large R jet reconstruction and calibration at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Taenzer, Joe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Large-R jets are used by many ATLAS analyses working in boosted regimes. ATLAS Large-R jets are reconstructed from locally callibrated calorimeter topoclusters with the Anti-k_{t} algorithm with radius parameter R=1.0, and then groomed to remove pile-up with the trimming algorithm with f_{cut} 0.05 and subjet radius R=0.2. Monte Carlo based energy and mass calibrations correct the reconstructed jet energy and mass to truth, followed by in-situ calibrations using a number of different techniques. Large-R jets can also be reconstructed using small-R jets as constituents, instead of topoclusters, a technique called jet reclustering, or from track calo clusters (TCCs), which are constituents constructed using both tracking and calorimeter information. An overview of large-R jet reconstruction will be presented here, along with selected results from the jet mass calibrations, both Monte Carlo based an insitu, from jet reclustering, and from track calo clusters.

  7. Report on the consultants' meeting on preparation of the proposal for a coordinated research project to update X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.; Herman, M.

    1998-05-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section has been charged by the International Nuclear Data Committee to consider the establishment of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to update the IAEA database of X-ray and γ-ray Standards for Detector Calibration. This CRP should re-define the radionuclides most suited for detector calibration, extending applications to safeguards, materials analysis, environmental monitoring, and medical use. This document is a report on the Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA, Vienna, between 24-25 November 1997 to assess the current needs, re-define the most suitable radionuclides, and advise the IAEA Nuclear Data Section on the need and form of such a CRP

  8. submitter Muon trigger efficiency of the ATLAS Detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gallus, Petr

    The diploma thesis is devoted to the study of the muon trigger efficiency performance in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC collider. It contains measurements of efficiency of muon triggers of Level 1 and Level 2. Level 1 (LVL1) trigger efficiency of L1 MU20 and L1 2MU20 triggers is measured using Monte-Carlo simulated events. For Level 2 the efficiency of MuFast trigger is analysed in relation to the LVL1 decision. In both examples it is shown that the trigger efficiency depends on the detector geometry and transversal momentum pT of muons. Key words: ATLAS, LHC, trigger

  9. Design of a software for gamma detector efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopy with highly-pure-germanium detector is one of the most used method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples. Nevertheless Gamma spectroscopy results require to be corrected, first for taking into account the self-shielding effect that represents the absorption of the photons by the sample itself and secondly for correcting the fact that 2 photons emitted simultaneously with energy E 1 and E 2 are likely to be simultaneously detected and then counted as a single photon with an energy E 1 +E 2 . This effect is called gamma-gamma coincidence. A software has been designed to simulate both effect and produce correcting factors in the case of cylindrical geometries. This software has been validated on Americium 241 for the self-shielding effect and on Cesium 134 for gamma-gamma coincidence. (A.C.)

  10. Determination of the detection efficiency of a HPGe detector by means of the MCNP 4A simulation code; Determinacion de la eficiencia de deteccion de un detector HPGe mediante el codigo de simulacion MCNP 4A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, B. [Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, A.P. 579C, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In the majority of the laboratories, the calibration in efficiency of the detector is carried out by means of the standard sources measurement of gamma photons that have a determined activity, or for matrices that contain a variety of radionuclides that can embrace the energy range of interest. Given the experimental importance that has the determination from the curves of efficiency to the effects of establishing the quantitative results, is appealed to the simulation of the response function of the detector used in the Regional Center of Nuclear Studies inside the energy range of 80 keV to 1400 keV varying the density of the matrix, by means of the application of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The adjustment obtained shows an acceptance grade in the range of 100 to 600 keV, with a smaller percentage discrepancy to 5%. (Author)

  11. Optimization, Synchronization, Calibration and Diagnostic of the RPC PAC Muon Trigger System for the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bunkowski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid is one of the four experiments that will analyse the results of the collisions of the protons accelerated by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The collisions of proton bunches occur in the middle of the CMS detector every 25 ns, i.e. with a frequency of 40 MHz. Such a high collision frequency is needed because the probability of interesting processes, which we hope to discover at the LHC (such as production of Higgs bosons or supersymmetric particles) is very small. The objects that are the results of the proton-proton collisions are detected and measured by the CMS detector. Out of each bunch crossing the CMS produces about 1 MB of data; 40 millions of bunch collisions per second give the data stream of 40 terabytes (1013) per second. Such a stream of data is practically not possible to record on mass storage, therefore the first stage of the analysis of the detector data is performed in real time by the dedicated trigger system. Its task is to select potentially interesting events (...

  12. Efficiency calibration of electron spectrometers by the help of standard spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.; Cserny, I.; Varga, D.; Koever, I.; Toekesi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. For studying thin films and surface nanostructures quantitative analytical applications of electron spectroscopic techniques have a great importance. The most frequently used techniques are XPS, XAES and AES in quantitative surface electron spectroscopy. Applying these techniques changes in the detection efficiency vs. electron kinetic energy change the measured electron peak intensity ratios and in this way the neglect of the energy dependence of the spectrometer efficiency can influence surface atomic concentrations derived. The importance of the precise determination of the atomic concentrations is very crucial, especially in the determination of non-destructive depth profiles by the help of AR-XPS in which small changes in the relative concentrations can change dramatically the concentration depth profiles of a few nanometer depth ranges. In the present study the REELS technique was used to determine the relative detection efficiency by the help of a standard spectrum measured on the surface of fine microcrystalline Cu specimen. The experimental relative efficiency curves vs. electron kinetic energy were compared to the calculated efficiency curve. The efficiency calibration is discussed from the point of view of quantitative XPS, AR- XPS, AES and from the point of view of IMFP determination by XPS. The work was supported by the Hungarian National Science Foundation, OTKAT038016. For the Cu specimen and the standard spectrum the authors are indebted to the Sur- face Analysis Society of Japan, to Dr. Shigeo Tanuma and Professor Keisuke Goto (NIT). (author)

  13. Spectral calibration of filters and detectors of solar EUV telescope for 13.2 nm for the TESIS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, S.V.; Shestov, S.V.; Pertsov, A.A.; Reva, A.A.; Zuev, S.Yu.; Lopatin, A.Ya.; Luchin, V.I.; Zhou, Kh.; Khuo, T.

    2008-01-01

    The full-sun EUV telescope for 13.2 nm spectral band for the TESIS experiment is designed to produce images of hot coronal plasma (T ∼ 10 MK). Calibration process of optical elements is presented. Spectral transmission of multilayer Zr/Si filters, sensitivity and radiation tolerance of CCD detector have been measured. Peak transmission of EUV filters in working, spectral band reaches 40-50% (filters with 50 and 55 layers are used), spectral dependence of transmission is close to calculated one. Transmission of filters in white light is equal to (1-2)x10 -6 . Sensitivity of CCD ranges from 0.01 to 0.1 ADC units per photon, radiation tolerance is better than 10 9 rad [ru

  14. Calculation of the relative efficiency of thermoluminescent detectors to space radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilski, P.

    2011-01-01

    Thermoluminescent (TL) detectors are often used for measurements of radiation doses in space. While space radiation is composed of a mixture of heavy charged particles, the relative TL efficiency depends on ionization density. The question therefore arises: what is the relative efficiency of TLDs to the radiation present in space? In the attempt to answer this question, the relative TL efficiency of two types of lithium fluoride detectors for space radiation has been calculated, based on the theoretical space spectra and the experimental values of TL efficiency to ion beams. The TL efficiency of LiF:Mg,Ti detectors for radiation encountered at typical low-Earth’s orbit was found to be close to unity, justifying a common application of these TLDs to space dosimetry. The TL efficiency of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors is significantly lower. It was found that a shielding may have a significant influence on the relative response of TLDs, due to changes caused in the radiation spectrum. In case of application of TLDs outside the Earth’s magnetosphere, one should expect lower relative efficiency than at the low-Earth’s orbit.

  15. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  16. Determination of the germanium detector efficiency for measurements of the radionuclide activity contained in a radioactive waste drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, S.; Ballester, S.; Hoyler, F.

    2006-01-01

    One of the features in the characterization of a drum containing radioactive wastes is to verify the activity of radionuclides contained in the drum. An H.P. Ge detector can be used for this measurement. However, it is necessary to perform an efficiency calibration for all geometries involved. In the framework of a joint project between the Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Spain) and the Fachbereich Angewandte Naturwissenschaften und Technik (Fachhochschule Aachen, Abteilung Julich, Germany), different configurations for a drum containing radioactive sources have been implemented in the laboratory. A cylindrical drum of 850 mm height, a diameter equal to 560 mm and 3 mm of steel thickness has been used in the experimental measurements. The drum contains a clay ceramic matrix whose chemical composition is 55% SiO 2 , 40% of Al 2 O 3 and 5% of TiO 2 . Several vertical PVC tubes having a diameter of 30 mm are inserted in the drum at different distances from the central axis. In the experiment, a pack of point sources with 133 Ba, 60 Co and 137 Cs is introduced into each one of the tubes. A ring-shape distributed source is generated by rotating the drum around its axis during the measurement. The detector efficiency is determined experimentally for these configurations. On the other hand, a Monte Carlo model, using the M.C.N.P. code, has been developed to simulate the drum, the clay matrix and the PVC tubes. The effect of the drum spinning has been reproduced simulating a ring source with different diameters. The model also includes detailed detector geometry. Using this Monte Carlo model, the detector efficiency is calculated for each configuration implemented in the laboratory. Comparison of results from Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurements should permit the validation of the M.C.N.P. model. Consequently it will be possible to obtain efficiency curves without experimental measurements. Therefore, these

  17. Energy Calibration of a Silicon-Strip Detector for Photon-Counting Spectral CT by Direct Usage of the X-ray Tube Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats; Karlsson, Staffan; Persson, Mats; Xu, Cheng; Huber, Ben

    2015-02-01

    The variation among energy thresholds in a multibin detector for photon-counting spectral CT can lead to ring artefacts in the reconstructed images. Calibration of the energy thresholds can be used to achieve homogeneous threshold settings or to develop compensation methods to reduce the artefacts. We have developed an energy-calibration method for the different comparator thresholds employed in a photon-counting silicon-strip detector. In our case, this corresponds to specifying the linear relation between the threshold positions in units of mV and the actual deposited photon energies in units of keV. This relation is determined by gain and offset values that differ for different detector channels due to variations in the manufacturing process. Typically, the calibration is accomplished by correlating the peak positions of obtained pulse-height spectra to known photon energies, e.g. with the aid of mono-energetic x rays from synchrotron radiation, radioactive isotopes or fluorescence materials. Instead of mono-energetic x rays, the calibration method presented in this paper makes use of a broad x-ray spectrum provided by commercial x-ray tubes. Gain and offset as the calibration parameters are obtained by a regression analysis that adjusts a simulated spectrum of deposited energies to a measured pulse-height spectrum. Besides the basic photon interactions such as Rayleigh scattering, Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption, the simulation takes into account the effect of pulse pileup, charge sharing and the electronic noise of the detector channels. We verify the method for different detector channels with the aid of a table-top setup, where we find the uncertainty of the keV-value of a calibrated threshold to be between 0.1 and 0.2 keV.

  18. Studies for a top quark mass measurement and development of a jet energy calibration with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantsch, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a new jet energy calibration method as well as studies for a top quark mass measurement with the ATLAS detector are presented. The new calibration method considers jet shape variables in order to improve the linearity and resolution of the jet energy response. Promising results are shown for jet events from Monte Carlo simulation as well as from first √(s)=900 GeV proton-proton collision data of the Large Hadron Collider. In addition, Monte Carlo studies for a top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets decay channel of top quark pair events are performed. Several top quark reconstruction methods are investigated in pseudo-experiments which are equivalent to an integrated luminosity of L=200 pb -1 at √(s)=10 TeV. Assuming a generated top quark mass of m t gen =172.5 GeV, the most promising result is achieved with the Max-p T reconstruction method which returns a top quark mass of m Max-p T t,el-channel =170.4±2.2 vertical stroke stat. ± 8.8 vertical stroke syst. GeV in the electron plus jets decay channel including a bias correction of +5.2 GeV for the central top quark mass value.

  19. Studies for a top quark mass measurement and development of a jet energy calibration with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantsch, Andreas

    2012-06-11

    In this thesis, the development of a new jet energy calibration method as well as studies for a top quark mass measurement with the ATLAS detector are presented. The new calibration method considers jet shape variables in order to improve the linearity and resolution of the jet energy response. Promising results are shown for jet events from Monte Carlo simulation as well as from first {radical}(s)=900 GeV proton-proton collision data of the Large Hadron Collider. In addition, Monte Carlo studies for a top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets decay channel of top quark pair events are performed. Several top quark reconstruction methods are investigated in pseudo-experiments which are equivalent to an integrated luminosity of L=200 pb{sup -1} at {radical}(s)=10 TeV. Assuming a generated top quark mass of m{sub t}{sup gen}=172.5 GeV, the most promising result is achieved with the Max-p{sub T} reconstruction method which returns a top quark mass of m{sup Max-p{sub Tt,el-channel}}=170.4{+-}2.2 vertical stroke {sub stat.}{+-} 8.8 vertical stroke {sub syst.} GeV in the electron plus jets decay channel including a bias correction of +5.2 GeV for the central top quark mass value.

  20. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176 Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176 Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  1. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  2. Photometric Calibration of the Barium Cloud Image in a Space Active Experiment: Determining the Release Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Liang-Hai; Li Lei; Wang Jing-Dong; Tao Ran; Cheng Bing-Jun; Zhang Yi-Teng

    2014-01-01

    The barium release experiment is an effective method to explore the near-earth environment and to study all kinds of space physics processes. The first space barium release experiment in China was successfully carried out by a sounding rocket on April 5, 2013. This work is devoted to calculating the release efficiency of the barium release by analyzing the optical image observed during the experiment. First, we present a method to calibrate the images grey value of barium cloud with the reference stars to obtain the radiant fluxes at different moments. Then the release efficiency is obtained by a curve fitting with the theoretical evolution model of barium cloud. The calculated result is basically consistent with the test value on ground

  3. Calibration and GEANT4 Simulations of the Phase II Proton Compute Tomography (pCT) Range Stack Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Boi, S. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Francis, K. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Kalnins, J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Ford, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rauch, J. E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rubinov, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sellberg, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wilson, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Naimuddin, M. [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2015-12-29

    Northern Illinois University in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Delhi University has been designing and building a proton CT scanner for applications in proton treatment planning. The Phase II proton CT scanner consists of eight planes of tracking detectors with two X and two Y coordinate measurements both before and after the patient. In addition, a range stack detector consisting of a stack of thin scintillator tiles, arranged in twelve eight-tile frames, is used to determine the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of each track through the patient. The X-Y coordinates and WEPL are required input for image reconstruction software to find the relative (proton) stopping powers (RSP) value of each voxel in the patient and generate a corresponding 3D image. In this Note we describe tests conducted in 2015 at the proton beam at the Central DuPage Hospital in Warrenville, IL, focusing on the range stack calibration procedure and comparisons with the GEANT~4 range stack simulation.

  4. Search for supersymmetry in the fully hadronic channel and jet calibration with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00436210

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a very precise model describing the elementary particles and their interactions. However, some issues lead physicists to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Supersymmetry is an extension of the Standard Model providing solutions to the current issues. In this thesis, results are obtained using the data collected in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC (CERN). The thesis is based in two parts: The first part is a performance analysis improving the energy measurement of high energy objects called "jets". They are generated by the hadronization of quarks and gluons in the detector via the strong nuclear interaction. My contribution is the last step of the the reconstruction and calibration chain and is fully based on data. The method uses the very precise measurement of the photon energy, and provides corrections to the jet energy scale. My contribution consists in set-up the method, estimate the corrections, measure the jet energy scale and evalua...

  5. Correcting Detector Efficiency Effects in Event-by-Event Net-Proton Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of fluctuations of conserved quantities give valuable information on the susceptibilities of the nuclear matter produced in a heavy-ion collision, and could in principle be used to distinguish QGP from hadronic matter. However, measurements of the cumulants of conserved-quantity distributions are affected by the detector efficiency, which must be accounted for in order to ensure accuracy. Following the development of a toy model that simulates detector efficiency effects on net-proton number, various correction methods, including those developed by A. Bzdak and V. Koch, were implemented and tested in a wide range of conditions. We find that the first four cumulants of net-proton-number distribution can be accurately reproduced by the Koch-Bzdak corrections with reasonable input statistics. Various methods of correcting for $p_T$ dependence of detector efficiency are also explored.

  6. Influence of the geometrical characteristics of an HpGe detector on its efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M.J.; Timon, A.F.; Sanchez, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    Computer codes based on Monte Carlo calculations have been extensively developed for the computation of the efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry. The errors in the specific parameters of the detector due to the lack of precise knowledge of its characteristics usually represent one of the most important sources of inaccuracy in this simulation technique. Influence of several detector parameters on the efficiency for a typical coaxial n-type HpGe detector is presented. Calculations of the full-energy peak efficiencies were performed by means of a Monte Carlo code in the range 122-1836 keV for several types of source configuration: point source, cellulose filter, and two different cylindrical boxes containing a solid matrix of SiO 2 . The detector parameters varied were the crystal diameter, crystal height, diameter of the internal core, and the position of the crystal with respect to the beryllium window. Significant deviations in the efficiency, depending on the source geometry and the photon energy, can be produced by varying only slightly some of the detector parameters. (author)

  7. Manufacturing of different gel detectors and their calibration for spatial radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.

    2008-05-01

    Three types of gel dosemeter have been made and their most important properties for radiation dosimetry were studied. The comparison between the three categories helps to widen knowledge in each of these detectors and to establish a method for the preparation as well as testing of this radiation sensitive materials. Experiments show the technical application possibility for using these gel detectors to measure the spatial radiation dose distribution in the range of doses given for cancer treatment. The experimental results give some important characteristic for the three gel dosemeter used in comparison to that of the traditional dosimetry systems. It also shows the simplicity of manufacturing the dosemeter from low cost materials and its radiation response to ionizing. The relationships between the dosemeter response and the dose rate as well as the radiation energy were also investigated. Important subjects that have been also taken into consideration are the effects of ambient conditions and storage likelihood of the studied materials. Recommendation was made for the use of these materials in practical applications and for handling as well as their long term storage possibility. (author)

  8. More efficient evolutionary strategies for model calibration with watershed model for demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, J. S.; Skahill, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    Evolutionary strategies allow automatic calibration of more complex models than traditional gradient based approaches, but they are more computationally intensive. We present several efficiency enhancements for evolution strategies, many of which are not new, but when combined have been shown to dramatically decrease the number of model runs required for calibration of synthetic problems. To reduce the number of expensive model runs we employ a surrogate objective function for an adaptively determined fraction of the population at each generation (Kern et al., 2006). We demonstrate improvements to the adaptive ranking strategy that increase its efficiency while sacrificing little reliability and further reduce the number of model runs required in densely sampled parts of parameter space. Furthermore, we include a gradient individual in each generation that is usually not selected when the search is in a global phase or when the derivatives are poorly approximated, but when selected near a smooth local minimum can dramatically increase convergence speed (Tahk et al., 2007). Finally, the selection of the gradient individual is used to adapt the size of the population near local minima. We show, by incorporating these enhancements into the Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES; Hansen, 2006), that their synergetic effect is greater than their individual parts. This hybrid evolutionary strategy exploits smooth structure when it is present but degrades to an ordinary evolutionary strategy, at worst, if smoothness is not present. Calibration of 2D-3D synthetic models with the modified CMAES requires approximately 10%-25% of the model runs of ordinary CMAES. Preliminary demonstration of this hybrid strategy will be shown for watershed model calibration problems. Hansen, N. (2006). The CMA Evolution Strategy: A Comparing Review. In J.A. Lozano, P. Larrañga, I. Inza and E. Bengoetxea (Eds.). Towards a new evolutionary computation. Advances in estimation of

  9. Update of X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. Summary report of the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Nichols, A.

    1999-07-01

    The discussions and conclusions of the First Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and γ-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration are described in this summary report. The agreed list of radionuclides to be evaluated is given, along with the evaluation procedures and assignment of tasks among participants of the CRP. 14 presentations given at the meeting were indexed separately

  10. Calibration system with cryogenically-cooled loads for cosmic microwave background polarization detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, M; Tajima, O; Chinone, Y; Hazumi, M; Ishidoshiro, K; Nagai, M

    2011-05-01

    We present a novel system to calibrate millimeter-wave polarimeters for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. This technique is an extension of the conventional metal mirror rotation approach, however, it employs cryogenically-cooled blackbody absorbers. The primary advantage of this system is that it can generate a slightly polarized signal (∼100 mK) in the laboratory; this is at a similar level to that measured by ground-based CMB polarization experiments observing a ∼10 K sky. It is important to reproduce the observing condition in the laboratory for reliable characterization of polarimeters before deployment. In this paper, we present the design and principle of the system and demonstrate its use with a coherent-type polarimeter used for an actual CMB polarization experiment. This technique can also be applied to incoherent-type polarimeters and it is very promising for the next-generation CMB polarization experiments.

  11. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France); Chappert, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  12. Cosmic-ray muons as a calibration source for high-energy gamma-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoerngren Engblom, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper a measurement of the directional distribution of cosmic-ray muons, at the latitude of Stockholm, is reported. In fitting the measured flux to a simple analytical expression, the distribution was found to be symmetric around a line approximately to the northwest at 4.2±0.7 degrees from zenith. The east-west asymmetry amounted to a difference in the total intensity of 20±4% at the zenith angle of 45 degrees. The spectra of energies deposited by the muons in a BGO-detector orientated at different angles, are obtained through a Monte Carlo-simulation, where the muon distribution is used as a weight function for sampling muons in different directions. (author)

  13. Calibration of PM-355 nuclear track detectors for low-energy deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M.J.; Czaus, K.

    2008-01-01

    A dependence of track diameters on deuteron energy was investigated for PM-355 nuclear track detectors. Deuteron streams were obtained from RPI-IBIS facility at the pulsed injection of deuterium. Mass and energy analysis was performed with a Thomson-type spectrometer and PM-355 samples. An etched deuteron parabola extended from about 20 keV to about 500 keV. The energy resolution of measurements on the parabola at 20 keV was ±0.2keV, and at 500 keV amounted to ±50keV. Accuracy of the determination of deuteron energies decreased for higher energy values. Results are presented in diagrams showing the track diameters as a function of deuteron energy for chosen etching times (1-8 h)

  14. Evidence for plasma effect on charge collection efficiency in proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, F; Canali, C; Vittone, E; Polesello, P; Biggeri, U; Leroy, C

    1999-01-01

    The radiation damage in 100 mu m thick Schottky diodes made on semi-insulating undoped GaAs materials, were studied using alpha-, beta-, proton- and gamma-spectroscopy as well as I-V measurements. The results have been analysed within the framework of the Hecht model to investigate the influence of the plasma produced by short-range strongly ionising particles on the detector performance after 24 GeV proton irradiation. It has been found that with the mean free drift lengths for electrons and holes determined from alpha-spectra in overdepleted detectors, the charge collection efficiency for beta-particles, cce subbeta, is well predicted in the unirradiated detectors, while in the most irradiated ones, the cce subbeta is underestimated by more than 40%. The observed disagreement can be explained by assuming that the charge carrier recombination in the plasma region of such detectors, becomes significant.

  15. Research of z-axis geometric dose efficiency in multi-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Hyun; Kim, Moon Chan

    2006-01-01

    With the recent prevalence of helical CT and multi-slice CT, which deliver higher radiation dose than conventional CT due to overbeaming effect in X-ray exposure and interpolation technique in image reconstruction. Although multi-detector and helical CT scanner provide a variety of opportunities for patient dose reduction, the potential risk for high radiation levels in CT examination can't be overemphasized in spite of acquiring more diagnostic information. So much more concerns is necessary about dose characteristics of CT scanner, especially dose efficient design as well as dose modulation software, because dose efficiency built into the scanner's design is probably the most important aspect of successful low dose clinical performance. This study was conducted to evaluate z-axis geometric dose efficiency in single detector CT and each level multi-detector CT, as well as to compare z-axis dose efficiency with change of technical scan parameters such as focal spot size of tube, beam collimation, detector combination, scan mode, pitch size, slice width and interval. The results obtained were as follows; 1. SDCT was most highest and 4 MDCT was most lowest in z-axis geometric dose efficiency among SDCT, 4, 8, 16, 64 slice MDCT made by GE manufacture. 2. Small focal spot was 0.67-13.62% higher than large focal spot in z-axis geometric dose efficiency at MDCT. 3. Large beam collimation was 3.13-51.52% higher than small beam collimation in z-axis geometric dose efficiency at MDCT. Z-axis geometric dose efficiency was same at 4 slice MDCT in all condition and 8 slice MDCT of large beam collimation with change of detector combination, but was changed irregularly at 8 slice MDCT of small beam collimation and 16 slice MDCT in all condition with change of detector combination. 5. There was no significant difference for z-axis geometric dose efficiency between conventional scan and helical scan, and with change of pitch factor, as well as change of slice width or interval for

  16. Calibration, alignment and long-term performance of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, E.

    2009-03-01

    With an active area of more than 200 m 2 , the CMS silicon strip detector is the largest silicon tracker ever built. It consists of more than 15,000 individual silicon modules which have to meet very high standards in terms of noise behavior and electronic crosstalk, as well as their exact positioning within the tracker. Furthermore, the modules will be exposed to a harsh radiation environment over the lifetime of the tracker. This thesis deals with several of the above-mentioned aspects. In the first part, individual modules are investigated using a testbeam. Some of the modules were irradiated up to an integrated dose which corresponds to the expected one over the life time of the tracker. These modules are investigated with respect to their signal-to-noise behavior, and their cross-talk. Several operational parameters are varied, such as the temperature and the bias voltage. It is shown that the modules behave as expected. The signal-to-noise ratio is well above the specifications and the cross-talk increases only very moderately with irradiation. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of the modules is investigated. Different cluster algorithms are utilized and compared. It is shown that the spatial resolution is not much affected by irradiation and that the spatial resolution can be improved with respect to the current standard reconstruction. In the second part, larger structures of the silicon tracker are studied during the socalled ''tracker slice-test''. Two sectors from one of the tracker end caps are investigated. Special emphasis is given to the commissioning of the system and the monitoring of the various commissioning parameters. Furthermore, the noise of the system is investigated as a function of the ambient temperature and different powering schemes. It is shown that the noise of the system behaves as expected. The noise is stable within 2% for different powering schemes. Also possible failures of components are investigated and persistent defects are

  17. Calibration, alignment and long-term performance of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, E.

    2009-03-15

    With an active area of more than 200 m{sup 2}, the CMS silicon strip detector is the largest silicon tracker ever built. It consists of more than 15,000 individual silicon modules which have to meet very high standards in terms of noise behavior and electronic crosstalk, as well as their exact positioning within the tracker. Furthermore, the modules will be exposed to a harsh radiation environment over the lifetime of the tracker. This thesis deals with several of the above-mentioned aspects. In the first part, individual modules are investigated using a testbeam. Some of the modules were irradiated up to an integrated dose which corresponds to the expected one over the life time of the tracker. These modules are investigated with respect to their signal-to-noise behavior, and their cross-talk. Several operational parameters are varied, such as the temperature and the bias voltage. It is shown that the modules behave as expected. The signal-to-noise ratio is well above the specifications and the cross-talk increases only very moderately with irradiation. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of the modules is investigated. Different cluster algorithms are utilized and compared. It is shown that the spatial resolution is not much affected by irradiation and that the spatial resolution can be improved with respect to the current standard reconstruction. In the second part, larger structures of the silicon tracker are studied during the socalled 'tracker slice-test'. Two sectors from one of the tracker end caps are investigated. Special emphasis is given to the commissioning of the system and the monitoring of the various commissioning parameters. Furthermore, the noise of the system is investigated as a function of the ambient temperature and different powering schemes. It is shown that the noise of the system behaves as expected. The noise is stable within 2% for different powering schemes. Also possible failures of components are investigated and persistent

  18. Efficient quantification of water content in edible oils by headspace gas chromatography with vapour phase calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Gong, Yi-Xian; Yu, Kong-Xian

    2018-06-01

    An automated and accurate headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) technique was investigated for rapidly quantifying water content in edible oils. In this method, multiple headspace extraction (MHE) procedures were used to analyse the integrated water content from the edible oil sample. A simple vapour phase calibration technique with an external vapour standard was used to calibrate both the water content in the gas phase and the total weight of water in edible oil sample. After that the water in edible oils can be quantified. The data showed that the relative standard deviation of the present HS-GC method in the precision test was less than 1.13%, the relative differences between the new method and a reference method (i.e. the oven-drying method) were no more than 1.62%. The present HS-GC method is automated, accurate, efficient, and can be a reliable tool for quantifying water content in edible oil related products and research. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Evaluating the Efficiency of a Multi-core Aware Multi-objective Optimization Tool for Calibrating the SWAT Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Izaurralde, R. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zong, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-08-20

    The efficiency of calibrating physically-based complex hydrologic models is a major concern in the application of those models to understand and manage natural and human activities that affect watershed systems. In this study, we developed a multi-core aware multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithm (MAMEOA) to improve the efficiency of calibrating a worldwide used watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)). The test results show that MAMEOA can save about 1-9%, 26-51%, and 39-56% time consumed by calibrating SWAT as compared with sequential method by using dual-core, quad-core, and eight-core machines, respectively. Potential and limitations of MAMEOA for calibrating SWAT are discussed. MAMEOA is open source software.

  20. O5S, Calibration of Organic Scintillation Detector by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: O5S is designed to directly simulate the experimental techniques used to obtain the pulse height distribution for a parallel beam of mono-energetic neutrons incident on organic scintillator systems. Developed to accurately calibrate the nominally 2 in. by 2 in. liquid organic scintillator NE-213 (composition CH-1.2), the programme should be readily adaptable to many similar problems. 2 - Method of solution: O5S is a Monte Carlo programme patterned after the general-purpose Monte Carlo neutron transport programme system, O5R. The O5S Monte Carlo experiment follows the course of each neutron through the scintillator and obtains the energy-deposits of the ions produced by elastic scatterings and reactions. The light pulse produced by the neutron is obtained by summing up the contributions of the various ions with the use of appropriate light vs. ion-energy tables. Because of the specialized geometry and simpler cross section needs O5S is able to by-pass many features included in O5R. For instance, neutrons may be followed individually, their histories analyzed as they occur, and upon completion of the experiment, the results analyzed to obtain the pulse-height distribution during one pass on the computer. O5S does allow the absorption of neutrons, but does not allow splitting or Russian roulette (biased weighting schemes). SMOOTHIE is designed to smooth O5S histogram data using Gaussian functions with parameters specified by the user

  1. Calibrations for charged particle tracking and measurements of w photoproduction with the GlueX detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staib, Michael [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-09-21

    The GlueX experiment is a new experimental facility at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA. The experiment aims to map out the spectrum of hybrid mesons in the light quark sector. Measurements of the spin-density matrix elements in omega photoproduction are performed with a linear polarized photon beam on an unpolarized proton target, and presented in bins of Mandelstam t for beam energies of 8.4-9.0 GeV. The spin-density matrix elements are exclusively measured through two decays of the omega meson: omega -> pi^+ pi^- pi^0 and omega ->pi^0 gamma. A description of the experimental apparatus is presented. Several methods used in the calibration of the charged particle tracking system are described. These measurements greatly improve the world statistics in this energy range. These are the first results measured through the omega ->pi^0 gamma decay at this energy. Results are generally consistent with a theoretical model based on diffractive production with Pomeron and pseudoscalar exchange in the t-channel.

  2. Theoretical determination of the neutron detection efficiency of plastic track detectors. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzsch, G.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model to determine the neutron detection efficiency of organic solid state nuclear track detectors without external radiator is described. The model involves the following calculation steps: production of heavy charged particles within the detector volume, characterization of the charged particles by appropriate physical quantities, application of suitable registration criteria, formation of etch pits. The etch pits formed are described by means of a distribution function which is doubly differential in both diameter and depth of the etch pits. The distribution function serves as the input value for the calculation of the detection efficiency. The detection efficiency is defined as the measured effect per neutron fluence. Hence it depends on the evaluation technique considered. The calculation of the distribution function is carried out for cellulose triacetate. The determination of the concrete detection efficiency using the light microscope and light transmission measurements as the evaluation technique will be described in further publications. (orig.)

  3. Impact of geometry on light collection efficiency of scintillation detectors for cryogenic rare event searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danevich, F.A.; Kobychev, V.V.; Kobychev, R.V.; Kraus, H.; Mikhailik, V.B.; Mokina, V.M.; Solsky, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of photon propagation in scintillation detectors were performed with the aim to find the optimal scintillator geometry, surface treatment, and shape of external reflector in order to achieve maximum light collection efficiency for detector configurations that avoid direct optical coupling, a situation that is commonly found in cryogenic scintillating bolometers in experimental searches for double beta decay and dark matter. To evaluate the light collection efficiency of various geometrical configurations we used the ZEMAX ray-tracing software. It was found that scintillators in the shape of a triangular prism with an external mirror shaped as truncated cone gives the highest light collection efficiency. The results of the simulations were confirmed by carrying out measurements of the light collection efficiencies of CaWO 4 crystal scintillators. A comparison of simulated and measured values of light output shows good agreement

  4. Calibration, alignment and long-term performance of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    CERN Document Server

    Butz, Erik

    2009-01-01

    With an active area of more than 200 m2 , the CMS silicon strip detector is the largest silicon tracker ever built. It consists of more than 15,000 individual silicon modules which have to meet very high standards in terms of noise behavior and electronic crosstalk, as well as their exact positioning within the tracker. Furthermore, the modules will be exposed to a harsh radiation environment over the lifetime of the tracker. This thesis deals with several of the above-mentioned aspects. In the first part, individual modules are investigated using a testbeam. Some of the modules were irradiated up to an integrated dose which corresponds to the expected one over the life time of the tracker. These modules are investigated with respect to their signal- to-noise behavior, and their cross-talk. Several operational parameters are varied, such as the temperature and the bias voltage. It is shown that the modules behave as expected. The signal-to-noise ratio is well above the specifications and the cross-talk increa...

  5. Dependence of NaI(Tl) detector intrinsic efficiency on source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on source–detector distance, energy and off-axis distance: Their ... This d/R value at which minimum efficiency occurs approaches zero as off- axis distance ... It should be noted at this point that from the point of view of radiation protection ...

  6. Further comments on the geometrical efficiency of a parallel-disk source and detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, L.

    1994-01-01

    A derivation is presented for a previously published formula, which determines the geometrical efficiency of a parallel-disk source and detector system. The formula involves an integral over a product of two Bessel functions. An algebraic approximation to the integral is also discussed. (orig.)

  7. A diffraction limited nitrogen laser for detector calibration in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartjes, F.G.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. In part I the operation of a pulsed two-stage nitrogen laser is described. In contrast to most other lasers an optical resonator can not be used in a nitrogen laser because of the very short pulse time (∼ 1 ns). Therefore the emitted beam of a simple nitrogen laser has a large divergence. A nitrogen laser with a small beam divergence however can be constructed via the 'Master Oscillator Power Amplifier' principle. Herein a double nitrogen laser system is employed in which both lasers fire simultaneously. The diameter of the laser beam from the first stage (oscillator) is enlarged by a telescope by which the divergence decreases strongly. In a second stage (amplifier) subsequently the weak laser beam is amplified again. The outcoming beam has an elongated diameter which is changed in an approximately round form by a telescope of two cylindrical lenses. The process leading to the formation of population inversion in the nitrogen causing emission of laser ligth is described. The electric circuit, which delivers the high-voltage pulse causing the electric discharge in the laser cavity, is described. The mechanical construction of the laser, in particular with regard to the choices of the materials, is described. Finally, the optical system of the two-stage nitrogen laser is explained. In part II the application of the two-stage nitrogen laser in high-energy physics is treated. Instructions are given about the practical use of the laser: the usual optical system and the ionization profile to be expected in the detector gas. Herein three different kinds of beams are distinguished: the parallel beam, the weakly focussed, and the strongly focussed beam. Some examples are given of the use of the laser: a time very close to the wire, the outlining of the drift wire chambers with a long parallel beam, and the measurement of optical properties of scintillating plastic fibers. (author). 52 refs.; 76 figs.; 4 tabs

  8. Development of source-less efficiency calibration procedure for CeBr3 based gamma spectrometry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Amit K.; Narayani, K.; Pant, Amar D.; Bhosale, Nitin; Anilkumar, S.; Palani Selvam, T.

    2018-01-01

    Scintillation spectrometers are widely used in detection and spectrometry of gamma photons. Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) is the most commonly used scintillation detector for gamma ray spectrometry. However for portable application that require higher efficiency and better resolution Cerium Bromide (CeBr 3 ) crystals are more suitable than NaI(Tl) crystals. CeBr 3 detectors have high light output (∼ 68,000 photons/MeV), good proportionality, fast response and better energy resolution (<4% for 662 keV of 137 Cs), which makes it very promising detector for gamma ray spectrometry. In the present work, experimental and Monte Carlo based efficiencies for CeBr 3 detector for 137 Cs and 60 Co were evaluated

  9. Advanced Multilayer Composite Heavy-Oxide Scintillator Detectors for High Efficiency Fast Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Naydenov, Sergei V.; Pochet, Thierry; Onyshchenko, Gennadiy M.; Piven, Leonid A.; Smith, Craig F.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a new approach to fast neutron and neutron-gamma detection based on large-area multilayer composite heterogeneous detection media consisting of dispersed granules of small-crystalline scintillators contained in a transparent organic (plastic) matrix. Layers of the composite material are alternated with layers of transparent plastic scintillator material serving as light guides. The resulting detection medium - designated as ZEBRA - serves as both an active neutron converter and a detection scintillator which is designed to detect both neutrons and gamma-quanta. The composite layers of the ZEBRA detector consist of small heavy-oxide scintillators in the form of granules of crystalline BGO, GSO, ZWO, PWO and other materials. We have produced and tested the ZEBRA detector of sizes 100x100x41 mm and greater, and determined that they have very high efficiency of fast neutron detection (up to 49% or greater), comparable to that which can be achieved by large sized heavy-oxide single crystals of about Ø40x80 cm3 volume. We have also studied the sensitivity variation to fast neutron detection by using different types of multilayer ZEBRA detectors of 100 cm2 surface area and 41 mm thickness (with a detector weight of about 1 kg) and found it to be comparable to the sensitivity of a 3He-detector representing a total cross-section of about 2000 cm2 (with a weight of detector, including its plastic moderator, of about 120 kg). The measured count rate in response to a fast neutron source of 252Cf at 2 m for the ZEBRA-GSO detector of size 100x100x41 mm3 was 2.84 cps/ng, and this count rate can be doubled by increasing the detector height (and area) up to 200x100 mm2. In summary, the ZEBRA detectors represent a new type of high efficiency and low cost solid-state neutron detector that can be used for stationary neutron/gamma portals. They may represent an interesting alternative to expensive, bulky gas counters based on 3He or 10B neutron

  10. Charge collection efficiency of irradiated silicon detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Collins, P.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Lourenco, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Chapuy, S.; Dimcovski, Z.; Grigoriev, E.; Bell, W.; Devine, S.R.H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Jungermann, L.; Casagrande, L.; Cindro, V.; Mikuz, M.; Zavartanik, M.; Via, C. da; Esposito, A.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Buontempo, S.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Pagano, S.; Ruggiero, G.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2000-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of heavily irradiated silicon diode detectors was investigated at temperatures between 77 and 200 K. The CCE was found to depend on the radiation dose, bias voltage value and history, temperature, and bias current generated by light. The detector irradiated to the highest fluence 2x10 15 n/cm 2 yields a MIP signal of at least 15000 e - both at 250 V forward bias voltage, and at 250 V reverse bias voltage in the presence of a light-generated current. The 'Lazarus effect' was thus shown to extend to fluences at least ten times higher than was previously studied

  11. Effects of the interstrip gap on the efficiency and response of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torresi D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of the segmentation of the electrodes of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs are investigated. In order to characterize the response of the DSSSDs we perform a first experiment by using tandem beams of different energies directly sent on the detector and a second experiment by mean of a proton microbeam. Results show that the effective width of the inter-strip region and the efficiency for full energy detection, varies with both detected energy and bias voltage. The experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by a simplified model based on the Shockley-Ramo-Gunn framework.

  12. Systematization of efficiency correction for gamma-ray disk sources with semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Full energy peak efficiency correction for disk sources has been systematically studied using the mapping method with two high-purity germanium detectors and two low-energy photon spectrometers. The following are found using only single-line (i.e., no coincidence summing loses) γ-rays: (1) The efficiency distributions on a plane parallel to the entrance window of semiconductor detectors is in perfect accord with Gaussian curves inside the circumference of the cylindrical Ge crystal, however, they deviate from the curves outside the circumference. (2) The width parameters of the Gaussian function fitted to the efficiency distributions have a systematic relationship with γ-ray energy. (3) The mapping method is of practical use and has satisfactory accuracy

  13. Determination of alpha particle detection efficiency of an imaging plate (IP) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.M; Iida, Takao; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine the detection efficiency of the imaging plate (IP) detector, the true radioactivity of the alpha particles, which sampled in the collection media, should be known. The true radioactivity could be accurately predicted with the help of the reference alpha spectrometer measurement. The detection efficiency calculated for the IP was estimated with the theoretical curve and the experimental data. It is assumed that the air sample contained the decay products of both 222 Rn and 220 Rn series, the most significant sources of alpha particles. The present study estimated the detection efficiency of the IP as 39.3% with an uncertainty of 2.9 that is well enough to confirm the future use of the IP as a radiation detector. Experimental materials and methods are described. (S.Y.)

  14. Data reduction pipeline for the CHARIS integral-field spectrograph I: detector readout calibration and data cube extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Rizzo, Maxime; Groff, Tyler; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Greco, Johnny P.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Limbach, Mary Anne; Galvin, Michael; Loomis, Craig; Knapp, Gillian; McElwain, Michael W.; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Currie, Thayne; Mede, Kyle; Tamura, Motohide; Takato, Naruhisa; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2017-10-01

    We present the data reduction pipeline for CHARIS, a high-contrast integral-field spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope. The pipeline constructs a ramp from the raw reads using the measured nonlinear pixel response and reconstructs the data cube using one of three extraction algorithms: aperture photometry, optimal extraction, or χ2 fitting. We measure and apply both a detector flatfield and a lenslet flatfield and reconstruct the wavelength- and position-dependent lenslet point-spread function (PSF) from images taken with a tunable laser. We use these measured PSFs to implement a χ2-based extraction of the data cube, with typical residuals of ˜5% due to imperfect models of the undersampled lenslet PSFs. The full two-dimensional residual of the χ2 extraction allows us to model and remove correlated read noise, dramatically improving CHARIS's performance. The χ2 extraction produces a data cube that has been deconvolved with the line-spread function and never performs any interpolations of either the data or the individual lenslet spectra. The extracted data cube also includes uncertainties for each spatial and spectral measurement. CHARIS's software is parallelized, written in Python and Cython, and freely available on github with a separate documentation page. Astrometric and spectrophotometric calibrations of the data cubes and PSF subtraction will be treated in a forthcoming paper.

  15. An Introduction to ATLAS Pixel Detector DAQ and Calibration Software Based on a Year's Work at CERN for the Upgrade from 8 to 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094561

    An overview is presented of the ATLAS pixel detector Data Acquisition (DAQ) system obtained by the author during a year-long opportunity to work on calibration software for the 2015-16 Layer‑2 upgrade. It is hoped the document will function more generally as an easy entry point for future work on ATLAS pixel detector calibration systems. To begin with, the overall place of ATLAS pixel DAQ within the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the purpose of the Layer-2 upgrade and the fundamentals of pixel calibration are outlined. This is followed by a brief look at the high level structure and key features of the calibration software. The paper concludes by discussing some difficulties encountered in the upgrade project and how these led to unforeseen alternative enhancements, such as development of calibration “simulation” software allowing the soundness of the ongoing upgrade work to be verified while not all of the actual readout hardware was available for the most comprehensive testing.

  16. Thermal inertia and energy efficiency – Parametric simulation assessment on a calibrated case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aste, Niccolò; Leonforte, Fabrizio; Manfren, Massimiliano; Mazzon, Manlio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We perform a parametric simulation study on a calibrated building energy model. • We introduce adaptive shadings and night free cooling in simulations. • We analyze the effect of thermal capacity on the parametric simulations results. • We recognize that cooling demand and savings scales linearly with thermal capacity. • We assess the advantage of medium-heavy over medium and light configurations. - Abstract: The reduction of energy consumption for heating and cooling services in the existing building stock is a key challenge for global sustainability today and buildings’ envelopes retrofit is one the main issues. Most of the existing buildings’ envelopes have low levels of insulation, high thermal losses due to thermal bridges and cracks, absence of appropriate solar control, etc. Further, in building refurbishment, the importance of a system level approach is often undervalued in favour of simplistic “off the shelf” efficient solutions, focused on the reduction of thermal transmittance and on the enhancement of solar control capabilities. In many cases, the importance of the dynamic thermal properties is often neglected or underestimated and the effective thermal capacity is not properly considered as one of the design parameters. The research presented aims to critically assess the influence of the dynamic thermal properties of the building fabric (roof, walls and floors) on sensible heating and cooling energy demand for a case study. The case study chosen is an existing office building which has been retrofitted in recent years and whose energy model has been calibrated according to the data collected in the monitoring process. The research illustrates the variations of the sensible thermal energy demand of the building in different retrofit scenarios, and relates them to the variations of the dynamic thermal properties of the construction components. A parametric simulation study has been performed, encompassing the use of

  17. Modeling the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierstorfer, Karl

    2018-01-01

    To find a simple model for the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of photon-counting detectors in the low flux limit. Formula for the spatial cross-talk, the noise power spectrum and the DQE of a photon-counting detector working at a given threshold are derived. Parameters are probabilities for types of events like single counts in the central pixel, double counts in the central pixel and a neighboring pixel or single count in a neighboring pixel only. These probabilities can be derived in a simple model by extensive use of Monte Carlo techniques: The Monte Carlo x-ray propagation program MOCASSIM is used to simulate the energy deposition from the x-rays in the detector material. A simple charge cloud model using Gaussian clouds of fixed width is used for the propagation of the electric charge generated by the primary interactions. Both stages are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation randomizing the location of impact which finally produces the required probabilities. The parameters of the charge cloud model are fitted to the spectral response to a polychromatic spectrum measured with our prototype detector. Based on the Monte Carlo model, the DQE of photon-counting detectors as a function of spatial frequency is calculated for various pixel sizes, photon energies, and thresholds. The frequency-dependent DQE of a photon-counting detector in the low flux limit can be described with an equation containing only a small set of probabilities as input. Estimates for the probabilities can be derived from a simple model of the detector physics. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Absolute sensitivity calibration from 20 A to 430 A of a grazing incidence spectrometer with a multi-element spectral detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Manning, H.L.; Marmar, E.S.

    1986-07-01

    Two methods which together allow sensitivity calibration from 20 A to 430 A are described in detail. The first method, useful up to 120 A, uses a low power source to generate Kα x-rays which are alternately viewed by an absolute detector (a proportional counter) and the spectrometer. The second method extends that calibration to 430 A. It relies on the 2:1 brightness ratio of bright doublet lines from impurity ions which have a single outer shell electron and which are present in hot, magnetically confined plasmas. It requires that the absolute sensitivity of the spectrometer be known at one wavelength point, and in practice requires a multi-element spectral detector

  19. Calibration of new batches and a study of applications of nuclear track detectors under the harsh conditions of nuclear fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowska, A., E-mail: a.malinowska@ncbj.gov.pl [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7 Str., 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Szydlowski, A.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.; Malinowski, K.; Kuk, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7 Str., 05-400 Otwock (Poland)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each new batch of PM-355 material should be carefully calibrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detectors heated at a temperature higher than 100 Degree-Sign C demonstrate v nearly equal to 1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dependence of V{sub B} on the temperature is similar to the dependence of V{sub B} on the dose of electron and gamma radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aging effect of these materials also has a significant influence on the track diameter. - Abstract: This paper describes calibration studies of PM-355 detectors manufactured at different times in order to compare their sensitivity to the investigated ions. These studies were motivated by the application of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) in fusion experiments to measure energetic ions escaping from high-temperature plasmas. The CR-39 detector and its new versions such as PM-355, PM-500, PM-600 have been examined for several years at our institute. The PM-355 plastic appeared to be the best, especially for the detection of light ions. However, to use these detectors optimally, especially in spectroscopic measurements, each new batch of PM-355 material should be carefully calibrated. In high temperature plasma experiments the detectors operate under harsh conditions of high temperature, heat impact, intense X-ray, neutron and fast electron radiation. In order to evaluate the effect of these conditions on the crater formation process, some of the {alpha} particle- and proton-irradiated PM-355 detector samples were heated in an oven and then etched and scanned. Other alpha- and proton-irradiated samples were exposed to {gamma} and electron radiation of doses varying from 100 to 2000 kGy. The irradiated samples were then etched in steps and the bulk etching rate v{sub B} of the PM-355 material was determined. The craters induced by the projectiles in both heated and {gamma} and electron irradiated samples differ considerably from the

  20. Update of X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Nichols, A.L.

    2000-09-01

    The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and γ-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration was held at PTB Braunschweig from 10 to 12 May 2000. A primary aim of this meeting was to review progress in the evaluation and recommendation of data under the auspices of the CRP. All CRP activities were reviewed, and actions agreed for the remaining 18 months of the programme. Separate indexing was provided for 13 contributions to the meeting

  1. Update of X- and {gamma}-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A L [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    2000-09-01

    The Second Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and {gamma}-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration was held at PTB Braunschweig from 10 to 12 May 2000. A primary aim of this meeting was to review progress in the evaluation and recommendation of data under the auspices of the CRP. All CRP activities were reviewed, and actions agreed for the remaining 18 months of the programme. Separate indexing was provided for 13 contributions to the meeting.

  2. Investigation of efficient termination structure for improved breakdown properties of semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizaj, D.; Resnik, D.; Vrtacnik, D.; Amon, S.

    1998-01-01

    Efficiency of a new junction termination structure for improvement of breakdown properties of semiconductor radiation detectors is investigated. The structure consists of a diffused resistor winding around the active junction in a spiral fashion. The current flow through the spiral enables controlled potential distribution along the spiral turns and thus controlled depletion spreading from the main junction, efficiently preventing premature avalanche breakdown. Both multiple guard-ring structures and spiral junction termination structures have shown good breakdown properties typically three to five times higher than breakdown voltages of diodes without junction termination. The breakdown voltages of spiral junction termination structures are only weakly influenced by changes in substrate doping concentration caused by neutron irradiation. They can thus be considered for termination of future semiconductor radiation detectors

  3. An efficient and cost-effective microchannel plate detector for slow neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, B. B.; Vadas, J.; Bancroft, D.; deSouza, Z. O.; Huston, J.; Hudan, S.; Baxter, D. V.; deSouza, R. T.

    2018-05-01

    A novel approach for efficiently imaging objects with slow neutrons in two dimensions is realized. Neutron sensitivity is achieved by use of a boron doped microchannel plate (MCP). The resulting electron avalanche is further amplified with a Z-stack MCP before being sensed by two orthogonally oriented wire planes. Coupling of the wire planes to delay lines efficiently encodes the position information as a time difference. To determine the position resolution, slow neutrons were used to illuminate a Cd-mask placed directly in front of the detector. Peaks in the resulting spectrum exhibited an average peak width of 329 μm FWHM, corresponding to an average intrinsic resolution of 216 μm. The center region of the detector exhibits a significantly better spatial resolution with an intrinsic resolution of <100 μm observed.

  4. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J.W. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Kim, J. [Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Park, H. [Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Allee, D.R. [Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85284 (United States); Quevedo-Lopez, M. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Gnade, B., E-mail: beg031000@utdallas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to {sup 3}He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10{sup −6} gamma-ray efficiency.

  5. Measurement of neutron detection efficiencies in NaI using the Crystal Ball detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Koetke, D.D. E-mail: donald.koetke@valpo.edu; Allgower, C.; Bekrenev, V.; Benslama, K.; Berger, E.; Briscoe, W.J.; Clajus, M.; Comfort, J.R.; Craig, K.; Gibson, A.; Grosnick, D.; Huber, G.M.; Isenhower, D.; Kasprzyk, T.; Knecht, N.; Koulbardis, A.; Kozlenko, N.; Kruglov, S.; Kycia, T.; Lolos, G.J.; Lopatin, I.; Manley, D.M.; Manweiler, R.; Marusic, A.; McDonald, S.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Olmsted, J.; Papandreou, Z.; Peaslee, D.; Peterson, R.J.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Pulver, M.; Ramirez, A.F.; Sadler, M.; Shafi, A.; Slaus, I.; Spinka, H.; Starostin, A.; Staudenmaier, H.M.; Supek, I.; Thoms, J.; Tippens, W.B

    2001-04-21

    We report on a measurement of the neutron detection efficiency in NaI crystals in the Crystal Ball (CB) detector obtained from a study of {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi} degree sign n reactions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. A companion GEANT-based Monte Carlo study has been done to simulate these reactions in the CB, and a comparison with the data is provided.

  6. A Novel Front-End ASIC With Post Digital Filtering and Calibration for CZT-Based PET Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Yin, J.; Li, C.; Zeng, H.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel front-end electronics based on a front-end ASIC with post digital filtering and calibration dedicated to CZT detectors for PET imaging. A cascade amplifier based on split-leg topology is selected to realize the charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA) for the sake of low noise performances and the simple scheme of the power supplies. The output of the CSA is connected to a variable-gain amplifier to generate the compatible signals for the A/D conversion. A multi-channel single-slope ADC is designed to sample multiple points for the digital filtering and shaping. The digital signal processing algorithms are implemented by a FPGA. To verify the proposed scheme, a front-end readout prototype ASIC is designed and implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS process. In a single readout channel, a CSA, a VGA, a 10-bit ADC and registers are integrated. Two dummy channels, bias circuits, and time controller are also integrated. The die size is 2.0 mm x 2.1 mm. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000 e - to 100000 e - , which is suitable for the detection of the X-and gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 550 keV. The linearity of the output voltage is less than 1 %. The gain of the readout channel is 40.2 V/pC. The static power dissipation is about 10 mW/channel. The above tested results show that the electrical performances of the ASIC can well satisfy PET imaging applications. (authors)

  7. A Novel Front-End ASIC With Post Digital Filtering and Calibration for CZT-Based PET Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, W.; Yin, J.; Li, C.; Zeng, H.; Gao, D. [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer Science and Techonology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an (China); Hu, Y. [Institut Pluridiscipline Hubert Curien, CNRS/UDS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel front-end electronics based on a front-end ASIC with post digital filtering and calibration dedicated to CZT detectors for PET imaging. A cascade amplifier based on split-leg topology is selected to realize the charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA) for the sake of low noise performances and the simple scheme of the power supplies. The output of the CSA is connected to a variable-gain amplifier to generate the compatible signals for the A/D conversion. A multi-channel single-slope ADC is designed to sample multiple points for the digital filtering and shaping. The digital signal processing algorithms are implemented by a FPGA. To verify the proposed scheme, a front-end readout prototype ASIC is designed and implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS process. In a single readout channel, a CSA, a VGA, a 10-bit ADC and registers are integrated. Two dummy channels, bias circuits, and time controller are also integrated. The die size is 2.0 mm x 2.1 mm. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000 e{sup -} to 100000 e{sup -}, which is suitable for the detection of the X-and gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 550 keV. The linearity of the output voltage is less than 1 %. The gain of the readout channel is 40.2 V/pC. The static power dissipation is about 10 mW/channel. The above tested results show that the electrical performances of the ASIC can well satisfy PET imaging applications. (authors)

  8. Production of 16N and obtaining of its gamma spectrum in order to calibrate detectors or determination of fluorine in geological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey-Ronco, M.A.; Alonso-Sanchez, T.; Castro-Garcia, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show a procedure for producing 16 N and a method to obtain its gamma spectrum with a NaI(Tl) detector. We also demonstrate the interest of this radioactive element for the purpose of NaI(Tl) detector calibration and for the determination of fluorine in geological specimens using an Alpha Beryllium neutron source. This work consists of a theoretical study which analyzes the characteristics of 16 N and nuclear reactions that originate from an Americium Beryllium source of 1Ci activity. We justify our choice of reaction 19 F(n,α) 16 N and the use of fluorspar as a source of fluorine. The mathematical procedure followed to obtain the gamma rays spectrum produced by 16 N in a NaI(Tl) detector is shown.

  9. Production of {sup 16}N and obtaining of its gamma spectrum in order to calibrate detectors or determination of fluorine in geological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey-Ronco, M.A., E-mail: rey@uniovi.e [Departamento de Energia, Universidad de Oviedo, 33004 Oviedo (Spain); Alonso-Sanchez, T., E-mail: tjalonso@uniovi.e [Departamento de Explotacion y Prospeccion de Minas, Universidad de Oviedo, 33004 Oviedo (Spain); Castro-Garcia, M.P., E-mail: UO21947@uniovi.e [Departamento de Explotacion y Prospeccion de Minas, Universidad de Oviedo, 33004 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we show a procedure for producing {sup 16}N and a method to obtain its gamma spectrum with a NaI(Tl) detector. We also demonstrate the interest of this radioactive element for the purpose of NaI(Tl) detector calibration and for the determination of fluorine in geological specimens using an Alpha Beryllium neutron source. This work consists of a theoretical study which analyzes the characteristics of {sup 16}N and nuclear reactions that originate from an Americium Beryllium source of 1Ci activity. We justify our choice of reaction {sup 19}F(n,{alpha}){sup 16}N and the use of fluorspar as a source of fluorine. The mathematical procedure followed to obtain the gamma rays spectrum produced by {sup 16}N in a NaI(Tl) detector is shown.

  10. Efficiency correction for disk sources using coaxial High-Purity Ge detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Hiroshi.

    1993-03-01

    Efficiency correction factors for disk sources were determined by making use of closed-ended coaxial High-Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors, their relative efficiencies for a 3' 'x3' ' NaI(Tl) with the 1.3 MeV γ-rays were 30 % and 10 %, respectively. Parameters for the correction by mapping method were obtained systematically, using several monoenergetic (i.e. no coincidence summing loses) γ-ray sources produced by irradiation in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) core. These were found out that (1) the systematics of the Gaussian fitting parameters, which were calculated using the relative efficiency distributions of HPGe, to the γ-ray energies are recognized, (2) the efficiency distributions deviate from the Gaussian distributions outside of the radii of HPGe. (3) mapping method is a practical use in satisfactory accuracy, as the results in comparison with the disk source measurements. (author)

  11. Detective quantum efficiency: a standard test to ensure optimal detector performance and low patient exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escartin, Terenz R.; Nano, Tomi F.; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2016-03-01

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE), expressed as a function of spatial frequency, describes the ability of an x-ray detector to produce high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images. While regulatory and scientific communities have used the DQE as a primary metric for optimizing detector design, the DQE is rarely used by end users to ensure high system performance is maintained. Of concern is that image quality varies across different systems for the same exposures with no current measures available to describe system performance. Therefore, here we conducted an initial DQE measurement survey of clinical x-ray systems using a DQE-testing instrument to identify their range of performance. Following laboratory validation, experiments revealed that the DQE of five different systems under the same exposure level (8.0 μGy) ranged from 0.36 to 0.75 at low spatial frequencies, and 0.02 to 0.4 at high spatial frequencies (3.5 cycles/mm). Furthermore, the DQE dropped substantially with decreasing detector exposure by a factor of up to 1.5x in the lowest spatial frequency, and a factor of 10x at 3.5 cycles/mm due to the effect of detector readout noise. It is concluded that DQE specifications in purchasing decisions, combined with periodic DQE testing, are important factors to ensure patients receive the health benefits of high-quality images for low x-ray exposures.

  12. Monte Carlo evaluation of the neutron detection efficiency of a superheated drop detector

    En