WorldWideScience

Sample records for detector applications ii

  1. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  2. SLAC Scanner Processor applications in the data acquisition system for the upgraded Mark II detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.; Glanzman, T.; Lankford, A.J.; Riles, K.

    1985-09-01

    The SLAC Scanner Processor is a general purpose, programmable FASTBUS crate/cable master/slave module. This device plays a central role in the readout, buffering and pre-processing of data from the upgraded Mark II detector's new central drift chamber. In addition to data readout, the SSPs assist in a variety of other services, such as detector calibration, FASTBUS system management, FASTBUS system initialization and verification, and FASTBUS module testing. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2016-09-21

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  4. The CDF SVX II detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    The proposed CDF SVX II detector upgrade for secondary vertex detection during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II collider run is described. The general design and important features of this silicon vertex detector are presented. The CDF physics goals which are addressed by this detector are also given

  5. Test of GERDA Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Gusev, Konstantin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard; Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. The experiment uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. In GERDA Phase I five BEGe detectors were operated successfully. These detectors are distinguished for improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. In Phase II additional 25 BEGe detectors will be installed. New electronics and radio-pure low-mass holders were specially designed for Phase II. Prior to the installation in GERDA all BEGe detectors are tested in their final assembly in the LNGS underground laboratory. This talk presents the mechanics and performance of the GERDA Phase II detector assembly.

  6. The Mark II detector for the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.; Baden, A.R.; Boyer, J.; Butler, F.; Drell, P.S.; Fay, J.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Haggerty, J.; Harr, R.; Hearty, C.; Herrup, D.; Holmgren, S.O.; Jaffre, M.; Juricic, I.; Kadyk, J.A.; Kral, J.F.; Levi, M.E.; Lynch, G.R.; Richman, J.D.; Rouse, F.R.; Schaad, M.W.; Schmidke, W.B.; Schumm, B.A.; Trilling, G.H.; Wood, D.R.; Akerlof, C.; Bonvicini, G.; Chapman, J.; Chmeissani, M.; Frey, R.; Gero, E.; Hong, S.J.; Koska, W.; Nitz, D.; Petradza, M.; Thun, R.; Tschirhart, R.; Veltman, H.; Alexander, J.P.; Ballam, J.; Barklow, T.; Bartelt, J.; De Boer, W.; Boyarski, A.; Braune, K.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.L.; Cords, D.; Coupal, D.P.; Destaebler, H.C.; Dorfan, J.M.; Feldman, G.J.; Fernandes, D.; Field, R.C.; Fordham, C.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Glanzman, T.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.; Himel, T.; Hutchinson, D.; Innes, W.R.; Jacobsen, R.G.; Jaros, J.A.; Jung, C.K.; Karlen, D.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.; Komamiya, M.; Kowalski, L.A.; Kozanecki, W.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Lueth, V.; Mattison, T.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mueller, L.; Munger, C.T.; Nash, J.; Ong, R.A.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Perl, J.; Perl, M.L.; Perrier, F.; Petersen, A.; Pitthan, R.; Riles, K.; Swartz, M.; Taylor, R.E.; Van Kooten, R.; Voruganti, P.; Weigend, A.; Woods, M.; Wormser, G.; Wright, R.; Alvarez, M.; Calvino, F.; Fernandez, E.; Ford, W.T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S.R.; Weber, P.; White, S.L.; Averill, D.; Blockus, D.; Brabson, B.; Brom, J.M.; Murray, W.N.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.R.; Snyder, A.; Yurko, M.; Barish, B.C.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hoenk, M.; Kuhlen, M.; Li, Z.; McKenna, J.A.; Milliken, B.D.; Nelson, M.E.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.C.; Soderstrom, E.; Stroynowski, R.; Weinstein, A.J.; Weir, A.J.; Wicklund, E.; Wolf, R.C.; Wu, D.Y.; Barnett, B.A.; Boswell, C.; Dauncey, P.; Drewer, D.C.; Harral, B.; Hylen, J.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Stoker, D.P.; Vejcik, S.; Breakstone, A.; Cence, R.J.; Gong, X.; Harris, F.A.; Koide, A.; Parker, S.I.; Green, A.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; California Univ., Berkeley

    1989-01-01

    The Mark II detector has been upgraded in preparation for its role as the first detector to take data at the Stanford Linear Collider. The new detector components include the central drift chamber, the time-of-flight system, the coil, the endcap electromagnetic calorimeters and the beam energy and luminosity measuring devices. There have also been improvements in detector hermeticity. All of the major components were installed for a test run at the PEP storage ring (√s=29 GeV) in 1985. This paper describes the upgraded detector, including its trigger and data acquisition systems, and gives performance figures for its components. Future improvements are also discussed. (orig.)

  7. The Gerda Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Schoenert, Stefan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Phase II of the Gerda (Germanium Detector Array) experiment will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Prerequisites for Phase II are an increased target mass and a reduced background index of < 10 {sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr). Major hardware upgrades to achieve these requirements are scheduled for 2013. They include the deployment of a new radio pure low mass detector assembly. The structural properties of available radio-pure materials and reduction of mass necessitate a change of the electrical contacting used to bias and read-out the detectors. The detector assembly design and the favored contacting solution are presented.

  8. Mark II magnetic detector for SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The Mark II Detector, presently in the design stage, is a SLAC/LBL detector project to replace the Mark I now in operation at SPEAR. While similar in concept to the Mark I it will have improved momentum resolution, shower detection, solid angle coverage for both triggering and tracking and a magnet design providing easier access to those particles transmitted through the aluminum coil

  9. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  10. Applications of nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medveczky, L.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a scientific research-work are summarized. Nuclear track detectors were used for new applications or in unusual ways. Photographic films, nuclear emulsions and dielectric track detectors were investigated. The tracks were detected by optical microscopy. Empirical formulation has been derived for the neutron sensitivity of certain dielectric materials. Methods were developed for leak testing of closed alpha emitting sources. New procedures were found for the application and evaluation of track detector materials. The results were applied in the education, personnel dosimetry, radon dosimetry etc. (R.J.)

  11. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, M., E-mail: markus.friedl@oeaw.ac.at [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Ackermann, K. [MPI Munich, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Aihara, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aziz, T. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Experimental High Energy Physics Group, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bergauer, T. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bozek, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Division of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31 342 Krakow (Poland); Campbell, A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dingfelder, J. [University of Bonn, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Drasal, Z. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Frankenberger, A. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Gadow, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Gfall, I. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T. [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Higuchi, T. [University of Tokyo, Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Himori, S. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Aoba Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Irmler, C. [HEPHY – Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Ishikawa, A. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Aoba Aramaki Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Joo, C. [Seoul National University, High Energy Physics Laboratory, 25-107 Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-21

    The KEKB machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8×10{sup 35}cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with this 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors at higher radii than the old detector. The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) will have a total sensitive area of 1.13m{sup 2} and 223,744 channels—twice as many as its predecessor. All silicon sensors will be made from 150 mm wafers in order to maximize their size and thus to reduce the relative contribution of the support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and to minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel “Origami” chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. This report gives an overview on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics.

  12. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, M.; Ackermann, K.; Aihara, H.; Aziz, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bozek, A.; Campbell, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Drasal, Z.; Frankenberger, A.; Gadow, K.; Gfall, I.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Higuchi, T.; Himori, S.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C.

    2013-01-01

    The KEKB machine and the Belle experiment in Tsukuba (Japan) are now undergoing an upgrade, leading to an ultimate luminosity of 8×10 35 cm −2 s −1 in order to measure rare decays in the B system with high statistics. The previous vertex detector cannot cope with this 40-fold increase of luminosity and thus needs to be replaced. Belle II will be equipped with a two-layer Pixel Detector surrounding the beam pipe, and four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors at higher radii than the old detector. The Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) will have a total sensitive area of 1.13m 2 and 223,744 channels—twice as many as its predecessor. All silicon sensors will be made from 150 mm wafers in order to maximize their size and thus to reduce the relative contribution of the support structure. The forward part has slanted sensors of trapezoidal shape to improve the measurement precision and to minimize the amount of material as seen by particles from the vertex. Fast-shaping front-end amplifiers will be used in conjunction with an online hit time reconstruction algorithm in order to reduce the occupancy to the level of a few percent at most. A novel “Origami” chip-on-sensor scheme is used to minimize both the distance between strips and amplifier (thus reducing the electronic noise) as well as the overall material budget. This report gives an overview on the status of the Belle II SVD and its components, including sensors, front-end detector ladders, mechanics, cooling and the readout electronics

  13. Performance of GERDA phase II BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. GERDA uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. The experiment proceeds in two phases. In Phase I a background index of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached and a new lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 95% C.L.). In Phase II the background index will be lowered by an order of magnitude and a sensitivity of 10{sup 26} yr will be reached. In order to achieve this goal 30 new custom-made broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors and a liquid argon scintillation light veto will be deployed. Five BEGe detectors have been operated successfully in Phase I and demonstrated their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. Special designed electronics will further improve energy resolution and PSD performance. The first results from commissioning of the new BEGe detectors are presented in this talk.

  14. The Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Hans-Günther, E-mail: moser@mpp.mpg.de

    2016-09-21

    The Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will explore heavy flavour physics (B, charm and tau) at the starting of 2018 with unprecedented precision. Charged particles are tracked by a two-layer DEPFET pixel device (PXD), a four-layer silicon strip detector (SVD) and the central drift chamber (CDC). The PXD will consist of two layers at radii of 14 mm and 22 mm with 8 and 12 ladders, respectively. The pixel sizes will vary, between 50 μm×(55–60) μm in the first layer and between 50 μm×(70–85) μm in the second layer, to optimize the charge sharing efficiency. These innermost layers have to cope with high background occupancy, high radiation and must have minimal material to reduce multiple scattering. These challenges are met using the DEPFET technology. Each pixel is a FET integrated on a fully depleted silicon bulk. The signal charge collected in the ‘internal gate’ modulates the FET current resulting in a first stage amplification and therefore very low noise. This allows very thin sensors (75 μm) reducing the overall material budget of the detector (0.21% X{sub 0}). Four fold multiplexing of the column parallel readout allows read out a full frame of the pixel matrix in only 20 μs while keeping the power consumption low enough for air cooling. Only the active electronics outside the detector acceptance has to be cooled actively with a two phase CO{sub 2} system. Furthermore the DEPFET technology offers the unique feature of an electronic shutter which allows the detector to operate efficiently in the continuous injection mode of superKEKB.

  15. Diamond radiation detectors II. CVD diamond development for radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Interest in radiation detectors has supplied some of the impetus for improving the electronic properties of CVD diamond. In the present discussion, we will restrict our attention to polycrystalhne CVD material. We will focus on the evolution of these materials over the past decade and the correlation of detector performance with other properties of the material

  16. SVX II a silicon vertex detector for run II of the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoletto, D.

    1994-11-01

    A microstrip silicon detector SVX II has been proposed for the upgrade of the vertex detector of the CDF experiment to be installed for run II of the Tevatron in 1998. Three barrels of four layers of double sided detectors will cover the interaction region. The requirement of the silicon tracker and the specification of the sensors are discussed together with the proposed R ampersand D to verify the performance of the prototypes detectors produced by Sintef, Micron and Hamamatsu

  17. Nuclear detectors: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadj, Marouane

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear technology is a vast domain. It has several applications, for instance in hydrology, it is used in the analysis of underground water, dating by carbon 14, Our study consists on representing the nuclear detectors based on their principle of functioning and their electronic constitution. However, because of some technical problems, we have not made a deepen study on their applications that could certainly have a big support on our subject. In spite of the existence of an equipment of high performance and technology in the centre, it remains to resolve the problem of control of instruments. Therefore, the calibration of these equipment remains the best guaranteed of a good quality of the counting. Besides, it allows us to approach the influence of the external and internal parameters on the equipment and the reasons of errors of measurements, to introduce equivalent corrections. (author). 22 refs

  18. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  19. Mechanical design of the CDF SVX II silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    A next generation silicon vertex detector is planned at CDF for the 1998 Tevatron collider run with the Main Injector. The SVX II silicon vertex detector will allow high luminosity data-taking, enable online triggering of secondary vertex production, and greatly increase the acceptance for heavy flavor physics at CDF. The design specifications, geometric layout, and early mechanical prototyping work for this detector are discussed

  20. Background sources and masks for Mark II detector at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyk, J.

    1981-06-01

    The shielding masks currently at use in several of the current experiments at PEP are the result of an early organized effort to understand the sources of particle background expected at PEP, followed by the evolution of the conceptual designs into actual hardware. The degree and kind of background particle loading which could be tolerated was expected to differ significantly among the different experiments, and several designs emerged from the common study. Qualitatively, the types of radiations studied were, Synchrotron Radiation (SR), Beam Gas Bremsstrahlung (BGB), and, to a limited extent others, e.g., Electroproduction (EP). Calculations will be given of predicted occupancies in the pipe counter and other sensitive elements at small radius, since these will be most susceptible to the SR and BGB backgrounds. The calculations presented in this note are specific to the Mark II detector. Some general statements will be made first about the character of each of the various types of backgrounds considered, then some detailed calculations made for application to the Mark II detector

  1. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov,; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech.

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  2. Recent validation tests of the Edelweiss II detector holders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwamm, F.; Chapellier, M.; Herve, S.; Karolak, M.; Navick, X.-F.

    2006-01-01

    A very good understanding of noise sources is highly important for the sensitivity of a dark matter search experiment. One of these noise contributions in the Edelweiss experiment could be the microphonics and temperature variations caused by vibrations of the cryostat. Recent studies complement an earlier work in describing the effect of the Edelweiss II detector holders on the amplitude of the vibrations seen by the detector. The results of these studies will be presented in this article

  3. Semiconductor radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this book is to educate the reader on radiation detectors, from sensor to read-out electronics to application. Relatively new detector materials, such as CdZTe and Cr compensated GaAs, are introduced, along with emerging applications of radiation detectors. This X-ray technology has practical applications in medical, industrial, and security applications. It identifies materials based on their molecular composition, not densities as the traditional transmission equipment does. With chapters written by an international selection of authors from both academia and industry, the book covers a wide range of topics on radiation detectors, which will satisfy the needs of both beginners and experts in the field.

  4. Imaging gaseous detectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nappi, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Covers the detector and imaging technology and their numerous applications in nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, medicine and radiation measurements Foreword from G. Charpak, awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for this invention.

  5. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications-specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3 . A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made

  6. Test of In-core Flux Detectors in KNK II

    CERN Document Server

    Hoppe, P

    1979-01-01

    The development of in-core detectors for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is still in an early stage, and little operation experience is available. Therefore self-powered neutron and gamma detectors and neutron sensitive ionization chambers -especially developed for LMFBRs- have been tested in the Fast Sodium Cooled Test Reactor KNK II. Seven flux detectors have been installed in the core of KNK II by means of a special test rig. Five of them failed already within the first week during operation in the reactor. Due to measurements of electrical resistances and capacities, sodium penetrating into the detectors or cables probably seems to be the cause. As tests prior to the installation in the core proved the tightness of all detectors, it is suspected that small cracks have developed in the detector casings or in the outer cable sheaths during their exposure to the hot coolant. Two ionization chambers did not show these faults. However, one of them failed because the saturation current plateau disap...

  7. The track finding algorithm of the Belle II vertex detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilka Tadeas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Belle II experiment is a high energy multi purpose particle detector operated at the asymmetric e+e− - collider SuperKEKB in Tsukuba (Japan. In this work we describe the algorithm performing the pattern recognition for inner tracking detector which consists of two layers of pixel detectors and four layers of double sided silicon strip detectors arranged around the interaction region. The track finding algorithm will be used both during the High Level Trigger on-line track reconstruction and during the off-line full reconstruction. It must provide good efficiency down to momenta as low as 50 MeV/c where material effects are sizeable even in an extremely thin detector as the VXD. In addition it has to be able to cope with the high occupancy of the Belle II detectors due to the background. The underlying concept of the track finding algorithm, as well as details of the implementation are outlined. The algorithm is proven to run with good performance on simulated ϒ(4S → BB̄ events with an efficiency for reconstructing tracks of above 90% over a wide range of momentum.

  8. Test of In-core Flux Detectors in KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, P.; Mitzel, F.

    1979-10-01

    The development of in-core detectors for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is still in an early stage, and little operation experience is available. Therefore self-powered neutron and gamma detectors and neutron sensitive ionization chambers -especially developed for LMFBRs- have been tested in the Fast Sodium Cooled Test Reactor KNK II. Seven flux detectors have been installed in the core of KNK II by means of a special test rig. Five of them failed already within the first week during operation in the reactor. Due to measurements of electrical resistances and capacities, sodium penetrating into the detectors or cables probably seems to be the cause. As tests prior to the installation in the core proved the tightness of all detectors, it is suspected that small cracks have developed in the detector casings or in the outer cable sheaths during their exposure to the hot coolant. Two ionization chambers did not show these faults. However, one of them failed because the saturation current plateau disappeared and the other one's sensitivity decreased by a factor of five during the test period. It is suspected that in both cases changes of the filling gas might be involved

  9. Performance of BEGe detectors for GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    After the end of the data-taking for GERDA Phase I, the apparatus has been upgraded to fulfill the requirements of the second phase. Phase II sensitivity will be driven by 30 custom made BEGe detectors. This detectors are now available and can be operated in phaseII configuration in the GERDA cryostat together with the liquid argon scintillation veto. The performances of BEGe detectors in liquid argon are presented in this talk. Besides the spectroscopy capability, the focus will be placed on the expectations in terms of background rejection via pulse shape discrimination (PSD). In particular the main goal the BEGe's pulse shape analysis is to discriminate surface events produced by beta emitters (e.g. {sup 42}K) present in the liquid Ar.

  10. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  11. The data acquisition system of the Belle II Pixel Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, D.; Dingfelder, J.; Geßler, T.; Konorov, I.; Kühn, W.; Lange, S.; Lautenbach, K.; Levit, D.; Liu, Z.; Marinas, C.; Schnell, M.; Spruck, B.; Zhao, J.

    2014-08-01

    At the future Belle II experiment the DEPFET (DEPleted Field Effect Transistor) pixel detector will consist of about 8 million channels and is placed as the innermost detector. Because of its small distance to the interaction region and the high luminosity in Belle II, for a trigger rate of about 30 kHz with an estimated occupancy of about 3 % a data rate of about 22 GB/s is expected. Due to the high data rate, a data reduction factor higher than 30 is needed in order to stay inside the specifications of the event builder. The main hardware to reduce the data rate is a xTCA based Compute Node (CN) developed in cooperation between IHEP Beijing and University Giessen. Each node has as main component a Xilinx Virtex-5 FX70T FPGA and is equipped with 2 × 2 GB RAM , GBit Ethernet and 4 × 6.25 Gb/s optical links. An ATCA carrier board is able to hold up to four CN and supplies high bandwidth connections between the four CNs and to the ATCA backplane. To achieve the required data reduction on the CNs, regions of interest (ROI) are used. These regions are calculated in two independent systems by projecting tracks back to the pixel detector. One is the High Level Trigger (HLT) which uses data from the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), a silicon strip detector, and outer detectors. The other is the Data Concentrator (DATCON) which calculates ROIs based on SVD data only, in order to get low momentum tracks. With this information, only PXD data inside these ROIs will be forwarded to the event builder, while data outside of these regions will be discarded. First results of the test beam time in January 2014 at DESY with a Belle II vertex detector prototype and full DAQ chain will be presented.

  12. Radon detectors for continuous environmental monitoring applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisoutham, O.; Werczynski, S.; Chambers, S.; Zahorowski, W.

    2003-01-01

    The two-filter method is presently the best technique available for real-time low-level counting of atmospheric 222 Rn. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has developed and deployed a range of dual flow loop, two-filter radon detectors around the world for various applications. The detectors have a response time of 45 minutes, and can be custom built for specific purposes. The largest detectors have a lower limit of detection of ∼10 mBq m -3

  13. Boundary scan test of Belle II pixel detector electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitl, Philipp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    For the upgrade of the Vertex Detector at the Belle II experiment, DEPFET sensors will be used. These sensors need Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for control, readout and data processing. Because of high demands for a low material budget in the sensitive area, there is only little space left for these ASICs. Using state-of-the-art technologies like Ball Grid Array (BGA) chips, which are flip-chip mounted, the requirement of 14 ASICs on each of the 40 half ladders can be fulfilled. However, this highly integrated on-sensor ASIC solution results in a lack of physical access to the electrical connections, which is a problem for traditional testing methods. To overcome these limitations, the JTAG standard IEEE 1149.1 is used to check if the circuit is in working condition. This method provides electrical access to the boundary scan cells implemented in the ASICs. Therefore it is possible to perform connectivity tests and verify if the production of the circuit was successful.

  14. Whole body detectors for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silar, J.

    The requirements are presented on the parameters of whole-body detectors suitable for clinical retention assays and the detector-patient configuration described. A whole-body detector was developed with an axial configuration of two pairs of large-volume scintillation detectors with NaI(Tl) crystals. One pair is placed under the bed, the other above the bed on which the patient is being examined. The axes of the crystals are located at a distance of 90 cm apart. The field of vision of the detector is described for the application of a 137 Cs source in the air and in a 24 cm layer of water. The positive characteristics of the detector are listed as being homogeneous sensitivity, energy resolution, long-term stability of signal pulse amplitude and average pulse rate in the integral mode. The results obtained show that the detector may be used to evaluate the level of contamination of persons by gamma emitters within the region of approximately 800 Bq to 74 MBq. The error in converting the number of signal pulses in the integral mode does not exceed 50% for gamma emitters with a photon energy above 30O keV. (J.B.)

  15. 3D Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pennicard, D

    2009-01-01

    3D detectors are a novel variety of photodiode radiation detector, invented by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). Instead of having n- and p-type contacts on the front and back surfaces of a silicon substrate, like a standard photodiode, they have columns of doped material passing through the thickness of the silicon. This structure means that the detector can combine a reasonable substrate thickness with a very small electrode spacing, resulting in a low depletion voltage, fast charge collection and low charge sharing. These detectors have a couple of promising applications. Their fast charge collection and low depletion voltage should make them very radiation-tolerant. So, they could be used for future particle physics experiments at the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC), where high levels of radiation damage are expected. Also, their low charge sharing means they could potentially improve X-ray diffraction measurements at synchrotrons such as Diamond Light Source. This would allow these experiments, for exa...

  16. Noise propagation issues in Belle II pixel detector power cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, M.; Arteche, F.; Echeverria, I.; Pradas, A.; Rivetta, C.; Moser, H.-G.; Kiesling, C.; Rummel, S.; Arcega, F. J.

    2018-04-01

    The vertex detector used in the upgrade of High-Energy physics experiment Belle II includes DEPFET pixel detector (PXD) technology. In this complex topology the power supply units and the front-end electronics are connected through a PXD power cable bundle which may propagate the output noise from the power supplies to the vertex area. This paper presents a study of the propagation of noise caused by power converters in the PXD cable bundle based on Multi-conductor Transmission Line (MTL) theory. The work exposes the effect of the complex cable topology and shield connections on the noise propagation, which has an impact on the requirements of the power supplies. This analysis is part of the electromagnetic compatibility based design focused on functional safety to define the shield connections and power supply specifications required to ensure the successful integration of the detector and, specifically, to achieve the designed performance of the front-end electronics.

  17. LHCb detector and trigger performance in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca, Dordei

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of b- and c- hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events into two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  18. Flat detectors and their clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic and interventional flat detector X-ray systems are penetrating the market in all application segments. First introduced in radiography and mammography, they have conquered cardiac and general angiography and are getting increasing attention in fluoroscopy. Two flat detector technologies prevail. The dominating method is based on an indirect X-ray conversion process, using cesium iodide scintillators. It offers considerable advantages in radiography, angiography and fluoroscopy. The other method employs a direct converter such as selenium which is particularly suitable for mammography. Both flat detector technologies are based on amorphous silicon active pixel matrices. Flat detectors facilitate the clinical workflow in radiographic rooms, foster improved image quality and provide the potential to reduce dose. This added value is based on their large dynamic range, their high sensitivity to X-rays and the instant availability of the image. Advanced image processing is instrumental in these improvements and expand the range of conventional diagnostic methods. In angiography and fluoroscopy the transition from image intensifiers to flat detectors is facilitated by ample advantages they offer, such as distortion-free images, excellent coarse contrast, large dynamic range and high X-ray sensitivity. These characteristics and their compatibility with strong magnetic fields are the basis for improved diagnostic methods and innovative interventional applications. (orig.)

  19. Principle and applications of ionic thermometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkranz, J.; Jakes, D.

    1989-01-01

    The basic principles of electric conductivity of ionic compounds as well as causes and the character of phase transformation in these systems are briefly explained. The design of ionic thermometric detectors, their function and some applications in thermometry are also described. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  20. The ATLAS detector simulation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimoldi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The simulation program for the ATLAS experiment at CERN is currently in a full operational mode and integrated into the ATLAS common analysis framework, Athena. The OO approach, based on GEANT4, has been interfaced within Athena and to GEANT4 using the LCG dictionaries and Python scripting. The robustness of the application was proved during the test productions since 2004. The Python interface has added the flexibility, modularity and interactivity that the simulation tool requires in order to be able to provide a common implementation of different full ATLAS simulation setups, test beams and cosmic ray applications. Generation, simulation and digitization steps were exercised for performance and robustness tests. The comparison with real data has been possible in the context of the ATLAS Combined Test Beam (2004-2005) and cosmic ray studies (2006)

  1. The Belle II silicon vertex detector assembly and mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S., E-mail: stefano.bettarini@pi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    The Belle II experiment at the asymmetric SuperKEKB collider in Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity approximately 50 times greater than its predecessor (Belle). The central feature of the experiment is a vertex detector comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detectors (PXD) and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors (SVD). One of the key measurements for Belle II is CP violation asymmetry in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons, which hinges on a precise charged-track vertex determination and low-momentum track measurement. Towards this goal, a proper assembly of the SVD components with precise alignment ought to be performed and the geometrical tolerances should be checked to fall within the design limits. We present an overview of the assembly procedure that is being followed, which includes the precision gluing of the SVD module components, wire-bonding of the various electrical components, and precision 3D coordinate measurements of the final SVD modules. Finally, some results from the latest test-beam are reported.

  2. Silicon micro-vertex detector for Belle II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    The Belle experiment at the KEK B-factory is Japan provided the landmark experimental confirmation of CP violation mechanism within the standard model that led to the physics Nobel prize in 2008. In its second phase, called Belle II, it would seek for the holy-grail of new physics using rare decays of B and D mesons and tau leptons as a probe, in complimentary to the direct searches carried out with the LHC experiments. An important component of this upgrade is to replace the innermost subdetector, namely the silicon micro-vertex detector (SVD). The new SVD will, like the old one, consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detector, but made from 6âĂİ wafers and located at higher radii as a novel, two-layer DEPFET pixel detector will be inserted very dose to the beam- pipe. Starting with the physics motivation, we discuss the design concept, fabrication and the Indian contributions toward the Belle II SVD. (author)

  3. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  4. The Mark II vertex detectors: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1987-03-01

    The art of detecting the decay vertices from heavy quarks and leptons is comparatively new at electron-positron storage rings. So far, drift chambers positioned just outside the vacuum pipes which surround the interfaction region have provided the first accurate determinations of the tau and bottom lifetimes, and confirmed earlier measurements of charmed particle lifetimes. ''Second generation'' vertex detectors have demonstrated the feasibility of tagging heavy flavors by observing decay vertices, and are being used to search for anomalous decay topologies. These chambers have modest resolution on the scale of the effects they seek to measure, but are now well-understood and reliable tools. A generation of vertex detectors, considerably more ambitious, is under construction for experiments at SLC and LEP. They boast impact parameter resolution improved by a factor of four or more over previous detectors, and sub-millimeter track-pair resolution. The Mark II collaboration hopes to reach these goals with a high pressure precision drift chamber, and eventually surpass them with the addition of a silicon microstrip detector

  5. The Mark II vertex detectors: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1987-03-01

    The art of detecting the decay vertices from heavy quarks and leptons is comparatively new at electron-positron storage rings. So far, drift chambers positioned just outside the vacuum pipes which surround the interfaction region have provided the first accurate determinations of the tau and bottom lifetimes, and confirmed earlier measurements of charmed particle lifetimes. ''Second generation'' vertex detectors have demonstrated the feasibility of tagging heavy flavors by observing decay vertices, and are being used to search for anomalous decay topologies. These chambers have modest resolution on the scale of the effects they seek to measure, but are now well-understood and reliable tools. A generation of vertex detectors, considerably more ambitious, is under construction for experiments at SLC and LEP. They boast impact parameter resolution improved by a factor of four or more over previous detectors, and sub-millimeter track-pair resolution. The Mark II collaboration hopes to reach these goals with a high pressure precision drift chamber, and eventually surpass them with the addition of a silicon microstrip detector.

  6. Radiation effects on II-VI compound-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Dusi, W; Auricchio, N; Chirco, P; Zanarini, M; Siffert, P; Fougeres, P

    2002-01-01

    The performance of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to a radiation source can be strongly altered by the interaction of the ionizing particles and the material. Up to now, few experimental data are available on the response of II-VI compound detectors to different types of radiation sources. We have carried out a thorough investigation on the effects of gamma-rays, neutrons and electron irradiation both on CdTe : Cl and Cd sub 0 sub . sub 9 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 1 Te detectors. We have studied the detector response after radiation exposure by means of dark current measurements and of quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep traps present in the material have been characterized by means of PICTS (photo-induced current transient spectroscopy) analyses, which allow to determine the trap apparent activation energy and capture cross-section. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation doses has been monitored for all the different types of radiati...

  7. ICC Type II large-format FPA detector assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Thomas H.; Powers, Thomas P.

    1997-08-01

    ICC presents a new addition to their integrated detector assembly product line with the announcement of their type II large format staring class FPA units. A result of internally funded research and development, the ICC type II detector assembly can accommodate all existing large format staring class PtSi, InSb and MCT focal planes, up to 640 by 480. Proprietary methodologies completely eliminate all FPA stresses to allow for maximum FPA survivability. Standard optical and cryocooler interfaces allow for the use of BEI, AEG, TI SADA Hughes/Magnavox and Joule Thompson coolers. This unit has been qualified to the current SADA II thermal environmental specifications and was tailored around ICC's worldwide industry standard type IV product. Assembled in a real world flexible manufacturing environment, this unit features a wide degree of adaptability and can be easily modified to a user's specifications via standard options and add-ons that include optical interfaces, electrical interfaces and window/filter material selections.

  8. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment

  9. Heterojunction Structures for Photon Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    IR: Fourier-transform infrared FTO: Fluorine doped tin oxide G-R: generation-recombination HEIWIP: heterojunction interfacial workfunction internal...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The work presented here report findings in (1) infrared detectors based on p-GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions , (2) J and H...aggregate sensitized heterojunctions for solar cell and photon detection applications, (3) heterojunctions sensitized with quantum dots as low cost

  10. Ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for radiation detection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P.H., E-mail: pinghe.lu@redlen.com; Gomolchuk, P.; Chen, H.; Beitz, D.; Grosser, A.W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper described improvements in the ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for use in radiation detection applications. Research included experimenting with various conductive and underfill adhesive material systems suitable for CZT substrates. A detector design with encapsulation patterning was developed to protect detector surfaces and to control spacing between CZT anode and PCB carrier. Robustness of bare detectors was evaluated through temperature cycling and metallization shear testing. Attachment processes using well-chosen adhesives and PCB carrier materials were optimized to improve reliability of detector assemblies, resulted in Improved Attachment Detector Assembly. These detector assemblies were subjected to aggressive temperature cycling, and varying levels of drop/shock and vibration, in accordance with modified JEDEC, ANSI and FedEx testing standards, to assess their ruggedness. Further enhanced detector assembly ruggedization methods were investigated involving adhesive conformal coating, potting and dam filling on detector assemblies, which resulted in the Enhanced Ruggedization Detector Assembly. Large numbers of CZT detectors and detector assemblies with 5 mm and 15 mm thick, over 200 in total, were tested. Their performance was evaluated by exposure to various radioactive sources using comprehensive predefined detector specifications and testing protocols. Detector assemblies from improved attachment and enhanced ruggedization showed stable performances during the harsh environmental condition tests. In conclusion, significant progress has been made in improving the reliability and enhancing the ruggedness of CZT detector assemblies for radiation detection applications deployed in operational environments. - Highlights: • We developed ruggedization methods to enhance reliability of CZT detector assemblies. • Attachment of CZT radiation detectors was improved through comparative studies. • Bare detector metallization

  11. Detector applications in medecine and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Del Guerra, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    In recent years new diagnostic and therapeutic methods have been attracting more and more dedicated attention by the scientific community.The goal is a better understanding of the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the human being in an effort to find more appropriate medical prevention, diagnosis and therapy.Many of the achievements obtained so far derive from the use and the optimisation of detectors and techniques,which originated in the other fields of physics. The spin-off of High Energy Physics to Medical Physics has been particularly relevant in the field of detectors for medical imaging and especially for medical imaging with ionizing radiation. In this series of lectures,starting from the requests of each technique and or application I will attempt to present a survey of the detectors for medecine and biology. Various fields of medical imaging will be touched : radiology,digital radiography,mammography and radiotherapy. The capabilities of the major types of detectors (1-D and 2-D position sensitiv...

  12. BTDI detector technology for reconnaissance application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Stefan; Eckardt, Andreas; Krutz, David

    2017-11-01

    The Institute of Optical Sensor Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the institute's scientific results of the leading-edge detector design in a BTDI (Bidirectional Time Delay and Integration) architecture. This project demonstrates an approved technological design for high or multi-spectral resolution spaceborne instruments. DLR OS and BAE Systems were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for future projects, new manufacturing accuracy in order to keep pace with ambitious scientific and user requirements. Resulting from customer requirements and available technologies the current generation of space borne sensor systems is focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high-spectral resolution with intelligent control applications and new focal plane concepts opens the door to new remote sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview of the detector development and verification program at DLR on detector module level and key parameters like SNR, linearity, spectral response, quantum efficiency, PRNU, DSNU and MTF.

  13. The data handling processor of the Belle II DEPFET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germic, Leonard; Hemperek, Tomasz; Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Paschen, Botho; Luetticke, Florian; Krueger, Hans; Marinas, Carlos; Wermes, Norbert [Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A two layer highly granular DEPFET pixel detector will be operated as the innermost subsystem of the Belle II experiment, at the new Japanese super flavor factory (SuperKEKB). Such a finely segmented system will allow to improve the vertex reconstruction in such ultra high luminosity environment but, at the same time, the raw data stream generated by the 8 million pixel detector will exceed the capability of real-time processing due to its high frame rate, considering the limited material budged and strict space constrains. For this reason a new ASIC, the Data Handling Processor (DHP) is designed to provide data processing at the level of the front-end electronics, such as zero-suppression and common mode correction. Additional feature of the Data Handling Processor is the control block, providing control signals for the on-module ASICs used in the pixel detector. In this contribution, the description of the latest chip revision in TSMC 65 nm technology together with the latest test results of the interface functionality tests are presented.

  14. Pixel Detectors for Particle Physics and Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, N

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor pixel detectors offer features for the detection of radiation which are interesting for particle physics detectors as well as for imaging e.g. in biomedical applications (radiography, autoradiography, protein crystallography) or in Xray astronomy. At the present time hybrid pixel detectors are technologically mastered to a large extent and large scale particle detectors are being built. Although the physical requirements are often quite different, imaging applications are emerging and interesting prototype results are available. Monolithic detectors, however, offer interesting features for both fields in future applications. The state of development of hybrid and monolithic pixel detectors, excluding CCDs, and their different suitability for particle detection and imaging, is reviewed.

  15. Angular resolution in underground detectors and a status report of the Soudan II nucleon decay detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.; Barrett, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is a status report of the Soudan II honeycomb drift chamber project. It reports on the physics goals, present progress and future schedule of our experiment. It also includes a discussion of the angular resolution of cosmic ray muons which can be achieved in underground detectors, and in particular how to calibrate the resolution using the moon's shadow in cosmic rays. This last point has relevance in trying to understand the angular distributions in the reported observations of underground muons from Cygnus X-3. 12 refs., 9 figs

  16. The Belle II imaging Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, J.; Belle II Barrel Particle Identification Group

    2017-12-01

    High precision flavor physics measurements are an essential complement to the direct searches for new physics at the LHC ATLAS and CMS experiments. Such measurements will be performed using the upgraded Belle II detector that will take data at the SuperKEKB accelerator. With 40x the luminosity of KEKB, the detector systems must operate efficiently at much higher rates than the original Belle detector. A central element of the upgrade is the barrel particle identification system. Belle II has built and installed an imaging-Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector. The iTOP uses quartz optics as Cherenkov radiators. The photons are transported down the quartz bars via total internal reflection with a spherical mirror at the forward end to reflect photons to the backward end where they are imaged onto an array of segmented Micro-Channel Plate Photo-Multiplier Tubes (MCP-PMTs). The system is read out using giga-samples per second waveform sampling Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). The combined timing and spatial distribution of the photons for each event are used to determine particle species. This paper provides an overview of the iTOP system.

  17. The BEAST II Experiment at Belle II. Characterization of the commissioning detector system for SuperKEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlburg, Patrick; Eyring, Andreas; Filimonov, Viacheslav; Krueger, Hans; Mari, Laura; Marinas, Carlos; Pohl, David-Leon; Wermes, Norbert; Dingfelder, Jochen [University of Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Before the upgraded vertex detector for the Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan will be installed, a dedicated detector system for machine commissioning (BEAST II) will be employed. One of its main objectives is to measure and characterize the different background types in order to ensure a safe environment before the installation of the actual silicon detector systems close to the interaction point. FANGS, a detector system at BEAST II, based on ATLAS-IBL front-end electronics and planar silicon sensors is currently being developed for this purpose. The unique feature of this detector system is the high energy resolution achieved by using an external FPGA clock to sample the time-over-threshold signal, while keeping the excellent timing properties. The complete detector system is presented in this talk.

  18. CMS detector tracking performance in Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Brondolin, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of Run-II in June 2015, LHC has delivered pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 13TeV and with a bunch time separation of 25 ns. On avarage, more than 25 inelastic collisions are superimposed on the event of interest. Under these new conditions, the CMS collaboration has re-calibrated and verified the performance of the whole detector. In particular, the CMS tracking performance has been measured both directly and indirectly. Direct measurements are, among others, the beam spot determination, the vertex resolution and the muon reconstruction efficiency with the tag and probe technique. An indirect assessment can be given by the pion reconstruction efficiency and the low-mass resonance parameters as a function of different single track kinematics.

  19. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bozek, A. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); and others

    2016-07-11

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  20. Tests of the gated mode for Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinker, Eduard [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer intrinsic amplification and very high signal to noise ratio. They form an integral building block for the vertex detector system of the Belle II experiment, which will start data taking in the year 2017 at the SuperKEKB Collider in Japan. A special Test board (Hybrid4) is used, which contains a small version of the DEPFET sensor with a read-out (DCD) and a steering chip (Switcher) attached, both controlled by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as the central interface to the computer. In order to keep the luminosity of the collider constant over time, the particle bunch currents have to be topped off by injecting additional bunches at a rate of 50 Hz. The particles in the daughter bunches produce a high rate of background (noisy bunches) for a short period of time, saturating the occupancy of the sensor. Operating the DEPFET sensor in a Gated Mode allows preserving the signals from collisions of normal bunches while protecting the pixels from background signals of the passing noisy bunches. An overview of the Gated Mode and first results is presented.

  1. Advancement and application of bubble detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.A.; Casson, W.H.; Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    A new technology is vying for position in the dosimetry community. This relatively young technology is building upon the foundation of the bubble chamber, conceptualized by Glaser in 1952. Although the attitudes surrounding this technology are somewhat mixed, applications of this technology hold great promise for the future of neutron dosimetry. The Dosimetry Applications Research facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory is looking into some innovative applications of this technology. The authors are investigating options for overcoming its limiting features in hopes of achieving an unprecedented level of proficiency in neutron detection. Among these are the developing and testing of a Combination Area Neutron Spectrometer, CANS, assessing the plausibility of extremity applications, the assembly of an alternative reader for research, investigation of temperature-related effects and how to correct for them and considerations on the coming of age of neutron dosimetry via real time detection of bubble formation in Bubble Technology Industries Inc. detectors. The authors attempt to answer the questions: (1) What areas hold the greatest promise for application of this emerging technology?; (2) What obstacles must be overcome before full-blown application becomes a reality?; and (3) What might the future hold?

  2. Self powered platinum flux detector application for shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guoquan

    2005-01-01

    This article introduce Neutron Flux Detector application in Candu Power Plant, including: design purpose, location in the site, dynamic compensation, differential compensation, detector assembly pressurized with high pure helium etc. And shielding grounding improvement is suggested because of detector signal and setpoint signal noise. (authors)

  3. Solid-state radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses the current solid state material used in advance detectors manufacturing and their pros and cons and how one can tailor them using different techniques, to get the maximum performance. The book is application oriented to radiation detectors for medical, X and gamma rays application, and good reference with in-depth discussion of detector's physics as it relates to medical application tailored for engineers and scientists.

  4. Ultra-thin infrared metamaterial detector for multicolor imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, John A; Tian, Zhao-Bing; Krishna, Sanjay; Padilla, Willie J

    2017-09-18

    The next generation of infrared imaging systems requires control of fundamental electromagnetic processes - absorption, polarization, spectral bandwidth - at the pixel level to acquire desirable information about the environment with low system latency. Metamaterial absorbers have sparked interest in the infrared imaging community for their ability to enhance absorption of incoming radiation with color, polarization and/or phase information. However, most metamaterial-based sensors fail to focus incoming radiation into the active region of a ultra-thin detecting element, thus achieving poor detection metrics. Here our multifunctional metamaterial absorber is directly integrated with a novel mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) detector with an ultra-thin (~λ/15) InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (T2SL) interband cascade detector. The deep sub-wavelength metamaterial detector architecture proposed and demonstrated here, thus significantly improves the detection quantum efficiency (QE) and absorption of incoming radiation in a regime typically dominated by Fabry-Perot etalons. Our work evinces the ability of multifunctional metamaterials to realize efficient wavelength selective detection across the infrared spectrum for enhanced multispectral infrared imaging applications.

  5. Proportional gas scintillation detectors and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petr, I.

    1978-01-01

    The principle is described of a gas proportional scintillation detector and its function. Dependence of Si(Li) and xenon proportional detectors energy resolution on the input window size is given. A typical design is shown of a xenon detector used for X-ray spetrometry at an energy of 277 eV to 5.898 keV and at a gas pressure of 98 to 270 kPa. Gas proportional scintillation detectors show considerable better energy resolution than common proportional counters and even better resolution than semiconductor Si(Li) detectors for low X radiation energies. For detection areas smaller than 25 mm 2 Si(Li) detectors show better resolution, especially for higher X radiation energies. For window areas 25 to 190 mm 2 both types of detectors are equal, for a window area exceeding 190 mm 2 the proportional scintillation detector has higher energy resolution. (B.S.)

  6. CVD polycrystalline diamond. A novel neutron detector and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongkolnavin, R.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Polycrystalline Diamond film has been investigated as a low noise sensor for beta particles, gammas and neutrons using High Energy Physics technologies. Its advantages and disadvantages have been explored in comparison with other particle detectors such as silicon detector and other plastic scintillators. The performance and characteristic of the diamond detector have been fully studied and discussed. These studies will lead to a better understanding of how CVD diamonds perform as a detector and how to improve their performance under various conditions. A CVD diamond detector model has been proposed which is an attempt to explain the behaviour of such an extreme detector material. A novel neutron detector is introduced as a result of these studies. A good thermal and fast neutron detector can be fabricated with CVD diamond with new topologies. This detector will perform well without degradation in a high neutron radiation environment, as diamond is known to be radiation hard. It also offers better neutrons and gammas discrimination for high gamma background applications compared to other semiconductor detectors. A full simulation of the detector has also been done using GEANT, a Monte-Carlo simulation program for particle detectors. Simulation results show that CVD diamond detectors with this novel topology can detect neutrons with great directionality. Experimental work has been done on this detector in a nuclear reactor environment and accelerator source. A novel neutron source which offers a fast pulse high-energy neutrons has also been studied. With this detector, applications in neutron spectrometer for low-Z material have been pursued with various neutron detection techniques. One of these is a low-Z material identification system. The system has been designed and simulated for contraband luggage interrogation using the detector and the novel neutron source. Also other neutron related applications have been suggested. (author)

  7. CVD polycrystalline diamond. A novel neutron detector and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongkolnavin, R.

    1998-07-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Polycrystalline Diamond film has been investigated as a low noise sensor for beta particles, gammas and neutrons using High Energy Physics technologies. Its advantages and disadvantages have been explored in comparison with other particle detectors such as silicon detector and other plastic scintillators. The performance and characteristic of the diamond detector have been fully studied and discussed. These studies will lead to a better understanding of how CVD diamonds perform as a detector and how to improve their performance under various conditions. A CVD diamond detector model has been proposed which is an attempt to explain the behaviour of such an extreme detector material. A novel neutron detector is introduced as a result of these studies. A good thermal and fast neutron detector can be fabricated with CVD diamond with new topologies. This detector will perform well without degradation in a high neutron radiation environment, as diamond is known to be radiation-hard. It also offers better neutrons and gammas discrimination for high gamma background applications compared to other semiconductor detectors. A full simulation of the detector has also been done using GEANT, a Monte Carlo simulation program for particle detectors. Simulation results show that CVD diamond detectors with this novel topology can detect neutrons with great directionality. Experimental work has been done on this detector in a nuclear reactor environment and accelerator source. A novel neutron source which offers a fast pulse high-energy neutrons has also been studied. With this detector, applications in neutron spectrometry for low-Z material have been pursued with various neutron detection techniques. One of these is a low-Z material identification system. The system has been designed and simulated for contraband luggage interrogation using the detector and the novel neutron source. (author)

  8. Application of AXUV photoelectric diode detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Guogang; Pan Ningdong; Liu Yi

    2006-01-01

    Based on the photo-voltage effect of PN junction, two kinds of detector are introduced. Newly designed AXUV (Absolute Extreme Ultra Violet) photodiodes array radiation diagnostic system is installed in the HA-2A tokamak device. The advantages of AXUV detector are its near theoretical high quantum efficiency, high sensitivity, high responsibility, electromagnetic and vibration immunity, low price. (authors)

  9. Principle and applications of Controlled-Drift Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2007-01-01

    The Controlled-Drift Detector is a fully depleted silicon detector that allows 2D position sensing and energy spectroscopy of X-rays in the range 0.5-30 keV with imaging capability up to 100 kframe/s, event timing of few ns and limited readout channels. In this paper we review the Controlled-Drift Detector operating principle and we present its applications in X-ray absorption imaging and in Compton electrons tracking

  10. Monitoring complex detectors: the uSOP approach in the Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capua, F. Di; Aloisio, A.; Giordano, R.; Ameli, F.; Anastasio, A.; Izzo, V.; Tortone, G.; Branchini, P.

    2017-01-01

    uSOP is a general purpose single board computer designed for deep embedded applications in control and monitoring of detectors, sensors and complex laboratory equipments. It is based on the AM3358 (1 GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor), equipped with USB and Ethernet interfaces. On-board RAM and solid state storage allows hosting a full LINUX distribution. In this paper we discuss the main aspects of the hardware and software design and the expandable peripheral architecture built around field busses. We report on several applications of uSOP system in the Belle II experiment, presently under construction at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). In particular we will report the deployment of uSOP in the monitoring system framework of the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter.

  11. Monitoring complex detectors: the uSOP approach in the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, F.; Aloisio, A.; Ameli, F.; Anastasio, A.; Branchini, P.; Giordano, R.; Izzo, V.; Tortone, G.

    2017-08-01

    uSOP is a general purpose single board computer designed for deep embedded applications in control and monitoring of detectors, sensors and complex laboratory equipments. It is based on the AM3358 (1 GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor), equipped with USB and Ethernet interfaces. On-board RAM and solid state storage allows hosting a full LINUX distribution. In this paper we discuss the main aspects of the hardware and software design and the expandable peripheral architecture built around field busses. We report on several applications of uSOP system in the Belle II experiment, presently under construction at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). In particular we will report the deployment of uSOP in the monitoring system framework of the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter.

  12. BABAR - the detector for the PEP II B Factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1994-09-01

    BABAR refers to the detector that is being designed for the PEP II B-Factory at SLAC to perform a comprehensive study of CP violation in B meson decays. The design requirements and the principal detector components are briefly described. A summary of the expected physics performance is presented

  13. Twenty-three ionization heat detectors for the Dark Matter search with EDELWEISS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navick, X.-F.; Beeman, J.; Carty, M.; Chapellier, M.; Gerbier, G.; Granelli, R.; Herve, S.; Karolak, M.; Nizery, F.; Schwamm, F.; Villar, V.

    2006-01-01

    The first phase of the EDELWEISS-II Dark Matter search is under construction. In this phase, 23 detectors with NTD thermal sensors are going to be used for the direct detection of WIMPs. In this paper, we are describing the production, mounting, monitoring and storage techniques, together with the different characteristics of the detectors and their variations

  14. MSM optical detector on the basis of II-type ZnSe/ZnTe superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetzov, P. I., E-mail: pik218@ire216.msk.su; Averin, S. V., E-mail: sva278@ire216.msk.su; Zhitov, V. A.; Zakharov, L. Yu.; Kotov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    On the basis of a type-II ZnSe/ZnTe superlattice, a MSM (metal—semiconductor–metal) photodetector is fabricated and investigated. The detector features low dark currents and a high sensitivity. The spectral characteristic of the detector provides the possibility of the selective detection of three separate spectral portions of visible and near-infrared radiation.

  15. Silicon radiation detectors: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    Silicon nuclear radiation detectors are available today in a large variety of sizes and types. This profusion has been made possible by the ever increasing quality and diameter silicon single crystals, new processing technologies and techniques, and innovative detector design. The salient characteristics of the four basic detector groups, diffused junction, ion implanted, surface barrier, and lithium drift are reviewed along with the silicon crystal requirements. Results of crystal imperfections detected by lithium ion compensation are presented. Processing technologies and techniques are described. Two recent novel position-sensitive detector designs are discussed - one in high-energy particle track reconstruction and the other in x-ray angiography. The unique experimental results obtained with these devices are presented

  16. Detectors in Medicine and Biology: Applications of Detectors in Technology, Medicine and Other Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Detectors in Medicine and Biology in 'Applications of Detectors in Technology, Medicine and Other Fields', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B2: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 2: Systems and Applications'. This document is part of Part 2 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '7.1 Detectors in Medicine and Biology' of Chapter '7 Applications of Detectors in Technology; Medicine and Other Fields' with the content: 7.1 Detectors in Medicine and Biology 7.1.1 Dosimetry and medical imaging 7.1.1.1 Radiotherapy and dosimetry 7.1.1.2 Status of medical imaging 7.1.1.3 Towards in-vivo molecular imaging 7.1.2 X-Ray radiography and computed tomography (CT) 7.1.2.1 Different X-Ray imaging modalities 7.1.2.2 Detec...

  17. Wire gaseous coordinate detectors and their applications in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peshekhonov, V.D.

    1986-01-01

    Wire gaseous coordinate detectors continue to be a basic tool in experimental high-energy physics and are being intensively introduced into related areas of science and technology, particularly biomedical research. The constant evolution of these detectors allows broad application of their new modificatons: multistep chambers, low-pressure detectors, time-projection chambers, and so on, so that detector systems are enriched with new possibilities. In this review we give the operating principles and fundamental parameters of these detectors and discuss some examples of how they are used in experimental physics. We also explore some of the features of the use of these detectors for research in molecular biology and medical diagnostics for examples of existing and projected setups

  18. Fast track-finding trigger processor for the SLAC/LBL Mark II Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brafman, H.; Breidenbach, M.; Hettel, R.; Himel, T.; Horelick, D.

    1977-10-01

    The SLAC/LBL Mark II Magnetic Detector consists of various particle detectors arranged in cylindrical symmetry located in and around an axial magnetic field. A versatile, programmable secondary trigger processor was designed and built to find curved tracks in the detector. The system operates at a 10 MHz clock rate with a total processing time of 34 μsec and is used to ''trigger'' the data processing computer, thereby rejecting background and greatly improving the data acquisition aspects of the detector-computer combination

  19. Detector response theory and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keijzer, J.

    1992-11-01

    Some methods to describe the dynamics of fission reactors are investigated. First the reactivity of a reactor is regarded. The values of an exact calculation of the reactivity are compared with values obtained by first-order perturbation theory. Then a description of the point reactor kinetic theory and the detector response theory is given. A comparison of the two methods is made, using models of some well defined perturbations. Two of the perturbations are such that a physical movement of some absorber is regarded. A new way of modelling these moving objects is proposed. The result of the point reactor kinetic theory and the detecor response theory did not differ too much for perturbations which were far from the detector position. Locally however point reactor kinetic theory was not, in contrast with detector response theory, able to produce reliable results. The results of these calculations are to be compared with experiments, which will be performed later. (orig.)

  20. Microstructured silicon neutron detectors for security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, S; Fleta, C; Jumilla, C; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D; Rodriguez, J; Lozano, M; Guardiola, C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and performance of a perforated thermal neutron silicon detector with a 6 LiF neutron converter. This device was manufactured within the REWARD project workplace whose aim is to develop and enhance technologies for the detection of nuclear and radiological materials. The sensor perforated structure results in a higher efficiency than that obtained with an equivalent planar sensor. The detectors were tested in a thermal neutron beam at the nuclear reactor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon and the intrinsic detection efficiency for thermal neutrons and the gamma sensitivity were obtained. The Geant4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the experimental conditions, i.e. thermal neutron beam and the whole detector geometry. An intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency of 8.6%±0.4% with a discrimination setting of 450 keV was measured

  1. Wavelets: Applications to Image Compression-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wavelets: Applications to Image Compression-II. Sachin P ... successful application of wavelets in image com- ... b) Soft threshold: In this case, all the coefficients x ..... [8] http://www.jpeg.org} Official site of the Joint Photographic Experts Group.

  2. SATA II - Stochastic Algebraic Topology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0018 SATA II - Stochastic Algebraic Topology and Applications 150032 Robert Adler TECHNION ISRAEL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Final...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Dec 2014 to 14 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SATA II - Stochastic Algebraic Topology and Applications... Topology and Applications Continuation of, and associated with SATA: Stochastic Algebraic Topology and Applications FA8655-11-1-3039, 09/1/2011–08/31/2014

  3. Modern gas-avalanche radiation detectors: from innovations to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) technologies allow for the conception of advanced large area radiation detectors with unprecedented spatial resolutions and sensitivities, capable of operating under very high radiation flux. After more than two decades of extensive R and D carried by large number of groups worldwide, these detector technologies have reached high level of maturity. Nowadays, they are adapted as leading instruments for a growing number of applications in particle physics and in many other fields on basic and applied research. The growing interest in MPGD technologies and their mass-production capabilities naturally motivates further developments in the field. The state-of-the-art detector concepts and technologies have been introduced and their evolution, properties and current leading applications have been reviewed. Future potential applications as well as new technology challenges have been discussed

  4. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, Markus, E-mail: friedl@hephy.a [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Bergauer, Thomas; Gfall, Immanuel; Irmler, Christian; Valentan, Manfred [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-01

    After 10 years of successful operation, the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will be completed in 2010. Thereafter, a major upgrade of the KEK-B machine is foreseen until 2014, aiming at a final luminosity of 8x10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is about 40 times higher than the present peak value. Consequently, also the Belle experiment needs to be changed and the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) in particular will be completely replaced as it already operates close to its limits in the present system. The future SVD (a.k.a. SuperSVD) will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors like the present one, but at larger radii, because it will be complemented by a two-layer pixel detector as the innermost sensing device. The SuperSVD will be entirely composed of silicon sensors made from 6 in. wafers read out by APV25 front-end chips that were originally developed for the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several years of R and D effort led to innovations such as the Origami chip-on-sensor concept and readout electronics with hit time finding which were successfully demonstrated on prototypes. These features will be included in the final system which is presently being designed. This paper will give an overview of the SuperSVD and present results from prototype tests ranging from detector modules to back-end electronics.

  5. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, Markus; Bergauer, Thomas; Gfall, Immanuel; Irmler, Christian; Valentan, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    After 10 years of successful operation, the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will be completed in 2010. Thereafter, a major upgrade of the KEK-B machine is foreseen until 2014, aiming at a final luminosity of 8x10 35 cm -2 s -1 , which is about 40 times higher than the present peak value. Consequently, also the Belle experiment needs to be changed and the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) in particular will be completely replaced as it already operates close to its limits in the present system. The future SVD (a.k.a. SuperSVD) will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors like the present one, but at larger radii, because it will be complemented by a two-layer pixel detector as the innermost sensing device. The SuperSVD will be entirely composed of silicon sensors made from 6 in. wafers read out by APV25 front-end chips that were originally developed for the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several years of R and D effort led to innovations such as the Origami chip-on-sensor concept and readout electronics with hit time finding which were successfully demonstrated on prototypes. These features will be included in the final system which is presently being designed. This paper will give an overview of the SuperSVD and present results from prototype tests ranging from detector modules to back-end electronics.

  6. CZT Virtual Frisch-grid Detector: Principles and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Hossain, A.; James, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for using as room-temperature semiconductor detectors, because it has a wide bandgap and a high atomic number. However, due to the material's poor hole mobility, several special techniques were developed to ensure its suitability for radiation detection. Among them, the virtual Frisch-grid CZT detector is an attractive option, having a simple configuration, yet delivering an outstanding spectral performance. The goal of our group in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is to improve the performance of Frisch-ring CZT detectors; most recently, that effort focused on the non-contacting Frisch-ring detector, allowing us to build an inexpensive, large-volume detector array with high energy-resolution and a large effective area. In this paper, the principles of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are described, especially BNL's innovative improvements. The potential applications of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are discussed, and as an example, a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer using a CZT virtual Frischgrid detector array is introduced, which is a self-contained device with a radiation detector, readout circuit, communication circuit, and high-voltage supply. It has good energy resolution of 1.4% (FWHM of 662-keV peak) with a total detection volume of ∼20 cm 3 . Such a portable inexpensive device can be used widely in nonproliferation applications, non-destructive detection, radiation imaging, and for homeland security. Extended systems based on the same technology have potential applications in industrial- and nuclear-medical-imaging

  7. JTAG boundary-scan of the Belle II pixel vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitl, Philipp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    For the upgrade of the Vertex Detector at the Belle II experiment, DEPFET sensors will be used. This new technology requires specific electronics for controlling and readout. Therefore three different kinds of Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) are mounted very close to the sensors. Because of space limitations ball grid arrays (BGAs) are used for the contacts to the electronic circuitry. After the mounting process this results in a lack of physical access to the electrical connections. With Boundary-Scan tests, following the IEEE Std 1149.1, it is possible to regain access to the pins for interconnection tests. In this way a quality assurance (QA) is possible to verify that the integration was done correctly and that the circuitry and the electronics are working properly. The present user-friendly system is presented, including the description of additionally developed hardware as well as necessary adjustments to the netlist files and Boundary-Scan Description Language (BSDL) Files of the ASICs. Achieved measurement results from the so far produced detector modules are shown.

  8. The resonant detector and its application to epithermal neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Andreani, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Imberti, S.; Bracco, A.; Previtali, E.; Pessina, G.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy are being opened by the development of the resonant detector (RD) and its use on inverse geometry time of flight spectrometers at spallation sources. The RD was first proposed in the 1980s and was recently brought to a performance level exceeding conventional neutron-sensitive Li-glass scintillator detectors. It features a photon counter coupled to a neutron analyzer foil. Resonant neutron absorption in the foil results in the emission of prompt gamma rays that are detected in the photon counter. The dimensions of the RD set the spatial resolution that can be achieved, ranging from a fraction of a cm to several cm. It can thus be tailored to the construction of detector arrays of different geometry. The main results of the research on this kind of detector are reported leading to the present optimized RD design based on a combination of YAP scintillation photon counter and uranium or gold analyzer foils. This detector has already been selected for application in the upgrade of the VESUVIO spectrometer on ISIS. A special application is the Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank, which will extend the kinematical region for neutron scattering to low momentum transfer ( -1 ) whilst still keeping energy transfer >1 eV, thus allowing new experimental studies in condensed matter systems. The first results of tests made with prototype VLAD detectors are presented, confirming the usefulness of the RD for measurements at scattering angles as low as 2-5 deg

  9. Innovative applications and developments of micro-pattern gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Francke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Study of nature and the world around us has been a primary motivation for scientists and researchers for centuries. Advanced methods in the study of elementary particles have led to even greater discoveries in recent years. "Innovative Applications and Developments of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors" focuses on the analysis and use of various gas detection systems, providing a detailed description of some of the most commonly used gas detectors and the science behind them. From early detectors to modern tools and techniques, this book will be of particular use to practitioners and researchers in chemical engineering and materials science, in addition to students and academicians concentrating in the field.

  10. Theory of Moxon-Rae type detectors. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.S.; Majkrzak, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical development of the Moxon-Rae detector's detection mechanism has been extended to include photoelectric effect and pair production for (γ,e) processes in addition to the previously considered Compton scattering. Further the converters now include Al and Pb along with C that was treated in the earlier theory. Quantitative calculations of the electron production probability, fsup((1)) (E,t) and the electron transmission probability, fsup((2)) (E,t) have been made for C, Al and Pb converters for photon energy Esub(γ) up to 10 MeV. A comparison of the fsup((1)) (E,t) fsup((2)) (E,t) values with the recently published Monte Carlo calculations of the response of Moxon-Rae detectors indicates that the two sets of values agree rather well. Various parameters useful for similar calculations, employing other converters, are also included. (Auth.)

  11. Semiconductor Pixel detectors and their applications in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, J

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor technology allow construction of highly efficient and low noise pixel detectors of ionizing radiation. Steadily improving quality of front end electronics enables fast digital signal processing in each pixel which offers recording of more complete information about each detected quantum (energy, time, number of particles). All these features improve an extend applicability of pixel technology in different fields. Some applications of this technology especially for imaging in life sciences will be shown (energy and phase sensitive X-ray radiography and tomography, radiography with heavy charged particles, neutron radiography, etc). On the other hand a number of obstacles can limit the detector performance if not handled. The pixel detector is in fact an array of individual detectors (pixels), each of them has its own efficiency, energy calibration and also noise. The common effort is to make all these parameters uniform for all pixels. However an ideal uniformity can be never reached. Moreover, it is often seen that the signal in one pixel can affect the neighbouring pixels due to various reasons (e.g. charge sharing). All such effects have to be taken into account during data processing to avoid false data interpretation. A brief view into the future of pixel detectors and their applications including also spectroscopy, tracking and dosimetry is given too. Special attention is paid to the problem of detector segmentation in context of the charge sharing effect.

  12. He-4 fast neutron detectors in nuclear security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murer, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents studies of "4He fast neutron detectors for nuclear security applications. Such devices are high pressure gas scintillation detectors, sensitive to neutrons in the energy range of fission sources. First, an introduction to the scope of the intended application is given. This is followed by a description of all components relevant to the operation of the detector. The next chapter presents studies of various characteristics of the neutron detector, among them properties of its scintillation response, differences between neutron and gamma interactions and effects of the light collection process. The results of the detector characterization are used to develop neutron gamma discrimination methods. These methods are put to the test using measurements with a high gamma flux, and the results are compared to performance requirements of Radiation Portal Monitors. Background neutron measurements are presented next. Measured neutron rates are compared to values published in scientific literature. The fluctuation of the background count rate was studied, and the contribution of muons evaluated. Two applications of the detectors in the field of nuclear security are discussed in the last two chapters. The first one is a novel method to measure the plutonium mass in a container filled with Mixed Oxide Fuel. The last chapter presents the development of a Radiation Portal Monitor which, in addition to neutron and gamma counting, exploits time correlation to detect threats such as plutonium and "6"0Co. (author)

  13. He-4 fast neutron detectors in nuclear security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murer, D. E.

    2014-07-01

    This work presents studies of {sup 4}He fast neutron detectors for nuclear security applications. Such devices are high pressure gas scintillation detectors, sensitive to neutrons in the energy range of fission sources. First, an introduction to the scope of the intended application is given. This is followed by a description of all components relevant to the operation of the detector. The next chapter presents studies of various characteristics of the neutron detector, among them properties of its scintillation response, differences between neutron and gamma interactions and effects of the light collection process. The results of the detector characterization are used to develop neutron gamma discrimination methods. These methods are put to the test using measurements with a high gamma flux, and the results are compared to performance requirements of Radiation Portal Monitors. Background neutron measurements are presented next. Measured neutron rates are compared to values published in scientific literature. The fluctuation of the background count rate was studied, and the contribution of muons evaluated. Two applications of the detectors in the field of nuclear security are discussed in the last two chapters. The first one is a novel method to measure the plutonium mass in a container filled with Mixed Oxide Fuel. The last chapter presents the development of a Radiation Portal Monitor which, in addition to neutron and gamma counting, exploits time correlation to detect threats such as plutonium and {sup 60}Co. (author)

  14. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  15. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z., E-mail: zhirui.xu@epfl.ch; Tobin, M.

    2016-07-11

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  16. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086132; Tobin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  17. A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00425747; McMahon, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that detects proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV. The Semiconductor Tracker is part of the Inner Detector, implemented using silicon microstrip detectors with binary read-out, providing momentum measurement of charged particles with excellent resolution. The operation of the LHC and the ATLAS experiment started in 2010, with ten years of operation expected until major upgrades are needed in the accelerator and the experiments. The ATLAS tracker will need to be completely replaced due to the radiation damage and occupancy of some detector elements and the data links at high luminosities. These upgrades after the first ten years of operation are named the Phase-II Upgrade and involve a re-design of the LHC, resulting in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker a...

  18. Calibration and performance of the MARK II drift chamber vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrett, D.; Ford, W.T.; Hinshaw, D.A.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Weber, P.

    1990-05-01

    We have calibrated and studied the performance of the MARK II drift chamber vertex detector with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber inside the MARK II detector at the SLC. The chamber achieves 30 μm impact parameter resolution and 500 μm track-pair resolution using CO 2 /C 2 H 6 H 6 (92/8) at 2 atmospheres pressure. The chamber has successfully recorded Z 0 decays at the SLC, and resolved tracks in dense hadronic jets with good efficiency and high accuracy. 5 refs., 13 figs

  19. Application of cadmium telluride detectors to high energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.; Thomas, G.; Cuzin, M.; Verger, L.

    1991-01-01

    15 years ago, Cadmium Telluride detectors have been investigated in our laboratory as possible detectors for medical scanners [1]. Today most of these machines are using high pressure Xenon gas as multicells detectors, BGO or CdWO 4 scintillators for industrial computerized tomography. Xenon gas detectors are well suited for detection of 100 KeV X-rays and enables to build 1000 cells homogeneous detector with a dynamic range of 3 decades. BGO and CdWO 4 scintillators, associated with photomultipliers or photodiodes are used for higher energy (400 KeV). They present a low afterglow and a dynamic range of 4 to 5 decades. Non destructive testing of very absorbing objects (eg 2 m diameter solid rocket motor) by X-ray tomography requires much higher energy X-rays (16 MeV) and doses up to 12000 rads/min at 1 meter. For this application Cadmium Telluride detectors operating as photoconductors are well suited. A prototype of tomograph machine, able to scan 0.5 m diameter high density objects has been realized with 25 CdTe detectors (25x15x0.8 mm 3 ). It produces good quality 1024x1024 tomographic images

  20. Characterization of large volume HPGe detectors. Part II: Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, Bart; Reiter, Peter; Pascovici, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Measurements on a 12-fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356keV γ-rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and digital signal processing electronics

  1. The silicon strips Inner Tracker (ITk) of the ATLAS Phase-II upgrade detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220523; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The inner detector of the present ATLAS detector has been designed and developed to function in the environment of the present Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the next-generation tracking detector proposed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the so-called ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade, the particle densities and radiation levels will be higher by as much as a factor of ten. The new detectors must be faster, they need to be more highly segmented, and covering more area. They also need to be more resistant to radiation, and they require much greater power delivery to the front-end systems. At the same time, they cannot introduce excess material which could undermine performance. For those reasons, the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector must be redesigned and rebuilt completely. The inner detector of the current detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk). It consists of an innermost pixel detector and an outer strips tracker. This contribution focuses on the strips tracker. The basic detection unit of the ...

  2. Application Programming in AWIPS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Matt; McGrath, Kevin; Burks, Jason; Carcione, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Since its inception almost 8 years ago, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has integrated NASA data into the National Weather Service's decision support system (DSS) the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SPoRT has, in some instances, had to shape and transform data sets into various formats and manipulate configurations to visualize them in AWIPS. With the advent of the next generation of DSS, AWIPS II, developers will be able to develop their own plugins to handle any type of data. Raytheon is developing AWIPS II to be a more extensible package written mainly in Java, and built around a Service Oriented Architecture. A plugin architecture will allow users to install their own code modules, and (if all the rules have been properly followed) they will work hand-in-hand with AWIPS II as if it were originally built in. Users can bring in new datasets with existing plugins, tweak plugins to handle a nuance or desired new functionality, or create an entirely new visualization layout for a new dataset. SPoRT is developing plugins to ensure its existing NASA data will be ready for AWIPS II when it is delivered, and to prepare for the future of new instruments on upcoming satellites.

  3. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  4. Beauty in photoproduction at HERA II with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutle, Sarah

    2010-02-15

    The production of beauty quarks in ep collisions should be accurately calculable in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) since the large mass of the b quark provides a hard scale. Therefore it is interesting to compare such predictions to results using photoproduction events where a low-virtuality photon, emitted by the incoming lepton, collides with a parton from the incoming proton. A measurement of beauty in photoproduction has been made at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 126 pb{sup -}1. Beauty was identified in events with a muon in the final state by using the transverse momentum of the muon relative to the closest jet. Lifetime information from the silicon vertex detector was also used; the impact parameter of the muon with respect to the primary vertex was exploited to discriminate between signal and background. Cross sections for beauty production as a function of the muon and the jet variables were measured and compared to QCD predictions and to previous measurements. The data were found to be well described by the predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD. The dijet sample of beauty photoproduction events was also used to study higher-order QCD topologies. At leading order, the two jets in the event are produced back-to-back in azimuthal angle, such that {delta}{phi}{sup jj}={phi}{sup j1}-{phi}{sup j2}={pi}. Additional soft radiation causes small azimuthal decorrelations, whilst {delta}{phi}{sup jj} significantly lower than {pi} is evidence of additional hard radiation. In this thesis, the cross section versus {delta}{phi}{sup jj} for beauty photoproduction and the comparison to NLO QCD predictions and Monte Carlo models are presented. (orig.)

  5. Beauty in photoproduction at HERA II with the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutle, Sarah

    2010-02-01

    The production of beauty quarks in ep collisions should be accurately calculable in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) since the large mass of the b quark provides a hard scale. Therefore it is interesting to compare such predictions to results using photoproduction events where a low-virtuality photon, emitted by the incoming lepton, collides with a parton from the incoming proton. A measurement of beauty in photoproduction has been made at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 126 pb - 1. Beauty was identified in events with a muon in the final state by using the transverse momentum of the muon relative to the closest jet. Lifetime information from the silicon vertex detector was also used; the impact parameter of the muon with respect to the primary vertex was exploited to discriminate between signal and background. Cross sections for beauty production as a function of the muon and the jet variables were measured and compared to QCD predictions and to previous measurements. The data were found to be well described by the predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD. The dijet sample of beauty photoproduction events was also used to study higher-order QCD topologies. At leading order, the two jets in the event are produced back-to-back in azimuthal angle, such that Δφ jj =φ j1 -φ j2 =π. Additional soft radiation causes small azimuthal decorrelations, whilst Δφ jj significantly lower than π is evidence of additional hard radiation. In this thesis, the cross section versus Δφ jj for beauty photoproduction and the comparison to NLO QCD predictions and Monte Carlo models are presented. (orig.)

  6. Robust track fitting in the Belle II inner tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadler, Moritz; Frühwirth, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Track fitting in the new inner tracker of the Belle II experiment uses the GENFIT package. In the latter both a standard Kalman filter and a robust extension, the deterministic annealing filter (DAF), are implemented. This contribution presents the results of a simulation experiment which examines the performance of the DAF in the inner tracker, in terms of outlier detection ability and of the impact of different kinds of background on the quality of the fitted tracks.

  7. The ultra low mass cooling system of the Belle II DEPFET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Valls, P.; Marinas, C.

    2013-01-01

    The new Japanese Super Flavor Factory Belle II is designed with high precision in mind, making a good vertex resolution a necessity. In order to achieve the required resolution in the vertex reconstruction, besides highly segmented pixel detectors, the material budget has to be kept at very low levels, since more material results in multiple scattering and degrades the resolution. As a consequence, there is a direct impact on the cooling system, that has to be carefully designed, not allowing active cooling pipes inside the acceptance region. In this asymmetric e + e − experiment the angular acceptance ranges from 17° to 150°, leaving room for support structures outside this range. The Belle II vertex detector includes DEPFET technology in its vertex detector the front end electronics (FEE) of which, placed outside the acceptance, can be cooled by 2-phase CO 2 through massive support structures while the sensitive area relies on forced convection with cold nitrogen gas

  8. Dead layer and active volume determination for GERDA Phase II detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bjoern [TU Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The GERDA experiment investigates the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge and is currently running Phase I of its physics program. Using the same isotope as the Heidelberg Moscow (HDM) experiment, GERDA aims to directly test the claim of observation by a subset of the HDM collaboration. For the update to Phase II of the experiment in 2013, the collaboration organized the production of 30 new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) type detectors from original 35 kg enriched material and tested their performance in the low background laboratory HADES in SCK.CEN, Belgium. With additional 20 kg of detectors, GERDA aims to probe the degenerated hierarchy scenario. One of the crucial detector parameters is the active volume (AV) fraction which directly enters into all physics analysis. This talk presents the methodology of dead layer and AV determination with different calibration sources such as {sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 228}Th and the results obtained for the new Phase II detectors. Furthermore, the AV fraction turned out to be the largest systematic uncertainty in the analysis of Phase I data which makes it imperative to reduce its uncertainty for Phase II. This talk addresses the major contributions to the AV uncertainty and gives an outlook for improvements in Phase II analysis.

  9. Studies of Inner Detector Layouts with 5 Pixel layers for the Phase-II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Garcia-Sciveres, M

    2013-01-01

    This note describes a study of Inner Detector layouts for the phase-II upgrade. Starting from the LOI layout the impact of adding a 5th pixel layer, and shortening the pixel and/or SCT barrel layers is studied.

  10. Nuclear-Recoil Energy Scale in CDMS II Silicon Dark-Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; et al.

    2018-03-07

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment aims to detect dark matter particles that elastically scatter from nuclei in semiconductor detectors. The resulting nuclear-recoil energy depositions are detected by ionization and phonon sensors. Neutrons produce a similar spectrum of low-energy nuclear recoils in such detectors, while most other backgrounds produce electron recoils. The absolute energy scale for nuclear recoils is necessary to interpret results correctly. The energy scale can be determined in CDMS II silicon detectors using neutrons incident from a broad-spectrum $^{252}$Cf source, taking advantage of a prominent resonance in the neutron elastic scattering cross section of silicon at a recoil (neutron) energy near 20 (182) keV. Results indicate that the phonon collection efficiency for nuclear recoils is $4.8^{+0.7}_{-0.9}$% lower than for electron recoils of the same energy. Comparisons of the ionization signals for nuclear recoils to those measured previously by other groups at higher electric fields indicate that the ionization collection efficiency for CDMS II silicon detectors operated at $\\sim$4 V/cm is consistent with 100% for nuclear recoils below 20 keV and gradually decreases for larger energies to $\\sim$75% at 100 keV. The impact of these measurements on previously published CDMS II silicon results is small.

  11. NbN nanowire optical detectors for high speed applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, O; Pagano, S; Ejrnaes, M; Nappi, C; Pessina, E; Fontana, F

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel geometry for single photon optical detectors (SSPD) based on NbN nanowires. Traditionally the SSPD are realized in a meander structure in order to realize a reasonable (few square microns) collecting area. This has the disadvantage of generating a large detector inductance, mostly of kinetic origin, that strongly limits the detector operation in high speed applications, such as telecommunication. Moreover the extreme aspect ratio of the detector (a nanowire a fraction of mm long and 100 nm wide) puts strong requirements on the nanofabrication processes, with negative effects on the production yield. Our novel proposed geometry is based on a parallel stripes configuration designed in such a way that the light induced switching of a single stripe generates the switching of all the other through a cascade mechanism. The net result is an SSPD device that has a much lower intrinsic inductance, and consequently a much wider bandwidth (up to 10 GHz range). Moreover the signal amplitude generated is much larger than that of traditional SSPD, due to the contribution of all the parallel stripe. We present here the design and results of numerical simulation of the response of this novel type of SSPD. In particular we discuss of the design solutions that allow the cascade operation of the detector, by realizing a very fast and synchronous switching of all the parallel lines. Key issues, such as the optimal number of parallel lines, with respect to fabrication and operation constraints of the detectors are also discussed

  12. Application of solid state nuclear track detectors in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.; Subba Ramu, M.C.; Mishra, U.C.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of the application of nuclear track detectors with emphasis on recent developments in the field of radiation protection. Track etch detectors have been used for the measurements of low level radiation in the environment, fast neutron and radon daughter inhalation dose. Recent developments in the field of dosimetry seem to be promising. In fast neutron dosimetry, track etch detectors can be used without inclusion of fissile materials by using the electrochemical etching technique. These detectors can provide important information in the energy range upto 250 keV. Survey of this range of energy with TLD is difficult because they are extremely energy dependent and over-respond to low energy neutrons. Measurement of radon using track detectors can help to lower the cost of the radon dosimeters. Certain detectors are sensitive to alpha particles from radon and their progeny. Higher sensitivity permits their use in a passive type of personnel dosimeter, which does not require the troublesome aspects of air sampling for the collection of radon daughter samples. (author), 38 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs

  13. The Silicon Vertex Detector for b-tagging at Belle II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentan, M.

    2013-01-01

    building a high luminosity B factory and a high precision particle detector, and an introduction to the Belle II experiment, outlining purpose and working principle of the involved subdetectors. More details are given on the Belle II SVD, including mechanical structure, sensors, electrical readout and cooling. Furthermore, the basics of semiconductor physics and silicon processing are reviewed, and the principles of single-sided and double-sided silicon microstrip sensors are explained in detail. The author's main task was to develop a trapezoidal double-sided silicon microstrip sensor for the forward region of the Belle II SVD, from the initial CAD drawings to the production. He developed a software framework aiming at fast and flexible design of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, both for rectangular and trapezoidal shapes. Using this framework, a whole wafer was equipped with a full-scale trapezoidal sensor, several test sensors for optimising the layout, and test structures. Several batches of prototype sensors were produced by Micron Semiconductor Ltd. in England, in close collaboration with the author. The wafer contains small test sensors dedicated to investigating the strip insulation on the n-side, featuring the p-stop blocking method (in three geometry patterns: atoll, common and a combined variant) and of the p-spray blocking method. These sensors have been extensively tested by the author in particle beams and gamma irradiations, showing that the atoll p-stop pattern is best suited for application at Belle II. The full-scale prototype sensors were thoroughly tested by the author in the semiconductor laboratory and in particle beams, long-term stability has been demonstrated by irradiation and thermal cycling campaigns. The knowledge gained by examining the test sensors and full-scale sensors led to an update of the design of the full-scale sensor. After production of another prototype batch the updated design was evaluated, compliance with the

  14. Paired emitter-detector light emitting diodes for the measurement of lead(II) and cadmium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.-T. [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: kim.lau@dcu.ie; McHugh, Eimear [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Baldwin, Susan [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Diamond, Dermot [Adaptive Sensors Group, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: Dermot.diamond@dcu.ie

    2006-05-31

    A transmittance mode optical device based on using a reverse biased light emitting diode (LED) as light detector has been developed for colorimetric analysis. This new optical device was validated with bromocresol green dye for absorbance measurements before being employed for detecting cadmium(II) and lead(II) in water. Results show that the performance of this LED-based device is comparable to much more expensive bench top UV-vis instruments, but with the advantages of being low cost, low power and simple to operate.

  15. Paired emitter-detector light emitting diodes for the measurement of lead(II) and cadmium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, K.-T.; McHugh, Eimear; Baldwin, Susan; Diamond, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    A transmittance mode optical device based on using a reverse biased light emitting diode (LED) as light detector has been developed for colorimetric analysis. This new optical device was validated with bromocresol green dye for absorbance measurements before being employed for detecting cadmium(II) and lead(II) in water. Results show that the performance of this LED-based device is comparable to much more expensive bench top UV-vis instruments, but with the advantages of being low cost, low power and simple to operate

  16. Modeling indirect detectors for performance optimization of a digital mammographic detector for dual energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, N; Koukou, V; Sotiropoulou, P; Nikiforidis, G; Kalyvas, N; Michail, C; Valais, I; Kandarakis, I; Fountos, G; Bakas, A

    2015-01-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. The advent of two X-ray energies (low and high) requires a suitable detector. The scope of this work is to determine optimum detector parameters for dual energy applications. The detector was modeled through the linear cascaded (LCS) theory. It was assumed that a phosphor material was coupled to a CMOS photodetector (indirect detection). The pixel size was 22.5 μm. The phosphor thickness was allowed to vary between 20mg/cm 2 and 160mg/cm 2 The phosphor materials examined where Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb and Gd 2 O 2 S:Eu. Two Tungsten (W) anode X-ray spectra at 35 kV (filtered with 100 μm Palladium (Pd)) and 70 kV (filtered with 800 pm Ytterbium (Yb)), corresponding to low and high energy respectively, were considered to be incident on the detector. For each combination the contrast- to-noise ratio (CNR) and the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector, were calculated. The 40 mg/cm 2 and 70 mg/cm 2 Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb exhibited the higher DOG values for the low and high energy correspondingly. Higher CNR between microcalcification and mammary gland exhibited the 70mg/cm 2 and the 100mg/cm 2 Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb for the low and the high energy correspondingly

  17. Image feature detectors and descriptors foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hassaballah, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with a selection of high-quality chapters that cover both theoretical concepts and practical applications of image feature detectors and descriptors. It serves as reference for researchers and practitioners by featuring survey chapters and research contributions on image feature detectors and descriptors. Additionally, it emphasizes several keywords in both theoretical and practical aspects of image feature extraction. The keywords include acceleration of feature detection and extraction, hardware implantations, image segmentation, evolutionary algorithm, ordinal measures, as well as visual speech recognition. .

  18. Charged particle traps II applications

    CERN Document Server

    Werth, Günther; Major, Fouad G

    2009-01-01

    This, the second volume of Charged Particle Traps, is devoted to applications, complementing the first volume’s comprehensive treatment of the theory and practice of charged particle traps, their many variants and refinements. In recent years, applications of far reaching importance have emerged ranging from the ultra-precise mass determinations of elementary particles and their antiparticles and short-lived isotopes, to high-resolution Zeeman spectroscopy on multiply-charged ions, to microwave and optical spectroscopy, some involving "forbidden" transitions from metastable states of such high resolution that optical frequency standards are realized by locking lasers to them. Further the potential application of trapped ions to quantum computing is explored, based on the extraordinary quantum state coherence made possible by the particle isolation. Consideration is given to the Paul and Penning traps as potential quantum information processors.

  19. Improved performances of CsI(Tl) scintillation detectors for DIAMANT II multidetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurer, J-N.; Virassamynaiken, E.; Kalinka, G.; Nyako, B.M.; Gal, J.

    1997-01-01

    The scintillation detectors used for light particle discrimination require a careful optimization of performances of the scintillator-light guide assembly to ensure a good light channeling to photodiode. To obtain a good energy resolution and a good peak symmetry such an optimization has been carried out on the 'Chess-Board' detectors consisting of 25 units, a system which is to be utilised as additional detector at EUROBALL. Recently, such optimization has been realised also for the detectors of the DIAMANT II assembly. This multidetector includes the 'Chess-Board' and constitutes a more segmented version of DIAMANT with 82 detectors instead of 54 detectors. The ensemble of these charged light particle detectors is to be incorporated in EUROBALL. For the first newly conditioned 34 detectors the light collection and the energy resolution measured for 5.5 MeV α particles equal 70 ± 3% and 2.4 ± 0.2%, respectively. The best result was obtained with 232 U as a α particle source and using a 6 μs time constant amplifier. The line shape of the spectrum peaks can be described by the function 1/(E 0 - E) 1-α convoluted with Lorentz and Gauss functions. For the peak of 8.7 MeV, measured with the CsI (Tl) detector, the asymmetry is as low as α 0.02 while the Gaussian and Lorentzian widths are given by 2 Γ/E 0 0.005 and 2.35 σ/E 0 = 0.019

  20. The Detector Physics and Applications Center—DePAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plothow-Besch, H.; Besch, H.-J.; Fiorini, C.; Grupen, C.; Hassard, J.; Longoni, A.; Walenta, A. H.

    2001-09-01

    A new project, the "Detector Physics and Applications Center (DePAC)", is presented. DePAC is a general detector and sensor database, which is not application specific, on the Internet. DePAC collects and explains the physics, the technology and the application of a wide range of radiation detectors. DePAC also collects and describes information about noise problems, front-end electronics, data transfer, processing and storage. DePAC provides short write-ups and source code of all sorts of detector related software depending on availability. DePAC collects useful constants and properties of materials in an exhaustive series of tables and graphs. DePAC also acts as a point of contact for researchers and industry in an interdisciplinary way, e.g. in biology, in medicine, in materials research and in high energy or nuclear physics. Last but not least, DePAC aims to develop also into a virtual lecturing school and serves as a tutorial for students and all interested scientists.

  1. The Detector Physics and Applications Center - DePAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plothow-Besch, H.; Besch, H.-J.; Fiorini, C.; Grupen, C.; Hassard, J.; Longoni, A.; Walenta, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    A new project, the 'Detector Physics and Applications Center (DePAC)', is presented. DePAC is a general detector and sensor database, which is not application specific, on the Internet. DePAC collects and explains the physics, the technology and the application of a wide range of radiation detectors. DePAC also collects and describes information about noise problems, front-end electronics, data transfer, processing and storage. DePAC provides short write-ups and source code of all sorts of detector related software depending on availability. DePAC collects useful constants and properties of materials in an exhaustive series of tables and graphs. DePAC also acts as a point of contact for researchers and industry in an interdisciplinary way, e.g. in biology, in medicine, in materials research and in high energy or nuclear physics. Last but not least, DePAC aims to develop also into a virtual lecturing school and serves as a tutorial for students and all interested scientists

  2. The Detector Physics and Applications Center - DePAC

    CERN Document Server

    Plothow-Besch, H; Fiorini, C; Grupen, C; Hassard, J; Longoni, A; Walenta, Albert H

    2001-01-01

    A new project, the 'Detector Physics and Applications Center (DePAC)', is presented. DePAC is a general detector and sensor database, which is not application specific, on the Internet. DePAC collects and explains the physics, the technology and the application of a wide range of radiation detectors. DePAC also collects and describes information about noise problems, front-end electronics, data transfer, processing and storage. DePAC provides short write-ups and source code of all sorts of detector related software depending on availability. DePAC collects useful constants and properties of materials in an exhaustive series of tables and graphs. DePAC also acts as a point of contact for researchers and industry in an interdisciplinary way, e.g. in biology, in medicine, in materials research and in high energy or nuclear physics. Last but not least, DePAC aims to develop also into a virtual lecturing school and serves as a tutorial for students and all interested scientists.

  3. Thermal flow in detectors of CNA-II with spontaneous fissions source of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascitti, J. A

    2012-01-01

    The thermal flux in the position of ex-core and in-core CNA-II Nuclear Power Plant (CNA-II) detectors is estimated considering neutron from the 238 U spontaneous fissions as the source, for the reactor cold state (isothermal state with both coolant and moderator at a temperature of 60 o C, a pressure of 35 ata and 15.46 ppm of natural Boron), and 24% inserted control rods (slightly sub-critical). Results are obtained for two different situations: with and without photo-neutrons due to the (γ,n) reaction in D 2 O. It is concluded that the thermal flux is under the detection limit of the boron trifluoride 104-SR or 282-IB detectors (≅10 -1 cm-2.s -1 ). These detectors are located in opposite positions in the inner concrete shielding, having the lowest detection limit among all ex-core detectors. A significant difference is verified in neutron fluxes between both cases, which suggest that photo-neutrons in large heavy water reactors such as CNA-II should not be ignored. The total neutron flux attenuation factor between the inner and outer region of the reactor pressure vessel was estimated to be 7.0 x 10 -7 . It should be mentioned that none of the results here presented has been affected by any correction factor. Each value has a percentage relative error representing the statistical uncertainty due to the probabilistic Monte Carlo method used to obtain it (author)

  4. Commissioning and performance studies of a proton recoil detector at the COMPASS-II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerg, Philipp; Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Koenigsmann, Kay; Kremser, Paul; Schopferer, Sebastian [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The COMPASS-II experiment is a fixed target experiment situated at CERN. A tertiary myon beam from the SPS scattered of protons from a liquid hydrogen target is used to measure Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Hard Exclusive Meson Production (HEMP). These processes offer a unique way to determine Generalized Parton Distributions, which are related to the total angular momentum of quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the nucleon by Ji's Sum Rule. One of the major parts of the COMPASS-II upgrade is the CAMERA detector. CAMERA is a proton recoil detector surrounding the COMPASS-II liquid hydrogen target. Its purpose is to measure the recoiled target proton in DVCS and HEMP reactions and viz to act as a veto to ensure the exclusivity of the measurement. The talk gives an outline of the detector and its readout electronics. It is focused on the commissioning and performance of the CAMERA detector and gives a brief insight into the ongoing DVCS analysis.

  5. Application of Geiger-mode photosensors in Cherenkov detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamal, Ahmed, E-mail: gamal.ahmed@assoc.oeaw.ac.a [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Al-Azhar University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Paul, Buehler; Michael, Cargnelli [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Roland, Hohler [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Johann, Marton [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Herbert, Orth [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Ken, Suzuki [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-05-21

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. We are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  6. Artificial neural network based pulse-shape analysis for cryogenic detectors operated in CRESST-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, Andreas [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: CRESST-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    In this talk we report on results of a pulse-shape analysis of cryogenic detectors based on artificial neural networks. To train the neural network a large amount of pulses with known properties are necessary. Therefore, a data-driven simulation used to generate these sets will be explained. The presented analysis shows an excellent discrimination performance even down to the energy threshold. The method is applied to several detectors, among them is the module with the lowest threshold (307eV) operated in CRESST-II phase 2. The performed blind analysis of this module confirms the substantially enhanced sensitivity for light dark matter published in 2015.

  7. Evidence for D0-D(0) mixing using the CDF II detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-03-28

    We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for the rare decay D{0}-->K{+}pi{-} to the Cabibbo-favored decay D{0}-->K{-}pi;{+}. A signal of 12.7x10;{3} D{0}-->K{+}pi{-} decays was obtained using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of 1.5 fb;{-1}. We measure the D0-D[over ]{0} mixing parameters (R_{D},y{'},x{'2}), and find that the data are inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a probability equivalent to 3.8 Gaussian standard deviations.

  8. Construction of the new silicon microstrips tracker for the Phase-II ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Zhijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The inner detector of the present ATLAS detector has been designed and developed to function in the environment of the present Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the next-generation tracking detector proposed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the so-called ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade, the particle densities and radiation levels will be higher by as much as a factor of ten. The new detectors must be faster, they need to be more highly segmented, and covering more area. They also need to be more resistant to radiation, and they require much greater power delivery to the front-end systems. For those reasons, the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector must be redesigned and rebuilt completely. The design of the ATLAS Upgrade inner tracker (ITk) has already been defined. It consists of several layers of silicon particle detectors. The innermost layers will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, and the outer layers will consist of silicon microstrip sensors. This paper will focus on the latest research and development act...

  9. Study of improved K{sub S}{sup 0} detection at the Belle II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Leonard; Kuehn, Wolfgang; Lange, Soeren [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    In the near future, the Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB accelerator at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan, will start operation at a luminosity a factor 40 higher than its predecessor experiment, Belle. The physics program includes the search for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics by the investigation of CP violating processes and rare B meson decays. Many important decay channels involve K{sub S}{sup 0} mesons. The detector features two layers of silicon pixel cells (PXD) closest to the interaction point surrounded by four layers of double sided silicon strip detectors (SVD). The high background level of the Pixel Detector requires an online data reduction system: Using the SVD and the surrounding detectors, the online reconstructed tracks of charged particles are extrapolated to the PXD layers, where Regions of Interest (ROIs) are defined around the intercepts. Only the pixel data inside these ROIs are stored. Thus, particles creating an insufficient number of hits in the outer detectors are not reconstructed and subsequently no ROIs are created, resulting in the loss of the related hits in the Pixel Detector. As a consequence, particles creating a sufficient number of hits in all six layers, but not in the outer four, are lost. In this contribution, we perform online tracking using all six layers to find the tracks of pions for improved K{sub S}{sup 0} detection. The combinatorics of the hit-track assignments is reduced by artificial neural networks.

  10. Aerogels: II. Applications in catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Aleksandar M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel synthesis, and the resulting materials (xerogels and aerogels are finding increasing application in the synthesis of catalysts, due to their unique characteristics. The most important features of the sol-gel process are: the ability to achieve homogeneity at the molecular level, the introduction of several species in only one step and the ability to stabilize metastable phases. The supercritical drying process produces aerogels with structural features quite different to conventional materials. Some of these characteristics of aerogels can make them very effective catalysts.

  11. Novel Neutron Detector for High Rate Imaging Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    The Phase II period performance was May 30, 2002 through May 29, 2004. This development effort was successfully completed within the period and budget allotted. The proposed design was successfully fabricated from B 4 C-coated aluminum and copper film, slit and wound to form 4 mm diameter straws, cut to 100 cm in length, and threaded with resistive anode wires (20 (micro)m in diameter). This paper reports testing done with two 50-straw detector modules at the reactor of the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A and M University (TAMU NSC)

  12. A theoretical investigation of spectra utilization for a CMOS based indirect detector for dual energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyvas, N; Michail, C; Valais, I; Kandarakis, I; Fountos, G; Martini, N; Koukou, V; Sotiropoulou, P

    2015-01-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. Currently commercially available detectors may be suitable for dual energy mammographic applications. The scope of this work was to theoretically examine the performance of the Radeye CMOS digital indirect detector under three low- and high-energy spectral pairs. The detector was modeled through the linear system theory. The pixel size was equal to 22.5μm and the phosphor material of the detector was a 33.9 mg/cm 2 Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb phosphor screen. The examined spectral pairs were (i) a 40kV W/Ag (0.01cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations, (ii) a 40kV W/Cd (0.013cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations and (iii) a 40kV W/Pd (0.008cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations. For each combination the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), showing the signal to noise ratio transfer, the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the detector output signal were calculated. The second combination exhibited slightly higher DOG (326 photons per X-ray) and lower CV (0.755%) values. In terms of electron output from the RadEye CMOS, the first two combinations demonstrated comparable DQE values; however the second combination provided an increase of 6.5% in the electron output. (paper)

  13. Results on light dark matter particles with a low-threshold CRESST-II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Iachellini, N.F.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Pagliarone, C.; Schaeffner, K. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Defay, X.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Schoenert, S.; Trinh Thi, H.H.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Schieck, J.; Tuerkoglu, C. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Wien (Austria); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reindl, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The CRESST-II experiment uses cryogenic detectors to search for nuclear recoil events induced by the elastic scattering of dark matter particles in CaWO{sub 4} crystals. Given the low energy threshold of our detectors in combination with light target nuclei, low mass dark matter particles can be probed with high sensitivity. In this letter we present the results from data of a single detector module corresponding to 52 kg live days. A blind analysis is carried out. With an energy threshold for nuclear recoils of 307 eV we substantially enhance the sensitivity for light dark matter. Thereby, we extend the reach of direct dark matter experiments to the sub- GeV/c{sup 2} region and demonstrate that the energy threshold is the key parameter in the search for low mass dark matter particles. (orig.)

  14. Electronics and mechanics for the Silicon Vertex Detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irmler, C; Bergauer, T; Friedl, M; Gfall, I; Valentan, M, E-mail: irmler@hephy.oeaw.ac.a [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    A major upgrade of the KEK-B factory (Tsukuba, Japan), aiming at a peak luminosity of 8 x 10{sup 35}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which is 40 times the present value, is foreseen until 2014. Consequently an upgrade of the Belle detector and in particular its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is required. We will introduce the concept and prototypes of the full readout chain of the Belle II SVD. Its APV25 based front-end utilizes the Origami chip-on-sensor concept, while the back-end VME system provides online data processing as well as hit time finding using FPGAs. Furthermore, the design of the double-sided silicon detectors and the mechanics will be discussed.

  15. The Belle II DEPFET pixel vertex detector. Development of a full-scale module prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarenko, Mikhail

    2013-11-01

    The Belle II experiment, which will start after 2015 at the SuperKEKB accelerator in Japan, will focus on the precision measurement of the CP-violation mechanism and on the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. A new detection system with an excellent spatial resolution and capable of coping with considerably increased background is required. To address this challenge, a pixel detector based on DEPFET technology has been proposed. A new all silicon integrated circuit, called Data Handling Processor (DHP), is implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology. It is designed to steer the detector and preprocess the generated data. The scope of this thesis covers DHP tests and optimization as well the development of its test environment, which is the first Full-Scale Module Prototype of the DEPFET Pixel Vertex detector.

  16. Novel detectors for silicon based microdosimetry, their concepts and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the development of semiconductor microdosimetry and the most current (state-of-the-art) Silicon on Insulator (SOI) detectors for microdosimetry based mainly on research and development carried out at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) at the University of Wollongong with collaborators over the last 18 years. In this paper every generation of CMRP SOI microdosimeters, including their fabrication, design, and electrical and charge collection characterisation are presented. A study of SOI microdosimeters in various radiation fields has demonstrated that under appropriate geometrical scaling, the response of SOI detectors with the well-known geometry of microscopically sensitive volumes will record the energy deposition spectra representative of tissue cells of an equivalent shape. This development of SOI detectors for microdosimetry with increased complexity has improved the definition of microscopic sensitive volume (SV), which is modelling the deposition of ionising energy in a biological cell, that are led from planar to 3D SOI detectors with an array of segmented microscopic 3D SVs. The monolithic ΔE-E silicon telescope, which is an alternative to the SOI silicon microdosimeter, is presented, and as an example, applications of SOI detectors and ΔE-E monolithic telescope for microdosimetery in proton therapy field and equivalent neutron dose measurements out of field are also presented. An SOI microdosimeter "bridge" with 3D SVs can derive the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in 12C ion radiation therapy that matches the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) quite well, but with outstanding spatial resolution. The use of SOI technology in experimental microdosimetry offers simplicity (no gas system or HV supply), high spatial resolution, low cost, high count rates, and the possibility of integrating the system onto a single device with other types of detectors.

  17. Si and gaas pixel detectors for medical imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisogni, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    As the use of digital radiographic equipment in the morphological imaging field is becoming the more and more diffuse, the research of new and more performing devices from public institutions and industrial companies is in constant progress. Most of these devices are based on solid-state detectors as X-ray sensors. Semiconductor pixel detectors, originally developed in the high energy physics environment, have been then proposed as digital detector for medical imaging applications. In this paper a digital single photon counting device, based on silicon and GaAs pixel detector, is presented. The detector is a thin slab of semiconductor crystal where an array of 64 by 64 square pixels, 170- m side, has been built on one side. The data read-out is performed by a VLSI integrated circuit named Photon Counting Chip (PCC), developed within the MEDIPIX collaboration. Each chip cell geometrically matches the sensor pixel. It contains a charge preamplifier, a threshold comparator and a 15 bits pseudo-random counter and it is coupled to the detector by means of bump bonding. Most important advantages of such system, with respect to a traditional X-rays film/screen device, are the wider linear dynamic range (3x104) and the higher performance in terms of MTF and DQE. Besides the single photon counting architecture allows to detect image contrasts lower than 3%. Electronics read-out performance as well as imaging capabilities of the digital device will be presented. Images of mammographic phantoms acquired with a standard Mammographic tube will be compared with radiographs obtained with traditional film/screen systems

  18. Infralevel radiochemical applications-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses several practical applications of low level nuclear radiation from natural sources, and even from a man-made source-spent nuclear fuel elements from dismantled nuclear power plant reactors. The natural sources are the ubiquitous potassium 40 in the Earth's crust and the non-weapon isotope of uranium-238. Additionally, in this research it is appropriate to include the non-nuclear processes as the various forms of luminescences and the quasi-nuclear Cerenkov luminescence, since fluorescence can be induced by nuclear radiation, as is Cerenkov radiation; chemiluminescence can be initiated by nuclear radiation, and the secondary processes of nuclear radiation caused by the Compton effect, the (Irene) Curie effect, and the unusual and unique effect of a 3 He alpha-particle reacting oppositely from the beta-ray decay of 3 H, can influence and produce all the known luminescences. The conclusions from the small amount of research carried out are predominantly tentative and even conjectural. The device described is being called a nuclear electrophorus since its functional properties are the same as the static electricity-producing electrophorus of the late 19th Century

  19. The power supply system for the DEPFET pixel detector at BELLE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade of the KEKB accelerator towards 8×10 35 cm −2 s −1 poses several challenges for the BELLE II detector. Especially the innermost detector will be faced with a significant radiation of several MRad per year as well as a high hit density. To cope with this a silicon pixel detector will be used for the inner layers of the silicon tracker. The pixel detector (PXD) consists of two layers of DEPFET active pixel sensors. The DEPFET technology has an unique set of advantages like low power dissipation in the active area, flexible device size, radiation hardness and a thinning procedure allowing to adjust the thickness of the device over a wide range. The two layers close to the interaction point together with a low material budget will improve the IP resolution by a factor of 2 compared to the previous installed silicon detector. In addition silicon stand-alone pattern recognition will be possible together with the four layers of double sided strip detectors (DSSD) of the strip detector. The PXD detector system consists of the DEPFET modules with integrated readout chips, the data handling hybrid receiving the data and sending them to compute nodes performing an online pattern recognition. Moreover the power supply system provides the supply voltages for the DEPFET from a position outside of the detector. The power distribution is designed to provide low output impedance over all frequencies and transient response with appropriate overshoots. The PXD pose several challenges to the power distribution system—number of voltages, tight requirements on regulation and noise. -- Highlights: ► The KEKB accelerator receive a luminosity upgrade towards 8×10 35 cm −2 s −1 . ► A two layer pixel detector based on the DEPFET technology will be installed. ► An improvement of a factor of 2 in. impact parameter resolution is expected. ► The 34 A dedicated power supply system for the detector is under development which aims for low noise, low output impedance

  20. Application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Jarad, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    The application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurements is discussed. The ''Can Technique'', used for measuring radon emanation from building materials, walls and soil; the ''Working Level Monitor'', used for measuring short period working levels of radon daughters in houses; and ''Passive Radon Dosimeters'', used to measure radon levels in houses for long term (few months) periods are described. Application of nuclear track detectors for measuring the radon daughters plate-out on the surface of mixing fan blades and walls are discussed. The uranium content of some wall papers was found to be 6 ppm. The variation of radon progeny concentration in the same room was measured and supported by another study through Gas Chromatograph measurements. The independence of radon concentration on room level in high-rise buildings was established. The effect of sub-floor radon emanation on radon concentration in houses is dependent on whether there is sub-floor ventilation or not. (author)

  1. First large DEPFET pixel modules for the Belle II Pixel Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Felix; Avella, Paola; Kiesling, Christian; Koffmane, Christian; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Valentan, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Andricek, Ladislav; Richter, Rainer [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer excellent signal to noise ratio, resolution and low power consumption with a low material budget. They will be used at Belle II and are a candidate for an ILC vertex detector. The pixels are integrated in a monolithic piece of silicon which also acts as PCB providing the signal and control routings for the ASICs on top. The first prototype DEPFET sensor modules for Belle II have been produced. The modules have 192000 pixels and are equipped with SMD components and three different kinds of ASICs to control and readout the pixels. The entire readout chain has to be studied; the metal layer interconnectivity and routings need to be verified. The modules are fully characterized, and the operation voltages and control sequences of the ASICs are investigated. An overview of the DEPFET concept and first characterization results is presented.

  2. DUMAND-II (Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detector) PROGRESS Report

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Kenneth K.

    1994-01-01

    The DUMAND-II detector will search for astronomical sources of high energy neutrinos. Successful deployment of the basic infrastructure, including the shore cable, the underwater junction box, and an environmental module was accomplished in December, 1993. One optical module string was also deployed and operated, logging data for about 10 hours. The underwater cable was connected to the shore station where we were able to successfully exercise system controls and log further environmental dat...

  3. Instrumentation for Applied Physics and Industrial Applications: Applications of Detectors in Technology, Medicine and Other Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hillemanns, H

    2011-01-01

    Instrumentation for Applied Physics and Industrial Applications in 'Applications of Detectors in Technology, Medicine and Other Fields', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B2: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 2: Systems and Applications'. This document is part of Part 2 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Section '7.3 Instrumentation for Applied Physics and Industrial Applications' of Chapter '7 Applications of Detectors in Technology; Medicine and Other Fields' with the content: 7.3 Instrumentation for Applied Physics and Industrial Applications 7.3.1 Applications of HEP Detectors 7.3.2 Fast Micro- and Nanoelectronics for Particle Detector Readout 7.3.2.1 Fast Counting Mode Front End Electronics 7.3.2.2 NINO,...

  4. Admittance detector for high impedance systems: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-02

    We describe an admittance detector for high impedance systems (small capillary bore and/or low solution specific conductance). Operation in the low frequency range (≤1 kHz, much lower than most relevant publications) provides optimum response to conductance changes in capillaries ≤20 μm in bore. The detector design was based on studies described in a preceding companion paper ( Zhang, M.; Stamos, B. N.; Amornthammarong, N.; Dasgupta, P. K. Anal. Chem. 2014, 8 , DOI 10.1021/ac503245a.). The highest S/N for detecting 100 μM KCl (5.5 μM peak concentration, ∼0.8 μS/cm) injected into water flowing through a capillary of 7.5 μm inner radius (r) was observed at 500-750 Hz. A low bias current operational amplifier in the transimpedance configuration permitted high gain (1 V/nA) to measure pA-nA level currents in the detection cell. Aside from an oscillator, an offset-capable RMS-DC converter formed the complete detection circuitry. Limits of detection (LODs) of KCl scaled inversely with the capillary cross section and were 2.1 and 0.32 μM injected KCl for r = 1 and 2.5 μm capillaries, respectively. When used as a detector on an r = 8 μm bore poly(methyl methacrylate) capillary in a split effluent stream from a suppressed ion chromatograph, the LOD was 27 nM bromide (Vex 22 V p-p), compared to 14 nM observed with a commercial bipolar pulse macroscale conductivity detector with an actively thermostated cell. We also show applications of the detector in electrophoresis in capillaries with r = 1 and 2.5 μm. Efficient heat dissipation permits high concentrations of the background electrolyte and sensitive detection because of efficient electrostacking.

  5. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Poley, Luise; Bloch, Ingo; Edwards, Sam; Friedrich, Conrad; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jones, Tim; Lacker, Heiko; Pyatt, Simon; Rehnisch, Laura; Sperlich, Dennis; Wilson, John

    2015-01-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy gl...

  6. Diamond detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Universita di Firenze, L.go E. Fermi 2, 50125 Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: desio@arcetri.astro.it; Pace, E. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Universita di Firenze, L.go E. Fermi 2, 50125 Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, v. G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Cinque, G.; Marcelli, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Achard, J.; Tallaire, A. [LIMHP-CNRS, University of Paris XIII, 99 Avenue JB Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2007-07-15

    Due to its unique physical properties, diamond is a very appealing material for the development of electronic devices and sensors. Its wide band gap (5.5 eV) endows diamond based devices with low thermal noise, low dark current levels and, in the case of radiation detectors, high visible-to-X-ray signal discrimination (visible blindness) as well as high sensitivity to energies greater than the band gap. Furthermore, due to its radiation hardness diamond is very interesting for applications in extreme environments, or as monitor of high fluency radiation beams. In this work the use of diamond based detectors for X-ray sensing is discussed. On purpose, some photo-conductors based on different diamond types have been tested at the DAFNE-L synchrotron radiation laboratory at Frascati. X-ray sensitivity spectra, linearity and stability of the response of these diamond devices have been measured in order to evidence the promising performance of such devices.

  7. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors: physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Chandra M; Tanner, Michael G; Hadfield, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    Single-photon detectors based on superconducting nanowires (SSPDs or SNSPDs) have rapidly emerged as a highly promising photon-counting technology for infrared wavelengths. These devices offer high efficiency, low dark counts and excellent timing resolution. In this review, we consider the basic SNSPD operating principle and models of device behaviour. We give an overview of the evolution of SNSPD device design and the improvements in performance which have been achieved. We also evaluate device limitations and noise mechanisms. We survey practical refrigeration technologies and optical coupling schemes for SNSPDs. Finally we summarize promising application areas, ranging from quantum cryptography to remote sensing. Our goal is to capture a detailed snapshot of an emerging superconducting detector technology on the threshold of maturity. (topical review)

  8. Diamond detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Sio, A.; Pace, E.; Cinque, G.; Marcelli, A.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its unique physical properties, diamond is a very appealing material for the development of electronic devices and sensors. Its wide band gap (5.5 eV) endows diamond based devices with low thermal noise, low dark current levels and, in the case of radiation detectors, high visible-to-X-ray signal discrimination (visible blindness) as well as high sensitivity to energies greater than the band gap. Furthermore, due to its radiation hardness diamond is very interesting for applications in extreme environments, or as monitor of high fluency radiation beams. In this work the use of diamond based detectors for X-ray sensing is discussed. On purpose, some photo-conductors based on different diamond types have been tested at the DAFNE-L synchrotron radiation laboratory at Frascati. X-ray sensitivity spectra, linearity and stability of the response of these diamond devices have been measured in order to evidence the promising performance of such devices

  9. The status of the SLAC Linear Collider and of the Mark II detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1987-10-01

    At SLAC we are currently involved in the exciting challenge of commissioning the first example of a new type of colliding beam accelerator, the SLAC Linear Collider, or SLC. The goals of the SLC are two-fold. It will explore the concept of linear colliders, and it will allow the study of physics on the Z 0 resonance. It accomplishes these goals by exploiting the existing SLAC linac and the large visible cross-section of approximately thirty nanobarns of the Z 0 . The MARK II detector will have the opportunity to be first to explore the physics in this regime. This paper briefly reports the status of the SLC and of the MARK II as of early October 1987, at which time commissioning efforts were interrupted in order to place the MARK II detector at the collision point and to incorporate some improvements to the SLC. The first portion of this report highlights some of the milestones achieved in the SLC commissioning and some of the problems encountered. The last portion outlines improvements made to the MARK II for physics at the SLC. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. Operational Experience, Improvements, and Performance of the CDF Run II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Calancha, C; Carron, S.; Cihangir, S.; Corbo, M.; Clark, D.; Di Ruzza, B.; Eusebi, R.; Fernandez, J.P.; Freeman, J.C.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Grinstein, S.; Hartz, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hocker, A.; Husemann, U.; Incandela, J.; Issever, C.; Jindariani, S.; Junk, T.R.; Knoepfel, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.; Merkel, P; Mondragon, M.N.; Moore, R.; Mumford, J.R.; Nahn, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, T.K.; Pavlicek, V.; Pursley, J.; Redondo, I.; Roser, R.; Schultz, K.; Spalding, J.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Tesarek, R.; Treptow, K.; Wallny, R.; Worm, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) pursues a broad physics program at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Between Run II commissioning in early 2001 and the end of operations in September 2011, the Tevatron delivered 12 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. Many physics analyses undertaken by CDF require heavy flavor tagging with large charged particle tracking acceptance. To realize these goals, in 2001 CDF installed eight layers of silicon microstrip detectors around its interaction region. These detectors were designed for 2--5 years of operation, radiation doses up to 2 Mrad (0.02 Gy), and were expected to be replaced in 2004. The sensors were not replaced, and the Tevatron run was extended for several years beyond its design, exposing the sensors and electronics to much higher radiation doses than anticipated. In this paper we describe the operational challenges encountered over the past 10 years of running the CDF silicon detectors, the preventive measures undertaken, an...

  11. Particlc detectors. Foundations and applications; Teilchendetektoren. Grundlagen und Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolanoski, Hermann; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Interaction of particles with matter, motion of charge carriers in electric and magnetic fields, signal generation by moving charges, non-electronic detectors, gas-filled detectors, semiconductor detectors, track reconstruction and momentum measurement, photodetectors, Cherenkov detectors, transition-radiation detectors, scintillation detectors, particle identification, calorimeters, detection of cosmic particles, signal processing and noise, trigger and data acquisition systems. (HSI)

  12. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544 Princeton, NJ (United States); Bellini, F.; Casali, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); Castellano, M.G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie – CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); D' Addabbo, A. [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (L' Aquila) 67010 (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [INFN – Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Martinez, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Tomei, C. [INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm{sup 2} substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  13. A simple Bragg detector design for AMS and IBA applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Arnold Milenko; Döbeli, Max; Seiler, Martin; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-08-01

    A new compact Bragg type gas ionization chamber (GIC) has been built for use as particle counter in AMS and IBA applications. The detector stands out due to its simple concept, which does not include a Frisch grid. Test experiments have been performed with ions in the mass range from He to Th and energies ranging from 30 keV to 2.5 MeV, in order to find optimal measurement conditions and to characterize the detector performance. For projectiles heavier than Al at energies below 2.5 MeV the obtained energy resolution is comparable with that of a state-of-the-art GIC with Frisch grid and clearly outperforms solid state detectors. Additionally the operation of this simplified Bragg GIC in the electron multiplication mode was investigated for the first time, which allows the detection of radiocarbon ions at energies below 50 keV with an energy resolution of the order of 10 keV.

  14. Applications for X-ray detectors in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remillard, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Position-sensitive X-Ray detectors continue to playa central role in high-energy astrophysics. The current science goals are reviewed with emphasis on requirements in terms of camera performance. Wide-field imaging techniques, including coded mask cameras, are an essential part of space programs because of the transient nature of high-priority targets, e.g. eruptions from black-hole binaries and cosmic explosions such as gamma ray bursts. Pointing X-ray telescopes are being planned with a wide range of photon energies and with collection designs that include both mirrors and coded masks. Requirements for high spectral resolution and high time resolution are driven by diverse types of X-ray sources such as msec pulsars, quasars with emission-line profiles shaped by general relativity, and X-ray binaries that exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations in the range of 40-1300 Hz. Many laboratories and universities are involved in space-qualification of new detector technologies, e.g. CZT cameras, X-ray calorimeters, new types of CCDs, and GEM detectors. Even X-ray interferometry is on the horizon of NASA's science roadmap. The difficulties in advancing new technologies for space science applications require careful coordinations between industry and science groups in order to solve science problems while minimizing risk

  15. Applications of noble gas radiation detectors to counter-terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are essential tools in the detection, analysis and disposition of potential terrorist devices containing hazardous radioactive and/or fissionable materials. For applications where stand-off distance and source shielding are limiting factors, large detectors have advantages over small ones. The ability to distinguish between Special Nuclear Materials and false-positive signals from natural or man-made benign sources is also important. Ionization chambers containing compressed noble gases, notably xenon and helium-3, can be scaled up to very large sizes, improving the solid angle for acceptance of radiation from a distant source. Gamma spectrometers using Xe have a factor of three better energy resolution than NaI scintillators, allowing better discrimination between radioisotopes. Xenon detectors can be constructed so as to have extremely low leakage currents, enabling them to operate for long periods of time on batteries or solar cells. They are not sensitive to fluctuations in ambient temperature, and are therefore suitable for deployment in outdoor locations. Position-sensitive 3He chambers have been built as large as 3000 cm2, and with spatial resolution of less than 1 mm. Combined with coded apertures made of cadmium, they can be used to create images of thermal neutron sources. The natural background of spallation neutrons from cosmic rays generates a very low count rate, so this instrument could be quite effective at identifying a man-made source, such as a spontaneous fission source (Pu) in contact with a moderator (high explosive)

  16. Dual detector neutron lifetime log: theory and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpas, C.J.; Wichmann, P.A.; Fertl, W.H.; DeVries, M.R.; Rndall, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Neutron Lifetime Log instrumentation has continued to evolve and now is equipped with dual detectors for increased ease in gas detection and also a ratio response for a simultaneous porosity determination. A good deal of experimentation was involved to minimize both lithology and salinity effects on the porosity indication. This paper contains a discussion of the theory and concepts related to the application of the Dual Detector Neutron Lifetime Log (DNLL). It is important to note that with these advances the recording of thermal neutron capture cross section (Σ) remains consistent with the past measurements of earlier generations of instruments as the most accurate determination of this parameter. A number of field examples of the newly logged results are shown. These field cases include Dual Detector NLL's run thru the drill strings of highly deviated holes when difficulties were encountered in getting conventional open hole logs to bottom, logs thru open perforations and hot radioactive zones, comparisons of the large and small diameter instruments, logs with anomalous fluids in the annulus, logs thru multiple casing strings, and a number of other examples

  17. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M.G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm"2 substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  18. Applications of alpha particles detectors made of nitrocellulose film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, N.; Salinas, B.; Pineda, H.

    1978-01-01

    We describe the experiments realized in order to probe the response of the alpha particles detectors manufactured in our laboratory and their suitability to some important applications. The detection system is a nitrocellulose film which register the transit of the charged particles. The traces left by the particles during their transit are manifested through a controlled chemical attack and counted after that with a microscope. This monitor system was utilized in the following applications: 1) uranium prospection 2) alpha autoradiography 4) determination of air pollution by alpha emitters. The results which were obtained are satisfactory and in spite that in these first applications only qualitative measurements were made the method could be used for quantitative determinations when we will have a better knowledge of the effect of factors which are not under our control. (author)

  19. Optimization of ADC transfer curves for the Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haidl, Jakob; Mueller, Felix; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Kiesling, Christian; Valentan, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Koffmane, Christian [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Super-KEKB accelerator at the KEK high energy research center in Tsukuba in Japan will provide a 40 times higher luminosity. To cope with this high luminosity the Belle detector is improved to Belle II, which includes the integration of a two layer DEPFET pixel detector (PXD) resulting in a higher vertex resolution. The task of the read-out electronics is to process the high data rate of the PXD. To fulfill these requirements three different types of ASICs were designed. The foremost of them called Drain Current Digitizer (DCD) converts the drain currents of the DEPFET pixel sensors into digital code. Since the PXD will be equipped with 160 DCDs automatic testing of the chips is needed. Analog to digital transfer curves are an appropriate tool for error recognition and optimization of the digitization process within the DCD. An overview of measurements and optimization strategies is presented.

  20. Silicon Detector System for High Rate EXAFS Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pullia, A.; Kraner, H. W.; Siddons, D. P.; Furenlid, L. R.; Bertuccio, G.

    1995-01-01

    A multichannel silicon pad detector for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) applications has been designed and built. The X-ray spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that an adequate energy resolution of 230 eV FWHM (corresponding to 27 rms electrons in silicon) can be achieved reliably at −35 °C. A resolution of 190 eV FWHM (corresponding to 22 rms electrons) has been obtained from individual pads at −35 °C. At room temperature (25 °C) an average energy resolution of 380 eV FWH...

  1. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: three decades of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Kopytko, M.; Martyniuk, P.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been considerable progress towards III-V antimonide-based low dimensional solids development and device design innovations. From a physics point of view, the type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice is an extremely attractive proposition. Their development results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe FPAs at reasonable cost and theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type-II superlattice (T2SL) detectors compared to HgCdTe. Lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall lifetime are equal. Based on these promising results it is obvious now that the InAs/GaSb superlattice technology is competing with HgCdTe third generation detector technology with the potential advantage of standard III-V technology to be more competitive in costs and as a consequence series production pricing. Comments to the statement whether the superlattice IR photodetectors can outperform the "bulk" narrow gap HgCdTe detectors is one of the most important questions for the future of IR photodetectors presented by Rogalski at the April 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, Florida, are more credible today and are presented in this paper. It concerns the trade-offs between two most competing IR material technologies: InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices and HgCdTe ternary alloy system.

  2. Application of MOSFET radiation detector for patient dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubra, M.; Cygler, J.; Szanto, J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A new direct reading Metal Oxide-Silicon Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) based radiation detector system has been investigated in a variety of clinical radiotherapy procedures. The aim of this study is to report on the clinical applicability of such a device, its ease of use and on its dosimetric properties that include precision angular and energy dependence. Comparisons of patient dose measurements obtained by the MOSFET based system and the commonly used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) and diodes are discussed. Material and Methods: A commercially available MOSFET dosimetry system that employs dual MOSFET dual bias arrangements has been used in this study. The detector is bonded with the epoxy to the end of a long (1.5 m) flexible cable whose other end is connected to a bias supply box operated by a battery. The bias box can accommodate up to 5 MOSFETs and after radiation exposure the dose can be determined by connecting the detectors to a pre calibrated reader. For the clinical evaluation 5 MOSFETs were used on patients undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR). The MOSFET detectors were taped to patient surface adjacent to the routinely used TLDs and/or diodes. To examine energy dependence the MOSFET sensitivity (mV/Gy) was determined in relation to a calibrated dose from 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The directional dependence was investigated by placing a MOSFET during irradiation in a special polystyrene insert that can be manually rotated to the required angle. Precision (reproducibility) measurements were made by exposing MOSFETs to multiple fractions of dose in the range of 3 x 10 -2 to 2 Gy. Results: In 3 of TBI trials the diodes measured average dose was within 1.0% of the prescribed dose compared to 3.7% for TLDs and 1.8% for MOSFETs. The MOSFETs average sensitivity for 6 MV was within 2% of the 18 MV photon beam. The reproducibility of MOSFET response was better than 3 % provided the dose per fraction is

  3. Particle identification using dE/dx in the Mark II detector at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.P.; Feldman, G.J.; Hanson, G.; Nash, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Rankin, P.; Van Kooten, R.

    1989-04-01

    The central drift chamber in the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider has been instrumented with 100-MHz Flash-ADCs. Pulse digitization provides particle identification through the measurement of average ionization loss in the chamber. We present the results of a study of system performance and outline the systematic corrections that optimize resolution. The data used are from a short test run at PEP with one-third of the FADCs installed and an extensive cosmic ray sample with the fully instrumented chamber. 11 refs., 9 figs

  4. Silicon Detector System for High Rate EXAFS Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullia, A; Kraner, H W; Siddons, D P; Furenlid, L R; Bertuccio, G

    1995-08-01

    A multichannel silicon pad detector for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) applications has been designed and built. The X-ray spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that an adequate energy resolution of 230 eV FWHM (corresponding to 27 rms electrons in silicon) can be achieved reliably at -35 °C. A resolution of 190 eV FWHM (corresponding to 22 rms electrons) has been obtained from individual pads at -35 °C. At room temperature (25 °C) an average energy resolution of 380 eV FWHM is achieved and a resolution of 350 eV FWHM (41 rms electrons) is the best performance. A simple cooling system constituted of Peltier cells is sufficient to reduce the reverse currents of the pads and their related shot noise contribution, in order to achieve resolutions better than 300 eV FWHM which is adequate for the EXAFS applications.

  5. Detecting an infrared photon within an hour. Transition-edge detector at ALPS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Horns, Dieter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Collaboration: ALPS-II collaboration

    2013-09-15

    An essential design requirement of the ALPS-II experiment is the efficient detection of single photons with a very low instrumental background of 10 {mu}Hz. In 2011 the ALPS collaboration started to set up a TES detector (Transition-Edge Sensor) for ALPS-II, the second phase of the experiment. Since mid of 2013 the setup is ready for characterization in the ALPS laboratory: an ADR cryostat (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) as millikelvin environment, a low noise SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) with electronics for read-out and a fiber-coupled high-efficient TES for near-infrared photons as sensor. First measurements have shown a good discrimination between noise and 1064 nm signals.

  6. Detecting an infrared photon within an hour. Transition-edge detector at ALPS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan; Hamburg Univ.; Horns, Dieter

    2013-09-01

    An essential design requirement of the ALPS-II experiment is the efficient detection of single photons with a very low instrumental background of 10 μHz. In 2011 the ALPS collaboration started to set up a TES detector (Transition-Edge Sensor) for ALPS-II, the second phase of the experiment. Since mid of 2013 the setup is ready for characterization in the ALPS laboratory: an ADR cryostat (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) as millikelvin environment, a low noise SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) with electronics for read-out and a fiber-coupled high-efficient TES for near-infrared photons as sensor. First measurements have shown a good discrimination between noise and 1064 nm signals.

  7. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. II. Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Jakobsson, B. E-mail: bo.jakobsson@kosufy.lu.se; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J

    2003-03-11

    We describe the detectors for identification of charged particles and fragments in CHICSi, a large solid angle multi-telescope system mounted inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), cluster-jet target chamber. CHICSi performs nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. The telescopes consist of a first very thin, 10-14 {mu}m Si detector, a second 300 {mu}m (or possibly 500 {mu}m) ion implanted Si detector supplemented by a 6 mm GSO(Ce) scintillator read out by a photodiode (PD) or by a third 300 {mu}m Si detector. The telescopes provide full charge separation up to Z=17 and mass resolution up to A=9 in the energy range 0.7-60A MeV. The thin p-i-n diode detector, etched out from a 280 {mu}m Si wafer, and the GSO/PD detector, both exclusively developed for CHICSi, provide an energy resolution {<=}8%, while the standard 300 {mu}m detectors have {<=}2% energy resolution. Radiation stability of the Si detectors is confirmed up to an integrated flux of 10{sup 10} alpha particles. The GSO detector has 70% light collection efficiency with the optical coupling to the PD a simple open, 0.2 mm, gap. A new method, developed to perform absolute energy calibration for the GSO/PD detector is presented.

  8. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. II. Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Jakobsson, B.; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the detectors for identification of charged particles and fragments in CHICSi, a large solid angle multi-telescope system mounted inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), cluster-jet target chamber. CHICSi performs nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. The telescopes consist of a first very thin, 10-14 μm Si detector, a second 300 μm (or possibly 500 μm) ion implanted Si detector supplemented by a 6 mm GSO(Ce) scintillator read out by a photodiode (PD) or by a third 300 μm Si detector. The telescopes provide full charge separation up to Z=17 and mass resolution up to A=9 in the energy range 0.7-60A MeV. The thin p-i-n diode detector, etched out from a 280 μm Si wafer, and the GSO/PD detector, both exclusively developed for CHICSi, provide an energy resolution ≤8%, while the standard 300 μm detectors have ≤2% energy resolution. Radiation stability of the Si detectors is confirmed up to an integrated flux of 10 10 alpha particles. The GSO detector has 70% light collection efficiency with the optical coupling to the PD a simple open, 0.2 mm, gap. A new method, developed to perform absolute energy calibration for the GSO/PD detector is presented

  9. Preliminary results from a novel CVD diamond detector system for molecular imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    A novel biomolecular imaging system incorporating a Chemical Vapour Deposition diamond detector is in development. The synthetic diamond is used as a UV detector to image nucleic acids in electrophoresis gels. The microstrip diamond detector currently has a spatial resolution of 30 μm. Preliminary results are presented which include: QE measurements of diamond detectors, detector time response, detector UV response and current detection limits of biomolecules in gel. The potential applications of the technology, and its significant advantages in speed and sensitivity over the current systems are discussed

  10. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B.; Park, H.; Uozumi, S.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A.K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P.K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.

    2016-01-01

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  11. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H., E-mail: sunshine@knu.ac.kr [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uozumi, S. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); and others

    2016-09-21

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  12. Development of a Single Detector Ring Micro Crystal Element Scanner: QuickPET II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Miyaoka

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a single ring version of the micro crystal element scanner (MiCES and investigation of its spatial resolution imaging characteristics for mouse positron emission tomography (PET imaging. This single ring version of the MiCES system, referred to as QuickPET II, consists of 18 MiCE detector modules mounted as a single ring in a vertical gantry. The system has a 5.76-cm transverse field of view and a 1.98-cm axial field of view. In addition to the scanner and data acquisition system, we have developed an iterative reconstruction that includes a model of the system's detector response function. Evaluation images of line sources and mice have been acquired. Using filtered backprojection, the resolution for a reconstructed line source has been measured at 1.2 mm full width at half maximum. F-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose mouse PET images are provided. The result shows that QuickPET II has the imaging characteristics to support high-resolution, static mouse PET studies using 18-F labeled compounds.

  13. A search for supersymmetric electrons with the Mark II detector at PEP [Positron Electron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, B.W.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental search for selectrons, the supersymmetric partner of the electron, has been performed at the PEP storage ring at SLAC using the Mark II detector. The experimental search done was based upon hypothetical reaction in e + e - interactions at PEP center of mass energies of 29 GeV. In this reaction the selectrons, e, are assumed produced by the interaction of one of initial state electrons with a photon radiated from the other initial state electron. This latter electron is assumed to continue down the beam pipe undetected. The photon and electron then produce a selectron and a photino, γ, in the supersymmetric analog of Compton scattering. The photino is assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particle, and as such, does not interact in the detector, thereby escaping detection very much like a neutrino. The selectron is assumed to immediately decay into an electron and photino. This electron is produced with large p perpendicular with respect to the beam pipe, since it must balance the transverse momentum carried off by the photinos. Thus, the experimental signature of the process is a single electron in the detector with a large unbalanced tranverse momentum. No events of this type were observed in the original search of 123 pb -1 of data, resulting in a cross section limit of less than 2.4 x 10 -2 pb (at the 95% CL) within the detector acceptance. This cross section upper limit applies to any process which produces anomalous single electron events with missing transverse momentum. When interpreted as a supersymmetry search it results in a lower selectron mass limit of 22.2 GeV/c 2 for the case of massless photinos. Limits for non-zero mass photinos have been calculated. 87 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs

  14. A search for supersymmetric electrons with the Mark II detector at PEP (Positron Electron Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeClaire, B.W.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental search for selectrons, the supersymmetric partner of the electron, has been performed at the PEP storage ring at SLAC using the Mark II detector. The experimental search done was based upon hypothetical reaction in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at PEP center of mass energies of 29 GeV. In this reaction the selectrons, e-tilde, are assumed produced by the interaction of one of initial state electrons with a photon radiated from the other initial state electron. This latter electron is assumed to continue down the beam pipe undetected. The photon and electron then produce a selectron and a photino, ..gamma..-tilde, in the supersymmetric analog of Compton scattering. The photino is assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particle, and as such, does not interact in the detector, thereby escaping detection very much like a neutrino. The selectron is assumed to immediately decay into an electron and photino. This electron is produced with large p perpendicular with respect to the beam pipe, since it must balance the transverse momentum carried off by the photinos. Thus, the experimental signature of the process is a single electron in the detector with a large unbalanced tranverse momentum. No events of this type were observed in the original search of 123 pb/sup -1/ of data, resulting in a cross section limit of less than 2.4 x 10/sup -2/ pb (at the 95% CL) within the detector acceptance. This cross section upper limit applies to any process which produces anomalous single electron events with missing transverse momentum. When interpreted as a supersymmetry search it results in a lower selectron mass limit of 22.2 GeV/c/sup 2/ for the case of massless photinos. Limits for non-zero mass photinos have been calculated. 87 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. A large area detector for x-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.; Huang, Qiang; Hopf, R.; Wang, Kemei.

    1993-01-01

    A large area detector for x-ray synchrotron applications has been developed. The front end of this device consist of a scintillator coupled to a fiber-optic taper. The fiber-optic taper is comprised of 4 smaller (70 mm x 70 mm) tapers fused together in a square matrix giving an active area of 140 mm x 140 mm. Each taper has a demagnification of 5.5 resulting in four small ends that are 12 mm diagonally across. The small ends of each taper are coupled to four microchannel-plate-based image intensifiers. The output from each image intensifier is focused onto a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) detector. The four CCDs are read out in parallel and are independently controlled. The image intensifiers also act as fast (20 ns) electronic shutters. The system is capable of displaying images in real time. Additionally, with independent control on the readout of each row of data from the CCD, the system is capable of performing high speed imaging through novel readout manipulation

  16. Calibration and GEANT4 Simulations of the Phase II Proton Compute Tomography (pCT) Range Stack Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Boi, S. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Francis, K. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Kalnins, J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Ford, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rauch, J. E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rubinov, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sellberg, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wilson, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Naimuddin, M. [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2015-12-29

    Northern Illinois University in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Delhi University has been designing and building a proton CT scanner for applications in proton treatment planning. The Phase II proton CT scanner consists of eight planes of tracking detectors with two X and two Y coordinate measurements both before and after the patient. In addition, a range stack detector consisting of a stack of thin scintillator tiles, arranged in twelve eight-tile frames, is used to determine the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of each track through the patient. The X-Y coordinates and WEPL are required input for image reconstruction software to find the relative (proton) stopping powers (RSP) value of each voxel in the patient and generate a corresponding 3D image. In this Note we describe tests conducted in 2015 at the proton beam at the Central DuPage Hospital in Warrenville, IL, focusing on the range stack calibration procedure and comparisons with the GEANT~4 range stack simulation.

  17. The Radamon radon detector and an example of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csige, I.; Csegzi, S.

    2001-01-01

    The etched track type Radamon radon detector is presented. As an example of application representative indoor radon survey was performed in Gyergyoremete (Romania) to pilot a study that can be done in other places of the country. Gyergyoremete was selected, because it was built on volcanic rock, where a number of aligning mineral water springs indicates the existence of geological faulting, and therefore, it was suspected that the village could be on a radon prone area. Measurements were done in sleeping rooms at pillow level. Representativity of the sample was ensured by random pull of 120 houses from the stock (hypergeometric statistical model). From the results it can be stated that the percentages of houses expected to have annual average 222 Rn activity concentration higher than 400 Bq m -3 is less than 1%

  18. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  19. Advanced Fire Detector for Space Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New sensor technology is required to face the challenging tasks associated with future space exploration involving missions to the Moon and Mars. The safety and...

  20. Assessment of ambient-temperature, high-resolution detectors for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, gamma- and x-ray spectrometry are used routinely in nuclear safeguards verification measurements of plutonium and uranium in the field. These measurements are now performed with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors that require cooling liquid-nitrogen temperatures, thus limiting their utility in field and unattended safeguards measurement applications. Ambient temperature semiconductor detectors may complement HPGe detectors for certain safeguards verification applications. Their potential will be determined by criteria such as their performance, commercial availability, stage of development, and costs. We have conducted as assessment of ambient temperature detectors for safeguards measurement applications with these criteria in mind

  1. Recent developments for the pattern recognition in the central drift chamber of the Belle II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trusov, Viktor; Feindt, Michael; Heck, Martin; Hauth, Thomas; Goldenzweig, Pablo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Belle II experiment is designed to perform more precise measurements (e.g. C P-violation measurements, New Physics phenomena, rare decays etc) than its predecessor, the Belle experiment. To achieve this goal, the luminosity of the experiment will be increased by a factor of 40 and as result multiple times more data will be collected. Due to this fact, faster reconstruction algorithms for the data processing need to be developed and at the same time accurate physical results should be retained. One important part in the data processing chain is the track reconstruction section. We present the development of one of the pattern recognition algorithms for the Belle II experiment based on conformal and Legendre transformations. In order to optimize the performance of the algorithm (CPU time and efficiency) we have introduced specialized processing steps. To show improvements in the results we introduce efficiency measurements of the tracking algorithms in the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) which were done using Monte-Carlo simulation of e{sup +} e{sup -} collisions followed by a full simulation of the Belle II detector.

  2. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    The present conference discusses Schottky-barrier IR image sensors, SWIR and MWIR Schottky-barrier imagers, a 640 x 640 PtSi, models of nonlinearities in focal plane arrays, retinal function relative to IRT focal plane arrays, a solid-state pyroelectric imager, and electrolyte electroreflectance spectroscopies for the ion-implanted HgCdTe with thermal annealing. Also discussed are HgCdTe hybrid focal plane arrays for thermoelectrically cooled applications, a novel IR detector plasma-edge detector, and IR detector circuits using monolithic CMOS amps with InSb detectors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  3. Behaviour of Belle II ARICH Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindo, H.; Adachi, I.; Dolenec, R.; Hataya, K.; Iori, S.; Iwata, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kataura, R.; Kawai, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Konno, T.; Korpar, S.; Kriz˘an, P.; Kumita, T.; Mrvar, M.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Yonenaga, M.; Yusa, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The proximity-focusing Aerogel Ring-Imaging Cherenkov detector (ARICH) has been designed to separate kaons from pions in the forward end-cap of the Belle II spectrometer. The detector will be placed in 1.5 T magnetic field and must have immunity to it. In ARICH R&D, we solve the problem with new equipment called Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector (HAPD) which developed by Hamamatsu Photonics. Recently the production of about 500 HAPDs was completed. We test HAPDs in magnetic field in KEK. We found some HAPDs have significant amount of dead time, which reaches up to 30% in the worst case. The dead time is caused by very large (more than 10,000 times larger than a single photon signal) and frequent (∼5 Hz) signals, which make electronics paralysed. The huge signals are observed in about 30% of HAPDs. To identify the origin and understand the mechanism, we perform some extra test of HAPDs. We find a strange dependence of the huge signals to the APD bias voltage. If we reduce the bias voltage applied to one of the 4 APDs by 10 V, the frequency of the huge signals is much reduced. On the other hand, if we reduce the voltage of all the 4 HAPDs, huge signals do not decrease, or even increase in some case. We also find the huge signals seems to be related to the vacuum inside HAPD. We present about the observation of the huge signals of HAPDs in the magnetic field, and our strategy to manage it.

  4. Extraction of minority carrier diffusion length of MWIR Type-II superlattice nBp detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Zahra; Kazemi, Alireza; Myers, Stephen; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Mathews, Sen; Steenbergen, Elizabeth H.; Morath, Christian; Cowan, Vincent M.; Ariyawansa, Gamini; Scheihing, John; Krishna, Sanjay

    2017-08-01

    We present a model for the spectral external quantum efficiency (EQE) to extract the minority carrier diffusion length (Ln) of a unipolar nBp InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (T2SL) mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector. The detector consists of a 4 μm thick p-doped 10ML InAs/10ML GaSb SL absorber with a 50% cut-off wavelength of 5 μm at 80 K and zero bias. The n-type doped InAs/AlSb SL barrier in the structure was included to reduce the GR dark current. By fitting the experimentally measured EQE data to the theoretically calculated QE based on the solution of the drift-diffusion equation, the p-type absorber was found the have Ln = 10 +/- 0.5 μm at 80K, and Ln = 12 +/- 0.5 μm at 120K and 150K. We performed the absorption coefficient measurement at different temperatures of interest. Also, we estimated the reduced background concentration and the built-in potential by utilizing a capacitance-voltage measurement technique. We used time-resolved-photoluminescence (TRPL) to determine the lifetime at 80K. With the result of the model and the lifetime measurement, we calculated the diffusion coefficient and the mobility in the T2SL detector at various temperatures. Also, we studied the behavior of different dark current mechanisms by fitting the experimentally measured and simulated dark current density under different operating temperatures and biases.

  5. The 640 × 512 LWIR type-II superlattice detectors operating at 110 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bi-Song; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhou, Wen-Hong; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Guo-Wei; Li, Yun-Tao; Ding, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Zhou; Lei, Hua-Wei; Liu, Wei-Hua; Du, Yu; Zhang, Li-Fang; Liu, Bin; Wang, Li-Bao; Huang, Li

    2018-03-01

    The type-II InAs/GaSb superlattices (T2SLs)-based 640 × 512 long wavelength infrared (LWIR) Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector with15 μm pitch and 50% cut-off wavelength of 10.5 μm demonstrates a peak quantum efficiency of 38.6% and peak detectivity of 1.65 × 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 8.1 μm, high pixel operability of 99.5% and low responsivity non-uniformity of 2.69% at 80 K. The FPA exhibits clear infrared imaging at 110 K and diffusion-limited dark current densities below Tennant's 'Rule07' at temperature above 100 K, which is attributed to the efficient suppression of diffusion dark current and surface leak current by introducing M-structure barrier and double hetero-structure passivation layers.

  6. The neural network z-vertex trigger for the Belle II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skambraks, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Sara [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Chen, Yang; Kiesling, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We present a neural network based first level track trigger for the upcoming Belle II detector at the high luminosity SuperKEKB flavor factory. Using hit and drift time information from the Central Drift Chamber (CDC), neural networks estimate the z-coordinates of single track vertex positions. Especially beam induced background, with vertices outside of the interaction region, can clearly be rejected. This allows to relax the track trigger conditions and thus enhances the efficiency for events with a low track multiplicity. In the CDC trigger pipeline, the preceding 2D pattern recognition enables a unique per track input representation and a sectorization of the track parameter phase space. The precise z-vertices are then estimated by an ensemble of sector-specific local expert neural networks. After an introduction to the neural trigger system, the benefits of an improved 3D pattern recognition are discussed.

  7. Precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass M{sub W} using data corresponding to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470 126 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 624 708 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates yield the measurement M{sub W} = 80 387 {+-} 12{sub stat} {+-} 15{sub syst} = 80 387 {+-} 19 MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  8. Detector solenoid compensation in the PEP-II B-Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosochkov, Y.; Cai, Y.; Irwin, J.; Sullivan, M.

    1995-01-01

    The PEP-II experimental detector includes a strong 1.5 T solenoid field in the interaction region (IR). With the fringe fields, the solenoid extends over a range of 6 m. Additional complications are that (1) it is displaced longitudinally from the interaction point (IP) by about 40 cm, (2) neither beam is parallel to the solenoid axis, and (3) the solenoid overlaps a dipole and a quadrupole on either side of the IP. In each half IR the correction system includes a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and normal quadrupoles to independently compensate the coupling, orbit perturbation, dispersion and focusing effect produced by the solenoid. The correction schemes for the Low Energy Ring (LER) and for the High Energy Ring (HER) are described, and the impact on the dynamic aperture is evaluated

  9. GERDA phase II detectors: Behind the production and characterisation at low background conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneschg, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is designed to search for the rare neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium diodes are operated in liquid argon which is used as coolant, as passive and soon active as well shield against external radiation. Currently, Phase I of the experiment is running using ∼15 kg of co-axial High Purity Germanium diodes. In order to increase the sensitivity of the experiment 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be added within 2013. This presentation reviews the production chain of the new BEGe detectors from isotopic enrichment to diode production and testing. As demonstrated all steps were carefully planned in order to minimize the exposure of the enriched germanium to cosmic radiation. Following this premise, acceptance and characterisation measurement of the newly produced diodes have been performed within the HEROICA project in the Belgian underground laboratory HADES close to the diode manufacturer. The test program and the results from a subset of the recently terminated GERDA Phase II BEGe survey will be presented.

  10. Online data reduction with FPGA-based track reconstruction for the Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, Bruno; Wessel, Christian; Marinas, Carlos; Dingfelder, Jochen [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The innermost two layers of the Belle II vertex detector at the KEK facility in Tsukuba, Japan, will be covered by high-granularity DEPFET pixel sensors (PXD). The large number of pixels leads to a maximum data rate of 256 Gbps, which has to be significantly reduced by the Data Acquisition System (DATCON). For the data reduction the hit information of the surrounding Silicon strip Vertex Detector (SVD) is utilized to define so-called Regions of Interest (ROI). Only hit information of the pixels located inside these ROIs are saved. The ROIs for the PXD are computed by reconstructing track segments from SVD data and extrapolation to the PXD. The goal is to achieve a data reduction of at least a factor of 10 with this ROI selection. All the necessary processing stages, the receiving, decoding and multiplexing of SVD data on 48 optical fibers, the track reconstruction and the definition of the ROIs, will be performed by the presented system. The planned hardware design is based on a distributed set of Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMC) each equipped with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and 4 optical transceivers. In this talk, the status and plans for the DATCON prototype and the FPGA-based tracking algorithm are introduced as well as the plans for their test in the upcoming test beam at DESY.

  11. Single photon light detector for deep ocean applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, S.; Babson, J.; Learned, J.G.; O'Connor, D.; Grieder, P.K.F.; Wilson, C.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a single photon sensitive light detector module which can be operated in the ocean to a depth of 5000 m. It was designed primarily to be used as a Cherenkov light detector in conjunction with the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detector) experiment. After calibration in the laboratory, seven detectors, assembled in a vertical string geometry, have been operated simultaneously in the deep ocean off the coast of the island of Hawaii. Cosmic ray muons have been recorded successfully at dephts ranging from 2000 to 4000 m. The results have demonstrated the capability of the detector; it fulfills the specifications required for the modules to be used in a deep ocean muon and neutrino detector. (orig.)

  12. II. Application of genetically modified breeding by introducing foreign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of salinity tolerant Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus through traditional and modern breeding methods: II. Application of genetically modified breeding by introducing foreign DNA into fish gonads.

  13. The development of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L.; Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Pavlopoulos, N.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.

    2004-01-01

    There are several applications and fundamental research areas which require the detection of VUV light at cryogenic temperatures. For these applications we have developed and successfully tested special designs of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes able to operate at low temperatures: sealed gaseous detectors with MgF2 windows and windowless detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated, that both primary and secondary (due to the avalanche multiplication inside liquids) scintillation lights could be recorded by photosensitive gaseous detectors. The results of this work may allow one to significantly improve the operation of some noble liquid gas TPCs.

  14. Nuclear Material Accountability Applications of a Continuous Energy and Direction Gamma Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerts, David; Bean, Robert; Paff, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently developed a detector system based on the principle of a Wilson cloud chamber that gives the original energy and direction to a gamma ray source. This detector has the properties that the energy resolution is continuous and the direction to the source can be resolved to desired fidelity. Furthermore, the detector has low power requirements, is durable, operates in widely varying environments, and is relatively cheap to produce. This detector is expected, however, to require significant time to perform measurements. To mitigate the significant time for measurements, the detector is expected to scale to very large sizes with a linear increase in cost. For example, the proof of principle detector is approximately 30,000 cm3. This work describes the technical results that lead to these assertions. Finally, the applications of this detector are described in the context of nuclear material accountability.

  15. Synchrotron applications of pixel and strip detectors at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.; Nave, C.

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of position-sensitive X-ray detectors have been commissioned on the synchrotron X-ray beamlines operating at the Diamond Light Source in UK. In addition to mature technologies such as image-plates, CCD-based detectors, multi-wire and micro-strip gas detectors, more recent detectors based on semiconductor pixel or strip sensors coupled to CMOS read-out chips are also in use for routine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The performance of several commercial and developmental pixel/strip detectors for synchrotron studies are discussed with emphasis on the image quality achieved with these devices. Examples of pixel or strip detector applications at Diamond Light Source as well as the status of the commissioning of these detectors on the beamlines are presented. Finally, priorities and ideas for future developments are discussed.

  16. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II

  17. More Than ALICE: Development of an augmented reality mobile application for the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ouellette, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    More Than ALICE is a mobile application for iOS and Android built in the Unity Engine. This project concerns the development of the second edition of the application, which is meant to completely succeed the original version built in 2014. The purpose of the application is to describe the various components of the ALICE detector and to overlay live collisions to increase public awareness for the research goals of the ALICE collaboration. The application provides an augmented reality (AR) interface via the Vuforia SDK to track images of the ALICE detector or components of the paper model of ALICE that can be purchased at the ALICE secretariat office. For those without access to either images of the detector or the detector model, the app provides a virtual detector model (VR) that contains the same functionality as the augmented reality.

  18. Application of Rossi-type detectors in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H.G.; Hartmann, G.H.; Krauss, O.; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg

    1983-01-01

    Rossi-type detectors can measure the energy dose and the pertinent quality factor simultaneously and independent of the radiation. This is possible because these detectors are able to measure the energy as well as the LET distribution of the measured radiation. The quality factor is then calculated on this basis. The principle of measurement, problems and solutions are discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  19. GridPix detectors – introduction and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, J., E-mail: kaminski@physik.uni-bonn.de; Bilevych, Y.; Desch, K.; Krieger, C.; Lupberger, M.

    2017-02-11

    GridPix detectors are a new kind of detectors combining a high density pixelized readout ASIC with a Micromegas gas amplification stage. Because of the alignment of mesh holes and pixels, a high efficiency for detecting and separating single primary electrons is reached. This feature leads to excellent spatial and energy resolutions as demonstrated by several different setups.

  20. Mitigating radiation damage of single photon detectors for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Cranmer, Miles [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Choi, Eric [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Magellan Aerospace, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hudson, Danya; Piche, Louis P.; Scott, Alan [Honeywell Aerospace (formerly COM DEV Ltd.), Ottawa, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Single-photon detectors in space must retain useful performance characteristics despite being bombarded with sub-atomic particles. Mitigating the effects of this space radiation is vital to enabling new space applications which require high-fidelity single-photon detection. To this end, we conducted proton radiation tests of various models of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one model of photomultiplier tube potentially suitable for satellite-based quantum communications. The samples were irradiated with 106 MeV protons at doses approximately equivalent to lifetimes of 0.6, 6, 12 and 24 months in a low-Earth polar orbit. Although most detection properties were preserved, including efficiency, timing jitter and afterpulsing probability, all APD samples demonstrated significant increases in dark count rate (DCR) due to radiation-induced damage, many orders of magnitude higher than the 200 counts per second (cps) required for ground-to-satellite quantum communications. We then successfully demonstrated the mitigation of this DCR degradation through the use of deep cooling, to as low as -86 C. This achieved DCR below the required 200 cps over the 24 months orbit duration. DCR was further reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures of +50 to +100 C. (orig.)

  1. Advancements of floating strip Micromegas detectors for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klitzner, Felix; Biebel, Otmar; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Flierl, Bernhard [LS Schaile, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Magallanes, Lorena [LS Parodi, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Parodi, Katia [LS Parodi, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (Germany); Voss, Bernd [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Floating strip Micromegas have proven to be high-rate capable tracking detectors with excellent spatial and temporal resolution for particle fluxes up to 7 MHz/cm{sup 2}. To further increase the high-rate capability a Ne:CF{sub 4} 86:14 vol.% gas mixture has been used as detector gas. We present results from measurements with a seven detector system consisting of six low material budget floating strip Micromegas, a GEM detector and a scintillator based particle range telescope. The gaseous and the scintillation detectors were read out with APV25 frontend boards, allowing for single strip readout with pulse height and timing information. A two-dimensional readout anode for floating strip Micromegas has been tested for the first time. The Micromegas detectors were operated with minimal additional drift field, which significantly improves the timing resolution and also the spatial resolution for inclined tracks. We discuss the detector performance in high-rate carbon and proton beams at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and present radiographies of phantoms, acquired with the system.

  2. Application of position-sensitive detectors to positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Takaji; Uchida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Omura, Tomohide

    1994-01-01

    Positron imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to be a promising tool for basic and clinical research, because it makes possible the study of regional chemistry within multiple organs of the body in living human beings and experimental animals. New schemes of high resolution block detectors have been developed to improve the performance of positron imaging systems, which employ small segments of bismuth germanate (BGO) arrays and position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT). The coincidence detector resolution of less than 2.0 mm in full width at half maximum was achieved with the detectors, which is very close to the theoretical resolution limit in positron imaging. (author)

  3. THGEM based photon detector for Cherenkov imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, M; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Croci, G; Colantoni, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Duarte Pinto, S; Denisov, O; Diaz, V; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Giacomini, G; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Jahodova, V; Königsmann, K; Lauser, L; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Nerling, F; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Polak, J; Rocco, E; Ropelewski, L; Sauli, F; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schopferer, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Takekawa, S; Tessarotto, F; Wollny, H

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a single photon detector for Cherenkov imaging counters. This detector is based on the use of THGEM electron multipliers in a multilayer design. The major goals of our project are ion feedback suppression down to a few per cent, large gain, fast response, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and a large detector size. We report about the project status and perspectives. In particular, we present a systematic study of the THGEM response as a function of geometrical parameters, production techniques and the gas mixture composition. The first figures obtained from measuring the response of a CsI coated THGEM to single photons are presented.

  4. More than ALICE: Development of an augmented reality mobile application for the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatouli, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    More Than ALICE is a mobile application for iOS and Android devices. This project concerns the development of the v2.1 of the application which is meant to enhance the capacity of tracking quickly and reliably parts of the detector and its paper model. It recognises different parts of it and displays labels explaining its structure. Additionally, visualisation of the collisions can also be shown on the top of the camera image. More Than ALICE aims to increase the public awareness of the research goals of the ALICE collaboration. The application provides an Augmented Reality (AR) interface to track the detector during underground visits or its paper model which can be purchased at the ALICE secretariat. For those without access to either the detector or the paper model, the app provides the virtual model of the detector where the users can explore and understand the different parts of the detector and see real-time collisions.

  5. Applications of 'edge-on' illuminated porous plate detectors for diagnostic X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, P M

    2002-01-01

    Scanning X-ray imaging systems for non-invasive diagnostics have several advantages over conventional imaging systems using area detectors. They significantly reduce the detected scatter radiation, cover large areas and potentially provide high spatial resolution. Applications of one-dimensional gaseous detectors and 'edge-on' illuminated silicon strip detectors for scanning imaging systems are currently under intensive investigation. The purpose of this work is to investigate 'edge-on' illuminated Porous Plate (PP) detectors for applications in diagnostic X-ray imaging. MicroChannel Plate (MCP), which is a common type of PP, has previously been investigated as a detector in surface-on illumination mode for medical X-ray imaging. However, its detection efficiency was too low for medical imaging applications. In the present study, the PP are used in the 'edge-on' illumination mode. Furthermore, the structural parameters of different PP types are optimized to improve the detection efficiency in the diagnostic X...

  6. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice infrared detectors: Future prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2017-09-01

    Investigations of antimonide-based materials began at about the same time as HgCdTe ternary alloys—in the 1950s, and the apparent rapid success of their technology, especially low-dimensional solids, depends on the previous five decades of III-V materials and device research. However, the sophisticated physics associated with the antimonide-based bandgap engineering concept started at the beginning of 1990s gave a new impact and interest in development of infrared detector structures within academic and national laboratories. The development of InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) results from two primary motivations: the perceived challenges of reproducibly fabricating high-operability HgCdTe focal plane arrays (FPAs) at reasonable cost and the theoretical predictions of lower Auger recombination for type T2SL detectors compared with HgCdTe. Second motivation—lower Auger recombination should be translated into a fundamental advantage for T2SL over HgCdTe in terms of lower dark current and/or higher operating temperature, provided other parameters such as Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetime are equal. InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetectors offer similar performance to HgCdTe at an equivalent cut-off wavelength, but with a sizeable penalty in operating temperature, due to the inherent difference in SRH lifetimes. It is predicted that since the future infrared (IR) systems will be based on the room temperature operation of depletion-current limited arrays with pixel densities that are fully consistent with background- and diffraction-limited performance due to the system optics, the material system with long SRH lifetime will be required. Since T2SLs are very much resisted in attempts to improve its SRH lifetime, currently the only material that meets this requirement is HgCdTe. Due to less ionic chemical bonding, III-V semiconductors are more robust than their II-VI counterparts. As a result, III-V-based FPAs excel in operability, spatial uniformity, temporal stability

  7. Development of neutron-monitor detectors applicable for energies up to 100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Kim, Eunjoo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakamura, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    For the purpose of monitoring of neutron doses in high energy accelerator facilities, we have been developing neutron detectors which are applicable for neutron energies up to 100 MeV. The present paper reports characteristics of a phoswitch-type neutron detector which is composed of a liquid organic scintillator and {sup 6}Li+ZnS(Ag) sheets. (author)

  8. Application of imitation for energy calibration of silicon semiconductor detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aivazyan, G M; Mikaelyan, M A

    2003-01-01

    An effective method is described for energy calibration of semiconductor detectors (SCD) with different thickness. The method is based on imitating the charge on the input of the preamplifier deposited in SCD by known energy ionizing particles, the imitation being performed by a pulser with a partial with use of alpha-active sources. The results of laboratory studies of the described method are given with detectors of either large, 50-1000 mu m, or small, 18-20 mu m, thickness

  9. On Performance of Linear Multiuser Detectors for Wireless Multimedia Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rekha; Reddy, B. V. R.; Bindu, E.; Nayak, Pinki

    In this paper, performance of different multi-rate schemes in DS-CDMA system is evaluated. The analysis of multirate linear multiuser detectors with multiprocessing gain is analyzed for synchronous Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) systems. Variable data rate is achieved by varying the processing gain. Our conclusion is that bit error rate for multirate and single rate systems can be made same with a tradeoff with number of users in linear multiuser detectors.

  10. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Can Aydiner, C.; Almer, J.; Bernier, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Haeffner, D.; Kump, K.; Lee, P. L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A.; Vera, G.; LANL; GE Healthcare

    2008-01-01

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 (micro)m x 200 (micro)m pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 (micro)m x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO 2 powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s -1 in radiography mode, 30 frames s -1 in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO 2 in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements

  11. Calculation and applications of the frequency dependent neutron detector response functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dam, H.; Van Hagen, T.H.J.J. der; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Keijzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical basis is presented for the evaluation of the frequency dependent function that enables to calculate the response of a neutron detector to parametric fluctuations ('noise') or oscillations in reactor core. This function describes the 'field view' of a detector and can be calculated with a static transport code under certain conditions which are discussed. Two applications are presented: the response of an ex-core detector to void fraction fluctuations in a BWR and of both in and ex-core detectors to a rotating neutron absorber near or inside a research reactor core. (authors). 7 refs., 4 figs

  12. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S., E-mail: erickson@gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, 770 State St., Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on radiation detector and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This workshop was held from January 23 to 25, 1996 at National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. At the workshop, lectures were given on the development of the single ion detector using MCP in heavy ion microbeam device, the response of MCP to single heavy ion, the response of a superheated liquid drop type detector to low LET radiation, the response characteristics of a CR-39 flight track detector to hydrogen isotopes, the analysis of small nuclear flight tracks on CR-39 with an interatomic force microscope, charge-sensible amplifiers, the signal-processing circuit for position detection, time and depth-resolved measurement of ion tracks in condensed matter, the response of a thin Si detector to electrons, the method of expressing gas-amplifying rate curves in proportional count gas for low temperature, the characteristics of self annihilating streamer by ultraviolet laser, the development of slow positron beam using radioisotopes, the development of a tunnel junction type x-ray detector, the development of the pattern-analyzing system for PIXE spectra, the characteristics of NE213-CaF 2 bond type neutron detector and many others. In this report, the gists of these papers are collected. (K.I.)

  14. A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Agapopoulou, Christina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC with instantaneous luminosities up to L = 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2}s^{−1} will have a severe impact on pile-up. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction performance for especially jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region of the ATLAS detector. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters of ATLAS for pile-up mitigation in the offline reconstruction. An additional use of the detector as a luminometer is proposed. This device covers the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4. Four layers of Silicon sensors are foreseen to provide precision timing information with a time resolution of the order of 30 picoseconds per minimum ionizing particle in order to assign the energy deposits in the calorimeter to different proton-proton collision vertices. Each read...

  15. Investigation of self-powered gamma flux detectors with Lead(II) oxide serving as both emitter and insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, H.; Yue, S.; Jonkmans, G.; Sur, B.; Hilborn, J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Lead(II) oxide as the electron-emitting component and the insulating component of self-powered flux detectors is a concept that had not been previously explored. Detectors constructed from various combinations of electrodes (stainless steel, Al, Pb, and W) and insulating materials (Al 2 O 3 and PbO) were irradiated in a 427 Gy/h gamma field. Although high gamma sensitivities were achieved, PbO did not prove to be a strong emitter of gamma-induced electrons. Nevertheless, PbO did serve as a better insulator than one that is currently in use, namely alumina. (author)

  16. The ITk strips tracker for the phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector of the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koutoulaki, Afroditi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The inner detector of the present ATLAS detector has been designed and developed to function in the environment of the present Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the next-generation tracking detector proposed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the so-called ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade, the particle densities and radiation levels will be higher by as much as a factor of ten. The new detectors must be faster, they need to be more highly segmented, and covering more area. They also need to be more resistant to radiation, and they require much greater power delivery to the front-end systems. At the same time, they cannot introduce excess material which could undermine performance. For those reasons, the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector must be redesigned and rebuilt completely. The design of the ATLAS Upgrade inner tracker (ITk) has already been defined. It consists of several layers of silicon particle detectors. The innermost layers will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, and the outer layers will consist of s...

  17. Development of new hole-type avalanche detectors and the first results of their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Charpak, Georges; Breuil, P.; Di Mauro, A.; Martinengo, P.; Peskov, V.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new detector of photons and charged particles- a hole-type structure with electrodes made of a double layered resistive material: a thin low resistive layer coated with a layer having a much higher resistivity. One of the unique features of this detector is its capability to operate at high gas gains (up to 10E4) in air or in gas mixtures with air. They can also operate in a cascaded mode or be combined with other detectors, for example with GEM. This opens new avenues in their applications. Several prototypes of these devices based on new detectors and oriented on practical applications were developed and successfully tested: a detector of soft X-rays and alpha particles, a flame sensor, a detector of dangerous gases. All of these detectors could operate stably even in humid air and/or in dusty conditions. The main advantages of these detectors are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. For example, due to the avalanche multiplication, the detectors of flames and dangerous gases...

  18. Scalable Background-Limited Polarization-Sensitive Detectors for mm-wave Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostem, Karwan; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe A.; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin L.; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Marriage, Tobias A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report on the status and development of polarization-sensitive detectors for millimeter-wave applications. The detectors are fabricated on single-crystal silicon, which functions as a low-loss dielectric substrate for the microwave circuitry as well as the supporting membrane for the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The orthomode transducer (OMT) is realized as a symmetric structure and on-chip filters are employed to define the detection bandwidth. A hybridized integrated enclosure reduces the high-frequency THz mode set that can couple to the TES bolometers. An implementation of the detector architecture at Q-band achieves 90% efficiency in each polarization. The design is scalable in both frequency coverage, 30-300 GHz, and in number of detectors with uniform characteristics. Hence, the detectors are desirable for ground-based or space-borne instruments that require large arrays of efficient background-limited cryogenic detectors.

  19. The TIGER trigger processor for the CAMERA detector at COMPASS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Tobias; Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Joerg, Philipp; Kremser, Paul; Kunz, Tobias; Michalski, Christoph; Schopferer, Sebastian; Szameitat, Tobias [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In today's nuclear and high-energy physics experiments the background-induced occupancy of the detector channels can be quite high; therefore it is important to have sophisticated trigger subsystems which process the data in real-time to generate trigger objects for the global trigger decision. In this work we present a FPGA based low-latency trigger processor for the COMPASS-II experiment. TIGER is a high-performance trigger processor that was developed to fit perfectly in the GANDALF framework and extend its versatility. It is designed as a VXS module and is allocated to the central VXS switch slot, which has a direct link from every payload slot. The synchronous transfer protocol was optimized for low latencies and offers a bandwidth of up to 8 Gbit/s per link. The centerpiece of the board is a Xilinx Virtex-6 SX315T FPGA, offering vast programmable logic, embedded memory and DSP resources. It is accompanied by DDR3 memory, a COM Express CPU and a MXM GPU. Besides the VXS backplane ports, the board features two SFP+ transceivers, 32 LVDS inputs and 32 LVDS outputs to interface with the global trigger system and a Gigabit Ethernet port for configuration and monitoring.

  20. Study of gluing and wire bonding for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Hyun, H.J.; Jeon, H.B.; Joo, C.W.; Kah, D.H.; Kim, H.J.; Mibe, T.; Onuki, Y.; Park, H.; Rao, K.K.; Sato, N.; Shimizu, N.; Tanida, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into gluing and wire bonding for assembling the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) for the Belle II experiment at KEK in Japan. Optimizing the gluing of the silicon microstrip sensors, the support frame, and the readout flex cables is important for achieving the required mechanical precision. The wire bonding between the sensors and the readout electronic chips also needs special care to maximize the physics capability of the SVD. The silicon sensors and signal fan out flex circuits (pitch adapters) are glued and connected using wire bonding. We determine that gluing quality is important for achieving good bonding efficiency. The standard deviation in the glue thickness for the best result is measured to be 3.11 μm. Optimal machine parameters for wire bonding are determined to be 70 mW power, 20 gf force, and 20 ms for the pitch adapter and 60 mW power, 20 gf force, and 20 ms for the silicon strip sensors; these parameters provide a pull force of (10.92±0.72) gf. With these settings, 75% of the pitch adapters and 25% of the strip sensors experience the neck-broken type of break

  1. Measurements of the exclusive production of a real photon with the ZEUS detector at HERA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamarta Martinez, R.

    2007-06-01

    The study of exclusive processes is one of the most promising tools to obtain information on the nucleon via generalized parton distributions. The simplest of these reactions is the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering process in which a real photon is produced via diffractive exchange. Using the interference term between Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes it is possible to extract the generalized parton distributions. The measurement presented in this thesis is a study of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes recorder with the ZEUS detector. The data analyzed were taken with HERA II in the years 2003 to 2005, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 41 pb -1 for e + p and 136 pb -1 for e - p scattering data. The cross section of the elastic Bethe-Heitler process measured in the kinematic region 230 2 2 and vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 is presented. The feasibility of measurement of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering process is also reported. (orig.)

  2. Observation of D⁰-D¯⁰ mixing using the CDF II detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-12-06

    We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0→K(+)π(-) to the Cabibbo-favored decay D(0)→K(-)π(+). The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3×10(4) D(*+)→π(+)D(0), D(0)→K(+)π(-) decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6  fb(-1) for pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96  TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D¯0 mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R(D)=(3.51±0.35)×10(-3), y'=(4.3±4.3)×10(-3), and x'2=(0.08±0.18)×10(-3). We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'2-y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D¯0 mixing from a single experiment.

  3. DUMAND-II (deep underwater muon and neutrino detector) progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kenneth K.

    1995-07-01

    The DUMAND II detector will search for astronomical sources of high energy neutrinos. Successful deployment of the basic infrastructure, including the shore cable, the underwater junction box, and an environmental module was accomplished in December, 1993. One optical module string was also deployed and operated, logging data for about 10 hours. The underwater cable was connected to the shore station where we were able to successfully exercise system controls and log further environmental data. After this time, water leaking into the electronics control module for the deployed string disabled the string electrical system. The acquired data are consistent with the expected rate of downgoing muons, and our ability to reconstruct muons was demonstrated. The measured acoustical backgrounds are consistent with expectation, which should allow acoustical detection of nearby PeV particle cascades. The disabled string has been recovered and is undergoing repairs ashore. We have identified the source of the water leak and implemented additional testing and QC procedures to ensure no repetition in our next deployment. We will be ready to deploy three strings and begin continuous data taking in late 1994 or early 1995.

  4. Progress on uncooled PbSe detectors for low-cost applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, German; Gomez, Luis J.; Villamayor, Victor; Alvarez, M.; Rodrigo, Maria T.; del Carmen Torquemada, Maria; Sanchez, Fernando J.; Verdu, Marina; Diezhandino, Jorge; Rodriguez, Purificacion; Catalan, Irene; Almazan, Rosa; Plaza, Julio; Montojo, Maria T.

    2004-08-01

    This work reports on progress on development of polycrystalline PbSe infrared detectors at the Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo de la Armada (CIDA). Since mid nineties, the CIDA owns an innovative technology for processing uncooled MWIR detectors of polycrystalline PbSe. Based on this technology, some applications have been developed. However, future applications demand smarter, more complex, faster yet cheaper detectors. Aiming to open new perspectives to polycrystalline PbSe detectors, we are currently working on different directions: 1) Processing of 2D arrays: a) Designing and processing low density x-y addressed arrays with 16x16 and 32x32 elements, as an extension of our standard technology. b) Trying to make compatible standard CMOS and polycrystalline PbSe technologies in order to process monolithic large format arrays. 2) Adding new features to the detector such as monolithically integrated spectral discrimination.

  5. Application of Control System Studio for the NOνA Detector Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukhanin, Gennadiy; Biery, Kurt; Foulkes, Stephen; Kowalkowski, Jim; Paterno, Marc; Rechenmacher, Ron; Frank, Martin; Hatzikoutelis, Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    In the NOνA experiment, the Detector Controls System (DCS) provides a method for controlling and monitoring important detector hardware and environmental parameters. It is essential for operating the detector and is required to have access to roughly 370,000 independent programmable channels via more than 11,600 physical devices. In this paper, we demonstrate an application of Control System Studio (CSS), developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the NOνA experiment. The application of CSS for the DCS of the NOνA experiment has been divided into three phases: (1) user requirements and concept prototype on a test-stand, (2) small scale deployment at the prototype Near Detector on the Surface, and (3) a larger scale deployment at the Far Detector. We also give an outline of the CSS integration with the NOνA online software and the alarm handling logic for the Front-End electronics.

  6. 2. International workshop Solid state nuclear track detectors and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perelygin, V.P.

    1992-01-01

    The 2. Workshop on Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) held in Dubna, 24-26 Mar 1992. Possibilities of SSNTD applications in the fields of high and low energy physics, dosimetry and radioecology were discussed

  7. DOE seeks applicants to develop next-generation nuclear detectors. (Sensors)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "DOE's Division of High Energy Physics seeks grant applications for development of advanced detectors in the areas of high energy physics experiments, which includes accelerator-based and non-accelerator based experiments" (1/2 page).

  8. Preliminary studies of microchannel plate photomultiplier tube neutron detectors for flight test applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, K.W.

    1978-10-01

    Electrical, mechanical, thermal, and neutron response data indicate that microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes are viable candidates as miniature, ruggedized neutron detectors for flight test applications in future weapon systems

  9. Background level of natural radioactivities in a giant water Cherenkov detector and its surrounding environment; KAMIOKANDE-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Sakanoue, Masanobu; Komura, Kazuhisa; Ueno, Kaoru [Kanazawa Univ., Tatsunokuchi, Ishikawa (Japan). Low Level Radioactivity Lab.

    1989-12-01

    The KAMIOKANDE-II water Cherenkov detector for the measurement of nucleon decay and/or solar neutrino has been operating in the underground laboratory at a depth of 2,700 m.w.e. (meter water equivalent) in Kamioka mine of Gifu Prefecture. Concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn as the major background sources have been measured for various kinds of rocks, mine water, mine air and high purity water used as a detector during the period from August 1986 to December 1987. The concentration levels of these radionuclides and their seasonal variation have become clear. Some of these results have provided useful informations for decreasing the background level of water Cherenkov detector. (author).

  10. Application of imitation for energy calibration of silicon semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aivazyan, G.M.; Badalyan, H.V.; Mikaelyan, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    An effective method is described for energy calibration of semiconductor detectors (SCD) with different thickness. The method is based on imitating the charge on the input of the preamplifier deposited in SCD by known energy ionizing particles, the imitation being performed by a pulser with a partial with use of α-active sources. The results of laboratory studies of the described method are given with detectors of either large, 50-1000μm, or small, 18-20 μm, thickness

  11. CMOS-compatible plenoptic detector for LED lighting applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Alexander; Ghasemi, Javad; Nezhadbadeh, Shima; Nie, Xiangyu; Zarkesh-Ha, Payman; Brueck, S R J

    2015-09-07

    LED lighting systems with large color gamuts, with multiple LEDs spanning the visible spectrum, offer the potential of increased lighting efficiency, improved human health and productivity, and visible light communications addressing the explosive growth in wireless communications. The control of this "smart lighting system" requires a silicon-integrated-circuit-compatible, visible, plenoptic (angle and wavelength) detector. A detector element, based on an offset-grating-coupled dielectric waveguide structure and a silicon photodetector, is demonstrated with an angular resolution of less than 1° and a wavelength resolution of less than 5 nm.

  12. Recent progress in sensor- and mechanics-R and D for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergauer, T., E-mail: thomas.bergauer@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Doljeschi, P.; Frankenberger, A.; Friedl, M.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Onuki, Y. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Smiljic, D. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Tsuboyama, T. [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Valentan, M. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-08-01

    The Belle experiment at the KEKB electron/positron collider in Tsukuba (Japan) was successfully running for more than ten years. A major update of the machine to SuperKEKB is now foreseen until 2015, aiming a peak luminosity which is 40 times the peak value of the previous system. This also requires a redesign of the Belle detector (leading to Belle II) and especially its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which surrounds the beam pipe. The future Belle II SVD will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors based on 6 in. silicon wafers. Three of the four layers will be equipped with trapezoidal sensors in the slanted forward region. Moreover, two inner layers with pixel detectors based on DEPFET technology will complement the SVD as innermost detector. Since the KEKB-factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by arranging the sensors in the so-called “Origami chip-on-sensor concept”, and a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO{sub 2} cooling for the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget. In this paper, an overview of the future Belle II SVD design will be given, covering the silicon sensors, the readout electronics and the mechanics. A strong emphasis will be given to our R and D work on double-sided sensors where different p-stop layouts for the n-side of the detectors were compared. Moreover, this paper gives updated numbers for the mechanical dimensions of the ladders and their radii.

  13. Recent progress in sensor- and mechanics-R and D for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergauer, T.; Doljeschi, P.; Frankenberger, A.; Friedl, M.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Onuki, Y.; Smiljic, D.; Tsuboyama, T.; Valentan, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Belle experiment at the KEKB electron/positron collider in Tsukuba (Japan) was successfully running for more than ten years. A major update of the machine to SuperKEKB is now foreseen until 2015, aiming a peak luminosity which is 40 times the peak value of the previous system. This also requires a redesign of the Belle detector (leading to Belle II) and especially its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which surrounds the beam pipe. The future Belle II SVD will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors based on 6 in. silicon wafers. Three of the four layers will be equipped with trapezoidal sensors in the slanted forward region. Moreover, two inner layers with pixel detectors based on DEPFET technology will complement the SVD as innermost detector. Since the KEKB-factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by arranging the sensors in the so-called “Origami chip-on-sensor concept”, and a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO 2 cooling for the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget. In this paper, an overview of the future Belle II SVD design will be given, covering the silicon sensors, the readout electronics and the mechanics. A strong emphasis will be given to our R and D work on double-sided sensors where different p-stop layouts for the n-side of the detectors were compared. Moreover, this paper gives updated numbers for the mechanical dimensions of the ladders and their radii

  14. Application of pulse shape discrimination in Si detector for fission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) with totally depleted transmission type Si surface barrier detector in reverse mount has been investigated to identify fission fragments in the presence of elastic background in heavy ion-induced fission reactions by both numerical simulation and experimental studies. The PSD method is ...

  15. Application of a diode-array detector in capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, W.; Hoek, van R.; Engelhardt, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade diode-array detection has proved to be extremely useful in high performance liquid chromatography in recording UV-visible spectra directly and on-line in the column effluent. In capillary electrophoresis (CE) only fast-scanning detectors with long scan times (up to 2 s) are

  16. CMOS-TDI detector technology for reconnaissance application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Jung, Melanie; Sengebusch, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    The Institute of Optical Sensor Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the institute's scientific results of the leading-edge detector design CMOS in a TDI (Time Delay and Integration) architecture. This project includes the technological design of future high or multi-spectral resolution spaceborne instruments and the possibility of higher integration. DLR OS and the Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems (IMS) in Duisburg were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for future projects, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generation of space borne sensor systems is focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large-swath and high-spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC (analog digital converter) chains and new focal-plane concepts opens the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep-space instruments. The paper gives an overview of the detector development status and verification program at DLR, as well as of new control possibilities for CMOS-TDI detectors in synchronization control mode.

  17. Applications of Bonner sphere detectors in neutron field dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awschalom, M.; Sanna, R.S.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of neutron moderation and spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, and moderators that are useful for Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. The choice of the neutron detector for a Bonner sphere spectrometer is examined. Spectral deconvolution methods are briefly reviewed, including derivative, parametric, quadrature, and Monte Carlo methods. Calibration is then discussed

  18. Amorphous selenium based detectors for medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Kang, Sung H.; Choi, Michael; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed and characterized large volume amorphous (a-) selenium (Se) stabilized alloys for room temperature medical imaging devices and high-energy physics detectors. The synthesis and preparation of well-defined and high quality a-Se (B, As, Cl) alloy materials have been conducted using a specially designed alloying reactor at EIC and installed in an argon atmosphere glove box. The alloy composition has been precisely controlled and optimized to ensure good device performance. The synthesis of large volume boron (B) doped (natural and isotopic 10B) a-Se (As, Cl) alloys has been carried out by thoroughly mixing vacuum distilled and zone-refined (ZR) Se with previously synthesized Se-As master alloys, Se-Cl master alloys and B. The synthesized a-Se (B, As, Cl) alloys have been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and detector testing. The a- Se alloys have shown high promise for x-ray detectors with its high dark resistivity (10 10-10 13 Ωcm), good charge transport properties, and cost-effective large area scalability. Details of various steps about detector fabrication and testing of these imaging devices are also presented.

  19. Keeping the Background Low: Production and Testing of the GERDA Phase II Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmer, Sabine

    2013-06-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso searches for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76 Ge. The first phase using ∼15 kg of coaxial germanium detectors is ongoing. In a second phase, additional ∼20 kg of newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors will be deployed. To limit the generation of cosmogenically induced radioisotopes, the exposure of the germanium to cosmic radiation during the detector production and testing was minimized. An acceptance and characterization campaign of the newly produced detectors was carried out at the HEROICA facility in the HADES underground laboratory in Mol, Belgium. An overview over the complete production process, from isotopic enrichment of the material to the detector testing protocol, is given. (authors)

  20. Progress in multi-element silicon detectors for synchrotron XRF applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, B.; Rossington, C.; Kipnis, I.; Krieger, B.

    1995-10-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon and high purity germanium detectors for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. We have been developing these types of detectors specifically for low noise synchrotron applications, such as extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, microprobe x-ray fluorescence and total reflection x-ray fluorescence. The current version of the 192-element detector and integrated circuit preamplifier, cooled to -25 degrees C with a single-stage thermoelectric cooler, achieves an energy resolution of <200 eV full width of half maximum (FWHM) per channel (at 5.9 keV, 2 μs peaking time), and each detector element is designed to handle ∼20 kHz count rate. The detector system will soon be completed to 64 channels using new application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) amplifier chips, new CAMAC (Computer Automated Measurement and Control standard) analog-to-digital converters recently developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), CAMAC histogramming modules, and Macintosh-based data acquisition software. We report on the characteristics of this detector system, and the work in progress towards the next generation system

  1. Circular-detector array hybrid emission computed tomograph, HEADTOME-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Kazuo; Kanno, Iwao; Miura, Yuko; Miura, Syuichi [Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Hattori, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Takashi; Higashi, Yoshihumi

    1982-08-01

    The HEADTOME-II is a successor of the original hybrid ECT, the HEADTOME-I, which was built and used in Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita. The new machine has three detector rings comprising 64 Nal crystals each, the axial length of which is 30 mm, 100 mm in total for three rings including 5 mm lead shield between the rings, and is long enough to examine most of the brain at a given time. The system sensitivity for positrons is 27.5 kcps/..mu..Ci/ml for intra-ring coincidence and 36.5 kcps for inter-ring coincidence. Spatial resolution is 10 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view. For single photon ECT study, new ''Turbofan'' rotating collimators, high sensitivity H.S. and high resolution H.R., are adopted. The collimators for single photons and positrons can be selected by manual operation. The system sensitivity for sup(99m)Tc is, 52.5 kcps/..mu..Ci/ml by H.S. and 13.8 kcps by H.R. collimator. Spatial resolution at the center of the field of view is 20 mm for H.S. and 11 mm for H.R. respectively. High quality images have been obtained by sup(99m)Tc, /sup 81/mKr, /sup 111/In and /sup 11/C. The regional cerebral blood flow study by /sup 133/Xe inhalation or intra-venous injection has been tried and good results are obtained.

  2. A circular-detector array hybrid emission computed tomograph, HEADTOME-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Kazuo; Kanno, Iwao; Miura, Yuko; Miura, Syuichi; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Takashi; Higashi, Yoshihumi.

    1982-01-01

    The HEADTOME-II is a successor of the original hybrid ECT, the HEADTOME-I, which was built and used in Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita. The new machine has three detector rings comprising 64 Nal crystals each, the axial length of which is 30 mm, 100 mm in total for three rings including 5 mm lead shield between the rings, and is long enought to examine the most part of the brain at a time. The system sensitivity for positrons is 27.5 kcps/μCi/ml for intra-ring coincidence and 36.5 kcps for inter-ring coincidence. Spatial resolution is 10 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view. For single photon ECT study, new ''Turbofan'' rotaing collimators, high sensitivity H.S. and high resolution H.R., are adopted. The collimators for single photons and positrons can be selected by manual operation. The system sensitivity for sup(99m)Tc is, 52.5 kcps/μCi/ml by H.S. and 13.8 kcps by H.R. collimator. Spatial resolution at the center of the field of view is 20 mm for H.S. and 11 mm for H.R. respectively. High quality images have been obtained by sup(99m)Tc, 81 mKr, 111 In and 11 C. The regional cerebral blood flow study by 133 Xe inhalation or intra-venous injection has been tried and good results are obtained. (author)

  3. A dark-matter search using the final CDMS II dataset and a novel detector of surface radiocontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Zeeshan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence from galaxies, galaxy clusters, and cosmological scales suggests that ~85% of the matter of our universe is invisible. The missing matter, or "dark matter" is likely composed of non-relativistic, non-baryonic particles, which have very rare interactions with baryonic matter and with one another. Among dark matter candidates, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are particularly well motivated. In the early universe, thermally produced particles with weak-scale mass and interactions would `freeze out’ at the correct density to be dark matter today. Extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, such as Supersymmetry, which solve gauge hierarchy and coupling unification problems, naturally provide such particles. Interactions of WIMPs with baryons are expected to be rare, but might be detectable in low-noise detectors. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses ionization- and phonon- sensitive germanium particle detectors to search for such interactions. CDMS detectors are operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, within a shielded environment to lower cosmogenic and radioactive background. The combination of phonon and ionization signatures from the detectors provides excellent residual-background rejection. This dissertation presents improved techniques for phonon calibration of CDMS II detectors and the analysis of the final CDMS II dataset with 612 kg-days of exposure. We set a limit of 3.8x10$^{-}$44 cm$^{2}$ on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section for a WIMP mass of 70 GeV/c$^{2}$. At the time this analysis was published, these data presented the most stringent limits on WIMP scattering for WIMP masses over 42 GeV/c$^{2}$, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. Next-generation rare-event searches such as SuperCDMS, COUPP, and CLEAN will be limited in sensitivity, unless they achieve stringent control of the surface radioactive contamination on their detectors. Low

  4. Application of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers with semiconductor detectors in radiometric analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugelt, P.; Schieckel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Problems and possibilities of applying semiconductor detector spectrometers in radiometric analyses are described. A summary of the state of the art and tendencies of device engineering and spectra evaluation is given. Liquid-nitrogen cooled Li-drifted Si-detectors and high-purity Ge-detectors are compared. Semiconductor detectors working at room temperature are under development. In this connection CdTe and HgI 2 semiconductor detectors are compared. The use of small efficient computers in the spectrometer systems stimulates the development of algorithms for spectra analyses and for determining the concentration. Fields of application of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers are X-ray diffraction and X-ray macroanalysis in investigating the structure of extensive surface regions

  5. Nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present monograph is intended to treat the commonly used detectors in the field of nuclear physics covering important developments of the recent years. After a general introduction, a brief account of interaction of radiation with matter relevant to the processes in radiation detection is given in Chapter II. In addition to the ionization chamber, proportional counters and Geiger Mueller counters, several gas-filled detectors of advanced design such as those recently developed for heavy ion physics and other types of studies have been covered in Chapter III. Semiconductor detectors are dealt with in Chapter IV. The scintillation detectors which function by sensing the photons emitted by the luminescence process during the interaction of the impinging radiation with the scintillation detector medium are described in Chapter V. The topic of neutron detectors is covered in Chapter VI, as in this case the emphasis is more on the method of neutron detection rather than on detector type. Electronic instrumentation related to signal pulse processing dealt with in Chapter VII. The track etch detectors based on the visualization of the track of the impinging charge particle have also been briefly covered in the last chapter. The scope of this monograph is confined to detectors commonly used in low and medium energy nuclear physics research and applications of nuclear techniques. The monograph is intended for post-graduate students and those beginning to work with the radiation detectors. (author)

  6. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  7. ALICE Diffractive Detector Control System for RUN-II in the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00522336; Martinez, M.I.; Monzon, I. Leon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes general characteristics of the deployment and commissioned of the Detector Control System (DCS) AD0 for the second phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The AD0 detector is installed in the ALICE experiment to provide a better selection of diffractive events.

  8. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegnar, P.; Eldridge, J.S.; Teasley, N.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125 I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125 I and 131 I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125 I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bioindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities

  9. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegnar, P.; Eldridge, J.S.; Teasley, N.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125 I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125 I and 131 I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125 I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bionindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegnar, P.; Eldridge, J.S.; Teasley, N.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125 I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125 I and 131 I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125 I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bioindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  12. SIMMER-II code and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.L.

    1979-01-01

    The significant features of SIMMER-II, a disrupted-core analysis code, are described. The code has the capabalities to begin space-time neutronics calculations from nonstationary reactor states, to track the intermixing of fuel of different enrichments, and to model the complicated heat- and mass-transfer processes that occur in the transition phase. Example calculations are presented for analyses of whole-core accidents and for analyses of experiments supporting the code models

  13. PICsIT a position sensitive detector for space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Labanti, C; Ferriani, S; Ferro, G; Malaguti, G; Mauri, A; Rossi, E; Schiavone, F; Stephen, J B; Traci, A; Visparelli, D

    2002-01-01

    Pixellated Imaging CsI Telescope (PICsIT) is the high energy detector plane of Imager on Board INTEGRAL Satellite (IBIS), one of the main instruments on board the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) satellite that will be launched in the year 2001. It consists of 4096 CsI(Tl) individual detector elements and operates in the energy range from 120 to 10,000 keV. PICsIT is made up of 8 identical modules, each housing 512 scintillating crystals coupled to PIN photodiodes (PD). Each crystal, 30 mm long and with a cross-section of 8.55x8.55 mm sup 2 , is wrapped with a white diffusing coating and then inserted into an aluminium crate. In order to have a compact design, two electronic boards, mounted directly below the crystal/PD assembly, host both the Analogue and Digital Front-End Electronics (FEE). The behaviour of the read-out FEE has a direct impact on the performance of the whole detector in terms of lower energy threshold, energy resolution and event time tagging. Due to the great numb...

  14. Application of solid state track detector to neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takao

    1979-01-01

    Though solid state track detectors (SSTD) are radiation measuring instrument for heavy charged particles by itself, it can be used as radiation measuring instrument for neutrons, if nuclear reactions such as (n, f) or (n, α) reaction are utilized. Since the means was found, which permits to observe the tracks of heavy charged particles in a solid with an optical microscope by chemically etching the tracks to enlarge them to etch pits, various types of detectors have been developed for the purpose of measuring neutron dose. The paper is described on the materials and construction of the SSTDs for neutron dosimetry, and the sensitivity is explained with mathematical equations. The features of neutron dosimetry with SSTDs are as follows: They are compact, and scarcely disturb neutron field, thus delicate dose distribution can be known; integration measurement is possible regardless of dose rate values because of integrating type detectors; it is not influenced by β-ray or γ-ray except the case when there is high energy radiation such as causing photonuclear reactions or high dose such as degrading solids, it has pretty high sensitivity; track fading is negligible during the normal measuring time around room temperature; and the etching images of tracks are relatively clear, and various automatic counting systems can be employed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. CVD diamonds as thermoluminescent detectors for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewska, B.; Olko, P.; Nesladek, M.; Waligorski, M.P.R.; Kerremans, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Diamond is believed to be a promising material for medical dosimetry due to its tissue equivalence, mechanical and radiation hardness, and lack of solubility in water or in disinfecting agents. A number of diamond samples, obtained under different growth conditions at Limburg University, using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique, was tested as thermoluminescence dosemeters. Their TL glow curve, TL response after doses of gamma rays, fading, and so on were studied at dose levels and for radiation modalities typical for radiotherapy. The investigated CVD diamonds displayed sensitivity comparable with that of MTS-N (Li:Mg,Ti) detectors, signal stability (reproducibility after several readouts) below 10% (1 SD) and no fading was found four days after irradiation. A dedicated CVD diamond plate was grown, cut into 20 detector chips (3x3x0.5 mm) and used for measuring the dose-depth distribution at different depths in a water phantom, for 60 Co and six MV X ray radiotherapy beams. Due to the sensitivity of diamond to ambient light, it was difficult to achieve reproducibility comparable with that of standard LiF detectors. (author)

  16. Performance Evaluation of New Generation CdZnTe Detectors for Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovs, V.; Mintcheva, J.; Berlizov, A.; Lebrun, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride detectors (CdZnTe) have found a wide application in nondestructive assay measurements in the IAEA's verification practice. It is because of their form factor, usability, sensitivity and good spectral characteristics that they are extensively used for fresh and spent fuel attribute test measurements. Until now, the series of CdZnTe detectors utilized in the IAEA have covered the range of 5 mm 3 , 20 mm 3 , 60 mm 3 and 500mm 3 of sensitive volume. Recently, new CdZnTe detectors with improved spectroscopic characteristics and significantly bigger active volume have become available, owing to advances in crystal and detector manufacturing and signal processing technologies. The distinctive feature of this new technological development is the application of a low-intensity monochromatic optical stimulation with infrared (IR) light. The use of IR illumination with a properly chosen wavelength close to the absorption edge of the CdZnTe can significantly improve the performance of the detectors. Recognizing potential benefits of these detectors in safeguards applications, the IAEA has performed an evaluation of their performance characteristics. Under evaluation were several new detectors with sensitive volumes of 500 mm 3 , 1500 mm 3 and 4000 mm 3 , as well as all-in-one 60 mm 3 , 500 mm 3 and 1500 mm 3 integrated micro-spectrometers available from RITEC, Latvia. In addition to the standard performance characteristics, such as energy resolution, peak shape, efficiency, linearity, throughput and temperature stability, the potential use of the detectors for safeguards specific measurements, such as uranium enrichment with infinite thickness method, was of particular interest. The paper will describe the advances in the CdZnTe detector technology and present the results of their performance evaluation. (author)

  17. A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Agapopoulou, Christina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC with instantaneous luminosities up to L ≃ 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1} will have a severe impact on pile-up. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction and trigger performance for especially jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters for pile-up mitigation at Level-0 (L0) trigger level and in the offline reconstruction. This device cover the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4.2. Four layers of Silicon sensors, possibly interleaved with Tungsten, are foreseen to provide precision timing information for charged and neutral particles with a time resolution of the order of 30 pico-seconds per readout cell in order to assign the energy deposits in the calorimeter to different proton-proton collision verti...

  18. Application for TJ-II Signals Visualization: User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Portas, A. B.; Cremy, C.; Vega, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this documents are described the functionalities of the application developed by the Data Acquisition Group for TJ-II signal visualization. There are two versions of the application, the On-line version, used for signal visualization during TJ-II operation, and the Off-line version, used for signal visualization without TJ-II operation. Both versions of the application consist in a graphical user interface developed for X/Motif, in which most of the actions can be done using the mouse buttons. The functionalities of both versions of the application are described in this user's guide, beginning at the application start-up and explaining in detail all the options that it provides and the actions that can be done with each graphic control. (Author) 8 refs

  19. Fabrication and characterization of a 3D Positive ion detector and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Pitchaikannu; Sureka, Chandrasekaran Senbagavadivoo

    2017-11-01

    There is a growing interest to experimentally evaluate the track structure induced by ionizing particles in order to characterize the radiobiological quality of ionizing radiation for applications in radiotherapy and radiation protection. To do so, a novel positive ion detector based on the multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) technology has been proposed previously, which works under the principle of ion induced impact ionization. Based on this, an upgraded 3D positive ion detector was fabricated in order to improve its efficiency and use it for various applications. To improve the efficiency of the detector, cathodes with different insulators (Bakelite plate and Steatite Ceramics) and conducting layers (ITO, FTO, and Gold coated cathode) were studied under various gaseous media (methane, nitrogen, and air) using Am-241, Co-60, Co-57, Na-22, Cs-137, and Ba-133 sources. From this study, it is confirmed that the novel 3D positive ion detector that has been upgraded using gold as strip material, tungsten (87%) coated copper (13%) as the core wire, gold coated ceramic as cathode, and thickness of 3.483 mm showed 9.2% efficiency under methane medium at 0.9 Torr pressure using an Am-241 source. It is also confirmed that when the conductivity of the cathode and thickness of the detector is increased, the performance of the detector is improved significantly. Further, the scope of the detector to use in the field of radiation protection, radiation dosimetry, gamma spectrometry, radiation biology, and oncology are reported here.

  20. Development and application of nuclear radiation detector made from high resistivity silicon and compound semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Honglin; Zhang Xiufeng; Zhang Wanchang; Li Jiang

    1995-11-01

    The development of high resistivity silicon detectors and compound semiconductor detectors as well as their application in nuclear medicine are described. It emphasizes on several key techniques in fabricating detectors in order to meet their application in nuclear medicine. As for a high resistivity silicon detector, its counting rate to 125 I 28.5 keV X-ray has to be improved. So employing a conic mesa structure can increase the thickness of samples, and can raise the electric field of collecting charges under the same bias voltage. As for a GaAs detector, its performance of collecting charges has to be improved. So the thicknesses of GaAs samples are decreased and proper thermal treatment to make Ni-Ge-Au ohmic contacts are employed. Applying a suitable reverse bias voltage can obtain a fully depleted detector, and can obtain a lower forward turn-on voltage and a thinner weak electric field region. After resolving these key techniques, the performance of GaAs detectors has been distinctly improved. The count rate to 125 I X-ray has increased by three or five times under the same testing condition and background circumstance (2 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.)

  1. A Comparison Framework for Reactor Anti-Neutrino Detectors in Near-Field Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brodsky, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Electron anti-neutrino ( e) detectors can support nuclear safeguards, from reactor monitoring to spent fuel characterization. In recent years, the scientific community has developed multiple detector concepts, many of which have been prototyped or deployed for specific measurements by their respective collaborations. However, the diversity of technical approaches, deployment conditions, and analysis techniques complicates direct performance comparison between designs. We have begun development of a simulation framework to compare and evaluate existing and proposed detector designs for nonproliferation applications in a uniform manner. This report demonstrates the intent and capabilities of the framework by evaluating four detector design concepts, calculating generic reactor antineutrino counting sensitivity, and capabilities in a plutonium disposition application example.

  2. Solid-state photo-detectors for both CT and PET applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moraes, Danielle; Jarron, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    New semiconductor detectors have recently gained a lot of attention for medical applications in general. Advances in CdZnTe-detector arrays might improve both energy resolution and spatial resolution of clinical X-ray systems. Alternative system designs based on TFA technology combining photo-detector arrays with CMOS electronics open a possibility for compact imaging cameras. This scenario allows for the use of alternative materials such as a-Si:H and HgI2 that can be applied alone or integrated with scintillators. Results obtained with such materials are presented.

  3. Application of machine learning techniques to lepton energy reconstruction in water Cherenkov detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakopoulou, E.; Cowan, G. A.; Needham, M. D.; Playfer, S.; Taani, M.

    2018-04-01

    The application of machine learning techniques to the reconstruction of lepton energies in water Cherenkov detectors is discussed and illustrated for TITUS, a proposed intermediate detector for the Hyper-Kamiokande experiment. It is found that applying these techniques leads to an improvement of more than 50% in the energy resolution for all lepton energies compared to an approach based upon lookup tables. Machine learning techniques can be easily applied to different detector configurations and the results are comparable to likelihood-function based techniques that are currently used.

  4. Application of a wedge strip anode in micro-pattern gaseous detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yang; Yang Yigang; Li Yulan; Li Yuanjing

    2013-01-01

    The wedge strip anode (WSA) has been widely used in 2-D position-sensitive detectors. A circular WSA with an effective diameter of 52 mm is successfully coupled to a tripe gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector through a simple resistive layer. A spatial resolution of 440 μm (FWHM) is achieved for a 10 kVp X-ray using 1 atm Ar:CO 2 =70:30 gas. The simple electronics of only three channels makes it very useful in applications strongly requiring simple interface design, e.g. sealed tubes and high pressure detectors. (authors)

  5. Recent Technological Developments on LGAD and iLGAD Detectors for Tracking and Timing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the last technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n++-p+-p structure, where the doping profile of the p+ layer ...

  6. Solid state nuclear track detectors and their application in industrial health, radiological and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, M.

    1993-09-01

    Passive Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors are electrically non conductive solids, mainly used for the registration of α-particles and neutron induced recoils. The stability of the particle tracks in the solid allow longer integration periods, what is essential for the measurement of small, time variant radiation exposures. This report gives an overview on non-photographic track detectors, their processing, dosimetric properties and examples for their application in industrial health, radiological and environmental protection. (orig.) [de

  7. Artificial neural networks application for analysis of gamma ray spectrum obtained from the scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegowski, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Scintillation detectors are commonly used for the gamma ray detection. Actually the small peak resolution and the significant Compton effect fraction limit their utilization in the gamma ray spectrometry analysis. This article presents the artificial neural networks (ANN) application to the analysis of the gamma ray spectra acquired from scintillation detectors. The obtained results validate the effectiveness of the ANN method to spectrometry analysis. (author)

  8. Future Perspectives for the Application of Low Temperature Detectors in Heavy Ion Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.

    2009-01-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics is given, and the next generation heavy ion facility FAIR is described with a special emphasis on the potential advantage of Low Temperature Detectors (LTDs) for applications in heavy ion physics. For prototype LTDs for the energy sensitive detection of heavy ions excellent results with respect to energy resolution down to δE/E = 1-2x10 -3 for a wide range of incident energies, and with respect to other detector properties, such as energy linearity with no indication of pulse height defects even for the heaviest ions, have been obtained. In addition, prototype detectors for hard X-rays have shown energy resolutions down to δE = 30-40eV at 60 keV. Consequently, both detector schemes have already been successfully used for first experiments. At present, the design and setup of large solid angle detector arrays is in progress. With the already achieved performance, LTDs promise a large potential for applications in atomic and nuclear heavy ion physics. A brief overview of prominent examples, including high-resolution nuclear spectroscopy, nuclear structure studies with radioactive beams, superheavy element research, as well as high-resolution atomic spectroscopy on highly charged ions and tests of QED in strong electromagnetic fields is presented.

  9. Longwave Imaging for Astronomical Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact portable longwave camera for astronomical applications. In Phase 1, we successfully developed the eye of the camera, i.e. the focal...

  10. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, J., E-mail: jnikolic@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinča, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Puzovic, J. [University of Belgrade Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 6, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M. [University of Belgrade Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinča, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  11. New developments in CVD diamond for detector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; de Boer, W.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Dulinski, W.; Doroshenko, J.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fischer, P.; Fizzotti, F.; Furetta, C.; Gan, K. K.; Ghodbane, N.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Keil, M.; Knoepfle, K. T.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Menichelli, D.; Meuser, S.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L.; Potenza, R.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Tuve, C.; Vincenzo, B.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternative sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC and other machines where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last seven years the RD42 collaboration has developed diamond detectors and tested them with LHC electronics towards the end of creating a device usable by experiments. The most recent results of this work are presented. Recently, a new form of CVD diamond has been developed: single crystal CVD diamond which resolves many of the issues associated with poly-crystalline CVD material. The first tests of this material are also presented.

  12. New developments in CVD diamond for detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W. [HEPHY, Vienna (Austria); Berdermann, E. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A. [LETI/DEIN/SPE/CEA Saclay (France); Boer, W. de [Universitaet Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bogani, F. [LENS, Florence (Italy); Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M. [University of Florence (Italy); Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W. [LEPSI, IN2P3/CNRS-ULP, Strasbourg (France); Conway, J.; Doroshenko, J. [Rutgers University, Piscataway (United States); D' Angelo, P.; Furetta, C. [INFN, Milano (Italy); Dabrowski, W. [UMM, Cracow (Poland); Delpierre, P.; Fallou, A. [CPPM, Marseille (France); Eijk, B. van [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fischer, P. [Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Fizzotti, F. [University of Torino (Italy); Gan, K.K.; Ghodbane, N.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Keil, M.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Menichelli, D.; Meuser, S.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L.; Potenza, R.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Tuve, C.; Vincenzo, B.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2004-07-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternative sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC and other machines where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last seven years the RD42 collaboration has developed diamond detectors and tested them with LHC electronics towards the end of creating a device usable by experiments. The most recent results of this work are presented. Recently, a new form of CVD diamond has been developed: single crystal CVD diamond which resolves many of the issues associated with poly-crystalline CVD material. The first tests of this material are also presented. (orig.)

  13. New developments in CVD diamond for detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Boer, W. de; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Conway, J.; Doroshenko, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Furetta, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Fallou, A.; Eijk, B. van; Fischer, P.; Fizzotti, F.; Gan, K.K.; Ghodbane, N.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Keil, M.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Menichelli, D.; Meuser, S.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L.; Potenza, R.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Tuve, C.; Vincenzo, B.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternative sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC and other machines where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last seven years the RD42 collaboration has developed diamond detectors and tested them with LHC electronics towards the end of creating a device usable by experiments. The most recent results of this work are presented. Recently, a new form of CVD diamond has been developed: single crystal CVD diamond which resolves many of the issues associated with poly-crystalline CVD material. The first tests of this material are also presented. (orig.)

  14. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Angloher, G.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, CIUC, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Schaeffner, K. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von; Guetlein, A.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Schoenert, S.; Stanger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Kluck, H. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Wien (Austria); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Sivers, M. von [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESSTII aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO{sub 4} sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of ∝0.60 keV and a resolution of σ ∼ 0.090 keV (at 2.60 keV).With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3GeV/c{sup 2}. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail. (orig.)

  15. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to fabricate a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate a suitably-doped active layer...

  16. Operational experience with the CMS pixel detector in LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Karancsi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    The CMS pixel detector was repaired successfully, calibrated and commissioned for the second run of Large Hadron Collider during the first long shutdown between 2013 and 2015. The replaced pixel modules were calibrated separately and show the expected behavior of an un-irradiated detector. In 2015, the system performed very well with an even improved spatial resolution compared to 2012. During this time, the operational team faced various challenges including the loss of a sector in one half shell which was only partially recovered. In 2016, the detector is expected to withstand instantaneous luminosities beyond the design limits and will need a combined effort of both online and offline teams in order to provide the high quality data that is required to reach the physics goals of CMS. We present the operational experience gained during the second run of the LHC and show the latest performance results of the CMS pixel detector.

  17. Application of AXUV diode detectors at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernert, M.; Eich, T.; Burckhart, A.; Fuchs, J. C.; Giannone, L.; Kallenbach, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Sieglin, B.

    2014-03-01

    In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, a radiation measurement for a wide spectral range, based on semiconductor detectors, with 256 lines of sight and a time resolution of 5μs was recently installed. In combination with the foil based bolometry, it is now possible to estimate the absolutely calibrated radiated power of the plasma on fast timescales. This work introduces this diagnostic based on AXUV (Absolute eXtended UltraViolet) n-on-p diodes made by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. The measurement and the degradation of the diodes in a tokamak environment is shown. Even though the AXUV diodes are developed to have a constant sensitivity for all photon energies (1 eV-8 keV), degradation leads to a photon energy dependence of the sensitivity. The foil bolometry, which is restricted to a time resolution of less than 1 kHz, offers a basis for a time dependent calibration of the diodes. The measurements of the quasi-calibrated diodes are compared with the foil bolometry and found to be accurate on the kHz time scale. Therefore, it is assumed, that the corrected values are also valid for the highest time resolution (200 kHz). With this improved diagnostic setup, the radiation induced by edge localized modes is analyzed on fast timescales.

  18. Application of AXUV diode detectors at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernert, M.; Eich, T.; Burckhart, A.; Fuchs, J. C.; Giannone, L.; Kallenbach, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Sieglin, B.

    2014-01-01

    In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, a radiation measurement for a wide spectral range, based on semiconductor detectors, with 256 lines of sight and a time resolution of 5μs was recently installed. In combination with the foil based bolometry, it is now possible to estimate the absolutely calibrated radiated power of the plasma on fast timescales. This work introduces this diagnostic based on AXUV (Absolute eXtended UltraViolet) n-on-p diodes made by International Radiation Detectors, Inc. The measurement and the degradation of the diodes in a tokamak environment is shown. Even though the AXUV diodes are developed to have a constant sensitivity for all photon energies (1 eV-8 keV), degradation leads to a photon energy dependence of the sensitivity. The foil bolometry, which is restricted to a time resolution of less than 1 kHz, offers a basis for a time dependent calibration of the diodes. The measurements of the quasi-calibrated diodes are compared with the foil bolometry and found to be accurate on the kHz time scale. Therefore, it is assumed, that the corrected values are also valid for the highest time resolution (200 kHz). With this improved diagnostic setup, the radiation induced by edge localized modes is analyzed on fast timescales

  19. Gamma detection: an unusual application for surface barrier detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichtenbaum de Iacub, S; Matatagui, E

    1983-02-01

    The silicon surface barrier detectors (SBD), may be ideal devices to be used in dose indicators for the monitoring of gamma radiations; the SBD working as a cavity sensor. The measurement consists in counting the number of pulses that exceeds a certain level of discrimination, this number being proportional to the absorbed dose. The spectral distribution of the pulses gives an idea of the existing photon field's energy. Characteristic spectra obtained with different gamma and X-ray sources are described and analyzed, and tests are carried out by using different sensitive volumes of the detector in order to determine significant parameters for a gamma-monitor system. The results from the measurements indicate: a) high sensitivity of the system with SBD (high density of material); b) low background: enviromental backgrounds are reliably registered (approx. 10 R/h); c) minimum detectable energies of the order of 60 keV; d) possibility to determine high exposure rates (approx. 100 R/h); e) for emitters of low Z, the result is approximately independent from the gamma energy. These results suggest the possibility of constructing fixed and portable systems, appropriate for gamma monitoring, which utilize SBD as sensors; these devices are adequate for working at enviroment temperatures, being compact, reliable, with low polarization voltages, and of relatively low cost.

  20. Gamma detection: an unusual application for surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtenbaum de Iacub, Silvana; Matatagui, Emilio

    1983-01-01

    The silicon surface barrier detectors (SBD), may be ideal devices to be used in dose indicators for the monitoring of gamma radiations; the SBD working as a cavity sensor. The measurement consists in counting the number of pulses that exceeds a certain level of discrimination, this number being proportional to the absorbed dose. The spectral distribution of the pulses gives an idea of the existing photons field's energy. Characteristic spectra obtained with different gamma-and X ray sources are described and analyzed, and tests are carried out by using different sensitive volumes of the detector in order to determine significant parameters for a gamma-monitor system. The results from the measurements indicate: a) high sensitivity of the system with SBD (high density of material); b) low background: enviromental backgrounds are reliably registered (approx. 10μ R/h); c) minimum detectable energies of the order of 60 keV; d) possibility to determine high exposure rates (approx. 100 R/h); e) for emitters of low Z, the result is approximately independent from the gamma energy. These results suggest the possibility of constructing fixed and portable systems, appropriate for gamma monitoring, which utilize SBD as sensors; these devices are adequate for working at enviroment temperatures, being compact, reliable, with low polarization voltages, and of relatively low cost. (M.E.L.) [es

  1. CYCLODEXTRINS - FIELFS OF APPLICATION. PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Duca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents an analysis of potential and current applications of cyclodextrins as biologically active substances in medicine. The main applications described here include use of cyclodextrins as agents that form inclusion complexes with endogenous substances (membrane lipids, cellular cholesterol, agents that form inclusion complexes with exogenous substances with their man role as guest molecules (sugammadex, FBCx, agents that block endogenous and exogenous macromolecules (ion channels, anthrax toxin, α-hemolysin, and agents which activity is based on the chemical nature of them and of their derivatives (cyclodextrin polysulphate derivatives. The fi rst classifi cation for medically important biological activity of cyclodextrins has been proposed.

  2. The Layout and Performance of the Phase-II upgrade of the tracking detector of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Xiaocong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    HL-LHC will deliver about 3000 fb-1 of integrated luminosity in over 10 year. This will present an extremely challenging environment to the ATLAS experiment, well beyond that for which it was designed. In ATLAS Phase II upgrade, the Inner Detector will be replace by a new all-silicon Inner Tracker to maintain tracking performance in this high-occupancy environment and to cope with the increase of approximately a factor of ten in the integrated radiation dose. The ITk Detector layout is designed to meet the requirement for identifying charged particles with high efficiency and measuring their properties with high precision in the denser environment. The Layout and performance of the ITk is presented.

  3. Application of CMOS charge-sensitive preamplifier in triple-GEM detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Li Jin; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Deng Zhi; Li Yulan; Liu Yinong; Li Yuanjing

    2006-01-01

    Among the various micro-pattern gas detectors (MPGD) that are available, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector is an attractive gas detector that has been used in particle physics experiments. However the GEM detector usually needs thousands of preamplifier units for its large number of micro-pattern readout strips or pads, which leads to considerable difficulties and complexities for front end electronics (FEE). Nowadays, by making use of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), it is feasible to integrate hundreds of preamplifier units and other signal process circuits in a small-sized chip, which can be bound to the readout strips or pads of a micro-pattern particle detector (MPPD). Therefore, CMOS ASIC may provide an ideal solution to the readout problem of MPPD. In this article, a triple GEM detector is constructed and one of its readout strips is connected to a CMOS charge-sensitive preamplifier chip. The chip was exposed to an 55 Fe source of 5.9 kev X-ray, and the amplitude spectrum of the chip was tested, and it was found that the energy resolution was approximately 27%, which indicates that the chip can be used in triple GEM detectors. (authors)

  4. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  5. Towards Gotthard-II: development of a silicon microstrip detector for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Andrä, M.; Barten, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Redford, S.; Ruat, M.; Ruder, C.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Turcato, M.; Vetter, S.

    2018-01-01

    Gotthard-II is a 1-D microstrip detector specifically developed for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser. It will not only be used in energy dispersive experiments but also as a beam diagnostic tool with additional logic to generate veto signals for the other 2-D detectors. Gotthard-II makes use of a silicon microstrip sensor with a pitch of either 50 μm or 25 μm and with 1280 or 2560 channels wire-bonded to adaptive gain switching readout chips. Built-in analog-to-digital converters and digital memories will be implemented in the readout chip for a continuous conversion and storage of frames for all bunches in the bunch train. The performance of analogue front-end prototypes of Gotthard has been investigated in this work. The results in terms of noise, conversion gain, dynamic range, obtained by means of infrared laser and X-rays, will be shown. In particular, the effects of the strip-to-strip coupling are studied in detail and it is found that the reduction of the coupling effects is one of the key factors for the development of the analogue front-end of Gotthard-II.

  6. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; García, M. Fernández; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Stricker, M.; Vila, I.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n++-p+-p structure, where the doping profile of the p+ layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  7. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; García, M. Fernández; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Stricker, M.; Vila, I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n"+"+–p"+–p structure, where the doping profile of the p"+ layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  8. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Fadeyev, V. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Fernández-Martínez, P. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); García, M. Fernández [Instituto de Física de Cantabria IFCA-CSIC-UC, Santander (Spain); Flores, D. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Galloway, Z. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Gallrapp, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Hidalgo, S. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Liang, Z. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Merlos, A. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Moll, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Quirion, D. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Sadrozinski, H. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics SCIPP, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Stricker, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Vila, I. [Instituto de Física de Cantabria IFCA-CSIC-UC, Santander (Spain)

    2016-09-21

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n{sup ++}–p{sup +}–p structure, where the doping profile of the p{sup +} layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  9. Applications of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector to ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanasaki, Masato; Hattori, Atsuto; Oda, Keiji; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Yuji; Sakaki, Hironao; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kondo, Kiminori; Kurashima, Satoshi; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2012-01-01

    CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector, which was developed for optical lens, has been applied for various field such as radon surveys, measurement of galactic cosmic ray, cell irradiation experiment and so on. The CR-39 detectors have the great advantages of being insensitive to high energy photons and electrons and capable of detecting only ions in the mixed fields such as laser driven relativistic plasmas. Though there are some analytical methods of CR-39 to diagnose ion beam, unfortunately, only few researchers in the field of plasma know the methods. This article looks at how to use CR-39 detectors and introduce the accomplishment of the joint study JAEA and Kobe Univ. for application of CR-39 detectors to ion beam diagnosis. (author)

  10. Fast "swarm of detectors" and their application in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoziyoev, G. P.; Shoziyoev, Sh. P.

    2017-06-01

    New opportunities in science appeared with the latest technology of the 21st century. This paper points to creating a new architecture for detection systems of different characteristics in astrophysics and geophysics using the latest technologies related to multicopter cluster systems, alternative energy sources, cluster technologies, cloud computing and big data. The idea of a quick-deployable scaleable dynamic system of a controlled drone with a small set of different detectors for detecting various components of extensive air showers in cosmic rays and in geophysics is very attractive. Development of this type of new system also allows to give a multiplier effect for the development of various sciences and research methods to observe natural phenomena.

  11. The overvoltage protection module for the power supply system for the pixel detector at Belle II experiment at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, P.; Kisielewski, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the overvoltage protection modules (OVP) for the power supply (PS) system of the Belle II pixel detector (PXD) are described. The aim of the OVP is to protect the detector and associated electronics against overvoltage conditions. Most critical in the system are voltages supplying the front-end ASICs. The PXD detector consists of the DEPFET sensor modules with integrated chips like the Drain Current Digitizer, the Switcher and the Data Handling Processor. These chips, implemented in modern sub-micron technologies, are quite vulnerable to variations in the supply voltages. The PXD will be placed in the Belle II experiment as close as possible to the interaction point, where access during experiment is very limited or even impossible, thus the PS and OVP systems exploit the remote-sensing method. Overvoltage conditions are due to failures of the PS itself, wrong setting of the output voltages or transient voltages coming out of hard noisy environment of the experiment. The OVP modules are parts of the PS modules. For powering the PXD 40 PS modules are placed 15 m outside the Belle II spectrometer. Each one is equipped with the OVP board. All voltages (22) are grouped in 4 domains: Analog, Digital, Steering and Gate which have independent grounds. The OVP boards are designed from integrated circuits from Linear Technology. All configurations were simulated with the Spice program. The control electronics is designed in a Xilinx CPLD. Two types of integrated circuits were used. LT4356 surge stopper protects loads from high voltage transients. The output voltages are limited to a safe value and also protect loads against over current faults. For less critical voltages, the LTC2912 voltage monitors are used that detect under-voltage and overvoltage events. It has to be noted that the OVP system is working independently of any other protection of the PS system, which increases its overall reliability. (authors)

  12. The overvoltage protection module for the power supply system for the pixel detector at Belle II experiment at KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapusta, P.; Kisielewski, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-875 Krakow, (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the overvoltage protection modules (OVP) for the power supply (PS) system of the Belle II pixel detector (PXD) are described. The aim of the OVP is to protect the detector and associated electronics against overvoltage conditions. Most critical in the system are voltages supplying the front-end ASICs. The PXD detector consists of the DEPFET sensor modules with integrated chips like the Drain Current Digitizer, the Switcher and the Data Handling Processor. These chips, implemented in modern sub-micron technologies, are quite vulnerable to variations in the supply voltages. The PXD will be placed in the Belle II experiment as close as possible to the interaction point, where access during experiment is very limited or even impossible, thus the PS and OVP systems exploit the remote-sensing method. Overvoltage conditions are due to failures of the PS itself, wrong setting of the output voltages or transient voltages coming out of hard noisy environment of the experiment. The OVP modules are parts of the PS modules. For powering the PXD 40 PS modules are placed 15 m outside the Belle II spectrometer. Each one is equipped with the OVP board. All voltages (22) are grouped in 4 domains: Analog, Digital, Steering and Gate which have independent grounds. The OVP boards are designed from integrated circuits from Linear Technology. All configurations were simulated with the Spice program. The control electronics is designed in a Xilinx CPLD. Two types of integrated circuits were used. LT4356 surge stopper protects loads from high voltage transients. The output voltages are limited to a safe value and also protect loads against over current faults. For less critical voltages, the LTC2912 voltage monitors are used that detect under-voltage and overvoltage events. It has to be noted that the OVP system is working independently of any other protection of the PS system, which increases its overall reliability. (authors)

  13. Continuum Thermodynamics - Part II: Applications and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Bettina; Wilmanski, Krzysztof

    The intention by writing Part II of the book on continuum thermodynamics was the deepening of some issues covered in Part I as well as a development of certain skills in dealing with practical problems of oscopic processes. However, the main motivation for this part is the presentation of main facets of thermodynamics which appear when interdisciplinary problems are considered. There are many monographs on the subjects of solid mechanics and thermomechanics, on fluid mechanics and on coupled fields but most of them cover only special problems in great details which are characteristic for the chosen field. It is rather seldom that relations between these fields are discussed. This concerns, for instance, large deformations of the skeleton of porous materials with diffusion (e.g. lungs), couplings of deformable particles with the fluid motion in suspensions, couplings of adsorption processes and chemical reactions in immiscible mixtures with diffusion, various multi-component aspects of the motion, e.g. of avalanches, such as segregation processes, etc...

  14. Contributions for the application of a phoswich detector on the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalaqua Junior, L.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of a phoswich detector and the parameters of the pulse shape descrimination system are evaluated aiming the application on environmental analysis by direct low level gamma ray spectrometry. The calibration curves and adjustments for the pulse discrimination, detector resolution and homogeneity measurements are presented. Background reduction and the 210 Pb detection eficiency on evaporated sources are evaluated. The results obtained demonstrates the application potentiality on the analysis of environmental samples due to a high detection eficiency and good geometry conditions to the measurements. (author) [pt

  15. Regge calculus and observations. II. Further applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.M.; Ellis, G.F.R.

    1983-03-01

    The method, developed in an earlier paper, for tracing geodesics of particles and light rays through Regge calculus space-times, is applied to a number of problems in the Schwarschild geometry. It is possible to obtain accurate predictions of light-bending by taking sufficiently small Regge blocks. Calculations of perihelion precession, Thomas precession and the distortion of a ball of fluid moving on a geodesic can also show good agreement with the analytic solution. However difficulties arise in obtaining accurate predictions for general orbits in these space-times. Applications to other problems in general relativity are discussed briefly. (author)

  16. Regge calculus and observations. II. Further applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ruth M.; Ellis, G. F. R.

    1984-11-01

    The method, developed in an earlier paper, for tracing geodesies of particles and light rays through Regge calculus space-times, is applied to a number of problems in the Schwarzschild geometry. It is possible to obtain accurate predictions of light bending by taking sufficiently small Regge blocks. Calculations of perihelion precession, Thomas precession, and the distortion of a ball of fluid moving on a geodesic can also show good agreement with the analytic solution. However difficulties arise in obtaining accurate predictions for general orbits in these space-times. Applications to other problems in general relativity are discussed briefly.

  17. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb has a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  18. Real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Dujany, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  19. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    these metal ions are exocyclically coordinated by the ligand, which explains the high Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities. Our receptor bp18c6(2-) shows promise for application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication by Pb(II) and (90)Sr(II).

  20. Detector with internal gain for short-wave infrared ranging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2017-09-01

    Abstarct.Highly sensitive photon detectors are regarded as the key enabling elements in many applications. Due to the low photon energy at the short-wave infrared (SWIR), photon detection and imaging at this band are very challenging. As such, many efforts in photon detector research are directed toward improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range. To solve these problems, we have developed an electron-injection (EI) technique. The significance of this detection mechanism is that it can provide both high efficiency and high sensitivity at room temperature, a condition that is very difficult to achieve in conventional SWIR detectors. An EI detector offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement due to a feedback stabilized internal avalanche-free gain. Devices exhibit an excess noise of unity, operate in linear mode, require bias voltage of a few volts, and have a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. We review the material system, operating principle, and development of EI detectors. The shortcomings of the first-generation devices were addressed in the second-generation detectors. Measurement on second-generation devices showed a high-speed response of ˜6 ns rise time, low jitter of less than 20 ps, high amplification of more than 2000 (at optical power levels larger than a few nW), unity excess noise factor, and low leakage current (amplified dark current ˜10 nA at a bias voltage of -3 V and at room temperature. These characteristics make EI detectors a good candidate for high-resolution flash light detection and ranging (LiDAR) applications with millimeter scale depth resolution at longer ranges compared with conventional p-i-n diodes. Based on our experimentally measured device characteristics, we compare the performance of the EI detector with commercially available linear mode InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) as well as a p-i-n diode using a theoretical model. Flash LiDAR images obtained by our model show that the EI

  1. Asymmetric synthesis II more methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    After the overwhelming success of 'Asymmetric Synthesis - The Essentials', narrating the colorful history of asymmetric synthesis, this is the second edition with latest subjects and authors. While the aim of the first edition was mainly to honor the achievements of the pioneers in asymmetric syntheses, the aim of this new edition was bringing the current developments, especially from younger colleagues, to the attention of students. The format of the book remained unchanged, i.e. short conceptual overviews by young leaders in their field including a short biography of the authors. The growing multidisciplinary research within chemistry is reflected in the selection of topics including metal catalysis, organocatalysis, physical organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, and its applications in total synthesis. The prospective reader of this book is a graduate or undergraduate student of advanced organic chemistry as well as the industrial chemist who wants to get a brief update on the current developments in th...

  2. The silicon vertex tracker for star and future applications of silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellwied, Rene

    2001-01-01

    The Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) for the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory has recently been completed and installed. First data were taken in July 2001. The SVT is based on a novel semi-conductor technology called Silicon Drift Detectors. 216 large area (6 by 6 cm) Silicon wafers were employed to build a three barrel device capable of vertexing and tracking in a high occupancy environment. Its intrinsic radiation hardness, its operation at room temperature and its excellent position resolution (better than 20 micron) in two dimensions with a one dimensional detector readout, make this technology very robust and inexpensive and thus a viable alternative to CCD, Silicon pixel and Silicon strip detectors in a variety of applications from fundamental research in high-energy and nuclear physics to astrophysics to medical imaging. I will describe the development that led to the STAR-SVT, its performance and possible applications for the near future

  3. Cerium doped GSO scintillators and its application to position sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, H.; Shimizu, K.; Susa, K.; Kubota, S.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the light output and the decay times of Ce doped Gd/sub 2/SiO/sub 5/ on Ce concentration is measured. By using the difference in decay times on Ce concentration for GSO(Ce), the combination of different concentration of GSO(Ce) scintillators is shown to be useful as position sensitive detectors. A Ce doped Gd/sub 2/SiO/sub 5/ (GSO(Ce)) single crystal is an excellent scintillator featuring, a large light output, a short decay time and a high absorption coefficient. Further investigation aimed at its implementation to scintillators has been carried out previously. An application of the GSO(Ce) scintillators to the gamma-ray detectors of positron emission computed tomography has also been shown. The authors have investigated the dependence of its scintillation properties on the Ce concentration and its application to position sensitive detectors

  4. A new temperature threshold detector - Application to missile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coston, C. J.; Higgins, E. V.

    Comprehensive thermal surveys within the case of solid propellant ballistic missile flight motors are highly desirable. For example, a problem involving motor failures due to insulator cracking at motor ignition, which took several years to solve, could have been identified immediately on the basis of a suitable thermal survey. Using conventional point measurements, such as those utilizing typical thermocouples, for such a survey on a full scale motor is not feasible because of the great number of sensors and measurements required. An alternate approach recognizes that temperatures below a threshold (which depends on the material being monitored) are acceptable, but higher temperatures exceed design margins. In this case hot spots can be located by a grid of wire-like sensors which are sensitive to temperature above the threshold anywhere along the sensor. A new type of temperature threshold detector is being developed for flight missile use. The considered device consists of KNO3 separating copper and Constantan metals. Above the KNO3 MP, galvanic action provides a voltage output of a few tenths of a volt.

  5. Radioactivity Portal Monitor: An actual application and its unconventional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izraelevitch, F.; Matatagui, E.; Regueiro Veiga, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    A Radioactivity Portal Monitor is an instrument designed to be used at traffic check points to detect the presence of ionizing radiation in goods, vehicles, people, in critical places such as those at border road crossing, airports and seaports, the entrance at nuclear facilities etc. and alert the officer to the presence of radioactive and nuclear material. We have developed and built, and is in operation a Radioactivity Portal Monitor for gamma radiation. The detector and the associated electronics does not follow a conventional design concept and is based on a pressurized ionization chamber with a very large sensitive volume (60 liters) and a very large length (2 meters), and a very low level DC electronics (fAmp). The System is simple, and its operational characteristics are excellent. The reference radiation level is the background radiation, which is continuously measured, and compared with the radiation level measured when a subject (vehicle, person, good) goes trough the Monitor. The system automatically takes a decision, and alert the officer with an alarm signal if the detected radiation level is larger than the reference (dynamical) level. We will describe the designed system and some of its characterization results will be shown (author)

  6. High speed quantitative digital beta autoradiography using a multi-step avalanche detector and an Apple-II microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.

    1985-04-01

    The development of an electronic, digital beta autoradiography system is described. Using a Multi-Step Avalanche/Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MSA/MWPC) detector system fitted with delay line readout, high speed digital imaging is demonstrated with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Good proportionality of observed counting rate relative to the known tritium activity is demonstrated. The application of the system to autoradiography in immunoelectrophoresis, histopathology and DNA sequencing is described. (author)

  7. Development of (Cd,Zn)Te X-ray and gamma ray radiation detectors for medical and security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, J.; Hoeschl, P.; Belas, E.; Grill, V.; Fauler, A.; Dambacher, M.; Procz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: There is a growing need for large area X-and Gamma radiation detectors for penetrating radiations in various fields of application e.g. astronomy, detectors for nuclear medicine, biosensor materials, security, non-proliferation of hazardous materials, and environmental applications etc. Direct X-rays conversion into electric charges in a semiconductor is envisaged with better spectroscopic characteristics to improve contrast and quantitative measurements compared to indirect detection using scintillators. The family of II-VI semiconductor materials combine a range of excellent properties such as their high sensitivity due to the high mobility-lifetime products, their high energy resolution as a consequence of the electron-hole pair formation energy, their reasonable maturity in terms of microelectronic technologies required for commercial detector fabrication, wide range of stopping power and band-gaps available. In particular, CdTe and Cd x Zn 1-x Te (CZT) with Zn=0.1 offer a favorable combination of physical and chemical properties that makes it attractive as a room temperature X-ray detector material of choice for many applications involving photon energies up to several hundreds of keV. From the scientific experience accumulated in the past years, the detector properties are strongly dependent on a series of parameters which must be strictly controlled during crystal growth, such as the homogeneity, stoichiometry and the related intrinsic defects which appear during the material growth, a high mobility-lifetime for electron and holes is mandatory etc. Production of detector-grade CdTe and CdZnTe on industrial scale is still a challenge and optimal growth methods and growth conditions have been under intensive investigation. Progress in crystal growth and characterization achieved in a project of Institute partnership between Charles University in Prague and University of Freiburg, Germany which was sponsored by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, will

  8. A spectrometer using semi-conductor detectors; study and applications (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, G.

    1963-01-01

    The low average energy, 2.5 to 3.5 eV, required to produce one hole-electron pair in a semiconductor allows an accurate measurement of the energy of the ionizing particles. A high resolution spectrometer has been built using semiconductor detectors. The limit of resolution, due to electronics associated to the detector, to the detector itself and to the source of particles is studied here. The present practical limit of resolution of the spectrometer is 1700 elementary electric charges (full width at half maximum of a ray of a spectrum) or 6 keV in terms of energy lost by a particle in a silicon detector. The physical resolution usually obtained is 20 keV (0.33 per cent) with α particles of the 212 Bi (6.087 MeV). It depends a lot of the kind of detector used. Some results, concerning the background of the detectors and limit of measurements for low energies are given. Various applications are presented: spectrometry β, spectrometry γ and X, spectrometry of mixtures of α radioactive elements, collection of α spectra. (author) [fr

  9. Characterization of the exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector for small field applications in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, C.; Lindsay, C.; Beaudry, J.; Penner, C.; Strgar, V.; Lee, R.; Duzenli, C.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate dosimetry in small field proton therapy is challenging, particularly for applications such as ocular therapy, and suitable detectors for this purpose are sought. The Exradin W1 plastic scintillating fibre detector is known to out-perform most other detectors for determining relative dose factors for small megavoltage photon beams used in radiotherapy but its potential in small proton beams has been relatively unexplored in the literature. The 1 mm diameter cylindrical geometry and near water equivalence of the W1 makes it an attractive alternative to other detectors. This study examines the dosimetric performance of the W1 in a 74 MeV proton therapy beam with particular focus on detector response characteristics relevant to relative dose measurement in small fields suitable for ocular therapy. Quenching of the scintillation signal is characterized and demonstrated not to impede relative dose measurements at a fixed depth. The background cable-only (Čerenkov and radio-fluorescence) signal is 4 orders of magnitude less than the scintillation signal, greatly simplifying relative dose measurements. Comparison with other detectors and Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the W1 is useful for measuring relative dose factors for field sizes down to 5 mm diameter and shallow spread out Bragg peaks down to 6 mm in depth.

  10. Trigger drift chamber for the upgraded mark II detector at PEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Weber, P.; White, S. L.; Alvarez, M.; Calviño, F.; Fernandez, E.

    1987-04-01

    A small cylindrical track detector was built as an array of single-wire drift cells with aluminized mylar cathode tubes. Point measurement resolution of ˜ 90 μm was achieved with a drift gas of 50% argon-50% ethane at atmospheric pressure. The chamber construction, electronics, and calibration are discussed. Performance results from PEP colliding-beam data are presented.

  11. Trigger drift chamber for the upgraded Mark II detector at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.T.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S.R.; Weber, P.; White, S.L.; Alvarez, M.; Calvino, F.; Fernandez, E.; Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona

    1987-01-01

    A small cylindrical track detector was built as an array of single-wire drift cells with aluminized mylar cathode tubes. Point measurement resolution of ∝90 μm was achieved with a drift gas of 50% argon-50% ethane at atmospheric pressure. The chamber construction, electronics, and calibration are discussed. Performance results from PEP colliding-beam data are presented. (orig.)

  12. Proceedings of the seventeenth national symposium on solid state nuclear track detectors and their applications: abstracts and souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Gaurang; Kishore, Sangeeta; Patel, Purvi

    2011-10-01

    The proceedings of the seventeenth national symposium on solid state nuclear track detectors and their applications (SSNTD-17) contains a number of research papers on different areas of solid state nuclear track detectors. It provides a common scientific platform to the scientists for sharing their knowledge and reviews the present state-of-art and advancements in the field of solid state nuclear track detectors and their applications and also some aspects of nuclear energy. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  13. Technology developments and first measurements of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) for high energy physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Baselga, M.; Fleta, C.; Flores, D.; Greco, V; Hidalgo, S.; Mandić, I.; Kramberger, G.; Quirion, D.; Ullan, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a new concept of silicon radiation detector with intrinsic multiplication of the charge, called Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD). These new devices are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) normally used for optical and X-ray detection applications. The main differences to standard APD detectors are the low gain requested to detect high energy charged particles, and the possibility to have fine segmentation pitches: this allows fabrication of microstrip or pixel devices which do not suffer from the limitations normally found [1] in avalanche detectors. In addition, a moderate multiplication value will allow the fabrication of thinner devices with the same output signal of standard thick substrates. The investigation of these detectors provides important indications on the ability of such modified electrode geometry to control and optimize the charge multiplication effect, in order to fully recover the collection efficiency of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, at reasonable bias voltage, compatible with the voltage feed limitation of the CERN High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) experiments [2]. For instance, the inner most pixel detector layers of the ATLAS tracker will be exposed to fluences up to 2×10 16 1 MeV n eq /cm 2 , while for the inner strip detector region fluences of 1×10 15 n eq /cm 2 are expected. The gain implemented in the non-irradiated devices must retain some effect also after irradiation, with a higher multiplication factor with respect to standard structures, in order to be used in harsh environments such those expected at collider experiments

  14. Development of TiBr semiconductor crystal for applications as radiation detector and photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Icimone Braga de

    2006-01-01

    In this work, Tlbr crystals were grown by the Bridgman method from zone melted materials. The influence of the purification efficiency and the crystalline surface quality on the crystal were studied, evaluating its performance as a radiation detector. Due to significant improvement in the purification and crystals growth, good results have been obtained for the developed detectors. The spectrometric performance of the Tlbr detector was evaluated by 241 Am (59 keV), 133 Ba (80 e 355 keV), 57 Co (122 keV), 22 Na (511 keV) and 137 Cs (662 keV) at room temperature. The best energy resolution results were obtained from purer detectors. Energy resolutions of 10 keV (16%), 12 keV (15%), 12 keV (10%), 28 keV (8%), 31 keV (6%) and 36 keV (5%) to 59, 80, 122, 355, 511 and 662 keV energies, respectively, were obtained. A study on the detection response at -20 deg C was also carried out, as well as the detector stability in function of the time. No significant difference was observed in the energy resolution between measurements at both temperatures. It was observed that the detector instability causes degradation of the spectroscopic characteristics during measurements at room temperature and the instability varies for each detector. This behavior was also verified by other authors. The viability to use the developed Tlbr crystal as a photodetector coupled to scintillators crystals was also studied in this work. Due to its quantum efficiency in the region from 350 to 500 nm, Tlbr shows to be a promising material to be used as a photodetector. As a possible application of this work, the development of a surgical probe has been initiated using the developed Tlbr crystal as the radiation detector of the probe. (author)

  15. CCD detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation application

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, M G

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of the application of some types of CCDs for the study of fast processes (by recording an image formed by a short flash of synchrotron radiation) is considered. The first results of model experiments are also described.

  16. II - Detector simulation for the LHC and beyond : how to match computing resources and physics requirements

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Detector simulation at the LHC is one of the most computing intensive activities. In these lectures we will show how physics requirements were met for the LHC experiments and extrapolate to future experiments (FCC-hh case). At the LHC, detectors are complex, very precise and ambitious: this implies modern modelisation tools for geometry and response. Events are busy and characterised by an unprecedented energy scale with hundreds of particles to be traced and high energy showers to be accurately simulated. Furthermore, high luminosities imply many events in a bunch crossing and many bunch crossings to be considered at the same time. In addition, backgrounds not directly correlated to bunch crossings have also to be taken into account. Solutions chosen for ATLAS (a mixture of detailed simulation and fast simulation/parameterisation) will be described and CPU and memory figures will be given. An extrapolation to the FCC-hh case will be tried by taking as example the calorimeter simulation.

  17. Status of SAT CID InSb detector technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatard, J.P.; Lussereau, A.; Lorans, D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents SAT indium antimonide Charge Injection Devices (C.I.D) Technology, post focal plane signal processing and some applications. These detectors are constituted by MOS capacitors realized on InSb wafers using integrated circuit-like processing. When a negative voltage is applied to the structure (put it into depletion) the capacitors form integrating detectors for use in 3-5 μm band. Linear arrays constituted by a line of single capacitors, matrix arrays constituted by a group of two coupled MOS capacitors, collect and store photon generated charge carriers. In the last case, the selection of a site is accomplished by X-Y decoding technique

  18. 14th ICATPP Conference on Astroparticle, Particle, Space Physics and Detectors for Physics Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Claude; Price, Lawrence; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio; Ruchti, Randy; ICATPP 2013; International Conference on Advanced Technology and Particle Physics

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of the subnuclear world is done through increasingly complex experiments covering a wide range of energy and performed in a large variety of environments ranging from particle accelerators, underground detectors to satellites and the space laboratory. The achievement of these research programs calls for novel techniques, new materials and instrumentation to be used in detectors, often of large scale. Therefore, fundamental physics is at the forefront of technological advance and also leads to many applications. Among these, are the progresses from space experiments whose results allow the understanding of the cosmic environment, of the origin and evolution of the universe after the Big Bang.

  19. Application of the Neganov-Luke effect to low-threshold light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, M.; Boslau, O.; Feilitzsch, F.v.; Goldstrass, P.; Jochum, J.; Kemmer, J.; Potzel, W.; Rau, W.

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of a temperature signal and scintillation light of a CaWO 4 crystal can be used for background rejection in cryogenic dark matter experiments. In our case the light is measured with a cryogenic detector that consists of a silicon absorber with a superconducting phase transition thermometer. Due to the Neganov-Luke effect the thermal signal is enhanced when a voltage is applied to the silicon absorber. First results with the application of this effect to our low-threshold light detectors will be discussed in this paper

  20. Figures of merit for detectors in digital radiography. II. Finite number of secondaries and structured backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, Angel R.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2004-01-01

    The current paradigm for evaluating detectors in digital radiography relies on Fourier methods. Fourier methods rely on a shift-invariant and statistically stationary description of the imaging system. The theoretical justification for the use of Fourier methods is based on a uniform background fluence and an infinite detector. In practice, the background fluence is not uniform and detector size is finite. We study the effect of stochastic blurring and structured backgrounds on the correlation between Fourier-based figures of merit and Hotelling detectability. A stochastic model of the blurring leads to behavior similar to what is observed by adding electronic noise to the deterministic blurring model. Background structure does away with the shift invariance. Anatomical variation makes the covariance matrix of the data less amenable to Fourier methods by introducing long-range correlations. It is desirable to have figures of merit that can account for all the sources of variation, some of which are not stationary. For such cases, we show that the commonly used figures of merit based on the discrete Fourier transform can provide an inaccurate estimate of Hotelling detectability

  1. The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector: status and perspectives for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE Transition Radiation Detector contributes to the tracking, particle identification, and triggering capabilities of the experiment. It is composed of six layers of multi-wire proportional chambers, each of which is preceded by a radiator and a Xe/CO$_2$-filled drift volume. The signal is sampled in timebins of 100~ns over the drift length which allows for the reconstruction of chamber-wise track segments, both online and offline. The particle identification is based on the specific energy loss of charged particles and additional transition radiation photons, the latter being a signature for electrons. The detector is segmented into 18 sectors, of which 13 were installed in Run I. The TRD was included in data taking since the LHC start-up and was successfully used for electron identification and triggering. During the Long Shutdown 1, the detector was completed and now covers the full azimuthal acceptance. Furthermore, the readout and trigger components were upgraded. When data taking was started for ...

  2. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging Phase I SBIR successes, in Phase II, a single photon sensitive LIDAR receiver will be fabricated and delivered to NASA. In Phase I, high-gain,...

  3. Verification of Dosimetry Measurements with Timepix Pixel Detectors for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, M.; Pinsky, L. S.; Idarraga-Munoz, J.; Hoang, S. M.; Semones, E.; Bahadori, A.; Stoffle, N.; Rios, R.; Vykydal, Z.; Jakubek, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The current capabilities of modern pixel-detector technology has provided the possibility to design a new generation of radiation monitors. Timepix detectors are semiconductor pixel detectors based on a hybrid configuration. As such, the read-out chip can be used with different types and thicknesses of sensors. For space radiation dosimetry applications, Timepix devices with 300 and 500 microns thick silicon sensors have been used by a collaboration between NASA and University of Houston to explore their performance. For that purpose, an extensive evaluation of the response of Timepix for such applications has been performed. Timepix-based devices were tested in many different environments both at ground-based accelerator facilities such as HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan), and at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY), as well as in space on board of the International Space Station (ISS). These tests have included a wide range of the particle types and energies, from protons through iron nuclei. The results have been compared both with other devices and theoretical values. This effort has demonstrated that Timepix-based detectors are exceptionally capable at providing accurate dosimetry measurements in this application as verified by the confirming correspondence with the other accepted techniques.

  4. CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector and its application in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Pengji; Tang Xiaowei; Wang Long; Liang Tianjiao

    2000-01-01

    The transparent and stable plastic material CR-39 can be used as a nuclear track detector which is highly sensitive to charged particles. It can record tracks induced by protons , alphas, fission fragments and other charged particles. Among various available solid state nuclear track detectors CR-39 has the lowest deposited energy density detection-threshold. The response of CR-39 to charged particles and the response curve of υ T of different charged particles to REL are given. The CR-39 detector is widely used in studies of nuclear reactions, angular distributions and reaction cross-sections caused by neutrons and charged particles. Neutron spectra, over a wide energy range, can be measured by the combination of CR-39 and a transformation screen. The successful applications of CR-39 in alpha particle dosimetry, environmental science (especially in the measurement of radon) and in biomedicine, such as the analysis of alpha radioactivity in sections of organic tissues, are described

  5. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Harris; Gan, K.K.; Kass, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  6. Development of a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector for Belle II ring-imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, S., E-mail: shohei.nishida@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Adachi, I. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Hamada, N. [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Hara, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Iijima, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Iwata, S.; Kakuno, H. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Kawai, H. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Korpar, S.; Krizan, P. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogawa, S. [Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Pestotnik, R.; Ŝantelj, L.; Seljak, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sumiyoshi, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Tabata, M. [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Tahirovic, E. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Yoshida, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Yusa, Y. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    The Belle II detector, a follow up of the very successful Belle experiment, is under construction at the SuperKEKB electron–positron collider at KEK in Japan. For the PID system in the forward region of the spectrometer, a proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator is being developed. For the position sensitive photon sensor, a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector has been developed with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. In this report, we describe the specification of the Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector and the status of the mass production.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of a MOSFET detector for clinical application in photon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Nishio, Teiji; Miyagishi, Tomoko; Goka, Tomonori; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of a metal oxide-silicon semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector are studied with megavoltage photon beams for patient dose verification. The major advantages of this detector are its size, which makes it a point dosimeter, and its ease of use. In order to use the MOSFET detector for dose verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and in-vivo dosimetry for radiation therapy, we need to evaluate the dosimetric properties of the MOSFET detector. Therefore, we investigated the reproducibility, dose-rate effect, accumulated-dose effect, angular dependence, and accuracy in tissue-maximum ratio measurements. Then, as it takes about 20 min in actual IMRT for the patient, we evaluated fading effect of MOSFET response. When the MOSFETs were read-out 20 min after irradiation, we observed a fading effect of 0.9% with 0.9% standard error of the mean. Further, we applied the MOSFET to the measurement of small field total scatter factor. The MOSFET for dose measurements of small field sizes was better than the reference pinpoint chamber with vertical direction. In conclusion, we assessed the accuracy, reliability, and usefulness of the MOSFET detector in clinical applications such as pinpoint absolute dosimetry for small fields.

  8. Position sensitive photon detectors for nuclear physics, particle physics and healthcare applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, B

    2012-01-01

    Modern experiments in hadronic physics require detector systems capable of identifying and reconstructing all final-state particles and their momentum vectors. Imaging Cherenkov counters (RICH and DIRC) are frequently employed in nuclear and particle physics experiments. These detectors require high-rate, single-photon capable light detection system with sufficient granularity and position resolution. Several candidate systems are available, ranging from multi-anode photomultiplier tubes to micro-channel plate systems to silicon photomultipliers. Each of these detection solutions has particular advantages and disadvantages. Detailed studies of rate dependence, cross-talk, time-resolution and position resolution for a range of available photon detection solutions are presented. These properties make these photon detection systems ideal for radionuclide imaging applications. Cherenkov radiation can also be used for medical imaging applications. Two different applications using the Cherenkov effect for radionuclide imaging will be reviewed.

  9. Quantitative Characterization of Phosphor Detector for Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baciero, A.; Zurro, B.; McCarthy, K. J.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments made to characterize phosphor screens with application as broadband radiation detectors, are described. Several radiation sources, covering the spectral range between the ultraviolet and X ray, were used. In addition, details are given of three original phosphor-screen-based detectors that were designed for use as broadband detectors in magnetically confined fusion devices. The first measurements obtained with these detectors in plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator device are presented together with the analysis performed. (Author)

  10. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the AMANDA-II detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissing, Henrike

    2009-01-01

    Cherenkov emissions of magnetically charged particles passing through a transparent medium will exceed those of electrically charged particles by several orders of magnitude. The Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA), a neutrino telescope utilizing the glacial ice at the geographic South Pole as Cherenkov medium, is capable of efficiently detecting relativistic magnetic monopoles that may pass through its sensitive volume. This thesis presents the search for Cherenkov signatures from relativistic magnetic monopoles in data taken with AMANDA during the 2000. No such signal is observed in the data, and the analysis allows to place upper limits on the flux of relativistic magnetic monopoles. The limit obtained for monopoles reaching the detector from below the horizon, i.e., those monopoles that are capable of crossing the Earth, is the most stringent experimental constraint on the flux of magnetic monopoles to date: Dependent on the monopole speed, the flux limit (at 90% confidence level) varies between 3.8 x 10 -17 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 (for monopoles moving at the vacuum speed of light) and 8.8 x 10 -16 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 (for monopoles moving at a speed just above the Cherenkov threshold). The limit obtained for monopoles reaching the detector from above the horizon is less stringent by roughly an order of magnitude, owing to the much larger background from down-going atmospheric muons. This looser limit is valid for a larger class of magnetic monopoles, since the monopole's capability to pass through the Earth is not a requirement. (orig.)

  11. Description of current pulses induced by heavy ions in silicon detectors (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrita, H. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Parlog, M. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Borderie, B., E-mail: borderie@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Lavergne, L. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Le Neindre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Rivet, M.F.; Barbey, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Bougault, R. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Chabot, M. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Chbihi, A. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Cussol, D. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Univ. de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Oliveira Santos, F. de [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Edelbruck, P. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Frankland, J.D. [GANIL (DSM-CEA/CNRS/IN2P3), F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Galichet, E. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Conservatoire National des Arts et Metier, F-75141 Paris Cedex 03 (France); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph. [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ.e Claude Bernard Lyon I, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lopez, O. [LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, ENSICAEN, Univ. de Caen, F-14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2011-06-21

    Current pulses induced in a silicon detector by 10 different heavy ion species at known energies around 10 A MeV have been sampled in time at high frequency. Their individual average shapes are quite well reproduced by a fit procedure based on our recent charge carrier collection treatment which considers the progressive extraction of the electrons and holes from the high carrier density zone along the ionizing particle track. This region is assumed to present a supplementary dielectric polarization and consequently a disturbed electric field. The influence of the nature of the heavy ion on the values of the three fit parameters is analyzed.

  12. Quantitative Characterization of Phosphor Detector for Fusion Plasmas; Caracterizacion Cuantitativa de Detectores Luminiscentes para Plasmas de Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciero, A; Zurro, B; McCarthy, K J

    2004-07-01

    Experiments made to characterize phosphor screens with application as broadband radiation detectors, are described. Several radiation sources, covering the spectral range between the ultraviolet and X ray, were used. In addition, details are given of three original phosphor-screen-based detectors that were designed for use as broadband detectors in magnetically confined fusion devices. The first measurements obtained with these detectors in plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator device are presented together with the analysis performed. (Author)

  13. Dielectric track detectors and their applications in boron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysak, F.; Krejci, M.

    1982-01-01

    Examples are presented of the applications of autoradiography using plastic films in the study of the distribution of boron in metal materials and its translocation owing to diffusion annealing. Alpha radiation is induced in the material by thermal neutrons while the reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li is used. Diffusion processes were studied in the transition zone between the base material and the overlay in hard alloy surfacing. The metallographically treated samples were placed on cellulose nitrate films and irradiated in a reactor. Autoradiograms showed that up to an annealing temperature of 800 degC there was no notable diffusion. Only at 900 degC migration occurred of boron from the transition zone to the base material. Also studied was the distribution of boron in soldered joints of nickel heat resisting alloys. The joints were subjected to homogenization annealing and the gradual disintegration was monitored of boride phases in dependence on the temperature and duration of annealing. Inside the joint boron practically disappeared and it finally appeared in the base material outside of the initial interface. (M.D.)

  14. VXI based multibunch detector and QPSK modulator for the PEP-II/ALS/DAΦNE longitudinal feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1997-04-01

    The PEP-II/ALS/DAΦNE feedback systems are complex systems implemented using analog, digital and microwave circuits. The VXI hardware implementation for the Front-end and Back-end analog processing modules is presented. The Front-end module produces a baseband beam phase signal from pickups using a microwave tone burst generator. The Back-end VXI module generates an AM/QPSK modulated signal from a baseband correction signal computed in a digital signal processor. These components are implemented in VXI packages that allow a wide spectrum of system functions including a 120 MHz bandwidth rms detector, reference phase servo, woofer link to the RF control system, standard VXI status/control, and user defined registers. The details of the design and implementation of the VXI modules including performance characteristics are presented

  15. Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andeen, Jr., Timothy R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at √s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W → ev and Z → ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure MW = 80340 ± 37 (stat.) ± 26 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80340 ± 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and MW = 80361 ± 28 (stat.) ± 17 (sys. theo.) ± 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = 80361 ± 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

  16. High-operating temperature MWIR photon detectors based on type II InAs/GaSb superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Manijeh; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Delaunay, Pierre-Yves; Abdollahi Pour, Siamak; Huang, Edward Kwei-wei; Manukar, Paritosh; Bogdanov, Simeon; Chen, Guanxi

    2010-01-01

    Recent efforts have been paid to elevate the operating temperature of Type II InAs/GaSb superlattice Mid Infrared photon detectors. Optimized growth parameters and interface engineering technique enable high quality material with a quantum efficiency above 50%. Intensive study on device architecture and doping profile has resulted in almost one order of magnitude of improvement to the electrical performance and lifted up the 300K-background BLIP operation temperature to 166K. At 77K, the ~4.2 μm cut-off devices exhibit a differential resistance area product in excess of the measurement system limit (106 Ohm.cm2) and a detectivity of 3x1013cm.Hz1/2/W. High quality focal plane arrays were demonstrated with a noise equivalent temperature of 10mK at 77K. Uncooled camera is capable to capture hot objects such as soldering iron.

  17. $W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

  18. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091576

    2016-01-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{33}$ cm$^2$ s$^1$ and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance ...

  19. Advances in CMOS solid-state photomultipliers for scintillation detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric [Radiation Monitoring Devices, 44 Hunt Street, Watertownm, MA 02472 (United States); Augustine, Frank L., E-mail: JChristian@RMDInc.co [Augustine Engineering, 2115 Park Dale Ln, Encinitas, CA 92024 (United States)

    2010-12-11

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance.

  20. Polyethylene Naphthalate Scintillator: A Novel Detector for the Dosimetry of Radioactive Ophthalmic Applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flühs, Dirk; Flühs, Andrea; Ebenau, Melanie; Eichmann, Marion

    2015-09-01

    Dosimetric measurements in small radiation fields with large gradients, such as eye plaque dosimetry with β or low-energy photon emitters, require dosimetrically almost water-equivalent detectors with volumes of <1 mm(3) and linear responses over several orders of magnitude. Polyvinyltoluene-based scintillators fulfil these conditions. Hence, they are a standard for such applications. However, they show disadvantages with regard to certain material properties and their dosimetric behaviour towards low-energy photons. Polyethylene naphthalate, recently recognized as a scintillator, offers chemical, physical and basic dosimetric properties superior to polyvinyltoluene. Its general applicability as a clinical dosimeter, however, has not been shown yet. To prove this applicability, extensive measurements at several clinical photon and electron radiation sources, ranging from ophthalmic plaques to a linear accelerator, were performed. For all radiation qualities under investigation, covering a wide range of dose rates, a linearity of the detector response to the dose was shown. Polyethylene naphthalate proved to be a suitable detector material for the dosimetry of ophthalmic plaques, including low-energy photon emitters and other small radiation fields. Due to superior properties, it has the potential to replace polyvinyltoluene as the standard scintillator for such applications.

  1. Muon reconstruction and identification with the Run II D0 detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 737, Feb (2014), s. 281-294 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Fermilab * D0 * Tevatron Run II * muon identification * muon reconstruction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014

  2. A calorimeter software trigger for the Mark II detector at SLC [Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.; Glanzman, T.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Tinsman, J.; Holmgren, S.; Schaad, M.W.

    1989-04-01

    A new FASTBUS-based calorimeter software trigger for the upgraded Mark II at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is presented. The trigger requirements for SLC and a short description of the hardware used for this purpose are given, followed by a detailed description of the software. Some preliminary results are presented. 9 refs., 4 figs

  3. Mirage effect sensor with simple detector and with multiple detector: application to non destructive evaluation by photothermal excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnier, Francois

    1990-01-01

    Local photothermal excitation of absorbing sample provides spatial and temporal temperature distribution inside this sample and its neighbouring medium. Optical, thermal and geometrical characteristics (thickness, presence of a defect...) modify surface temperature evolution. The realization of an optical instrument using mirage effect, sensitive and accurate, has came out of two industrial applications of non destructive evaluation: - automatic set-up for absolute measurement of thermal losses on concentrical pipes interface.- set up for quantitative measurement of optical absorption losses on multi coated laser mirrors. To obtain images and compensate acquisition slowness due to investigated thermal phenomenons, a synchronous integration signal process from a multi detector, is described. Experimental set-up using mirage effect detected by a linear CCD reading sensor is realized on this principle. Some examples prove feasibility of this parallel measurement along an excitation line. At last, high frequency parallel synchronous detection with sequential cut-out demodulation was tested and succeeded with a 50 kHz optical signal. (author) [fr

  4. [An application of electrochemical detector to dental pharmacology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, J

    1990-03-01

    The electrochemical detection (ECD) is highly sensitive and can distinguish selectively electrochemically active materials. A sensitive and selective ECD is widely used for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of phenolic compounds, such as catecholamines, indoleamines and phenolic steroids in biological materials. In the present study, the HPLC/ECD system was applied for the simultaneous determination of various dental drugs, such as phenol, guaiacol, m-cresol, o-chlorophenol, p-chlorophenol, m-chlorophenol, eugenol, pyrogallol and resorcin. As a compromise between sensitivity and stability, the applied voltage was set at 1.2 V vs the reference electrode. These drugs were rapidly and selectively separated on a reversed-phase column using 10 mM acetate buffer (pH 4.0)-methanol (7:3, v/v) as a mobile phase. The detection limits of these drugs were determined to be 0.25 pmol per injection. These results imply that the HPLC/ECD method should be capable of determining these dental drugs with high sensitivity. The ECD was also applied to determine the enzyme activity. A highly sensitive and specific assay for alkaline and acid phosphatases and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in biological materials, such as plasma, saliva and bone, has been established. Phenol, formed enzymatically from the substrate, was determined by HPLC/ECD. The retention time of phenol was 7 min and no other peaks were observed. The method is rapid and sensitive with a detection limit for phenol of as little as 0.5 pmol. Thus, as little as 0.5 microliters of rat plasma or 10 microliters of human saliva is all that is required for both alkaline and acid phosphatase assays. The assay is accurate and reproducible. Using this assay, alkaline and acid phosphatase activities in human saliva and in rat saliva elicited by pilocarpine and isoproterenol were determined. It will be possible to apply this new assay method to extremely small biological samples. Thus, the application of the HPLC

  5. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  6. National and International Security Applications of Cryogenic Detectors - Mostly Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    As with science, so with security--in both arenas, the extraordinary sensitivity of cryogenic sensors enables high-confidence detection and high-precision measurement even of the faintest signals. Science applications are more mature, but several national and international security applications have been identified where cryogenic detectors have high potential payoff. International safeguards and nuclear forensics are areas needing new technology and methods to boost speed, sensitivity, precision and accuracy. Successfully applied, improved nuclear materials analysis will help constrain nuclear materials diversion pathways and contribute to treaty verification. Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors for X-ray, gamma-ray, neutron, and alpha-particle spectrometry are under development with these aims in mind. In each case the unsurpassed energy resolution of microcalorimeters reveals previously invisible spectral features of nuclear materials. Preliminary results of quantitative analysis indicate substantial improvements are still possible, but significant work will be required to fully understand the ultimate performance limits.

  7. International and national security applications of cryogenic detectors - mostly nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    As with science, so with security - in both arenas, the extraordinary sensitivity of cryogenic sensors enables high-confidence detection and high-precision measurement even of the faintest signals. Science applications are more mature, but several national and international security applications have been identified where cryogenic detectors have high potential payoff. International safeguards and nuclear forensics are areas needing new technology and methods to boost speed, sensitivity, precision and accuracy. Successfully applied, improved nuclear materials analysis will help constrain nuclear materials diversion pathways and contribute to treaty verification. Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors for X-ray, gamma ray, neutron, and alpha particle spectrometry are under development with these aims in mind. In each case the unsurpassed energy resolution of microcalorimeters reveals previously invi sible spectral features of nuclear materials. Preliminary results of quantitative analysis indicate substantial improvements are still possible, but significant work will be required to fully understand the ultimate performance limits.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation for pixel detectors: a feasibility study for X radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, F.; Akiba, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the feasibility of a Monte Carlo simulation for the description of pixel semiconductor detectors as a tool for research and development of such devices and their applications for X-rays. We present as a result the technical aspects and main characteristics of a set of algorithms recently developed which allows one to estimate the energy spectrum and cluster classification. (author)

  9. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco Navarro, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS physics goals require excellent resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and on the quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the Run II of the LHC, the system was upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). An outline of the track based alignment approach and its implementation within the ATLAS software will be presented. Special attention will be paid to integration of the IBL into the alignment framework, techniques allowing to identify and eliminate tracking systematics as well as strategies to deal with time-dependent alignment. Performance from the commissioning of Cosmic data and potentially early LHC Run II proton-proton collisions will be discussed.

  10. Is the Spencer-Attix cavity equation applicable for solid-state detectors irradiated in megavoltage electron beams?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobit, P.N.; Sandison, G.A.; Calgary Univ., AB

    2001-01-01

    The applicability of the Spencer-Attix cavity equation in determining absorbed doses in water using solid state detectors irradiated by megavoltage electron beams have been examined. The calculations were performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. This work is an extension of a recently published article examining the perturbation of dose by solid state detectors in megavoltage electron beams. (orig.)

  11. Development of pattern recognition algorithms for the central drift chamber of the Belle II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trusov, Viktor

    2016-11-04

    In this thesis, the development of one of the pattern recognition algorithms for the Belle II experiment based on conformal and Legendre transformations is presented. In order to optimize the performance of the algorithm (CPU time and efficiency) specialized processing steps have been introduced. To show achieved results, Monte-Carlo based efficiency measurements of the tracking algorithms in the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) has been done.

  12. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS inner detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, Luise; Bloch, Ingo; Edwards, Sam

    2016-04-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). This glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study concerning the use of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, the thermal conduction and shear strength, thermal cycling, radiation hardness, corrosion resistance and shear strength tests. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  13. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS inner detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poley, Luise [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany); Bloch, Ingo [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Edwards, Sam [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-04-15

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). This glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study concerning the use of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, the thermal conduction and shear strength, thermal cycling, radiation hardness, corrosion resistance and shear strength tests. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  14. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00407830; Bloch, Ingo; Edwards, Sam; Friedrich, Conrad; Gregor, Ingrid M.; Jones, T; Lacker, Heiko; Pyatt, Simon; Rehnisch, Laura; Sperlich, Dennis; Wilson, John

    2016-05-24

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). This glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study concerning the use of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, the thermal conduction and shear strength, thermal cycling, radiation hardness, corrosion resistance and shear strength tests. These investigatio...

  15. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, L.; Bloch, I.; Edwards, S.; Friedrich, C.; Gregor, I.-M.; Jones, T.; Lacker, H.; Pyatt, S.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Wilson, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive used initially between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). However, this glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for possible use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, thermal conduction and shear strength. Samples were thermally cycled, radiation hardness and corrosion resistance were also determined. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives than silver loaded glue. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  16. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, L.; Bloch, I.; Friedrich, C.; Gregor, I.-M.; Edwards, S.; Pyatt, S.; Wilson, J.; Jones, T.; Lacker, H.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.

    2016-01-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive used initially between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). However, this glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for possible use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, thermal conduction and shear strength. Samples were thermally cycled, radiation hardness and corrosion resistance were also determined. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives than silver loaded glue. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  17. Recent developments and applications of fast position-sensitive gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    1999-01-01

    The introduction, 30 years ago, of the multiwire proportional chamber initiated a very active and fruitful period of development of fast gas detectors. Performing position-sensitive devices have been perfected, for the needs of elementary particle physics and for applications in medical diagnostics, biology, material analysis. The high rate performance of wire counters, limited by positive ions accumulation, was largely improved with the introduction of the micro-strip gas chamber, capable of achieving position accuracies of few tens of microns at radiation fluxes exceeding 1 MHz/mm 2 . The micro-strip chamber properties have been extensively studied in view of large scale use in high luminosity experiments; some interesting applications in other fields will be described here. Originally conceived as a gain booster to solve reliability problems met with micro-strips, the gas electron multiplier was invented about a year and a half ago. Progress made with high gain models is leading to a new concept in gas detectors, powerful yet cheap and reliable. Possible developments and applications will be discussed: large area position-sensitive photo detectors and X-ray imagers, including devices with non-planar geometry suited to spectrometers and crystal diffraction studies

  18. Past and future application of solid-state detectors in manned spaceflight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, G.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation exposure in space missions can be reduced by careful mission planning and appropriate measures, such as provision of a radiation shelter, but it cannot be eliminated. The reason for that is the high penetration capability of the radiation components owing to their high energies. Radiation is therefore an acknowledged primary concern for manned spaceflight and is a potentially limiting factor for long-term orbital and interplanetary missions. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin and of the radiation belts, as well as of secondary particles produced in interactions of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the earth. The complexity even increases by placing a spacecraft into this environment owing to the interaction of the radiation components with the shielding material. Therefore it is a challenge to provide for appropriate measurements in this radiation field, coping with the limited resources on experiment power and mass. Solid-state dosemeters were already chosen for measurements in the first manned flights. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) especially found a preferred application because they are light-weighted, need no power supply and they are tissue-equivalent. Most of the data available until 1996 were gathered by using these passive detectors; this especially holds for heavy ion particle spectra. The systems, supplemented by converter foils or fission detectors and bubble detectors, provide information on dose, particle flux-, energy- and linear energy transfer spectra of the ionising radiation and neutron fluxes and doses. From 1989, silicon detectors were used for dose and flux measurements and later on for particle spectrometry. Silicon detectors were demonstrated as a powerful tool for the description of space radiation environment. Optical simulated luminescence (OSL) detectors have now been introduced as a

  19. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  20. Characterization of a glass GEM for sealed detectors application and reduction of charging-up effects

    CERN Document Server

    Erdal, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Apart from high energy physics experiments, there has been a great effort in recent years to incorporate MPGDs in many other applications i.e. medical treatments and imaging and home land security. However, MPGDs (as most gaseous detectors) are normally operated under a constant flushing of the gas. Their use thus turns them expensive since they rely on a constant gas supply and a suitable infrastructure, but most important is the loss of their portability. These reasons have pushed the community to search for other solutions, aiming for the development of sealed detectors. The demands for such is to be made out of low outgassing rate materials and possibly the use of only noble gas to avoid aging due to chemical activity of the ionized gas of the avalanche. The default material for GEM detectors - Polyimide (Kapton), is not suitable for a sealed detector because of its high outgassing rate, thus calling for new solutions. Moreover, GEMs, being essentially made out of an insulating material, pose a problem in...

  1. Development of innovative micro-pattern gaseous detectors with resistive electrodes and first results of their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Di Mauro, A; Martinengo, P; Nappi, E; Oliveira, R; Peskov, Vladimir; Periale, L; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Rodionov, I; Santiard, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    The paper summarizes our latest progress in the development of newly introduced micro pattern gaseous detectors with resistive electrodes. These resistive electrodes protect the detector and the front-end electronics in case of occasional discharges and thus make the detectors very robust and reliable in operation. As an example, we describe in greater detail a new recently developed GEM-like detector, fully spark-protected with electrodes made of resistive kapton. We discovered that all resistive layers used in these studies (including kapton), that are coated with photosensitive layers, such as CsI, can be used as efficient photo cathodes for detectors operating in a pulse counting mode. We describe the first applications of such detectors combined with CsI or SbCs photo cathodes for the detection of UV photons at room and cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Application of the self-powered detector concept in the design of a threshold gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVert, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    The self-powered detector concept has been utilized to develop an energy threshold gamma-ray detector. Gamma-ray energy discrimination is achieved by using a thick annular lead shield around the outer wall (emitter) of the detector in conjunction with a self-shielding central electrode (collector). Measurements conducted in the graphite pit of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor have confirmed its ability to detect high-energy prompt fission gamma rays while discriminating against a significant flux of low-energy gamma rays from the decay of fission products. Also, auto-power spectral densities obtained with the detector were used to estimate the kinetic parameter, β/l, of the reactor

  3. Testing the applicability of the k 0-NAA method at the MINT's TRIGA MARK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siong, Wee Boon; Dung, Ho Manh; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abd.; Elias, Md. Suhaimi

    2006-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at MINT is using the NAA technique since 1980s and is the only laboratory in Malaysia equipped with a research reactor, namely the TRIGA MARK II. Throughout the years the development of NAA technique has been very encouraging and was made applicable to a wide range of samples. At present, the k 0 method has become the preferred standardization method of NAA (k 0 -NAA) due to its multi-elemental analysis capability without using standards. Additionally, the k 0 method describes NAA in physically and mathematically understandable definitions and is very suitable for computer evaluation. Eventually, the k 0 -NAA method has been adopted by MINT in 2003, in collaboration with the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Vietnam. The reactor neutron parameters (α and f) for the pneumatic transfer system and for the rotary rack at various locations, as well as the detector efficiencies were determined. After calibration of the reactor and the detectors, the implemented k 0 method was validated by analyzing some certified reference materials (including IAEA Soil 7, NIST 1633a, NIST 1632c, NIST 1646a and IAEA 140/TM). The analysis results of the CRMs showed an average u score well below the threshold value of 2 with a precision of better than ±10% for most of the elemental concentrations obtained, validating herewith the introduction of the k 0 -NAA method at the MINT

  4. Testing the applicability of the k0-NAA method at the MINT's TRIGA MARK II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siong, Wee Boon; Dung, Ho Manh; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abd.; Elias, Md. Suhaimi

    2006-08-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at MINT is using the NAA technique since 1980s and is the only laboratory in Malaysia equipped with a research reactor, namely the TRIGA MARK II. Throughout the years the development of NAA technique has been very encouraging and was made applicable to a wide range of samples. At present, the k0 method has become the preferred standardization method of NAA ( k0-NAA) due to its multi-elemental analysis capability without using standards. Additionally, the k0 method describes NAA in physically and mathematically understandable definitions and is very suitable for computer evaluation. Eventually, the k0-NAA method has been adopted by MINT in 2003, in collaboration with the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Vietnam. The reactor neutron parameters ( α and f) for the pneumatic transfer system and for the rotary rack at various locations, as well as the detector efficiencies were determined. After calibration of the reactor and the detectors, the implemented k0 method was validated by analyzing some certified reference materials (including IAEA Soil 7, NIST 1633a, NIST 1632c, NIST 1646a and IAEA 140/TM). The analysis results of the CRMs showed an average u score well below the threshold value of 2 with a precision of better than ±10% for most of the elemental concentrations obtained, validating herewith the introduction of the k0-NAA method at the MINT.

  5. Prototype Si microstrip sensors for the CDF-II ISL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, K; Kanao, K; Kim, S; Ogasawara, M; Ohsugi, T; Shimojima, M; Takikawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Prototype Si microstrip sensors for the CDF-II ISL were fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics and SEIKO Instruments using 4'' technology. The sensor is AC coupled and double-sided forming a stereo angle of 1.207 degree sign . The strip pitch is 112 mu m on both sides. The main differences between the two manufacturers lie on the technologies of passivation and the structure of coupling capacitors. We describe the design of the sensor and evaluation results of the performance. The evaluations include the total and individual strip currents and interstrip capacitance measured before and after sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma irradiation. (author)

  6. Spectroscopic Imaging Using Ge and CdTe Based Detector Systems for Hard X-ray Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astromskas, Vytautas

    Third generation synchrotron facilities such as the Diamond Light Source (DLS) have a wide range of experiments performed for a wide range of science fields. The DLS operates at energies up to 150 keV which introduces great challenges to radiation detector technology. This work focuses on the requirements that the detector technology faces for X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and powder diffraction experiments in I12 and I15 beam lines, respectively. A segmented HPGe demonstrator detector with in-built charge sensitive CUBE preamplifiers and a Schottky e- collection CdTe Medipix3RX detector systems were investigated to understand the underlying mechanisms that limit spectroscopic, imaging performances and stability and to find ways to overcome or minimise those limitations. The energy resolution and stability of the Ge demonstrator detector was found to have the required characteristics for XAFS measurements. Charge sharing was identified as a limiting factor to the resolution which is going to be addressed in the future development of a full detector system as well as reductions in electronic noise and cross-talk effects. The stability study of the Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX detector showed that polarization is highly dependent on temperature, irradiation duration and incoming flux. A new pixel behaviour called tri-phase (3-P) pixel was identified and a novel method for determining optimum operational conditions was developed. The use of the 3-P pixels as a criterion for depolarization resulted in a stable performance of the detector. Furthermore, the detector was applied in powder diffraction measurement at the I15 beam line and resulted in the detector diffraction pattern matching the simulated data. CdTe Medipix3RX and HEXITEC spectroscopic imaging detectors were applied in identification and discrimination of transitional metals for security application and K-edge subtraction for medical applications. The results showed that both detectors have potential

  7. Technical Proposal for the Phase-II Upgrade of the CMS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration; Contardo, D; Klute, M; Mans, J; Silvestris, L; Butler, J; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2015-01-01

    This Technical Proposal presents the upgrades foreseen to prepare the CMS experiment for the High Luminosity LHC. In this second phase of the LHC physics program, the accelerator will provide to CMS an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500 fb-1 over 10 years of operation, starting in 2025. This will substantially enlarge the mass reach in the search for new particles and will also greatly extend the potential to study the properties of the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented p-p luminosity, the CMS collaboration will need to address the aging of the present detector and to improve the ability of the apparatus to isolate and precisely measure the products of the most interesting collisions. This document describes the conceptual designs and the expected performance of the upgrades, along with the plans to develop the appropriate experimental techniques. The infrastructure upgrades and the logistics of the installation in the experim...

  8. A novel technique for compensation of space charge effects in the LUPIN-II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassell, C., E-mail: cc878@uowmail.edu.au [Politecnico of Milan, Department of Energy, Via la Masa 34, 20154 Milan (Italy); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Physics, NSW 2522 (Australia); Ferrarini, M. [Fondazione CNAO, via Caminadella16, 20123 Milano (Italy); Rosenfeld, A. [University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Physics, NSW 2522 (Australia); Caresana, M. [Politecnico of Milan, Department of Energy, Via la Masa 34, 20154 Milan (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    A new method for improving REM counter performance in Pulsed Neutron Fields (PNFs) has been developed. This method uses an analysis of the build-up of space charge in the counter to compensate for an underestimation of Ambient Dose Equivalent (H*(10)) in intense pulsed fields. It was applied to three sets of experimental data acquired using the LUPIN-II REM counter device, which is designed for use in PNFs. The data was acquired using the cyclotron at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), at the HiRadMat facility at CERN and at the ‘Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste’ (ELETTRA), Italy. A comparison of the data with and without this compensation method is used to highlight its effectiveness. The LUPIN-II performance, which has already been shown to be able to cope with fields of up to hundreds of nSv/burst, is improved by at least one order of magnitude, with further potential for improvement.

  9. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-07

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm  ×  25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40

  10. Measurement of beauty quark production from dimuon events with the ZEUS detector at HERA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, Danny

    2011-10-01

    In this thesis, a measurement of beauty quark production via the process ep→e'b anti bX→e'μμX in electron-proton collisions at HERA using a data sample recorded by the ZEUS detector in the years 2003-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 376 pb -1 , is presented. A low transverse momentum threshold for muon identification in combination with the large rapidity coverage of the ZEUS muon-detection system gives access to essentially the full phase space for beauty quark production. Dimuon charge correlations as well as hadronic isolation and the mass of the dimuon system were used to separate the beauty signal from backgrounds. Visible, differential and total cross sections for beauty quark production were measured and compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations and previous measurements. In addition, a first search for QCD instanton-induced processes containing both a charm- and beauty-quark pair in dimuon events was performed. In order to differentiate between beauty and instanton events, discriminating observables sensitive to the hadronic final state, so-called event shape variables, were used in combination with the dimuon requirement. As technical part of this thesis, the reconstruction algorithm for so-called energy flow objects (EFOs) was modified. EFOs contain the combined information of primary and secondary vertex-fitted tracks as well as CAL energy measurements. The modification considers additional tracks close to but not fitted to the primary vertex and which fulfill reasonable track and impact parameter requirements. As a result, the efficiency to reconstruct muon candidates with high impact parameter values as energy flow objects was increased. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of beauty quark production from dimuon events with the ZEUS detector at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bot, Danny

    2011-10-15

    In this thesis, a measurement of beauty quark production via the process ep{yields}e'b anti bX{yields}e'{mu}{mu}X in electron-proton collisions at HERA using a data sample recorded by the ZEUS detector in the years 2003-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 376 pb{sup -1}, is presented. A low transverse momentum threshold for muon identification in combination with the large rapidity coverage of the ZEUS muon-detection system gives access to essentially the full phase space for beauty quark production. Dimuon charge correlations as well as hadronic isolation and the mass of the dimuon system were used to separate the beauty signal from backgrounds. Visible, differential and total cross sections for beauty quark production were measured and compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations and previous measurements. In addition, a first search for QCD instanton-induced processes containing both a charm- and beauty-quark pair in dimuon events was performed. In order to differentiate between beauty and instanton events, discriminating observables sensitive to the hadronic final state, so-called event shape variables, were used in combination with the dimuon requirement. As technical part of this thesis, the reconstruction algorithm for so-called energy flow objects (EFOs) was modified. EFOs contain the combined information of primary and secondary vertex-fitted tracks as well as CAL energy measurements. The modification considers additional tracks close to but not fitted to the primary vertex and which fulfill reasonable track and impact parameter requirements. As a result, the efficiency to reconstruct muon candidates with high impact parameter values as energy flow objects was increased. (orig.)

  12. Report on application specific integrated circuits for relativistic heavy ion detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    Detector systems for RHIC experiments are invariably going to be large and complex. Thus it behooves the planners to incorporate elements that have little need for adjustment, calibration and correction to the produced data. For example, if power, size and cost considerations permit, time can be digitized directly (i.e. with counters, shift registers, etc.) where no adjustments, calibrations or corrections are required. The circuit either works correctly or not at all. This kind of circuit behavior is extremely valuable in detectors with 10 5 or more channel elements. In analog to digital conversion applications, direct conversion (i.e. flash ADC) may be prohibitive in cost, size and power. Here major effort must be given to minimize the magnitude of offset and conversion gain variance. Where possible self correction and adjustment should be applied at the subsystem level

  13. Study of Te Inclusions in CdMnTe Crystals for Nuclear Detector Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babalola, O.S.; Bolotnikov, A.; Groza, M.; Hossain, A.; Egarievwe, S.; James, R.; Burger, A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration, size and spatial distribution of Te inclusions in the bulk of CdMnTe crystals mined from two batches of ingots were studied. An isolated planar layer decorated with Te inclusions was identified in CdMnTe crystals from the second ingot. The internal electric field of a CMT crystal was probed by infrared (IR) imaging employing Pockels electro-optic effect. The effect of an isolated plane of Te inclusions on the internal electric-field distribution within the CdMnTe crystal was studied. Space charge accumulation around the plane of Te inclusions was observed, which was found to be higher when the detector was reverse-biased. The effects of the plane of Te inclusions on the electric-field distribution within the CdMnTe crystal, and the quality of CdMnTe crystals for nuclear detector applications are discussed.

  14. A gated LaBr3(Ce) detector for border protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etile, A.; Denis-Petit, D.; Gaudefroy, L.; Meot, V.; Roig, O.

    2018-01-01

    We report on the dedicated implementation of the blocking technique for a LaBr3(Ce) detector as well as associated electronics and data acquisition system for border protection applications. The detector is meant to perform delayed γ-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments produced via photofission induced by a high intensity pulsed photon beam. The gating technique avoids saturation of the detection chain during irradiation. The resulting setup allows us to successfully perform delayed γ-ray spectroscopy starting only 30 ns after the gating operation. The measured energy resolution ranges from 5% to 6.5% at 662 keV depending on the γ-ray detection time after the gating operation.

  15. Research on Mechanical Shim Application with Compensated Prompt γ Current of Vanadium Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical shim is an advanced technology for reactor power and axial offset control with control rod assemblies. To address the adverse accuracy impact on the ex-core power range neutron flux measurements-based axial offset control resulting from the variable positions of control rod assemblies, the lead-lag-compensated in-core self-powered vanadium detector signals are utilized. The prompt γ current of self-powered detector is ignored normally due to its weakness compared with the delayed β current, although it promptly reflects the flux change of the core. Based on the features of the prompt γ current, a method for configuration of the lead-lag dynamic compensator is proposed. The simulations indicate that the method can improve dynamic response significantly with negligible adverse effects on the steady response. The robustness of the design implies that the method is of great value for engineering applications.

  16. Research on mechanical shim application with compensated prompt γ current of vanadium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhi [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    Mechanical shim is an advanced technology for reactor power and axial offset control with control rod assemblies. To address the adverse accuracy impact on the ex-core power range neutron flux measurements-based axial offset control resulting from the variable positions of control rod assemblies, the lead-lag-compensated in-core self-powered vanadium detector signals are utilized. The prompt γ current of self-powered detector is ignored normally due to its weakness compared with the delayed β current, although it promptly reflects the flux change of the core. Based on the features of the prompt γ current, a method for configuration of the lead-lag dynamic compensator is proposed. The simulations indicate that the method can improve dynamic response significantly with negligible adverse effects on the steady response. The robustness of the design implies that the method is of great value for engineering applications.

  17. Application of digital sampling techniques to particle identification in scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardelli, L.; Bini, M.; Poggi, G.; Taccetti, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the use of a fast digitizing system for identification of fast charged particles with scintillation detectors is discussed. The three-layer phoswich detectors developed in the framework of the FIASCO experiment for the detection of light charged particles (LCP) and intermediate mass fragments (IMF) emitted in heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies are briefly discussed. The standard analog electronics treatment of the signals for particle identification is illustrated. After a description of the digitizer designed to perform a fast digital sampling of the phoswich signals, the feasibility of particle identification on the sampled data is demonstrated. The results obtained with two different pulse shape discrimination analyses based on the digitally sampled data are compared with the standard analog signal treatment. The obtained results suggest, for the present application, the replacement of the analog methods with the digital sampling technique

  18. Principles and applications of a neutral current detector for neutrino physics and astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukier, A.; Stodolsky, L.

    1982-01-01

    We study neutrino detection through the elastic scattering of neutrinos on nuclei and identification of the recoil energy. The very large value of the cross section compared to previous methods indicates a detector would be relatively light and suggests the possibility of a true 'neutrino observatory'. We examine a realization in terms of the superconducting grain idea, which appears in principle feasible through extension and extrapolation of presently known techniques. Such a detector would permit determination of the neutrino spectrum and should be intensive to neutrino oscillations. Various applications and tests are discussed, including spallation sources, reactors, supernovas, solar and terrestrial neutrinos. A supernova would permit a simple determination of the number of neutrinos and their masses, while for solar neutrinos rates of thousands of S.N.U. are theoretically attainable. A preliminary estimate of the most difficult backgrounds is attempted. (orig.)

  19. Development of the online data reduction system and feasibility studies of 6-layer tracking for the Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchow, David

    2015-04-24

    The Belle II experiment, the upgrade of the Belle experiment, at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) in Tsukuba, Japan, will be built to answer fundamental questions that are not covered by the Standard Model of particle physics. For this reason, decays should be observed with high precision. To be able to measure all decay products with a very accurate vertex resolution, it was decided to add a Pixel Detector (PXD) with an inner radius of only 14 mm in short distance around the beam (outer radius 12.5 mm). This increases the vertex resolution and it is possible to improve the reconstruction efficiency and accuracy. Because of the short distance to the interaction point, we expect to have a background induced occupancy of up to 3% on the pixel detector. This generates an expected data rate of about 20 GB/s and exceeds the bandwidth limitations of the data storage. Based on hits in the outer detectors, back projections of particle tracks are performed and Region of Interests (ROI) on the PXD sensors are calculated. Based on those ROIs the data are reduced. In this thesis I present my development of the ROI based data reduction algorithm as well as my feasibility studies about a future 6-layer tracking. Online Data Reduction for Belle II A first test with the whole DAQ integration and prototype sensors of PXD and SVD had been performed at DESY. For the verification of the ROI selection logic a full recording of in- and output data was included. With this setup I recorded 1.2.10{sup 6} events containing in total 4.8.10{sup 8} hits. The occupancy of originally ∼ 0.80% was reduced with my ROI selection logic by a factor of 6.9 to ∼ 0.12% by rejecting all hits outside any ROI. In addition I investigated the ROI positioning and got a result of a distance between ROI center and hit of 17.624±0.029 with a main offset direction of (π)/(2) and (3π)/(2). With a more accurate position of the ROIs their size could be reduced which would optimize the

  20. Department of Radiation Detectors - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekoszewski, J.

    1997-01-01

    Work carried out in 1996 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. The Departamental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors, adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments. These objectives were accomplished in 1996 by: research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. a spherical set of particle detectors silicon ball), detectors for particle identification), development of technology of high-resistivity silicon detectors HRSi (grant proposal), development of thermoelectric cooling systems (grant proposal), research on p-i-n photodiode-based personal dosimeters, study of applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. The Department conducts research on the design and technology involved in producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. Various tube models and their power supplies were developed. Some work has also been devoted to the detection and dosimetry of X-rays. X-ray tube generators are applied to non-destructive testing and are components of analytical systems such as: X-ray fluorescence chemical composition analysis, gauges of layer thickness and composition stress measurements, on-line control of processes, others where an X-ray tube may replace a radio-isotope source. In 1996, the Department: reviewed the domestic demand for X-ray generators, developed an X-ray generator for diagnosis of ostheroporosis of human limbs, prepared a grant proposal for the development of a new instrument for radiotherapy, the so-called needle-like X-ray tube. (author)

  1. Department of Radiation Detectors - Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekoszewski, J. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Work carried out in 1996 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. The Departamental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors, adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments. These objectives were accomplished in 1996 by: research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. a spherical set of particle detectors silicon ball), detectors for particle identification), development of technology of high-resistivity silicon detectors HRSi (grant proposal), development of thermoelectric cooling systems (grant proposal), research on p-i-n photodiode-based personal dosimeters, study of applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. The Department conducts research on the design and technology involved in producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. Various tube models and their power supplies were developed. Some work has also been devoted to the detection and dosimetry of X-rays. X-ray tube generators are applied to non-destructive testing and are components of analytical systems such as: X-ray fluorescence chemical composition analysis, gauges of layer thickness and composition stress measurements, on-line control of processes, others where an X-ray tube may replace a radio-isotope source. In 1996, the Department: reviewed the domestic demand for X-ray generators, developed an X-ray generator for diagnosis of ostheroporosis of human limbs, prepared a grant proposal for the development of a new instrument for radiotherapy, the so-called needle-like X-ray tube. (author).

  2. Instrumentation: Photodiode Array Detectors in UV-VIS Spectroscopy. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dianna G.

    1985-01-01

    A previous part (Analytical Chemistry; v57 n9 p1057A) discussed the theoretical aspects of diode ultraviolet-visual (UV-VIS) spectroscopy. This part describes the applications of diode arrays in analytical chemistry, also considering spectroelectrochemistry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), HPLC data processing, stopped flow, and…

  3. Studies and development of a readout ASIC for pixelated CdTe detectors for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalowska, A.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is part of a project where a new instrument is developed: a camera for hard X-rays imaging spectroscopy. It is dedicated to fundamental research for observations in astrophysics, at wavelengths which can only be observed using space-borne instruments. In this domain the spectroscopic accuracy as well as the imaging details are of high importance. This work has been realized at CEA/IRFU (Institut de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l'Univers), which has a long-standing and successful experience in instruments for high energy physics and space physics instrumentation. The objective of this thesis is the design of the readout electronics for a pixelated CdTe detector, suitable for a stacked assembly. The principal parameters of this integrated circuit are a very low noise for reaching a good accuracy in X-ray energy measurement, very low power consumption, a critical parameter in space-borne applications, and a small dead area for the full system combining the detector and the readout electronics. In this work I have studied the limits of these three parameters in order to optimize the circuit. In terms of the spectral resolution, two categories of noise had to be distinguished to determine the final performance. The first is the Fano noise limit, related to detector interaction statistics, which cannot be eliminated. The second is the electronic noise, also unavoidable; however it can be minimized through optimization of the detection chain. Within the detector, establishing a small pixel pitch of 300 μm reduces the input capacitance and the dark current. This limits the effects of the electronic noise. Also in order to limit the input capacitance the future camera is designed as a stacked assembly of the detector with the readout ASIC. This allows to reach extremely good input parameters seen by the readout electronics: a capacitance in range of 0.3 pF-1 pF and a dark current below 5 pA. In the frame of this thesis I have

  4. Study of charm quark fragmentation into D* mesons with the H1 detector at HERA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liptaj, Andrej

    2008-12-01

    In this work charm quark fragmentation into D * mesons is investigated in deep-inelastic electron proton collisions. This work is based on data collected in the years 2004 - 2007 by the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 354.1 pb -1 . Three observables denoted z jet ,z hem and z hem (jet) are measured, each of them meant to approximate the momentum fraction of the charm quark transferred to the D * meson. In case of z jet the quark momentum is estimated as the momentum of the D * jet, for the two other observables it is approximated by the momentum of an appropriately chosen D * hemisphere. The visible range is defined by the phase space requirements on the DIS events: Q 2 > 5 GeV 2 , 0.05 *± particles: 1.5 GeV T (D * ) * ) vertical stroke T (D * jet) > 3.0 GeV enters the phase space definition in case of z jet and z hem (jet) , where a reconstructed jet containing the D * meson is required. Within this phase space the normalized single differential cross sections are measured in bins of the three observables. Two Monte Carlo models, RAPGAP and CASCADE, both interfaced with the PYTHIA program for the Lund string fragmentation, are used to make predictions of the respective cross sections for different parametrizations (Peterson and Kartvelishvili) of the charm fragmentation function. The difference in cross sections between data and Monte Carlo model predictions for different values of the fragmentation parameter is quantified by calculating values of χ 2 in order to extract optimal parameters for the Peterson and Kartvelishvili parametrization. Using predictions from PYTHIA for e + e - annihilation optimal parameters are extracted also from the published BELLE and ALEPH data. The obtained results show that the H1 data allow the determination of the fragmentation parameters with a precision which is of interest. The extracted parameters are however found to apparently depend on the charm quark production energy: the z hem

  5. Some applications of the Helium Leak Detectors in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psacharopulo, A.

    1985-01-01

    The improved reliability and ease of operation of Helium Mass Spectrometer leak Detectors currently manufactured has dramatically widened the field of applications for these instruments. The authors describe here some applications: 1. Testing power plants steam condensers in operation; 2. Leak checking of underground pressurized cables or pipes. The field of applications of the Helium Leak Detectors is nowadays much larger due to the increased reliability and ease of operation of current instruments. This has allowed their use in several applications where the techniques used in the past were totally insufficient. The major benefits of the helium method are the very high sensitivity (up to 10 -1 std cc/sec, equivalent to 1 cm 3 every 300 years), fast response times, no operator judgement, possibility to adjust the sensitivity of the instrument to the requirements of the parts under test, and absolute selectivity for helium (no response to any other gas). To these benefits there has been recently the addition of better reliability, ease of operation, allowing unskilled operators to perform tests, no need for liquid nitrogen and finally the physical size of some instruments available today means that they can be easily carried around for on-site tests

  6. Application of the A/E pulse shape discrimination method to first Ge-76 enriched BEGe detectors operated in GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea; Agostini, Matteo; Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    In 2013 the Gerda experiment will be upgraded to its second phase with more than double of the current {sup 76}Ge mass. The additional diodes are custom made Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors. This design has been chosen to enhance the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability, with respect to the Phase I coaxial detectors. The goal of Phase II is to improve by one order of magnitude the current background index; the PSD will bring a major contribution to this result. Since summer 2012 the first set of five enriched BEGe detectors are operated in Gerda Phase I. This offers us the possibility to test the PSD performances and the signal analysis in an environment as close as possible to the Gerda Phase II configuration. In this talk I present the A/E analysis, the calibration of the cut parameters and the results in terms of background reduction for the data taken with these enriched BEGe.

  7. Commercial Applications at FRM II Based on Neutron Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstenberg, H.; Draack, A.; Kastenmuller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Due to its design as a heavy water moderated reactor with a very compact core FRM II, Germany's most modern and most powerful research reactor, offers excellent conditions for basic research using beam tubes. On the other hand it is equipped with various irradiation facilities to be used mainly for industrial purposes. From the very beginning of reactor operation a dedicated department had been implemented in order to provide a neutron irradiation service to interested parties on a commercial basis. As of today the most widely used application is Si doping. The semiautomatic doping facility accepts ingots with diameters between 125 mm and 200 mm and a maximum height of 500 mm. The irradiation channel is located deep in the heavy water tank and exhibits a ratio of thermal/fast neutron flux density of > 1000. This value allows the doping of Si to a target resistivity as high as 1100 Ωcm within the tight limits regarding accuracy and homogeneity specified by the customer. Typically the throughput of Si doped in FRM II sums up to about 15 t/year. Another topic of growing importance is the use of FRM II aiming the production of radioisotopes mainly for the radiopharmaceutical industry. The maybe most challenging example is the production of Lu-177 n. c. a. based on the irradiation of Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} to a high fluence of thermal neutrons of typically 1.5E20 cm{sup -2}. The Lu-177 activity delivered to the customer is in the range of 750 GBq. With respect to further processing it turned out to be a highly advantageous to have the laboratories of ITG, the company extracting the Lu-177 from the freshly irradiated Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} on site FRM II. Further irradiation facilities are available at FRM II in order to allow the activation of samples for analytical purposes or to irradiate samples for geochronological investigations using the fission track technique. Finally a project on the future installation of a facility dedicated to the irradiation of U-targets for

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  10. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00386283; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An o...

  11. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An outl...

  12. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector Upgraded for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butti, Pierfrancesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require high resolution, unbiased measurement of all charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system, notably quality of its offline alignment. ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL). Offline track alignment of the ATLAS tracking system has to deal with about 700,000 degrees of freedom (DoF) defining its geometrical parameters. The task requires using very large data sets and represents a considerable numerical challenge in terms of both CPU time and precision. The adopted strategy uses a hierarchical approach to alignment, combining local and global least squares techniques. An o...

  13. 3D monolithically stacked CMOS active pixel sensor detectors for particle tracking applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passeri, D; Placidi, P; Servoli, L; Meroli, S; Magalotti, D; Marras, A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we propose an innovative approach to particle tracking based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors layers, monolithically integrated in an all-in-one chip featuring multiple, stacked, fully functional detector layers capable to provide momentum measurement (particle impact point and direction) within a single detector. This will results in a very low material detector, thus dramatically reducing multiple scattering issues. To this purpose, we rely on the capabilities of the CMOS vertical scale integration (3D IC) technology. A first chip prototype has been fabricated within a multi-project run using a 130 nm CMOS Chartered/Tezzaron technology, featuring two layers bonded face-to-face. Tests have been carried out on full 3D structures, providing the functionalities of both tiers. To this purpose, laser scans have been carried out using highly focussed spot size obtaining coincidence responses of the two layers. Tests have been made as well with X-ray sources in order to calibrate the response of the sensor. Encouraging results have been found, fostering the suitability of both the adopted 3D-IC vertical scale fabrication technology and the proposed approach for particle tracking applications.

  14. Measurement and analysis of high energy radiation through activation detectors. Application in dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklavenitis, L.

    1967-10-01

    This work is concerned with the possibility of measurement and analysis of radiation fluences within objects of small volume submitted to a high energy proton beam. The first part, consecrated to the establishment of a method of analysis, comprises a detailed study of the radiation nature and energy spectra as well as of the various dosimetry methods. In order to select a group of detectors, high energy nuclear reactions were systematically studied and for some of them cross sections were measured or calculated: for example the cross section of the reaction 11 B (p,n) 11 C between 150 and 3000 MeV and of the reaction 34 S (p,2pn) 32 P between 50 and 3000 MeV. The second part is relative to the application of the fore-mentioned analysis to radiation within a tissue equivalent phantom irradiated by 3 GeV protons. This analysis is sufficiently detailed to allow the reconstitution of the absorbed doses, the dose equivalent and, contingent on a better knowledge of the dose due to heavy particles, the quality factors. It allowed also to follow the evolution of the various dosimetric data as a function of the depth inside the phantom and to verify calculations already done by other researchers. The comparison of the measured doses and the corresponding detector activities revealed the possibility that some detectors could give directly the absorbed dose, or even the dose equivalent, by a simple activity measurement. (author) [fr

  15. Applications of pixellated GaAs X-ray detectors in a synchrotron radiation beam

    CERN Document Server

    Watt, J; Campbell, M; Mathieson, K; Mikulec, B; O'Shea, V; Passmore, M S; Schwarz, C; Smith, K M; Whitehill, C

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors are being investigated as imaging devices for radiography and synchrotron radiation beam applications. Based on previous work in the CERN RD19 and the UK IMPACT collaborations, a photon counting GaAs pixel detector (PCD) has been used in an X-ray powder diffraction experiment. The device consists of a 200 mu m thick SI-LEC GaAs detector patterned in a 64*64 array of 170 mu m pitch square pixels, bump-bonded to readout electronics operating in single photon counting mode. Intensity peaks in the powder diffraction pattern of KNbO/sub 3/ have been resolved and compared with results using the standard scintillator, and a PCD predecessor (the Omega 3). The PCD shows improved speed, dynamic range, 2-D information and comparable spatial resolution to the standard scintillator based systems. It also overcomes the severe dead time limitations of the Omega 3 by using a shutter based acquisition mode. A brief demonstration of the possibilities of the system for dental radiography and...

  16. Life test of the InGaAs focal plane arrays detector for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xian-Liang; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Li, Xue; Huang, Zhang-Cheng; Gong, Hai-Mei

    2017-08-01

    The short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) InGaAs focal plane array (FPA) detector consists of infrared detector chip, readout integrated circuit (ROIC), and flip-chip bonding interconnection by Indium bump. In order to satisfy space application requirements for failure rates or Mean Time to Failure (MTTF), which can only be demonstrated with the large number of detectors manufactured, the single pixel in InGaAs FPAs was chosen as the research object in this paper. The constant-stress accelerated life tests were carried out at 70°C 80°C 90°C and100°C. The failed pixels increased gradually during more than 14000 hours at each elevated temperatures. From the random failure data the activation energy was estimated to be 0.46eV, and the average lifetime of a single pixel in InGaAs FPAs was estimated to be longer than 1E+7h at the practical operating temperature (5°C).

  17. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Λb Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce Λb baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the Λb baryon in the semileptonic channel Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$ μ- $\\bar{v}$μ. In total 186 pb-1 of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 Λb candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of Λb baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the Λb is measured to be τ = 1.29 ± 0.11(stat.) ± 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of cτ = 387 ± 33(stat.) ± 21 (syst.) μm.

  18. Evaluation of radiation tolerance of FETs used for Astro-E2 hard X-ray detector (HXD-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takeshi; Niko, Hisako; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Kawaharada, Madoka; Takahashi, Isao; Miyasaka, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the radiation tolerance of three types of metal-can MOS Field Effect Transistors (FETs). They are candidates for flight electronics of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD-II) experiment which is onboard the cosmic X-ray satellite Astro-E2 scheduled for launch in 2005. We irradiated FETs with a Co60γ-ray source under several different experimental conditions, and measured changes in their I-V characteristic curves. After a 10krad irradiation during which the gate voltage is set at 0V, all types showed a decrease in the switching voltage by ∼0.2-0.4V. In addition, the gate conductance increased under some irradiation conditions. These experimental results may be explained in terms of trapped charges and boundary levels in the oxide layer beneath the gate electrode. We have confirmed that at least two types of FETs can be used in our satellite-borne experiment, one as relay-driving FETs and the other in TTL-ECL conversion circuits

  19. Search for the Higgs Boson in the All-Hadronic Final State Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, Francesco [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports the result of a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in events containing four reconstructed jets associated with quarks. For masses below 135 GeV/c2, the Higgs boson decays to bottom-antibottom quark pairs are dominant and result primarily in two hadronic jets. An additional two jets can be produced in the hadronic decay of a W or Z boson produced in association with the Higgs boson, or from the incoming quarks that produced the Higgs boson through the vector boson fusion process. The search is performed using a sample of s = sqrt(1.96) TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb-1 recorded by the CDF II detector. The data are in agreement with the background model and 95% credibility level upper limits on Higgs boson production are set as a function of the Higgs boson mass. The median expected (observed) limit for a 125 GeV/c2 Higgs boson is 11.0 (9.0) times the predicted standard model rate.

  20. Proceedings of the twentieth national conference on solid state nuclear track detectors and their applications: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) - A class of passive detectors, developed by R.L. Fleischer, P.B. Price and R.M. Walker in the early 1960s have found numerous applications in various fields of science and technology. SSNTDs have been recognized as very potential and effective tools in exploring various areas of research. The intrinsic features of SSNTDs like low cost , availability, versatility and their remarkable stability have contributed to applications in a wide range of fields opening up new vistas which were practically unthinkable and unbelievable about a decade or two ago. Apart from the direct applications of far reaching consequences in nuclear physics, other areas as diverse as bio-medical sciences, cosmic rays and space physics, environmental research, geochronology and geophysics, materials sciences, lunar science, meteorites and tektites; microanalysis, mine safety, nuclear technology, uranium prospecting and most recently nano/micro technology etc., have been greatly influenced by SSNTDs. They have a very important role to play in radiation measurement, micro technology and dosimetry and thus are potential enough in spreading awareness about the radiation environment and its impact on the general public and the academic peers. In order to disseminate the knowledge generated in this fast growing field, there is a need to bring material science and radiation community on a common platform and discuss various operational and radiation protection aspects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina substrate. The charge cloud is matched to the anode period so that it is collected on several neighboring fingers to ensure an accurate event charge centroid can be determined. Each finger of the anode is connected to a low noise charge sensitive amplifier and followed by subsequent A/D conversion of individual strip charge values and a hardware centroid determination of better than 1/100 of a strip are possible. Recently we have commissioned a full 32 x 32 mm XS open face laboratory detector and demonstrated excellent resolution (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NASA and NSF we are developing high rate (>107 Hz) XS encoding electronics that will encode temporally simultaneous

  2. Application of Earthquake Subspace Detectors at Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes, Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, P.; Benz, H.; Yeck, W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the capabilities of earthquake subspace detectors for detailed cataloging and tracking of seismicity in a number of regions and settings. We are exploring the application of subspace detectors at the United States Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) to analyze seismicity at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes. Elevated levels of microseismicity and occasional swarms of earthquakes associated with active volcanism here present cataloging challenges due the sheer numbers of earthquakes and an intrinsically low signal-to-noise environment featuring oceanic microseism and volcanic tremor in the ambient seismic background. With high-quality continuous recording of seismic data at HVO, we apply subspace detectors (Harris and Dodge, 2011, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., doi: 10.1785/0120100103) during intervals of noteworthy seismicity. Waveform templates are drawn from Magnitude 2 and larger earthquakes within clusters of earthquakes cataloged in the HVO seismic database. At Kilauea, we focus on seismic swarms in the summit caldera region where, despite continuing eruptions from vents in the summit region and in the east rift zone, geodetic measurements reflect a relatively inflated volcanic state. We also focus on seismicity beneath and adjacent to Mauna Loa's summit caldera that appears to be associated with geodetic expressions of gradual volcanic inflation, and where precursory seismicity clustered prior to both Mauna Loa's most recent eruptions in 1975 and 1984. We recover several times more earthquakes with the subspace detectors - down to roughly 2 magnitude units below the templates, based on relative amplitudes - compared to the numbers of cataloged earthquakes. The increased numbers of detected earthquakes in these clusters, and the ability to associate and locate them, allow us to infer details of the spatial and temporal distributions and possible variations in stresses within these key regions of the volcanoes.

  3. A 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction soft X-ray detector for environmental science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Green, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    We are operating a superconducting tunnel junction detector for high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. We have recently upgraded the instrument from 9 to 36 pixels for increased sensitivity. We have also acquired a new digital signal readout to increase the total count rate capabilities to ∼10 6 counts/s while maintaining a high peak-to-background ratio. We report on the performance of the spectrometer, and discuss speciation measurements of chromium in welding aerosols as a typical application of the instrument in environmental science

  4. A BGO detector array and its application in intermediate energy heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuyu; Jin Genming; He Zhiyong; Duan Limin; Wu Heyu; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng; Zhang Baoguo; Wen Wanxin; Dai Guangxi

    1996-01-01

    A BGO crystal (Bi 4 Ge 3 O 12 ) as the E detector of ΔE-E for identification of reaction products has been used for detecting the charged particles emitting from the 25 MeV 40 Ar induced reaction. The responses of the BGO crystal to various light charged particles were measured. A close-packed hexagonal array consisting of thirteen ΔE-E telescopes (Si-BGO) has been developed to detect the light charged particles interfering with each other in intermediate-energy heavy-ion induced reactions. Some applications of this telescope array are also described. (orig.)

  5. Update of X- and γ-ray decay data standards for detector calibration and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Nichols, A.L.

    2002-12-01

    The Third Research Co-ordination Meeting to Update X- and γ-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration and Other Applications was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna from 21 to 24 October 2002. A primary aim of ths meeting was to review progress in the evaluation and recommendation of the specified decay data. CRP participants reviewed the status of their evaluations, as agreed at the previous meetings, and demonstrated that good progress had been made. Details of the content and presentational format of the recommended database were agreed, with an aim of completion by the end of 2002 and publication of the IAEA-TECDOC report in 2003. (author)

  6. Growth, characterization and properties of CVD diamond films for applications as radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciorti, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the work is to give a picture of the current state of the art of CVD (chemical vapour deposition) diamond. The interest is due to the capability to grow over large areas a material with physical properties suitable for an impressive number of applications. The authors focuses on the potential of diamond as a radiation detector and gets into details of the huge field that extends from the thermochemistry of the deposition process to the test of a diamond-based tracker with a fast readout electronics

  7. A 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction soft X-ray detector for environmental science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Advanced Detector Group, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov; Drury, Owen B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Advanced Detector Group, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cramer, Stephen P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Green, Peter G. [University of California Davis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We are operating a superconducting tunnel junction detector for high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. We have recently upgraded the instrument from 9 to 36 pixels for increased sensitivity. We have also acquired a new digital signal readout to increase the total count rate capabilities to {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s while maintaining a high peak-to-background ratio. We report on the performance of the spectrometer, and discuss speciation measurements of chromium in welding aerosols as a typical application of the instrument in environmental science.

  8. Evaluations of the commercial spectrometer systems for safeguards applications using the germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, D.T.

    1998-01-01

    Safeguards applications require the best spectrometer systems with excellent resolution, stability, and throughput. Instruments must perform well in all the situations and environments. Data communication to the computer should be convenient, fast, and reliable. The software should have all the necessary tools and be ease to use. Portable systems should be small in size, lightweight, and have a long battery life. Nine commercially available spectrometer systems are tested with both the planar and coaxial germanium detectors. Considering the performance of the Digital Signal Processors (DSP), digital-based spectroscopy may be the future of gamma-ray spectroscopy

  9. A digital data acquisition scheme for SPECT and PET small animal imaging detectors for Theranostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, M.; Fysikopoulos, E.; Loudos, G.

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticle based drug delivery is considered as a new, promising technology for the efficient treatment of various diseases. When nanoparticles are radiolabelled it is possible to image them, using molecular imaging techniques. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia is one of the most promising nanomedicine directions and requires the accurate, non-invasive, monitoring of temperature increase and drug release. The combination of imaging and therapy has opened the very promising Theranostics domain. In this work, we present a digital data acquisition scheme for nuclear medicine dedicated detectors for Theranostic applications.

  10. Applications of a pnCCD detector coupled to columnar structure CsI(Tl) scintillator system in ultra high energy X-ray Laue diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokr, M.; Schlosser, D.; Abboud, A.; Algashi, A.; Tosson, A.; Conka, T.; Hartmann, R.; Klaus, M.; Genzel, C.; Strüder, L.; Pietsch, U.

    2017-12-01

    Most charge coupled devices (CCDs) are made of silicon (Si) with typical active layer thicknesses of several microns. In case of a pnCCD detector the sensitive Si thickness is 450 μm. However, for silicon based detectors the quantum efficiency for hard X-rays drops significantly for photon energies above 10 keV . This drawback can be overcome by combining a pixelated silicon-based detector system with a columnar scintillator. Here we report on the characterization of a low noise, fully depleted 128×128 pixels pnCCD detector with 75×75 μm2 pixel size coupled to a 700 μm thick columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator in the photon range between 1 keV to 130 keV . The excellent performance of the detection system in the hard X-ray range is demonstrated in a Laue type X-ray diffraction experiment performed at EDDI beamline of the BESSY II synchrotron taken at a set of several GaAs single crystals irradiated by white synchrotron radiation. With the columnar structure of the scintillator, the position resolution of the whole system reaches a value of less than one pixel. Using the presented detector system and considering the functional relation between indirect and direct photon events Laue diffraction peaks with X-ray energies up to 120 keV were efficiently detected. As one of possible applications of the combined CsI-pnCCD system we demonstrate that the accuracy of X-ray structure factors extracted from Laue diffraction peaks can be significantly improved in hard X-ray range using the combined CsI(Tl)-pnCCD system compared to a bare pnCCD.

  11. A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS calorimeter system: detector concept description and first beam test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, D.

    2018-02-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) with instantaneous luminosities up to 7.5ṡ1034 cm-2s-1 will have a severe impact on the ATLAS detector performance. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction performance for electrons, photons as well as jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap and forward calorimeters for pile-up mitigation. This device should cover the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4.0. Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) technology has been chosen as it provides an internal gain good enough to reach large signal over noise ratio needed for excellent time resolution. The requirements and overall specifications of the High Granular Timing Detector at the HL-LHC will be presented as well as the conceptual design of its mechanics and electronics. Beam test results and measurements of irradiated LGAD silicon sensors, such as gain and timing resolution, will be shown.

  12. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E., E-mail: emoreno.emb@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Av. San Claudio y Rio Verde, Puebla (Mexico); Moreno Barbosa, F. [Hospital General del Sur Hospital de la Mujer, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  13. Investigation of the limitations of the highly pixilated CdZnTe detector for PET applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Sergey; Yin, Yongzhi; Wu, Heyu; Wen, Jie; Krawczynski, Henric; Meng, Ling-Jian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2012-11-21

    We are investigating the feasibility of a high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) insert device based on the CdZnTe detector with 350 µm anode pixel pitch to be integrated into a conventional animal PET scanner to improve its image resolution. In this paper, we have used a simplified version of the multi pixel CdZnTe planar detector, 5 mm thick with 9 anode pixels only. This simplified 9 anode pixel structure makes it possible to carry out experiments without a complete application-specific integrated circuits readout system that is still under development. Special attention was paid to the double pixel (or charge sharing) detections. The following characteristics were obtained in experiment: energy resolution full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) is 7% for single pixel and 9% for double pixel photoelectric detections of 511 keV gammas; timing resolution (FWHM) from the anode signals is 30 ns for single pixel and 35 ns for double pixel detections (for photoelectric interactions only the corresponding values are 20 and 25 ns); position resolution is 350 µm in x,y-plane and ∼0.4 mm in depth-of-interaction. The experimental measurements were accompanied by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to find a limitation imposed by spatial charge distribution. Results from MC simulations suggest the limitation of the intrinsic spatial resolution of the CdZnTe detector for 511 keV photoelectric interactions is 170 µm. The interpixel interpolation cannot recover the resolution beyond the limit mentioned above for photoelectric interactions. However, it is possible to achieve higher spatial resolution using interpolation for Compton scattered events. Energy and timing resolution of the proposed 350 µm anode pixel pitch detector is no better than 0.6% FWHM at 511 keV, and 2 ns FWHM, respectively. These MC results should be used as a guide to understand the performance limits of the pixelated CdZnTe detector due to the underlying detection processes, with the understanding of

  14. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  15. Ba anti Bar status report on the design of a detector for the study of CP violation at PEP-II at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Experiments designed to measure CP-violating asymmetries in the B meson system must emphasize exclusive state reconstruction with the highest possible resolution and efficiency. In the case of B 0 mesons produced in pairs at the Υ(4S) resonance at an asymmetric e + e - storage ring, this capability must be accompanied by precise vertex reconstruction in the direction of the e + e - beams (henceforth the z direction). These are difficult requirements, beyond the scope of any existing storage ring detector. The challenge of designing an asymmetric storage ring capable of producing the large number of neutral B meson pairs required to measure CP-violating asymmetries in decays to CP eigenstates has been handsomely met in the PEP-II design. As the first asymmetric e + e - storage ring, PEP-II presents a novel set of experimental challenges to a 4π detector. This Status Report describes the design of a new detector fully capable of exploiting the physics opportunities provided by PEP-II

  16. Ba{anti B}ar status report on the design of a detector for the study of CP violation at PEP-II at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    Experiments designed to measure CP-violating asymmetries in the B meson system must emphasize exclusive state reconstruction with the highest possible resolution and efficiency. In the case of B{sup 0} mesons produced in pairs at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring, this capability must be accompanied by precise vertex reconstruction in the direction of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams (henceforth the z direction). These are difficult requirements, beyond the scope of any existing storage ring detector. The challenge of designing an asymmetric storage ring capable of producing the large number of neutral B meson pairs required to measure CP-violating asymmetries in decays to CP eigenstates has been handsomely met in the PEP-II design. As the first asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring, PEP-II presents a novel set of experimental challenges to a 4{pi} detector. This Status Report describes the design of a new detector fully capable of exploiting the physics opportunities provided by PEP-II.

  17. Development of a stable and sensitive semiconductor detector by using a mixture of lead(II) iodide and lead monoxide for NDT radiation dose detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Y. J.; Kim, K. T.; Han, M. J.; Moon, C. W.; Kim, J. E.; Park, J. K.; Park, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, high-energy radiation has been widely used in various industrial fields, including the medical industry, and increasing research efforts have been devoted to the development of radiation detectors to be used with high-energy radiation. In particular, nondestructive industrial applications use high-energy radiation for ships and multilayered objects for accurate inspection. Therefore, it is crucial to verify the accuracy of radiation dose measurements and evaluate the precision and reproducibility of the radiation output dose. Representative detectors currently used for detecting the dose in high-energy regions include Si diodes, diamond diodes, and ionization chambers. However, the process of preparing these detectors is complex in addition to the processes of conducting dosimetric measurements, analysis, and evaluation. Furthermore, the minimum size that can be prepared for a detector is limited. In the present study, the disadvantages of original detectors are compensated by the development of a detector made of a mixture of polycrystalline PbI2 and PbO powder, which are both excellent semiconducting materials suitable for detecting high-energy gamma rays and X-rays. The proposed detector shows characteristics of excellent reproducibility and stable signal detection in response to the changes in energy, and was analyzed for its applicability. Moreover, the detector was prepared through a simple process of particle-in-binder to gain control over the thickness and meet the specific value designated by the user. A mixture mass ratio with the highest reproducibility was determined through reproducibility testing with respect to changes in the photon energy. The proposed detector was evaluated for its detection response characteristics with respect to high-energy photon beam, in terms of dose-rate dependence, sensitivity, and linearity evaluation. In the reproducibility assessment, the detector made with 15 wt% PbO powder showed the best characteristics of 0

  18. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer and flow meter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to Cherenkov and gaseous charged particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhroob, M.; Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Bozza, G.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Degeorge, C.; Deterre, C.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Favre, G.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Hasib, A.; Katunin, S.; Langevin, N.; Lombard, D.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; O'Rourke, A.; Pearson, B.; Robinson, D.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Strauss, M.; Vacek, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-03-01

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom microcontroller-based electronics, currently used in the ATLAS Detector Control System, with numerous potential applications. Three instruments monitor C3F8 and CO2 coolant leak rates into the nitrogen envelopes of the ATLAS silicon microstrip and Pixel detectors. Two further instruments will aid operation of the new thermosiphon coolant recirculator: one of these will monitor air leaks into the low pressure condenser while the other will measure return vapour flow along with C3F8/C2F6 blend composition, should blend operation be necessary to protect the ATLAS silicon tracker under increasing LHC luminosity. We describe these instruments and their electronics.

  19. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J.W. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Kim, J. [Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Park, H. [Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Allee, D.R. [Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85284 (United States); Quevedo-Lopez, M. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Gnade, B., E-mail: beg031000@utdallas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to {sup 3}He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10{sup −6} gamma-ray efficiency.

  20. The radiation gas detectors with novel nanoporous converter for medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, H.; Saramad, S.

    2018-02-01

    For many reason it is tried to improve the quantum efficiency (QE) of position sensitive gas detectors. For energetic X-rays, the imaging systems usually consist of a bulk converter and gas amplification region. But the bulk converters have their own limitation. For X-rays, the converter thickness should be increased to achieve a greater detection efficiency, however in this case, the chance of escaping the photoelectrons is reduced. To overcome this limitation, a new type of converter, called a nanoporous converter such as Anodizing Aluminum Oxide (AAO) membrane with higher surface to volume ratio is proposed. According to simulation results with GATE code, for this nanoporous converter with the 1 mm thickness and inter pore distance of 627 nm, for 20-100 keV X-ray energies with a reasonable gas pressure and different pore diameters, the QE can be one order of magnitude greater than the bulk ones, which is a new approach for proposing high QE position sensitive gas detectors for medical imaging application and also high energy physics.

  1. A 32-channel front-end ASIC for GEM detectors used in beam monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciriello, F.; Altieri, P. R.; Corsi, F.; De Robertis, G.; Felici, G.; Loddo, F.; Lorusso, L.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Stamerra, A.

    2017-11-01

    A multichannel, mixed-signal, front-end ASIC for GEM detectors, intended for beam monitoring in hadron therapy applications, has been designed and prototyped in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The analog channels are based on the classic CSA + shaper processing chain, followed by a peak detector which can work as an analog memory, to simplifiy the analog-to-digital conversion of the peak voltage of the output pulse, proportional to the energy of the detected event. The available hardware resources include an 8-bit A/D converter and a standard-cell digital part, which manages the read-out procedure, in sparse or serial mode. The ASIC is self-triggered and transfers energy and address data to the external DAQ via a fast 100 MHz LVDS link. Preliminary characterization results show that the non-linearity error is limited to 5% for a maximum input charge of about 70 fC, the measured ENC is about 1400e- and the time jitter of the trigger signal generated in response to an injected charge of 60 fC is close to 200 ps.

  2. Success and failure of dead-time models as applied to hybrid pixel detectors in high-flux applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobott, B. A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Schmitt, B.; Trueb, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Lee, V.; Peake, D. J.; Elbracht-Leong, S.; Schubert, A.; Kirby, N.; Boland, M. J.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Rassool, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    Detector response functionals are found to have useful but also limited application to synchrotron studies where bunched fills are becoming common. By matching the detector response function to the source temporal structure, substantial improvements in efficiency, count rate and linearity are possible. The performance of a single-photon-counting hybrid pixel detector has been investigated at the Australian Synchrotron. Results are compared with the body of accepted analytical models previously validated with other detectors. Detector functionals are valuable for empirical calibration. It is shown that the matching of the detector dead-time with the temporal synchrotron source structure leads to substantial improvements in count rate and linearity of response. Standard implementations are linear up to ∼0.36 MHz pixel −1 ; the optimized linearity in this configuration has an extended range up to ∼0.71 MHz pixel −1 ; these are further correctable with a transfer function to ∼1.77 MHz pixel −1 . This new approach has wide application both in high-accuracy fundamental experiments and in standard crystallographic X-ray fluorescence and other X-ray measurements. The explicit use of data variance (rather than N 1/2 noise) and direct measures of goodness-of-fit (χ r 2 ) are introduced, raising issues not encountered in previous literature for any detector, and suggesting that these inadequacies of models may apply to most detector types. Specifically, parametrization of models with non-physical values can lead to remarkable agreement for a range of count-rate, pulse-frequency and temporal structure. However, especially when the dead-time is near resonant with the temporal structure, limitations of these classical models become apparent. Further, a lack of agreement at extreme count rates was evident

  3. Application of PSpice circuit simulator in development of resistive plate chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yaping; Cai Xu

    2008-01-01

    An electrical model was presented for resistive plate chamber (RPC) detector. The readout signals of RPC detector were studied with PSpice simulation based on the model. The simulation results show a good agreement with real data and authoritative data. Physical performance of RPC detector can be predicted by the PSpice simulation, so this is an efficient means to optimize RPC detector's research and development. (authors)

  4. CdTe in photoconductive applications. Fast detector for metrology and X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzin, M.

    1991-01-01

    Operating as a photoconductor, the sensitivity and the impulse response of semi-insulating materials greatly depend on the excitation duration compared to electron and hole lifetimes. The requirement of ohmic contact is shortly discussed. Before developing picosecond measurements with integrated autocorrelation system, this paper explains high energy industrial tomographic application with large CdTe detectors (25x15x0.9 mm 3 ). The excitation is typically μs range. X-ray flash radiography, with 10 ns burst, is in an intermediate time domain where excitation is similar to electron life-time. In laser fusion experiment excitation is in the range of 50 ps and we develop photoconductive devices able to study very high speed X-ray emission time behaviour. Thin polycristalline MOCVD CdTe films with picosecond response are suitable to perform optical correlation measurements of single shot pulses with a very large bandwidth (- 50 GHz)

  5. Application of MSM InP detectors to the measurement of pulsed X-ray radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryc, L.; Dobrzanski, L.; Dubecký, L.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Riesz, F.; Slysz, W.; Surma, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 163, 4-6 (2008), 559-567 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : InP detector * X-ray detector * picosecond detector * laser plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.415, year: 2008

  6. Practical application of HgI2 detectors to a space-flight scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.; Albee, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric iodide X-ray detectors have been undergoing tests in a prototype scanning electron microscope system being developed for unmanned space flight. The detector program addresses the issues of geometric configuration in the SEM, compact packaging that includes separate thermoelectric coolers for the detector and FET, X-ray transparent hermetic encapsulation and electrical contacts, and a clean vacuum environment.

  7. Highly accurate determination of relative gamma-ray detection efficiency for Ge detector and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, H.; Mori, C.; Fleming, R.F.; Dewaraja, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    When quantitative measurements of γ-rays using High-Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors are made for a variety of applications, accurate knowledge of oy-ray detection efficiency is required. The emission rates of γ-rays from sources can be determined quickly in the case that the absolute peak efficiency is calibrated. On the other hand, the relative peak efficiencies can be used for determination of intensity ratios for plural samples and for comparison to the standard source. Thus, both absolute and relative detection efficiencies are important in use of γ-ray detector. The objective of this work is to determine the relative gamma-ray peak detection efficiency for an HPGe detector with the uncertainty approaching 0.1% . We used some nuclides which emit at least two gamma-rays with energies from 700 to 2400 keV for which the relative emission probabilities are known with uncertainties much smaller than 0.1%. The relative peak detection efficiencies were calculated from the measurements of the nuclides, 46 Sc, 48 Sc, 60 Co and 94 Nb, emitting two γ- rays with the emission probabilities of almost unity. It is important that various corrections for the emission probabilities, the cascade summing effect, and the self-absorption are small. A third order polynomial function on both logarithmic scales of energy and efficiency was fitted to the data, and the peak efficiency predicted at certain energy from covariance matrix showed the uncertainty less than 0.5% except for near 700 keV. As an application, the emission probabilities of the 1037.5 and 1212.9 keV γ-rays for 48 Sc were determined using the function of the highly precise relative peak efficiency. Those were 0.9777+0,.00079 and 0.02345+0.00017 for the 1037.5 and 1212.9 keV γ-rays, respectively. The sum of these probabilities is close to unity within the uncertainty which means that the certainties of the results are high and the accuracy has been improved considerably

  8. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O'Sullivan, Andrew W; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm 3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm 2 . Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/-0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  9. Application of PCT to the EBR II ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.; Johnson, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    We are evaluating the use of the Product Consistency Test (PCT) developed to monitor the consistency of borosilicate glass waste forms for application to the multiphase ceramic waste form (CWF) that will be used to immobilize waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR II). The CWF is a multiphase waste form comprised of about 70% sodalite, 25% borosilicate glass binder, and small amounts of halite and oxide inclusions. It must be qualified for disposal as a non-standard high-level waste (HLW) form. One of the requirements in the DOE Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) for HLW waste forms is that the consistency of the waste forms be monitored.[1] Use of the PCT is being considered for the CWF because of the similarities of the dissolution behaviors of both the sodalite and glass binder phases in the CWF to borosilicate HLW glasses. This paper provides (1) a summary of the approach taken in selecting a consistency test for CWF production and (2) results of tests conducted to measure the precision and sensitivity of the PCT conducted with simulated CWF

  10. A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeter system: detector concept description and first beam test results

    CERN Document Server

    Argyropoulos, Spyridon; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) with instantaneous luminosities up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm−2 s-1 will have a severe impact on the ATLAS detector performance. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction and trigger performance for electrons, photons as well as jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region, where the liquid Argon based electromagnetic calorimeter has coarser granularity compared to the central region. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters for pile-up mitigation at Level-0 (L0) trigger level and in the offline reconstruction. This device should cover the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4.2. Four layers of Silicon sensors are foreseen to provide a precision timing information for minimum ionizing particle with a time resolution better than 50 pico-seconds ...

  11. A High Granular Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeter system: detector concept description and first beam test results

    CERN Document Server

    Lacour, Didier; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) with instantaneous luminosities up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm−2 s-1 will have a severe impact on the ATLAS detector performance. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction and trigger performance for electrons, photons as well as jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region, where the liquid Argon based electromagnetic calorimeter has coarser granularity compared to the central region. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters for pile-up mitigation at Level-0 (L0) trigger level and in the offline reconstruction. This device should cover the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4.2. Four layers of Silicon sensors are foreseen to provide a precision timing information for minimum ionizing particle with a time resolution better than 50 pico-seconds ...

  12. Liquid chromatography automatic system with optical activity laser detector and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajer, V.; Naranjo, S.; Fernandez, H.; Mora, W.; Cepero, T.; Arista, E.; Mesa, G.; Cossio, G.; Arreche, J.; Fonfria, C.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    A new liquid chromatographic system with polarimetric detection and a computer program allowing the output of chromatograms to a display on line and electronic data storing was designed, built and put to work. The chromatographic system includes the laser polarimetric detector, having a measuring interval of one second, the chromatographic columns, the continuous flux polarimeter tubes of 50 and 100 mm, the programs for data acquisition, processing and storing, and the technical know-how for its most efficiently application. Thirty minutes is all the time needed to obtain a chromatogram by this method which is reasonably shorter than the time required for any other known comparable technique, and offering, besides, lower operation cost. The combination of molecular exclusion liquid chromatography and laser polarimetric detection has turned into a carbohydrate separation and quantification system of basic importance for the evaluation of plants fluids of industrial interest (sugarcane, agave, vegetable extracts, etc.). It is described here the application of this system as an early or complementary indicator of leaf scald -disease that affects sugarcane plants-. Another application on algae extracts gave good results in the separation and identification of biologically active components. The introduction of this system in several research centers in Cuba and abroad has resulted in practical information for the industry. (Author)

  13. Technology developments and first measurements on inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) for high energy physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carulla, M.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; IMB-CNM (CSIC); Flores, D.; IMB-CNM (CSIC); González, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Jaramillo, R.; Merlos, A.; Palomo, F.R.; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D.; Vila, I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The first Inverse Low Gain Avalanche Detector (iLGAD) have been fabricated at IMB-CNM (CSIC). The iLGAD structure includes the multiplication diffusions at the ohmic contact side while the segmentation is implemented at the front side with multiple P + diffusions. Therefore, iLGAD is P on P position-sensitive detector with a uniform electric field all along the device area that guarantees the same signal amplification wherever a particle passes through the sensitive bulk solving the main draw of the LGAD microstrip detector. However, the detection current is dominated by holes flowing back from the multiplication junction with the subsequent transient current pulse duration increase in comparison with conventional LGAD counterparts. Applications of iLGAD range from tracking and timing applications like determination of primary interaction vertex to medical imaging. The paper addresses the optimization of the iLGAD structure with the aid of TCAD simul...

  14. Uses of microchannel plate intensified detectors for imaging applications in the X-ray, EUV and visible wavelength regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, P.D.; Carter, M.K.; Pike, C.D.; Harrison, R.A.; Kent, B.J.; Swinyard, B.M.; Patchett, B.E.; Redfern, R.M.; Shearer, A.; Colhoun, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory photon counting detector (RALPCD) has been refined to meet project requirements for a flexible imaging arrangement with applications at X-ray, EUV and visible wavelengths. The basic detector design comprises commercially available high gain microchannel plate intensifiers fibre optically coupled to CID or CCD cameras, to form a modular detector arrangement with the appropriate RAL detection and centroiding software. Frames of data from the cameras are detected and centroided in a transputer or C40 parallel processor array where correction algorithms use look up tables to produce pattern free images at high resolution. Data from completed applications are used to illustrate the performance and future advances are discussed. (orig.)

  15. CHICSI [VersionII] - a proposal for a multi-detector ΔE-E particle telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the CHICSI project is to build a silicon ΔE-E telescope system for the measurement of charged ejectiles produced in violent heavy ion collisions in the CELSIUS storage ring. Of particular interest is the detection of intermediate mass fragments in order to investigate the behaviour of nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The present report gives a detailed specification of the CHICSI detector system, to a large extent based on consultations with detector - and electronics company experts. The operation in a storage ring environment requires special attention to the ultra high vacuum condition and target arrangements. The multidetector system will be operated in conjunction with other detector systems as the slow heavy ion recoil detector. 11 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Uncooled Radiation Hard Large Area SiC X-ray and EUV Detectors and 2D Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to design, fabricate, characterize and commercialize large area, uncooled and radiative hard 4H-SiC EUV ? soft X-ray detectors capable of ultra...

  17. Application of the pulse-shape technique to proton-alpha discrimination in Si-detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausch, G.; Moszynski, M.; Wolski, D.; Bohne, W.; Grawe, H.; Hilscher, D.; Schubart, R.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.

    1995-04-01

    The capability of the pulse-shape technique with reversed n-type Si detectors for discrimination of protons and alphas produced in fusion-evaporation reactions was tested at the VICKSI cyclotron in Berlin. We applied a zero-crossing technique which does not need any external time reference, and which can therefore be exploited at DC accelerators. Excellent proton-alpha discrimination in the full energy range of the evaporation spectra, but also charge and even isotope resolution for heavier ions produced in projectile fragmentation, was obtained with detectors of an existing Si ball. There is no doubt that the pulse-shape discrimination works well with detectors from serial production and under experimental conditions which are typical for nuclear structure studies. An application of this technique in Si detector arrays is obvious, but some special features must be considered in the design of the electronics. The particle discrimination depends strongly on the electric field distribution inside the detector. Stabilization of the bias voltage at the detector is therefore recommended. A consequence of the rear-side injection mode is a strong variation of the charge-collection time with energy, charge, and mass number of the detected ion. To obtain a precise energy signal it is indispensable to correct for the ballistic deficit. (orig.)

  18. A gas microstrip wide angle X-ray detector for application in synchrotron radiation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Mir, J A; Simmons, J E; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R; Dobson, B R; Farrow, R C; Helsby, W I; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Microstrip Detector has counting rate capabilities several orders of magnitude higher than conventional wire proportional counters while providing the same (or better) energy resolution for X-rays. In addition the geometric flexibility provided by the lithographic process combined with the self-supporting properties of the substrate offers many exciting possibilities for X-ray detectors, particularly for the demanding experiments carried out on Synchrotron Radiation Sources. Using experience obtained in designing detectors for Particle Physics we have developed a detector for Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies. The detector has a fan geometry which makes possible a gas detector with high detection efficiency, sub-millimetre spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a wide range of X-ray energy. The detector is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  19. Evaluation of slow shutdown system flux detectors in Point Lepreau Generating Station - II: dynamic compensation error analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, V.N.P.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Taylor, D. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    CANDU reactors are protected against reactor overpower by two independent shutdown systems: Shut Down System 1 and 2 (SDS1 and SDS2). At the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS), the shutdown systems can be actuated by measurements of the neutron flux from Platinum-clad Inconel In-Core Flux Detectors. These detectors have a complex dynamic behaviour, characterized by 'prompt' and 'delayed' components with respect to immediate changes in the in-core neutron flux. It was shown previously (I: Dynamic Response Characterization by Anghel et al., this conference) that the dynamic responses of the detectors changed with irradiation, with the SDS2 detectors having 'prompt' signal components that decreased significantly. In this paper we assess the implication of these changes for detector dynamic compensation errors by comparing the compensated detector response with the power-to-fuel and the power-to-coolant responses to neutron flux ramps as assumed by previous error analyses. The dynamic compensation error is estimated at any given trip time for all possible accident flux ramps. Some implications for the shutdown system trip set points, obtained from preliminary results, are discussed. (author)

  20. Prototyping of larger structures for the Phase-II upgrade of the pixel detector of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez Feito, Diego; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    For the high luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) it is forseen to replace the current inner tracker of the ATLAS experiment with a new detector to cope with the occuring increase in occupancy, bandwidth and radiation damage. It will consist of an inner pixel and outer strip detector aiming to provide tracking coverage up to |η|<4. The layout of the pixel detector is foreseen to consist of five layers of pixel silicon sensor modules in the central region and several ring-shaped layers in the forward region. It results in up to 14 m² of silicon depending on the selected layout. Beside the challenge of radiation hardness and high-rate capable silicon sensors and readout electronics many system aspects have to be considered for a fully functional detector. Both stable and low mass mechanical structures and services are important. Within the collaboration a large effort is started to prototype larger detector structures for both the central and forward region of the detector. The aspect of sy...

  1. Low‐cost flexible thin‐film detector for medical dosimetry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkai, C.; Han, Z.; Shulevich, Y.; Menichelli, D.; Hesser, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize dosimetric properties of thin film photovoltaic sensors as a platform for development of prototype dose verification equipment in radiotherapy. Towards this goal, flexible thin‐film sensors of dose with embedded data acquisition electronics and wireless data transmission are prototyped and tested in kV and MV photon beams. Fundamental dosimetric properties are determined in view of a specific application to dose verification in multiple planes or curved surfaces inside a phantom. Uniqueness of the new thin‐film sensors consists in their mechanical properties, low‐power operation, and low‐cost. They are thinner and more flexible than dosimetric films. In principle, each thin‐film sensor can be fabricated in any size (mm2 – cm2 areas) and shape. Individual sensors can be put together in an array of sensors spreading over large areas and yet being light. Photovoltaic mode of charge collection (of electrons and holes) does not require external electric field applied to the sensor, and this implies simplicity of data acquisition electronics and low power operation. The prototype device use for testing consists of several thin film dose sensors, each of about 1.5 cm×5 cm area, connected to simple readout electronics. Sensitivity of the sensors is determined per unit area and compared to EPID sensitivity, as well as other standard photodiodes. Each sensor independently measures dose and is based on commercially available flexible thin‐film aSi photodiodes. Readout electronics consists of an ultra low‐power microcontroller, radio frequency transmitter, and a low‐noise amplification circuit implemented on a flexible printed circuit board. Detector output is digitized and transmitted wirelessly to an external host computer where it is integrated and processed. A megavoltage medical linear accelerator (Varian Tx) equipped with kilovoltage online imaging system and a Cobalt source are use to irradiate

  2. Low-cost flexible thin-film detector for medical dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, P; Abkai, C; Han, Z; Shulevich, Y; Menichelli, D; Hesser, J

    2014-03-06

    The purpose of this study is to characterize dosimetric properties of thin film photovoltaic sensors as a platform for development of prototype dose verification equipment in radiotherapy. Towards this goal, flexible thin-film sensors of dose with embedded data acquisition electronics and wireless data transmission are prototyped and tested in kV and MV photon beams. Fundamental dosimetric properties are determined in view of a specific application to dose verification in multiple planes or curved surfaces inside a phantom. Uniqueness of the new thin-film sensors consists in their mechanical properties, low-power operation, and low-cost. They are thinner and more flexible than dosimetric films. In principle, each thin-film sensor can be fabricated in any size (mm² - cm² areas) and shape. Individual sensors can be put together in an array of sensors spreading over large areas and yet being light. Photovoltaic mode of charge collection (of electrons and holes) does not require external electric field applied to the sensor, and this implies simplicity of data acquisition electronics and low power operation. The prototype device used for testing consists of several thin film dose sensors, each of about 1.5 cm × 5 cm area, connected to simple readout electronics. Sensitivity of the sensors is determined per unit area and compared to EPID sensitivity, as well as other standard photodiodes. Each sensor independently measures dose and is based on commercially available flexible thin-film aSi photodiodes. Readout electronics consists of an ultra low-power microcontroller, radio frequency transmitter, and a low-noise amplification circuit implemented on a flexible printed circuit board. Detector output is digitized and transmitted wirelessly to an external host computer where it is integrated and processed. A megavoltage medical linear accelerator (Varian Tx) equipped with kilovoltage online imaging system and a Cobalt source are used to irradiate different thin

  3. Application of CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Imaging Corrosion under Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.

    2007-05-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) on the external wall of steel pipes is a common problem in many types of industrial plants. This is mainly due to the presence of moisture or water in the insulation materials. This type of corrosion can cause failures in areas that are not normally of a primary concern to an inspection program. The failures are often the result of localised corrosion and not general wasting over a large area. These failures can tee catastrophic in nature or at least have an adverse economic effect in terms of downtime and repairs. There are a number of techniques used today for CUI investigations. The main ones are profile radiography, pulse eddy current, ultrasonic spot readings and insulation removal. A new system now available is portable Pipe-CUI-Profiler. The nucleonic system is based on dual-beam gamma-ray absorption technique using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors. The Pipe-CUI-Profiler is designed to inspect pipes of internal diameter 50, 65, 80, 90, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Pipeline of these sizes with aluminium or thin steel sheathing, containing fibreglass or calcium silicate insulation to thickness of 25, 40 and 50 mm can be inspected. The system has proven to be a safe, fast and effective method of inspecting pipe in industrial plant operations. This paper describes the application of gamma-ray techniques and CdZnTe semiconductor detectors in the development of Pipe-CUI-Profiler for non-destructive imaging of corrosion under insulation of steel pipes. Some results of actual pipe testing in large-scale industrial plant will be presented.

  4. Application of CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Imaging Corrosion under Insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) on the external wall of steel pipes is a common problem in many types of industrial plants. This is mainly due to the presence of moisture or water in the insulation materials. This type of corrosion can cause failures in areas that are not normally of a primary concern to an inspection program. The failures are often the result of localised corrosion and not general wasting over a large area. These failures can tee catastrophic in nature or at least have an adverse economic effect in terms of downtime and repairs. There are a number of techniques used today for CUI investigations. The main ones are profile radiography, pulse eddy current, ultrasonic spot readings and insulation removal. A new system now available is portable Pipe-CUI-Profiler. The nucleonic system is based on dual-beam gamma-ray absorption technique using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors. The Pipe-CUI-Profiler is designed to inspect pipes of internal diameter 50, 65, 80, 90, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Pipeline of these sizes with aluminium or thin steel sheathing, containing fibreglass or calcium silicate insulation to thickness of 25, 40 and 50 mm can be inspected. The system has proven to be a safe, fast and effective method of inspecting pipe in industrial plant operations. This paper describes the application of gamma-ray techniques and CdZnTe semiconductor detectors in the development of Pipe-CUI-Profiler for non-destructive imaging of corrosion under insulation of steel pipes. Some results of actual pipe testing in large-scale industrial plant will be presented

  5. Eigendecomposition model of resistance temperature detector with applications to S-CO{sub 2} cycle sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifetz, Alexander, E-mail: aheifetz@anl.gov; Vilim, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Developed eigendecomposition model of resistance temperature detector (RTD) in a fluid. • Showed that RTD time constant primarily depends on the rate of heat transfer from the fluid to the outer wall of RTD. • Showed that RTD time constant can be calculated as the sum of reciprocal eigenvalues of the heat transfer matrix. • Calculated time constant of thermowell-mounted RTD sensor at the hot side of the precooler in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle. - Abstract: Super-critical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) is a promising thermodynamic cycle for advanced nuclear reactors and solar energy conversion applications. Dynamic control of the proposed recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle is accomplished with input from resistance temperature detector (RTD) measurements of the process fluid. One of the challenges in practical implementation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle is high corrosion rate of component and sensor materials. In this paper, we develop a mathematical model of RTD sensing using eigendecomposition model of radial heat transfer in a layered long cylinder. We show that the value of RTD time constant primarily depends on the rate of heat transfer from the fluid to the outer wall of RTD. We also show that for typical material properties, RTD time constant can be calculated as the sum of reciprocal eigenvalues of the heat transfer matrix. Using the computational model and a set of RTD and CO{sub 2} fluid thermo-physical parameter values, we calculate the value of time constant of thermowell-mounted RTD sensor at the hot side of the precooler in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle. The eigendecomposition model of RTD will be used in future studies to model sensor degradation and its impact on control of S-CO{sub 2}.

  6. Application of a-Si:H radiation detectors in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyoung-Koo.

    1995-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a proposed a-Si:H-based current-integrating gamma camera were performed. The analysis showed that the intrinsic resolution of such a camera was 1 ∼ 2.5 mm, which is somewhat better than that of a conventional gamma camera, and that the greater blurring, due to the detection of scattered γ-rays, could be reduced considerably by image restoration techniques. This proposed gamma camera would be useful for imaging shallow organs such as the thyroid. Prototype charge-storage a-Si:H pixel detectors for such a camera were designed, constructed and tested. The detectors could store signal charge as long as 5 min at -26C. The thermal generation current in reverse biased a-Si:H p-i-n photodetectors was investigated, and the Poole-Frenkel effect was found to be the most significant source of the thermal generation current. Based on the Poole-Frenkel effect, voltage- and time-dependent thermal generation current was modeled. Using the model, the operating conditions of the proposed a-Si:H gamma camera, such as the operating temperature, the operating bias and the γ-scan period, could be predicted. The transient photoconductive gain mechanism in various a-Si:H devices was investigated for applications in digital radiography. Using the a-Si:H photoconductors in n-i-n configuration in pixel arrays, enhancement in signal collection (more than 200 times higher signal level) can be achieved in digital radiography, compared to the ordinary p-i-n type a-Si:H x-ray imaging arrays

  7. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1990-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and X-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; i) classical semiconductor diode detectors and ii) semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. (orig.)

  8. Radiographic inspection. Film replacement with digital detector arrays in aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, Frank; Bavendiek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The new Digital Radiographic Inspection method replace more and more the conventional Film technique. For DDA (Digital Detector Array) systems it is currently necessary to use automated or semi-automated systems. For CR (Computer Radiography) Systems the conventional Film Systems may be used. For this CR technique operators can use same X-Ray Units (Bunker) and same X-Ray equipment. But on CR technique we have basically the same settings like the Film-based technique. More or less same exposure times and for aerospace application long scanning times for the CR foils. In fact there is no big benefit in capacity or in economical view. Regarding this issue we thought about the option to use a DDA System instead of a Film or CR System to use the current Film Equipment (Bunker, Generator, Tube.) and replace this 1:1 by a manual system. In this time only small detectors with fine pixel pitch was available on the market. With this type of DDA's is was absolutely uneconomical to inspect parts in serial inspection. Therefore a new generation of DDA's were developed, which is able to replace Film or CR System 1:1 with adequate economical properties for specific applications. The new PerkinElmer XRD 1611 Panel has a size of 40 x 40 cm and a pixel pitch of 100 μm. The baseline for the new DDA Panel was the most used X-Ray Film in size 30 x 40 cm. The Pixel Pitch and requirements for Bad Pixel based on the requirements for spatial resolution of the applicable ASTM standards and different customer specifications for castings. With this new DDA System is it possible to inspect small and medium castings in very short time with excellent image quality. The System is able to process images under 1 minute include averaging. Images will be transferred by a specific software tool to an offline reading station where certified Level 2 operator can inspect the images. Images will be archived as 16bit DICONDE File. All relevant images information are included in DICONDE File

  9. ATLAS ITk Short Strip Prototype Module with Integrated DCDC Powering and Control Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Tracker detector at the HL - LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Greenall, Ashley; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The prototype Barrel module design, for the Phase II upgrade of the of the new Inner Tracker (ITk) detector at the LHC, has adopted an integrated low mass assembly featuring single-sided flexible circuits, with readout ASICs, glued to the silicon strip sensor. Further integration has been achieved by the attachment of module DCDC powering, HV sensor biasing switch and autonomous monitoring and control to the sensor. This low mass, integrated module approach benefits further in a reduced width stave structure to which the modules are attached. The results of preliminary electrical tests of such an integrated module will be presented.

  10. Prototyping of petalets for the Phase-II upgrade of the silicon strip tracking detector of the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, S.; Benítez, V.; Fernández-Tejero, J.; Fleta, C.; Lozano, M.; Ullán, M.; Lacker, H.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Ariza, D.; Bloch, I.; Díez, S.; Gregor, I.; Keller, J.; Lohwasser, K.; Poley, L.; Prahl, V.; Zakharchuk, N.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Bernabéu, J.; Lacasta, C.; Marco-Hernandez, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz Contell, C.; Soldevila Serrano, U.; Affolder, T.; Greenall, A.; Gallop, B.; Phillips, P. W.; Cindro, V.

    2018-03-01

    In the high luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to reach unprecedented values, resulting in about 200 proton-proton interactions in a typical bunch crossing. To cope with the resultant increase in occupancy, bandwidth and radiation damage, the ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by an all-silicon system, the Inner Tracker (ITk). The ITk consists of a silicon pixel and a strip detector and exploits the concept of modularity. Prototyping and testing of various strip detector components has been carried out. This paper presents the developments and results obtained with reduced-size structures equivalent to those foreseen to be used in the forward region of the silicon strip detector. Referred to as petalets, these structures are built around a composite sandwich with embedded cooling pipes and electrical tapes for routing the signals and power. Detector modules built using electronic flex boards and silicon strip sensors are glued on both the front and back side surfaces of the carbon structure. Details are given on the assembly, testing and evaluation of several petalets. Measurement results of both mechanical and electrical quantities are shown. Moreover, an outlook is given for improved prototyping plans for large structures.

  11. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors II: performance tests on Advanced LIGO data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Jade; Heng, Ik Siong; Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Font, José A; Lynch, Ryan; Trifirò, Daniele; Cuoco, Elena; Cavaglià, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The data taken by the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors contains short duration noise transients that limit the significance of astrophysical detections and reduce the duty cycle of the instruments. As the advanced detectors are reaching sensitivity levels that allow for multiple detections of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources it is crucial to achieve a fast and accurate characterization of non-astrophysical transient noise shortly after it occurs in the detectors. Previously we presented three methods for the classification of transient noise sources. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), Principal Component LALInference Burst (PC-LIB) and Wavelet Detection Filter with Machine Learning (WDF-ML). In this study we carry out the first performance tests of these algorithms on gravitational-wave data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. We use the data taken between the 3rd of June 2015 and the 14th of June 2015 during the 7th engineering run (ER7), and outline the improvements made to increase the performance and lower the latency of the algorithms on real data. This work provides an important test for understanding the performance of these methods on real, non stationary data in preparation for the second advanced gravitational-wave detector observation run, planned for later this year. We show that all methods can classify transients in non stationary data with a high level of accuracy and show the benefits of using multiple classifiers. (paper)

  12. Performances of a HGCDTE APD Based Detector with Electric Cooling for 2-μm DIAL/IPDA Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumas A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on design and testing of an HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode (APD detector assembly for lidar applications in the Short Wavelength Infrared Region (SWIR : 1,5 - 2 μm. This detector consists in a set of diodes set in parallel -making a 200 μm large sensitive area- and connected to a custom high gain TransImpedance Amplifier (TIA. A commercial four stages Peltier cooler is used to reach an operating temperature of 185K. Crucial performances for lidar use are investigated : linearity, dynamic range, spatial homogeneity, noise and resistance to intense illumination.

  13. Applications of the Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) technology to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Garner, S.E.; Johnson, J.P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) systems are designed to monitor alpha contamination by measuring the number of ions in the air. Alpha particles are a form of ionizing radiation and a typical 5-MeV alpha particle will create about 150,000 ion pairs in air. Field tests at various DOE sites have shown that LRAD Surface Soil Monitors (SSM), Sample Monitors, and Object Monitors are faster and more sensitive than traditional alpha detectors for measuring alpha contamination. This paper discusses the various applications of LRAD technology to low-level radioactive waste management

  14. AWIPS II Application Development, a SPoRT Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Jason E.; Smith, Matthew; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is deploying its next-generation decision support system, called AWIPS II (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II). NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several software 'plug-ins' to extend the capabilities of AWIPS II. SPoRT aims to continue its mission of improving short-term forecasts by providing NASA and NOAA products on the decision support system used at NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs). These products are not included in the standard Satellite Broadcast Network feed provided to WFOs. SPoRT has had success in providing support to WFOs as they have transitioned to AWIPS II. Specific examples of transitioning SPoRT plug-ins to WFOs with newly deployed AWIPS II systems will be presented. Proving Ground activities (GOES-R and JPSS) will dominate SPoRT's future AWIPS II activities, including tool development as well as enhancements to existing products. In early 2012 SPoRT initiated the Experimental Product Development Team, a group of AWIPS II developers from several institutions supporting NWS forecasters with innovative products. The results of the team's spring and fall 2013 meeting will be presented. Since AWIPS II developers now include employees at WFOs, as well as many other institutions related to weather forecasting, the NWS has dealt with a multitude of software governance issues related to the difficulties of multiple remotely collaborating software developers. This presentation will provide additional examples of Research-to-Operations plugins, as well as an update on how governance issues are being handled in the AWIPS II developer community.

  15. CR-39 α track detector and its application in observing of the hot particles in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Benchuan

    1992-01-01

    CR-39 α track detector is a new α remitting radionuclides plastic detector. It is audio-visual, convenient and economic in the detection of α particle track and the distribution of α emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. CR-39 α track detector is used to observe the hot particles in rock and the hot particles coming from the liquid effluents discharged by spent fuel reprocessing plant in UK in marine environment and got good results

  16. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holub, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gao, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kulpin, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Oliva, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rose, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Towne, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  18. Direct liquid content measurement applicable for He II space cryostats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, M.

    1988-01-01

    A direct calorimetric method for content measurement in the He II cryostat ISO was assessed. A well defined heat pulse into the He II bath causes a small temperature increase which can be measured and directly correlated to the liquid mass through the He II specific heat. To study this method under the potential zero gravity constraints of disconnected liquid volumes a setup was established for investigating heat transfer between separated liquid volumes. The results for different fluid configurations confirm that even for completely disconnected volumes the heat is almost immediately distributed throughout the whole liquid by evaporation and recondensation

  19. Development of Ge/NbSi detectors for EDELWEISS-II with identification of near-surface events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juillard, A.; Marnieros, S.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Berge, L.; Collin, S.; Fiorucci, S.; Lalu, F.; Dumoulin, L.

    2006-01-01

    The actual limitation of Ge ionization heat cryogenic detectors for direct WIMP detection such as EDELWEISS arises from incomplete charge collection for near-surface events. We present results on Ge/NbSi detectors that are fitted with segmented electrodes and two NbSi Anderson insulator thermometric layers. Three such bolometers were studied in the low-background cryostat of the EDELWEISS collaboration in the LSM: analysis of the athermal signals allows us to identify and reject events occurring in the first millimeter under the electrodes

  20. Development of Ge/NbSi detectors for EDELWEISS-II with identification of near-surface events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juillard, A. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France)]. E-mail: juillard@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Marnieros, S. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France); Dolgorouky, Y. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France); Berge, L. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France); Collin, S. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France); Fiorucci, S. [C.E.A, Centre d' etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA, Gif. Yvette, Cedex 91191n (France); Lalu, F. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France); Dumoulin, L. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 108, Orsay Campus 91405 (France)

    2006-04-15

    The actual limitation of Ge ionization heat cryogenic detectors for direct WIMP detection such as EDELWEISS arises from incomplete charge collection for near-surface events. We present results on Ge/NbSi detectors that are fitted with segmented electrodes and two NbSi Anderson insulator thermometric layers. Three such bolometers were studied in the low-background cryostat of the EDELWEISS collaboration in the LSM: analysis of the athermal signals allows us to identify and reject events occurring in the first millimeter under the electrodes.

  1. Response of LR-115 type II and CR-39 plastic track detectors to Am-Be and 14.1-MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.A.; Chong, C.S.; Saat, Ahmat; Sidik, A.G.; Ghose, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The fast-neutron response of the plastic LR-115 type II and CR-39 track detectors have been compared, using a 14.1-MeV neutron generator and a radionuclide Am-Be neutron source (effective primary neutron energy 4.5-MeV). The distribution of track diameters for a range of etching times has been evaluated, taking into account track registration efficiency and the relevant fast neutron scattering cross-sections. The efficiency of etched-track formation in LR-115 type II due to neutron irradiation is approximately double that in CR-39. The 14.1-MeV neutrons also tend to produce tracks in both materials with somewhat greater efficiency than do the lower energy neutrons from the radionuclide source, for a given etching time. (author)

  2. Compact 2-Micron Transmitter for Remote Sensing Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort we propose to work with NASA to extend the Phase I achievements, which focused on design and development of very compact master and...

  3. Obtaining muonic density estimates via application of matrix formalism to proposed surface detector upgrade at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, David; Engel, Ralph; Roth, Markus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre Auger-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Event-by-event identification of cosmic ray primary composition lends itself to enhanced event selection in the search for anisotropic arrival directions. Principally, the number of muons reaching Earth's surface in an extensive air shower is indicative of composition. The Pierre Auger Observatory seeks to capitalize on this axiom by improving reconstructed muonic density estimates via an upgrade to its surface detector array. This upgrade, consisting of placing a scintillator on top of each existing water Cherenkov detector, exploits the differing response of two detectors to muonic and electromagnetic particles. Exploitation of this difference may be expressed in a matrix formalism whose application to simulated proton and iron showers is presented here.

  4. The use of 2D pixel detectors in micro- and nano-CT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Hoorebeke, Luc van; Jacobs, Patric; Masschaele, Bert; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Cnudde, Veerle; De Witte, Yoni

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography or CT is a non-destructive imaging technique that uses penetrating radiation (mostly X-rays) to visualize the internal structure of a sample. The best-known example is the medical CT scanner, which has become a standard diagnostic tool in medicine, providing detailed views of the body with spatial resolutions below 1 mm. In recent years another type of CT scanner has been developed for mostly industrial and scientific applications, namely micro-CT scanners. These reached spatial resolutions down to a few microns. During 2005 the Radiation Physics research group (Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics) and the Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology research group (Department of Geology and Soil Science) of the Ghent University jointly developed a modular micro-CT setup. The two main goals were to achieve a spatial resolution below 1 μm and to have a very versatile tool providing high-quality images. The source is a dual-head X-ray tube with a transmission type head with a nominal focal spot size of 900 nm below 40 kV tube voltage for high-resolution applications and a directional high-power head (up to 160 kV, up to 150 W), which enables scanning of larger samples. A six-axis sample manipulator system was assembled. The crucial component in this is an ultra-high-precision air-bearing rotation stage to keep all motion errors during rotation well below 1 μm. Depending on the application we have the choice between a number of detectors, each with its own advantages in terms of size, pixel resolution and energy sensitivity

  5. {sup 3}He Replacement for Nuclear Safeguards Applications- an integrated test program to compare alternative neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, H. O.; Henzlova, D.; Evans, L. G.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Marlow, J. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Safeguards Science and Technology Group, Los Alamos, (United States)

    2011-12-15

    During the past several years, the demand for {sup 3}He gas has far exceeded the gas supply. This shortage of {sup 3}He gas is projected to continue into the foreseeable future. There is a need for alternative neutron detectors that do not require {sup 3}He gas. For more than four decades, neutron detection has played a fundamental role in the safeguarding and control of nuclear materials at production facilities, fabrication plants and storage sites worldwide. Neutron measurements for safeguards applications have requirements that are unique to the quantitative assay of special nuclear materials. These neutron systems measure the neutron multiplicity distributions from each spontaneous fission and/or induced fission event. The neutron time correlation counting requires that two or more neutrons from a single fission event be detected. The doubles and triples neutron counting rate depends on the detector efficiency to the 2nd and 3rd power, respectively, so low efficiency systems will not work for the coincidence measurements, and any detector instabilities are greatly amplified. In the current test program, we will measure the alternative detector properties including efficiency, die-away time, multiplicity precision, gamma sensitivity, dead-time, and we will also consider the detector properties that would allow commercial production to safeguards scale assay systems. This last step needs to be accomplished before the proposed technologies can reduce the demand on {sup 3}He gas in the safeguards world. This paper will present the methodology that includes MCNPX simulations for comparing divergent detector types such as {sup 10}B lined proportional counters with {sup 3}He gas based systems where the performance metrics focus on safeguards applications.

  6. Study of a high spatial resolution {sup 10}B-based thermal neutron detector for application in neutron reflectometry: the Multi-Blade prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscitelli, F; Buffet, J C; Clergeau, J F; Cuccaro, S; Guérard, B; Khaplanov, A; Manna, Q La; Rigal, J M; Esch, P Van, E-mail: piscitelli@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), 6, Jules Horowitz, 38042, Grenoble (France)

    2014-03-01

    Although for large area detectors it is crucial to find an alternative to detect thermal neutrons because of the {sup 3}He shortage, this is not the case for small area detectors. Neutron scattering science is still growing its instruments' power and the neutron flux a detector must tolerate is increasing. For small area detectors the main effort is to expand the detectors' performances. At Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) we developed the Multi-Blade detector which wants to increase the spatial resolution of {sup 3}He-based detectors for high flux applications. We developed a high spatial resolution prototype suitable for neutron reflectometry instruments. It exploits solid {sup 10}B-films employed in a proportional gas chamber. Two prototypes have been constructed at ILL and the results obtained on our monochromatic test beam line are presented here.

  7. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run-II at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407702

    2016-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of the LHC. Taking advantage of the detector development period 2013 – 2014, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface to equip it with new service panels and to repair modules furthermore this helped with the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), fourth layer of pixel, installed in between the existing Pixel Detector and a new beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been used. A new readout chip has been designed with CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical perfor...

  8. Placement of HPGE detectors for whole body counting applications using simulations of voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzocchi, O.; Breustedt, B.; Zankl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The partial body counter at KIT is going to be rebuilt in order to replace the old Ge detectors with four new HPGe detectors. The new installation will also add whole body capabilities to the system, thanks to an improved mechanics able to position the detectors with a high degree of freedom in the chamber. During the definition of the position of the detectors a compromise between the opposite goals of high efficiency and small dependence of the detection efficiency on the position of the source had to be sought. High detection efficiency involves placing the detector near the skin, where the photon flux is maximal, while the second goal involves placing the detectors at a greater distance from the body. The same concept was applied during the definition of the partial body measurement configurations, but the goal was the increase of the specificity of the measurement. In addition, the mechanical installation poses some constraints: two detectors are mounted on carts and therefore can be placed independently around the subjects, but not in front of it, while the other two detectors are mounted on carts hanging from the same rail on the ceiling, therefore their distance from the subject is constrained by the maximum offset between them. (orig.)

  9. Si(Li) detector system for application to x-ray astronomy rocket experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, R.E.; Cheron, C.; Friant, A.; Jehanno, C.; Rocchia, R.; Rothenflug, R.; Testard, O.

    1975-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of Si(Li) detectors in x-ray astronomy rocket experiments are discussed. In particular a detector system is described that can be used at the focus of a grazing-incidence paraboloid telescope for the energy range 0.3 to 2 keV. (U.S.)

  10. Validation and uncertainty quantification of detector response functions for a 1″×2″ NaI collimated detector intended for inverse radioisotope source mapping applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N.; Azmy, Y.; Gardner, R. P.; Mattingly, J.; Smith, R.; Worrall, L. G.; Dewji, S.

    2017-11-01

    Detector response functions (DRFs) are often used for inverse analysis. We compute the DRF of a sodium iodide (NaI) nuclear material holdup field detector using the code named g03 developed by the Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) at NC State University. Three measurement campaigns were performed in order to validate the DRF's constructed by g03: on-axis detection of calibration sources, off-axis measurements of a highly enriched uranium (HEU) disk, and on-axis measurements of the HEU disk with steel plates inserted between the source and the detector to provide attenuation. Furthermore, this work quantifies the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulations used in and with g03, as well as the uncertainties associated with each semi-empirical model employed in the full DRF representation. Overall, for the calibration source measurements, the response computed by the DRF for the prediction of the full-energy peak region of responses was good, i.e. within two standard deviations of the experimental response. In contrast, the DRF tended to overestimate the Compton continuum by about 45-65% due to inadequate tuning of the electron range multiplier fit variable that empirically represents physics associated with electron transport that is not modeled explicitly in g03. For the HEU disk measurements, computed DRF responses tended to significantly underestimate (more than 20%) the secondary full-energy peaks (any peak of lower energy than the highest-energy peak computed) due to scattering in the detector collimator and aluminum can, which is not included in the g03 model. We ran a sufficiently large number of histories to ensure for all of the Monte Carlo simulations that the statistical uncertainties were lower than their experimental counterpart's Poisson uncertainties. The uncertainties associated with least-squares fits to the experimental data tended to have parameter relative standard deviations lower than the peak channel relative standard

  11. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-05-04

    One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

  12. Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions for nuclear radiation detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Luke, P.N.; Wang, N.W.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1996-10-01

    Results on characterization of electrical properties of amorphous Si films for the 3 different growth methods (RF sputtering, PECVD [plasma enhanced], LPCVD [low pressure]) are reported. Performance of these a-Si films as heterojunctions on high resistivity p-type and n- type crystalline Si is examined by measuring the noise, leakage current, and the alpha particle response of 5mm dia detector structures. It is demonstrated that heterojunction detectors formed by RF sputtered films and PECVD films are comparable in performance with conventional surface barrier detectors. Results indicate that the a-Si/c-Si heterojunctions have the potential to greatly simplify detector fabrication. Directions for future avenues of nuclear particle detector development are indicated

  13. Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions for nuclear radiation detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Luke, P.N.; Wang, N.W.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1996-01-01

    Results on the characterization of the electrical properties of amorphous silicon films for the three different growth methods, RF sputtering, PECVD, and LPCVD are reported. The performance of these a-Si films as heterojunctions on high resistivity p-type and n-type crystalline silicon is examined by measuring the noise, leakage current and the alpha particle response of 5 mm diameter detector structures. It is demonstrated that heterojunction detectors formed by RF sputtered films and PECVD films are comparable in performance with conventional surface barrier detectors. The results indicate that the a-Si/c-Si heterojunctions have the potential to greatly simplify detector fabrication. Directions for future avenues of nuclear particle detector development are indicated

  14. New Type Far IR and THz Schottky Barrier Detectors for Scientific and Civil Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Ivanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experimental investigation into a new type of VLWIR detector based on hot electron gas emission and architecture of the detector are presented and discussed. The detectors (further referred to as HEGED take advantage of the thermionic emission current change effect in a semiconductor diode with a Schottky barrier (SB as a result of the direct transfer of the absorbed radiation energy to the system of electronic gas in the quasimetallic layer of the barrier. The possibility of detecting radiation having the energy of quantums less than the height of the Schottky diode potential barrier and of obtaining a substantial improvement of a cutoff wavelength to VLWIR of the PtSi/Si detector has been demonstrated. The complementary contribution of two physical mechanisms of emanation detection—“quantum” and hot electrons gas emission—has allowed the creation of a superwideband IR detector using standard silicon technology.

  15. Development of GEM detector for plasma diagnostics application: simulations addressing optimization of its performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, M.; Malinowski, K.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Czarski, T.; Linczuk, P.; Wojeński, A.; Krawczyk, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    The advanced Soft X-ray (SXR) diagnostics setup devoted to studies of the SXR plasma emissivity is at the moment a highly relevant and important for ITER/DEMO application. Especially focusing on the energy range of tungsten emission lines, as plasma contamination by W and its transport in the plasma must be understood and monitored for W plasma-facing material. The Gas Electron Multiplier, with a spatial and energy-resolved photon detecting chamber, based SXR radiation detection system under development by our group may become such a diagnostic setup considering and solving many physical, technical and technological aspects. This work presents the results of simulations aimed to optimize a design of the detector's internal chamber and its performance. The study of the effect of electrodes alignment allowed choosing the gap distances which maximizes electron transmission and choosing the optimal magnitudes of the applied electric fields. Finally, the optimal readout structure design was identified suitable to collect a total formed charge effectively, basing on the range of the simulated electron cloud at the readout plane which was in the order of ~ 2 mm.

  16. A 0.18 μm CMOS fluorescent detector system for bio-sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Liu; Guoping, Chen; Zhiliang, Hong

    2009-01-01

    A CMOS fluorescent detector system for biological experiment is presented. This system integrates a CMOS compatible photodiode, a capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA), and a 12 bit pipelined analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and is implemented in a 0.18 μm standard CMOS process. Some special techniques, such as a 'contact imaging' detecting method, pseudo-differential architecture, dummy photodiodes, and a T-type reset switch, are adopted to achieve low-level sensing application. Experiment results show that the Nwell/Psub photodiode with CTIA pixel achieves a sensitivity of 0.1 A/W at 515 nm and a dark current of 300 fA with 300 mV reverse biased voltage. The maximum differential and integral nonlinearity of the designed ADC are 0.8 LSB and 3 LSB, respectively. With an integrating time of 50 ms, this system is sensitive to the fluorescence emitted by the fluorescein solution with concentration as low as 20 ng/mL and can generate 7 fA photocurrent. This chip occupies 3 mm2 and consumes 37 mW.

  17. A 0.18 μm CMOS fluorescent detector system for bio-sensing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Nan; Chen Guoping; Hong Zhiliang

    2009-01-01

    A CMOS fluorescent detector system for biological experiment is presented. This system integrates a CMOS compatible photodiode, a capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA), and a 12 bit pipelined analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and is implemented in a 0.18 μm standard CMOS process. Some special techniques, such as a 'contact imaging' detecting method, pseudo-differential architecture, dummy photodiodes, and a T-type reset switch, are adopted to achieve low-level sensing application. Experiment results show that the Nwell/Psub photodiode with CTIA pixel achieves a sensitivity of 0.1 A/W at 515 nm and a dark current of 300 fA with 300 mV reverse biased voltage. The maximum differential and integral nonlinearity of the designed ADC are 0.8 LSB and 3 LSB, respectively. With an integrating time of 50 ms, this system is sensitive to the fluorescence emitted by the fluorescein solution with concentration as low as 20 ng/mL and can generate 7 fA photocurrent. This chip occupies 3 mm 2 and consumes 37 mW.

  18. Development of microstrip gas chamber and application to imaging gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimori, T.; Minami, S.; Nagae, T.; Takahashi, T.; Miyagi, T.

    1992-07-01

    We have developed Microstrip Gas Chamber (MSGC) by using Multi-Chip technology which enables high-density assembly of bare LSI chips on a silicon board. Our MSGC was operated steadily with ∼ 10 3 gain more than one week. An energy resolution of 15% (FWHM) for 5.9 keV X-ray of 55 Fe was obtained. With very thin polyimide substrate of 16 μm thickness, two interesting phenomena were observed; one is a strong dependence of gains on the back plane potential, and the other is little time variation of gains. New type of MSGC with a guarding mask of a thin polyimide layer on the cathode edges has been examined to reduce incidental electrical discharges between anode and cathode strips. Furthermore, new approach to reduce the resistivity of the substrate has been examined. By these approaches, the stability of the high gain operation of ∼ 10 4 has been drastically improved. In addition, we discuss the possibility of the application of MSGC to the coded mask X-ray imaging detector for astrophysics. (author)

  19. The GBT-SCA, a radiation tolerant ASIC for detector control applications in SLHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, A; Kloukinas, K; Marchioro, A; Moreira, P; Ranieri, A; De Robertis, D

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the architecture of the GigaBit Transceiver – Slow Control Adapter (GBT–SCA) ASIC suitable for the control and monitoring applications of the embedded front-end electronics in the future SLHC experiments. The GBT–SCA is part the GBT chipset currently under development for the SLHC detector upgrades. It is designed for radiation tolerance and it will be fabricated in a commercial 130 nm CMOS technology. The paper discusses the GBT-SCA architecture, the data transfer protocol, the ASIC interfaces, and its integration with the GBT optical link. The GBT–SCA is one the components of the GBT system chipset. It is proposed for the future SLHC experiments and is designed to be configurable matching different front-end system requirements. The GBT-SCA is intended for the slow control and monitoring of the embedded front end electronics and implements a point-to-multi point connection between one GBT optical link ASIC and several front end ASICs. The GBT-SCA connects to a dedicated electrica...

  20. Measurements of hadronic B decays to excited-charm mesons, observation of a new charm resonance and construction of a silicon vertex detector for CLEO II.V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Timothy Knight

    We describe measurements of the branching ratiosmath> B(B --->D*+p- p-total) =(29.2+/-4.5+/-3.8+/-3.1) ×10-4 B(B- --> D*+p- p -non- res)=( 9.7+/-3.6+/-1.5+/-1.9)× 10- 4 B(B---> D1(2420) 0p-) B(D1( 2420)0--> D*+p- )= (6.9+1.8-1.4 +/-1.1+/-0.4)× 10-4 B(B---> D01( j= / )p- ) B(D01 (j= /) -->D* +p-) = ( 10.6+/-1.9+/-1.7+/-2.3)× 10-4 B(B---> D*2( 2460)0p- )B(D *2( 2460)0--> D*+p- )= (3.1+/- 0.84+/-0.46+/-0.28)×10 -4, using data collected by the CLEO II detector. These measurements provide the first observation of the D01(j=/) with a mass and width of 2.461+0.053- 0.049GeV and 290+110 - 91MeV respectively. The mixing angles between the partial waves and strong phase shifts among the resonances are also measured assuming one possible parameterization of the amplitude. A method allowing full reconstruction of the signal without reconstruction of the D meson in the final state is used. The measurements are extracted using an four-dimensional, unbinned, maximum- likelihood fit to the distributions of the D*+p- mass and the decay angles. The primary element of the CLEO II.V upgrade was the installation of a three-layer Silicon Vertexing Detector. The design and construction of this detector are described in detail.

  1. 3-D Spatial Resolution of 350 μm Pitch Pixelated CdZnTe Detectors for Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongzhi; Chen, Ximeng; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Garson, Alfred; Li, Qiang; Guo, Qingzhen; Krawczynski, Henric; Meng, Ling-Jian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    We are currently investigating the feasibility of using highly pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for sub-500 μ m resolution PET imaging applications. A 20 mm × 20 mm × 5 mm CdZnTe substrate was fabricated with 350 μ m pitch pixels (250 μ m anode pixels with 100 μ m gap) and coplanar cathode. Charge sharing among the pixels of a 350 μ m pitch detector was studied using collimated 122 keV and 511 keV gamma ray sources. For a 350 μ m pitch CdZnTe detector, scatter plots of the charge signal of two neighboring pixels clearly show more charge sharing when the collimated beam hits the gap between adjacent pixels. Using collimated Co-57 and Ge-68 sources, we measured the count profiles and estimated the intrinsic spatial resolution of 350 μ m pitch detector biased at -1000 V. Depth of interaction was analyzed based on two methods, i.e., cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time, in both 122 keV and 511 keV measurements. For single-pixel photopeak events, a linear correlation between cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time was shown, which would be useful for estimating the DOI information and preserving image resolution in CdZnTe PET imaging applications.

  2. Status of GENIUS-TF-II and TF-III-The long-term stability of naked detectors in liquid nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 10 39 80, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: H.Klapdor@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Krivosheina, I.V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 10 39 80, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    GENIUS-TF-II is a setup of six naked high purity Ge detectors (15kg) in liquid nitrogen in Gran Sasso. It has been installed in October, 2004-after the first four naked Ge detectors had been installed on May 5, 2003 (GENIUS-TF-I). The GENIUS-Test-Facility (GENIUS-TF) is the first and up to now only setup ever testing the novel technique aiming at extreme background reduction in search for rare decays in particular underground. The goal of GENIUS-TF was to test some key operational parameters of the full GENIUS project proposal in 1997 [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 13 (1998) 3953; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, J. Hellmig, M. Hirsch, GENIUS-Proposal, 20 November 1997; J. Hellmig and H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Z. Phys. A 359 ( 1997) 351 and nucl-ex/9801004; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, M. Hirsch, Z. Phys. A 359 (1997) 361; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, J. Hellmig, M. Hirsch, J. Phys. G 24 (1998) 483; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, CERN Courier, November 1997, pp. 16-18]. Simultaneous physical goal is to search for the annual modulation of the Dark Matter signal [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 481 (2002) 149; C. Tomei, A. Dietz, I. Krivosheina, H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 508 (2003) 343]. After operation of GENIUS-TF over three years with finally six naked Ge detectors (15kg) in liquid nitrogen in Gran Sasso we realize serious problems for realization of a full-size GENIUS-like experiment: (1) Background from Rn222 diffusing into the setup, on a level far beyond the expectation. (2) Limited long-term stability of naked detectors in liquid nitrogen as result of increasing leakage current. None of the six detectors is running after three years with the nominal leakage current. Three of the six detectors do not work any more at all. The results of our three years of investigation of the long-term stability may cast doubt on the possibility to perform full GENIUS-like projects.

  3. Status of GENIUS-TF-II and TF-III-The long-term stability of naked detectors in liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.; Krivosheina, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    GENIUS-TF-II is a setup of six naked high purity Ge detectors (15kg) in liquid nitrogen in Gran Sasso. It has been installed in October, 2004-after the first four naked Ge detectors had been installed on May 5, 2003 (GENIUS-TF-I). The GENIUS-Test-Facility (GENIUS-TF) is the first and up to now only setup ever testing the novel technique aiming at extreme background reduction in search for rare decays in particular underground. The goal of GENIUS-TF was to test some key operational parameters of the full GENIUS project proposal in 1997 [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 13 (1998) 3953; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, J. Hellmig, M. Hirsch, GENIUS-Proposal, 20 November 1997; J. Hellmig and H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Z. Phys. A 359 ( 1997) 351 and nucl-ex/9801004; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, M. Hirsch, Z. Phys. A 359 (1997) 361; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, J. Hellmig, M. Hirsch, J. Phys. G 24 (1998) 483; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, CERN Courier, November 1997, pp. 16-18]. Simultaneous physical goal is to search for the annual modulation of the Dark Matter signal [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 481 (2002) 149; C. Tomei, A. Dietz, I. Krivosheina, H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 508 (2003) 343]. After operation of GENIUS-TF over three years with finally six naked Ge detectors (15kg) in liquid nitrogen in Gran Sasso we realize serious problems for realization of a full-size GENIUS-like experiment: (1) Background from Rn222 diffusing into the setup, on a level far beyond the expectation. (2) Limited long-term stability of naked detectors in liquid nitrogen as result of increasing leakage current. None of the six detectors is running after three years with the nominal leakage current. Three of the six detectors do not work any more at all. The results of our three years of investigation of the long-term stability may cast doubt on the possibility to perform full GENIUS-like projects

  4. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer/flowmeter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to gaseous tracking and Cherenkov detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, R.; Berry, S.; Berthoud, J.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Botelho-Direito, J.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Bozza, G.; Da Riva, E.; Degeorge, C.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Lombard, D.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-01-01

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom electronics, currently in use in the ATLAS inner detector, with numerous potential applications. The instrument has demonstrated ~0.3% mixture precision for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures and < 10-4 resolution for N2/C3F8 mixtures. Moderate and high flow versions of the instrument have demonstrated flow resolutions of +/- 2% F.S. for flows up to 250 l.min-1, and +/- 1.9% F.S. for linear flow velocities up to 15 ms-1; the latter flow approaching that expected in the vapour return of the thermosiphon fluorocarbon coolant recirculator being built for the ATLAS silicon tracker.

  5. Progress towards vertical transport study of proton-irradiated InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice materials for space-based infrared detectors using magnetoresistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Mitchell C.; Morath, Christian P.; Fahey, Stephen; Klein, Brianna; Cowan, Vincent M.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice (T2SLS) materials are being considered for space-based infrared detector applications. However, an inadequate understanding of the role of carrier transport, specifically the vertical mobility, in the radiation tolerance of T2SLS detectors remains. Here, progress towards a vertical transport study of proton-irradiated, p-type InAs/GaSb T2SLS materials using magnetoresistance measurements is reported. Measurements in the growth direction of square mesas formed from InAs/GaSb superlattice material were performed using two distinct contact geometries in a Kelvin mode setup at variable magnetic fields, ranging from -9 T to 9 T, and temperatures, ranging from 5 K and 300 K. The results here suggested multi-carrier conduction and a field-dependent series resistance from the contact layer were present. The implications of these results and the plans for future magnetoresistance measurements on proton-irradiated T2SLS materials are discussed.

  6. SAGE Version 7.0 Algorithm: Application to SAGE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damadeo, R. P; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.; Iyer, N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) version 7.0 algorithm and how it is applied to SAGE II. Changes made between the previous (v6.2) and current (v7.0) versions are described and their impacts on the data products explained for both coincident event comparisons and time-series analysis. Users of the data will notice a general improvement in all of the SAGE II data products, which are now in better agreement with more modern data sets (e.g. SAGE III) and more robust for use with trend studies.

  7. Pay for Performance Proposals in Race to the Top Round II Applications. Briefing Memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    The Education Commission of the States reviewed all 36 Race to the Top (RttT) round II applications. Each of the 36 states that applied for round II funding referenced pay for performance under the heading of "Improving teacher and principal effectiveness based on performance." The majority of states outlined pay for performance…

  8. Comparison of morphological and conventional edge detectors in medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabi, Lotfi; Loloyan, Mansur; Huang, H. K.

    1991-06-01

    Recently, mathematical morphology has been used to develop efficient image analysis tools. This paper compares the performance of morphological and conventional edge detectors applied to radiological images. Two morphological edge detectors including the dilation residue found by subtracting the original signal from its dilation by a small structuring element, and the blur-minimization edge detector which is defined as the minimum of erosion and dilation residues of the blurred image version, are compared with the linear Laplacian and Sobel and the non-linear Robert edge detectors. Various structuring elements were used in this study: regular 2-dimensional, and 3-dimensional. We utilized two criterions for edge detector's performance classification: edge point connectivity and the sensitivity to the noise. CT/MR and chest radiograph images have been used as test data. Comparison results show that the blur-minimization edge detector, with a rolling ball-like structuring element outperforms other standard linear and nonlinear edge detectors. It is less noise sensitive, and performs the most closed contours.

  9. Application of CO II laser for removal of oral mucocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, J.; Moriya, K.; Hirai, Y.

    2006-02-01

    Mucocele is an oral soft tissue cyst caused by the disturbance of saliva flow. Mucocele is widely observed in child patients and recurrence is high. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of CO II laser irradiation in the case of mucocele. A CO II laser was used on 45 subjects, aged between 0 to 15 years, having mucocele on lip, lingual, or buccal mucosa. Our procedure in using CO II laser was not to vaporize the mucocele but to remove the whole mucocele mass. The border of mucocele was firstly incised by laser following defocusly ablating the root or body of mucocele separating from sorrounding tissue. As a result, mucocele was easily and completely removed without breaking the wall of mucocele. None of the cases required suturing. The results were as follows. 1. The mucocele of lip or lingual mucosa with a rich blood supply, was efficiently removed, without bleeding, giving a clear operative field during the operation. 2. The surgery itself was simple and less time-consuming. 3. After two or three weeks the wound was completely healed without almost any discomfort in all patients 4. Wound contraction and scarring were decreased or eliminated. 5. The reoccurrence of mucocele was not seen, except only in one case of lingual mucocele. In conclusion the use of CO II laser proved to be a very safe and effective mode for the removal of mucocele, especially in small children.

  10. Application of the GEANT3 geometry package to the description of the OPAL detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J; Brun, R; Bruyant, F; Zanarini, P; Bullock, F W; Hobson, P R; Chang, C Y; Dumont, J J; Hemingway, R J; McPherson, A C

    1987-10-01

    We present the general features of the GEANT3 package for coding the geometrical structure of a large and complex detector in the computer programs used for their design and analysis. This package has been developed in the context of Monte Carlo studies of detector performance but should be well matched to the problem of analysis. As a specific example, we illustrate the description of the OPAL detector for the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN and show the results of a sample study using this description.

  11. The application of an ultraviolet sensitive fire detector in a manned space vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, R. M. F.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a detector which is sensitive to the ultraviolet molecular emissions of flames and has been selected as the basic element of the NASA Skylab fire-detection system. This detector is sensitive to approximately 10 to the minus 12th watts of ultraviolet radiation and will detect small flames at distances in excess of three meters. Its response to a variety of burning spacecraft materials has been investigated both in one-gravity and zero-gravity. The results of experiments conducted in an aircraft flying zero-gravity parabolas in an attempt to simulate the characteristics of a fire which the detector must sense are cited.

  12. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  13. An application of the GEANT3 geometry package to the description of the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Bullock, F.W.; Hobson, P.R.; Lorazo, B.; Mallet, J.; Patrick, G.; Possoz, A.; Rossi, A.; Bologna Univ.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    We present the general features of the GEANT3 package for coding the geometrical structure of a large and complex detector in the computer programs used for their design and analysis. This package has been developed in the context of Monte Carlo studies of detector performance but should be well matched to the problem of analysis. As a specific example, we illustrate the description of the OPAL detector for the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN and show the results of a sample study using this description. (orig.)

  14. Amalgam Electrode-Based Electrochemical Detector for On-Site Direct Determination of Cadmium(II and Lead(II from Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Nejdl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toxic metal contamination of the environment is a global issue. In this paper, we present a low-cost and rapid production of amalgam electrodes used for determination of Cd(II and Pb(II in environmental samples (soils and wastewaters by on-site analysis using difference pulse voltammetry. Changes in the electrochemical signals were recorded with a miniaturized potentiostat (width: 80 mm, depth: 54 mm, height: 23 mm and a portable computer. The limit of detection (LOD was calculated for the geometric surface of the working electrode 15 mm2 that can be varied as required for analysis. The LODs were 80 ng·mL−1 for Cd(II and 50 ng·mL−1 for Pb(II, relative standard deviation, RSD ≤ 8% (n = 3. The area of interest (Dolni Rozinka, Czech Republic was selected because there is a deposit of uranium ore and extreme anthropogenic activity. Environmental samples were taken directly on-site and immediately analysed. Duration of a single analysis was approximately two minutes. The average concentrations of Cd(II and Pb(II in this area were below the global average. The obtained values were verified (correlated by standard electrochemical methods based on hanging drop electrodes and were in good agreement. The advantages of this method are its cost and time effectivity (approximately two minutes per one sample with direct analysis of turbid samples (soil leach in a 2 M HNO3 environment. This type of sample cannot be analyzed using the classical analytical methods without pretreatment.

  15. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) with SPU II card for Leak Detector Use Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, S.G.

    1999-01-01

    The following Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the ENRAF series 854 ATG with SPU II card prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies the gauge and alarms functionality

  16. Assessment of applicability of portable HPGe detector with in situ object counting system based on performance evaluation of thyroid radiobioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Seok; Kwon, Tae Eun; Pak, Min Jung; Park, Se Young; Ha, Wi Ho; Jin, Young Woo [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Different cases exist in the measurement of thyroid radiobioassays owing to the individual characteristics of the subjects, especially the potential variation in the counting efficiency. An In situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) was developed to perform an efficiency calibration based on the Monte Carlo calculation, as an alternative to conventional calibration methods. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of ISOCS to thyroid radiobioassays by comparison with a conventional thyroid monitoring system. The efficiency calibration of a portable high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was performed using ISOCS software. In contrast, the conventional efficiency calibration, which needed a radioactive material, was applied to a scintillator-based thyroid monitor. Four radioiodine samples that contained 125I and 131I in both aqueous solution and gel forms were measured to evaluate radioactivity in the thyroid. ANSI/HPS N13.30 performance criteria, which included the relative bias, relative precision, and root-mean-squared error, were applied to evaluate the performance of the measurement system. The portable HPGe detector could measure both radioiodines with ISOCS but the thyroid monitor could not measure 125I because of the limited energy resolution of the NaI(Tl) scintillator. The 131I results from both detectors agreed to within 5% with the certified results. Moreover, the 125I results from the portable HPGe detector agreed to within 10% with the certified results. All measurement results complied with the ANSI/HPS N13.30 performance criteria. The results of the intercomparison program indicated the feasibility of applying ISOCS software to direct thyroid radiobioassays. The portable HPGe detector with ISOCS software can provide the convenience of efficiency calibration and higher energy resolution for identifying photopeaks, compared with a conventional thyroid monitor with a NaI(Tl) scintillator. The application of ISOCS software in a radiation

  17. 3-Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane Modified Diatomite: Preparation and Application for Voltammetric Determination of Lead (II and Cadmium (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Quang Khieu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, functionalized diatomite was prepared by grafting of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS to diatomite (MPTMS-diatomite. The diatomite with thermal treatment from 100 to 700°C was functionalized by MPTMS under dry and humid conditions. The obtained MPTMS-diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravity-differential scanning calorimeter (TG-DSC, and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR. The results showed that an increase in treatment temperature seems to reduce the loading of MPTMS onto diatomite. The humidity of diatomite was favorable for the grafting of functional groups on the surface. The possible mechanisms of MPTMS loading to diatomite (MPTMS-diatomite were also proposed. The performance of a carbon paste electrode (CPE modified with MPTMS-diatomite in the simultaneous determination of Cd(II and Pb(II ions was addressed.

  18. Universal mobile electrochemical detector designed for use in resource-limited applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Hennek, Jonathan W; Kumar, Ashok A; Maxwell, E Jane; Fernández-Abedul, Maria Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2014-08-19

    This paper describes an inexpensive, handheld device that couples the most common forms of electrochemical analysis directly to "the cloud" using any mobile phone, for use in resource-limited settings. The device is designed to operate with a wide range of electrode formats, performs on-board mixing of samples by vibration, and transmits data over voice using audio--an approach that guarantees broad compatibility with any available mobile phone (from low-end phones to smartphones) or cellular network (second, third, and fourth generation). The electrochemical methods that we demonstrate enable quantitative, broadly applicable, and inexpensive sensing with flexibility based on a wide variety of important electroanalytical techniques (chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, and potentiometry), each with different uses. Four applications demonstrate the analytical performance of the device: these involve the detection of (i) glucose in the blood for personal health, (ii) trace heavy metals (lead, cadmium, and zinc) in water for in-field environmental monitoring, (iii) sodium in urine for clinical analysis, and (iv) a malarial antigen (Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2) for clinical research. The combination of these electrochemical capabilities in an affordable, handheld format that is compatible with any mobile phone or network worldwide guarantees that sophisticated diagnostic testing can be performed by users with a broad spectrum of needs, resources, and levels of technical expertise.

  19. SiPM application for a detector for UHE neutrinos tested at Sphinx station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iori, M.; Atakisi, I.O.; Chiodi, G.; Denizli, H.; Ferrarotto, F.; Kaya, M.; Yilmaz, A.; Recchia, L.; Russ, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the preliminary test results of the prototype detector, working at Sphinx Observatory Center, Jungfraujoch (∼3800 m a.s.l.) HFSJG – Switzerland. This prototype detector is designed to measure large zenith angle showers produced by high energy neutrino interactions in the Earth crust. This station provides us an opportunity to understand if the prototype detector works safely (or not) under hard environmental conditions (the air temperature changes between −25 °C and −5 °C). The detector prototype is using silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) produced by SensL and DRS4 chip as read-out part. Measurements at different temperature at fixed bias voltage (∼29.5 V) were performed to reconstruct tracks by Time Of Flight

  20. SiPM application for a detector for UHE neutrinos tested at Sphinx station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iori, M.; Atakisi, I. O.; Chiodi, G.; Denizli, H.; Ferrarotto, F.; Kaya, M.; Yilmaz, A.; Recchia, L.; Russ, J.

    2014-04-01

    We present the preliminary test results of the prototype detector, working at Sphinx Observatory Center, Jungfraujoch (~3800 m a.s.l.) HFSJG - Switzerland. This prototype detector is designed to measure large zenith angle showers produced by high energy neutrino interactions in the Earth crust. This station provides us an opportunity to understand if the prototype detector works safely (or not) under hard environmental conditions (the air temperature changes between -25 °C and -5 °C). The detector prototype is using silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) produced by SensL and DRS4 chip as read-out part. Measurements at different temperature at fixed bias voltage (~29.5 V) were performed to reconstruct tracks by Time Of Flight.