WorldWideScience

Sample records for detection mass spectrometry

  1. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Verena Taudte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR- like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR, although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX. This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis.

  2. Simultaneous mass detection for direct inlet mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, R.L.

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of analytical techniques for application in trace analysis has led to interest in practical methods for real-time monitoring. Direct inlet mass spectrometry (DIMS) has been the subject of considerable activity in recent years. A DIMS instrument is described which consists of an inlet system designed to permit particles entrained in the inlet air stream to strike a hot, oxidized rhenium filament which serves as a surface ionization source. A mass analyzer and detection system then permits identification of the elemental composition of particulates which strike the filament.

  3. Chiral recognition detected by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, M

    1997-01-01

    Detection of chiral recognition in various intermolecular interaction systems using mass spectrometry has become important for the modern fields of analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry due to the characteristic nature of the rapid method and the trace amount needed. This review presents the various methods for detecting and evaluating chiral recognition used primarily in fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Emphasis is put on fundamentals and applications of these methods for variously existing enantioselective intermolecular interaction systems.

  4. Bio-Aerosol Detection Using Mass Spectrometry: Public Health Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludvigson, Laura D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    I recently spent a summer as an intern at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I worked on a project involving the real-time, reagentless, single cell detection of aerosolized pathogens using a novel mass spectrometry approach called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS). Based upon preliminary results showing the differentiation capabilities of BAMS, I would like to explore the development and use of this novel detection system in the context of both environmental and clinical sample pathogen detection. I would also like to explore the broader public health applications that a system such as BAMS might have in terms of infectious disease prevention and control. In order to appreciate the potential of this instrument, I will demonstrate the need for better pathogen detection methods, and outline the instrumentation, data analysis and preliminary results that lead me toward a desire to explore this technology further. I will also discuss potential experiments for the future along with possible problems that may be encountered along the way.

  5. Bio-Aerosol Detection Using Mass Spectrometry: Public Health Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludvigson, L D

    2004-03-05

    I recently spent a summer as an intern at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I worked on a project involving the real-time, reagentless, single cell detection of aerosolized pathogens using a novel mass spectrometry approach called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS). Based upon preliminary results showing the differentiation capabilities of BAMS, I would like to explore the development and use of this novel detection system in the context of both environmental and clinical sample pathogen detection. I would also like to explore the broader public health applications that a system such as BAMS might have in terms of infectious disease prevention and control. In order to appreciate the potential of this instrument, I will demonstrate the need for better pathogen detection methods, and outline the instrumentation, data analysis and preliminary results that lead me toward a desire to explore this technology further. I will also discuss potential experiments for the future along with possible problems that may be encountered along the way.

  6. Rapid Detection of Irreversible Acetylcholineasterase Inhibitor by Mass Spectrometry Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡婷婷; 张立; 汪蓉; 梁晨; 赵武生; 傅得锋; 张玉荣; 郭寅龙

    2012-01-01

    Here we developed a rapid method to detect acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity by matrix-assisted laser de- sorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS) for screening irreversible AChE inhibi- tors. Due to its good salt-tolerance and low sample consumption, MALDI-FTMS could facilitate rapid detection, especially detection in real application. AChE activity was determined through calculating abundance of substrate and product in mass spectrometry. By this approach, we investigated the relation of organophosphorous (OP) con- centrations and AChE inhibition. Shown in different inhibition curves from different OP pesticides, enzyme inhibi- tions still kept good correlation with concentration of OPs. Finally, this AChE-inhibited method was applied to screen whole bloods of four decedents and discuss their death reason. In contrast to healthy persons, three of dece- dents showed low AChE activity, and probably died for irreversible AChE inhibitors. Through the following de- tecting in GC-MS/MS, the possible death reason of these three decedents was confirmed, and another decedent actually died for sumicidin, a non-AChE inhibitor. It demonstrated that screening irreversible AChE inhibitors by detecting enzyme activity in MALDI-FTMS provided fast and accurate analysis results and excluded another toxicants not functioning on ACHE. This method offered alternative choices for indicating the existence of enzyme inhibitors.

  7. Method for predicting peptide detection in mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Lars [West Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA; Petritis, Konstantinos [Richland, WA

    2010-07-13

    A method of predicting whether a peptide present in a biological sample will be detected by analysis with a mass spectrometer. The method uses at least one mass spectrometer to perform repeated analysis of a sample containing peptides from proteins with known amino acids. The method then generates a data set of peptides identified as contained within the sample by the repeated analysis. The method then calculates the probability that a specific peptide in the data set was detected in the repeated analysis. The method then creates a plurality of vectors, where each vector has a plurality of dimensions, and each dimension represents a property of one or more of the amino acids present in each peptide and adjacent peptides in the data set. Using these vectors, the method then generates an algorithm from the plurality of vectors and the calculated probabilities that specific peptides in the data set were detected in the repeated analysis. The algorithm is thus capable of calculating the probability that a hypothetical peptide represented as a vector will be detected by a mass spectrometry based proteomic platform, given that the peptide is present in a sample introduced into a mass spectrometer.

  8. Direct Detection of Biotinylated Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric strategies to identify protein subpopulations involved in specific biological functions rely on covalently tagging biotin to proteins using various chemical modification methods. The biotin tag is primarily used for enrichment of the targeted subpopulation for subsequent mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. A limitation of these strategies is that MS analysis does not easily discriminate unlabeled contaminants from the labeled protein subpopulation under study. To solve this problem, we developed a flexible method that only relies on direct MS detection of biotin-tagged proteins called “Direct Detection of Biotin-containing Tags” (DiDBiT). Compared with conventional targeted proteomic strategies, DiDBiT improves direct detection of biotinylated proteins ∼200 fold. We show that DiDBiT is applicable to several protein labeling protocols in cell culture and in vivo using cell permeable NHS-biotin and incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA), into newly synthesized proteins, followed by click chemistry tagging with biotin. We demonstrate that DiDBiT improves the direct detection of biotin-tagged newly synthesized peptides more than 20-fold compared to conventional methods. With the increased sensitivity afforded by DiDBiT, we demonstrate the MS detection of newly synthesized proteins labeled in vivo in the rodent nervous system with unprecedented temporal resolution as short as 3 h. PMID:25117199

  9. Charge detection mass spectrometry: Instrumentation & applications to viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.

    For over three decades, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to ionize non-covalent complexes and subsequently transfer the intact ion into the gas phase for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. ESI generates a distribution of multiple charged ions, resulting in an m/z spectrum comprised of a series of peaks, known as a charge state envelope. To obtain mass information, the number of charges for each peak must be deduced. For smaller biological analytes like peptides, the charge states are sufficiently resolved and this process is straightforward. For macromolecular complexes exceeding ~100 kDa, this process is complicated by the broadening and shifting of charge states due to incomplete desolvation, salt adduction, and inherent mass heterogeneity. As the analyte mass approaches the MDa regime, the m/z spectrum is often comprised of a broad distribution of unresolved charge states. In such cases, mass determination is precluded. Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is an emerging MS technique for determining the masses of heterogeneous, macromolecular complexes. In CDMS, the m/z and z of single ions are measured concurrently so that mass is easily calculated. With this approach, deconvolution of an m/z spectrum is unnecessary. This measurement is carried out by passing macroions through a conductive cylinder. The induced image charge on the cylindrical detector provides information about m/z and z: the m/z is related to its time-of-flight through the detector, and the z is related to the intensity of the image charge. We have applied CDMS to study the self-assembly of virus capsids. Late-stage intermediates in the assembly of hepatitis B virus, a devastating human pathogen, have been identified. This is the first time that such intermediates have been detected and represent a significant advancement towards understanding virus capsid assembly. CDMS has also been used to identify oversized, non-icosahedral polymorphs in the assembly of woodchuck hepatitis

  10. BPDA - A Bayesian peptide detection algorithm for mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga-Neto Ulisses

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry (MS is an essential analytical tool in proteomics. Many existing algorithms for peptide detection are based on isotope template matching and usually work at different charge states separately, making them ineffective to detect overlapping peptides and low abundance peptides. Results We present BPDA, a Bayesian approach for peptide detection in data produced by MS instruments with high enough resolution to baseline-resolve isotopic peaks, such as MALDI-TOF and LC-MS. We model the spectra as a mixture of candidate peptide signals, and the model is parameterized by MS physical properties. BPDA is based on a rigorous statistical framework and avoids problems, such as voting and ad-hoc thresholding, generally encountered in algorithms based on template matching. It systematically evaluates all possible combinations of possible peptide candidates to interpret a given spectrum, and iteratively finds the best fitting peptide signal in order to minimize the mean squared error of the inferred spectrum to the observed spectrum. In contrast to previous detection methods, BPDA performs deisotoping and deconvolution of mass spectra simultaneously, which enables better identification of weak peptide signals and produces higher sensitivities and more robust results. Unlike template-matching algorithms, BPDA can handle complex data where features overlap. Our experimental results indicate that BPDA performs well on simulated data and real MS data sets, for various resolutions and signal to noise ratios, and compares very favorably with commonly used commercial and open-source software, such as flexAnalysis, OpenMS, and Decon2LS, according to sensitivity and detection accuracy. Conclusion Unlike previous detection methods, which only employ isotopic distributions and work at each single charge state alone, BPDA takes into account the charge state distribution as well, thus lending information to better identify weak peptide

  11. Detection of adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2010-01-01

    There have been many attempts in the past to determine whether significant levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts form in cells and contribute to the anticancer activity of this agent. Supraclincal drug levels have been required to study drug-DNA adducts because of the lack of sensitivity associated with many of the techniques employed, including liquid scintillation counting of radiolabeled drug. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has provided the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adduct formation in cells at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection (compared to liquid scintillation counting) and has revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. The rigorous protocol required for this approach, together with many notes on the precautions and procedures required in order to ensure that absolute levels of Adriamycin-DNA adducts can be determined with good reproducibility, is outlined in this chapter.

  12. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained r...

  13. Detection systems for mass spectrometry imaging: a perspective on novel developments with a focus on active pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, JH; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Instrumental developments for imaging and individual particle detection for biomolecular mass spectrometry (imaging) and fundamental atomic and molecular physics studies are reviewed. Ion-counting detectors, array detection systems and highmass detectors for mass spectrometry (imaging) are treated.

  14. Discrimination analysis of mass spectrometry proteomics for ovarian cancer detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun HONG; Xiao-dan WANG; David SHEN; Su ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:A discrimination analysis has been explored for the probabilistic classifica-tion of healthy versus ovarian cancer serum samples using proteomics data from mass spectrometry (MS).Methods:The method employs data normalization,clustering,and a linear discriminant analysis on surface-enhanced laser desorp-tion ionization (SELDI) time-of-flight MS data.The probabilistic classification method computes the optimal linear discriminant using the complex human blood serum SELDI spectra.Cross-validation and training/testing data-split experi-ments are conducted to verify the optimal discriminant and demonstrate the accu-racy and robustness of the method.Results:The cluster discrimination method achieves excellent performance.The sensitivity,specificity,and positive predic-tive values are above 97% on ovarian cancer.The protein fraction peaks,which significantly contribute to the classification,can be available from the analysis process.Conclusion:The discrimination analysis helps the molecular identities of differentially expressed proteins and peptides between the healthy and ovarian patients.

  15. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry for explosives trace detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Anna; Elfving, Anders; Elfsberg, Mattias; Hurtig, Tomas; Johansson, Niklas; Al-Khalili, Ahmed; Käck, Petra; Wallin, Sara; Östmark, Henric

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the ongoing development of a laser ionization mass spectrometric system to be applied for screening for security related threat substances, specifically explosives. The system will be part of a larger security checkpoint system developed and demonstrated within the FP7 project EFFISEC to aid border police and customs at outer border checks. The laser ionization method of choice is SPI (single photon ionization), but the system also incorporates optional functionalities such as a cold trap and/or a particle concentrator to facilitate detection of minute amounts of explosives. The possibility of using jet-REMPI as a verification means is being scrutinized. Automated functionality and user friendliness is also considered in the demo system development.

  16. [Identification and quantitative determination of baclofen in human blood by HPLC with mass spectrometry detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukova, O A; Kotlovsky, M Yu; Pokrovsky, A A; Suvorova, E V; Shivrina, T G; Krasnov, E A; Efremov, A A

    2016-03-01

    A method of identification and quantitative determination of baclofen in blood by HPLC with mass spectrometry detection has been developed. It is characterized by high sensitivity, specificity, linearity, accuracy, reproducibility, and a low detection for quantitative determination. The method has been used for diagnostics of acute baclofen poisoning in patients.

  17. Detection, characterization, and screening of heme-binding molecules by mass spectrometry for malaria drug discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Durango, K.; Maciuk, A.; Harfouche, A.; Torijano-Gutierrez, S.; Jullian, J.C.; Quintin, J.; Spelman, K.; Mouray, E.; Grellier, P.; Figadere, B.

    2012-01-01

    Drug screening for antimalarials uses heme biocrystallization inhibition methods as an alternative to parasite cultures, but they involve complex processes and cannot detect artemisinin-like molecules. The described method detects heme-binding compounds by mass spectrometry, using dissociation of th

  18. Detection of negative ions in glow discharge mass spectrometry for analysis of solid specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Molchan, Igor S.; Tauziede, C.

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for elemental and molecular analysis of halogen-containing samples by glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry, consisting of detection of negative ions from a pulsed RF glow discharge in argon. Analyte signals are mainly extracted from the afterglow regime...... be used to study the distribution of a tantalum fluoride layer within the anodized tantala layer. Further, comparison is made with data obtained using glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, where elemental fluorine can only be detected using a neon plasma. The ionization mechanisms responsible...... for the formation of negative ions in glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry are briefly discussed....

  19. Application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics techniques for the detection of protein doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Richard G; Creaser, Colin S

    2010-04-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches have been used to develop methodologies capable of detecting the abuse of protein therapeutics such as recombinant human erythropoietin and recombinant human growth hormone. Existing detection methods use antibody-based approaches that, although effective, suffer from long assay development times and specificity issues. The application of liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and selected reaction-monitoring-based analysis has demonstrated the ability to detect and quantify existing protein therapeutics in plasma. Furthermore, the multiplexing capability of selected reaction-monitoring analysis has also aided in the detection of multiple downstream biomarkers in a single analysis, requiring less sample than existing immunological techniques. The flexibility of mass spectrometric instrumentation has shown that the technique is capable of detecting the abuse of novel and existing protein therapeutics, and has a vital role in the fight to keep sports drug-free.

  20. Highly sensitive detection of melamine based on reversed phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU QingQing; FAN KeXin; SHA Wei; RUAN HongQiang; ZENG Rong; SHIEH ChiaHui

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we developed a highly sensitive method to detect melamine based on reversed phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. A mass spectrometry compatible ion pair, heptafluorobu-tyric acid(HFBA), was used to separate melamine by reversed phase liquid chromatography prior to electrospray mass spectrometry. The incorporation of isotope internal standard and multiple reaction monitoring improved the accuracy and linearity of quantification. Based on this strategy, the method limit of quantification was 0.1 ng/g. The limits of quantification were 8 ng/g for liquid milk and 15 ng/g for dry milk powder. This method provided a reproducible and stable approach to sensitive detection and quantification of melamine.

  1. The investigation of ionization conditions in the trace amounts detection of heterocyclic compounds by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltaeva, Y. R.; Sysoev, A. A.; Poteshin, S. S.; Negru, K. I.; Grishin, S. S.; Trefilova, V. V.; Zuev, M. I.; Baberkina, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    The first part of paper is devoted to the detection of New Psychoactive Substances by ion mobility mass spectrometry study. In the second part of the paper presents a promising approach to prevent the spread of narcotic substances, consisting in the use of field-portable ion mobility spectrometers and finding the correlation between the peaks of the spectrograms of ion mobility and the chemical structure of the compound.

  2. Rapid Detection of Ricin in Serum Based on Cu-Chelated Magnetic Beads Using Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Song, Jian; Wang, Hong-Li; Xu, Bin; Liu, Feng; He, Kun; Wang, Na

    2016-04-01

    The protein toxin ricin obtained from castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) seeds is a potent biological warfare agent due to its ease of availability and acute toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a rapid and simple method to detect ricin in serum in vitro. The ricin was mixed with serum and digested by trypsin, then all the peptides were efficiently extracted using Cu-chelated magnetic beads and were detected with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The specific ricin peptides were identified by Nanoscale Ultra Performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry according to their sequences. The assay required 2.5 hours, and a characteristic peptide could be detected down to 4 ng/μl and used as a biomarker to detect ricin in serum. The high sensitivity and simplicity of the procedure makes it valuable in clinical practice.

  3. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Ditada, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J.P.; Clacher, A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  4. Development of a nucleotide sugar purification method using a mixed mode column & mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Heather; Xia, Fang; Lo, Mei-Chu; Zhou, Jing; Jordan, John B; McCarter, John; Barnhart, Wesley W; Gahm, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-11-10

    Analysis of nucleotide sugars, nucleoside di- and triphosphates and sugar-phosphates is an essential step in the process of understanding enzymatic pathways. A facile and rapid separation method was developed to analyze these compounds present in an enzymatic reaction mixture utilized to produce nucleotide sugars. The Primesep SB column explored in this study utilizes hydrophobic interactions as well as electrostatic interactions with the phosphoric portion of the nucleotide sugars. Ammonium formate buffer was selected due to its compatibility with mass spectrometry. Negative ion mode mass spectrometry was adopted for detection of the sugar phosphate (fucose-1-phophate), as the compound is not amenable to UV detection. Various mobile phase conditions such as pH, buffer concentration and organic modifier were explored. The semi-preparative separation method was developed to prepare 30mg of the nucleotide sugar. (19)F NMR was utilized to determine purity of the purified fluorinated nucleotide sugar. The collected nucleotide sugar was found to be 99% pure.

  5. First screening method for the simultaneous detection of seven allergens by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heick, J; Fischer, M; Pöpping, B

    2011-02-18

    The development of a multi-method for the detection of seven allergens based on liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction mode is described. It is based on extraction of the allergenic proteins from a food matrix, followed by enzymatic digestion with trypsin. The chosen marker peptides were implemented into one method that is capable of the simultaneous detection of milk, egg, soy, hazelnut, peanut, walnut and almond. This method has been used to detect all seven allergenic commodities from incurred reference bread material, which was baked according to a standard recipe from the baking industry. Detected concentrations ranged from 10 to 1000 μg/g, demonstrating that the mass spectrometric based method is a useful tool for allergen screening.

  6. Integration of continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry with chromatography and mass-selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Liberman, Rosa G; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2008-07-01

    Physical combination of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) instrument with a conventional gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is described. The resulting hybrid instrument (GC/MS/AMS) was used to monitor mass chromatograms and radiochromatograms simultaneously when (14)C-labeled compounds were injected into the gas chromatograph. Combination of the two instruments was achieved by splitting the column effluent and directing half to the mass spectrometer and half to a flow-through CuO reactor in line with the gas-accepting AMS ion source. The reactor converts compounds in the GC effluent to CO2 as required for function of the ion source. With cholesterol as test compound, the limits of quantitation were 175 pg and 0.00175 dpm injected. The accuracy achieved in analysis of five nonzero calibration standards and three quality control standards, using cholesterol-2,2,3,4,4,6-d6 as injection standard, was 100 +/- 11.8% with selected ion monitoring and 100 +/- 16% for radiochromatography. Respective values for interday precision were 1.0-3.2 and 22-32%. Application of GC/MS/AMS to a current topic of interest was demonstrated in a model metabolomic study in which cultured primary hepatocytes were given [(14)C]glucose and organic acids excreted into the culture medium were analyzed.

  7. Detection and confirmation of serum lipid biomarkers for preeclampsia using direct infusion mass spectrometry[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Swati; Young, SydneyA.; Esplin, M. Sean; Peaden, Benjamin; Tolley, H. Dennis; Porter, T. Flint; Varner, Michael W.; D’Alton, Mary E.; Jackson, Bruce J.; Graves, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial research, the early diagnosis of preeclampsia remains elusive. Lipids are now recognized to be involved in regulation and pathophysiology of some disease. Shotgun lipidomic studies were undertaken to determine whether serum lipid biomarkers exist that predict preeclampsia later in the same in pregnancy. A discovery study was performed using sera collected at 12–14 weeks pregnancy from 27 controls with uncomplicated pregnancies and 29 cases that later developed preeclampsia. Lipids were extracted and analyzed by direct infusion into a TOF mass spectrometer. MS signals, demonstrating apparent differences were selected, their abundances determined, and statistical differences tested. Statistically significant lipid markers were reevaluated in a second confirmatory study having 43 controls and 37 preeclampsia cases. Multi-marker combinations were developed using those lipid biomarkers confirmed in the second study. The initial study detected 45 potential preeclampsia markers. Of these, 23 markers continued to be statistically significant in the second confirmatory set. Most of these markers, representing several lipid classes, were chemically characterized, typically providing lipid class and potential molecular components using MS2. Several multi-marker panels with areas under the curve >0.85 and high predictive values were developed. Developed panels of serum lipidomic biomarkers appear to be able to identify most women at risk for preeclampsia in a given pregnancy at 12–14 weeks gestation. PMID:26891737

  8. Autopiquer - a Robust and Reliable Peak Detection Algorithm for Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, David P. A.; Hughes, Sam; Kilgour, Samantha L.; Mackay, C. Logan; Palmblad, Magnus; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Ernst, Robert K.; Clarke, David J.; Goodlett, David R.

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple algorithm for robust and unsupervised peak detection by determining a noise threshold in isotopically resolved mass spectrometry data. Solving this problem will greatly reduce the subjective and time-consuming manual picking of mass spectral peaks and so will prove beneficial in many research applications. The Autopiquer approach uses autocorrelation to test for the presence of (isotopic) structure in overlapping windows across the spectrum. Within each window, a noise threshold is optimized to remove the most unstructured data, whilst keeping as much of the (isotopic) structure as possible. This algorithm has been successfully demonstrated for both peak detection and spectral compression on data from many different classes of mass spectrometer and for different sample types, and this approach should also be extendible to other types of data that contain regularly spaced discrete peaks.

  9. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-03-16

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described.

  10. Desalting by crystallization: detection of attomole biomolecules in picoliter buffers by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Xingchuang; Wang, Song; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Sichun; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-10-06

    Sensitive detection of biomolecules in small-volume samples by mass spectrometry is, in many cases, challenging because of the use of buffers to maintain the biological activities of proteins and cells. Here, we report a highly effective desalting method for picoliter samples. It was based on the spontaneous separation of biomolecules from salts during crystallization of the salts. After desalting, the biomolecules were deposited in the tip of the quartz pipet because of the evaporation of the solvent. Subsequent detection of the separated biomolecules was achieved using solvent assisted electric field induced desorption/ionization (SAEFIDI) coupled with mass spectrometry. It allowed for direct desorption/ionization of the biomolecules in situ from the tip of the pipet. The organic component in the assistant solvent inhibited the desorption/ionization of salts, thus assured successful detection of biomolecules. Proteins and peptides down to 50 amol were successfully detected using our method even if there were 3 × 10(5) folds more amount of salts in the sample. The concentration and ion species of the salts had little influence on the detection results.

  11. Detection of biomarkers of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri through mass spectrometry and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents.

  12. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages.

  13. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  14. Detection of bacterial protein toxins by solid phase magnetic immunocapture and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Schlosser, Gitta

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial protein toxins are involved in a number of infectious and foodborne diseases and are considered as potential biological warfare agents as well. Their sensitive multiplex detection in complex environmental, food, and biological samples are an important although challenging task. Solid-phase immunoaffinity capture provides an efficient way to enrich and purify a wide range of proteins from complex mixtures. We have shown that staphylococcal enterotoxins, for example, can be efficiently enriched by means of magnetic immunocapture using antibody functionalized paramagnetic beads. The method was successfully interfaced by the on-beads and off-beads detection using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry at the protein level and by the off-beads nano-electrospray ionization-MS/MS detection at the enzyme digests level, enabling thus the unambiguous identification of the toxin. The method is applicable to any bacterial toxin to which an antibody is available.

  15. Subsurface detection of fossil fuel pollutants by photoionization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbat, Albert; Considine, Thomas; Antle, Patrick M

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes analysis of environmental pollutants at depth without bringing sample to the surface. It is based on an improved 3-stage Peltier freeze trap, which efficiently pre-concentrates volatile coal tar and petroleum hydrocarbons, and an integrated system for detecting pollutants on-line, in real-time by photoionization detection and quantitation by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as the probe is advanced into the subsurface. Findings indicate measurement precision and accuracy for volatiles meet EPA criteria for hazardous waste site investigations. When a Teflon membrane inlet is used to detect contaminants in groundwater, its 140 degrees C temperature limit restricts analyte collection in soil to C(2)-phenanthrenes. Two case studies demonstrate the probe is well-suited to tracking petroleum and coal tar plumes from source to groundwater.

  16. Detection of histamine in beer by nano extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiuxiao; Li, Ming; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Ruifeng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, rapid quantitative detection of histamine in beer was achieved by using nano extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano EESI-MS) coupling with standard addition method. Based on the MS(2) experiment, histamine concentrations in three beer samples were determined to be 1.10 ± 0.12 µg/ml, 0.81 ± 0.09 µg/ml and 0.79 ± 0.09 µg/ml. The limit of detection for this method was calculated to be 0.02 µg/ml. These results show that this novel method can be used for direct, rapid and sensitive detection of histamine in beer without any tedious sample pretreatment.

  17. Detection of Stimulants and Narcotics by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Sports Doping Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Brian D; Kucherova, Yulia; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Sports drug testing laboratories are required to detect several classes of compounds that are prohibited at all times, which include anabolic agents, peptide hormones, growth factors, beta-2 agonists, hormones and metabolic modulators, and diuretics/masking agents. Other classes of compounds such as stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, and glucocorticoids are also prohibited, but only when an athlete is in competition. A single class of compounds can contain a large number of prohibited substances and all of the compounds should be detected by the testing procedure. Since there are almost 70 stimulants on the prohibited list it can be a challenge to develop a single screening method that will optimally detect all the compounds. We describe a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing method for detection of all the stimulants and narcotics on the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Urine for LC-MS/MS testing does not require sample pretreatment and is a direct dilute and shoot method. Urine samples for the GC-MS method require a liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride.

  18. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  19. Characterization of intact protein conjugates and biopharmaceuticals using ion-exchange chromatography with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and top-down tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneeruddin, Khaja; Nazzaro, Mark; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2015-10-06

    Characterization of biopharmaceutical products is a challenging task, which needs to be carried out at several different levels (including both primary structure and conformation). An additional difficulty frequently arises due to the structural heterogeneity inherent to many protein-based therapeutics (e.g., extensive glycosylation or "designer" modifications such as chemical conjugation) or introduced postproduction as a result of stress (e.g., oxidation and deamidation). A combination of ion-exchange chromatography (IXC) with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) allows characterization of complex and heterogeneous therapeutic proteins and protein conjugates to be accomplished at a variety of levels without compromising their conformational integrity. The IXC/ESI MS measurements allow protein conjugates to be profiled by analyzing conjugation stoichiometry and the presence of multiple positional isomers, as well as to establish the effect of chemical modifications on the conformational integrity of each species. While mass profiling alone is not sufficient for identification of nonenzymatic post-translational modifications (PTMs) that result in a very small mass change of the eluting species (e.g., deamidation), this task can be completed using online top-down structural analysis, as demonstrated using stressed interferon-β as an example. The wealth of information that can be provided by IXC/native ESI MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on protein-based therapeutics will undoubtedly make it a very valuable addition to the experimental toolbox of biopharmaceutical analysis.

  20. Hydrophobic Fractionation Enhances Novel Protein Detection by Mass Spectrometry in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Chang, Helena R.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a novel fractionation protocol targeting hydrophobic proteins as possible cancer cell membrane biomarkers. Hydrophobic proteins of breast cancer tissues and cell lines were enriched by polymeric reverse phase columns. The retained proteins were eluted and digested for peptide identification by nano-liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using a hybrid linear ion-trap Orbitrap. Hundreds of proteins were identified from each of these three specimens: tumors, normal breast tissue, and breast cancer cell lines. Many of the identified proteins defined key cellular functions. Protein profiles of cancer and normal tissues from the same patient were systematically examined and compared. Stem cell markers were overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared with non-TNBC samples. Because breast cancer stem cells are known to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and can be the source of metastasis frequently seen in patients with TNBC, our study may provide evidence of molecules promoting the aggressiveness of TNBC. The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful for early detection and better treatment of breast cancer. PMID:20596302

  1. Sinapine detection in radish taproot using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dejuan; Luo, Liping; Jiang, Cuicui; Han, Jing; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Tingting; Jiang, Jie; Zhou, Zhiquan; Chen, Huanwen

    2011-03-23

    Plant research and natural product detection are of sustainable interests. Benefited by direct detection with no sample preparation, sinapine, a bioactive chemical usually found in various seeds of Brassica plants, has been unambiguously detected in radish taproot (Raphanus sativus) tissue using a liquid-assisted surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). A methanol aqueous solution (1:1) was nebulized by a nitrogen sheath gas toward the corona discharge, resulting in charged ambient small droplets, which affected the radish tissue for desorption/ionization of analytes on the tissue surface. Thus, sinapine was directly detected and identified by tandem DAPCI-MS experiments without sample pretreatment. The typical relative standard deviation (RSD) of this method for sinapine detection was 5-8% for six measurements (S/N=3). The dynamic response range was 10(-12)-10(-7) g/cm2 for sinapine on the radish skin surface. The discovery of sinapine in radish taproot was validated by using HPLC-UV methods. The data demonstrated that DAPCI assisted by solvent enhanced the overall efficiency of the desorption/ionization process, enabling sensitive detection of bioactive compounds in plant tissue.

  2. Detection and imaging of thermochromic ink compounds in erasable pens using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Amin; Prova, Shamina S; Bagga, Aafreen K; Yan Chi Ting, Michelle; Brar, Gurnoor; Ifa, Demian R

    2017-06-30

    Thermochromic ink pens are widely accessible worldwide and have gained popularity among the general public. These pens are very useful to undo mistakes while writing important documents or exams. They are also, however, misused in committing crimes such as counterfeiting checks or wills. Thus, the forensics community is in need of techniques that will allow these forgeries to be detected rapidly, reliably and conveniently. Thermochromic ink compounds were investigated using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) coupled with an LTQ mass spectrometer and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis was conducted using Electrospray Ionization (ESI) coupled with an Orbitrap LTQ mass spectrometer performing Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) for identification of ink traces. Chemical marker ions characteristic of the state of ink (visible or invisible) were identified and mapped in ink traces by the use of DESI-MS imaging. These ions can be employed by forensic experts as fingerprint markers in forged documents. The marker ions were also characterised by conducting tandem mass spectrometry using paper spray in an Orbitrap LTQ mass spectrometer. Specific chemical components yielding ions of m/z 400, 405, 615 and 786 were distinguished as only being apparent in the invisible and reappeared state of the ink. The absence of these compounds in the original state of the ink enabled their recognition as useful chemical determinants in detecting forgery. DESI-MSI was thus shown to be a very useful, convenient and reliable technique for detecting forgery in paper documents due to its fast and reproducible mode of analysis, with no sample preparation and minimal damage to the document under investigation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Fast, ultra-trace detection of juvenile hormone III from mosquitoes using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Cesar E; Nouzova, Marcela; Benigni, Paolo; Quirke, J Martin E; Noriega, Fernando G; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, a new protocol for fast separation and quantification of JH III from biological samples using liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry is described. In particular, the proposed protocol improves existing methodologies by combining a limited number of sample preparation steps with fast LC-MS/MS detection, providing lower limits of detection and demonstrated matrix effect control, together with high inter and intraday reproducibility. A limit of detection of 8pg/mL (0.32pg on column) was achieved, representing a 15-fold gain in sensitivity with respect to previous LC-MS based protocols. The performance of the LC-MS/MS protocol is comparable to previously described JH III quantitation protocol based on fluorescence detection, with the added advantage that quantification is independent of the availability of fluorescent tags that are often unavailable or show quite diverse responses on a batch-to-batch basis. Additionally, a detailed description of the JH III fragmentation pathway is provided for the first time, based on isolation of the molecular ion and their intermediate fragments using in-source MS/MS, MS/MS(n) and FT-ICR MS/MS measurements. The JH III workflow was evaluated as a function of developmental changes, sugar feeding and farnesoic acid stimulation in mosquitoes and can be applied to the detection of other juvenile hormones.

  4. Gluten Detection and Speciation by Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Lock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS has been used historically in proteomics research for over 20 years. However, until recently LC-MS/MS has only been routinely used in food testing for small molecule contaminant detection, for example pesticide and veterinary residue detection, and not as a replacement of microbiological food testing methods, specifically allergen analysis. Over the last couple of years, articles have started to be published which describe the detection of allergens by LC-MS/MS. In this article we will describe how LC-MS/MS can be applied in the area of gluten detection and how it can be used to specifically differentiate the species of gluten used in food, where specific markers for each variety of gluten can be simultaneously acquired and detected at the same time. The article will discuss the effect of variety on the peptide response observed from different wheat grain varieties and will describe the sample preparation protocol which is essential for generating the peptide markers used for speciation.

  5. Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook.

  6. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in Multidrug Resistant Clinical Isolate Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Proteobacteria communicate via production followed by response of quorum sensing molecules, namely, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. These molecules consist of a lactone moiety with N-acyl side chain with various chain lengths and degrees of saturation at C-3 position. AHL-dependent QS is often associated with regulation of diverse bacterial phenotypes including the expression of virulence factors. With the use of biosensor and high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, the AHL production of clinical isolate A. baumannii 4KT was studied. Production of short chain AHL, namely, N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL, was detected.

  7. Detection of plutonium isotopes at lowest quantities using in-source resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, S; Hakimi, A; Stöbener, N; Trautmann, N; Wendt, K

    2012-11-01

    The in-source resonance ionization mass spectrometry technique was applied for quantification of ultratrace amounts of plutonium isotopes as a proof of principle study. In addition to an overall detection limit of 10(4) to 10(5) atoms, this method enables the unambiguous identification and individual quantification of the plutonium isotopes (238)Pu and (241)Pu which are of relevance for dating of radiogenic samples. Due to the element-selective ionization process, these isotopes can be measured even under a high surplus of isobaric contaminations from (238)U or (241)Am, which considerably simplifies chemical preparation. The technique was developed, tested, and characterized on a variety of synthetic and calibration samples and is presently applied to analyze environmental samples.

  8. Spontaneous Mass and Charge Losses from Single Multi-Megadalton Ions Studied by Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, David Z.; Alexander, Andrew W.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous mass and charge losses from individual multi-megadalton ions have been observed with charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) by trapping single hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids for 3 s. Gradual increases in the oscillation frequency of single ions in the ion trap are attributed mainly to mass loss (probably solvent, water, and/or salt). The total mass lost during the 3 s trapping period peaks at around 20 kDa for 4 MDa HBV T = 4 capsids. Discrete frequency drops punctuate the gradual increases in the oscillation frequencies. The drops are attributed to a sudden loss of charge. In most cases a single positive charge is lost along with some mass (on average around 1000 Da). Charge loss occurs for over 40% of the trapped ions. It usually occurs near the beginning of the trapping event, and it occurs preferentially in regions of the trap with strong electric fields, indicating that external electric fields promote charge loss. This process may contribute to the decrease in m/z resolution that often occurs with megadalton ions.

  9. Detecting trace components in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry data sets with two-dimensional wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Duane C.; Snapp, Robert R.

    2007-09-01

    TWiGS (two-dimensional wavelet transform with generalized cross validation and soft thresholding) is a novel algorithm for denoising liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data for use in "shot-gun" proteomics. Proteomics, the study of all proteins in an organism, is an emerging field that has already proven successful for drug and disease discovery in humans. There are a number of constraints that limit the effectiveness of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for shot-gun proteomics, where the chemical signals are typically weak, and data sets are computationally large. Most algorithms suffer greatly from a researcher driven bias, making the results irreproducible and unusable by other laboratories. We thus introduce a new algorithm, TWiGS, that removes electrical (additive white) and chemical noise from LC-MS data sets. TWiGS is developed to be a true two-dimensional algorithm, which operates in the time-frequency domain, and minimizes the amount of researcher bias. It is based on the traditional discrete wavelet transform (DWT), which allows for fast and reproducible analysis. The separable two-dimensional DWT decomposition is paired with generalized cross validation and soft thresholding. The Haar, Coiflet-6, Daubechie-4 and the number of decomposition levels are determined based on observed experimental results. Using a synthetic LC-MS data model, TWiGS accurately retains key characteristics of the peaks in both the time and m/z domain, and can detect peaks from noise of the same intensity. TWiGS is applied to angiotensin I and II samples run on a LC-ESI-TOF-MS (liquid-chromatography-electrospray-ionization) to demonstrate its utility for the detection of low-lying peaks obscured by noise.

  10. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  11. Acquiring Structural Information on Virus Particles with Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, David Z.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2016-06-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is a single-molecule technique particularly well-suited to measuring the mass and charge distributions of heterogeneous, MDa-sized ions. In this work, CDMS has been used to analyze the assembly products of two coat protein variants of bacteriophage P22. The assembly products show broad mass distributions extending from 5 to 15 MDa for A285Y and 5 to 25 MDa for A285T coat protein variants. Because the charge of large ions generated by electrospray ionization depends on their size, the charge can be used to distinguish hollow shells from more compact structures. A285T was found to form T = 4 and T = 7 procapsids, and A285Y makes a small number of T = 3 and T = 4 procapsids. Owing to the decreased stability of the A285Y and A285T particles, chemical cross-linking was required to stabilize them for electrospray CDMS. Graphical Abstract[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Comparative Study of Three Methods for Affinity Measurements: Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled with UV Detection and Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Gleb G.; Logie, Jennifer; Okhonin, Victor; Renaud, Justin B.; Mayer, Paul M.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2012-07-01

    We present affinity capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (ACE-MS) as a comprehensive separation technique for label-free solution-based affinity analysis. The application of ACE-MS for measuring affinity constants between eight small molecule drugs [ibuprofen, s-flurbiprofen, diclofenac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, folic acid, resveratrol, and 4,4'-(propane-1,3-diyl) dibenzoic acid] and β-cyclodextrin is described. We couple on-line ACE with MS to combine the separation and kinetic capability of ACE together with the molecular weight and structural elucidation of MS in one system. To understand the full potential of ACE-MS, we compare it with two other methods: Direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and ACE with UV detection (ACE-UV). After the evaluation, DIMS provides less reliable equilibrium dissociation constants than separation-based ACE-UV and ACE-MS, and cannot be used solely for the study of noncovalent interactions. ACE-MS determines apparent dissociation constants for all reacting small molecules in a mixture, even in cases when drugs overlap with each other during separation. The ability of ACE-MS to interact, separate, and rapidly scan through m/z can facilitate the simultaneous affinity analysis of multiple interacting pairs, potentially leading to the high-throughput screening of drug candidates.

  13. Multiplex detection of protein toxins using MALDI-TOF-TOF tandem mass spectrometry: application in unambiguous toxin detection from bioaerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Bhoj; Kamboj, Dev Vrat

    2012-12-04

    Protein toxins, such as botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), shiga toxin (STX), and plant toxin ricin, are involved in a number of diseases and are considered as potential agents for bioterrorism and warfare. From a bioterrorism and warfare perspective, these agents are likely to cause maximum damage to a civilian or military population through an inhalational route of exposure and aerosol is considered the envisaged mode of delivery. Unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol is of paramount importance, both for bringing mitigation protocols into operation and for implementation of effective medical countermeasures, in case a "biological cloud" is seen over a population. A multiplex, unambiguous, and qualitative detection of protein toxins is reported here using tandem mass spectrometry with MALDI-TOF-TOF. The methodology involving simple sample processing steps was demonstrated to identify toxins (ETX, Clostridium perfringes phospholipase C, and SEB) from blind spiked samples. The novel directed search approach using a list of unique peptides was used to identify toxins from a complex protein mixture. The bioinformatic analysis of seven protein toxins for elucidation of unique peptides with conservation status across all known sequences provides a high confidence for detecting toxins originating from any geographical location and source organism. Use of tandem MS data with peptide sequence information increases the specificity of the method. A prototype for generation of aerosol using a nebulizer and collection using a cyclone collector was used to provide a proof of concept for unambiguous detection of toxin from aerosol using precursor directed tandem mass spectrometry combined with protein database searching. ETX prototoxin could be detected from aerosol at 0.2 ppb concentration in aerosol.

  14. Rapid and high-throughput pan-Orthopoxvirus detection and identification using PCR and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshoo, Mark W; Whitehouse, Chris A; Nalca, Aysegul; Zoll, Scott; Ecker, Joseph A; Hall, Thomas A; Pennella, Thuy-Trang D; Duncan, David D; Desai, Anjali; Moradi, Emily K; Rudnick, Karl; Libby, Brian; Ranken, Raymond; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hofstadler, Steven A; Ecker, David J; Blyn, Lawrence B

    2009-07-22

    The genus Orthopoxvirus contains several species of related viruses, including the causative agent of smallpox (Variola virus). In addition to smallpox, several other members of the genus are capable of causing human infection, including monkeypox, cowpox, and other zoonotic rodent-borne poxviruses. Therefore, a single assay that can accurately identify all orthopoxviruses could provide a valuable tool for rapid broad orthopovirus identification. We have developed a pan-Orthopoxvirus assay for identification of all members of the genus based on four PCR reactions targeting Orthopoxvirus DNA and RNA helicase and polymerase genes. The amplicons are detected using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) on the Ibis T5000 system. We demonstrate that the assay can detect and identify a diverse collection of orthopoxviruses, provide sub-species information and characterize viruses from the blood of rabbitpox infected rabbits. The assay is sensitive at the stochastic limit of PCR and detected virus in blood containing approximately six plaque-forming units per milliliter from a rabbitpox virus-infected rabbit.

  15. Rapid and high-throughput pan-Orthopoxvirus detection and identification using PCR and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Eshoo

    Full Text Available The genus Orthopoxvirus contains several species of related viruses, including the causative agent of smallpox (Variola virus. In addition to smallpox, several other members of the genus are capable of causing human infection, including monkeypox, cowpox, and other zoonotic rodent-borne poxviruses. Therefore, a single assay that can accurately identify all orthopoxviruses could provide a valuable tool for rapid broad orthopovirus identification. We have developed a pan-Orthopoxvirus assay for identification of all members of the genus based on four PCR reactions targeting Orthopoxvirus DNA and RNA helicase and polymerase genes. The amplicons are detected using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS on the Ibis T5000 system. We demonstrate that the assay can detect and identify a diverse collection of orthopoxviruses, provide sub-species information and characterize viruses from the blood of rabbitpox infected rabbits. The assay is sensitive at the stochastic limit of PCR and detected virus in blood containing approximately six plaque-forming units per milliliter from a rabbitpox virus-infected rabbit.

  16. An HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous detection of alkylated base excision repair products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Elwood A; Rubinson, Emily H; Pereira, Kevin N; Calcutt, M Wade; Christov, Plamen P; Eichman, Brandt F

    2013-11-01

    DNA glycosylases excise a broad spectrum of alkylated, oxidized, and deaminated nucleobases from DNA as the initial step in base excision repair. Substrate specificity and base excision activity are typically characterized by monitoring the release of modified nucleobases either from a genomic DNA substrate that has been treated with a modifying agent or from a synthetic oligonucleotide containing a defined lesion of interest. Detection of nucleobases from genomic DNA has traditionally involved HPLC separation and scintillation detection of radiolabeled nucleobases, which in the case of alkylation adducts can be laborious and costly. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry method to simultaneously detect and quantify multiple alkylpurine adducts released from genomic DNA that has been treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). We illustrate the utility of this method by monitoring the excision of N3-methyladenine (3 mA) and N7-methylguanine (7 mG) by a panel of previously characterized prokaryotic and eukaryotic alkylpurine DNA glycosylases, enabling a comparison of substrate specificity and enzyme activity by various methods. Detailed protocols for these methods, along with preparation of genomic and oligonucleotide alkyl-DNA substrates, are also described.

  17. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-04

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  18. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  19. Using Mass Spectrometry to Detect Silanol Compounds in Water from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Kuo, C. K. Mike; Alverson, James T.; Wallace, William T.; Gazda, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The water produced by the U.S. Water Processor Assembly (WPA) on the International Space Station had virtually undetectable levels of total organic carbon (TOC) during the first 18 months of operation. In 2010, the TOC in the WPA product water rose to approx. 2 mg/L. The maximum allowable TOC concentration in the product water is 3.0 mg/L. Ground analysis indicated that > 90% of this increase was due to dimethylsilanediol (DMSD). Since then, recurring increases in TOC attributed to DMSD have occurred every 12-18 months. In 2015, a new compound was determined to be responsible for the TOC increase. This new contaminant was identified as monomethylsilanetriol (MMST). This poster details the efforts to identify and quantify DMSD and MMST. DMSD was initially discovered as a stray peak in a routine GC/MS analysis used to measure glycols. This method was not suitable for routine analysis of DMSD because of extreme carryover problems. MMST was discovered and identified using direct infusion electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry. The identification was confirmed by purchasing an MMST standard and analyzing it by HPLC with refractive index (RI) detection. An LC/MS method has been developed, based on the LC/RI method that quantifies both DMSD and MMST in a 14-minute isocratic run. This method employs atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in negative mode with selected ion monitoring.

  20. Carbofuran poisoning detected by mass spectrometry of butyrylcholinesterase adduct in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Ricordel, Ivan; Tong, Larry; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Baud, Frédéric; Mégarbane, Bruno; Maury, Eric; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-03-01

    Carbofuran is a pesticide whose acute toxicity is due to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in plasma is inhibited by carbofuran and serves as a biomarker of poisoning by carbofuran. The goal was to develop a method to positively identify poisoning by carbofuran. Sera from an attempted murder and an attempted suicide were analyzed for the presence of carbofuran adducts on BChE. The BChE from 1 ml of serum was rapidly purified on a 0.2 ml procainamide-Sepharose column. Speed was essential because the carbofuran-BChE adduct decarbamylates with a half-life of about 2 h. The partially purified BChE was boiled to denature the protein, thus stopping decarbamylation and making the protein vulnerable to digestion with trypsin. The labeled peptide was partially purified by HPLC before analysis by LC/MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode on the QTRAP 2000 mass spectrometer. Carbofuran was found to be covalently bound to Ser 198 of human BChE in serum samples from two poisoning cases. Multiple reaction monitoring triggered MS/MS spectra positively identified the carbofuran-BChE adduct. In conclusion a mass spectrometry method to identify carbofuran poisoning in humans has been developed. The method uses 1 ml of serum and detects low-level exposure associated with as little as 20% inhibition of plasma butyrylcholinesterase.

  1. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI).

  2. Carbapenemase Activity Detection by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabák, Jaroslav; Walková, Radka; Študentová, Vendula; Chudáčková, Eva; Bergerová, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is used for the determination of molecular weights of different chemical compounds. We describe here the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to detect a carbapenem antibiotic, meropenem, and its degradation products. Buffered meropenem solution (0.1 mM Tris-HCl, pH 6.8) was mixed with an overnight culture of bacteria. After 3-h incubation, the reaction mixture was centrifuged, and the supernatant was analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The presence or absence of peaks representing meropenem and its sodium salts was crucial. The average turnaround time of this test, considering the use of overnight culture, is 4 h. We validated this method for the detection of resistance to carbapenems in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by carbapenemase production. A total of 124 strains, including 30 carbapenemase-producing strains, were used in the study. The sensitivity of this method is 96.67%, with a specificity of 97.87%. Our results demonstrate the ability of this method to routinely detect carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp. in laboratories. This assay is comparable with a labor-intensive imipenem-hydrolyzing spectrophotometric assay that is a reference method for the detection of carbapenemase. As demonstrated here, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry may be used in microbiological laboratories not only for microbial identification but also for other applications, such as studies of mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. PMID:21775535

  3. Rapid detection of pesticides not amenable to multi-residue methods by flow injection-tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, J.G.J.; Dam, van R.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was investigated for the rapid detection of highly polar pesticides that are not amenable to multi-residue methods because they do not partition into organic solvents and require dedicated chromatographic conditions. The pesticides includ

  4. Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex engineered nanoparticles in biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binghui; Jackson, George S; Yokel, Robert A; Grulke, Eric A

    2014-08-01

    Complex engineered nanoparticles (CENPs), which have different core and surface components, are being developed for medicinal, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. One of the key challenges for environmental health and safety assessments of CENPs is to identify and quantity their transformations in biological environments. This study reports the effects of in vivo exposure of citrate-coated nanoalumina with different rare isotope labels on each component. This CENP was dosed to the rat and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to quantify (26)Al, (14)C, and their ratio in the dosing material and tissue samples. For CENPs detected in the liver, the rare isotope ratio, (14)C/(26)Al, was 87% of the dosing material's ratio. The citrate coating on the nanoalumina in the liver was stable or, if it degraded, its metabolites were incorporated with nearby tissues. However, in brain and bone where little alumina was detected, the rare isotope ratio greatly exceeded that of the dosing material. Therefore, in the animal, citrate dissociated from CENPs and redistributed to brain and bone. Tracking both the core and surface components by AMS presents a new approach for characterizing transformations of CENPs components in biological milieu or environments.

  5. Detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in environmental samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, Karin; Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Gomez Guzman, Jose Manuel; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Shinonaga, Taeko [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The Plutonium isotopes {sup 239}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=2.4.10{sup 4}a), {sup 240}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=6.5.10{sup 3}a) and {sup 242}Pu (T{sub 1/2}=3.7.10{sup 5}a) are anthropogenic radionuclides emitted into the environment by nuclear activities. Pu is accumulated in the human body and hence, poses a considerable hazard to human health. Due to the long half-lives, these isotopes are present in the biosphere on large time scales and a build-up can be expected. Therefore it is important to study the contamination pathway of Pu into the drinking water. At the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich a method to detect long-lived Pu isotopes by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is being developed. AMS requires only few milligrams of sample material, which is a substantial advantage over decay counting techniques. Consequently, more samples from different locations can be taken which is essential when searching for locally increased Pu concentrations as in the Pacific Ocean after the Fukushima accident in March 2011. Samples from different locations in the Pacific Ocean and from the snow-hydrosphere are planned to be investigated by AMS. The principle detection method using AMS and an overview of the status of the project is presented.

  6. Detection of metals and metalloproteins in the plasma of stroke patients by mass spectrometry methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Phanichand; Chitta, Karnakar R; Landero Figueroa, Julio A; Caruso, Joseph A; Adeoye, Opeolu

    2012-10-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability, worldwide. Metalloproteins and metals play key roles in epigenetic events in living organisms, including hypertension, the most important modifiable risk factor for stroke. Thus, metalloproteins may be important target biomarkers for disease diagnosis. The primary goal of this study was to assess metal containing proteins in blood plasma, detected by ICP-MS, followed by ESIMS for peptide/protein identification. We then compared the relative concentration differences between samples from patients with ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and stroke mimics. In 29 plasma samples (10 stroke mimics, 10 ischemic stroke and 9 hemorrhagic stroke patients) previously collected from patients who presented to the University of Cincinnati Emergency Department within 12 hours of symptom onset for a plasma banking project. For the metal associated protein study, Mg, Mn, Cu, Se concentrations were statistically different when compared between stroke mimics vs. ischemic stroke patients and ischemic stroke patients vs. hemorrhagic stroke patients. Pb concentrations were statistically different when compared between stroke mimics vs. ischemic stroke patients and Mo levels were statistically the same among the three groups. In addition, we also report concentration levels and preliminary correlation studies for total elemental analysis among the three sets of patients. This pilot study demonstrates that mass spectrometry methods may be highly valuable in detecting novel stroke biomarkers in blood plasma. Expanded studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  7. Tandem mass spectrometry in metallomics and the involving role of ICP-MS detection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, C G; Zachariadis, G A

    2014-03-28

    Metallomics is a relatively new branch of omics with a growing interest. The study of metallomes is becoming more focused in certain metabolites and the screening of various categories of analytes using a robust analytical methodology is more than appealing. In this context, when dealing with the challenge of identifying a certain species or specify a particular molecular structure, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is a reliable tool. Moreover, MS/MS instrumentation is recommended in hyphenated chromatographic techniques with MS detection such as LC-MS, where primary molecular species suffer minor fragmentation (soft-ionization techniques). ICP-MS is widely used in metallomics with its main advantages being the provided high sensitivity and selectivity. Usually, analyzes utilize ICP-MS as the main detection. Its role in proteomics is significant as an alternating choice for protein and peptide quantifications. In this review, we discuss modern trends and applications of MS/MS in the important and growing field of metallomics. These reports concern the identification, characterization and determination of various metal species such as metalloproteins, metallo-DNA adducts, metal-labeled molecules and other metal binding biomolecules. Such assays also present new and interesting hyphenated instrumentation and novel sophisticated apparatus. In addition, we designate the role of ICP-MS in the mentioned contributions and in the same scope we highlight some general analytical strategies.

  8. Detecting nanoparticulate silver using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrano, Denise M; Lesher, Emily K; Bednar, Anthony; Monserud, Jon; Higgins, Christopher P; Ranville, James F

    2012-01-01

    The environmental prevalence of engineered nanomaterials, particularly nanoparticulate silver (AgNP), is expected to increase substantially. The ubiquitous use of commercial products containing AgNP may result in their release to the environment, and the potential for ecological effects is unknown. Detecting engineered nanomaterials is one of the greatest challenges in quantifying their risks. Thus, it is imperative to develop techniques capable of measuring and characterizing exposures, while dealing with the innate difficulties of nanomaterial detection in environmental samples, such as low-engineered nanomaterial concentrations, aggregation, and complex matrices. Here the authors demonstrate the use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, operated in a single-particle counting mode (SP-ICP-MS), to detect and quantify AgNP. In the present study, two AgNP products were measured by SP-ICP-MS, including one of precisely manufactured size and shape, as well as a commercial AgNP-containing health food product. Serial dilutions, filtration, and acidification were applied to confirm that the method detected particles. Differentiation of dissolved and particulate silver (Ag) is a feature of the technique. Analysis of two wastewater samples demonstrated the applicability of SP-ICP-MS at nanograms per liter Ag concentrations. In this pilot study, AgNP was found at 100 to 200 ng/L in the presence of 50 to 500 ng/L dissolved Ag. The method provides the analytical capability to monitor Ag and other metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in fate, transport, stability, and toxicity studies using a commonly available laboratory instrument. Rapid throughput and element specificity are additional benefits of SP-ICP-MS as a measurement tool for metal and metal oxide engineered nanoparticles. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  9. Detection of dehydroepiandrosterone misuse by means of gas chromatography- combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareck, Ute; Geyer, Hans; Flenker, Ulrich; Piper, Thomas; Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    According to World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) rules (WADA Technical Document-TD2004EAAS) urine samples containing dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) concentrations greater than 100 ng ML(-1) shall be submitted to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis. The threshold concentration is based on the equivalent to the glucuronide, and the DHEA concentrations have to be adjusted for a specific gravity value of 1.020. In 2006, 11,012 doping control urine samples from national and international federations were analyzed in the Cologne doping control laboratory, 100 (0.9%) of them yielding concentrations of DHEA greater than 100 ng mL(-1). Sixty-eight percent of the specimens showed specific gravity values higher than 1.020, 52% originated from soccer players, 95% were taken in competition, 85% were male urines, 99% of the IRMS results did not indicate an application of testosterone or related prohormones. Only one urine sample was reported as an adverse analytical finding having 319 ng mL(-1) DHEA (screening result), more than 10,000 ng mL(-1) androsterone and depleted carbon isotope ratio values for the testosterone metabolites androsterone and etiocholanolone. Statistical evaluation showed significantly different DHEA concentrations between specimens taken in- and out-of- competition, whereas females showed smaller DHEA values than males for both types of control. Also a strong influence of the DHEA excretion on different sport disciplines was detectable. The highest DHEA values were detected for game sports (soccer, basketball, handball, ice hockey), followed by boxing and wrestling. In 2007, 6622 doping control urine samples were analyzed for 3alpha,5-cyclo-5alpha-androstan-6beta-ol-17-one (3alpha,5-cyclo), a DHEA metabolite which was described as a useful gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) screening marker for DHEA abuse. Nineteen urine specimens showed concentrations higher than the suggested threshold of 140 ng mL(-1), six urine samples yielded

  10. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  11. New Ionization and Detection Technologies for Mass Spectrometry Imaging. From Small Molecules to Intact Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a constantly growing interest in biomedical research to visualize changes in the location of various biomolecules in tissue sections as a result of complex diseases. Mass spectrometry imaging is one of the techniques that enable the mapping of molecules on a 2D surface. However, the techniq

  12. Absolute quantitation of proteins by Acid hydrolysis combined with amino Acid detection by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgorodskaya, Olga A; Körner, Roman; Kozmin, Yuri P;

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is among the most accurate methods for absolute quantification of proteins and peptides. Here, we combine acid hydrolysis with the addition of isotopically labeled standard amino acids and analysis by mass spectrometry for accurate and sensitive protein quantitation...

  13. Detection and analysis of polymerase chain reaction products by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, G.B., Doktycz, M.J., Britt, P.F., Vass, A.A., Buchanan, M.V.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes recent and ongoing efforts to overcome some of the obstacles to more routine and robust application of MALDI-TOF to analysis of polymerase chain reaction products and other information- bearing nucleic acid molecules. Methods for purifying nucleic acid samples are described, as is the application of delayed extraction TOF mass spectrometry to analysis of short oligonucleotides.

  14. A new peak detection algorithm for MALDI mass spectrometry data based on a modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt model

    OpenAIRE

    Wijetunge, Chalini D; Saeed, Isaam; Boughton, Berin A.; Roessner, Ute; Saman K. Halgamuge

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a ubiquitous analytical tool in biological research and is used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of bio-molecules. Peak detection is the essential first step in MS data analysis. Precise estimation of peak parameters such as peak summit location and peak area are critical to identify underlying bio-molecules and to estimate their abundances accurately. We propose a new method to detect and quantify peaks in mass spectra. It uses dual-tree complex wavele...

  15. Detecting Organic Compounds in Martian Soil Analogues Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the 1976 Viking missions was to determine whether organic compounds, possibly of biological origin, were present in the Martian surface soils. The Viking gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments found no evidence for any organic compounds of Martian origin above a few parts per billion in the upper 10 cm of surface soil [l], suggesting the absence of a widely distributed Martian biota. However, Benner et d. have suggested that significant amounts of non-volatile organic compounds, possibly including oxidation products of bioorganic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS [2]. Moreover, other key organic compounds important to biology, such as amino acids and nucleobases, would also likely have been missed by the Viking GCMS as these compounds require chemical derivatization to be stable in a GC column [3]. Recent pyrolysis experiments with a Mars soil analogue that had been innoculated with Escherichia coli bacteria have shown that amino acid decomposition products (amines) and nucleobases are among the most abundant products generated after pyrolysis of the bacterial cells [4,5]. At the part per billion level (Viking GCMS detection limit), these pyrolysis products generated from several million bacterial cells per gram of Martian soil would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments [4]. Analytical protocols are under development for upcoming in situ lander opportunities to target several important biological compounds including amino acids and nucleobases. For example, extraction and chemical derivatization techniques [3] are being adapted for space flight use to transform reactive or fragile molecules that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments, into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by GCMS. Recent experiments carried out at NASA Goddard have shown that using this derivatization technique all of the targeted compounds

  16. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples.

  17. Detection of stanozolol in environmental waters using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petroczi Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to frequent administration of a wide range of pharmaceutical products, various environmental waters have been found to be contaminated with pharmacologically active substances. For example, stanozolol, a synthetic anabolic steroid, is frequently misused for performance enhancement as well as for illegal growth promoting purposes in veterinary practice. Previously we reported stanozolol in hair samples collected from subjects living in Budapest. For this reason we initiated this study to explore possible environmental sources of steroid contamination. The aim of this study was to develop a method to monitor stanozolol in aqueous matrices using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Results Liquid-liquid extraction using pentane was found to be an efficient method for the extraction of stanozolol from water samples. This was followed by direct detection using LC-MS/MS. The method was capable of detecting 0.25 pg/mL stanozolol when only 5 mL water was processed in the presence of stanozolol D3 as internal standard. Fifteen bottled waters analysed were found to be negative for stanozolol. However, three out of six samples from the Danube river, collected from December '09 to November '10, were found to contain stanozolol at concentrations up to 1.82 pg/mL. In contrast, only one sample (out of six of urban tap water from Budapest city was found to contain stanozolol, at a concentration of 1.19 pg/mL. Conclusion The method developed is efficient, rapid, reproducible, sensitive and robust for the detection of stanozolol in aqueous matrices.

  18. Sputtered gas-phase dianions detected by high-sensitivity mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Golser, Robin

    2006-10-01

    The detection of small doubly-charged molecular anions by means of highly sensitive mass spectrometry is discussed. The production of these gas-phase dianions is accomplished by sputtering the specimen with Cs + ions with an energy of a few keV. It is demonstrated that dianions can be detected most easily when the molecular ion has an odd total mass; then, the dianions will show up at half-integral mass numbers in the mass spectrum. In addition, the agreement of the relative abundances of several isotopomers of a dianion with the nominal isotopic pattern corroborates the identification of a dianionic species in the mass spectrum. These features are exemplified by monitoring mixed silicon-oxygen dianions of the general form OO52-[28], Sn2-[29], SiC62-[30], BeCn2-[31], and PtX62- (X = F, Cl, Br) [32]. More recent work of this group investigated the existence of long-lived dianions containing tetrahedrally coordinated oxygen atoms, namely, O(C)42- and O(BN)42-[33], of cyclic carbon cluster dianions [34], of tetraborates [35], of derivatives of the closo-hexaborate dianion BH62-[36], and of aromatic dianions [37]. Apart from identifying (meta)stable dianions, these computations indicated a possible general formation principle: small dianions are expected to be particularly stable if they consist of a central, at least partially positively charged atom and several equivalent negatively charged ligands [2,6,30,38]. Furthermore, it was pointed out [31,39,40] that for multiply charged anions a repulsive Coulomb barrier for electron emission exists which may result in small metastable dianions which can be detected by mass spectrometry. In fact, the existence of such a Coulomb barrier was inferred from various experiments [41-47]. Apart from dianions, Cederbaum and coworkers studied different small MCAs [19,24,25,48-50]. Theoretical work by other groups [51-59] corroborated and diversified these results. Following the experimental detection of Cn2-[12], several different

  19. Detecting Organic Compounds in Martian Soil Analogues Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the 1976 Viking missions was to determine whether organic compounds, possibly of biological origin, were present in the Martian surface soils. The Viking gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments found no evidence for any organic compounds of Martian origin above a few parts per billion in the upper 10 cm of surface soil [l], suggesting the absence of a widely distributed Martian biota. However, Benner et d. have suggested that significant amounts of non-volatile organic compounds, possibly including oxidation products of bioorganic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS [2]. Moreover, other key organic compounds important to biology, such as amino acids and nucleobases, would also likely have been missed by the Viking GCMS as these compounds require chemical derivatization to be stable in a GC column [3]. Recent pyrolysis experiments with a Mars soil analogue that had been innoculated with Escherichia coli bacteria have shown that amino acid decomposition products (amines) and nucleobases are among the most abundant products generated after pyrolysis of the bacterial cells [4,5]. At the part per billion level (Viking GCMS detection limit), these pyrolysis products generated from several million bacterial cells per gram of Martian soil would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments [4]. Analytical protocols are under development for upcoming in situ lander opportunities to target several important biological compounds including amino acids and nucleobases. For example, extraction and chemical derivatization techniques [3] are being adapted for space flight use to transform reactive or fragile molecules that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments, into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by GCMS. Recent experiments carried out at NASA Goddard have shown that using this derivatization technique all of the targeted compounds

  20. BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry: Reagentless Detection of Individual Airborne Spores and Other Bioagent Particles Based on Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Paul Thomas [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Better devices are needed for the detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents. Advances in the ongoing development of one such device, the BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system, are described here in detail. The system samples individual, micrometer-sized particles directly from the air and analyzes them in real-time without sample preparation or use of reagents. At the core of the BAMS system is a dual-polarity, single-particle mass spectrometer with a laser based desorption and ionization (DI) system. The mass spectra produced by early proof-of-concept instruments were highly variable and contained limited information to differentiate certain types of similar biological particles. The investigation of this variability and subsequent changes to the DI laser system are described. The modifications have reduced the observed variability and thereby increased the usable information content in the spectra. These improvements would have little value without software to analyze and identify the mass spectra. Important improvements have been made to the algorithms that initially processed and analyzed the data. Single particles can be identified with an impressive level of accuracy, but to obtain significant reductions in the overall false alarm rate of the BAMS instrument, alarm decisions must be made dynamically on the basis of multiple analyzed particles. A statistical model has been developed to make these decisions and the resulting performance of a hypothetical BAMS system is quantitatively predicted. The predictions indicate that a BAMS system, with reasonably attainable characteristics, can operate with a very low false alarm rate (orders of magnitude lower than some currently fielded biodetectors) while still being sensitive to small concentrations of biological particles in a large range of environments. Proof-of-concept instruments, incorporating some of the modifications described here, have already performed well in independent testing.

  1. BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry: Reagentless Detection of Individual Airborne Spores and Other Bioagent Particles Based on Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, P T

    2004-07-20

    Better devices are needed for the detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents. Advances in the ongoing development of one such device, the BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system, are described here in detail. The system samples individual, micrometer-sized particles directly from the air and analyzes them in real-time without sample preparation or use of reagents. At the core of the BAMS system is a dual-polarity, single-particle mass spectrometer with a laser based desorption and ionization (DI) system. The mass spectra produced by early proof-of-concept instruments were highly variable and contained limited information to differentiate certain types of similar biological particles. The investigation of this variability and subsequent changes to the DI laser system are described. The modifications have reduced the observed variability and thereby increased the usable information content in the spectra. These improvements would have little value without software to analyze and identify the mass spectra. Important improvements have been made to the algorithms that initially processed and analyzed the data. Single particles can be identified with an impressive level of accuracy, but to obtain significant reductions in the overall false alarm rate of the BAMS instrument, alarm decisions must be made dynamically on the basis of multiple analyzed particles. A statistical model has been developed to make these decisions and the resulting performance of a hypothetical BAMS system is quantitatively predicted. The predictions indicate that a BAMS system, with reasonably attainable characteristics, can operate with a very low false alarm rate (orders of magnitude lower than some currently fielded biodetectors) while still being sensitive to small concentrations of biological particles in a large range of environments. Proof-of-concept instruments, incorporating some of the modifications described here, have already performed well in independent testing.

  2. Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, S.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2009-01-01

    With this book we want to illustrate how two quickly growing fields of instrumentation and technology, both applied to life sciences, mass spectrometry and microfluidics (or microfabrication) naturally came to meet at the end of the last century and how this marriage impacts on several types of appl

  3. Analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  4. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  5. Automated thermochemolysis reactor for detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Rands, Anthony D.; Losee, Scott C. [Torion Technologies, American Fork, UT 84003 (United States); Holt, Brian C. [Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Williams, John R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lammert, Stephen A. [Torion Technologies, American Fork, UT 84003 (United States); Robison, Richard A. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Tolley, H. Dennis [Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lee, Milton L., E-mail: milton_lee@byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-05-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An automated sample preparation system for Bacillus anthracis endospores was developed. •A thermochemolysis method was applied to produce and derivatize biomarkers for Bacillus anthracis detection. •The autoreactor controlled the precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. •Solid phase microextraction was used to extract biomarkers, and GC–MS was used for final identification. •This autoreactor was successfully applied to the identification of Bacillus anthracis endospores. -- Abstract: An automated sample preparation system was developed and tested for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for eventual use in the field. This reactor is capable of automatically processing suspected bio-threat agents to release and derivatize unique chemical biomarkers by thermochemolysis (TCM). The system automatically controls the movement of sample vials from one position to another, crimping of septum caps onto the vials, precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. The specific operations of introduction of sample vials, solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling, injection into the GC–MS system, and ejection of used vials from the system were performed manually in this study, although they can be integrated into the automated system. Manual SPME sampling is performed by following visual and audible signal prompts for inserting the fiber into and retracting it from the sampling port. A rotating carousel design allows for simultaneous sample collection, reaction, biomarker extraction and analysis of sequential samples. Dipicolinic acid methyl ester (DPAME), 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (a fragment of anthrose) and two methylated sugars were used to compare the performance of the autoreactor with manual TCM. Statistical algorithms were used to construct reliable bacterial endospore signatures, and 24

  6. Detection of 36 antibiotics in coastal waters using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NA Guangshui; GU Jia; GE Linke; ZHANG Peng; WANG Zhen; LIU Chunyang; ZHANG Lin

    2011-01-01

    Among pharmaceuticals and personal care products released into the aquatic environment,antibiotics are of particular concern,because of their ubiquity and health effects.Although scientists have recently paid more attention to the threat of antibiotics to coastal ecosystems,researchers have often focused on relatively few antibiotics,because of the absence of suitable analytical methods.We have therefore developed a method for the rapid detection of 36 antibiotic residues in coastal waters,including tetracyclines (TCs),sulfanilamides (SAs),and quinolones (QLs).The method consists of solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis,using electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive mode.The SPE was performed with Oasis HLB and Oasis MCX cartridges.Chromatographic separation on a C18 column was achieved using a binary eluent containing methanol and water with 0.1% formic acid.Typical recoveries of the analytes ranged from 67.4% to 109.3% at a fortification level of 100 ng/L.The precision of the method,calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD),was below 14.6% for all the compounds.The limits of detection (LODs) varied from 0.45 pg to 7.97 pg.The method was applied to determine the target analytes in coastal waters of the Yellow Sea in Liaoning,China.Among the tested antibiotics,31 were found in coastal waters,with their concentrations between the LOD and 212.5 ng/L.These data indicate that this method is valid for analysis of antibiotics in coastal waters.The study first reports such a large number of antibiotics along the Yellow Sea coast of Liaoning,and should facilitate future comprehensive evaluation of antibiotics in coastal ecosystems.

  7. Implementation of suitable flow injection/sequential-sample separation/preconcentration schemes for determination of trace metal concentrations using detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Wang, Jianhua

    2002-01-01

    Various preconditioning procedures encomprising appropriate separation/preconcentration schemes in order to obtain optimal sensitivity and selectivity characteristics when using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are pres......Various preconditioning procedures encomprising appropriate separation/preconcentration schemes in order to obtain optimal sensitivity and selectivity characteristics when using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS...... prior to detection are effected in a microconduit placed on top of an SI selection valve....

  8. Mass Spectrometry and Integrated Virus Detection System Characterization of MS2 Bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Dimensional Structure of the Bacterial Virus MS2. Nature. 1990, 345, pp 36-41. 24. Mark, A.; Tito, Kasper T., Karin, V.; Janos, H.; Robinson , C...Nonporous Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of Proteins from Human Breast ...Loo, J.A.; Edmonds, C.G.; Baringa, C.J.; Udseth, H.R. Bicyclization of a Weak Oxytocin Agonist Produces a Highly Potent Oxytocin Antagonist. Anal. Chem

  9. 12 Comprehensive Detection of Allergens in Grass Pollen Extracts by Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 40% of type 1-allergic individuals suffer from hypersensitivity to grass pollen. Patients are treated traditionally with specific immunotherapy using pollen extracts derived from one or several different Pooideae species. While for several species the most important allergens (group 1 and group 5) have been identified, other allergens have either not been identified or sequence data are still missing. We have used mass spectrometry (MS) together with genetic and immunolog...

  10. Mass Spectrometry-Based Detection and Assignment of Protein Posttranslational Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, S.; Burlingame, AL

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics allow the identification and quantitation of thousands of posttranslational modification (PTM) sites in a single experiment. This follows from the development of more effective class enrichment strategies, new high performance instrumentation and bioinformatic algorithms with rigorous scoring strategies. More widespread use of these combined capabilities have led to a vast expansion in our knowledge o...

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples.

  12. Physicochemical properties determining the detection probability of tryptic peptides in Fourier transform mass spectrometry. A correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael L; Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Sequence verification and mapping of posttranslational modifications require nearly 100% sequence coverage in the "bottom-up" protein analysis. Even in favorable cases, routine liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detects from protein digests peptides covering 50-90% of the sequence. Here we......, the signal increased with peptide hydrophobicity. Surprisingly, the pI values exhibited an opposite trend, with more acidic tryptic peptides detected with higher probability. A mixture of synthesized peptides of similar masses confirmed the hydrophobicity dependence but showed strong positive correlation...

  13. Determination of ascorbic acid and carotenoids in food commodities by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenich, A Garrido; Torres, M E Hernández; Vega, A Belmonte; Vidal, J L Martínez; Bolaños, P Plaza

    2005-09-21

    Two methods, one to determine ascorbic acid and one to determine lycopene and beta-carotene, in vegetables and fruits by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) have been established. The chromatographic separation of the studied compounds and their MS parameters were optimized to improve selectivity and sensitivity. In both methods, separation was carried out with two coupled columns, first a C(18) and then a dC(18), using as mobile phase 70% methanol (0.005% acetic acid) and 30% acetic acid 0.05% for ascorbic acid determination and a mixture of methanol, tetrahydrofuran, and acetonitrile (60:30:10 v/v/v) for carotenoid analysis in isocratic mode. The molecular ion was selected for the quantification in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Ascorbic acid was detected with electrospray ionization probe (ESI) in negative mode, while chemical ionization atmospheric pressure (APCI) in positive mode was used for the target carotenoids. The methodology for ascorbic acid analysis is based on an extraction with polytron using methanol and a mixture of methaphosphoric acid and acetic acid. Extraction of the carotenoids was carried out with tetrahydrofuran/methanol (1:1) (v/v). The proposed methods were applied, after their corresponding validations, to the analysis of four varieties of tomatoes, tomato in tin enriched and dried tomato, and to the analysis of mango and kiwi fruits, to compare the content in these compounds. Moreover, the influence of the process of freezing and the effect that the manipulation/preservation has in the content of ascorbic acid in tomato have also been studied.

  14. Ovarian cancer detection from metabolomic liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry data by support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker L DeEtte

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of ovarian cancer biomarker discovery efforts focus on the identification of proteins that can improve the predictive power of presently available diagnostic tests. We here show that metabolomics, the study of metabolic changes in biological systems, can also provide characteristic small molecule fingerprints related to this disease. Results In this work, new approaches to automatic classification of metabolomic data produced from sera of ovarian cancer patients and benign controls are investigated. The performance of support vector machines (SVM for the classification of liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF MS metabolomic data focusing on recognizing combinations or "panels" of potential metabolic diagnostic biomarkers was evaluated. Utilizing LC/TOF MS, sera from 37 ovarian cancer patients and 35 benign controls were studied. Optimum panels of spectral features observed in positive or/and negative ion mode electrospray (ESI MS with the ability to distinguish between control and ovarian cancer samples were selected using state-of-the-art feature selection methods such as recursive feature elimination and L1-norm SVM. Conclusion Three evaluation processes (leave-one-out-cross-validation, 12-fold-cross-validation, 52-20-split-validation were used to examine the SVM models based on the selected panels in terms of their ability for differentiating control vs. disease serum samples. The statistical significance for these feature selection results were comprehensively investigated. Classification of the serum sample test set was over 90% accurate indicating promise that the above approach may lead to the development of an accurate and reliable metabolomic-based approach for detecting ovarian cancer.

  15. Carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry for detection of endogenous steroid use: a testing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Brian D; Butch, Anthony W

    2013-07-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) testing is performed to determine if an atypical steroid profile is due to administration of an endogenous steroid. Androsterone (Andro) and etiocholanolone (Etio), and/or the androstanediols (5α- and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol) are typically analyzed by IRMS to determine the (13) C/(12) C ratio. The ratios of these target compounds are compared to the (13) C/(12) C ratio of an endogenous reference compound (ERC) such as 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol (Pdiol). Concentrations of Andro and Etio are high so (13) C/(12) C ratios can easily be measured in most urine samples. Despite the potentially improved sensitivity of the androstanediols for detecting the use of some testosterone formulations, additional processing steps are often required that increase labour costs and turnaround times. Since this can be problematic when performing large numbers of IRMS measurements, we established thresholds for Andro and Etio that can be used to determine the need for additional androstanediol testing. Using these criteria, 105 out of 2639 urine samples exceeded the Andro and/or Etio thresholds, with 52 of these samples being positive based on Andro and Etio IRMS testing alone. The remaining 53 urine samples had androstanediol IRMS testing performed and 3 samples were positive based on the androstanediol results. A similar strategy was used to establish a threshold for Pdiol to identify athletes with relatively (13) C-depleted values so that an alternative ERC can be used to confirm or establish a true endogenous reference value. Adoption of a similar strategy by other laboratories can significantly reduce IRMS sample processing and analysis times, thereby increasing testing capacity.

  16. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method for the speciation of selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenite and selenate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic spectrometric detection is presented. An organic polymeric strong anion exchange column was used as the stationary phase in combination...... with an aqueous solution of 6 mmol L-1 of salicylate ion at pH 8.5 as the mobile phase which allowed the isocratic separation of the four selenium analytes within 8 minutes. The separated selenium species were detected on-line by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) or inductively coupled plasma mass...... spectrometry (ICP-MS). The signal-to-noise ratio of the FAAS detector was optimized using a hydrogen-argon entrained-air flame and a slotted-tube atom trap (STAT) in the flame. The limit of detection (3 sigma) achieved by the HPLC-FAAS system was 1 mg L-1 of selenium (100 mu L injections) for each of the four...

  17. Aptamer-conjugated multifunctional nanoflowers as a platform for targeting, capture, and detection in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-22

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment, and detection. Here, we report the use of gold manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI-MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP). These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can (1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, (2) target cancer cells, and (3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells.

  18. Aptamer Conjugated Multifunctional Nanoflowers as a Platform for Targeting, Capture and Detection in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment and detection. Here, we report the use of gold-manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI–MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can 1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, 2) target cancer cells, and 3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells. PMID:23211039

  19. Mass spectrometry detection of fraudulent use of cow whey in water buffalo, sheep, or goat Italian ricotta cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerini, Serena; Montepeloso, Emanuela; Casella, Marialuisa; Crescenzi, Marco; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Fuselli, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    Ricotta cheese is a typical Italian product, made with whey from various species, including cow, buffalo, sheep, and goat. Ricotta cheese nominally manufactured from the last three species may be fraudulently produced using the comparatively cheaper cow whey. Exposing such food frauds requires a reliable analytical method. Despite the extensive similarities shared by whey proteins of the four species, a mass spectrometry-based analytical method was developed that exploits three species-specific peptides derived from β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin. This method can detect as little as 0.5% bovine whey in ricotta cheese from the other three species. Furthermore, a tight correlation was found (R(2)>0.99) between cow whey percentages and mass spectrometry measurements throughout the 1-50% range. Thus, this method can be used for forensic detection of ricotta cheese adulteration and, if properly validated, to provide quantitative evaluations.

  20. Rapid detection of hazardous chemicals in textiles by direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Borbála; Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Nagy, Tibor; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2016-07-01

    Residues of chemicals on clothing products were examined by direct analysis in real-time (DART) mass spectrometry. Our experiments have revealed the presence of more than 40 chemicals in 15 different clothing items. The identification was confirmed by DART tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments for 14 compounds. The most commonly detected hazardous substances were nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs), phthalic acid esters (phthalates), amines released by azo dyes, and quinoline derivates. DART-MS was able to detect NPEs on the skin of the person wearing the clothing item contaminated by NPE residuals. Automated data acquisition and processing method was developed and tested for the recognition of NPE residues thereby reducing the analysis time.

  1. A Computational Drug Metabolite Detection Using the Stable Isotopic Mass-Shift Filtering with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Pioglitazone and Flurbiprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Miyamoto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of metabolites in drug discovery is important. At present, radioisotopes and mass spectrometry are both widely used. However, rapid and comprehensive identification is still laborious and difficult. In this study, we developed new analytical software and employed a stable isotope as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. A deuterium-labeled compound and non-labeled compound were both metabolized in human liver microsomes and analyzed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS. We computationally aligned two different MS data sets and filtered ions having a specific mass-shift equal to masses of labeled isotopes between those data using our own software. For pioglitazone and flurbiprofen, eight and four metabolites, respectively, were identified with calculations of mass and formulas and chemical structural fragmentation analysis. With high resolution MS, the approach became more accurate. The approach detected two unexpected metabolites in pioglitazone, i.e., the hydroxypropanamide form and the aldehyde hydrolysis form, which other approaches such as metabolite-biotransformation list matching and mass defect filtering could not detect. We demonstrated that the approach using computational alignment and stable isotopic mass-shift filtering has the ability to identify drug metabolites and is useful in drug discovery.

  2. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins, and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols.

  3. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data.

  4. The use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to detect proteins in saliva from horses with and without systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Top Adler, Ditte Marie; Bundgaard, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess global expression of proteins in equine saliva using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Saliva was obtained from seven horses with and six horses without evidence of systemic inflammatory disease. Tryptic peptides from saliva were......, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein. The study is the first to describe detection of inflammatory proteins in horse saliva. The proteins detected were similar to those described in saliva from cattle, small ruminants and pigs. Detection of APPs in horses with systemic inflammation suggests that saliva may be used...

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  6. Detecting animal by-product intake using stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, D A F; Biscola, N P; Dos Santos, L D; Sartori, M M P; Denadai, J C; da Silva, E T; Ducatti, C; Bicudo, S D; Barraviera, B; Ferreira, R S

    2016-11-01

    Sheep are used in many countries as food and for manufacturing bioproducts. However, when these animals consume animal by-products (ABP), which is widely prohibited, there is a risk of transmitting scrapie - a fatal prion disease in human beings. Therefore, it is essential to develop sensitive methods to detect previous ABP intake to select safe animals for producing biopharmaceuticals. We used stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) for (13)C and (15)N to trace animal proteins in the serum of three groups of sheep: 1 - received only vegetable protein (VP) for 89 days; 2 - received animal and vegetable protein (AVP); and 3 - received animal and vegetable protein with animal protein subsequently removed (AVPR). Groups 2 and 3 received diets with 30% bovine meat and bone meal (MBM) added to a vegetable diet (from days 16-89 in the AVP group and until day 49 in the AVPR group, when MBM was removed). The AVPR group showed (15)N equilibrium 5 days after MBM removal (54th day). Conversely, (15)N equilibrium in the AVP group occurred 22 days later (76th day). The half-life differed between these groups by 3.55 days. In the AVPR group, (15)N elimination required 53 days, which was similar to this isotope's incorporation time. Turnover was determined based on natural (15)N signatures. IRMS followed by turnover calculations was used to evaluate the time period for the incorporation and elimination of animal protein in sheep serum. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were used to track animal protein in the diet. This method is biologically and economically relevant for the veterinary field because it can track protein over time or make a point assessment of animal feed with high sensitivity and resolution, providing a low-cost analysis coupled with fast detection. Isotopic profiles could be measured throughout the experimental period, demonstrating the potential to use the method for traceability and certification assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. DETECTING LOW-LEVEL SYNTHESIS IMPURITIES IN MODIFIED PHOSPHOROTHIOATE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Wyrzykiewicz, Tadeusz K; Limbach, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    An LC-MS method based on the use of high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS) for profiling oligonucleotides synthesis impurities is described.Oligonucleotide phosphorothioatediesters (phosphorothioate oligonucleotides), in which one of the non-bridging oxygen atoms at each phosphorus center is replaced by a sulfur atom, are now one of the most popular oligonucleotide modifications due to their ease of chemical synthesis and advantageous pharmacokinetic properties. Despite significant progress in the solid-phase oligomerization chemistry used in the manufacturing of these oligonucleotides, multiple classes of low-level impurities always accompany synthetic oligonucleotides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for the identification of these synthesis impurities. However, impurity profiling, where the entire complement of low-level synthetic impurities is identified in a single analysis, is more challenging. Here we present an LC-MS method based the use of high resolution-mass spectrometry, specifically Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS or FTMS). The optimal LC-FTMS conditions, including the stationary phase and mobile phases for the separation and identification of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, were found. The characteristics of FTMS enable charge state determination from single m/z values of low-level impurities. Charge state information then enables more accurate modeling of the detected isotopic distribution for identification of the chemical composition of the detected impurity. Using this approach, a number of phosphorothioate impurities can be detected by LC-FTMS including failure sequences carrying 3'-terminal phosphate monoester and 3'-terminal phosphorothioate monoester, incomplete backbone sulfurization and desulfurization products, high molecular weight impurities, and chloral, isobutyryl, and N(3) (2-cyanoethyl) adducts of the full

  8. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  9. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection and Quantitation of Monofluoroacetate in Plants Toxic to Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Barbosa, Joyce M; Lee, Stephen T; Cook, Daniel; Gardner, Dale R; Viana, Luis Henrique; Ré, Nilva

    2017-02-22

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatization of MFA with n-propanol in the presence of sulfuric acid to form propyl fluoroacetate was developed. This method compared favorably to a currently employed high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants. The GC-MS method was applied to the analysis of MFA in herbarium specimens of Fridericia elegans, Niedenzuella stannea, N. multiglandulosa, N. acutifolia, and Aenigmatanthera lasiandra. This is the first report of MFA being detected in F. elegans, N. multiglandulosa, N. acutifolia, and A. lasiandra, some of which have been reported to cause sudden death or that are toxic to livestock.

  10. A dried blood spot mass spectrometry metabolomic approach for rapid breast cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Qingjun Wang,1,2,* Tao Sun,3,* Yunfeng Cao,1,2,4,5 Peng Gao,2,4,6 Jun Dong,2,4 Yanhua Fang,2 Zhongze Fang,2 Xiaoyu Sun,2 Zhitu Zhu1,2 1Oncology Department 2, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, 2Personalized Treatment and Diagnosis Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University and Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jinzhou, 3Department of Internal Medicine 1, Cancer Hospital of China Medical University, Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Insititute, Shenyang, 4CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 5Key Laboratory of Contraceptives and Devices Research (NPFPC, Shanghai Engineer and Technology Research Center of Reproductive Health Drug and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai, 6Clinical Laboratory, Dalian Sixth People’s Hospital, Dalian, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Breast cancer (BC is still a lethal threat to women worldwide. An accurate screening and diagnosis strategy performed in an easy-to-operate manner is highly warranted in clinical perspective. Besides the routinely focused protein markers, blood is full of small molecular metabolites with diverse structures and properties. This study aimed to screen metabolite markers with BC diagnosis potentials.Methods: A dried blood spot-based direct infusion mass spectrometry (MS metabolomic analysis was conducted for BC and non-BC differentiation. The targeted analytes included 23 amino acids and 26 acylcarnitines.Results: Multivariate analysis screened out 21 BC-related metabolites in the blood. Regression analysis generated a diagnosis model consisting of parameters Pip, Asn, Pro, C14:1/C16, Phe/Tyr, and Gly/Ala. Tested with another set of BC and non-BC samples, this model showed a sensitivity of 92.2% and a specificity

  11. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed.

  12. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Profiling of urinary steroids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection and confirmation of androstenedione administration using isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhu; Wu, Moutian; Liu, Xin; Xu, Youxuan

    2011-12-20

    Androstenedione (4-androstene-3,17-dione) is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as an endogenous steroid. The official method to confirm androstenedione abuse is isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). According to the guidance published by WADA, atypical steroid profiles are required to trigger IRMS analysis. However, in some situations, steroid profile parameters are not effective enough to suspect the misuse of endogenous steroids. The aim of this study was to investigate the atypical steroid profile induced by androstenedione administration and the detection of androstenedione doping using IRMS. Ingestion of androstenedione resulted in changes in urinary steroid profile, including increased concentrations of androsterone (An), etiocholanolone (Etio), 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5α-diol), and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5β-diol) in all of the subjects. Nevertheless, the testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio was elevated only in some of the subjects. The rapid increases in the concentrations of An and Etio, as well as in T/E ratio for some subjects could provide indicators for initiating IRMS analysis only for a short time period, 2-22h post-administration. However, IRMS could provide positive determinations for up to 55h post-administration. This study demonstrated that, 5β-diol concentration or Etio/An ratio could be utilized as useful indicators for initiating IRMS analysis during 2-36h post-administration. Lastly, Etio, with slower clearance, could be more effectively used than An for the confirmation of androstenedione doping using IRMS.

  14. Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria by Using an Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Paul O.; Guezzou, Salim; Fonsale, Nathalie; Aubert, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of carbapenemase-producing bacteria poses a new challenge in the management of antibiotic therapies for patients. This report describes a new method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for rapid detection of carbapenemase activity in enterobacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In a panel of 78 isolates, including 41 carbapenemase-producing strains, the ULPC-MS/MS assay showed 100% agreement with molecular characterization, whereas six carbapenemase-producing isolates were not detected by the modified Hodge test. PMID:24295978

  15. Development of chiral methodologies by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet and mass spectrometry detection for duloxetine analysis in pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, Elena; Montealegre, Cristina; Marina, María Luisa; Crego, Antonio L

    2014-10-10

    Two chiral methodologies were developed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV and mass spectrometry (MS) detection to ensure the quality control of the drug duloxetine, commercialized as a pure enantiomer. Both methods were optimized to achieve a high baseline enantioresolution (Rs>2) and an acceptable precision (RSD values developed methods were validated and applied for the first time to the analysis of four pharmaceutical formulations. The content of R-duloxetine in all these samples was below the detection limit and the amount of S-duloxetine was in good agreement with the labeled content, obtaining results by the two methods that did not differ significantly (p-values >0.05).

  16. Detection of Ketones by a Novel Technology: Dipolar Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Qiangling; Zhou, Wenzhao; Zou, Xue; Wang, Hongmei; Huang, Chaoqun; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2017-05-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has played an important role in the field of real-time monitoring of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its advantages such as low limit of detection (LOD) and fast time response. Recently, a new technology of proton extraction reaction mass spectrometry (PER-MS) with negative ions OH- as the reagent ions has also been presented, which can be applied to the detection of VOCs and even inorganic compounds. In this work, we combined the functions of PTR-MS and PER-MS in one instrument, thereby developing a novel technology called dipolar proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS). The selection of PTR-MS mode and PER-MS mode was achieved in DP-PTR-MS using only water vapor in the ion source and switching the polarity. In this experiment, ketones (denoted by M) were selected as analytes. The ketone (molecular weight denoted by m) was ionized as protonated ketone [M + H]+ [mass-to-charge ratio ( m/z) m + 1] in PTR-MS mode and deprotonated ketone [M - H]- ( m/z m - 1) in PER-MS mode. By comparing the m/z value of the product ions in the two modes, the molecular weight of the ketone can be positively identified as m. Results showed that whether it is a single ketone sample or a mixed sample of eight kinds of ketones, the molecular weights can be detected with DP-PTR-MS. The newly developed DP-PTR-MS not only maintains the original advantages of PTR-MS and PER-MS in sensitive and rapid detection of ketones, but also can estimate molecular weight of ketones.

  17. Detection of Ketones by a Novel Technology: Dipolar Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Qiangling; Zhou, Wenzhao; Zou, Xue; Wang, Hongmei; Huang, Chaoqun; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2017-05-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has played an important role in the field of real-time monitoring of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to its advantages such as low limit of detection (LOD) and fast time response. Recently, a new technology of proton extraction reaction mass spectrometry (PER-MS) with negative ions OH(-) as the reagent ions has also been presented, which can be applied to the detection of VOCs and even inorganic compounds. In this work, we combined the functions of PTR-MS and PER-MS in one instrument, thereby developing a novel technology called dipolar proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (DP-PTR-MS). The selection of PTR-MS mode and PER-MS mode was achieved in DP-PTR-MS using only water vapor in the ion source and switching the polarity. In this experiment, ketones (denoted by M) were selected as analytes. The ketone (molecular weight denoted by m) was ionized as protonated ketone [M + H](+) [mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) m + 1] in PTR-MS mode and deprotonated ketone [M - H](-) (m/z m - 1) in PER-MS mode. By comparing the m/z value of the product ions in the two modes, the molecular weight of the ketone can be positively identified as m. Results showed that whether it is a single ketone sample or a mixed sample of eight kinds of ketones, the molecular weights can be detected with DP-PTR-MS. The newly developed DP-PTR-MS not only maintains the original advantages of PTR-MS and PER-MS in sensitive and rapid detection of ketones, but also can estimate molecular weight of ketones. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Interface for Detection of Extraterrestrial Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Adrian E.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Balvin, Manuel; Cook, Jamie E.; Espiritu, Ana Mellina; Kotecki, Carl; Towner, Deborah W.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The OASIS (Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy surfaces) microchip enables electrospray or thermospray of analyte for subsequent analysis by the OASIS time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Electrospray of buffer solution containing the nucleobase adenine was performed using the microchip and detected by a commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Future testing of thermospray and electrospray capability will be performed using a test fixture and vacuum chamber developed especially for optimization of ion spray at atmosphere and in low pressure environments.

  19. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Interface for Detection of Extraterrestrial Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Adrian E.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Balvin, Manuel; Cook, Jamie E.; Espiritu, Ana Mellina; Kotecki, Carl; Towner, Deborah W.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Ferrance, J.

    2014-01-01

    The OASIS (Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy surfaces) microchip enables electrospray or thermospray of analyte for subsequent analysis by the OASIS time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Electrospray of buffer solution containing the nucleobase adenine was performed using the microchip and detected by a commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Future testing of thermospray and electrospray capability will be performed using a test fixture and vacuum chamber developed especially for optimization of ion spray at atmosphere and in low pressure environments.

  20. Detection of trace organics in Mars analog samples containing perchlorate by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Danell, Ryan M; Brinckerhoff, William B; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso; Arevalo, Ricardo D; Getty, Stephanie A; Mahaffy, Paul R; Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred

    2015-02-01

    Evidence from recent Mars missions indicates the presence of perchlorate salts up to 1 wt % level in the near-surface materials. Mixed perchlorates and other oxychlorine species may complicate the detection of organic molecules in bulk martian samples when using pyrolysis techniques. To address this analytical challenge, we report here results of laboratory measurements with laser desorption mass spectrometry, including analyses performed on both commercial and Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) breadboard instruments. We demonstrate that the detection of nonvolatile organics in selected spiked mineral-matrix materials by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry is not inhibited by the presence of up to 1 wt % perchlorate salt. The organics in the sample are not significantly degraded or combusted in the LDI process, and the parent molecular ion is retained in the mass spectrum. The LDI technique provides distinct potential benefits for the detection of organics in situ on the martian surface and has the potential to aid in the search for signs of life on Mars.

  1. Detection of ergot (Claviceps purpurea) in a dairy feed component by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, P G

    1996-11-01

    A dairy feed that contained barley malt screenings caused hyperthermia in dairy cattle. The feed was suspected of containing ergot and was subsequently analyzed to determine the ricinoleate component, a special and prominent feature of oil-rich ergot tissue. Triglyceride oil was extracted by organic solvents from the dairy feed, and the oil was saponified to release fatty acids. Ricinoleate, as a methyl ester, was selectively resolved from other fatty acids by silica gel chromatography and was analyzed by capillary gas chromatography coupled with chemical ionization mass spectrometry, which demonstrated the presence of the methyl ricinoleate molecule and proved that the feed contained ergot. The methodology may be refined to monitor for ergot in powdered dairy feed more routinely.

  2. Filterless preconcentration, flow injection analysis and detection by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    The influence of interferences in the analysis of elements by inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) may be significantly diminished by utilising a protocol of flow-injection analysis (FIA). The method is based on filterless preconcentration of metallic elements at the walls...... of a knotted reactor that was made of nylon tubings. In the load mode, the preconcentration was accomplished by precipitation of metallic species in alkaline-buffered carriers onto the inner walls of the hydrofilic tube. After a preconcen-tration period of 40-120 seconds using sample volumes of 4-10 m......L, the analyte was transferred by a FIAS 400 system to the ICP-MS detector by dissolving the species in an acidic carrier. The magnitude of the enrichment factor largely depended on the time of preconcentration, on the pH-value of the preconcentration buffer and on the pH-value of the samples. Enrichment factors...

  3. Detection and characterization of N-alpha-chloramines by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Mark J

    2007-07-15

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a major product of activated neutrophils and may be important in antimicrobial activities of cells by oxidation or chlorination of susceptible amino acids. Three major peaks separated using C18 reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography RP-HPLC after incubation of leucine enkephalin (LeuEnk) with HOCl. Electrospray mass spectrometry showed masses of m/z 556.2, 590.2, and 624.4 corresponding to unmodified LeuEnk and peptides altered by addition of one or two chlorines (Cl). Formation of stable N-alpha-chloramines was indicated because the chlorinated peptides were readily reduced with the physiological reductants glutathione and ascorbic acid to LeuEnk (m/z 556.2) within 10 min. Sequence-specific ions observed in product ion spectra of single-charged monochlorinated and dichlorinated peptides were consistent with modification of the N-terminal amine. There was no evidence for chlorination of the Tyr aromatic ring in any spectra. Similar RP-HPLC profiles were obtained after oxidation of des-Tyr1-LeuEnk (GGFL) with the masses of the major products being m/z 393.3, 427.2, and 461.1. These were identified as unmodified GGFL, N-alpha-Cl-GGFL, and N-alpha-Cl2-GGFL based on comparison of tandem mass spectra. Oxidation of Met and formation of disulfide dimers was observed after incubation of either N-alpha-Cl-LeuEnk or N-alpha-Cl2-LeuEnk with a protein, indicating that both peptide N-alpha-chloramines were able to readily modify sulfur-containing amino acids within proteins. These data indicate initial formation of stable N-alpha-chorinated peptides after incubation with HOCl and suggest that N-alpha-chlorinated peptides may exist for some hours in the absence of physiological reducing agents or sulfur-containing amino acids.

  4. Detection of noncovalent complex between alpha-amylase and its microbial inhibitor tendamistat by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, D J; Collings, B A; Numao, S; Nesatyy, V J

    2001-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is now routinely used for detection of noncovalent complexes. However, detection of noncovalent protein-protein complexes is not a widespread practice and still produces some challenges for mass spectrometrists. Here we demonstrate the detection of a noncovalent protein-protein complex between alpha-amylase and its microbial inhibitor tendamistat using ESI-MS. Crude porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase was purified using a glycogen precipitation method. Noncovalent complexes between porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase and its microbial inhibitor tendamistat are probed and detected using ESI-MS. The atmosphere-vacuum ESI conditions along with solution conditions and the ratio of inhibitor over enzyme strongly affect the detection of noncovalent complexes in the gas phase. ESI mass spectra of alpha-amylase at pH 7 exhibited charge states significantly lower than that reported previously, which is indicative of a native protein conformation necessary to produce a noncovalent complex. Detection of noncovalent complexes in the gas phase suggests that further use of conventional biochemical approaches to provide a qualitative, and in some cases even quantitative, characterization of equilibria of noncovalent complexes in solution is possible.

  5. Detection of glutaric acidemia type 1 in infants through tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ruby P; Bishnupriya, G; Thushara, P K; Alap, Christy; Cariappa, Rohit; Annapoorani; Viswanathan, Kasi

    2015-06-01

    Glutaric acidemia type 1 (GA1) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder which goes underdiagnosed due to its latency period and subtle presentation. A pilot clinical study was conducted to assess the usefulness, specificity and sensitivity of the tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometer, specifically the Abbott (AB) Sciex 3200, in the screening for GA1 using dried blood spots. A total of 17,100 specimens, comprising pediatric patients and healthy newborns, were screened from June 2012 to June 2014. A selection criterion was applied to increase the range of samples tested. 14 of the total specimens tested presumptive positive for GA1, of whom all were symptomatic. The diagnosis was confirmed in 4 of the 14 cases and they were started on treatment. 4 cases expired before confirmation. The remaining cases were empirically started on treatment. Most of the patients responded favorably to the dietary management. One important observation was that the older symptomatic children diagnosed with GA1 had poorer outcomes in terms of recovery of delayed milestones and mental deterioration, further emphasizing the need for early diagnosis of organic acidemias along with the other biochemical defects. Tandem mass spectrometry was found to be more than 93.33% sensitive and more than 99.42% specific. The screening test proved to be very simple and economical.

  6. Detection of glutaric acidemia type 1 in infants through tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby P. Babu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutaric acidemia type 1 (GA1 is a rare inherited metabolic disorder which goes underdiagnosed due to its latency period and subtle presentation. A pilot clinical study was conducted to assess the usefulness, specificity and sensitivity of the tandem mass (MS/MS spectrometer, specifically the Abbott (AB Sciex 3200, in the screening for GA1 using dried blood spots. A total of 17,100 specimens, comprising pediatric patients and healthy newborns, were screened from June 2012 to June 2014. A selection criterion was applied to increase the range of samples tested. 14 of the total specimens tested presumptive positive for GA1, of whom all were symptomatic. The diagnosis was confirmed in 4 of the 14 cases and they were started on treatment. 4 cases expired before confirmation. The remaining cases were empirically started on treatment. Most of the patients responded favorably to the dietary management. One important observation was that the older symptomatic children diagnosed with GA1 had poorer outcomes in terms of recovery of delayed milestones and mental deterioration, further emphasizing the need for early diagnosis of organic acidemias along with the other biochemical defects. Tandem mass spectrometry was found to be more than 93.33% sensitive and more than 99.42% specific. The screening test proved to be very simple and economical.

  7. Detection of follicular transport of lidocaine and metabolism in adipose tissue in pig ear skin by DESI mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alvise, Janina; Mortensen, Rasmus; Hansen, Steen H; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is demonstrated as a detection technique for penetration experiments of drugs in skin. Lidocaine ointment was used as the model compound in ex vivo experiments with whole pig ears as the skin model. Follicular transport of lidocaine into the deeper skin layers is demonstrated for the first time. Furthermore, metabolism of lidocaine to 3-OH-lidocaine was observed in subcutaneous tissue as well as in lobules of white adipose tissue surrounding the hair follicles. These results suggest that it is advantageous to use full thickness skin, including subcutaneous tissue, for skin metabolism studies.

  8. Segmentation of multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry data for semi-automatic detection of regions of interest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Gormanns

    Full Text Available Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS associates secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS with detection of several atomic masses, the use of stable isotopes as labels, and affiliated quantitative image-analysis software. By associating image and measure, MIMS allows one to obtain quantitative information about biological processes in sub-cellular domains. MIMS can be applied to a wide range of biomedical problems, in particular metabolism and cell fate [1], [2], [3]. In order to obtain morphologically pertinent data from MIMS images, we have to define regions of interest (ROIs. ROIs are drawn by hand, a tedious and time-consuming process. We have developed and successfully applied a support vector machine (SVM for segmentation of MIMS images that allows fast, semi-automatic boundary detection of regions of interests. Using the SVM, high-quality ROIs (as compared to an expert's manual delineation were obtained for 2 types of images derived from unrelated data sets. This automation simplifies, accelerates and improves the post-processing analysis of MIMS images. This approach has been integrated into "Open MIMS," an ImageJ-plugin for comprehensive analysis of MIMS images that is available online at http://www.nrims.hms.harvard.edu/NRIMS_ImageJ.php.

  9. Segmentation of Multi-Isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data for Semi-Automatic Detection of Regions of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczatek, J. Collin; Turck, Christoph W.; Lechene, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) associates secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with detection of several atomic masses, the use of stable isotopes as labels, and affiliated quantitative image-analysis software. By associating image and measure, MIMS allows one to obtain quantitative information about biological processes in sub-cellular domains. MIMS can be applied to a wide range of biomedical problems, in particular metabolism and cell fate [1], [2], [3]. In order to obtain morphologically pertinent data from MIMS images, we have to define regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs are drawn by hand, a tedious and time-consuming process. We have developed and successfully applied a support vector machine (SVM) for segmentation of MIMS images that allows fast, semi-automatic boundary detection of regions of interests. Using the SVM, high-quality ROIs (as compared to an expert's manual delineation) were obtained for 2 types of images derived from unrelated data sets. This automation simplifies, accelerates and improves the post-processing analysis of MIMS images. This approach has been integrated into “Open MIMS,” an ImageJ-plugin for comprehensive analysis of MIMS images that is available online at http://www.nrims.hms.harvard.edu/NRIMS_ImageJ.php. PMID:22347386

  10. Photo-ionisation mass spectrometry as detection method for gas chromatography. Optical selectivity and multidimensional comprehensive separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Welthagen, Werner; Gröger, Thomas

    2008-03-14

    Mass spectrometry (MS) with soft ionisation techniques (i.e. ionisation without fragmentation of the analyte molecules) for gaseous samples exhibits interesting analytical properties for direct analysis applications (i.e. direct inlet mass spectrometric on-line monitoring) as well as mass spectrometric detection method for gas chromatography (GC-MS). Commonly either chemical ionisation (CI) or field ionisation (FI) is applied as soft ionisation technology for GC-MS. An interesting alternative to the CI and FI technologies methods are photo-ionisation (PI) methods. PI overcomes some of the limitations of CI and FI and furthermore add some unique analytical properties. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) method uses intense UV-laser pulses (wavelength range approximately 350-193 nm) for highly selective, sensitive and soft ionisation of predominately aromatic compounds. The single photon ionisation (SPI) method utilises VUV light (from lamps or laser sources, wavelengths range approximately 150-110 nm) can be used for a universal soft ionisation of organic molecules. In this article the historical development as well as the current status and concepts of gas chromatography hyphenated to photo-ionisation mass spectrometry are reviewed.

  11. Comparison of differential mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry for gas chromatographic detection of ignitable liquids from fire debris using projected difference resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Chen, Ping; Harrington, Peter B

    2009-08-01

    The significance of forensic arson analysis accelerates the applications of new technologies in this area. Based on the previously reported application of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a detection method for gas chromatography (GC) in arson analysis, the performances of DMS and mass spectrometry (MS) were compared using a novel chemometric tool, projected difference resolutions (PDRs). The PDR results show that one-way mass spectra data exhibit higher resolution than DMS data, while total ion chromatograms from GC-DMS show higher resolution than that from GC/MS for differentiating seven kinds of ignitable liquids. Combining the information from both chromatography and spectra, two-way data always have higher resolution than one-way data for these two detection methods, and GC/MS would exhibit better performance than GC-DMS according to the minimum resolution value. To verify the PDR results, a fuzzy rule-building expert system was applied for classifying these seven kinds of ignitable liquids from fire debris based on GC-DMS and GC/MS data, respectively. The prediction accuracies were consistent with PDR results, which proved that PDR is a powerful tool in comparing the performances of different analysis methods for pattern recognition.

  12. Mass spectrometry-based methods for detection and differentiation of botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jurgen G.; Boyer, Anne E.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Moura, Hercules; Barr, John R.; Woolfitt, Adrian R.

    2009-11-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for detecting the presence of clostridial neurotoxins in a sample by mixing a sample with a peptide that can serve as a substrate for proteolytic activity of a clostridial neurotoxin; and measuring for proteolytic activity of a clostridial neurotoxin by a mass spectroscopy technique. In one embodiment, the peptide can have an affinity tag attached at two or more sites.

  13. Detection of Sulfur-Fumigated Paeoniae Alba Radix in Complex Preparations by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Lin Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Alba Radix (PAR in different complex preparations is challenging due to the relatively lower content of PAR and interference from more complicated components in complex preparations with different multiple constituent herbs. In this study, a high performance liquid chromatography- triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for detecting sulfur-fumigated PAR in different complex preparations. Paeoniflorin, the major component of PAR, and paeoniflorin sulfonate, the characteristic artifact transformed from paeoniflorin during sulfur-fumigation of PAR, were used as chemical markers. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM scan was employed to maximize sensitivity and selectivity. Through optimizing full mass scan and daughter ion scan conditions, two mass transitions were selected and employed respectively for unequivocal identification of paeoniflorin and paeoniflorin sulfonate. The detection limits for paeoniflorin and paeoniflorin sulfonate using MRM were much lower than those detected with UV 270 nm. Paeoniflorin and paeoniflorin sulfonate could be simultaneously detected in different commercial PAR-containing complex preparations without interference of other components using the established method, indicating that the newly established method was selective and sensitive enough for screening sulfur-fumigated PAR in commercial complex preparations.

  14. High-resolution Orbitrap™-based mass spectrometry for rapid detection of peanuts in nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaci, Linda; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Bavaro, Simona L; Pilolli, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Peanut represents one of the most harmful allergenic foods capable of triggering severe and sometimes lethal reactions in allergic consumers upon ingestion of even small amounts. Several proteins capable of inducing allergic reactions that have been recognised by patients' IgE antibodies have been identified from this nut source. Methods mainly based on ELISA assays have been developed in order to detect peanuts in several food commodities. In addition LC-MS/MS methods based on different mass analysers have also been devised for tracing peanut contamination in different foods achieving low limits of detection. The applicability of a benchtop high-resolution Exactive™ mass spectrometer has never been investigated for the rapid screening of peanut contamination in complex food matrices like mixtures of nuts. We report in this paper the design of suitable peanut markers and the development of an high-resolution Orbitrap™ mass spectrometer-based method for peanut detection in a mixture of nuts species. With this aim, different types of samples were prepared: (1) nuts-based powder made up of a mixture of hazelnuts, pistachios, almonds and walnuts; and (2) nuts powder fortified with peanuts. Different levels of fortifications were produced and the applicability of the method was tested. Finally, a subset of six peptides fulfilling specific analytical requirements was chosen to check the suitability of the method tailored to the detection of peanuts in nuts-based products, and two of them, peptides VYD and WLG, were selected as quantitative markers. The method proved to be a suitable screening tool to assess the presence of traces of peanuts in other tree nuts with a limit of detection as low as 4 µg of peanuts proteins or 26 µg of peanuts in 1 g of matrix.

  15. Rapid and High-Throughput Detection and Quantitation of Radiation Biomarkers in Human and Nonhuman Primates by Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L.; Pannkuk, Evan L.; Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Hall, Adam B.; Fornace, Albert J.; Vouros, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Radiation exposure is an important public health issue due to a range of accidental and intentional threats. Prompt and effective large-scale screening and appropriate use of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate radiation injury requires rapid methods for determining the radiation dose. In a number of studies, metabolomics has identified small-molecule biomarkers responding to the radiation dose. Differential mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) has been used for similar compounds for high-throughput small-molecule detection and quantitation. In this study, we show that DMS-MS can detect and quantify two radiation biomarkers, trimethyl-L-lysine (TML) and hypoxanthine. Hypoxanthine is a human and nonhuman primate (NHP) radiation biomarker and metabolic intermediate, whereas TML is a radiation biomarker in humans but not in NHP, which is involved in carnitine synthesis. They have been analyzed by DMS-MS from urine samples after a simple strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE). The dramatic suppression of background and chemical noise provided by DMS-MS results in an approximately 10-fold reduction in time, including sample pretreatment time, compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). DMS-MS quantitation accuracy has been verified by validation testing for each biomarker. Human samples are not yet available, but for hypoxanthine, selected NHP urine samples (pre- and 7-d-post 10 Gy exposure) were analyzed, resulting in a mean change in concentration essentially identical to that obtained by LC-MS (fold-change 2.76 versus 2.59). These results confirm the potential of DMS-MS for field or clinical first-level rapid screening for radiation exposure.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of inhaled organic aerosol particles by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhomchuk, E V; Gulevich, D G; Taratayko, A I; Baklanov, A M; Selivanova, A V; Trubitsyna, T A; Voronova, I V; Kalinkin, P N; Okunev, A G; Rastigeev, S A; Reznikov, V A; Semeykina, V S; Sashkina, K A; Parkhomchuk, V V

    2016-09-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was shown to be applicable for studying the penetration of organic aerosols, inhaled by laboratory mice at ultra-low concentration ca. 10(3) cm(-3). We synthesized polystyrene (PS) beads, composed of radiocarbon-labeled styrene, for testing them as model organic aerosols. As a source of radiocarbon we used methyl alcohol with radioactivity. Radiolabeled polystyrene beads were obtained by emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of synthesized (14)C-styrene initiated by K2S2O8 in aqueous media. Aerosol particles were produced by pneumatic spraying of diluted (14)C-PS latex. Mice inhaled (14)C-PS aerosol consisting of the mix of 10(3) 225-nm particles per 1 cm(3) and 5·10(3) 25-nm particles per 1 cm(3) for 30 min every day during five days. Several millions of 225-nm particles deposited in the lungs and slowly excreted from them during two weeks of postexposure. Penetration of particles matter was also observed for liver, kidneys and brain, but not for a heart.

  17. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  18. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Koeplinger, Kenneth A. [Merck Research Laboratories; Vavek, Marissa [Merck Research Laboratories; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony [Rutgers University

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  19. International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, R G; Gelpi, E; Nibbering, N M

    2001-02-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the recently formalized International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS). It is presented here in order to increase awareness of the opportunities for collaboration in mass spectrometry in an international context. It also describes the recent 15th International Mass Spectrometry Conference, held August/September 2000, in Barcelona. Each of the authors is associated with the IMSS. The 15th Conference, which covers all of mass spectrometry on a triennial basis, was chaired by Professor Emilio Gelpi of the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Barcelona. The outgoing and founding President of the IMSS is Professor Graham Cooks, Purdue University, and the incoming President is Professor Nico Nibbering, University of Amsterdam. Similar material has been provided to the Editors of other journals that cover mass spectrometry.

  20. Detection of nitro-organic and peroxide explosives in latent fingermarks by DART- and SALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Frederick; Seviour, John; Lim, Angelina Yimei; Elumbaring-Salazar, Cheryl Grace; Loke, Jason; Ma, Jan

    2012-09-10

    The ability of two mass spectrometric methods, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) and direct analysis in real time (DART-MS), to detect the presence of seven common explosives (six nitro-organic- and one peroxide-type) in spiked latent fingermarks has been examined. It was found that each explosive could be detected with nanogram sensitivity for marks resulting from direct finger contact with a glass probe by DART-MS or onto stainless steel target plates using SALDI-TOF-MS for marks pre-dusted with one type of commercial black magnetic powder. These explosives also could be detected in latent marks lifted from six common surfaces (paper, plastic bag, metal drinks can, wood laminate, adhesive tape and white ceramic tile) whereas no explosive could be detected in equivalent pre-dusted marks on the surface of a commercial lifting tape by the DART-MS method due to high background interference from the tape material. The presence of TNT and Tetryl could be detected in pre-dusted latent fingermarks on a commercial lifting tape for up to 29 days sealed and stored under ambient conditions.

  1. Detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S; Ehorn, C A

    1999-10-01

    A confirmatory method for the detection and quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is presented. The method employs gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) using an internal ionization ion trap detector for sensitive MS-MS-in-time measurements of LSD extracted from urine. Following a single-step solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, underivatized LSD can be measured with limits of quantitation and detection of 80 and 20 pg/mL, respectively. Temperature-programmed on-column injections of urine extracts were linear over the concentration range 20-2000 pg/mL (r2 = 0.999). Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were LSD-positive samples in this laboratory. Comparisons with alternate GC-MS methods and extraction procedures are discussed.

  2. The application of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of high explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle (~1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  3. Method Development for the Detection of Human Myostatin by High-Resolution and Targeted Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Hassendrini Nileishika; Ashman, Keith; Vaswani, Kanchan; Kvaskoff, David; Rice, Gregory Edward; Mitchell, Murray David

    2014-06-30

    Myostatin, a highly conserved secretory protein, negatively regulates muscle development, affecting both the proliferation and differentiation of muscle cells. Proteolytic processing of the myostatin precursor protein generates a myostatin pro-peptide and mature protein. Dimerization of the mature myostatin protein creates the active form of myostatin. Myostatin dimer activity can be inhibited by noncovalent binding of two monomeric myostatin pro-peptides. This ability for myostatin to self-regulate as well as the altered expression of myostatin in states of abnormal health (e.g., muscle wasting) support the need for specific detection of myostatin forms. Current protein detection methods (e.g., Western blot) rely greatly on antibodies and are semiquantitative at best. Tandem mass spectometry (as in this study) provides a highly specific method of detection, enabling the characterization of myostatin protein forms through the analysis of discrete peptides fragments. Utilizing the scheduled high-resolution multiple reaction monitoring paradigm (sMRM(HR); AB SCIEX 5600 TripleTOF) we identified the lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of both mature (DFGLDCDEHSTESR) and pro-peptide regions (ELIDQYDVQR) as 0.19 nmol/L. Furthermore, scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM; AB SCIEX QTRAP 5500) identified a LLOQ for a peptide of the pro-peptide region (LETAPNISK) as 0.16 nmol/L and a peptide of the mature region (EQIIYGK) as 0.25 nmol/L.

  4. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  5. gamma-Ray-mediated oxidative labeling for detecting protein conformational changes by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Wren, J Clara; Konermann, Lars

    2008-03-15

    Exposure of proteins to hydroxyl radicals induces the incorporation of oxygen atoms into solvent-exposed side chains. Earlier studies have employed this approach for mapping protein-protein interactions in mass spectrometry-based footprinting experiments. This work explores whether the overall level of gamma-ray mediated oxidative labeling can be used for monitoring large-scale conformational changes. According to a recently developed kinetic model (Tong, X.; Wren, J. C.; Konermann, L. Anal. Chem. 2007, 79, 6376-6382), the apparent first-order rate constant for oxidative labeling can be approximated as k(app) = k(RAD)/([P](tot) + C/k(u)), where k(RAD) is the primary rate of *OH formation, [P](tot) is the protein concentration, C reflects the presence of competing radical deactivation channels, and ku is the rate constant at which hydroxyl radicals react with the protein. The current study introduces conformational effects into this model by proposing that k(u) = [see text for formula] , where N is the number of amino acids, alphai is a measure for the solvent exposure of residue i, and k(ch)(i) is the oxidation rate constant that would apply for a completely solvent-exposed side chain. Using myoglobin and cytochrome c as model systems, it is demonstrated that unfolding by addition of H(3)PO(4) increases k(app) by up to 30% and 70%, respectively. Unfolding by other commonly used denaturants such as organic acids or urea results in dramatically lower oxidation levels than for the native state, a behavior that is due to the radical scavenging activity of these substances (corresponding to an increased value of C). Control experiments on model peptides are suitable for identifying such "secondary" effects, i.e., factors that modify oxidation levels without being related to conformational changes. In conclusion, the overall *OH labeling level represents a viable probe of large-scale protein conformational changes only under conditions where secondary effects are known

  6. Novel algorithm for simultaneous component detection and pseudo-molecular ion characterization in liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaoan; Wo, Siukwan [School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Ho, Hingman; Han, Quanbin [School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, 7 Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Fan, Xiaohui [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zuo, Zhong, E-mail: joanzuo@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel stepwise component detection algorithm (SCDA) for LC–MS datasets. • New isotopic distribution and adduct-ion models for mass spectra. • Automatic component classification based on adduct-ion and isotopic distributions. - Abstract: Resolving components and determining their pseudo-molecular ions (PMIs) are crucial steps in identifying complex herbal mixtures by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. To tackle such labor-intensive steps, we present here a novel algorithm for simultaneous detection of components and their PMIs. Our method consists of three steps: (1) obtaining a simplified dataset containing only mono-isotopic masses by removal of background noise and isotopic cluster ions based on the isotopic distribution model derived from all the reported natural compounds in dictionary of natural products; (2) stepwise resolving and removing all features of the highest abundant component from current simplified dataset and calculating PMI of each component according to an adduct-ion model, in which all non-fragment ions in a mass spectrum are considered as PMI plus one or several neutral species; (3) visual classification of detected components by principal component analysis (PCA) to exclude possible non-natural compounds (such as pharmaceutical excipients). This algorithm has been successfully applied to a standard mixture and three herbal extract/preparations. It indicated that our algorithm could detect components’ features as a whole and report their PMI with an accuracy of more than 98%. Furthermore, components originated from excipients/contaminants could be easily separated from those natural components in the bi-plots of PCA.

  7. Detection, differentiation, and identification of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes C, CD, D, and DC by highly specific immunoassays and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansbauer, Eva-Maria; Skiba, Martin; Endermann, Tanja; Weisemann, Jasmin; Stern, Daniel; Dorner, Martin B; Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Wolf, Jessica; Luginbühl, Werner; Messelhäußer, Ute; Bellanger, Laurent; Woudstra, Cédric; Rummel, Andreas; Fach, Patrick; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2016-09-21

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes C and D and their mosaic variants CD and DC cause severe cases of botulism in animal husbandry and wildlife. Epidemiological data on the exact serotype or toxin variant causing outbreaks are rarely available, mainly because of their high sequence identity and the lack of fast and specific screening tools to detect and differentiate the four similar toxins. To fill this gap, we developed four highly specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) able to detect and differentiate botulinum neurotoxins type BoNT/C, D, CD, and DC based on four distinct combinations of specific monoclonal antibodies targeting both conserved and divergent subdomains of the four toxins. Here, highly sensitive detection with detection limits between 2 and 24 pg mL(-1) was achieved. The ELISAs were extensively validated and results were compared with data obtained by quantitative real-time PCR using a panel of Clostridium botulinum strains, real sample materials from veterinary botulism outbreaks, and non-BoNT-producing Clostridia. Additionally, in order to verify the results obtained by ELISA screening, the new monoclonal antibodies were used for BoNT enrichment and subsequent detection (i) on a functional level by endopeptidase mass spectrometry (Endopep-MS) assays and (ii) on a protein sequence level by LC-MS/MS spectrometry. Based on all technical information gathered in the validation study, the four differentiating ELISAs turned out to be highly reliable screening tools for the rapid analysis of veterinary botulism cases and should aid future field investigations of botulism outbreaks and the acquisition of epidemiological data.

  8. Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry detects rapid changes in volatile metabolite emission by Mycobacterium smegmatis after the addition of specific antimicrobial agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespo, E.; Cristescu, S. M.; de Ronde, H.; Kuijper, S.; Kolk, A.H.J.; Anthony, R.M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic activity of plants, animals or microbes can be monitored by gas headspace analysis. This can be achieved using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), a highly sensitive detection method for trace gas analysis. PTR-MS is rapid and can detect metabolic responses on-line as

  9. Capillary electrophoresis with UV detection and mass spectrometry in method development for profiling metabolites of steroid hormone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, Heli; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Oresic, Matej

    2008-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for comprehensive profiling of metabolites involved in mammalian steroid metabolism. The study was performed using the partial filling micellar electrokinetic chromatography (PF-MEKC) technique for determination of endogenous low-hydrophilic steroids. The detection techniques in capillary electrophoresis were UV absorption and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Thirteen steroids were included in the method development, and the selected were metabolites involved in major pathways of steroid biosynthesis. Although only eight of them could be separated and detected with UV, they could be identified by ESI-MS using selected ion monitoring (SIM) technique. Tandem MS spectra were also collected. UV detection was more sensitive than MS due to better separation of compounds and the selective signal sensitivity. The lowest limits of detection were 10-100 ng/mL for cortisone, corticosterone, hydrocortisone and testosterone. The other steroids could be detected at 500-1000 ng/mL. The identification of cortisone, corticosterone, hydrocortisone, estrogen and testosterone were made in patient urine samples and their concentrations were 1-40 microg/L.

  10. Broad-Range Detection of Microorganisms Directly from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens by PCR/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullberg, Måns; Lüthje, Petra; Mölling, Paula; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    The clinical demand on rapid microbiological diagnostic is constantly increasing. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, PCR/ESI-MS, offers detection and identification of over 750 bacteria and Candida species directly from clinical specimens within 6 hours. In this study, we investigated the clinical performance of the IRIDICA BAC LRT Assay for detection of bacterial pathogens in 121 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples that were received consecutively at our bacterial laboratory for BAL culture. Commensal or pathogenic microorganisms were detected in 118/121 (98%) BAL samples by PCR/ESI-MS, while in 104/121 (86%) samples by routine culture (PPCR/ESI-MS was evaluated in comparison with conventional culture-based or molecular methods. The agreement between positive findings was overall good. Most Staphylococcus aureus-positive PCR/ESI-MS results were confirmed by culture or species-specific PCR (27/33, 82%). The identity of Streptococcus pneumoniae could however be confirmed for only 6/17 (35%) PCR/ESI-MS-positive samples. Non-cultivable and fastidious pathogens, which were not covered by standard culture procedures were readily detected by PCR/ESI-MS, including Legionella pneumophila, Bordetella pertussis, Norcadia species and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS detected a broad range of potential pathogens with equal or superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods within few hours directly from BAL samples. This novel method might thus provide a relevant tool for diagnostics in critically ill patients. PMID:28085931

  11. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  12. Direct detection of free fatty acids in edible oils using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuping; Du, Zhenxia; Zhang, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Determination of free fatty acids (FFAs) in food products is of enormous interest mainly because they are related to the quality and authenticity of the oils. In this study, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), followed by an electrospray ionisation triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), is shown to provide a novel method for the separation and detection of FFAs in edible oils without any pretreatment. Eight FFAs were separated on a HSS C18 SB column with gradient elution within 3 min. Effects of different columns, modifiers and column temperature changes were evaluated. The results indicated the feasibility of this method for the high-throughput determination of individual FFAs with satisfactory correlation coefficients (R(2)>0.994) and good reproducibility of RSDoil were successfully distinguished into several categories, showing a potential application for the determination of oil quality or authenticity.

  13. Perfume fingerprinting by easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry: nearly instantaneous typification and counterfeit detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Renato; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Marques, Lygia Azevedo; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira

    2008-11-01

    Perfume counterfeiting is an illegal worldwide practice that involves huge economic losses and potential consumer risk. EASI is a simple, easily performed and rapidly implemented desorption/ionization technique for ambient mass spectrometry (MS). Herein we demonstrate that EASI-MS allows nearly instantaneous perfume typification and counterfeit detection. Samples are simply sprayed onto a glass rod or paper surface and, after a few seconds of ambient drying, a profile of the most polar components of the perfume is acquired. These components provide unique and reproducible chemical signatures for authentic perfume samples. Counterfeiting is readily recognized since the exact set and relative proportions of the more polar chemicals, sometimes at low concentrations, are unknown or hard to reproduce by the counterfeiters and hence very distinct and variable EASI-MS profiles are observed for the counterfeit samples.

  14. Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Detection of Metabolites of Aconite Alkaloids in Intestinal Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Hou, Guangyue; Xing, Junpeng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, direct analysis of real time ionization combined with multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (DART-MSn) was used to investigate the metabolic profile of aconite alkaloids in rat intestinal bacteria. A total of 36 metabolites from three aconite alkaloids were identified by using DART-MSn, and the feasibility of quantitative analysis of these analytes was examined. Key parameters of the DART ion source, such as helium gas temperature and pressure, the source-to-MS distance, and the speed of the autosampler, were optimized to achieve high sensitivity, enhance reproducibility, and reduce the occurrence of fragmentation. The instrument analysis time for one sample can be less than 10 s for this method. Compared with ESI-MS and UPLC-MS, the DART-MS is more efficient for directly detecting metabolic samples, and has the advantage of being a simple, high-speed, high-throughput method.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis-diode array detection--electrospray mass spectrometry for the analysis of selected tropane alkaloids in plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, L; Cherkaoui, S; Christen, P; Veuthey, J L

    1999-11-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis, coupled to UV and interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), is described for the simultaneous analysis of hyoscyamine and scopolamine. On-line UV detection occurred at 22 cm from the inlet of the capillary and ESI-MS monitoring was performed along the entire length of the capillary (85 cm). An alkaline solution of 40 mM ammonium acetate at pH 8.5 was suitable for the analysis of the alkaloids under consideration. Under the optimized conditions, including CE and ESI-MS parameters, the two alkaloids were resolved within a short time and with very high sensitivity. The differentiation of hyoscyamine and its positional isomer littorine, commonly encountered in plant material, is also presented using up-front collision-induced dissociation. Finally, the developed method was applied to the analysis of these alkaloids in Belladonna leaf extract and in Datura candida x D. aurea hairy root extract.

  16. Detection and Characterization of Non-covalent Complex between Lappaconitine and β-Cyclodextrin by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xuan XU; Li LI; Hao YUE; Zhi Qiang LIU; Ming Quan GUO; Shu Ying LIU

    2006-01-01

    The non-covalent complexes between lappaconitine (LA) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) have been detected and characterized by electrospray ionization combined with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The experimental results showed that only 1:1 non-covalent complex can be formed in different starting molar ratios of LA to β-CD. Furthermore, the diagnostic fragmentation of the β-CD-LA complex, with a significant contribution of covalent fragmentation of LA leaving the N-acetyl anthranoyl (AN) moiety inserted to β-CD, provided the convincing evidence for the formation of non-covalent complex between LA and β-CD and the cite of LA molecule included to cavity of β-CD assigned to AN residue.

  17. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: an emerging technology for detecting rare cells in tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managh, Amy J; Hutchinson, Robert W; Riquelme, Paloma; Broichhausen, Christiane; Wege, Anja K; Ritter, Uwe; Ahrens, Norbert; Koehl, Gudrun E; Walter, Lisa; Florian, Christian; Schlitt, Hans J; Reid, Helen J; Geissler, Edward K; Sharp, Barry L; Hutchinson, James A

    2014-09-01

    Administering immunoregulatory cells to patients as medicinal agents is a potentially revolutionary approach to the treatment of immunologically mediated diseases. Presently, there are no satisfactory, clinically applicable methods of tracking human cells in patients with adequate spatial resolution and target cell specificity over a sufficient period of time. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) represents a potential solution to the problem of detecting very rare cells in tissues. In this article, this exquisitely sensitive technique is applied to the tracking of gold-labeled human regulatory macrophages (Mregs) in immunodeficient mice. Optimal conditions for labeling Mregs with 50-nm gold particles were investigated by exposing Mregs in culture to variable concentrations of label: Mregs incubated with 3.5 × 10(9) particles/ml for 1 h incorporated an average of 3.39 × 10(8) Au atoms/cell without loss of cell viability. Analysis of single, gold-labeled Mregs by LA-ICP-MS registered an average of 1.9 × 10(5) counts/cell. Under these conditions, 100% labeling efficiency was achieved, and label was retained by Mregs for ≥36 h. Gold-labeled Mregs adhered to glass surfaces; after 24 h of culture, it was possible to colabel these cells with human-specific (154)Sm-tagged anti-HLA-DR or (174)Yb-tagged anti-CD45 mAbs. Following injection into immunodeficient mice, signals from gold-labeled human Mregs could be detected in mouse lung, liver, and spleen for at least 7 d by solution-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and LA-ICP-MS. These promising results indicate that LA-ICP-MS tissue imaging has great potential as an analytical technique in immunology. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Mass Spectrometry of Halopyrazolium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Pande, U. C.;

    1983-01-01

    Eleven halogen substituted 1-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolium bromides or chlorides were investigated by field desorption, field ionization, and electron impact mass spectrometry. Dealkylation was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition. An exchange between covalent and ionic halogen prior...

  19. Membrane lipid profile monitored by mass spectrometry detected differences between fresh and vitrified in vitro-produced bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Beatriz C S; Rocha-Frigoni, Nathália A S; Cabral, Elaine C; Franco, Marcos F; Ferreira, Christina R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Mingoti, Gisele Z

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of vitrification on membrane lipid profile obtained by mass spectrometry (MS) of in vitro-produced bovine embryos. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has been used to obtain individual embryo membrane lipid profiles. Due to conditions of analysis, mainly membrane lipids, most favorably phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and sphingomyelins (SMs) have been detected. The following ions described by their mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) and respective attribution presented increased relative abundance (1.2-20×) in the vitrified group: 703.5 [SM (16:0) + H]+; 722.5 [PC (40:3) + Na]+; 758.5 [PC (34:2) + H]+; 762.5 [PC (34:0) + H]+; 790.5 [PC (36:0) + H]+ and 810.5 [PC (38:4) + H]+ and/or [PC (36:1) + Na]+. The ion with a m/z 744.5 [PCp (34:1) and/or PCe (34:2)] was 3.4-fold more abundant in the fresh group. Interestingly, ions with m/z 722.5 or 744.5 indicate the presence of lipid species, which are more resistant to enzymatic degradation as they contain fatty acyl residues linked through ether type bonds (alkyl ether or plasmalogens, indicated by the lowercase 'e' and 'p', respectively) to the glycerol structure. The results indicate that cryopreservation impacts the membrane lipid profile, and that these alterations can be properly monitored by MALDI-MS. Membrane lipids can therefore be evaluated by MALDI-MS to monitor the effect of cryopreservation on membrane lipids, and to investigate changes in lipid profile that may reflect the metabolic response to the cryopreservation stress or changes in the environmental conditions.

  20. Detection of Gelatin Adulteration in Traditional Chinese Medicine: Analysis of Deer-Horn Glue by Rapid-Resolution Liquid Chromatography-Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous identification of donkey-hide gelatin and bovine-hide gelatin in deer-horn glue was established by rapid-resolution liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Water containing 1% NH4HCO3 was used for sample dissolution and trypsin was used for hydrolysis of the gelatins. After separation by a SB-C18 reversed-phase analytical column, collagen marker peptides were detected by mass spectrometry in positive electrospray ionization mode with multiple reaction monitoring. The method was specific, precise and reliable, and suitable for detection of adulterants derived from donkey-hide gelatin and bovine-hide gelatin in deer-horn glue.

  1. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry for Bacterial Protein Toxins — A Sensitive, Specific, High-Throughput Tool for Detection and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Kalb

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS is a valuable high-throughput tool for peptide analysis. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization (LC-ESI tandem-MS provides sensitive and specific quantification of small molecules and peptides. The high analytic power of MS coupled with high-specificity substrates is ideally suited for detection and quantification of bacterial enzymatic activities. As specific examples of the MS applications in disease diagnosis and select agent detection, we describe recent advances in the analyses of two high profile protein toxin groups, the Bacillus anthracis toxins and the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. The two binary toxins produced by B. anthracis consist of protective antigen (PA which combines with lethal factor (LF and edema factor (EF, forming lethal toxin and edema toxin respectively. LF is a zinc-dependent endoprotease which hydrolyzes specific proteins involved in inflammation and immunity. EF is an adenylyl cyclase which converts ATP to cyclic-AMP. Toxin-specific enzyme activity for a strategically designed substrate, amplifies reaction products which are detected by MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS. Pre-concentration/purification with toxin specific monoclonal antibodies provides additional specificity. These combined technologies have achieved high specificity, ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the anthrax toxins. We also describe potential applications to diseases of high public health impact, including Clostridium difficile glucosylating toxins and the Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase.

  2. Rapid and sensitive detection of carbapenemase activity in Acinetobacter baumannii using superficially porous liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Hu, Anren; Lai, Meng-Jiun; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Liao, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Kai-Chih

    2016-12-01

    The emergence and spread of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii poses a challenge for optimizing antibiotic therapies and preventing outbreaks. Traditional phenotypic assays such as the modified Hodge test (MHT) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of the carbapenemase genes are time-consuming and complicated. Therefore, new approaches for the efficient detection of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii are urgently required. In this study, we used the superficially porous liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to measure carbapenem hydrolysis in a solution spiked with test strains of A. baumannii. The rate of carbapenem hydrolysis during incubation was expressed as the ratio of the carbapenem peak area of the test A. baumannii strains to the noncarbapenemase-producing A. baumannii ATCC 17978. This method can accurately measure the carbapenem hydrolysis rate and, therefore, can effectively identify carbapenemase-producing strains within 75 minutes. A total of 112 A. baumannii strains were used in this study, including 103 clinical isolates with 68 carbapenem-resistant strains and 35 carbapenem-susceptible strains, seven ATCC strains and two selected mutants. The results of the superficially porous LC-MS/MS assay showed higher detection sensitivity compared to the results of the MHT. Our results demonstrate the ability of the former method to routinely detect carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Detection and determination of reticuline and N-methylcoculaurine in the Annonaceae family using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yaichiro; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Kamizono, Machiko; Matsumoto, Naoki; Tanahashi, Takao; Hara, Hiroshi; Caparros-Lefebvre, Dominique; Ohta, Shigeru

    2004-06-25

    In Guadeloupe, the French West Indies, there is a high incidence of atypical parkinsonism or progressive supranuclear palsy, and all of the investigated patients had taken herbal tea or tropical fruits of the Annonaceae family. Local inhabitants consume the fruits, and also drink tea made from the leaves. In the present study, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to detect low-molecular-weight neurotoxic benzylisoquinoline derivatives in the Annonaceae family. We detected reticuline and N-methylcoculaurine in every Annona muricata sample examined, except for pulp and seed. They were not detected in sweetsop fruits. Norreticuline was not detected in any sample. These three compounds were toxic to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and inhibited mitochondrial respiratory complex I. It is possible that uptake of the benzylisoquinoline derivatives reticuline and N-methylcoculaurine and their accumulation in the brain may be related to the pathogenesis of the local endemic disease.

  4. A Novel 14C-Postlabeling Assay Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry For the Detection of O6-Methyldeoxyguanosine Adducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompkins, E M; Farmer, P B; Lamb, J H; Jukes, R; Dingley, K; Ubick, E A; Turteltaub, K W; Martin, E A; Brown, K

    2005-11-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is currently one of the most sensitive methods available for the trace detection of DNA adducts and is particularly valuable for measuring adducts in humans or animal models. However, the standard approach requires administration of a radiolabeled compound. As an alternative, we have developed a preliminary {sup 14}C-postlabeling assay for detection of the highly mutagenic O{sup 6}-MedG, by AMS. Procedures were developed for derivatizing O{sup 6}-MedG using unlabeled acetic anhydride. Using conventional LC-MS analysis, the limit of detection for the major product, triacetylated O{sup 6}-MedG, was 10 fmoles. On reaction with {sup 14}C-acetic anhydride, using a specially designed enclosed system, the predominant product was {sup 14}C-di-acetyl O{sup 6}-MedG. This change in reaction profile was due to a modification of the reaction procedure, introduced as a necessary safety precaution. The limit of detection for {sup 14}C-diacetyl O{sup 6}-MedG by AMS was determined as 79 attomoles, {approx}18,000 fold lower than that achievable by LSC. Although the assay has so far only been carried out with labeled standards, the degree of sensitivity obtained illustrates the potential of this assay for measuring O{sup 6}-MedG levels in humans.

  5. A REVIEW ON MASS SPECTROMETRY DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri Neetu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique for "weighing" molecules. Obviously, this is not done with a conventional scale or balance. Instead, mass spectrometry is based upon the principle of the motion of a charged particle that is called an ion, in an electric or magnetic field. The mass to charge ratio (m/z of the ion affects particles motion. Since the charge of an electron is known, the mass to charge ratio (m/z is a measurement of mass of an ion. Mass spectrometry research focuses on the formation of gas phase ions, and detection of ions. Detectors in mass spectrometer detect the separated ions according to m/z ratio. The main disadvantages of conventional detectors are very low sensitivity and poor detection efficiency. Detectors are of a great interest to a wide range of industrial, military, environmental and even biological applications. In recent developments, molecules of higher mass can also be detected and enhanced lifetime under the less than ideal environments typically encountered in mass spectrometers. This review deals in detail about the design, working and principle of mass spectrometric detectors and their recent developments.

  6. Improving low-level plasma protein mass spectrometry-based detection for candidate biomarker discovery and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-09-01

    Methods. To improve the detection of low abundance protein candidate biomarker discovery and validation, particularly in complex biological fluids such as blood plasma, increased sensitivity is desired using mass spectrometry (MS)-based instrumentation. A key current limitation on the sensitivity of electrospray ionization (ESI) MS is due to the fact that many sample molecules in solution are never ionized, and the vast majority of the ions that are created are lost during transmission from atmospheric pressure to the low pressure region of the mass analyzer. Two key technologies, multi-nanoelectrospray emitters and the electrodynamic ion funnel have recently been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to greatly improve the ionization and transmission efficiency of ESI MS based analyses. Multi-emitter based ESI enables the flow from a single source (typically a liquid chromatography [LC] column) to be divided among an array of emitters (Figure 1). The flow rate delivered to each emitter is thus reduced, allowing the well-documented benefits of nanoelectrospray 1 for both sensitivity and quantitation to be realized for higher flow rate separations. To complement the increased ionization efficiency afforded by multi-ESI, tandem electrodynamic ion funnels have also been developed at PNNL, and shown to greatly improve ion transmission efficiency in the ion source interface.2, 3 These technologies have been integrated into a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of probable biomarker candidates in blood plasma and show promise for the identification of new species even at low level concentrations.

  7. Determination of alkylphenol and alkylphenolethoxylates in biota by liquid chromatography with detection by tandem mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Loyo-Rosales, J.E.; de la Paz Aviles, M.; Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of octylphenol, nonylphenol and the corresponding ethoxylates (1 to 5) in biota is presented. Extraction methods were developed for egg and fish matrices based on accelerated solvent extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction cleanup, using octadecylsilica or aminopropyl cartridges. Identification and quantitation were accomplished by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and compared to the traditional liquid chromatography with fluorescence spectroscopy detection. LC-MS-MS provides high sensitivity and specificity required for these complex matrices and an accurate quantitation with the use of 13C-labeled internal standards. Quantitation limits by LC-MS-MS ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g in eggs, and from 6 to 22 ng/g in fish samples. These methods were successfully applied to osprey eggs from the Chesapeake Bay and fish from the Great Lakes area. Total levels found in osprey egg samples were up to 18 ng/g wet mass and as high as 8.2 ug/g wet mass in the fish samples.

  8. Detection of 10 sweeteners in various foods by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui-Shiang Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The analytical method for sweeteners in various food matrixes is very important for food quality control and regulation enforcement. A simple and rapid method for the simultaneous determination of 10 sweeteners [acesulfame potassium (ACS-K, aspartame (ASP, cyclamate (CYC, dulcin (DUL, glycyrrhizic acid (GA, neotame (NEO, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC, saccharin (SAC, sucralose (SCL, and stevioside (STV] in various foods by liquid chromatography/tandem mass chromatography (LC–MS/MS was developed. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Phenomenex Luna Phenyl-Hexyl (5 μm, 4.6 mm × 150 mm column with gradient elution of 10 mM ammonium acetate in water and 10 mM ammonium acetate in methanol. The recoveries of the 10 sweeteners were between 75% and 120%, and the coefficients of variation were less than 20%. The limits of quantification were 0.5 μg/kg for NHDC and SCL. For the other sweeteners, the limits of quantification were 0.1 μg/kg. Compared to the traditional high-performance liquid chromatography method, the LC–MS/MS method could provide better sensitivity, higher throughput, enhanced specificity, and more sweeteners analyzed in a single run. The samples included 27 beverages (16 alcoholic and 11 nonalcoholic beverages and 15 pickled foods (1 pickled pepper, 3 candies, and 11 candied fruits. Two remanufactured wines were found to contain 7.2, 8.5 μg/g SAC and 126.5, 123 μg/g CYC, respectively. ACS-K, ASP, SCL, and NEO were detected in five beverages and drinks. The pickled peppers and candied fruits were found to contain SAC, GA, CYC, ASP, STV, NEO, and ACS-K. The wine with sweeteners detected was remanufactured wine, not naturally fermented wine. Therefore, the ingredient label for the sweeteners of remanufactured wine should be regulated by the proper authority for inspection of sweeteners.

  9. Capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry as a potential tool to detect lithium-induced nephropathy: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raedler, Thomas J; Wittke, Stefan; Jahn, Holger; Koessler, Andreas; Mischak, Harald; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2008-04-01

    Lithium remains the treatment of choice for many patients suffering from bipolar disorder. However, long-term treatment with lithium carries the potential to cause renal and thyroid dysfunction. Lithium-induced nephropathies are characterised by deterioration of urinary concentrating ability as well as, less frequently, a progressive and potentially irreversible decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Pathological changes after treatment with lithium include both tubulointerstitial and glomerular changes. Besides monitoring of the kidney-function, no screening-instruments exist for early identification of patients at risk of lithium-induced nephropathy. CE-MS (capillary electrophoresis coupled to a mass spectrometer) is a new technique that has been applied to the differential diagnosis of nephropathies. We sought to determine if CE-MS can be used to identify lithium-induced renal changes. A urine-sample was obtained from 14 subjects (7 males, 7 females, mean age 51.1 years) under long-term treatment with lithium (mean duration 17.4 years, range 8-35 years) without known nephropathy (mean creatinine 0.96 mg/dl; range 0.7-1.6). Urine samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analysis. CE-MS was performed according to standard procedures and a screen for nephropathies was used. Among the 14 urine samples, two subjects tested positive for a nephropathy. One further subject had a borderline result. Since 3/14 subjects with no known nephropathy showed some degree of pathological findings, CE-MS from a urine-sample may be helpful for the early detection of renal damage under treatment with lithium. However, a specific screen for lithium-induced nephropathies still needs to be developed.

  10. Improved detection of multiple environmental antibiotics through an optimized sample extraction strategy in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xinzhu; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C; Li, Xu; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was optimized in this study for sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple antibiotics in urban surface waters and soils. Among the seven classes of tested antibiotics, extraction efficiencies of macrolides, lincosamide, chloramphenicol, and polyether antibiotics were significantly improved under optimized sample extraction pH. Instead of only using acidic extraction in many existing studies, the results indicated that antibiotics with low pK a values (antibiotics with high pK a values (>7) were extracted more efficiently under neutral conditions. The effects of pH were more obvious on polar compounds than those on non-polar compounds. Optimization of extraction pH resulted in significantly improved sample recovery and better detection limits. Compared with reported values in the literature, the average reduction of minimal detection limits obtained in this study was 87.6% in surface waters (0.06-2.28 ng/L) and 67.1% in soils (0.01-18.16 ng/g dry wt). This method was subsequently applied to detect antibiotics in environmental samples in a heavily populated urban city, and macrolides, sulfonamides, and lincomycin were frequently detected. Antibiotics with highest detected concentrations were sulfamethazine (82.5 ng/L) in surface waters and erythromycin (6.6 ng/g dry wt) in soils. The optimized sample extraction strategy can be used to improve the detection of a variety of antibiotics in environmental surface waters and soils.

  11. A new peak detection algorithm for MALDI mass spectrometry data based on a modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a ubiquitous analytical tool in biological research and is used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of bio-molecules. Peak detection is the essential first step in MS data analysis. Precise estimation of peak parameters such as peak summit location and peak area are critical to identify underlying bio-molecules and to estimate their abundances accurately. We propose a new method to detect and quantify peaks in mass spectra. It uses dual-tree complex wavelet transformation along with Stein's unbiased risk estimator for spectra smoothing. Then, a new method, based on the modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt (mAPV) model and hierarchical particle swarm optimization, is used for peak parameter estimation. Results Using simulated data, we demonstrated the benefit of using the mAPV model over Gaussian, Lorentz and Bi-Gaussian functions for MS peak modelling. The proposed mAPV model achieved the best fitting accuracy for asymmetric peaks, with lower percentage errors in peak summit location estimation, which were 0.17% to 4.46% less than that of the other models. It also outperformed the other models in peak area estimation, delivering lower percentage errors, which were about 0.7% less than its closest competitor - the Bi-Gaussian model. In addition, using data generated from a MALDI-TOF computer model, we showed that the proposed overall algorithm outperformed the existing methods mainly in terms of sensitivity. It achieved a sensitivity of 85%, compared to 77% and 71% of the two benchmark algorithms, continuous wavelet transformation based method and Cromwell respectively. Conclusions The proposed algorithm is particularly useful for peak detection and parameter estimation in MS data with overlapping peak distributions and asymmetric peaks. The algorithm is implemented using MATLAB and the source code is freely available at http://mapv.sourceforge.net. PMID:26680279

  12. Determination of Zn-citrate in human milk by CIM monolithic chromatography with atomic and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milačič, Radmila; Ajlec, Dejan; Zuliani, Tea; Žigon, Dušan; Ščančar, Janez

    2012-11-15

    In human milk zinc (Zn) is bound to proteins and low molecular mass (LMM) ligands. Numerous investigations demonstrated that Zn bioavailability in human milk is for infant much higher than in cow's milk. It was presumed that in the LMM human milk fraction highly bioavailable Zn-citrate prevails. However, literature data are controversial regarding the amount of Zn-citrate in human milk since analytical procedures reported were not quantitative. So, complex investigation was carried out to develop analytical method for quantitative determination of this biologically important molecule. Studies were performed within the pH range 5-7 by the use of synthetic solutions of Zn-citrate prepared in HEPES, MOPS and MES buffers. Zn-citrate was separated on weak anion-exchange convective interaction media (CIM) diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) monolithic chromatographic column using NH(4)NO(3) as an eluent. Separated Zn species were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Quantitative separation of Zn-citrate complexes ([Zn(Cit)](-) and [Zn(Cit)(2)](4-); column recoveries 94-102%) and good repeatability and reproducibility of results with relative standard deviation (RSD±3.0%) were obtained. In fractions under the chromatographic peaks Zn-binding ligand was identified by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS-MS). Limits of detection (LOD) for determination of Zn-citrate species by CIM DEAE-FAAS and CIM DEAE-ICP-MS were 0.01 μg Zn mL(-1) and 0.0005 μg Zn mL(-1), respectively. Both techniques were sensitive enough for quantification of Zn-citrate in human milk. Results demonstrated that about 23% of total Zn was present in the LMM milk fraction and that LMM-Zn corresponded to Zn-citrate. The developed speciation method represents a reliable analytical tool for investigation of the percentage and the amount of Zn-citrate in human milk.

  13. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going.

  14. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  15. Detection of Yersinia pestis in environmental and food samples by intact cell immunocapture and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenau, Jérôme; Fenaille, François; Simon, Stéphanie; Filali, Sofia; Volland, Hervé; Junot, Christophe; Carniel, Elisabeth; Becher, François

    2014-06-17

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague, an acute and often fatal disease in humans. In addition to the risk of natural exposure to plague, there is also the threat of a bioterrorist act, leading to the deliberate spread of the bacteria in the environment or food. We report here an immuno-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (immuno-LC-MS/MS) method for the direct (i.e., without prior culture), sensitive, and specific detection of Y. pestis in such complex samples. In the first step, a bottom-up proteomics approach highlighted three relevant protein markers encoded by the Y. pestis-specific plasmids pFra (murine toxin) and pPla (plasminogen activator and pesticin). Suitable proteotypic peptides were thoroughly selected to monitor the three protein markers by targeted MS using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Immunocapture conditions were optimized for the isolation and concentration of intact bacterial cells from complex samples. The immuno-LC-SRM assay has a limit of detection of 2 × 10(4) CFU/mL in milk or tap water, which compares well with those of state-of-the-art immunoassays. Moreover, we report the first direct detection of Y. pestis in soil, which could be extremely useful in confirming Y. pestis persistence in the ground.

  16. Detection of buffalo mozzarella adulteration by an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Rosita; Severino, Valeria; Mendez, Alberto; Lliberia, Josep; Parente, Augusto; Chambery, Angela

    2012-11-01

    Over the past years, LC-MS-based approaches have gained a growing interest in food analysis by using different platforms and methodologies. In particular, enhanced selectivity and sensitivity of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) scan function offer powerful capabilities in detecting and quantifying specific analytes within complex mixtures such as food matrices. The MRM approach, traditionally applied in biomedical research, is particularly suitable for the detection of food adulteration and for the verification of authenticity to assure food safety and quality, both recognized as top priorities by the European Union Commission. Increasingly stringent legislation ensure products safety along every step 'from farm to fork', especially for traditional foods designed with the Protected Designation of Origin certification. Therefore, there is a growing demand of new methodologies for defining food authenticity in order to preserve their unique traits against frauds. In this work, an ultra performance liquid chromatopgraphy-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methodology based on MRM has been developed for the sensitive and selective detection of buffalo mozzarella adulteration. The targeted quantitative analysis was performed by monitoring specific transitions of the phosphorylated β-casein f33-48 peptide, identified as a novel species-specific proteotypic marker. The high sensitivity of MRM-based MS and the wide dynamic range of triple quadrupole spectrometers have proved to be a valuable tool for the analysis of food matrices such as dairy products, thus offering new opportunities for monitoring food quality and adulterations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Androgen and Estrogen Abuse in Breeding Animals by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/Combustion/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) Evaluated against Alternative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; De Kimpe, Norbert; Matthijs, Bert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-09-02

    The administration of synthetic homologues of naturally occurring steroids can be demonstrated by measuring (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of their urinary metabolites. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) was used in this study to appraise in a global approach isotopic deviations of two 17β-testosterone metabolites (17α-testosterone and etiocholanolone) and one 17β-estradiol metabolite (17α-estradiol) together with those of 5-androstene-3β,17α-diol as endogenous reference compound (ERC). Intermediate precisions of 0.35‰, 1.05‰, 0.35‰, and 0.21‰, respectively, were observed (n = 8). To assess the performance of the analytical method, a bull and a heifer were treated with 17β-testosterone propionate and 17β-estradiol-3-benzoate. The sensitivity of the method permitted the demonstration of 17β-estradiol treatment up to 24 days. For 17β-testosterone treatment, the detection windows were 3 days and 24 days for the bull and the heifer, respectively. The capability of GC-MS/C/IRMS to demonstrate natural steroid abuse for urinary steroids was eventually compared to those of mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) when measuring intact steroid esters in blood and hair.

  18. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap...

  19. Functional genomics by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the function of genes can take place at the oligonucleotide or protein level. The latter has the advantage of being closest to function, since it is proteins that perform most of the reactions necessary for the cell. For most protein based ('proteomic') approaches to gene...... function, mass spectrometry is the method of choice. Mass spectrometry can now identify proteins with very high sensitivity and medium to high throughput. New instrumentation for the analysis of the proteome has been developed including a MALDI hybrid quadrupole time of flight instrument which combines...... numbers of intact proteins by mass spectrometry directly. Examples from this laboratory illustrate biological problem solving by modern mass spectrometric techniques. These include the analysis of the structure and function of the nucleolus and the analysis of signaling complexes....

  20. The detection of iron protoporphyrin (heme b) in phytoplankton and marine particulate material by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry – comparison with diode array detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, Martha, E-mail: m.gledhill@geomar.de

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • Mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of heme b in biological material. • Optimal conditions involved selective reactant monitoring of the heme b product ion. • The isotopic signature for this iron tetrapyrrole further improved selectivity. • Mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry were compared for heme b analysis. • Combining techniques made a powerful tool for analysis of heme in marine microbes. - Abstract: A mass spectrometric (MS) method for the identification of iron protoporphyrin (IX) (FePTP, heme b) in marine particulate material and phytoplankton is described. Electrospray ionisation of FePTP produced the molecular Fe(III)PTP{sup +} ion (m/z = 616) or the pseudomolecular [Fe(II)PTP + H]{sup +} ion (m/z = 617), depending on the oxidation state of the central iron ion. Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the ion trap mass spectrometer resulted in a single detected product ion (m/z = 557) indicative of loss of ethanoic acid from a carboxylic acid side chain. Widening the isolation width to 616 ± 3 resulted in production of a mass spectrum demonstrating the distinctive isotopic ratio of the iron containing fragment, further increasing the specificity of the analysis. Selective reactant monitoring (SRM) of the fragment ion (m/z = 557) was applied to the detection of FePTP after chromatography of ammoniacal OGP extracts of marine samples. The detection limit for FePTP analysed by SRM after chromatography was 1.2 ± 0.5 fmol. For phytoplankton samples, reasonably good agreement was achieved between results obtained with SRM and those obtained by monitoring absorbance at λ = 400 nm using a diode array detector (DAD). Use of SRM for analysis of particulate material obtained from the high latitude North Atlantic allowed for the analysis of FePTP in the presence of a co-eluting compound that interfered with detection by DAD. Simultaneous collection of mass spectra from m/z = 300 to 1500 resulted in identification of the

  1. Multiple-reaction monitoring for multiplex detection of three bacterial toxins using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, S I; Uppal, A; Gupta, P; Kamboj, D V

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and shiga toxin are implicated in a number of diseases and food-borne intoxications and are considered potential agents for bioterrorism and warfare. Artificially generated aerosol is the likely mode of delivery of these for nefarious uses, potentially capable of causing mass destruction to human and animal health by inhalation of toxic bioaerosol. Multiplex and unambiguous detection of these agents is of paramount importance for emergency response in a biothreat scenario and for food safety. Multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) assay for simultaneous monitoring of the three toxins is reported here using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Three different peptides with two fragment ions each were considered for quantification and confirmation. One of the three MRM transitions from each toxin, which exhibited the best sensitivity, was selected for multiplexing of the assay. Simulating a biothreat scenario wherein the bioaerosol is collected in 10 ml of buffer, the multiplex assay was tested with blind samples with one or more of the three toxins even in the presence of interfering Escherichia coli lysate proteins. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Sensitive, Preclinical Detection of Prions in Brain by nanospray liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    More sensitive detection of prions in brain is important because it would allow early detection of disease in young animals and assure a safer food supply. We quantitated the amount of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP 27-30) by use of nano-scale liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem ma...

  3. Generic detection of basic taxoids in wood of European Yew (Taxus baccata) by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Geoffrey C; Rowe, Emily R; Veitch, Nigel C; Turner, Jill E; Dauncey, Elizabeth A

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence of the cardiotoxin taxine (comprising taxine B and several other basic taxoids) in leaves of Taxus baccata L. (European yew) is well known and has led to public concerns about the safety of eating or drinking from utensils crafted from the wood of this poisonous species. The occurrence of basic taxoids in the heartwood of T. baccata had not been examined in detail, although the bark is known to contain 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine. Initial examination of heartwood extracts for 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) revealed the presence of this basic taxoid at about 0.0007% dry weight, using a standard isolated from bark. Analyses for taxine B, however, proved negative at the extract concentration analysed. Observing other basic taxoids within the heartwood extracts was facilitated by developing generic LC-MS methods that utilised a fragment arising from the N-containing acyl group of basic taxoids as a reporter ion. Of the various MS strategies available on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap instrument that allowed observation of this reporter ion, combining all-ion collisions with high resolution ion filtering by the orbitrap was most effective, both in terms of the number of basic taxoids detected and sensitivity. Numerous basic taxoids, in addition to 2'β-deacetoxyaustrospicatine, were revealed by this method in heartwood extracts of T. baccata. Red wine readily extracted the basic taxoids from heartwood while coffee extracted them less efficiently. Contamination with basic taxoids could also be detected in soft cheese that had been spread onto wood. The generic LC-MS method for detecting basic taxoids complements specific methods for detecting taxine B when investigating yew poisoning cases in which the analysis of complex extracts may be required or taxine B has not been detected.

  4. Use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to detect carbapenemase production in Enterobacteriaceae by a rapid meropenem degradation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Claudio; Franza, Vincenzo; Conti, Matteo; Tamburini, Maria Vittoria; Roncarati, Greta; Cordovana, Miriam; Smirnova, Viktoria; Patrono, Daniela; Mancini, Rita; Landini, Maria Paola; Ambretti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay to detect carbapenemase activity in a group of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae by meropenem hydrolysis. This one-hour method showed a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100%, representing a rapid and reliable option compared to conventional phenotypic assays.

  5. Development of a transient response technique for heterogeneous catalysis in liquid phase, Part 2: Applying membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) for detection of dissolved gasses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radivojevic, D.; Ruitenbeek, M.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2008-01-01

    A home-made analyzer for dissolved gasses in water, based on membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), was successfully applied for the first time as an in-line method for detection of gases dissolved in an aqueous stream, at the exit of a catalytic reactor in a transient experiment. The technique

  6. Gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry detection of extracellular kynurenine and related metabolites in normal and lesioned rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarangelo, Francesca M; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Macherone, Anthony; Graham, David R; Schwarcz, Robert

    2012-02-15

    We describe here a gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) method for the sensitive and concurrent determination of extracellular tryptophan and the kynurenine pathway metabolites kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), and quinolinic acid (QUIN) in rat brain. This metabolic cascade is increasingly linked to the pathophysiology of several neurological and psychiatric diseases. Methodological refinements, including optimization of MS conditions and the addition of deuterated standards, resulted in assay linearity to the low nanomolar range. Measured in samples obtained by striatal microdialysis in vivo, basal levels of tryptophan, kynurenine, and QUIN were 415, 89, and 8 nM, respectively, but 3-HK levels were below the limit of detection (<2 nM). Systemic injection of kynurenine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect extracellular tryptophan but produced detectable levels of extracellular 3-HK (peak after 2-3 h: ~50 nM) and raised extracellular QUIN levels (peak after 2h: ~105 nM). The effect of this treatment on QUIN, but not on 3-HK, was potentiated in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-lesioned striatum. Our results indicate that the novel methodology, which allowed the measurement of extracellular kynurenine and 3-HK in the brain in vivo, will facilitate studies of brain kynurenines and of the interplay between peripheral and central kynurenine pathway functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  7. PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for detection of persistent enterococcus faecalis in cerebrospinal fluid following treatment of postoperative ventriculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, John J; Tsung, Andrew J; Flier, Lisa; Martinez, Derek L; Beam, Sarah B; Chen, Clifford; Lowery, Kristin S; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    We describe the use of PCR and electrospray ionization followed by mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to evaluate "culture-negative" cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a 67-year-old man who developed postoperative bacterial ventriculitis following a suboccipital craniotomy for resection of an ependymoma in the 4th ventricle. CSF samples were obtained on seven occasions, beginning in the operating room at the time of insertion of a right ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) and continuing until his death, 6 weeks later. During the course of the illness, two initial CSF specimens taken before the initiation of antimicrobial treatment were notable for growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Once antimicrobial treatment was initiated, all CSF cultures were negative. PCR/ESI-MS detected genetic evidence of E. faecalis in all CSF samples, but the level of detection (LOD) decreased once antimicrobial treatment was initiated. When our patient returned with symptoms of meningitis 3 days after the completion of antibiotic treatment, CSF cultures remained negative, but PCR/ESI-MS again found genetic evidence for E. faecalis at levels comparable to the pretreatment levels seen initially. This unique case and these findings suggest that determination of CSF LOD by PCR/ESI-MS may be a very sensitive indicator of persistent infection in patients on antibiotic therapy for complex CNS infections and may have relevance for treatment duration and assessment of persistent or recurrent infection at the completion of therapy.

  8. Applications of Hadamard transform-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the detection of hexamethyldisiloxane in a wafer cleanroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Kuo, Samuel; Yang, Jonathan; Hsiung, Szu-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2012-01-13

    The Hadamard transform-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HT-GC/MS) technique was successfully employed for the detection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO, C(6)H(18)OSi(2)) at the sub-nL/L level in a semiconductor wafer cleanroom. Indoor air samples were collected from the room, according to EPA Method TO-17 using a Tedlar bag where the air samples were allowed to pass through an absorption tube for 24 h. The condensed components were then heated and simultaneously injected into a GC column through a Hadamard-injector, which was operated in accordance with the Hadamard codes. Compared to the single injection used in most GC/MS systems, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were substantially improved after the inverse Hadamard transformation of the encoded chromatogram. Under optimized conditions, when cyclic S-matrix orders of 255, 1023 and 2047 were used, the S/N ratios of the HMDSO signals were substantially improved by 7.4-, 15.1- and 20.1-fold, respectively. These improvements are in good agreement with theoretically calculated values (8.0-, 16.0- and 22.6-fold, respectively). We found that when the HT-GC/MS technique was applied, HMDSO could be detected at the 0.1 nL/L level.

  9. Novel ionic liquid matrices for qualitative and quantitative detection of carbohydrates by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyong; Shen, Shanshan; Wu, Datong; Cai, Pengfei; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2017-09-08

    Analysis of carbohydrates based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is still challenging and researchers have been devoting themselves to efficient matrices discovery. In the present study, the design, synthesis, qualitative and quantitative performance of non-derivative ionic liquid matrices (ILMs) were reported. DHB/N-methylaniline (N-MA) and DHB/N-ethylaniline (N-EA), performing best for carbohydrate detection, have been screened out. The limit of detection for oligosaccharide provided by DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA were as low as 10 fmol. DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA showed significantly higher ion generation efficiency than DHB. The comparison of capacity to probe polysaccharide between these two ILMs and DHB also revealed their powerful potential. Their outstanding performance were probably due to lower proton affinities and stronger UV absorption at λ = 355 nm. What is more, taking DHB/N-MA as an example, quantitative analysis of fructo-oligosaccharide mixtures extracted and identified from rice noodles has been accomplished sensitively using an internal standard method. Overall, DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA exhibited excellent performance and might be significant sources as the carbohydrate matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Simultaneous Identification and Susceptibility Determination to Multiple Antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus by Bacteriophage Amplification Detection Combined with Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon C; Pierce, Carrie L; Schieltz, David M; Barr, John R

    2015-07-01

    The continued advance of antibiotic resistance in clinically relevant bacterial strains necessitates the development and refinement of assays that can rapidly and cost-effectively identify bacteria and determine their susceptibility to a panel of antibiotics. A methodology is described herein that exploits the specificity and physiology of the Staphylococci bacteriophage K to identify Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and determine its susceptibility to clindamycin and cefoxitin. The method uses liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor the replication of bacteriophage after it is used to infect samples thought to contain S. aureus. Amplification of bacteriophage K indicates the sample contains S. aureus, for it is only in the presence of a suitable host that bacteriophage K can amplify. If bacteriophage amplification is detected in samples containing the antibiotics clindamycin or cefoxitin, the sample is deemed to be resistant to these antibiotics, respectively, for bacteriophage can only amplify in a viable host. Thus, with a single work flow, S. aureus can be detected in an unknown sample and susceptibility to clindamycin and cefoxitin can be ascertained. This Article discusses implications for the use of bacteriophage amplification in the clinical laboratory.

  11. Coupling liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry detection with microfluidic droplet array for label-free enzyme inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2014-01-07

    In this work, the combination of droplet-based microfluidics with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was achieved, for providing a fast separation and high-information-content detection method for the analysis of nanoliter-scale droplets with complex compositions. A novel interface method was developed using an oil-covered droplet array chip to couple with an LC/MS system via a capillary sampling probe and a 4 nL injection valve without the need of a droplet extraction device. The present system can perform multistep operations including parallel enzyme inhibition reactions in nanoliter droplets, 4 nL sample injection, fast separation with capillary LC, and label-free detection with ESI-MS, and has significant flexibility in the accurate addressing and sampling of droplets of interest on demand. The system performance was evaluated using angiotensin I and angiotensin II as model samples, and the repeatabilities of peak area for angiotensin I and angiotensin II were 2.7% and 7.5% (RSD, n = 4), respectively. The present system was further applied to the screening for inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2) and measurement of the IC50 value of the inhibitor. The sample consumption for each droplet assay was 100 nL, which is reduced 10-100 times compared with conventional 384-multi-well plate systems usually used in high-throughput drug screening.

  12. Endogenous Plasma Peptide Detection and Identification in the Rat by a Combination of Fractionation Methods and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Bertile

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based analyses are essential tools in the field of biomarker research. However, detection and characterization of plasma low abundance and/or low molecular weight peptides is challenged by the presence of highly abundant proteins, salts and lipids. Numerous strategies have already been tested to reduce the complexity of plasma samples. The aim of this study was to enrich the low molecular weight fraction of rat plasma. To this end, we developed and compared simple protocols based on membrane filtration, solid phase extraction, and a combination of both. As assessed by UV absorbance, an albumin depletion 99% was obtained. The multistep fractionation strategy (including reverse phase HPLC allowed detection, in a reproducible manner (CV [1] 30%–35%, of more than 450 peaks below 3000 Da by MALDI-TOF/MS. A MALDI-TOF/MS-determined LOD as low as 1 fmol/μL was obtained, thus allowing nanoLC-Chip/ MS/MS identification of spiked peptides representing ∼10–6% of total proteins, by weight. Signal peptide recovery ranged between 5%–100% according to the spiked peptide considered. Tens of peptide sequence tags from endogenous plasma peptides were also obtained and high confidence identifications of low abundance fibrinopeptide A and B are reported here to show the efficiency of the protocol. It is concluded that the fractionation protocol presented would be of particular interest for future differential (high throughput analyses of the plasma low molecular weight fraction.

  13. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bamberger, Casimir; Bamberger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object's surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits the true imaging capabilities by ion optical means for the time of flight mass separation. The mass spectrometer is equipped with the ASIC Timepix chip as an array detector to acquire the position, mass, and intensity of ions that are imaged by MALDI directly from the target sample onto the detector. This imaging mass spectrometer has a spatial resolving power at the specimen of (84\\pm35) \\mu m with a mass resolution of 45 and locates atoms or organic compounds on a surface area up to ~2 cm2. Extended laser spots of ~5 mm2 on structured specimens allowed parallel imaging of s...

  14. Detection and quantification of proteins in clinical samples using high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2015-06-15

    Quantitative proteomics has benefited from the recent development of mass spectrometers capable of high-resolution and accurate-mass (HR/AM) measurements. While targeted experiments are routinely performed on triple quadrupole instruments in selected reaction monitoring (SRM; often referred as multiple reaction monitoring, MRM) mode, the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometers allow quantification in MS/MS mode, also known as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). This technique is characterized by higher selectivity and better confidence in the assignment of the precursor and fragment ions, and thus translates into an improved analytical performance. More fundamentally, PRM introduces a change of the overall paradigm of targeted experiments, by the decoupling of the acquisition and data processing. They rely on two distinct steps, with a simplified acquisition method in conjunction with a flexible, iterative, post-acquisition data processing. This account describes in detail the different steps of a PRM experiment, which include the design of the acquisition method, the confirmation of the identity of the analytes founded upon a full MS/MS fragmentation pattern, and the quantification based on the extraction of specific fragment ions (selected post-acquisition) using tight mass tolerance. The different types of PRM experiments, defined as large-scale screening or precise targeted quantification using calibrated internal standards, together with the considerations on the selection of experimental parameters are discussed.

  15. Bioaerosol detection by aerosol TOF-mass spectrometry: Application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Stowers, M.A.; Kientz, Ch.E.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    2000-01-01

    In previous publications the use of an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer was reported for the on-line measurements of aerosols (Weiss 1997, Kievit 1995). The apparatus is capable of measuring the size as well as the chemical composition, by the use of Laser Desorption/Ionisation (LDI), of an

  16. Investigations in the possibility of early detection of colorectal cancer by gas chromatography/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiumi, Shin; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kawana, Shuichi; Unno, Yumi; Sakai, Takero; Okamoto, Koji; Yamada, Yasuhide; Sudo, Kazuki; Yamaji, Taiki; Saito, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Okita, Natsuko Tsuda; Saito, Hiroshi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Ojima, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2017-03-07

    In developed countries, the number of patients with colorectal cancer has been increasing, and colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death. To improve the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients, it is necessary to establish novel screening methods that would allow early detection of colorectal cancer. We performed metabolome analysis of a plasma sample set from 282 stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer patients and 291 healthy volunteers using gas chromatography/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry in an attempt to identify metabolite biomarkers of stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer. The colorectal cancer patients included patients with stage 0 (N=79), I (N=80), and II (N=123) in whom invasion and metastasis were absent. Our analytical system detected 64 metabolites in the plasma samples, and the levels of 29 metabolites differed significantly (Bonferroni-corrected p=0.000781) between the patients and healthy volunteers. Based on these results, a multiple logistic regression analysis of various metabolite biomarkers was carried out, and a stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer prediction model was established. The area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity values of this model for detecting stage 0/I/II colorectal cancer were 0.996, 99.3%, and 93.8%, respectively. The model's sensitivity and specificity values for each disease stage were >90%, and surprisingly, its sensitivity for stage 0, specificity for stage 0, and sensitivity for stage II disease were all 100%. Our predictive model can aid early detection of colorectal cancer and has potential as a novel screening test for cases of colorectal cancer that do not involve lymph node or distant metastasis.

  17. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  18. Rapid detection of economic adulterants in fresh milk by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Grant; Higgs, Kerianne

    2013-05-03

    A method to aid in the detection of the economically driven adulteration of fresh milk with a range of small, nitrogen containing compounds, including melamine, ammeline, ammelide, cyanuric acid, allantoin, thiourea, urea, biuret, triuret, semicarbazide, aminotriazine, 3- and 4-aminotriazole, cyanamide, dicyandiamide, guanidine, choline, hydroxyproline, nitrate, and a range of amino acids, has been developed. (15)N2-Urea is used as an internal standard. The adulteration of milk with exogenous urea has previously been difficult to detect because of the variation in the naturally occurring levels of urea in milk. However, by monitoring the contaminants biuret and triuret, which comprise up to 1% of synthetic urea, the adulteration of milk with urea-based fertilizer can be detected. We estimate that to be economically viable, adulteration of the order of 90-4000ppm of the above adulterants would need to be added to fresh milk. For most of the compounds, an arbitrary detection threshold of 2ppm is therefore more than sufficient. For biuret, a lower detection threshold, better than 0.5ppm, is desirable and the sensitivity for biuret and triuret can be improved by the post-column addition of lithium to create lithium adducts under electrospray ionisation. Sample handling involves a two-step solvent precipitation method that is deployed in a 96-well plate format, and the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography uses a rapid gradient (1.2min). Three separate injections, to detect the positively charged compounds, the negatively charged compounds and amino acids and finally the lithium adducts, are used. This rapid and qualitative survey method may be deployed as a second tier screening method to quickly reduce sample numbers indicated as irregular by an FTIR based screening system, and to direct analysis to appropriate quantification methods.

  19. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus delta-toxin production by whole-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Gagnaire

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to detect the Staphylococcus aureus delta-toxin using Whole-Cell (WC Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS, correlate delta-toxin expression with accessory gene regulator (agr status, and assess the prevalence of agr deficiency in clinical isolates with and without resistance to methicillin and glycopeptides. The position of the delta-toxin peak in the mass spectrum was identified using purified delta-toxin and isogenic wild type and mutant strains for agr-rnaIII, which encodes delta-toxin. Correlation between delta-toxin production and agr RNAIII expression was assessed by northern blotting. A series of 168 consecutive clinical isolates and 23 unrelated glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus strains (GISA/heterogeneous GISA were then tested by WC-MALDI-TOF MS. The delta-toxin peak was detected at 3005±5 Thomson, as expected for the naturally formylated delta toxin, or at 3035±5 Thomson for its G10S variant. Multivariate analysis showed that chronicity of S. aureus infection and glycopeptide resistance were significantly associated with delta-toxin deficiency (p = 0.048; CI 95%: 1.01-10.24; p = 0.023; CI 95%: 1.20-12.76, respectively. In conclusion, the S. aureus delta-toxin was identified in the WC-MALDI-TOF MS spectrum generated during routine identification procedures. Consequently, agr status can potentially predict infectious complications and rationalise application of novel virulence factor-based therapies.

  20. Detection of trace gases from fermentation processes using photoacoustic spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boamfă-Ivan, Elena Iuliana

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents novel interdisciplinary Physics - Biology research work that employed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Both techniques were used in biological studies of trace gasses emitted by crop plants and fruit under stress situations. The findings

  1. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum using combined solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, N.A.; Mourão, M.; Kuijper, S.; Walters, E.; Janssen, H.-G.; Kolk, A.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, thermally-assisted hydrolysis and methylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) in combination with chemometrics has been used to develop a 20-compound model for fast differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in b

  2. Comparison of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the detection of lignans from sesame seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Gruppen, H.

    2008-01-01

    In sesame seeds, high concentrations of lignans are present. When these lignans are fermented in the human colon, a range of structurally different lignans is formed. A good liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) protocol for the analysis of lignans in complex mixtures is lacking. In order

  3. Comparison of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the detection of lignans from sesame seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Gruppen, H.

    2008-01-01

    In sesame seeds, high concentrations of lignans are present. When these lignans are fermented in the human colon, a range of structurally different lignans is formed. A good liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) protocol for the analysis of lignans in complex mixtures is lacking. In order

  4. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  5. Online coupling of digital microfluidic devices with mass spectrometry detection using an eductor with electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher A; Roper, Michael G

    2012-03-20

    MS detection coupled with digital microfluidic (DMF) devices has most commonly been demonstrated in an offline manner using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization. In this work, an eductor is demonstrated which facilitated online coupling of DMF with electrospray ionization MS detection. The eductor consisted of a transfer capillary, a standard ESI needle, and a tapered gas nozzle. As a pulse of N(2) was applied to the nozzle, a pressure differential was induced at the outlet of the ESI needle that pulled droplets from the DMF, past the ESI needle, and into the flow of gas exiting the nozzle, allowing detection by MS. Operating position, ionization potential, and N(2) pressure were optimized, with the optimum ionization potential and N(2) pressure found to be 3206 V and 80 psi, respectively. Online MS detection was demonstrated from both open and closed DMF devices using 2.5 μL and 630 nL aqueous droplets, respectively. Relative quantitation by DMF-MS was demonstrated by mixing droplets of caffeine with droplets of theophylline on an open DMF device and comparing the peak area ratio obtained to an on-chip generated calibration curve. This eductor-based method for transferring droplets has the potential for rapid, versatile, and high-throughput microfluidic analyses.

  6. Noninvasive Detection of the Gases Inside the Sealed Batteries by the On-line Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Rong ZHOU; Pei Fang LIU; Lin ZHUANG; Jun Tao LU

    2004-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is connected through an adaptor to a sealed small battery to probe the gas phase changes inside the battery. The factors influencing the response time are analyzed with a simplified model. The feasibility of the new technique is demonstrated with a Ni-Cd battery, showing different profiles of MS intensities for O2 and H2. Compared with gas chromatography, this technique has the advantage of being noninvasive and should be useful for the study and diagnostic examination of small sealed batteries.

  7. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  8. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.; Smith, D.F.; Jungmann, JH; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with

  9. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  10. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  11. Association of amino acids embedded in helium droplets detected by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, Matthieu R.; Achazi, Georg; Reichwald, Sebastian; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2015-12-01

    Amino acids were embedded in helium droplets. The electron impact ionization allows for detecting positively charged glycine, valine, histidine, tryptophan and their principal fragments. Monomers and polymers with up to four amino acids are reported. Heterodimers of tryptophan and valine or histidine are observed as well as heterodimers of included fragments. The ability of these associations of molecules to form complexes with water is examined.

  12. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  13. Simultaneous detection of multiple mycotoxins in broiler feeds using a liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkapan, Jutamart; Poapolathep, Saranya; Isariyodom, Supaporn; Kumagai, Susumu; Poapolathep, Amnart

    2016-02-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites that are typically present in grain and feed ingredients used for animal feeds. An analytical method using LC-ESI-MS/MS was developed to quantify nine mycotoxins, consisting of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), AFB2, AFG1, AFG2, T-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), zearalenone (ZEA) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in broiler feeds. In total, 100 samples of broiler feeds were collected from poultry farms in Central Thailand. The survey found that AFB1 and ZEA were the most prevalent mycotoxins in the feed samples at percentages of 93% and 63%, respectively. The limit of detections (LODs) of investigated mycotoxins was 0.20-0.78 ng/g. AFB2, DON, AFG1, NIV and T-2 toxin were also detectable at low contamination levels with percentages of 20%, 9%, 7%, 5% and 1%, respectively, whereas OTA and AFG2 were not detected in any of the feed samples. These results suggest that there is a very low level of risk of the exposure to mycotoxins in feeds obtained from broiler farms in Central Thailand.

  14. Separation and identification of moxifloxacin impurities in drug substance by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Sheng Wu; Zhi Xin Jia; Bao Ming Ning; Jin Lan Zhang; Song Wu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV/FTICRMS) method was described for the investigation of impurity profile in moxifloxacin (MOX) drug substance and chemical reference substance.Ten impurities were detected by HPLC-UV,while eight impurities were identified by using the high accurate molecular mass combined with multiple-stage mass spectrometric data and fragmentation rules.In addition,to our knowledge,five impurities were founded for the first time in MOX drug substance.

  15. Simultaneous detection of ten psychedelic phenethylamines in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Sarah; Banuelos, Stephanie; Perrella, Laura; Hardy, Brittany

    2011-09-01

    Psychedelic phenethylamines are an emerging class of designer drugs capable of producing a complex array of sought after adrenergic and hallucinogenic effects. Toxicological detection poses a number of challenges to laboratories. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure for the detection of psychedelic amphetamines using techniques that are widely accepted in forensic toxicology laboratories. In all, 10 target analytes were selected: 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromophenethylamine (2C-B), 2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-H), 2,5-dimethoxy-4iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4ethylthiophenethylamine (2C-T-2), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(n)propylthiophenethylamine (2C-T-7), 4-methylthioamphetamine (4-MTA), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromoamphetamine (DOB), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine (DOET), 2,5-dimethoxy4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), and 2,5-dimethoxy-4methylamphetamine (DOM). Target drugs in urine were analyzed by gas chromatography in selected ion monitoring mode after mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. Limits of detection for all analytes were 2-10 ng/mL, and limits of quantitation were 10 ng/mL or less. Precision evaluated at 50 and 500 ng/mL yielded CVs of 0.4-7.9% and accuracy in the range 91-116%. Calibration curves were linear to 1500 ng/mL using mescaline-d₉ as the internal standard. No carryover was evident at 5000 ng/mL (the highest concentration tested) and no interferences were observed from the presence of other structurally related compounds or endogenous bases.

  16. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Adriana; Piergianni, Maddalena; Buttrini, Mirko; Montecchini, Sara; Piccolo, Giovanna; Gorrini, Chiara; Rossi, Sabina; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora

    2015-01-01

    Detection of Entamoeba histolytica and its differentiation from Entamoeba dispar is an important goal of the clinical parasitology laboratory. The aim of this study was the identification and differentiation of E. histolytica and E. dispar by MALDI-TOF MS, in order to evaluate the application of this technique in routine diagnostic practice. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to 3 amebic reference strains and to 14 strains isolated from feces that had been differentiated by molecular methods in our laboratory. Protein extracts from cultures of these strains (axenic cultures for the 3 reference strains and monoxenic cultures for the 14 field isolates) were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the spectra obtained were analyzed by statistical software. Five peaks discriminating between E. histolytica and E. dispar reference strains were found by protein profile analysis: 2 peaks (8,246 and 8,303 Da) specific for E. histolytica and 3 (4,714; 5,541; 8,207 Da) for E. dispar. All clinical isolates except one showed the discriminating peaks expected for the appropriate species. For 2 fecal samples from which 2 strains (1 E. histolytica and 1 E. dispar) out of the 14 included in this study were isolated, the same discriminating peaks found in the corresponding isolated amebic strains were detected after only 12h (E. histolytica) and 24h (E. dispar) of incubation of the fecal samples in Robinson's medium without serum. Our study shows that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to discriminate between E. histolytica and E. dispar using in vitro xenic cultures and it also could have potential for the detection of these species in clinical samples.

  17. Detection of chloramphenicol residue in bovine meat using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiastuti R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloramphenicol (CAP is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been banned in many countries due to its serius side effect to human. Detection of CAP residue in food has been determined to a minimum required performance limit (MRPL of 0.3 ng/g. The purpose of this research was to conduct the analysis of CAP residue in bovine meat by using LCMS and to study the presence of CAP residue in marketed bovine meat samples. LC separation was done on a Shimpack column C18 with ammonium acetate 10 mM/water as mobile phase, and ESI-MS analysis in negative ion mode. The coefficient of determination, R2 = 0.9981 at concentration of 0.125, 0.25, 0.63, 1,00 and 2.00 ng/g. Recovery at three fortification levels (0.25, 0.50 and 1.00 ng/g was in the range 77.5, 97.3 and 83.4%. The decision limit and the detection capability were 0.15 ng/g and 0.17 ng/g respectively. Analysis results of 52 marketed samples showed that CAP residue were detected in 9 samples in the concentration range of 0.14 to 2.70 ng/g and 6 among those positive samples were above the MRPL value. Therefore, it is important to increase the awareness and also to monitor regularly CAP residues in food originated from animal to provide safe food for the consumers.

  18. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for the detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Calderaro

    Full Text Available Detection of Entamoeba histolytica and its differentiation from Entamoeba dispar is an important goal of the clinical parasitology laboratory. The aim of this study was the identification and differentiation of E. histolytica and E. dispar by MALDI-TOF MS, in order to evaluate the application of this technique in routine diagnostic practice. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to 3 amebic reference strains and to 14 strains isolated from feces that had been differentiated by molecular methods in our laboratory. Protein extracts from cultures of these strains (axenic cultures for the 3 reference strains and monoxenic cultures for the 14 field isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the spectra obtained were analyzed by statistical software. Five peaks discriminating between E. histolytica and E. dispar reference strains were found by protein profile analysis: 2 peaks (8,246 and 8,303 Da specific for E. histolytica and 3 (4,714; 5,541; 8,207 Da for E. dispar. All clinical isolates except one showed the discriminating peaks expected for the appropriate species. For 2 fecal samples from which 2 strains (1 E. histolytica and 1 E. dispar out of the 14 included in this study were isolated, the same discriminating peaks found in the corresponding isolated amebic strains were detected after only 12h (E. histolytica and 24h (E. dispar of incubation of the fecal samples in Robinson's medium without serum. Our study shows that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to discriminate between E. histolytica and E. dispar using in vitro xenic cultures and it also could have potential for the detection of these species in clinical samples.

  19. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry for the Detection and Differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Adriana; Piergianni, Maddalena; Buttrini, Mirko; Montecchini, Sara; Piccolo, Giovanna; Gorrini, Chiara; Rossi, Sabina; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora

    2015-01-01

    Detection of Entamoeba histolytica and its differentiation from Entamoeba dispar is an important goal of the clinical parasitology laboratory. The aim of this study was the identification and differentiation of E. histolytica and E. dispar by MALDI-TOF MS, in order to evaluate the application of this technique in routine diagnostic practice. MALDI-TOF MS was applied to 3 amebic reference strains and to 14 strains isolated from feces that had been differentiated by molecular methods in our laboratory. Protein extracts from cultures of these strains (axenic cultures for the 3 reference strains and monoxenic cultures for the 14 field isolates) were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the spectra obtained were analyzed by statistical software. Five peaks discriminating between E. histolytica and E. dispar reference strains were found by protein profile analysis: 2 peaks (8,246 and 8,303 Da) specific for E. histolytica and 3 (4,714; 5,541; 8,207 Da) for E. dispar. All clinical isolates except one showed the discriminating peaks expected for the appropriate species. For 2 fecal samples from which 2 strains (1 E. histolytica and 1 E. dispar) out of the 14 included in this study were isolated, the same discriminating peaks found in the corresponding isolated amebic strains were detected after only 12h (E. histolytica) and 24h (E. dispar) of incubation of the fecal samples in Robinson’s medium without serum. Our study shows that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to discriminate between E. histolytica and E. dispar using in vitro xenic cultures and it also could have potential for the detection of these species in clinical samples. PMID:25874612

  20. Detection and characterization of cholesterol-oxidized products using HPLC coupled to dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsein, Graziella E; Prado, Fernanda M; Mansano, Fernando V; Oliveira, Mauricio C B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    Oxidation of cholesterol (Ch) by a variety of reactive oxygen species gives rise mainly to hydroperoxides and aldehydes. Despite the growing interest in Ch-oxidized products, the detection and characterization of these products is still a matter of concern. In this work, the main Ch-oxidized products, namely, 3beta-hydroxycholest-5-ene-7alpha-hydroperoxide (7alpha-OOH), 3beta-5alpha-cholest-6-ene-5-hydroperoxide (5alpha-OOH), 3beta-hydroxycholest-4-ene-6alpha-hydroperoxide (6alpha-OOH), 3beta-hydroxycholest-4-ene-6beta-hydroperoxide (6beta-OOH), and 3beta-hydroxy-5beta-hydroxy-B-norcholestane-6beta-carboxaldehyde (ChAld), were detected in the same analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry. The use of selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) allowed a sensitive detection of each oxidized product, while the enhanced product ion mode (EPI) helped to improve the confidence of the analyses. Isotopic labeling experiments enabled one to elucidate mechanistic features during fragmentation processes. The characteristic fragmentation pattern of Ch-oxidized products is the consecutive loss of H(2)O molecules, yielding cationic fragments at m/z 401, 383, and 365. Homolytic scissions of the peroxide bond are also seen. With (18)O-labeling approach, it was possible to establish a fragmentation order for each isomer. The SRM transitions ratio along with EPI and (18)O-labeled experiments give detailed information about differences for water elimination, allowing a proper discrimination between the isomers. This is of special interest considering the emerging role of Ch-oxidized products in the development of diseases.

  1. Detection of singly- and doubly-charged quaternary ammonium drugs in equine urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emmie N M; Kwok, W H; Wong, April S Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2012-01-13

    Quaternary ammonium drugs (QADs) are anticholinergic agents some of which are known to have been abused or misused in equine sports. A recent review of literature shows that the screening methods reported thus far for QADs mainly cover singly-charged QADs. Doubly-charged QADs are extremely polar substances which are difficult to be extracted and poorly retained on reversed-phase columns. It would be ideal if a comprehensive method can be developed which can detect both singly- and doubly-charged QADs. This paper describes an efficient liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the simultaneous detection and confirmation of 38 singly- and doubly-charged QADs at sub-parts-per-billion (ppb) to low-ppb levels in equine urine after solid-phase extraction. Quaternary ammonium drugs were extracted from equine urine by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using an ISOLUTE(®) CBA SPE column and analysed by LC/MS/MS in the positive electrospray ionisation mode. Separation of the 38 QADs was achieved on a polar group embedded C18 LC column with a mixture of aqueous ammonium formate (pH 3.0, 10 mM) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. Detection and confirmation of the 38 QADs at sub-ppb to low-ppb levels in equine urine could be achieved within 16 min using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Matrix interference of the target transitions at the expected retention times was not observed. Other method validation data, including precision and recovery, were acceptable. The method was successfully applied to the analyses of drug-administration samples.

  2. Estimating the impact from Fukushima in Southern Spain by (131)I and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry detection of (129)I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J M; López-Gutiérrez, J M; García-Tenorio, R; Agulló, L; Peruchena, J I; Manjón, G; García-León, M

    2017-01-01

    After the Fukushima accident, large amounts of radionuclides were discharged to the atmosphere. Some of them travelled long distances and were detected in places as far from Japan as Spain a few days after the accident. One of these radionuclides was (131)I. Its isotope (129)I (T1/2 = 15.7 × 106 years) was also expected to follow the same pathway. In this work, we present the results for the (129)I concentration in the same atmospheric samples from Seville (Spain) where (131)I activity was measured in 2011 by Baeza et al. (2012). (129)I concentrations in aerosol and gaseous samples showed concentrations in the order of 104 and 105 atoms/m(3), typically higher in the gaseous form with respect to the aerosol form. Also (129)I in rainwater was measured, showing concentrations in the order of 10(8) atoms/L. The results show a very good agreement with the (131)I profile, showing that, if background from other sources is not relevant, it is possible to estimate the impact of similar events years after them thanks to the sensitivity of techniques like Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

  3. Validation of a Multiplex Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection of Selected Lysosomal Storage Diseases in Dried Blood Spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Schmitt Ribas PhD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interest in screening methods for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs has increased in recent years, since early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent or attenuate the onset of symptoms and the complications of these diseases. In the current work, we evaluated the performance of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS for the detection of some LSDs, aiming the future use of this methodology for the screening of these disorders. Methods: Standard curves and quality control dried blood spots were assayed to evaluate the precision, linearity, and accuracy. A total of 150 controls were grouped according to age and subjected to measurement of lysosomal enzymes deficient in Niemann-Pick A/B, Krabbe, Gaucher, Fabry, Pompe, and Mucopolysaccharidosis type I diseases. Samples from 59 affected patients with a diagnosis of LSDs previously confirmed by fluorimetric methods were analyzed. Results: Data from standard calibration demonstrated good linearity and accuracy and the intra- and interassay precisions varied from 1.17% to 11.60% and 5.39% to 31.24%, respectively. Except for galactocerebrosidase and α- l -iduronidase, enzyme activities were significantly higher in newborns compared to children and adult controls. Affected patients presented enzymatic activities significantly lower compared to all control participants. Conclusion: Our results show that MS/MS is a promising methodology, suitable for the screening of LSDs, but accurate diagnoses will depend on its correlation with other biochemical and/or molecular analyses.

  4. Detection of seminal fluid proteins in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, K; Wong, C H; Georgiou, A S

    2009-03-01

    The global increase of the human parasite, the common bed bug Cimex lectularius, calls for specific pest control target sites. The bed bug is also a model species for sexual conflict theory which suggests that seminal fluids may be highly diverse. The species has a highly unusual sperm biology and seminal proteins may have unique functions. One-dimensional PAGE gels showed 40-50% band sharing between C. lectularius and another cimicid species, Afrocimex constrictus. However, adult, sexually rested C. lectularius males were found to store 5-7 microg of seminal protein and with only 60 microg of protein we obtained informative 2-D PAGE gels. These showed 79% shared protein spots between 2 laboratory populations, and more than half of the shared protein spots were detected in the mated female. Further analysis using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that 26.5% of the proteins had matches among arthropods in databases and 14.5% matched Drosophila proteins. These included ubiquitous proteins but also those more closely associated with reproduction such as moj 29, ubiquitin, the stress-related elongation factor EF-1 alpha, a protein disulfide isomerase and an antioxidant, Peroxiredoxin 6.

  5. Application of Holistic Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Based Urinary Metabolomics for Prostate Cancer Detection and Biomarker Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available Human exhibit wide variations in their metabolic profiles because of differences in genetic factors, diet and lifestyle. Therefore in order to detect metabolic differences between individuals robust analytical methods are required. A protocol was produced based on the use of Liquid Chromatography- High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS in combination with orthogonal Hydrophilic Interaction (HILIC and Reversed Phase (RP liquid chromatography methods for the analysis of the urinary metabolome, which was then evaluated as a diagnostic tool for prostate cancer (a common but highly heterogeneous condition. The LC-HRMS method was found to be robust and exhibited excellent repeatability for retention times (0.9. In addition, using the receiver operator characteristics (ROC test, the area under curve (AUC for the combination of the four best characterised biomarker compounds was 0.896. The four biomarker compounds were also found to differ significantly (P<0.05 between an independent patient cohort and controls. This is the first time such a rigorous test has been applied to this type of model. If validated, the established protocol provides a robust approach with a potentially wide application to metabolite profiling of human biofluids in health and disease.

  6. Chiral liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method development for the detection of salbutamol in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sue Hay; Lee, Warren; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Tan, Soo Choon

    2016-07-01

    A sequential solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed and validated using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) for the detection and quantification of salbutamol enantiomers in porcine urine. Porcine urine samples were hydrolysed with β-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase from Helix pomatia and then subjected to a double solid-phase extraction (SPE) first using the Abs-Elut Nexus SPE and then followed by the Bond Elut Phenylboronic Acid (PBA) SPE. The salbutamol enantiomers were separated using the Astec CHIROBIOTIC™ T HPLC column (3.0mm×100mm; 5μm) maintained at 15°C with a 15min isocratic run at a flow rate of 0.4mL/min. The mobile phase constituted of 5mM ammonium formate in methanol. Salbutamol and salbutamol-tert-butyl-d9 (internal standard, IS) was monitored and quantified with the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method showed good linearity for the range of 0.1-10ng/mL with limit of quantification at 0.3ng/mL. Analysis of the QC samples showed intra- and inter-assay precisions to be less than 5.04%, and recovery ranging from 83.82 to 102.33%.

  7. Influence of Culture Media on Detection of Carbapenem Hydrolysis by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ana Carolina; Carvalhaes, Cecília Godoy; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Rockstroh, Anna Carolina; Machado, Antonia Maria Oliveira; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the influence of distinct bacterial growth media on detection of carbapenemase hydrolysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. False-negative results were observed for OXA-25-, OXA-26-, and OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates grown on MacConkey agar medium. The other culture media showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting carbapenemase.

  8. Using Mass Spectrometry to Detect Silanol Compounds in Water from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Kuo, C. K. Mike; Alverson, James T.; Wallace, William T.; Gazda, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Routine environmental monitoring is required during human spaceflight to help safeguard the health of crew members and assess the performance of vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) systems. In the case of the International Space Station (ISS), water quality monitoring is performed using a combination of in-flight and archival methods. Over the past several years, there have been periodic increases in the total organic carbon (TOC) levels in the water produced by the US Water Recovery System (WRS). When the first increase occurred in 2009, no target organic species were detected that could account for the increase. Here we describe the efforts to identify the unknown contaminants and develop methods to quantify them.

  9. Early Detection of Cancer by Affinity Mass Spectrometry-Set Aside funds — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.   RATIONALE The recent introduction of multiple reaction monitoring capabilities offers unprecedented capability to the research arsenal available to protein based biomarker discovery. Specific to the discovery process this technology offers an ability to monitor specific protein changes in concentration and/or post-translational modification. The ability to accurately confirm specific biomarkers in a sensitive and reproducible manner is critical to the confirmation and pre-validation process. We are proposing two collaborative studies that promise to develop Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) work flows for the biomarker scientific community and specifically for EDRN. B.   GOALS The overall goal for this proposal is the identification of protein biomarkers that can be associated with prostate cancer detection. The underlying goal is the application of a novel technological approach aided by MRM toward biomarker discovery. An additional goal will be the dissemination of knowledge gained from these studies EDRN wide.

  10. Detection of counterfeit electronic components through ambient mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Caldwell, Jack; Shelley, Jake T; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-09-21

    In the last several years, illicit electronic components have been discovered in the inventories of several distributors and even installed in commercial and military products. Illicit or counterfeit electronic components include a broad category of devices that can range from the correct unit with a more recent date code to lower-specification or non-working systems with altered names, manufacturers and date codes. Current methodologies for identification of counterfeit electronics rely on visual microscopy by expert users and, while effective, are very time-consuming. Here, a plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization source, the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) is used to generate a mass-spectral fingerprint from the surface of a variety of discrete electronic integrated circuits (ICs). Chemometric methods, specifically principal component analysis (PCA) and the bootstrapped error-adjusted single-sample technique (BEAST), are used successfully to differentiate between genuine and counterfeit ICs. In addition, chemical and physical surface-removal techniques are explored and suggest which surface-altering techniques were utilized by counterfeiters.

  11. Fesoterodine stress degradation behavior by liquid chromatography coupled to ultraviolet detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangoi, Maximiliano S; Todeschini, Vítor; Steppe, Martin

    2011-05-30

    In the present study, a rapid validated stability-indicating LC method was established and comprehensive stress testing of fesoterodine was carried out according to ICH guidelines. Fesoterodine was subjected to stress conditions of acid and basic hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and thermal decomposition. The degradation products formed under stress conditions were investigated by LC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. Successful separation of the drug from its degradation products was achieved on a monolithic C(18) column (100 mm × 4.6mm i.d.) maintained at 45°C using acetonitrile-methanol-0.03 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate (pH 3.8) (30:15:55, v/v/v) as the mobile phase. The flow rate was 2.4 mL min(-1) and the detection wavelength was 208 nm. Validation parameters such as specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, and robustness were evaluated. Chromatographic separation was obtained within 2.5 min and it was suitable for high-throughput analysis. Fragmentation patterns of degradation products formed under different stress conditions were studied and characterized through LC-ESI-MS fragmentation. Based on the results, a drug degradation pathway was proposed, and the validated LC method was successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of fesoterodine in tablet dosage forms, helping to improve quality control and to assure therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-30

    mass spectrometer. Also discussed were Corporation, St. Louis , Mo. unique analytical applications of several negative ion chemical Synthesis of the...were purchsed from obtained at a probe temperature of 180-200 °C and displays Sigma Chemical Co.. St. Louis , Mo. Arginine hydrochloride (4) a M4...13) Rosenstock. H, M.: Drax . K.: Stener. B. W: Hernon J. T. J. Phys. Chem, Ref. Data 1977, 6, Supl. 1. 774-783,167 occur in the ratio of 10/ 1

  13. Mass spectrometry in a multicusp ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullan, A.A. (Applied Physical Science, University of Ulster, Coleraine (Northern Ireland)); Graham, W.G. (Physics Department, Queen' s University, Belfast, (Northern Ireland))

    1990-08-05

    Mass spectrometry has been used for the detection of positive and negative ions in a multicusp ion source operating with both hydrogen and deuterium gas. The mass spectrometer operation has been optimized and it is shown that applying ion extraction voltages can disturb the discharge. Using this technique combined with a Langmuir probe technique we are able to study the positive ionic fractions present when operating with both gases (and the negative ion densities.)

  14. Toxin screening in phytoplankton: detection and quantitation using MALDI triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleno, Lekha; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2005-03-01

    The investigation of a MALDI triple quadrupole instrument for the analysis of spirolide toxins in phytoplankton samples is described in this study. A high-frequency (kHz) laser was employed for MALDI, generating a semicontinuous ion beam, thus taking advantage of the high duty cycle obtained in sensitive triple quadrupole MRM experiments. Initially, several experimental parameters such as type of organic matrix and concentration, solvent composition, and matrix-to-analyte ratio were optimized, and their impact on sensitivity and precision of the obtained ion currents for a reference spirolide, 13-desmethyl-C, was studied. In all quantitative experiments, excellent linearities in the concentration range between 0.01 and 1.75 microg/mL were obtained, with R2 values of 0.99 or higher. The average precision of the quantitative MALDI measurements was 7.4+/-2.4% RSD. No systematic errors were apparent with this method as shown by a direct comparison to an electrospray LC/MS/MS method. Most importantly, the MALDI technique was very fast; each sample spot was analyzed in less than 5 s as compared to several minutes with the electrospray assay. To demonstrate the potential of the MALDI triple quadrupole method, its application to quantitative analysis in several different phytoplankton samples was investigated, including crude extracts and samples from mass-triggered fractionation experiments. 13-Desmethyl spirolide C was successfully quantified in these complex samples at concentration levels from 0.05 to 90.4 microg/mL (prior to dilution to have samples fall within the dynamic range of the method) without extensive sample preparation steps. The versatility of the MALDI triple quadrupole method was also exhibited for the identification of unknown spirolide analogues. Through the use of dedicated linked scan functions such as precursor ion and neutral loss scans, several spirolide compounds were tentatively identified directly from the crude extract, without the usual time

  15. Detection of atypical bile acids in disease states and their identification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczepanik-Van Leeuwen, P. A.; Stellaard, F.

    1978-01-01

    The study of the bile acid constituents of serum, bile, urine, and stool of patients exhibiting liver disease has increased in importance with the availability of newer methods for their detection and identification. A cogent question for study has been whether specific bile acids are toxic and thus are the cause of liver disease, or whether they accumulate as a result of disease-induced alteration in metabolism. Examining a wide variety of clinical samples, we have observed that many patients with diagnosed cholestasis show the presence of atypical bile acids due to metabolic aberrations in either the side chain or in the steroid ring. Because cholestasis represents a spectrum of diseases with differing metabolic and/or anatomic defects and because our studies cover a variety of cholestatic states, we have sought to establish a correlation between the presence of these atypical bile acids and the disease state. The complexity of the bile acid mixtures to be examined requires that gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric-computer techniques be used to provide a reliable analysis. It is believed that atypical bile acids can be readily identified by GC/CI mass spectrometry with great sensitivity. It is also believed that such bile acid analysis may prove useful to the study and diagnosis of liver disease. Present data suggest that the identification of atypical bile acids in biological samples may enable differentiation between different types of intrahepatic cholestasis. Such analyses may prove useful to distinguish specific diseases, such as Byler's disease (and Byler's-like cholestasis) from other types of cholestasis and may distinguish diseases involving mitochondrial defects. Finally, the presence of atypical bile acids may indicate, by the particular compounds formed, where and what kind of damage occurs in a disease and may ultimately establish if these atypical bile acids are a cause or effect of the liver damage.

  16. Sampling and mass spectrometry approaches for the detection of drugs and foreign contaminants in breath for homeland security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Homeland security relies heavily on analytical chemistry to identify suspicious materials and persons. Traditionally this role has focused on attribution, determining the type and origin of an explosive, for example. But as technology advances, analytical chemistry can and will play an important role in the prevention and preemption of terrorist attacks. More sensitive and selective detection techniques can allow suspicious materials and persons to be identified even before a final destructive product is made. The work presented herein focuses on the use of commercial and novel detection techniques for application to the prevention of terrorist activities. Although drugs are not commonly thought of when discussing terrorism, narcoterrorism has become a significant threat in the 21st century. The role of the drug trade in the funding of terrorist groups is prevalent; thus, reducing the trafficking of illegal drugs can play a role in the prevention of terrorism by cutting off much needed funding. To do so, sensitive, specific, and robust analytical equipment is needed to quickly identify a suspected drug sample no matter what matrix it is in. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) is a novel technique that has previously been applied to biological and chemical detection. The current work applies SPAMS to drug analysis, identifying the active ingredients in single component, multi-component, and multi-tablet drug samples in a relatively non-destructive manner. In order to do so, a sampling apparatus was created to allow particle generation from drug tablets with on-line introduction to the SPAMS instrument. Rules trees were developed to automate the identification of drug samples on a single particle basis. A novel analytical scheme was also developed to identify suspect individuals based on chemical signatures in human breath. Human breath was sampled using an RTube{trademark} and the trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were preconcentrated using solid

  17. Detection of an extended human volatome with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Phillips

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOF MS has been proposed as a powerful new tool for multidimensional analysis of complex chemical mixtures. We investigated GCxGC-TOF MS as a new method for identifying volatile organic compounds (VOCs in normal human breath. METHODS: Samples of alveolar breath VOCs and ambient room air VOC were collected with a breath collection apparatus (BCA onto separate sorbent traps from 34 normal healthy volunteers (mean age = 40 yr, SD = 17 yr, male/female = 19/15. VOCs were separated on two serial capillary columns separated by a cryogenic modulator, and detected with TOF MS. The first and second dimension columns were non-polar and polar respectively. RESULTS: BCA collection combined with GC×GC-TOF MS analysis identified approximately 2000 different VOCs in samples of human breath, many of which have not been previously reported. The 50 VOCs with the highest alveolar gradients (abundance in breath minus abundance in ambient room air mostly comprised benzene derivatives, acetone, methylated derivatives of alkanes, and isoprene. CONCLUSIONS: Collection and analysis of breath VOCs with the BCA-GC×GC-TOF MS system extended the size of the detectable human volatile metabolome, the volatome, by an order of magnitude compared to previous reports employing one-dimensional GC-MS. The size of the human volatome has been under-estimated in the past due to coelution of VOCs in one-dimensional GC analytical systems.

  18. Determination of Tetracyclines in Honey Using Liquid Chromatography with Ultraviolet Absorbance Detection and Residue Confirmation by Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Yan; XU,Jin-Zhong; DING,Tao; LI,Gong-Hai

    2007-01-01

    A determination method has been optimized and validated for the simultaneous analysis of tetracycline (TC),oxytetracycline (OTC), chlortetracycline (CTC) and doxycycline (DC) in honey. Tetracyclines (TCs) were removed from honey samples by chelation with metal ions bound to small Chelating Sepharose Fast Flow columns and eluted with Na2EDTA-Mcllvaine pH 4.0 buffers. Extracts were further cleaned up by Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction (SPE), while other solid-phase extraction cartridges were compared. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a polar end-capped C18 column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of oxalic acid, acetonitrile,and methanol. LC with ultraviolet absorbance at 355 nm resulted in the quantitation of all four tetracycline residues from honey samples fortified at 15, 50, and 100 ng/g, with liner ranges for tetracyclines of 0.05 to 2 μg/mL. Mean recoveries for tetracyclines were greater than 50% with R.S.D. values less than 10% (n= 18). Detection limits of 5,5, 10, 10 ng/g for oxytetracycline, tetracycline, chlortetracycline and doxycycline, respectively and quantitation limits of 15 ng/g for all the four tetracyclines were determined. Direct confirmation of the four residues in honey (2-50 ng/g) was realized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The linear ranges of tetracyclines determined by LC/MS/MS were between 5 to 300 ng/mL, with the linear correlation coefficient r>0.995. The limits of detection of 1 to 2 ng/g were obtained for the analysis of the TCs in honey.

  19. Determination of serotonin and its precursors in chocolate samples by capillary liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-Casla, V; Rosales-Conrado, N; León-González, M E; Pérez-Arribas, L V; Polo-Díez, L M

    2012-04-06

    A method for the analysis of serotonin (5-HT) and its precursors, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and l-tryptophan (TP) in chocolate samples by capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (cLC-MS) has been developed. Optimum chromatographic conditions were established by using a personalized multifactorial experimental design. Finally the cLC separation was achieved through a mixture of acetonitrile and 5mM ammonium formate at pH 4 (3:97, v/v) as mobile phase in gradient elution, setting the injection volume at 10 μL and using pure water as injection solvent for focusing purposes on the head of the capillary column. For extraction of targets in chocolate samples a new, fast and simple procedure based on the use of acidic extraction medium and sonication was developed. Working in selected ion mode (m/z 177 for 5-HT, m/z 205 for l-tryptophan and m/z 221 for 5-HTP) detection limits were between 0.01 and 0.11 μg g(-1) and linearity was in the concentration range of 0.5-25 μg g(-1). Recoveries higher than 76% with RSDs lower than 8% were obtained from spiked samples for all analytes, showing the effectiveness of the proposed method. Serotonin and its precursors were determined in 5 kinds of commonly consumed chocolates with different cocoa contents (70-100%). The highest serotonin content was found in chocolate with a cocoa content of 85% (2.93 μg g(-1)). Regarding l-tryptophan, the highest content of this amino acid (13.27-13.34 μg g(-1)) was found in chocolate samples with the lowest cocoa content (70-85%). 5-Hydroxytryptophan was not detected in any chocolate samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of volatile compounds produced by microbial growth in urine by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Malina K; Hibbard-Melles, Kim; Davis, Brett; Scotter, Jenny

    2011-10-01

    Selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry has been used to measure the volatile compounds occurring in the headspace of urine samples inoculated with common urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing microbes Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, or Candida albicans. This technique has the potential to offer rapid and simple diagnosis of the causative agent of UTIs.

  1. Rapid Detection of Meat Spoilage by Measuring Volatile Organic Compounds by Using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, D; Margesin, R.; Klingsbichel, E.; E. Hartungen; Jenewein, D.; Schinner, F.; Märk, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of the microbial spoilage population for air- and vacuum-packaged meat (beef and pork) stored at 4°C was investigated over 11 days. We monitored the viable counts (mesophilic total aerobic bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterococcus spp.) by the microbiological standard technique and by measuring the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the recently developed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry system. Storage time,...

  2. Mass Spectrometry in Polymer Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Falkenhagen, Jana; Weidner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Combining an up-to-date insight into mass-spectrometric polymer analysis beyond MALDI with application details of the instrumentation, this is a balanced and thorough presentation of the most important and widely used mass-spectrometric methods.Written by the world's most proficient experts in the field, the book focuses on the latest developments, covering such technologies and applications as ionization protocols, tandem and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, gas-phase ion-separation techniques and automated data processing. Chapters on sample preparation, polymer degradation and the u

  3. Normal phase liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for separation, detection and mass spectrometric profiling of neutral sphingolipids and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwanah, Hany; Wirtz, Jennifer; Kolter, Thomas; Raith, Klaus; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2009-10-01

    Many lipidomic approaches focus on investigating aspects of sphingolipid metabolism. Special emphasis is put on neutral sphingolipids and cholesterol and their interaction. Such an interest is attributed to the fact that those lipids are altered in a series of serious disorders including various sphingolipidoses. High performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) has become a widely used technique for lipid analysis. However, mass spectrometric profiling is irreplaceable for gaining an overview about the various molecular species within a lipid class. In this work we have developed a sensitive method based on a gradient normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to quadrupole time of flight (QTOF) atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) in positive mode, which for the first time enables separation, on-line detection, and mass spectrometric profiling of multiple neutral sphingolipids including ceramide, glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, globotriaosylceramide, globotetraosylceramide, sphingomyelin as well as cholesterol within less than 15min. An important advantage of the presented HPLC/APCI-MS approach is that the separation pattern emulates the one obtained by an optimized HPTLC method with a multiple stage development. Thus, the lipid classes previously separated and quantified by HPTLC can be easily screened regarding their mass spectrometric profiles by HPLC/APCI-MS. In addition, the selected ionization conditions enable in-source fragmentation providing useful structural information. The methods (HPLC/APCI-MS and the optimized HPTLC) were applied for the analysis of the mentioned lipids in human fibroblasts. This approach is aimed basically at investigators who perform studies based on genetic modifications or treatment with pharmacological agents leading to changes in the biochemical pathways of neutral sphingolipids and cholesterol. In addition, it can be of interest for research on disorders related to

  4. Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategy for Direct Detection and Quantification of Some Mycotoxins Produced by Stachybotrys and Aspergillus spp. in Indoor Environments▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Erica; Bal, Karol; Nyman, Eva; Must, Aime; Larsson, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    Dampness in buildings has been linked to adverse health effects, but the specific causative agents are unknown. Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by molds and toxic to higher vertebrates. In this study, mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate the presence of mycotoxins predominantly produced by Aspergillus spp. and Stachybotrys spp. in buildings with either ongoing dampness or a history of water damage. Verrucarol and trichodermol, hydrolysis products of macrocyclic trichothecenes (including satratoxins), and trichodermin, predominately produced by Stachybotrys chartarum, were analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, whereas sterigmatocystin (mainly produced by Aspergillus versicolor), satratoxin G, and satratoxin H were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. These mycotoxin analytes were demonstrated in 45 of 62 building material samples studied, in three of eight settled dust samples, and in five of eight cultures of airborne dust samples. This is the first report on the use of tandem mass spectrometry for demonstrating mycotoxins in dust settled on surfaces above floor level in damp buildings. The direct detection of the highly toxic sterigmatocystin and macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins in indoor environments is important due to their potential health impacts. PMID:17483261

  5. Rapid detection and ruling out of neonatal sepsis by PCR coupled with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcò, Cristina; Karam, Oliver; Pfister, Riccardo; Gervaix, Alain; Renzi, Gesuele; Emonet, Stéphane; Schrenzel, Jacques; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2017-05-01

    Sepsis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates and clinicians are typically required to administer empiric antibiotics while waiting for blood culture results. However, prolonged and inappropriate use of antibiotics is associated with various complications and adverse events. Better tools to rapidly rule out bacterial infections are therefore needed. We aimed to assess the negative predictive value of PCR coupled with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) compared to conventional blood cultures in neonatal sepsis. Prospective observational study. All consecutive neonates (PCR/ESI-MS analysis were collected at the same time as samples for the blood culture, before the initiation of antibiotics. Our primary objective was to evaluate the negative predictive value of PCR/ESI-MS for the detection of bacteria in the bloodstream of newborns with suspected sepsis. Our secondary objective was the evaluation of the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the PCR/ESI-MS in such a neonatal population. We analysed 114 samples over 14months. The median age and weight were 32weeks+3days and 1840g, respectively. Two patients had negative PCR/ESI-MS results, but positive blood cultures. Overall, the negative predictive value was 98% (95%CI: 92% to 100%). Based on these results, PCR/ESI-MS analysis of blood samples of neonates with suspected sepsis appears to have a very good negative predictive value when compared to blood cultures as gold standard. This novel test might allow for early reassessment of the need for antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of cervical cancer biomarker patterns in blood plasma and urine by differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola C Garbett

    Full Text Available Improved methods for the accurate identification of both the presence and severity of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and extent of spread of invasive carcinomas of the cervix (IC are needed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC has recently been shown to detect specific changes in the thermal behavior of blood plasma proteins in several diseases. This methodology is being explored to provide a complementary approach for screening of cervical disease. The present study evaluated the utility of DSC in differentiating between healthy controls, increasing severity of CIN and early and advanced IC. Significant discrimination was apparent relative to the extent of disease with no clear effect of demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, smoking status and parity. Of most clinical relevance, there was strong differentiation of CIN from healthy controls and IC, and amongst patients with IC between FIGO Stage I and advanced cancer. The observed disease-specific changes in DSC profiles (thermograms were hypothesized to reflect differential expression of disease biomarkers that subsequently bound to and affected the thermal behavior of the most abundant plasma proteins. The effect of interacting biomarkers can be inferred from the modulation of thermograms but cannot be directly identified by DSC. To investigate the nature of the proposed interactions, mass spectrometry (MS analyses were employed. Quantitative assessment of the low molecular weight protein fragments of plasma and urine samples revealed a small list of peptides whose abundance was correlated with the extent of cervical disease, with the most striking plasma peptidome data supporting the interactome theory of peptide portioning to abundant plasma proteins. The combined DSC and MS approach in this study was successful in identifying unique biomarker signatures for cervical cancer and demonstrated the utility of DSC plasma profiles as a complementary diagnostic tool to evaluate

  7. Sensitive method for detection of cocaine and associated analytes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, Loralie J; Bjergum, Matthew W; Williamson, Christopher L; Crow, Frank W

    2009-10-01

    Cocaine (COC) is a potent CNS stimulant that is metabolized to benzoylecgonine (BE) and further metabolized to minor metabolites such as m-hydroxybenzoylecgonine (m-HOBE). COC is also metabolized to norcocaine (NC). Cocaethylene (CE) is formed when cocaine and ethyl alcohol are used simultaneously. Anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME) is a unique marker following smoked cocaine, and anhydroecgonine ethyl ester (AEEE) is found in cocaine smokers who also use ethyl alcohol. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the detection and quantitation of COC, BE, NC, CE, m-HOBE, AEME, and AEEE in urine. Two hundred samples previously analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) coupled with MS were extracted using solid-phase extraction. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a gradient consisting of mobile phase A [20 mM ammonium formate (pH 2.7)] and mobile phase B (methanol/acetonitrile, 50:50), an XDB-C(8) (50 x 2.1 mm, 1.8 microm) column and a flow rate of 270 microL/min. Concentrations were calculated by comparing the peak-area with the internal standard and plotted against a standard curve. The assay displayed linearity from 1.0 to 100 ng/mL. Within- and between-run coefficients of variation were < 10% throughout the linear range. A method comparison between GC-MS and LC-MS-MS showed good correlation for COC (r(2) = 0.982) and BE (r(2) = 0.955). We report here on a sensitive method to identify clinically and forensically relevant cocaine and associated analytes at concentrations as low as 1.0 ng/mL.

  8. Differentiation of Herba Cistanches by fingerprint with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Li, S P; Wang, Y T; Chen, X J; Tu, P F

    2009-03-13

    Herba Cistanche (Rou Cong Rong in Chinese), dried succulent stems of Cistanche deserticola or C. tubulosa, is a famous Chinese herbal medicine and has been recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In recent years, another two non-official species, C. salsa and C. sinensis have also been used as Herba Cistanche in some regions of China. To investigate the possibility of using these two non-official species as alternatives to the official species, a high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS) fingerprint method was developed to comparatively analyze the crude herbs of these four species. The fingerprint of C. deserticola, a historically certified species of Herba Cistanche, serves as 'standard pattern' for comparing the similarities with the other species by means of similarity and Principle Component Analysis. Additionally, 18 characteristic peaks in the fingerprints were identified by comparing their retention times, UV spectra and ESI-MS data with those of the reference substances and/or the data in the literatures. The comparative results demonstrate that the fingerprints of C. tubulosa and C. salsa possess high similarity to the standard pattern, suggesting that these two species may be used as alternative species; while that of C. sinensis has low similarity (0.053 correlation coefficient) to the standard pattern, indicating that it cannot be used as the substitute of the official herb. However, the varying fingerprint patterns among the samples of C. deserticola collected from various habitats illustrate that the quality consistency of crude herbs is still a problem worthy of serious concern.

  9. Detection of cervical cancer biomarker patterns in blood plasma and urine by differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Merchant, Michael L; Helm, C William; Jenson, Alfred B; Klein, Jon B; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Improved methods for the accurate identification of both the presence and severity of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and extent of spread of invasive carcinomas of the cervix (IC) are needed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has recently been shown to detect specific changes in the thermal behavior of blood plasma proteins in several diseases. This methodology is being explored to provide a complementary approach for screening of cervical disease. The present study evaluated the utility of DSC in differentiating between healthy controls, increasing severity of CIN and early and advanced IC. Significant discrimination was apparent relative to the extent of disease with no clear effect of demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, smoking status and parity. Of most clinical relevance, there was strong differentiation of CIN from healthy controls and IC, and amongst patients with IC between FIGO Stage I and advanced cancer. The observed disease-specific changes in DSC profiles (thermograms) were hypothesized to reflect differential expression of disease biomarkers that subsequently bound to and affected the thermal behavior of the most abundant plasma proteins. The effect of interacting biomarkers can be inferred from the modulation of thermograms but cannot be directly identified by DSC. To investigate the nature of the proposed interactions, mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed. Quantitative assessment of the low molecular weight protein fragments of plasma and urine samples revealed a small list of peptides whose abundance was correlated with the extent of cervical disease, with the most striking plasma peptidome data supporting the interactome theory of peptide portioning to abundant plasma proteins. The combined DSC and MS approach in this study was successful in identifying unique biomarker signatures for cervical cancer and demonstrated the utility of DSC plasma profiles as a complementary diagnostic tool to evaluate cervical cancer

  10. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, Anu; Haapala, Markus; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-30

    Many insects use chemicals synthesized in exocrine glands and stored in reservoirs to protect themselves. Two chemically defended insects were used as models for the development of a new rapid analytical method based on desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). The distribution of defensive chemicals on the insect body surface was studied. Since these chemicals are predominantly nonpolar, DAPPI was a suitable analytical method. Repeatability of DAPPI-MS signals and effects related to non-planarity and roughness of samples were investigated using acrylic sheets uniformly covered with an analyte. After that, analytical figures of merit of the technique were determined. The spatial distribution of (E)-1-nitropentadec-1-ene, a toxic nitro compound synthesized by soldiers of the termite Prorhinotermes simplex, was investigated. Then, the spatial distribution of the unsaturated aldehydes (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-4-oxohex-2-enal, (E)-oct-2-enal, (E,E)-deca-2,4-dienal and (E)-dec-2-enal was monitored in the stink bug Graphosoma lineatum. Chemicals present on the body surface were scanned along the median line of the insect from the head to the abdomen and vice versa, employing either the MS or MS(2) mode. In this fast and simple way, the opening of the frontal gland on the frons of termite soldiers and the position of the frontal gland reservoir, extending deep into the abdominal cavity, were localized. In the stink bug, the opening of the metathoracic scent glands (ostiole) on the ventral side of the thorax as well as the gland reservoir in the median position under the ventral surface of the anterior abdomen were detected and localized. The developed method has future prospects in routine laboratory use in life sciences.

  11. Detection of Volatile Aroma Compounds of Morchella by Headspace Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HS-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatira TAŞKIN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   This study was conducted at the Horticulture Department of Çukurova University, Adana, Turkey, in 2010 to determine the volatile aroma compounds of Morchella mushroom. Fresh samples of Morchella esculenta (Sample 1 and Morchella elata (Sample 2 were collected from Çanakkale (Sample 1 and Mersin (Sample 2 provinces in Turkey in the spring of 2010. Volatile aroma compounds were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS. A total of 31 aroma compounds were identified in the 2 analyzed samples: 7 alcohols, 7 esters, 7 ketones, 3 acids, 2 aldehydes, 1 terpene, phenol, 1-propanamine, geranyl linalool, and quinoline. Seventeen aroma components were identified in Sample 1, and 18 compounds were found in Sample 2. Phenol was determined as the major aroma compound in both Sample 1 and Sample 2, at 50.888% and 58.293% content, respectively. Alcohols, especially 1-octen-3-ol, were detected as the second major aroma components in Sample 1 and Sample 2, at 15.500% and 5.660% content, respectively. Carbamic acid, methyl ester was found only in Sample 1, at 11.379% content. The aroma components detected in the two samples differed. 1-Octadecanol; cyclooctylalcohol; trans-2-undecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, butyl ester (CAS; carbamic acid, methyl ester; 2-ethylhexyl-2-ethylhexanoate; phthalic acid, decyl isobutyl ester; 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate; decanal; nonanal; 7,9-di-tert-butyl-1-oxaspiro(4.5deca-6,9-diene-2,8-dione; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione; 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl; and trans-alpha-bisabolene were detected only in Sample 1. Ethanol; silanediol, 2-methylaminoethanol; L-alanine, ethyl ester; carbonic acid, dodecyl isobutyl ester; acetic acid; butanoic acid; 2,3,4H-pyran-4-one; 5,9-undecadien-2-one; cyclooctene; 2-cyclopenten-1-one; 1-propanamine; geranyl linalool; and quinoline were determined only in Sample 2.

  12. Quantitative profiling of retinyl esters in milk from different ruminant species by using high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Silvia; Caretti, Fulvia; Gentili, Alessandra; Curini, Roberta; Perret, Daniela; Pérez-Fernández, Virginia

    2016-11-15

    An effective high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS) analytical approach was developed for retinoid profiling in raw milk samples (cow, buffalo, ewe, and goat). The analytes were isolated by means of liquid-liquid extraction, including a "lipid freezing" step, with yields exceeding 66%. Since the positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) detection is not completely selective, a reliable identification has been accomplished by fully separating the analytes on a tandem C18/C30 column system under non-aqueous reversed phase (NARP) chromatography conditions. After validation, different milk varieties obtained from pasture-fed animals were analysed, providing, for the first time, the retinoid composition of both buffalo's and ewe's milk. According to the literature, retinyl palmitate has been found to be the most abundant vitamin A vitamer, but retinyl oleate is the prevalent form in the caprine milk.

  13. Comparison of Cocaine Detections in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry and in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Yun Ki; Kim, Ok Bae [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop [Wooju Communication and Technology Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we determined the detection limit and reproducibility of the new IMS equipped with corona discharge ionization source using cocaine. The sample was injected with liquid solution to compare the results of APCI-MS. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was a technique originally applied for the detection of trace compounds. IMS has been widely used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and illegal drugs since it combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng/L range to pg/L range, ppb range and ppt range) and relatively low technical expenditure with high-speed data acquisition. The time required to acquire a single spectrum is in the range of several tens ms. The working principle is based on the drift of ions at ambient pressure under the influence of an external electric field.

  14. Experimental study on the influence of dimethylamine on the detection of gas phase sulfuric acid using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondo, L.; Leiminger, M.; Simon, M.; Ehrhart, S.; Williamson, C.; Praplan, A.; Kürten, A.; Kirkby, J.; Curtius, J.; Cloud Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment was set up at the CLOUD aerosol chamber to test the quantitative detection of H2SO4 by CIMS by directly comparing the measured H2SO4 with and without DMA being present in the sample air. It was found that the H2SO4 cluster distribution changes but the CIMS detection efficiency is not strongly influenced.

  15. Quality assessment of crude and processed ginger by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xianmei; Yu, Jiangyong; Zhao, Ming; Zhao, Bin; Xue, Xingyang; Che, ChunTao; Meng, Jiang; Wang, Shumei

    2015-09-01

    A sensitive, simple, and validated high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry detection method was developed for three ginger-based traditional Chinese herbal drugs, Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Rhizome Preparatum, and Zingiberis Rhizome Carbonisata. Chemometrics methods, such as principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and analysis of variance, were also employed in the data analysis. The results clearly revealed significant differences among Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Rhizome Preparatum, and Zingiberis Rhizome Carbonisata, indicating variations in their chemical compositions during the processing, which may elucidate the relationship of the thermal treatment with the change of the constituents and interpret their different clinical uses. Furthermore, the sample consistency of Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Rhizome Preparatum, and Zingiberis Rhizome Carbonisata can also be visualized by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry analysis followed by principal component analysis/hierarchical cluster analysis. The comprehensive strategy of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis coupled with chemometrics should be useful in quality assurance for ginger-based herbal drugs and other herbal medicines.

  16. Simultaneous detection of five one-carbon metabolites in plasma using stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaikalakoteswari, Antonysunil; Webster, Craig; Goljan, Ilona; Saravanan, Ponnusamy

    2016-02-15

    Disturbance in one-carbon (1-C) cycle occurs due to nutritional deficiencies (vitamin B12/folate) or specific genetic polymorphisms. This leads to altered levels of key 1-C metabolites such as SAM (s-adenosyl methionine), SAH (s-adenosyl homocysteine), methionine, homocysteine and MMA (methyl malonic acid). These 1-C metabolites are determinants of cellular methylation potential and epigenetic modifications of DNA which impairs metabolic pathways in several pathological diseases and developmental programming. Though methods were able to measure these analytes only independently, none of the methods detect simultaneously. Therefore we developed a method to measure these five 1-C metabolites in a single run using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We used stable isotopes dilution LC-MS/MS to measure the 1-C metabolites in human plasma. Blood samples were collected from pregnant women (n=30) at early gestation in the ongoing, multicentre, prospective PRiDE study. Linearity exhibited across the calibration range for all the analytes with the limit of detection (LOD) of 1.005nmol/l for SAM, 0.081nmol/l for SAH, 0.002μmol/l for methionine, 0.046μmol/l for homocysteine and 3.920nmol/l for MMA. The average recovery for SAM was 108%, SAH-110%, methionine-97%, homocysteine-91% and MMA-102%. The inter-assay CV for SAM was 7.3, SAH-5.6%, methionine-3.5%, homocysteine-7.0% and MMA-4.0%. The intra-assay CV for SAM was 8.7%, SAH-4.7%, methionine-5.4%, homocysteine-8.1% and MMA-6.1%. Pregnant women at early gestation with low B12 levels had significantly higher homocysteine, MMA, lower levels of methionine, SAM and SAM:SAH ratio and higher triglycerides. We developed a simple and rapid method to simultaneously quantify 1-C metabolites such as SAM, SAH, methionine, homocysteine and MMA in plasma by stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS which would be useful to elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms related in the gene-nutrient interactions.

  17. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. The main use of AMS has been in the analysis of radiocarbon and other cosmogenic radionuclides for archaeological, geological and environmental applications. In addition, AMS has been recently applied in biomedicine to study exposure of human tissues to chemicals and biomolecules at attomole levels. There is also a world-wide effort to analyse rare nuclides of heavier masses, such as long-lived actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. The use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required and there are several attempts to develop smaller and cheaper AMS spectrometers. 5 refs.

  19. Regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase: conformational changes upon phosphorylation detected by H/D exchange and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-07-15

    The enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the liver to tyrosine. The enzyme is regulated allosterically by phenylalanine and by phosphorylation of Ser16. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry has been used to gain insight into any structural change upon phosphorylation. Peptides in both the catalytic and regulatory domains show increased deuterium incorporation into the phosphorylated protein. Deuterium is incorporated into fewer peptides than when the enzyme is activated by phenylalanine, and the incorporation is slower. This establishes that the conformational change upon phosphorylation of phenylalanine hydroxylase is different from and less extensive than that upon phenylalanine activation.

  20. Application of Nanodiamonds in Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Cheng; Xianglei Kong

    2010-01-01

    The combination of nanodiamond (ND) with biomolecular mass spectrometry (MS) makes rapid, sensitive detection of biopolymers from complex biosamples feasible. Due to its chemical inertness, optical transparency and biocompatibility, the advantage of NDs in MS study is unique. Furthermore, functionalization on the surfaces of NDs expands their application in the fields of proteomics and genomics for specific requirements greatly. This review presents methods of MS analysis based on solid phase...

  1. Laser mass spectrometry for selective ultratrace determination

    CERN Document Server

    Wendt, K; Müller, P; Nörtershäuser, W; Schmitt, A; Trautmann, N; Bushaw, B A

    1999-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been explored in respect to its capabilities for isobaric suppression, isotopic selectivity, and overall efficiency. Theoretical calculations within the density matrix formalism on coherent multi-step excitation processes predict high specifications, which have been confirmed by spectroscopic measurements in Ca and which make the technique attractive for ultratrace detection. Analytical applications are found in the determination of the ultratrace isotope sup 4 sup 1 Ca for cosmochemical, radiodating, and medical applications.

  2. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  3. Decoration of silicon nanostructures with copper particles for simultaneous selective capture and mass spectrometry detection of His-tagged model peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffinier, Yannick; Kurylo, Ievgen; Drobecq, Hervé; Szunerits, Sabine; Melnyk, Oleg; Zaitsev, Vladimir N; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2014-10-21

    We present in this work a simple and fast preparation method of a new affinity surface-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) substrate based on silicon nanostructures decorated with copper particles. The silicon nanostructures were fabricated by the metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method. Then, superhydrophilic areas surrounded by superhydrophobic regions were formed through hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octadecene, followed by local degradation of the octadecyl layer. After that, copper particles were deposited in the hydrophilic areas by using the electroless method. We have demonstrated that these surfaces were able to perform high selective capture of model His-tag peptide even in a complex mixture such as serum solution. Then, the captured peptide was detected by mass spectrometry at a femtomolar level without the need of organic matrix.

  4. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  5. A method for studies on interactions between a gold-based drug and plasma proteins based on capillary electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tam T T N; Østergaard, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    An analytical method based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection was developed for studies on the interaction of gold-containing drugs and plasma proteins using auranofin as example. A detection limit of 18 ng/mL of auranofin...... was the major auranofin-interacting protein in plasma. The CE-ICP-MS method is proposed as a novel approach for kinetic studies of the interactions between gold-based drugs and plasma proteins. Graphical Abstract Development of a CE-ICP-MS based method allows for studies on interaction of the gold containing...

  6. Comparison of High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detector and with Tandem Mass Spectrometry methods for detection and quantification of Ochratoxin A in green and roasted coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Duarte da Costa Cunha Bandeira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two analytical methods for the determination and confirmation of ochratoxin A (OTA in green and roasted coffee samples were compared. Sample extraction and clean-up were based on liquid-liquid phase extraction and immunoaffinity column. The detection of OTA was carried out with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC combined either with fluorescence detection (FLD, or positive electrospray ionization (ESI+ coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS. The results obtained with the LC-ESI-MS/MS were specific and more sensitive, with the advantages in terms of unambiguous analyte identification, when compared with the HPLC-FLD.

  7. Environmental screening of acidic compounds based on capillary zone electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection with identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, W C; Grange, A H; Kelliher, V; Patterson, D B; Montcalm, A; Glassman, J; Farley, J W

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of capillary zone electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection (CZE/LIF) to the discovery of acidic compounds in environmental matrixes or the screening of extracts for acidic components. Published studies indicate that coal-derived materials contain a significant fraction of acidic compounds relative to materials derived from petroleum and shales. Such compounds may be useful as marker compounds for site assessment and source apportionment issues, and their identification may be important in toxicological and other health issues. We used deep-UV light from the frequency-doubled Ar ion laser at 244 and 257 nm to study extracts of samples. The CZE/LIF technique possesses good sensitivity and therefore overcomes one of the limitations of CZE with UV detection. The present work depends on high pressure/temperature solvent extraction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PNA)-contaminated soil, followed by separation using CZE. The anionic analytes were separated by using borate or phosphate buffer (pH 9.2-12.3) after a chemical class separation. Samples were also characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using full scans at low resolution, and elemental compositions were determined unequivocally by GC/high-resolution MS (GC/HRMS) using mass peak profiling (MPP). The similarity of low-resolution electron ionization mass spectra for a standard, 1-hydroxypyrene, and for a series of compounds in a contaminated-soil extract suggested that several types of phenolic and hydroxy-PNAs were present, including hydroxylated derivatives of fluorenes, fluoranthenes, and pyrenes. GC/HRMS using MPP confirmed the elemental compositions of the hydroxyfluorenes and hydroxypyrenes (and presumably hydroxyfluoranthenes) as [C13H10O] and [C16H10O], respectively. A new version of the MPP software was written for the Finnigan-MAT 900S-Trap and was similar to that developed previously for the VG 250SE. Inclusion of a calibration

  8. Laser-cooling-assisted mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Christian; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, co-trapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. Our technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  9. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  10. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography - time-of-flight mass spectrometry and simultaneous electron capture detection/nitrogen phosphorous detection for incense analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tin C.; Marriott, Philip J.

    This study reports comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography hyphenated to time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection (GC × GC/TOFMS) for characterisation and identification of components generated by four different types of powdered incense headspace (H/S) and incense smoke. GC × GC/TOFMS allowed simultaneous separation and identification of compounds emitted into the atmosphere as a result of combustion of incense powder. The smoke stream comprised compounds originating from the incense powder, and combustion products such as saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, essential oil type compounds, nitromusks, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, which possibly include oxygenated and nitrated PAH), N-heterocyclics, pyrans and furans, which were detected and tentatively identified by GC × GC/TOFMS. GC × GC-electron capture detector/nitrogen phosphorous detector (ECD/NPD) potentially offers the prospect of providing selective chemical compositional information of incense powder and smoke, such as nitrogen-containing (N-containing) and halogenated compounds. Results of GC×GC-ECD/NPD showed that both incense powder and smoke generated emission of N-containing and halogenated compounds. A significant number of halogenated and N-containing compounds were emitted during the incomplete combustion of incense. However, one further objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capacity of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to specific and/or selective detectors such as those used in this study (GC × GC-ECD/NPD) for the detection of particular classes of compounds such as N-containing and halogenated compounds at trace level concentrations in complex smoke samples.

  11. Inkjet-printed gold nanoparticle surfaces for the detection of low molecular weight biomolecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsico, Alyssa L M; Creran, Brian; Duncan, Bradley; Elci, S Gokhan; Jiang, Ying; Onasch, Timothy B; Wormhoudt, Joda; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2015-11-01

    Effective detection of low molecular weight compounds in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is often hindered by matrix interferences in the low m/z region of the mass spectrum. Here, we show that monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can serve as alternate matrices for the very sensitive detection of low molecular weight compounds such as amino acids. Amino acids can be detected at low fmol levels with minimal interferences by properly choosing the AuNP deposition method, density, size, and monolayer surface chemistry. By inkjet-printing AuNPs at various densities, we find that AuNP clusters are essential for obtaining the greatest sensitivity. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  14. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS(n)) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  15. Implementation of suitable flow injection/sequential-sample separation/preconcentration schemes for determination of trace metal concentrations using detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Wang, Jianhua

    2002-01-01

    Various preconditioning procedures encomprising appropriate separation/preconcentration schemes in order to obtain optimal sensitivity and selectivity characteristics when using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are pres...

  16. Variations in IBD (ACAD8) in children with elevated C4-carnitine detected by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina B; Bischoff, Claus; Christensen, Ernst;

    2006-01-01

    or compound heterozygous for variations in the IBD gene have been reported. We present IBD deficiency in an additional four newborns with elevated C(4)-carnitine identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) screening in Denmark and the United States. Three showed urinary excretions of isobutyryl......-glycine, and in vitro probe analysis of fibroblasts from two newborns indicated enzymatic IBD defect. Molecular genetic analysis revealed seven new rare variations in the IBD gene (c.348C>A, c.400G>T, c.409G>A, c.455T>C, c.958G>A, c.1000C>T and c.1154G>A). Furthermore, sequence analysis of the short-chain acyl...

  17. Gas and liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection for environmental speciation analysis — advances and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpunar, Joanna; McSheehy, Shona; Połeć, Kasia; Vacchina, Véronique; Mounicou, Sandra; Rodriguez, Isaac; Łobiński, Ryszard

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in the coupling of gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) and their role in trace element speciation analysis of environmental materials are presented. The discussion is illustrated with three research examples concerning the following topics: (i) development and coupling of multicapillary microcolumn GC with ICP MS for speciation of organotin in sediment and biological tissue samples; (ii) speciation of arsenic in marine algae by size-exclusion-anion-exchange HPLC-ICP MS; and (iii) speciation of cadmium in plant cell cultures by size-exclusion HPLC-ICP MS. Particular attention is paid to the problem of signal identification in ICP MS chromatograms; the potential of electrospray MS/MS for this purpose is highlighted.

  18. Regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase: conformational changes upon phenylalanine binding detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Dangott, Lawrence J; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-04-20

    Phenylalanine acts as an allosteric activator of the tetrahydropterin-dependent enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry has been used to gain insight into local conformational changes accompanying activation of rat phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine. Peptides in the regulatory and catalytic domains that lie in the interface between these two domains show large increases in the extent of deuterium incorporation from solvent in the presence of phenylalanine. In contrast, the effects of phenylalanine on the exchange kinetics of a mutant enzyme lacking the regulatory domain are limited to peptides surrounding the binding site for the amino acid substrate. These results support a model in which the N-terminus of the protein acts as an inhibitory peptide, with phenylalanine binding causing a conformational change in the regulatory domain that alters the interaction between the catalytic and regulatory domains.

  19. Rapid detection of meat spoilage by measuring volatile organic compounds by using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, D; Margesin, R; Klingsbichel, E; Hartungen, E; Jenewein, D; Schinner, F; Märk, T D

    2003-08-01

    The evolution of the microbial spoilage population for air- and vacuum-packaged meat (beef and pork) stored at 4 degrees C was investigated over 11 days. We monitored the viable counts (mesophilic total aerobic bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterococcus spp.) by the microbiological standard technique and by measuring the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the recently developed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry system. Storage time, packaging type, and meat type had statistically significant (P meat. We found statistically significant strong correlations (up to 99%) between some of the VOCs and the bacterial contamination. The concentrations of these VOCs increased linearly with the bacterial numbers. This study is a first step toward replacing the time-consuming plate counting by fast headspace air measurements, where the bacterial spoilage can be determined within minutes instead of days.

  20. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry—especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644965

  1. Detection of Posaconazole by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry with Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Pin-Shiuan; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2015-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the detection of posaconazole using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection (SALDI/MS) was developed. After the DLLME, posaconazole was detected using SALDI/MS with colloidal gold and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as the co-matrix. Under optimal extraction and detection conditions, the calibration curve, which ranged from 1.0 to 100.0 nM for posaconazole, was observed to be linear. The limit of detection (LOD) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 nM for posaconazole. This novel method was successfully applied to the determination of posaconazole in human urine samples.

  2. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  3. Detection of Radical Adducts with Small Molecular Weights by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization with Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN,Yao-Wei; SUN,Shi-Hao; XIE,Jian-Ping; ZONG,Yong-Li; NIE,Cong; GUO,Yin-Long

    2007-01-01

    As an alternative method, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTMS) has been successfully used to detect and identify free radical adducts with small molecular weights of hydroxyl and 2-cyano-2-propyl radicals trapped with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). The detection and identification by MS/MS experiments using sustained offresonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) of [(DMPO+·OH-·H)+H+] (m/z 130.0868) and [DMPO+2 ·CH(CH3)2CN+H+] (m/z 250.1917) have demonstrated that MALDI-FTMS could be an effective method for detection and identification of free radical adducts. Other radical adducts have been also detected and identified. The approach of MALDI-FTMS is simple, fast, and sensitive which has potential for high-throughput analysis.

  4. Detection of VX contamination in soil through solid-phase microextraction sampling and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the VX degradation product bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Gary L; Kimm, Gregory; Koch, David; Savage, Paul B; Ding, Bangwei; Smith, Philip A

    2003-04-11

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) sampling and analysis method was developed for bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide (a degradation product of the nerve agent VX) in soil. A 30-min sampling time with a polydimethylsiloxane-coated fiber and high temperature alkaline hydrolysis allowed detection with 1.0 microg of VX spiked per g of agricultural soil. The method was successfully used in the field with portable GC-MS instrumentation. This method is relatively rapid (less than 1 h), avoids the use of complex preparation steps, and enhances analyst safety through limited use of solvents and decontamination of the soil before sampling.

  5. Use of solid-phase microextraction for the detection of acetic acid by ion-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and application to indoor levels in museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Ana F L; Van Vaeck, Luc; Van Grieken, René

    2005-03-01

    A simple and efficient method using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-ITMS) was developed for the analysis of acetic acid in air. The choice of the SPME fibre revealed to be critical as well as the sampling and desorption time. A dilution vessel was used for calibration. The precision of the method was found to be 4.7% relative standard deviation (RSD) and the detection limit 5.7 microg m(-3). The SPME-GC-MS technique was applied to the analysis of acetic acid in museum atmospheres.

  6. Detection, Characterization and Classification of Biological Components in Aerosols by Time-Resolved Laser Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-20

    samples were more than 2 cm from the center of a very open ion source. The laser pyrolysis spectra of the SBR sample (Figure 5a) and a SBR and natural...z) Figure 5. Laser pyrolysis mass spectra of vulcanized SBR (a) and SBR -NR (b) rubber compounds. Spectra consist primarily of fragment and molecular...4X .210󈨢 Ol~~L&42fjy DETECTION, CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF BIOLOGICAL COMPONENTS IN AEROSOLS BY TIME-RESOLVED LASER PYROLYSIS MASS

  7. Comparison and characterization of soybean and sunflower lecithins used for chocolate production by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with fluorescence detection and electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stephanie; Bürmann, Laura; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2015-03-25

    The scarce availability of nongenetically modified soybeans on the world market represents a growing problem for food manufacturers. Hence, in this study the effects of substituting soybean with sunflower lecithin were investigated with regard to chocolate production. The glycerophospholipid pattern of the different lecithin samples was investigated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography fluorescence detection (HPTLC-FLD) and by HPTLC-positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI(+)-MS) via the TLC-MS Interface and by scanning HPTLC-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). Especially, the contents of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) were of interest due to the influencing effects of these two glycerophospholipids on the rheological parameters of chocolate production. The lecithin substitution led to only slight differences in the rheological parameters of milk and dark chocolate. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of seven glycerophospholipids were studied for three detection modes. Mean LODs ranged from 8 to 40 mg/kg for HPTLC-FLD and, using a single-quadrupole MS, from 10 to 280 mg/kg for HPTLC-ESI(+)-MS as well as from 15 to 310 mg/kg for HPTLC-FLD-ESI(+)-MS recorded after derivatization with the primuline reagent.

  8. Classification of the medicinal plants of the genus Atractylodes using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and tandem mass spectrometry detection combined with multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kim, Unyong; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Seul Gi; Choi, Yong Seok; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-04-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and tandem mass spectrometry detection were developed for the discrimination of the rhizomes of four Atractylodes medicinal plants: A. japonica, A. macrocephala, A. chinensis, and A. lancea. A quantitative study was performed, selecting five bioactive components, including atractylenolide I, II, III, eudesma-4(14),7(11)-dien-8-one and atractylodin, on twenty-six Atractylodes samples of various origins. Sample extraction was optimized to sonication with 80% methanol for 40 min at room temperature. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was established using a C18 column with a water/acetonitrile gradient system at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and the detection wavelength was set at 236 nm. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was applied to certify the reliability of the quantitative results. The developed methods were validated by ensuring specificity, linearity, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, recovery, robustness, and stability. Results showed that cangzhu contained higher amounts of atractylenolide I and atractylodin than baizhu, and especially atractylodin contents showed the greatest variation between baizhu and cangzhu. Multivariate statistical analysis, such as principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, were also employed for further classification of the Atractylodes plants. The established method was suitable for quality control of the Atractylodes plants.

  9. Integrating qualitative and quantitative characterization of traditional Chinese medicine injection by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuan-yuan; Xiao, Xue; Luo, Juan-min; Fu, Chan; Wang, Qiao-wei; Wang, Yi-ming; Liang, Qiong-lin; Luo, Guo-an

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to describe and exemplify an integrated strategy of the combination of qualitative and quantitative characterization of a multicomponent mixture for the quality control of traditional Chinese medicine injections with the example of Danhong injection (DHI). The standardized chemical profile of DHI has been established based on liquid chromatography with diode array detection. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray multistage tandem ion-trap mass spectrometry have been developed to identify the major constituents in DHI. The structures of 26 compounds including nucleotides, phenolic acids, and flavonoid glycosides were identified or tentatively characterized. Meanwhile, the simultaneous determination of seven marker constituents, including uridine, adenosine, danshensu, protocatechuic aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, and salvianolic acid B, in DHI was performed by multiwavelength detection based on high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The integrated qualitative and quantitative characterization strategy provided an effective and reliable pattern for the comprehensive and systematic characterization of the complex traditional Chinese medicine system.

  10. Determination of Phenolic Content in Different Barley Varieties and Corresponding Malts by Liquid Chromatography-diode Array Detection-Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O. Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple and reliable method for the simultaneous determination of nine phenolic compounds in barley and malted barley was established, using liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. The phenolic compounds can be easily detected with both systems, despite significant differences in sensitivity. Concentrations approximately 180-fold lower could be achieved by mass spectrometry analysis compared to diode array detection, especially for the flavan-3-ols (+-catechin and (−-epicatechin, which have poor absorptivity in the UV region. Malt samples were characterized by higher phenolic content comparing to corresponding barley varieties, revealing a significant increase of the levels of (+-catechin and (−-epicatechin during the malting process. Moreover, the industrial malting is responsible for modification on the phenolic profile from barley to malt, namely on the synthesis or release of sinapinic acid and epicatechin. Accordingly, the selection of the malting parameters, as well as the barley variety plays an important role when considering the quality and antioxidant stability of beer.

  11. Detection of amino acid substitutions in the GyrA protein of fluoroquinolone-resistant typhoidal Salmonella isolates using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassing, Robert-Jan; Goessens, Wil H; Zeneyedpour, Lona; Sultan, Sadaf; van Kampen, Jeroen J; Verbon, Annelies; van Genderen, Perry J; Hays, John P; Luider, Theo M; Dekker, Lennard J

    2016-05-01

    Infections with typhoidal Salmonella isolates that are resistant to fluoroquinolone antibiotics have become very common in several Asian countries. In the majority of these cases, resistance to fluoroquinolone-based antibiotics is associated with genetic mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the bacterial DNA gyrase gene gyrA. The objective of this study was to detect these amino acid substitutions by high-resolution mass spectrometry instead of sequencing of the gyrA gene. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methodology was developed and evaluated for the detection of amino acid substitutions in the GyrA protein of 23 typhoidal Salmonella isolates. These isolates included typhoidal Salmonella that possessed different antibiotic sensitivities to fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The LC-MS methodology correctly identified peptide sequences associated with phenotypic QRDR mutations of the GyrA protein in all 23 phenotypically diverse typhoidal Salmonella isolates tested. In conclusion, a reliable and rapid LC-MS methodology has been developed that is able to identify GyrA QRDR mutations that are involved in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in typhoidal Salmonella spp. Furthermore, this 'proof of principle' study indicates the potential usefulness of LC-MS in future detection of antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection, identification, and occurrence of thiotetronic acids in drinking water from underground sources by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyczko, Jadwiga; Beach, Daniel; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that electrospray ionization (ESI) with differential ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS) and "soft" mass spectrometry (MS) provide unique analytical capabilities that led to the discovery of sulfur-containing polar congeners of thiotetronic acid (TA) in drinking water from underground sources in Canada and the United States. Polar TAs accumulate in underground aquifers and appear to be the most abundant class of organic compounds in bottled water but cannot be detected by conventional mass spectrometry methods. We show that normally stable TAs are converted into very reactive ions in ESI which have to be analyzed using special conditions in ESI-FAIMS-MS to avoid extensive dissociation and ion/molecule reactions. De novo identification of 10 TAs was accomplished by the comparative tandem mass spectrometry analysis of authentic TA derivatives from groundwater samples and synthetic TA analogues prepared for this study. We present highlights of gas phase ion chemistry of polar TAs to explain their unique properties and reactivity. TA derivatives were originally isolated from soil bacteria and are of interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to their potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and negligible toxicity to mammals. We suspect that TAs are natural disinfection agents protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination, but these compound undergo modifications or decompose during an ozonation water treatment.

  13. Direct Detection of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Aqueous Samples with Thermally-Assisted Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian S.; Ton, Alain T.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2011-07-01

    An ambient mass spectrometric method based on desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) has been developed to allow rapid, direct analysis of contaminated water samples, and the technique was evaluated through analysis of a wide array of pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP) contaminants. Incorporating direct infusion of aqueous sample and thermal assistance into the source design has allowed low ppt detection limits for the target analytes in drinking water matrices. With this methodology, mass spectral information can be collected in less than 1 min, consuming ~100 μL of total sample. Quantitative ability was also demonstrated without the use of an internal standard, yielding decent linearity and reproducibility. Initial results suggest that this source configuration is resistant to carryover effects and robust towards multi-component samples. The rapid, continuous analysis afforded by this method offers advantages in terms of sample analysis time and throughput over traditional hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques.

  14. Detection of gaseous compounds by needle trap sampling and direct thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry: concept and demonstrative application to breath gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeblatt, Juliane; Schubert, Jochen K; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    A fast detection method to analyze gaseous organic compounds in complex gas mixtures was developed, using a needle trap device (NTD) in conjunction with thermal-desorption photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-PI-TOFMS). The mass spectrometer was coupled via a deactivated fused silica capillary to an injector of a gas chromatograph. In the hot injector, the analytes collected on the NTD were thermally desorbed and directly transferred to the PI-TOFMS ion source. The molecules are softly ionized either by single photon ionization (SPI, 118 nm) or by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI, 266 nm), and the molecular ion signals are detected in the TOF mass analyzer. Analyte desorption and the subsequent PI-TOFMS detection step only lasts ten seconds. The specific selectivity of REMPI (i.e., aromatic compounds) and universal ionization characteristics render PI-MS as a promising detection system. As a first demonstrative application, the alveolar phase breath gas of healthy, nonsmoking subjects was sampled on NTDs. While smaller organic compounds such as acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene, or cysteamine can be detected in the breath gas with SPI, REMPI depicts the aromatic substances phenol and indole at 266 nm. In the breath gas of a healthy, smoking male subject, several xenobiotic substances such as benzene, toluene, styrene, and ethylbenzene can be found as well. Furthermore, the NTD-REMPI-TOFMS setup was tested for breath gas taken from a mechanically ventilated pig under continuous intravenous propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol, narcotic drug) infusion.

  15. The application of inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry for measurement of selenium isotopes, isotope ratios and chromatographic detection of selenoamino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2000-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS) was characterised for the detection of the six naturally occurring selenium isotopes. The potentially interfering argon dimers at the selenium masses m/z 74, 76, 78 and 80 were reduced in intensity by approximately five...... orders of magnitude by using methane as reactive cell gas in the DRC. By using 3% v/v methanol in water for carbon-enhanced ionisation of selenium, the sensitivity of Se-80 was 10(4) counts s(-1) per ng ml(-1) of selenium, and the estimated limit of detection was 6 pg ml(-1). The precision of the isotope...... ratios. Deuterated methane used as the DRC gas showed that hydrogen transfer from methane was not involved in the formation of SeH as SeD was absent in the mass spectrum. The almost interference-free detection of selenium by ICP-DRC-MS made the detection of the Se-80 isotope possible for detection...

  16. External Second Gate, Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Parametric Optimization for Detection of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E. Tarver

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. [1] In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. [2] The problem with conventional (signal averaging IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives. With external second gate, Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters (scan time and sampling rate to increase the spectral resolution to reduce false alarms and improve the sensitivity for early warning and contamination avoidance. In addition, with FT-IMS the entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a seven-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  17. Detection of anabolic and androgenic steroids and/or their esters in horse hair using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Karen Y; Choi, Timmy L S; Kwok, Wai Him; Wong, Jenny K Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2017-04-14

    Anabolic and androgenic steroids (AASs) are a class of prohibited substances banned in horseracing at all times. The common approach for controlling the misuse of AASs in equine sports is by detecting the presence of AASs and/or their metabolites in urine and blood samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This approach, however, often falls short as the duration of effect for many AASs are longer than their detection time in both urine and blood. As a result, there is a high risk that such AASs could escape detection in their official race-day samples although they may have been used during the long period of training. Hair analysis, on the other hand, can afford significantly longer detection windows. In addition, the identification of synthetic ester derivatives of AASs in hair, particularly for the endogenous ones, can provide unequivocal proof of their exogenous origin. This paper describes the development of a sensitive method (at sub to low parts-per-billion or ppb levels) for detecting 48 AASs and/or their esters in horse hair using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). Decontaminated horse hair was pulverised and subjected to in-situ liquid-liquid extraction in a mixture of hexane - ethyl acetate (7:3, v/v) and phosphate buffer (0.1M, pH 9.5), followed by additional clean-up using mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. The final extract was analysed using UHPLC-HRMS in the positive electrospray ionisation (ESI) mode with both full scan and parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). This method was validated for qualitative identification purposes. Validation data, including method specificity, method sensitivity, extraction recovery, method precision and matrix effect are presented. Method applicability was demonstrated by the successful detection and confirmation of testosterone propionate in a referee hair sample. To our knowledge, this was

  18. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  19. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  20. The detection of piroxicam, tenoxicam and their metabolites in equine urine by electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Andrew R; Suann, Craig J; Stenhouse, Allen M

    2004-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted into the metabolism and urinary excretion of orally administered piroxicam and tenoxicam in the horse. The major component detected in urine after the administration of piroxicam was 5'-hydroxypiroxicam, which was detectable up to 24 h post-administration. Unchanged piroxicam was present only as a minor component. In contrast, unchanged tenoxicam was the major component observed after the administration of tenoxicam, being detectable for 72 h post-administration, while 5'-hydroxytenoxicam was a minor component. Phase II beta-glucuronide conjugation in each case was found to be negligible. The ion trap mass spectral characteristics of piroxicam, tenoxicam, 5'-hydroxypiroxicam and 5'-hydroxytenoxicam under electrospray ionisation conditions were examined in some detail.

  1. NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility was created under the auspices of the Office of the Scientific Director to provide high-end mass-spectrometric...

  2. Determination of quinolone residues in shrimp using liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and residue confirmation by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbiwnyk, Christine M; Carr, Lori E; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Andersen, Wendy C; Miller, Keith E

    2007-07-23

    The quinolones, oxolinic acid (OXO), flumequine (FLU), and nalidixic acid (NAL), are antibacterial drugs effective against gram-negative bacteria. Quinolones are used in both human and veterinary medicine, but are currently not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in food fish. A liquid chromatography-fluorescence (LC-FL) method was developed to determine OXO, FLU, and NAL residues in shrimp. An additional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) method was created to confirm these residues using the same sample extract. Samples were prepared with a simple ethyl acetate extraction followed by solvent exchange into 0.2% formic acid and cleaned-up with hexane. Reverse phase chromatography was used to separate the three compounds in both procedures. For the LC-FL determinative method, fluorescence emission was monitored at 369 nm with excitation at 327 nm. With electrospray ionization, the three most abundant ions from the MS3 product ion spectrum were used to identify OXO, FLU, and NAL in the confirmation procedure. Shrimp samples fortified at levels ranging from 7.5 to 100 ng g(-1) were used to validate both methods.

  3. Analysis of thyreostatic drugs in thyroid samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuín, S; Centrich, F; Rúbies, A; Companyó, R; Prat, M D

    2008-06-09

    A method based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of six thyreostatic drugs in thyroid tissue has been optimised and validated in accordance with the Decision 2002/657/EC. Samples are extracted with methanol and the extracts cleaned-up on silica cartridges. The recoveries range from 40% for 6-phenyl-2-thiouracil to 79% for 2-thiouracil. Quantification is carried out with blank tissue samples spiked with the analytes in the range 25-500 microg kg(-1). 5,6-Dimethyl-2-thiouracil is used as internal standard. CCalpha and CCbeta are in the ranges 4.3-16.1 microg kg(-1) and 8.7-20.7 microg kg(-1), respectively. Accuracy, expressed as percentage of error, is lower than 6% and relative standard deviation in reproducibility conditions falls between 5.6 and 10.3%. Nowadays, the proposed method is routinely implemented in the laboratory of the Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona and allows processing of up to 20 samples per day.

  4. Covalent Surface Modification of Prions: A Mass Spectrometry-Based Means of Detecting Distinctive Structural Features of Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Dynin, Irina C

    2016-02-16

    Prions (PrP(Sc)) are molecular pathogens that are able to convert the isosequential normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a prion. The only demonstrated difference between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) is conformational: they are isoforms. A given host can be infected by more than one kind or strain of prion. Five strains of hamster-adapted scrapie [Sc237 (=263K), drowsy, 139H, 22AH, and 22CH] and recombinant PrP were reacted with five different concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mM) of reagent (N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of acetic acid) that acetylates lysines. The extent of lysine acetylation was quantitated by mass spectrometry. The lysines in rPrP react similarly. The lysines in the strains react differently from one another in a given strain and react differently when strains are compared. Lysines in the C-terminal region of prions have different strain-dependent reactivity. The results are consistent with a recently proposed model for the structure of a prion. This model proposes that prions are composed of a four-rung β-solenoid structure comprised of four β-sheets that are joined by loops and turns of amino acids. Variation in the amino acid composition of the loops and β-sheet structures is thought to result in different strains of prions.

  5. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) 1977-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, H. E.; Purser, K. H.; Litherland, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    The eleventh Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS 11) Conference took place in September 2008, the Thirtieth Anniversary of the first Conference. That occurred in 1978 after discoveries with nuclear physics accelerators in 1977. Since the first Conference there have now been ten further conferences on the development and applications of what has become known as AMS. This is the accepted acronym for the use of accelerators, together with nuclear and atomic physics techniques, to enhance the performance of mass spectrometers for the detection and measurement of rare long-lived radioactive elements such as radiocarbon. This paper gives an outline of the events that led to the first conference together with a brief account of the first four conferences before the introduction of the second generation of accelerator mass spectrometers at AMS 5.

  6. Non-polar lipids characterization of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization/mass spectrometry detection and non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanali, Chiara; Beccaria, Marco; Salivo, Simona; Tranchida, Peter; Tripodo, Giusy; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-08

    A chemical characterization of major lipid components, namely, triacylglycerols, fatty acids and the unsaponifiable fraction, in a Quinoa seed lipids sample is reported. To tackle such a task, non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was employed. The latter was interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the analysis of triacylglycerols. The main triacylglycerols (>10%) were represented by OLP, OOL and OLL (P = palmitoyl, O = oleoyl, L = linoleoyl); the latter was present in the oil sample at the highest percentage (18.1%). Furthermore, fatty acid methyl esters were evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. 89% of the total fatty acids was represented by unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters with the greatest percentage represented by linoleic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 48 and 28%, respectively. An extensive characterization of the unsaponifiable fraction of Quinoa seed lipids was performed for the first time, by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. Overall, 66 compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were tentatively identified, many constituents of which (particularly sterols) were confirmed by using gas chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  7. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus using 15N-labeled bacteriophage amplification coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Carrie L; Rees, Jon C; Fernández, Facundo M; Barr, John R

    2011-03-15

    A novel approach to rapid bacterial detection using an isotopically labeled (15)N bacteriophage and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is introduced. Current phage amplification detection (PAD) via mass spectrometric analysis is limited because host bacteria must be inoculated with low phage titers in such a way that initial infecting phage concentrations must be below the detection limit of the instrument, thus lengthening incubation times. Additionally, PAD techniques cannot distinguish inoculate input phage from output phage which can increase the possibility of false positive results. Here, we report a rapid and accurate PAD approach for identification of Staphylococcus aureus via detection of bacteriophage capsid proteins. This approach uses both a wild-type (14)N and a (15)N-isotopically labeled S. aureus-specific bacteriophage. High (15)N phage titers, above our instrument's detection limits, were used to inoculate S. aureus. MALDI-TOF MS detection of the (14)N progeny capsid proteins in the phage-amplified culture indicated the presence of the host bacteria. Successful phage amplification was observed after 90 min of incubation. The amplification was observed by both MALDI-TOF MS analysis and by standard plaque assay measurements. This method overcomes current limitations by improving analysis times while increasing selectivity when compared to previously reported PAD methodologies.

  8. On-line high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry profiling of human milk oligosaccharides derivatized with 2-aminoacridone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Fabio; Coppa, Giovanni V; Zampini, Lucia; Maccari, Francesca; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Santoro, Lucia; Gabrielli, Orazio; Volpi, Nicola

    2012-11-01

    A high-resolution normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry separation and structural characterization of the main oligosaccharides along with lactose from human milk samples is described. A total of 22 commercially available oligosaccharides were fluorotagged with 2-aminoacridone and separated on an amide column and identified on the basis of their retention times and mass spectra. Derivatized species having mass lower than approximately 800 to 900 exhibited mainly [M-H](-1) anions, oligomers with mass up to approximately 1000 to 1100 were represented by both [M-H](-1) and [M-2H](-2) anions, and oligomers greater than approximately 1200 to 1300 were characterized by a charge state of -3. Furthermore, the retention times were directly related to the glycans' molecular mass. Human milk samples from the four groups of donors (Se±/Le±) were analyzed for their composition and amount of free oligosaccharides after rapid and simple prepurification and derivatization steps also in the presence of lactose in high content. This analytical approach enabled us to perform the determination of species not detected by traditional techniques, such as sialic acid, as well as of species present in low content easily mistaken with other peaks. Finally, labeled human milk oligosaccharides were analyzed without any interference from excess fluorophore or interference from proteins, peptides, salts, and other impurities normally present in this complex biological fluid.

  9. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  10. [A novel method for the identification of illegal cooking oil (1): detection of three capsaicinoids with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Longxing; Jin, Jing; Wang, Shuqiu; Wang, Xingfu; Tian, Yuzeng; Chen, Jiping

    2012-11-01

    Illegal cooking oil (ICO, also named swill-cooked dirty oil) has recently become a serious food safety problem in China. Now, the identification method of ICO is also a hot research area. Owning to the special eating habits of Chinese people, cayenne is widely used in catering business. Capsaicinoids are main spicy compounds in cayenne. So, they are potential evaluation indices for the identification of ICO. In this study, a solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) method has been developed to detect the trace residues of three capsaicinoids (capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin and nonylic acid vanillylamide) in cooking oil. The oil sample was first extracted with 20 g/L sodium hydroxide, the C18 SPE cartridge was then used to clean-up the sample and enrich the analytes before the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detection. With this method, sixty seven blind samples provided by China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment were analyzed. The results showed that the capsaicinoids are good evaluation indices for the identification of ICO. In all the 48 ICO samples, 36 samples were successfully recognized. All the 19 normal oil samples were accurately identified. This method has been chosen and authorized as one of the four standard instrumental identification methods for ICO by the National Ministry of Health of China.

  11. Metal imaging in non-denaturating 2D electrophoresis gels by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for the detection of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J Susanne; Lobinski, Ryszard; Becker, J Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was developed as a powerful analytical technique for metal imaging of 2D gels for the detection of metalloproteins in rat kidney after electrophoretic separation. Protein complexes, extracted with water, were separated in their native state in the first and second dimension by blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Essential and toxic metals, such as zinc, copper, iron, manganese and lead, were monitored by LA-ICP-MS after gel ablation by a focused laser beam in a way that the total surface of a selected fragment of the gel was totally ablated. The metal distribution of this part of the gel was then constructed by plotting the metal (isotope) signal intensity as a function of the x,y (isoelectric point, molecular mass) coordinates of the gel. The proteins at locations rich in metals were cut out, digested with trypsin and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).

  12. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  13. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, D.; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2012-08-10

    The feasibility of using an online thermal-desorption electron-ionization high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the detection of particulate trace elements was investigated analyzing data from Mexico City obtained during the MILAGRO 2006 field campaign, where relatively high concentrations of trace elements have been reported. This potential application is of interest due to the real-time data provided by the AMS, its high sensitivity and time resolution, and the widespread availability and use of this instrument. High resolution mass spectral analysis, isotopic ratios, and ratios of different ions containing the same elements are used to constrain the chemical identity of the measured ions. The detection of Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sn, and Sb is reported. There was no convincing evidence for the detection of other trace elements commonly reported in PM. The elements detected tend to be those with lower melting and boiling points, as expected given the use of a vaporizer at 600oC in this instrument. Operation of the AMS vaporizer at higher temperatures is likely to improve trace element detection. The detection limit is estimated at approximately 0.3 ng m-3 for 5-min of data averaging. Concentration time series obtained from the AMS data were compared to concentration records determined from offline analysis of particle samples from the same times and locations by ICP (PM2.5) and PIXE (PM1.1 and PM0.3). The degree of correlation and agreement between the three instruments (AMS, ICP, and PIXE) varied depending on the element. The AMS shows promise for real-time detection of some trace elements, although additional work including laboratory calibrations with different chemical forms of these elements are needed to further develop this technique and to understand the differences with the ambient data from the other techniques. The trace elements peaked in the morning as expected for primary sources, and the many detected plumes suggest the presence of multiple

  14. Advances in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of several food allergens in complex and processed foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planque, M; Arnould, T; Dieu, M; Delahaut, P; Renard, P; Gillard, N

    2016-09-16

    Sensitive detection of food allergens is affected by food processing and foodstuff complexity. It is therefore a challenge to detect cross-contamination in food production that could endanger an allergic customer's life. Here we used ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for simultaneous detection of traces of milk (casein, whey protein), egg (yolk, white), soybean, and peanut allergens in different complex and/or heat-processed foodstuffs. The method is based on a single protocol (extraction, trypsin digestion, and purification) applicable to the different tested foodstuffs: chocolate, ice cream, tomato sauce, and processed cookies. The determined limits of quantitation, expressed in total milk, egg, peanut, or soy proteins (and not soluble proteins) per kilogram of food, are: 0.5mg/kg for milk (detection of caseins), 5mg/kg for milk (detection of whey), 2.5mg/kg for peanut, 5mg/kg for soy, 3.4mg/kg for egg (detection of egg white), and 30.8mg/kg for egg (detection of egg yolk). The main advantage is the ability of the method to detect four major food allergens simultaneously in processed and complex matrices with very high sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Evaluation of the Broad-Range PCR-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS System and Virus Microarrays for Virus Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanyn P. Taliaferro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced nucleic acid-based technologies are powerful research tools for novel virus discovery but need to be standardized for broader applications such as virus detection in biological products and clinical samples. We have used well-characterized retrovirus stocks to evaluate the limit of detection (LOD for broad-range PCR with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS or PLEX-ID, RT-PCR assays, and virus microarrays. The results indicated that in the absence of background cellular nucleic acids, PLEX-ID and RT-PCR had a similar LOD for xenotropic murine retrovirus-related virus (XMRV; 3.12 particles per µL whereas sensitivity of virus detection was 10-fold greater using virus microarrays. When virus was spiked into a background of cellular nucleic acids, the LOD using PLEX-ID remained the same, whereas virus detection by RT-PCR was 10-fold less sensitive, and no virus could be detected by microarrays. Expected endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences were detected in cell lines tested and known species-specific viral sequences were detected in bovine serum and porcine trypsin. A follow-up strategy was developed using PCR amplification, nucleotide sequencing, and bioinformatics to demonstrate that an RD114-like retrovirus sequence that was detected by PLEX-ID in canine cell lines (Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK and Cf2Th canine thymus was due to defective, endogenous gammaretrovirus-related sequences.

  16. Detection of polydimethylsiloxanes transferred from silicone-coated parchment paper to baked goods using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Andreas; Crawford, Elizabeth A; Gross, Jürgen H

    2016-04-01

    The non-stick properties of parchment papers are achieved by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coatings. During baking, PDMS can thus be extracted from the silicone-coated parchment into the baked goods. Positive-ion direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry (MS) is highly efficient for the analysis of PDMS. A DART-SVP source was coupled to a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect PDMS on the contact surface of baked goods after use of silicone-coated parchment papers. DART spectra from the bottom surface of baked cookies and pizzas exhibited signals because of PDMS ions of the general formula [(C2H6SiO)n  + NH4 ](+) in the m/z 800-1900 range.

  17. Discovery of the antibiotic phosacetamycin via a new mass spectrometry-based method for phosphonic acid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bradley S; Zhao, Changming; Gao, Jiangtao; Evans, Courtney M; Ju, Kou-San; Doroghazi, James R; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Kelleher, Neil L; Metcalf, William W

    2013-05-17

    Naturally occurring phosphonates such as phosphinothricin (Glufosinate, a commercially used herbicide) and fosfomycin (Monurol, a clinically used antibiotic) have proved to be potent and useful biocides. Yet this class of natural products is still an under explored family of secondary metabolites. Discovery of the biosynthetic pathways responsible for the production of these compounds has been simplified by using gene based screening approaches, but detection and identification of the natural products the genes produce have been hampered by a lack of high-throughput methods for screening potential producers under various culture conditions. Here, we present an efficient mass-spectrometric method for the selective detection of natural products containing phosphonate and phosphinate functional groups. We have used this method to identify a new phosphonate metabolite, phosacetamycin, whose structure, biological activity, and biosynthetic gene cluster are reported.

  18. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  19. Ion chemistry of VX surrogates and ion energetics properties of VX: new suggestions for VX chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midey, Anthony J; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    Room temperature rate constants and product ion branching ratios have been measured for the reactions of numerous positive and negative ions with VX chemical warfare agent surrogates representing the amine (triethylamine) and organophosphonate (diethyl methythiomethylphosphonate (DEMTMP)) portions of VX. The measurements have been supplemented by theoretical calculations of the proton affinity, fluoride affinity, and ionization potential of VX and the simulants. The results show that many proton transfer reactions are rapid and that the proton affinity of VX is near the top of the scale. Many proton transfer agents should detect VX selectively and sensitively in chemical ionization mass spectrometers. Charge transfer with NO(+) should also be sensitive and selective since the ionization potential of VX is small. The surrogate studies confirm these trends. Limits of detection for commercial and research grade CIMS instruments are estimated at 80 pptv and 5 ppqv, respectively.

  20. Characterization of the aerosol produced by infrared femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels for the sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of selenoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claverie, Fanny [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Novalase SA, Z.I de la Briqueterie, 6 Impasse du bois de la Grange, 33610 Canejan (France); Pecheyran, Christophe [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: Christophe.pecheyran@univ-pau.fr; Mounicou, Sandra [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Ballihaut, Guillaume [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire d' Ecologie Moleculaire (Microbiologie), UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, avenue de l' Universite, B.P. 1155, F-64013 Pau (France); Fernandez, Beatriz [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR 5254 CNRS- Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, 2 Avenue du President Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Alexis, Joel [Laboratoire Genie de Production, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tarbes, 47 avenue d' Azereix BP 1629, 65016 Tarbes (France)] (and others)

    2009-07-15

    A 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy (2-mm wide lane) previously developed for the detection of selenoproteins in gel electrophoresis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was found to increase signal sensitivity by a factor of 40 compared to conventional nanosecond ablation (0.12-mm wide lane) [G. Ballihaut, F. Claverie, C. Pecheyran, S. Mounicou, R. Grimaud and R. Lobinski, Sensitive Detection of Selenoproteins in Gel Electrophoresis by High Repetition Rate Femtosecond Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, Anal. Chem. 79 (2007) 6874-6880]. Such improvement couldn't be explained solely by the difference of amount of material ablated, and then, was attributed to the aerosol properties. In order to validate this hypothesis, the characterization of the aerosol produced by nanosecond and high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels was investigated. Our 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy of 2-mm wide lane was found to produce aerosols of similar particle size distribution compared to nanosecond laser ablation of 0.12-mm wide lane, with 38% mass of particles < 1 {mu}m. However, at high repetition rate, when the ablated surface was reduced, the particle size distribution was shifted toward thinner particle diameter (up to 77% for a 0.12-mm wide lane at 285 {mu}m depth). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy was employed to visualize the morphology of the aerosol. In the case of larger ablation, the fine particles ejected from the sample were found to form agglomerates due to higher ablation rate and then higher collision probability. Additionally, investigations of the plasma temperature changes during the ablation demonstrated that the introduction of such amount of polyacrylamide gel particles had very limited impact on the ICP source ({delta}T{approx} 25 {+-} 5 K). This suggests that the cohesion forces between the thin particles composing these large

  1. Mass spectrometry detection of G3m and IGHG3 alleles and follow-up of differential mother and neonate IgG3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechavanne, Célia; Guillonneau, François; Chiappetta, Giovanni; Sago, Laïla; Lévy, Prisca; Salnot, Virginie; Guitard, Evelyne; Ehrenmann, François; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Le Port, Agnès; Vinh, Joëlle; Mayeux, Patrick; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Migot-Nabias, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis for detection of immunoglobulins (IG) of the human IgG3 subclass is described that relies on polymorphic amino acids of the heavy gamma3 chains. IgG3 is the most polymorphic human IgG subclass with thirteen G3m allotypes located on the constant CH2 and CH3 domains of the gamma3 chain, the combination of which leads to six major G3m alleles. Amino acid changes resulting of extensive sequencing previously led to the definition of 19 IGHG3 alleles that have been correlated to the G3m alleles. As a proof of concept, MS proteotypic peptides were defined which encompass discriminatory amino acids for the identification of the G3m and IGHG3 alleles. Plasma samples originating from ten individuals either homozygous or heterozygous for different G3m alleles, and including one mother and her baby (drawn sequentially from birth to 9 months of age), were analyzed. Total IgG3 were purified using affinity chromatography and then digested by a combination of AspN and trypsin proteases, and peptides of interest were detected by mass spectrometry. The sensitivity of the method was assessed by mixing variable amounts of two plasma samples bearing distinct G3m allotypes. A label-free approach using the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) retention time of peptides and their MS mass analyzer peak intensity gave semi-quantitative information. Quantification was realized by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) using synthetic peptides as internal standards. The possibility offered by this new methodology to detect and quantify neo-synthesized IgG in newborns will improve knowledge on the first acquisition of antibodies in infants and constitutes a promising diagnostic tool for vertically-transmitted diseases.

  2. Mass spectrometry detection of G3m and IGHG3 alleles and follow-up of differential mother and neonate IgG3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Dechavanne

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry (MS analysis for detection of immunoglobulins (IG of the human IgG3 subclass is described that relies on polymorphic amino acids of the heavy gamma3 chains. IgG3 is the most polymorphic human IgG subclass with thirteen G3m allotypes located on the constant CH2 and CH3 domains of the gamma3 chain, the combination of which leads to six major G3m alleles. Amino acid changes resulting of extensive sequencing previously led to the definition of 19 IGHG3 alleles that have been correlated to the G3m alleles. As a proof of concept, MS proteotypic peptides were defined which encompass discriminatory amino acids for the identification of the G3m and IGHG3 alleles. Plasma samples originating from ten individuals either homozygous or heterozygous for different G3m alleles, and including one mother and her baby (drawn sequentially from birth to 9 months of age, were analyzed. Total IgG3 were purified using affinity chromatography and then digested by a combination of AspN and trypsin proteases, and peptides of interest were detected by mass spectrometry. The sensitivity of the method was assessed by mixing variable amounts of two plasma samples bearing distinct G3m allotypes. A label-free approach using the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC retention time of peptides and their MS mass analyzer peak intensity gave semi-quantitative information. Quantification was realized by selected reaction monitoring (SRM using synthetic peptides as internal standards. The possibility offered by this new methodology to detect and quantify neo-synthesized IgG in newborns will improve knowledge on the first acquisition of antibodies in infants and constitutes a promising diagnostic tool for vertically-transmitted diseases.

  3. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Mascuch

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  4. Technical note: Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Heinritzi, M.; Herzog, S.; Leiminger, M.; Bianchi, F.; Praplan, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Kürten, A.

    2015-12-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation and therefore the demand for highly sensitive gas phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas phase-sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, Extremely Low Volatile Organic Compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH, DMA) using the NO3-(HNO3)1-2(DMA) cluster ion signals. This observation was made at the CLOUD aerosol chamber, which was also used for calibration measurements. Good linearity between 0 and ~120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  5. Direct Separation of Pregabalin Enantiomers Using a Zwitterionic Chiral Selector by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Mass Spectrometry and Ultraviolet Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Narayana Chennuru

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The chromatographic resolution of pregabalin enantiomers has been often achieved by derivatization of the molecule, in order to reach enough sensitivity at low concentrations of the minor enantiomer present in the active principle. In the present article, the development and optimization of two liquid chromatographic methods are presented for the direct resolution of pregabalin enantiomers on a chiral stationary phase (CSP containing a zwitterionic selector derived from cinchona alkaloid and sulfonic acid (CHIRALPAK ZWIX. The key parameters for the separation as well as the compatibility of chromatographic conditions with different detection modes (ultraviolet and mass spectrometry were investigated. The resulting methods were found to be selective, of high performance and low limits of detection (2 µg/mL by UV and 1 ng/mL by MS, respectively and quantification (6 µg/mL by UV and 5 ng/mL by MS, respectively for the minor enantiomer which is considered as a chiral impurity.

  6. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascuch, Samantha J.; Moree, Wilna J.; Cheng-Chih Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G.; Cheng, Tina L.; Blehert, David S.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Frick, Winifred F.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  7. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  8. Comparison of the Detection Characteristics of Trace Species Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Breakdown Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS. Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application.

  9. Parallel microscope-based fluorescence, absorbance and time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection for high performance liquid chromatography and determination of glucosamine in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bo; Wang, Ling-Ling; Li, Qiong; Nie, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Shuang-Shuang; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Ren-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Jiao; Zhou, Hong-Bin

    2015-11-01

    A parallel microscope-based laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), ultraviolet-visible absorbance (UV) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) detection for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was achieved and used to determine glucosamine in urines. First, a reliable and convenient LIF detection was developed based on an inverted microscope and corresponding modulations. Parallel HPLC-LIF/UV/TOF-MS detection was developed by the combination of preceding Microscope-based LIF detection and HPLC coupled with UV and TOF-MS. The proposed setup, due to its parallel scheme, was free of the influence from photo bleaching in LIF detection. Rhodamine B, glutamic acid and glucosamine have been determined to evaluate its performance. Moreover, the proposed strategy was used to determine the glucosamine in urines, and subsequent results suggested that glucosamine, which was widely used in the prevention of the bone arthritis, was metabolized to urines within 4h. Furthermore, its concentration in urines decreased to 5.4mM at 12h. Efficient glucosamine detection was achieved based on a sensitive quantification (LIF), a universal detection (UV) and structural characterizations (TOF-MS). This application indicated that the proposed strategy was sensitive, universal and versatile, and it was capable of improved analysis, especially for analytes with low concentrations in complex samples, compared with conventional HPLC-UV/TOF-MS.

  10. Comparison of the Detection Characteristics of Trace Species Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Breakdown Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS). Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application. PMID:25769051

  11. Comparison of the detection characteristics of trace species using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping

    2015-03-11

    The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS). Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application.

  12. Analytical detection of explosives and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Bishu; Petersson, Fredrik; Juerschik, Simone [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Sulzer, Philipp; Jordan, Alfons [IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Maerk, Tilmann D. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); IONICON Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Watts, Peter; Mayhew, Chris A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 4TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This work demonstrates the extremely favorable features of Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the detection and identification of solid explosives, chemical warfare agent simulants and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs in real time. Here, we report the use of PTR-TOF, for the detection of explosives (e.g., trinitrotoluene, trinitrobenzene) and illicit, prescribed and designer drugs (e.g., ecstasy, morphine, heroin, ethcathinone, 2C-D). For all substances, the protonated parent ion (as we used H{sub 3}O{sup +} as a reagent ion) could be detected, providing a high level of confidence in their identification since the high mass resolution allows compounds having the same nominal mass to be separated. We varied the E/N from 90 to 220 T{sub d} (1 T{sub d}=10{sup -17} Vcm{sup -1}). This allowed us to study fragmentation pathways as a function of E/N (reduced electric field). For a few compounds rather unusual E/N dependencies were also discovered.

  13. Improved detection of low vapor pressure compounds in air by serial combination of single-sided membrane introduction with fiber introduction mass spectrometry (SS-MIMS-FIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Handberg, Eric; Noll, Robert J; Kilgour, David P A; Cooks, R Graham

    2005-05-01

    The use of two methods in tandem, single-sided membrane introduction mass spectrometry (SS-MIMS) and fiber introduction mass spectrometry (FIMS), is presented as a technique for field analysis. The combined SS-MIMS-FIMS technique was employed in both a modified commercial mass spectrometer and a miniature mass spectrometer for the selective preconcentration of the explosive simulant o-nitrotoluene (ONT) and the chemical warfare agent simulant, methyl salicylate (MeS), in air. A home-built FIMS inlet was fabricated to allow introduction of the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber into the mass spectrometer chamber and subsequent desorption of the trapped compounds using resistive heating. The SS-MIMS preconcentration system was also home-built from commercial vacuum parts. Optimization experiments were done separately for each preconcentration system to achieve the best extraction conditions prior to use of the two techniques in combination. Improved limits of detection, in the low ppb range, were observed for the combination compared to FIMS alone, using several SS-MIMS preconcentration cycles. The SS-MIMS-FIMS response for both instruments was found to be linear over the range 50 to 800 ppb. Other parameters studied were absorption time profiles, effects of sample flow rate, desorption temperature, fiber background, memory effects, and membrane fatigue. This simple, sensitive, accurate, robust, selective, and rapid sample preconcentration and introduction technique shows promise for field analysis of low vapor pressure compounds, where analyte concentrations will be extremely low and the compounds are difficult to extract from a matrix like air.

  14. A method detection limit for the analysis of natural organic matter via Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2014-08-19

    Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectra (FT-ICR-MS) of natural organic matter are complex and consist of several thousands of peaks. The corresponding mass to charge ratios (m/z) and signal intensities result from analytes and noise. The most commonly applied way of distinguishing between analyte and noise is a fixed signal-to-noise ratio below which a detected peak is considered noise. However, this procedure is problematic and can yield ambiguous results. For example, random noise peaks can occur slightly above the signal-to-noise threshold (false positives), while peaks of low abundance analytes may occasionally fall below the fixed threshold (false negatives). Thus, cumulative results from repeated measurements of the same sample contain more peaks than a single measurement. False positive and false negative signals are difficult to distinguish, which affects the reproducibility between replicates of a sample. To target this issue, we tested the feasibility of a method detection limit (MDL) for the analysis of natural organic matter to identify peaks that can reliably be distinguished from noise by estimating the uncertainty of the noise. We performed 556 replicate analyses of a dissolved organic matter sample from the deep North Pacific on a 15 T FT-ICR-MS; each of these replicate runs consisted of 500 cumulated broadband scans. To unambiguously identify analyte peaks in the mass spectra, the sample was also run at time-consuming high-sensitivity settings. The resulting data set was used to establish and thoroughly test a MDL. The new method is easy to establish with software help, does only require the additional analysis of replicate blanks (low time increase), and can implement all steps of sample preparation. Especially when analysis time does not allow for replicate runs, major merits of the MDL are reliable removal of false positive (noise) peaks and better reproducibility, while the risk of losing analytes with low signal intensities

  15. Aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry for bioaerosol analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefsman, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the thesis Aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry for bioaerosol analysis is described how the aerosol mass spectrometer of the TU Delft has been further developed for the on-line analysis of bioaerosols. Due to the implemented improvements mass spectra with high resolution and a high mass range can be

  16. Absorption Mode FTICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, D.F.; Kilgour, D.P.A.; Konijnenburg, M.; O'Connor, P.B.; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields

  17. The use of ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the detection of illicit drugs on clandestine records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Brian; Jourdan, Thomas; Fetterolf, Dean D.; Beasley, James O., II

    1995-01-01

    the records. The detection of trace drug residue on surfaces by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is well documented in literature. The following procedure will deal primarily with the newer techniques of trace drug analysis and drug record analysis developed by the Chemistry/Toxicology Unit of the FBI Laboratory since the more traditional techniques of latent finger print analysis and document analysis are well known.

  18. Protein Alterations in Infiltrating Ductal Carcinomas of the Breast as Detected by Nonequilibrium pH Gradient Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kabbage

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of breast-cancer detection through the identification of potential cancer biomarkers is considered as a promising strategy for effective assessment of the disease. The current study has used nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis with subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry to identify protein alterations in invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast from Tunisian women. We have identified multiple protein alterations in tumor tissues that were picked, processed, and unambiguously assigned identities by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. The proteins identified span a wide range of functions and are believed to have potential clinical applications as cancer biomarkers. They include glycolytic enzymes, molecular chaperones, cytoskeletal-related proteins, antioxydant enzymes, and immunologic related proteins. Among these proteins, enolase 1, phosphoglycerate kinase 1, deoxyhemoglobin, Mn-superoxyde dismutase, α-B-crystallin, HSP27, Raf kinase inhibitor protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, cofilin 1, and peptidylprolyl isomerase A were overexpressed in tumors compared with normal tissues. In contrast, the IGHG1 protein, the complement C3 component C3c, which are two newly identified protein markers, were downregulated in IDCA tissues.

  19. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  20. Detection of Carbohydrates and Steroids by Cation-Enhanced Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) for Biofluid Analysis and Tissue Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Gary J.; Woo, Hin-Koon; Yanes, Oscar; Shriver, Leah; Thomas, Diane; Uritboonthai, Wilasinee; Apon, Junefredo V.; Manchester, Marianne; Siuzdak, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) is a highly sensitive, matrix-free technique that is well suited for biofluid analysis and imaging of biological tissues. Here we provide a new technical variation of NIMS to analyze carbohydrates and steroids, molecules that are challenging to detect with traditional mass spectrometric approaches. Analysis of carbohydrates and steroids was accomplished by spray depositing NaCl or AgNO3 on the NIMS porous silicon surface to provide a uniform environment rich with cationization agents prior to desporption of the fluorinated polymer initiator. Laser desorption/ionization of the ion-coated NIMS surface allowed for Na+ cationization of carbohydrates and Ag+ cationization of steroids. The reliability of the approach is quantitatively demonstrated with a calibration curve over the physiological range of glucose and cholesterol concentrations in human serum (1 – 200 μM). Additionally we illustrate the sensitivity of the method by showing its ability to detect carbohydrates and steroids down to the 800-amol and 100-fmol levels, respectively. The technique developed is well suited for tissue imaging of biologically significant metabolites such as sucrose and cholesterol. To highlight its applicability, we used cation-enhanced NIMS to image the distribution of sucrose in a Gerbera jamesonii flower stem and the distribution of cholesterol in a mouse brain. The flower stem and brain sections were placed directly on the ion-coated NIMS surface without further preparation and analyzed directly. The overall results reported underscore the potential of NIMS to analyze and image chemically diverse compounds that have been traditionally challenging to observe with mass spectrometry-based techniques. PMID:19961200

  1. EPA Method 8321B (SW-846): Solvent-Extractable Nonvolatile Compounds by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Thermospray-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-TS-MS) or Ultraviolet (UV) Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 8321B describes procedures for preparation and analysis of solid, aqueous liquid, drinking water and wipe samples using high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for extractable non-volatile compounds.

  2. Chlorine activation by N2O5: simultaneous, in situ detection of ClNO2 and N2O5 by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Thornton

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for the simultaneous in situ detection of nitryl chloride (ClNO2 and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS. The technique relies on the formation and detection of iodide ion-molecule clusters, I(ClNO2− and I(N2O5−. The novel N2O5 detection scheme is direct. It does not suffer from high and variable chemical interferences, which are associated with the typical method of nitrate anion detection. We address the role of water vapor, CDC electric field strength, and instrument zero determinations, which influence the overall sensitivity and detection limit of this method. For both species, the method demonstrates high sensitivity (>1 Hz/pptv, precision (~10% for 100 pptv in 1 s, and accuracy (~20%, the latter ultimately determined by the nitrogen dioxide (NO2 cylinder calibration standard and characterization of inlet effects. For the typically low background signals (S/N ratios of 2 for 1 pptv in 60 s averages, but uncertainty associated with the instrumental zero currently leads to an ultimate detection limit of ~5 pptv for both species. We validate our approach for the simultaneous in situ measurement of ClNO2 and N2O5 while on board the R/V Knorr as part of the ICEALOT 2008 Field Campaign.

  3. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of methyl mycocerosates released by thermochemolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise M O'Sullivan

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis requires rapid diagnosis to prevent further transmission and allow prompt administration of treatment. Current methods for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis lack sensitivity are expensive or are extremely slow. The identification of lipids using gas chromatography- electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS could provide an alternative solution. We have studied mycocerosic acid components of the phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM family of lipids using thermochemolysis GC-EI/MS. To facilitate use of the technology in a routine diagnostic laboratory a simple extraction procedure was employed where PDIMs were extracted from sputum using petroleum ether, a solvent of low polarity. We also investigated a method using methanolic tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which facilitates direct transesterification of acidic components to methyl esters in the inlet of the GC-MS system. This eliminates conventional chemical manipulations allowing rapid and convenient analysis of samples. When applied to an initial set of 40 sputum samples, interpretable results were obtained for 35 samples with a sensitivity relative to culture of 94% (95%CI: 69.2,100 and a specificity of 100% (95%CI: 78.1,100. However, blinded testing of a larger set of 395 sputum samples found the assay to have a sensitivity of 61.3% (95%CI: 54.9,67.3 and a specificity of 70.6% (95%CI: 62.3,77.8 when compared to culture. Using the results obtained we developed an improved set of classification criteria, which when applied in a blinded re-analysis increased the sensitivity and specificity of the assay to 64.9% (95%CI: 58.6,70.8 and 76.2% (95%CI: 68.2,82.8 respectively. Highly variable levels of background signal were observed from individual sputum samples that inhibited interpretation of the data. The diagnostic potential of using thermochemolytic GC-EI/MS of PDIM biomarkers for diagnosis of tuberculosis in sputum has been established; however, further refinements in sample

  4. Efficient Detection of Carbapenemase Activity in Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization−Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in Less Than 30 Minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Camille; De Saint Martin, Luc; Cuzon, Gaelle; Bogaerts, Pierre; Lamar, Estelle; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) isolates is a major laboratory challenge, and their inappropriate or delayed detection may have negative impacts on patient management and on the implementation of infection control measures. We describe here a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization−time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-based method to detect carbapenemase activity in Enterobacteriaceae. After a 20-min incubation of the isolate with 0.5 mg/ml imipenem at 37°C, supernatants were analyzed by MALDI-TOF in order to identify peaks corresponding to imipenem (300 Da) and an imipenem metabolite (254 Da). A total of 223 strains, 77 CPE (OXA-48 variants, KPC, NDM, VIM, IMI, IMP, and NMC-A) and 146 non-CPE (cephalosporinases, extended-spectrum β-lactamases [ESBLs], and porin defects), were tested and used to calculate a ratio of imipenem hydrolysis: mass spectrometry [MS] ratio = metabolite/(imipenem + metabolite). An MS ratio cutoff was statistically determined to classify strains as carbapenemase producers (MS ratio of ≥0.82). We validated this method first by testing 30 of our 223 isolates (15 CPE and 15 non-CPE) 10 times to calculate an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC of 0.98), showing the excellent repeatability of the method. Second, 43 strains (25 CPE and 18 non-CPE) different from the 223 strains used to calculate the ratio cutoff were used as external controls and blind tested. They yielded sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The total cost per test is <0.10 U.S. dollars (USD). This easy-to-perform assay is time-saving, cost-efficient, and highly reliable and might be used in any routine laboratory, given the availability of mass spectrometry, to detect CPE. PMID:25926485

  5. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles Melero, Inmaculada; Peláez, Teresa; Rezusta López, Antonio; Garcia-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming an essential tool in most microbiology laboratories. At present, by using a characteristic fungal profile obtained from whole cells or through simple extraction protocols, MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of pathogenic fungi with a high performance potential. This methodology decreases the laboratory turnaround time, optimizing the detection of mycoses. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of human clinical fungal pathogens in the laboratory and discusses the future applications of this technology, which will further improve routine mycological diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Trace gas detection from fermentation processes in apples; an intercomparison study between proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry and laser photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamfa, E. I.; Steeghs, M. M. L.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2004-12-01

    A custom-built proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) instrument was used to monitor the emission of various compounds (aldehydes, alcohols, acids, acetates and C-6 compounds) related to fermentation, aroma and flavour, released by four apple cultivars (Elstar, Jonaglod, Granny Smith and Pink Lady) under short anaerobic (24 h) and post-anaerobic conditions. The novel feature of our instrument is the new design of the collisional dissociation chamber, which separates the high pressure in the drift tube (2 mbar) from the high vacuum pressure in the detection region (10-6 mbar). The geometry of this chamber was changed and a second turbo pump was added to reduce the influence of collisional loss of ions, background signals and cluster ions, which facilitates the interpretation of the mass spectra and increases the signal intensity at the mass of the original protonated compound. With this system, detection limits of similar magnitude to the ones reported in literature are reached. An intercomparison study between PTR-MS and a CO laser-based photoacoustic trace gas detector is presented. The alcoholic fermentation products (acetaldehyde and ethanol) from young rice plants were simultaneously monitored by both methods. A very good agreement was observed for acetaldehyde production. The photoacoustic detector showed about two times lower ethanol concentration as compared to PTR-MS, caused by memory effects due to sticking of compounds to the walls of the nylon tube used to transport the trace gases to the detector.

  7. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  8. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals with ultraviolet and electrospray-mass spectrometry detection in suspected counterfeit homeopathic medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panusa, Alessia; Multari, Giuseppina; Incarnato, Giampaolo; Gagliardi, Luigi

    2007-03-12

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with both ultraviolet (UV) and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection has been developed for the determination of seven pharmaceuticals in counterfeit homeopathic preparations. Naproxen, Ketoprofen, Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Piroxicam, Nimesulide and Paracetamol were separated by reversed phase chromatography with acetonitrile-water (0.1% acetic acid) mobile phase, and detected by UV at 245 nm and by ESI-MS in negative ionisation mode with the exception of Paracetamol which was detected in positive ionisation mode. Benzoic acid was used as internal standard (IS). This method was successfully applied to the analysis of homeopathic preparations like mother tinctures, solutions, tablets, granules, creams, and suppositories. Linearity was studied with UV detection in the 50-400 microg mL(-1) range and with ESI-MS in the 0.1-50 microg mL(-1) range. Good correlation coefficients were found in both UV and ESI-MS. Detection limits ranged from 0.18 to 41.5 ng in UV and from 0.035 to 1.00 ng in ESI-MS.

  9. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  10. Determination of neomycin and related substances in pharmaceutical preparations by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and charged aerosol detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypulkowska, K; Blazewicz, A; Fijalek, Z; Warowna-Grzeskiewicz, M; Srebrzynska, K

    2013-03-25

    A new, simple and repeatable liquid chromatographic method with charged aerosol detection (LC-CAD) for determination of neomycin and related substances has been developed. Analysis of neomycin or other aminoglycosides is problematic due to a lack of chromophores. Universal response of CAD enables direct quantification of neomycin and related substances, for which no reference standard are available. Separation was performed on C18 Hypersil(®) Gold aQ column using water, methanol and heptaflurobutyric acid as mobile phase. Under developed chromatographic conditions all impurities were well separated from neomycin B. Peaks identification was evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and applied to the content determination of neomycin and related substances in pharmaceutical preparations.

  11. Rapid Determination of Plutonium Isotopes in Environmental Samples Using Sequential Injection Extraction Chromatography and Detection by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2009-01-01

    by detection of isolated analytes with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method has been devised for the determination of Pu isotopes at environmentally relevant concentrations, whereby it has been successfully applied to the analyses of large volumes/amounts of samples, for example......This article presents an automated method for the rapid determination of 239Pu and 240Pu in various environmental samples. The analytical method involves the in-line separation of Pu isotopes using extraction chromatography (TEVA) implemented in a sequential injection (SI) network followed....... The analytical results of Pu isotopes in the reference materials showed good agreement with the certified or reference values at the 0.05 significance level. Chemical yields of Pu ranged from 80 to 105%, and the decontamination factors for uranium, thorium, mercury and lead were all above 104. The duration...

  12. Determination of butylated hydroxytoluene in food samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches-Silva, Ana; Cruz, José M; Sendón-García, Raquel; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2007-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed and compared with a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for determining butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in foodstuffs as a result of migration from plastic packaging. Similar extraction procedures were used in both methods. BHT was quantitated using an external standard in the HPLC method and an internal standard in the GC/MS method. Both methods presented good linearity (r(2) > or = 0.9917) and low detection limits. Recoveries obtained with the HPLC method (chicken meat, 95.8%, and Gouda cheese, 83.9%) were better than with the GC/MS method (chicken meat, 85.6%, and Gouda cheese, 71.3%).

  13. Analysis of oligomer proanthocyanidins in different barley genotypes using high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection-mass spectrometry and near-infrared methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verardo, Vito; Cevoli, Chiara; Pasini, Federica; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Marconi, Emanuele; Fabbri, Angelo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2015-04-29

    Proanthocyanidins are a class of polyphenols present in many foodstuffs (i.e., tea, cocoa, berries, etc.) that may reduce the risk of several chronic diseases. Barley, with sorghum, rice, and wheat, are the only cereals that contain these compounds. Because of that, two barley genotypes, named waxy and non-waxy, were analyzed by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection-mass spectrometry (NP-HPLC-FLD-MS). Total proanthocyanidin content ranged between 293.2 and 652.6 μg/g of flour. Waxy samples reported the highest content (p determination coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.92 to 0.97, in test set validation. Because of that, this study highlights that NIR spectroscopy technology with multivariate calibration analysis could be successfully applied as a rapid method to determine proanthocyanidin content in barley.

  14. Development and validation of a method for detection and quantification of ochratoxin A in green coffee using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Duarte da Costa Cunha Bandeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A method using Liquid Chromatography Tanden Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS with matrix-matched calibration curve was developed and validated for determining ochratoxin A (OTA in green coffee. Linearity was found between 3.0 and 23.0 ng.g-1. Mean recoveries ranged between 90.45% and 108.81%; the relative standard deviation under repeatability and intermediate precision conditions ranged from 5.39% to 9.94% and from 2.20% to 14.34%, respectively. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.2 ng.g-1 and 3.0 ng.g-¹, respectively. The method developed was suitable and contributed to the field of mycotoxin analysis, and it will be used for future production of the Certified Reference Material (CRM for OTA in coffee.

  15. Flow injection on-line dilution for multi-element determination in human urine with detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J.H.; Hansen, E.H.; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2001-01-01

    A simple flow injection on-line dilution procedure with detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the determination of copper, zinc, arsenic, lead, selenium, nickel and molybdenum in human urine. Matrix effects were minimized by employing a dilution fact...... of 16.5 with on-line standard addition, and Rh-103 was used as internal standard to compensate for signal fluctuation. The procedure was validated by the analysis of two standard reference materials SRM 2670 (NIST) and Seronorm (TM) Trace Elements in Urine. Recovery experiments were pet...... human urine samples. No correlations between the concentrations of the elements were observed. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved...

  16. Detection of illicit drugs on surfaces using direct analysis in real time (DART) time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Andrew H; Sovocool, G Wayne

    2011-05-15

    Methamphetamine (meth) from meth syntheses or habitual meth smoking deposited on household surfaces poses human health hazards. The U.S. State Departments of Health require decontamination of sites where meth was synthesized (meth labs) before they are sold. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) methods for meth analysis require wipe sampling, extraction, clean-up, solvent exchange, derivatization, and/or mass spectral analysis using selected ion monitoring. Rapid and inexpensive analyses could screen for drug-contamination within structures with greater spatial resolution, provide real-time analyses during decontamination, and provide thorough documentation of successful clean ups. Herein an autosampler/open-air ion source time-of-flight mass spectrometric technique is described that required only direct sampling using cotton-swab wipes. Each wipe sample collection required 2 min and data acquisition required only 13 s per sample. Optimum collision-induced dissociation voltages, desorption gas temperatures, and wipe sample solvents were determined for 11 drugs. Peaks were observed in analyte-ion traces for 0.025 µg/100 cm(2) of meth and seven other drugs. This level is half the detection limit of NIOSH methods and one-fourth of the lowest U.S. state decontamination limit for meth. Dynamic ranges of 100 in concentration were demonstrated for eight drugs, which is sufficient for a screening technique. The volatilities of 11 drugs deposited on glass were determined. The pick up of the drugs by solvent-soaked cotton-swab wipes from glass relative to acrylic latex paint was also compared.

  17. Sensitive and specific peak detection for SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry using a wavelet/neural-network based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A Emanuele

    Full Text Available SELDI-TOF mass spectrometer's compact size and automated, high throughput design have been attractive to clinical researchers, and the platform has seen steady-use in biomarker studies. Despite new algorithms and preprocessing pipelines that have been developed to address reproducibility issues, visual inspection of the results of SELDI spectra preprocessing by the best algorithms still shows miscalled peaks and systematic sources of error. This suggests that there continues to be problems with SELDI preprocessing. In this work, we study the preprocessing of SELDI in detail and introduce improvements. While many algorithms, including the vendor supplied software, can identify peak clusters of specific mass (or m/z in groups of spectra with high specificity and low false discover rate (FDR, the algorithms tend to underperform estimating the exact prevalence and intensity of peaks in those clusters. Thus group differences that at first appear very strong are shown, after careful and laborious hand inspection of the spectra, to be less than significant. Here we introduce a wavelet/neural network based algorithm which mimics what a team of expert, human users would call for peaks in each of several hundred spectra in a typical SELDI clinical study. The wavelet denoising part of the algorithm optimally smoothes the signal in each spectrum according to an improved suite of signal processing algorithms previously reported (the LibSELDI toolbox under development. The neural network part of the algorithm combines those results with the raw signal and a training dataset of expertly called peaks, to call peaks in a test set of spectra with approximately 95% accuracy. The new method was applied to data collected from a study of cervical mucus for the early detection of cervical cancer in HPV infected women. The method shows promise in addressing the ongoing SELDI reproducibility issues.

  18. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information...... from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene...... for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  19. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Gonzalez-Vila, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  20. Mass spectrometry of fluorocarbon-labeled glycosphingolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Arigi, Emma; Eichert, Heather;

    2010-01-01

    A method for generation of novel fluorocarbon derivatives of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with high affinity for fluorocarbon phases has been developed, and their potential applications to mass spectrometry (MS)-based methodologies for glycosphingolipidomics have been investigated. Sphingolipid...

  1. Imaging mass spectrometry of polymeric materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is a technique that makes images of molecular distributions at surfaces based on mass spectral information. At a range (typically a raster) of positions, mass spectra are measured from the surface giving a characteristic fingerprint for the material that is present at

  2. Secondary neutral mass spectrometry using three-color resonance ionization: Os detection at the ppb level and Fe detection in Si at the 40 ppt level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.; Whitten, J.E.; Gruen, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Blum, J.D.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Wasserburg, G.J. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Among the many uses of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy, secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) is both one of the most demanding and one of the most important. Recently, we have demonstrated that the selectivity of REMPI, and thus the sensitivity of SNMS, can be greatly enhanced using resonant excitation schemes involving multiply resonant processes. Of particular interest, is the use of autoionizing resonances, resonances with energies in excess of the ionization potential of the atom, in the REMPI process. The use of autoionizing resonances can reduce the laser intensity required to saturate the ionization process by more than an order of magnitude. This reduction can strongly reduce nonresonant ionization of background substituents enhancing the signal to noise of the SNMS measurement. While this approach to laser ionization SNMS is generally applicable, the three-color ionization method has been demonstrated using two widely disparate yet important systems. 42 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Method of Detecting and Distinguishing Type 1 and Type 2 Shiga-Like Toxins in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Skinner, Craig B; Patfield, Stephanie A; He, Xiaohua

    2015-12-02

    Shiga-like toxins (verotoxins) are responsible for the virulence associated with a variety of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Direct detection of toxins requires a specific and sensitive technique. In this study, we describe a mass spectrometry-based method of analyzing the tryptic decapeptides derived from the non-toxic B subunits. A gene encoding a single protein that yields a set of relevant peptides upon digestion with trypsin was designed. The (15)N-labeled protein was prepared by growing the expressing bacteria in minimal medium supplemented with (15)NH₄Cl. Trypsin digestion of the (15)N-labeled protein yields a set of (15)N-labeled peptides for use as internal standards to identify and quantify Shiga or Shiga-like toxins. We determined that this approach can be used to detect, quantify and distinguish among the known Shiga toxins (Stx) and Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2) in the low attomole range (per injection) in complex media, including human serum. Furthermore, Stx1a could be detected and distinguished from the newly identified Stx1e in complex media. As new Shiga-like toxins are identified, this approach can be readily modified to detect them. Since intact toxins are digested with trypsin prior to analysis, the handling of intact Shiga toxins is minimized. The analysis can be accomplished within 5 h.

  4. Use of Imipenem To Detect KPC, NDM, OXA, IMP, and VIM Carbapenemase Activity from Gram-Negative Rods in 75 Minutes Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M. V.; Zurita, A. N.; Pyka, J. S.; Murray, T. S.; Hodsdon, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics has led to a greater reliance upon carbapenems, but the expression of carbapenemases threatens to limit the utility of these drugs. Current methods to detect carbapenemase activity are suboptimal, requiring prolonged incubations during which ineffective therapy may be prescribed. We previously described a sensitive and specific assay for the detection of carbapenemase activity using ertapenem and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we assessed 402 Gram-negative rods, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae expressing IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM, and/or OXA carbapenemases, by using imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem with LC-MS/MS assays. LC-MS/MS methods for the detection of intact and hydrolyzed carbapenems from an enrichment broth were developed. No ion suppression was observed, and the limits of detection for all three drugs were below 0.04 μg/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of meropenem and ertapenem for carbapenemase activity among non-Enterobacteriaceae were low, but imipenem demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 95%, respectively, among all Gram-negative rods (GNR) tested, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. LC-MS/MS allows for the analysis of more complex matrices, and this LC-MS/MS assay could easily be adapted for use with primary specimens requiring growth enrichment. PMID:24789180

  5. Increased detection rate of melamine-containing calcium urolithiasis by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Fang; Liu, Chia-Chu; Chou, Yii-Her; Shiea, Jentaie; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Wang, Shiun-Shiuan; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2014-04-20

    Background: Studies have shown that melamine may be associated with urolithiasis. A more sensitive method is needed to analyze melamine in urinary stones to identify potential causes of urolithiasis.Methods: Here we compare the analytical methods of detecting melamine in urinary stones by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF MS) in the laboratory and clinic. First, we established the melamine detection limit in melamine cyanurate standard by the methods of FTIR spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF MS. Subsequently, we applied these two methods to 54 adult patients with upper urinary tract calcium urolithiasis.Results: We found that the detection limit of melamine in melamine cyanurate standard by MALD-TOF MS was~10,000-fold more sensitive than FTIR.We applied both instruments to 54 stone specimens from 54 calcium urolithias is patients. In those without distinctive melamine pattern in the FTIR spectra,melamine could be detected by MALD-TOF MS in an additional 12 out of 42 subjects' stone specimens (28.6%). Compared to MALD-TOF MS negative subjects (n = 30), those positive subjects (n = 12) excreted significantly higher urinary melamine levels (P melamine in melamine-containing kidney stones

  6. The detection and quantitative analysis of the psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A, in human biological fluids using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Pamela C; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Bosy, Thomas Z; Magluilo, Joseph; Past, Marilyn R

    2008-01-01

    Salvia divinorum, a member of the mint plant family, has hallucinogenic properties that have become increasingly sought after by recreational drug users. The main psychoactive component, salvinorin A, has potency comparable to lysergic acid diethylamide. Though still legal to possess in most of the United States and much of Europe, little is known regarding the compound's long-term health effects, addiction liability, and pharmacokinetics. Limited data are available in the scientific literature, and few analytical methods are published for the detection in human biological fluids. These factors contribute to the unfamiliarity of the compound and complicate the method development process necessary to accommodate special requested testing for salvinorin A. A sensitive analytical method for the detection and quantitation of salvinorin A in human biological fluids was developed and validated to resolve analytical shortcomings. The method utilizes a solid-phase extraction technique coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry operated in selected ion monitoring mode. The assay has a linear range of 5.0-100 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.997. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were experimentally determined as 2.5 and 5.0 ng/mL, respectively. The method has been applied to blood and urine samples successfully and can be used to detect the presence of salvinorin A in forensic testing.

  7. Simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate using rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and perchlorate removal in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Danielle M; Mu, Ruipu; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa; Adams, Craig; Eichholz, Todd; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan

    2015-06-01

    Perchlorate and bromate occurrence in drinking water causes health concerns due to their effects on thyroid function and carcinogenicity, respectively. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to advance a sensitive method for simultaneous rapid detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water system, (2) to systematically study the occurrence of these two contaminants in Missouri drinking water treatment systems, and (3) to examine effective sorbents for minimizing perchlorate in drinking water. A rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPIC-MS/MS) method was advanced for simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water. The HPIC-MS/MS method was rapid, required no preconcentration of the water samples, and had detection limits for perchlorate and bromate of 0.04 and 0.01 μg/L, respectively. The method was applied to determine perchlorate and bromate concentrations in total of 23 selected Missouri drinking water treatment systems during differing seasons. The water systems selected include different source waters: groundwater, lake water, river water, and groundwater influenced by surface water. The concentrations of perchlorate and bromate were lower than or near to method detection limits in most of the drinking water samples monitored. The removal of perchlorate by various adsorbents was studied. A cationic organoclay (TC-99) exhibited effective removal of perchlorate from drinking water matrices.

  8. Comparison of the sensitivity of different aroma extraction techniques in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect minor aroma compounds in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, Amparo; Wesselink, Wilma; de Jong, Catrienus

    2013-01-11

    MicroVinification platforms are used for screening purposes to study aroma development in wine. These high-throughput methodologies require flavor analysis techniques that allow fast detection of a high number of aroma compounds which often appear in very low concentrations (μg/l). In this work, a selection of aroma extraction techniques in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were evaluated to detect minor wine aroma compounds in low sample volume. The techniques evaluated were headspace (HS), headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction (HS-SPDE), headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and monolithic material sorptive extraction (MMSE). DI-SPME showed the highest sensitivity as expressed by detection of the highest percentage of total aroma compounds at concentrations around 0.1 μg/l. SBSE and MMSE followed DI-SPME in terms of sensitivity. HS-SPME was less sensitive but considered sensitive enough for detection of most of the volatile compounds present in highly aromatic wines. Matrix effect was shown to strongly affect aroma extraction and therefore the sensitivity of the different extraction methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid and facile detection of four date rape drugs in different beverages utilizing proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürschik, Simone; Agarwal, Bishu; Kassebacher, Thomas; Sulzer, Philipp; Mayhew, Christopher A; Märk, Tilmann D

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we illustrate the application of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in the field of food and drink safety. We present proof-of-principle measurements of four different drinks (water, tea, red wine and white wine) each spiked separately with four different date rape drugs (chloral hydrate, tricholorethanol, γ-butyrolactone and butanediol). At first, the ideal PTR-MS operating conditions (reduced electric field strength and monitoring the most abundant [fragment] ion) for detection of the drugs were determined utilizing a time-of-flight-based PTR-MS instrument. We then dissolved small quantities of the drugs (below the activation threshold for effects on humans) into the various types of drinks and detected them using a quadrupole-based PTR-MS instrument via two different sampling methods: (1) dynamic headspace sampling and (2) direct liquid injection. Both methods have their advantages and drawbacks. Only with dynamic headspace sampling can rape drug contaminations be detected within a timeframe of seconds, and therefore, this method is the most promising use of PTR-MS as a fast, sensitive and selective monitor for the detection of food and drink contamination.

  10. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of flavonoid aglycone compounds in honey using liquid chromatography with diode array detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Férez-Melgarejo, Gema; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A rapid approach for the determination of eight flavonoid aglycone compounds, baicalein, hesperitin, fisetin, naringenin, chrysin, myricetin, quercetin and kaempferol, in honey samples and related products has been optimized and validated. The enriched extracts obtained by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) were analyzed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection coupled to electrospray ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESI-ToFMS). For DLLME, using acetonitrile and chloroform as disperser and extractant solvents, respectively, a Taguchi experimental method was applied to find the optimal combination of following six factors: disperser and extractant solvent volumes, sodium chloride concentration, pH of the aqueous phase, honey mass and centrifugation time. The sedimented organic phase obtained after centrifugation was evaporated, reconstituted in acetonitrile and submitted to LC. The matrix effect was evaluated, and it was concluded that sample quantification can be carried out against aqueous external standards when using DAD and by matrix-matched calibration in the case of ToFMS. Detection limits in the ranges of 0.4-4 and 0.01-0.5 ng g(-1) were obtained for DAD and ToFMS, respectively. Satisfactory recovery values between 80 and 111% were obtained for three spiked samples. Honeys and related products were analyzed and flavonoids were found within a wide range.

  11. Bio-analytical method development and validation of Rasagiline by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection and its application to pharmacokinetic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravi Kumar Konda; Babu Rao Chandu; B.R. Challa; Chandrasekhar B. Kothapalli

    2012-01-01

    The most suitable bio-analytical method based on liquid liquid extraction has been developed and validated for quantification of Rasagiline in human plasma. Rasagiline-13C3 mesylate was used as an internal standard for Rasagiline. Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 3.5 um) column provided chromatographic separation of analyte followed by detection with mass spectrometry. The method involved simple isocratic chromatographic condition and mass spectrometric detection in the positive ionization mode using an API-4000 system. The lotal run time was 3.0 min. The proposed method has been validated with the linear range of 5 12000 pg/mL for Rasagiline. The intra-run and inter-run precision values were within 1.3% 2.9% and 1.6% 2.2% respectively for Rasagiline. The overall recovery for Rasagiline and Rasagiline-13C3 mesylate analog was 96.9% and 96.7% respectively. This validated method was successfully applied to the bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic study of human volunteers under fasting condition.

  12. Quantitative Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles by Field-Flow Fractionation Coupled Online with Light Scattering Detection and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Löschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels

    2011-01-01

    An analytical platform coupling asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was established and used for separation and quantitative determination of size and mass ...

  13. Application of Nanodiamonds in Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cheng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanodiamond (ND with biomolecular mass spectrometry (MS makes rapid, sensitive detection of biopolymers from complex biosamples feasible. Due to its chemical inertness, optical transparency and biocompatibility, the advantage of NDs in MS study is unique. Furthermore, functionalization on the surfaces of NDs expands their application in the fields of proteomics and genomics for specific requirements greatly. This review presents methods of MS analysis based on solid phase extraction and elution on NDs and different application examples including peptide, protein, DNA, glycan and others. Owing to the quick development of nanotechnology, surface chemistry, new MS methods and the intense interest in proteomics and genomics, a huge increase of their applications in biomolecular MS analysis in the near future can be predicted.

  14. Detection of metals in proteins by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: application to selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéry, Cyrille C; Günther, Detlef; Cornelis, Rita; Vanhaecke, Frank; Moens, Luc

    2003-10-01

    The capabilities of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the detection of trace elements in a gel after gel electrophoresis were systematically studied. Figures of merit, such as limit of detection, linearity, and repeatability, were evaluated for various elements (Li, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, Pt, Tl, Pb). Two ablation strategies were followed: single hole drilling, relevant for ablation of spots after two-dimensional (2-D) separations, and ablation with translation, i.e., on a line, relevant for one-dimensional (1-D) separations. This technique was applied to the detection of selenoproteins in red blood cells extracts after a 1-D separation (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) and the detection of selenium-containing proteins in yeast after 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE). The detection procedure was further improved by using the dynamic reaction cell technology, which allowed the removal of the Ar_2(+) interference and hence the use of the most abundant Se isotope, (80)Se. Reaction gases were compared (methane, carbon monoxide, ammonia, oxygen and the combination of argon (collision gas) and hydrogen (reaction gas)). In each instance, the reaction cell parameters were optimized in order to obtain the lowest detection limit for Se (as (80)Se(+), (82)Se(+) or (77)Se(+); and as (80)Se(16)O(+), (82)Se(16)O(+) or (77)Se(16)O(+) with O(2) as the reaction gas). Carbon monoxide was found to offer the best performance. The detection limit with the use of DRC and He as transport gas was 0.07 microg Se g(-1) gel with single hole drilling and 0.15 microg Se g(-1) gel for ablation with translation.

  15. Cluster SIMS Microscope Mode Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, András; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source is combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The mass spectral and imaging performance of the system is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. We show that the high secondary ion yield (with respect to traditional monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion ...

  16. Sampling human indigenous saliva peptidome using a lollipop-like ultrafiltration probe: simplify and enhance peptide detection for clinical mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhong; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-08-07

    Although human saliva proteome and peptidome have been revealed they were majorly identified from tryptic digests of saliva proteins. Identification of indigenous peptidome of human saliva without prior digestion with exogenous enzymes becomes imperative, since native peptides in human saliva provide potential values for diagnosing disease, predicting disease progression, and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Appropriate sampling is a critical step for enhancement of identification of human indigenous saliva peptidome. Traditional methods of sampling human saliva involving centrifugation to remove debris may be too time-consuming to be applicable for clinical use. Furthermore, debris removal by centrifugation may be unable to clean most of the infected pathogens and remove the high abundance proteins that often hinder the identification of low abundance peptidome. Conventional proteomic approaches that primarily utilize two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) gels in conjugation with in-gel digestion are capable of identifying many saliva proteins. However, this approach is generally not sufficiently sensitive to detect low abundance peptides/proteins. Liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics is an alternative that can identify proteins without prior 2-DE separation. Although this approach provides higher sensitivity, it generally needs prior sample pre-fractionation and pre-digestion with trypsin, which makes it difficult for clinical use. To circumvent the hindrance in mass spectrometry due to sample preparation, we have developed a technique called capillary ultrafiltration (CUF) probes. Data from our laboratory demonstrated that the CUF probes are capable of capturing proteins in vivo from various microenvironments in animals in a dynamic and minimally invasive manner. No centrifugation is needed since a negative pressure is created by simply syringe withdrawing during sample collection. The CUF probes combined with LC-MS have

  17. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  18. Analysis of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in leaves from Coffea arabica using high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrübbers, Lars C; Masís-Mora, Mario; Rojas, Elizabeth Carazo; Valverde, Bernal E; Christensen, Jan H; Cedergreen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a commonly applied herbicide in coffee plantations. Because of its non-selective mode of action it can damage the crop exposed through spray drift. Therefore, it is of interest to study glyphosate fate in coffee plants. The aim of this study was to develop an analytical method for accurate and precise quantification of glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) at trace levels in coffee leaves using liquid chromatography with single-quadrupole mass spectrometry detection. The method is based on a two-step solid phase extraction (SPE) with an intermediate derivatization reaction using 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC). An isotope dilution method was used to account for matrix effects and to enhance the confidence in analyte identification. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for glyphosate and AMPA in coffee leaves was 41 and 111 μg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. For the method optimization a design of experiments (DOE) approach was used. The sample clean-up procedure can be simplified for the analysis of less challenging matrices, for laboratories having a tandem mass spectrometry detector and for cases in which quantification limits above 0.1 mg kg(-1) are acceptable, which is often the case for glyphosate. The method is robust, possesses high identification confidence, while being suitable for most commercial and academic laboratories. All leaf samples from five coffee fields analyzed (n=21) contained glyphosate, while AMPA was absent. The simplified clean-up procedure was successfully validated for coffee leaves, rice, black beans and river water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 质谱检测泰乐菌素的方法研究进展%Research Progress of the Mass Spectrometry Detection Method of Tylosin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周秀锦; 张静; 林维宣; 王秋燕; 周向阳

    2016-01-01

    广泛应用于医学和兽医学领域的泰乐菌素具有中谱抗菌功能和动物生长促进作用,在各种介质中的污染状况和环境行为备受关注,质谱检测技术由于具有高效、稳定、高灵敏度等特点,成为泰乐菌素检测的主要手段。重点介绍2011年以来不同基质中泰乐菌素的样品前处理方法,以及LC-ESI-MS/MS、LDTD-APCI-MS/MS、LC-SALDI-MS 、LC-Q-Orbitrap等各种质谱检测技术的研究进展,以期为同类研究提供一定的参考。%Tylosin has a spectrum of antibacterial function and animal growth promoting effect, which is harm to humans and the environment, and arouses widespread attention.The mass spectrometry has become the major method for the determination of tylosin due to high efficiency , stability and sensitivity.In this research, we mainly introduced the sample pretreatment methods of tylosin in different substrates since 2011, as well as the research progresses of various mass spectrometry detection technologies, such as LC-ESI-MS/MS, LDTD-APCI-MS/MS, LC-SALDI-MS and LC-Q-Orbitrap.This research provides certain references for the further studies in similar works.

  20. Rapid on-site detection of explosives on surfaces by ambient pressure laser desorption and direct inlet single photon ionization or chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, S; Hölzer, J; Rittgen, J; Pütz, M; Schulte-Ladbeck, R; Zimmermann, R

    2013-09-01

    Considering current security issues, powerful tools for detection of security-relevant substances such as traces of explosives and drugs/drug precursors related to clandestine laboratories are required. Especially in the field of detection of explosives and improvised explosive devices, several relevant compounds exhibit a very low vapor pressure. Ambient pressure laser desorption is proposed to make these substances available in the gas phase for the detection by adapted mass spectrometers or in the future with ion-mobility spectrometry as well. In contrast to the state-of-the-art thermal desorption approach, by which the sample surface is probed for explosive traces by a wipe pad being transferred to a thermal desorber unit, by the ambient pressure laser desorption approach presented here, the sample is directly shockwave ablated from the surface. The laser-dispersed molecules are sampled by a heated sniffing capillary located in the vicinity of the ablation spot into the mass analyzer. This approach has the advantage that the target molecules are dispersed more gently than in a thermal desorber unit where the analyte molecules may be decomposed by the thermal intake. In the technical realization, the sampling capillary as well as the laser desorption optics are integrated in the tip of an endoscopic probe or a handheld sampling module. Laboratory as well as field test scenarios were performed, partially in cooperation with the Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt, BKA, Wiesbaden, Germany), in order to demonstrate the applicability for various explosives, drugs, and drug precursors. In this work, we concentrate on the detection of explosives. A wide range of samples and matrices have been investigated successfully.

  1. Studies on the metabolism and toxicological detection of the amphetamine-like anorectic mefenorex in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, T; Vernaleken, I; Maurer, H H

    1997-11-21

    Studies on the metabolism and on the toxicological analysis of mefenorex [R,S-N-(3-chloropropyl)-alpha-methylphenethylamine, MF] using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) are described. The metabolites were identified in urine samples of volunteers by GC-MS. Besides MF, thirteen metabolites including amphetamine (AM) could be identified and three partially overlapping metabolic pathways could be postulated. For GC-MS detection, the systematic toxicological analysis procedure including acid hydrolysis, extraction at pH 8-9 and acetylation was suitable (detection limits 50 ng/ml for MF and 100 ng/ml for AM). Excretion studies showed, that only AM but neither MF nor its specific metabolites were detectable between 32 and 68 h after ingestion of 80 mg of MF. Therefore, misinterpretation can occur. The Abbott TDx FPIA amphetamine/methamphetamine II gave positive results up to 68 h. All the positive immunoassay results could be confirmed by the described GC-MS procedure.

  2. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using phage amplification combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon C; Barr, John R

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality across the world. Developing new tests for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a core action to combat resistant infections. We describe a method that uses phage amplification detection (PAD) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to rapidly identify Staphylococcus aureus and determine phenotypic susceptibility to cefoxitin. Samples tested for S. aureus are incubated together with bacteriophage in the presence and absence of cefoxitin and subjected to rapid trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-MS analysis. Tryptic peptides derived from amplified phage proteins can be detected by MALDI-MS, as validated by time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF analysis of each peptide combined with database searching. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus show significant phage amplification in the presence of cefoxitin, while methicillin-sensitive S. aureus show no phage amplification relative to a no-antibiotic control. We also show that PAD methodology can be implemented on an FDA-approved commercial MALDI-MS bacterial identification system to identify S. aureus and determine antibiotic susceptibility. The novelty of this assay includes the use of phage-derived tryptic peptides as detected by MALDI-MS to monitor the results of PAD on an instrument common to many modern microbiology laboratories.

  3. Cuban and Brazilian red propolis: botanical origin and comparative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Lotti, Cinzia; Campone, Luca; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Campo Fernandez, Mercedes; Rastrelli, Luca

    2011-06-22

    Chemical composition of propolis depends on the specificity of the local flora at the site of collection and thus on the geographic and climatic characteristics of this place. This paper describes a comparative analysis of Cuban red propolis (CRP), Brazilian red propolis (BRP), and Dalbergia ecastophyllum exudates (DEE) by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and tandem mass spectrometry. The aim of this study was to investigate the overall chemical profile and the botanical origin of red propolis and to suggest similarities and differences between samples collected in different tropical regions. Isoliquiritigenin (1), liquiritigenin and naringenin (2 and 17), isoflavones (3-4 and 16), isoflavans (5-7 and 18), and pterocarpans (8-13) were detected in CRP, BRP, and DEE, whereas polyisoprenylated benzophenones (PPBs) guttiferone E/xanthochymol (14a,b) and oblongifolin A (15) were detected only in BRP. Pigments responsible for the red color of DEE and red propolis were also identified as two C30 isoflavans, the new retusapurpurin B (19) and retusapurpurin A (20). PPBs and pigments were isolated and unambiguously characterized by 1D and 2D NMR analysis. These results show that red propolis samples from different tropical zones have a similar chemical composition. DEE is the main red propolis source, but the presence of PPBs in BRP suggests the contribution of different botanical sources for Brazilian samples. This chemical information is important for quality control of red propolis and its commercial products and for biological study.

  4. A method to detect metal-drug complexes and their interactions with pathogenic bacteria via graphene nanosheet assist laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hui-Fen, E-mail: hwu@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 800, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probe transition metals-complexes based on noncovalent functionalized graphene for MALDI-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study interaction of transition metals complexes with pathogenic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propose a new biosensor for two pathogenic bacteria. - Abstract: A new method was proposed to probe the interactions between transition metals of Fe(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) with a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), flufenamic acid (FF) using graphene as a matrix for Graphene assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (GALDI-MS). Metal-drug complexation was confirmed via UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, pH meter, and change in solution conductivity. The optimal molar ratios for these complexation interactions are stoichiometry 1:2 in both Cu(II) and Fe(II) complexes, and 1:3 in Fe(III) complexes at physiological pH (7.4). Metal complexation of the drug could enhance fluorescence for 20 fold which is due to the charge transfer reaction or increase rigidity of the drug. The main interaction between graphene and flufenamic acid is the {Pi}-{Pi} interaction which allows us to probe the metal-drug complexation. The GALDI-MS could sensitively detect the drug at m/z 281.0 Da (protonated molecule) with detection limit 2.5 pmol (1.0 {mu}M) and complexation at m/z 661.0, 654.0 and 933.0 Da corresponding to [Cu(II)(FF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} + H]{sup +}, [Fe(II)(FF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} + H]{sup +} and [Fe(III) (FF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} + H]{sup +}, respectively (with limit of detection (LOD) 2.0 pmol (10.0 {mu}M). Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) spectra show change in the protein profile of intact pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus). The change in the ionization ability (mainly proton affinity) of pathogenic bacteria may be due to the interactions between the bacteria with the drug (or its

  5. Direct analysis of carbohydrates in animal plasma by ion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and pulsed amperometric detection for use as a non-invasive diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik, Darja; Smidovnik, Andrej; Jazbec-Križman, Petra; Križman, Mitja; Prošek, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    The present paper demonstrates that electrochemical detection (ECD) coupled to ion chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ECD-ESI/MS/MS) can be used to rapidly estimate some indications of the health status of organisms. The lactulose to mannitol ratio (L/M) is used as a non-invasive assay to investigate small intestinal absorption pathways and mucosal integrity. In the present study, an evaluation of the negative effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam perorally administrated to a group of dogs was carried out by determining the lactulose/mannitol index using the IC-ECD-ESI/MS/MS hyphenated technique. According to the results of the study, meloxicam altered gastrointestinal permeability. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) was tested to determine if it could prevent meloxicam induced gastrointestinal damage and it was found that CoQ(10) could be an effective preventive treatment. Furthermore, plasma glucose concentration level was determined to be an indirect indicator of the oxidative state in the blood. To find out the beneficial effects of a double antioxidant combination (α-lipoic acid (ALA) and CoQ(10)) on the total glucose level in chickens, ALA and CoQ(10) were provided as food additives in factory farm raised chicken. The results of the pilot study indicate that the glucose level in the plasma of chickens group fed with CoQ(10) and ALA was significantly decreased compared to the control group. Ion chromatography (IC) utilizing pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) was compared to ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as an analytical tool for monitoring the carbohydrate level in biological fluids. In electrochemical detection, the newly developed two-pulse waveform successfully withstands matrix effects in biological samples. Continuous on-line desalting of the high salt concentrations used as the eluent for carbohydrate separation from the anion-exchange column allows coupling of IC and MS

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1997-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

  7. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  8. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes......The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  9. The detection of iron protoporphyrin (heme b) in phytoplankton and marine particulate material by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry - comparison with diode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Martha

    2014-09-02

    A mass spectrometric (MS) method for the identification of iron protoporphyrin (IX) (FePTP, heme b) in marine particulate material and phytoplankton is described. Electrospray ionisation of FePTP produced the molecular Fe(III)PTP(+) ion (m/z=616) or the pseudomolecular [Fe(II)PTP + H](+) ion (m/z=617), depending on the oxidation state of the central iron ion. Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the ion trap mass spectrometer resulted in a single detected product ion (m/z=557) indicative of loss of ethanoic acid from a carboxylic acid side chain. Widening the isolation width to 616±3 resulted in production of a mass spectrum demonstrating the distinctive isotopic ratio of the iron containing fragment, further increasing the specificity of the analysis. Selective reactant monitoring (SRM) of the fragment ion (m/z=557) was applied to the detection of FePTP after chromatography of ammoniacal OGP extracts of marine samples. The detection limit for FePTP analysed by SRM after chromatography was 1.2±0.5fmol. For phytoplankton samples, reasonably good agreement was achieved between results obtained with SRM and those obtained by monitoring absorbance at λ=400nm using a diode array detector (DAD). Use of SRM for analysis of particulate material obtained from the high latitude North Atlantic allowed for the analysis of FePTP in the presence of a co-eluting compound that interfered with detection by DAD. Simultaneous collection of mass spectra from m/z=300 to 1500 resulted in identification of the pseudomolecular ion for the interfering compound. The CID fragmentation pattern and UV-visible mass spectra indicated that the interfering compound was a previously unidentified chlorin type compound. Comparison of FePTP determined by SRM and DAD on samples where this compound could not be detected showed that results collected using the two methods correlated. The use of both MS and DAD results in a powerful tool for quantifying this important biogenic component of the

  10. Extensive Peptide Fractionation and y1 Ion-Based Interference Detection Method for Enabling Accurate Quantification by Isobaric Labeling and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mingming; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kodali, Kiran; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; High, Anthony A; Wang, Hong; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Bi, Wenjian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xusheng; Zou, Wei; Peng, Junmin

    2017-02-22

    Isobaric labeling quantification by mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful technology for multiplexed large-scale protein profiling, but measurement accuracy in complex mixtures is confounded by the interference from coisolated ions, resulting in ratio compression. Here we report that the ratio compression can be essentially resolved by the combination of pre-MS peptide fractionation, MS2-based interference detection, and post-MS computational interference correction. To recapitulate the complexity of biological samples, we pooled tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeled Escherichia coli peptides at 1:3:10 ratios and added in ∼20-fold more rat peptides as background, followed by the analysis of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS. Systematic investigation shows that quantitative interference was impacted by LC fractionation depth, MS isolation window, and peptide loading amount. Exhaustive fractionation (320 × 4 h) can nearly eliminate the interference and achieve results comparable to the MS3-based method. Importantly, the interference in MS2 scans can be estimated by the intensity of contaminated y1 product ions, and we thus developed an algorithm to correct reporter ion ratios of tryptic peptides. Our data indicate that intermediate fractionation (40 × 2 h) and y1 ion-based correction allow accurate and deep TMT profiling of more than 10 000 proteins, which represents a straightforward and affordable strategy in isobaric labeling proteomics.

  11. Detection of bacteria from biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, A.J.; Basile, F.; Furlong, E.; Voorhees, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying specific bacteria from complex biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed. The technique employs commercially available magnetic beads coated with polycolonal antibodies raised against specific bacteria and whole cell analysis by MALDI-MS. A suspension of a bacterial mixture is mixed with the immunomagnetic beads specific for the target microorganism. After a short incubation period (20 mins) the bacteria captured by the beads are washed, resuspended in deionized H2O and directly applied onto a MALDI probe. Liquid suspensions containing bacterial mixtures can be screened within 1 h total analysis time. Positive tests result in the production of a fingerprint mass spectrum primarily consisting of protein biomarkers characteristic of the targeted microorganism. Using this procedure, Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated and detected from standard bacterial mixtures and spiked samples of river water, human urine, and chicken blood. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Detection of Serine Octamer by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry in Resultant Mixture of Aspartic Acid Exposed to Sunshine Under Natural Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huan-wen; LI Ming; JIN Wei; JIN Qin-han; ZHENG Jian

    2007-01-01

    Serine, one of the nonessential amino acids, is of principal interest because of its capability to form magic-number ionic clusters, which provide a remarkable preference for homochirality. With L-aspartic acid as the precursor,this study provides experimental evidence for serine formation in weak acidified aqueous solutions in the presence of iron, with exposure to sunlight, which simulates the natural conditions of the prebiotic aqueous environment. The resultant mixture is directly analyzed via desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry( DESI-MS), without any sample preseparation. The serine monomer is successfully detected as protonated molecules, giving a peak at m/z 106, which is confirmed by the MS/MS fragments. Protonated serine octamer(m/z 841) is also observed with significant abundance in the MS spectra and is confirmed by the MS/MS data, which shows the formation of the serine octamer by a synthesized serine in the resultant mixture. It is also found that the serine octamer yielded equivalent abundance in the DESI mass spectra in a wide pH range(pH=1-5), and that existence of ferrous salt and sunshine are essential for the conversion of aspartic acid to serine in the acidic water solution.

  13. Setting up of a liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection of caseins in food. A comparison with ELISA method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gastaldi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of caseins in food matrices is usually performed by using the competitiveenzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique. However such a technique suffers from a number of limitations. Among these, the applicability to a narrow concentration range, a non linear (logarithmic response, a non-negligible cross-reactivity and a high cost per kit. At the time of the completion of this study, in case of ELISA positive feedback, there was poor availability in the literature of finding reliable instrumental methods able to determine both qualitatively and quantitatively this class of substances. In the present study, a liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS/MS instrumental method was developed with a high resolution mass spectrometer (Orbitrap. Real samples of sausages in which caseins were detected by ELISA technique were analysed. A casein-free sample of ham was used as a blank. The analytical characteristics of the instrumental method were compared with those of a commercial ELISA test, declared specific for α- and β-casein.

  14. Instrument contributions to resolution and sensitivity in ultra high performance liquid chromatography using small bore columns: comparison of diode array and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckenmaier, Stephan; Miller, Christine A; van de Goor, Tom; Dittmann, Monika M

    2015-01-16

    UHPLC with DAD-UV detection or in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) has proven to be a robust and widely applicable platform for high sensitivity analyses of many types of chemical compounds. The majority of users employ narrow bore columns with 2.1mm internal diameter (ID) typically exhibiting very high efficiencies (>200,000 plates/m). This ultimately sets stringent demands upon the chromatographic system as the separation efficiency can be compromised by external contributions to dispersion caused by connection capillaries, auto-sampler and/or the detection device. Sample limited applications often use reduced column diameters down to capillary- or even nano-column format. Capillary (ID≤0.5mm) or small-bore columns (ID≤1mm) can be a good compromise between system robustness and enhanced sensitivity. Yet in this case, extra-column dispersion gains additional importance due to reduced peak volumes. To design an optimized system configuration for specific column dimensions and applications it is crucial to understand the dispersion contributions of individual extra-column components. This was subject to many studies done within our group and by others. Here, we employed a fully optimized UHPLC/UV system to investigate the contribution to peak dispersion obtained from columns ranging from capillary to narrow bore (0.3, 0.5, 1, 2.1mm) using a set of small molecules that were analyzed in gradient mode. Further UV detection was replaced by a triple quadrupole (QQQ) MS in order to evaluate its contribution to band broadening. In this context the impact of column-ID upon MS sensitivity when interfaced with an Agilent Jet Stream source was investigated. Data obtained from our test suite of compounds shows mostly mass-sensitive behavior of this advanced electrospray technology.

  15. Screening for anabolic steroids in sports: analytical strategy based on the detection of phase I and phase II intact urinary metabolites by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcells, Georgina; Pozo, Oscar J; Esquivel, Argitxu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2015-04-10

    In order to improve the detection capabilities of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in sports, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) screening method for the simultaneous detection of AAS phase I and phase II intact urinary metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) was developed. A total of 36 metabolites (7 unconjugated; 19 glucuronides and 10 sulfates) corresponding to 15 of the most reported AAS were included. Analytes were extracted from urine using C18 cartridges. LC and MS conditions were studied in-depth to determine the most sensitive and selective conditions for each analyte. A selected reaction monitoring method was set up. The optimization of the experimental parameters for 13 metabolites not available as standards was performed using excretion study urines. Extraction recoveries were above 77% for all 23 validated analytes. Intra-day precision was lower than 21%, and LODs were in the range 0.25-4ng/mL for 18 of the 23 analytes. Matrix effect was evaluated using post column infusion and ranged from 92 to 147%. The method was successfully applied to excretion study urines of different exogenous AAS. The suitability of the strategy was demonstrated with methyltestosterone and stanozolol excretion study urines by achieving detection times of 22 and 21 days, respectively. The method is compliant with the World Antidoping Agency requirements for most of the studied compounds. It represents a cost-effective approach that improves the detection capabilities of AAS by increasing the sensitivity for some metabolites and by including recently described phase II long-term metabolites not detectable using the current screening strategy.

  16. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Laboratory Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusair, O.; Bauder, W.; Gyürky, G.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Fülöp, Zs; Greene, J.; Kinoshita, N.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extreme sensitivity and discrimination power of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows for the search and the detection of rare nuclides either in natural samples or produced in the laboratory. At Argonne National Laboratory, we are developing an AMS setup aimed in particular at the detection of medium and heavy nuclides, relying on the high ion energy achievable with the ATLAS superconducting linear accelerator and on gas-filled magnet isobaric separation. The setup was recently used for the detection of the 146Sm p-process nuclide and for a new determination of the 146Sm half-life (68.7 My). AMS plays an important role in the measurement of stellar nuclear reaction cross sections by the activation method, extending thus the technique to the study of production of long-lived radionuclides. Preliminary measurements of the 147Sm(γ,n)146Sm are described. A measurement of the 142Nd(α,γ)146Sm and 142Nd(α,n)145Sm reactions is in preparation. A new laser-ablation method for the feeding of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source is described.

  17. Characterisation of Phenolic Compounds in South African Plum Fruits (Prunus salicina Lindl. using HPLC Coupled with Diode-Array, Fluorescence, Mass Spectrometry and On-Line Antioxidant Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalene de Beer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are abundant secondary metabolites in plums, with potential health benefits believed to be due to their antioxidant activity, amongst others. Phenolic characterisation of South African Prunus salicina Lindl. plums is necessary to fully evaluate their potential health benefits. An HPLC method using diode-array detection (DAD for quantification of phenolic compounds was improved and fluorescence detection (FLD was added for quantification of flavan-3-ols. Validation of the HPLC-DAD-FLD method showed its suitability for quantification of 18 phenolic compounds, including flavan-3-ols using FLD, and phenolic acids, anthocyanins and flavonols using DAD. The method was suitable for characterisation of the phenolic composition of 11 South African plum cultivars and selections, including various types with yellow and red skin and flesh. The method was used in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS to identify 24 phenolic compounds. Neochlorogenic acid and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside were the major compounds in most of the plums, while cyanidin-3-O-glucoside was absent in Sun Breeze plums with yellow skin and flesh. Post-column on-line coupling of the ABTS•+ scavenging assay with HPLC-DAD enabled qualitative evaluation of the relative contribution of individual phenolic compounds to the antioxidant activity. The flavan-3-ols, neochlorogenic acid and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside displayed the largest antioxidant response peaks.

  18. High-performance Liquid Chromatographic Ultraviolet Detection of Nilotinib in Human Plasma from Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, and Comparison with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Ryosuke; Satho, Yuhki; Itoh, Hiroki

    2016-11-01

    A method for determining nilotinib concentration in human plasma is proposed using high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection. Nilotinib and the internal standard dasatinib were separated using a mobile phase of 0.5% Na2 PO4 H2 O (pH 2.5)-acetonitrile-methanol (55:25:20, v/v/v) on a Capcell Pak C18 MG II column (250 × 4.6 mm) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, and ultraviolet measurement at 250 nm. The calibration curve exhibited linearity over the nilotinib concentration range of 50-2,500 ng/ml at 250 nm, with relative standard deviations (n = 5) of 7.1%, 2.5%, and 2.9% for 250, 1,500, and 2,500 ng/ml, respectively. The detection limit for nilotinib was 5 ng/ml due to three blank determinations (ρ = 3). This method was successfully applied to assaying nilotinib in human plasma samples from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. In addition, we compared the results with those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) at BML, Inc. (a commercial laboratory). A strong correlation was observed between the nilotinib concentrations measured by our high-performance liquid chromatographic method and those obtained by LC/MS-MS (r(2) = 0.988, P < 0.01). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Application of carbohydrate arrays coupled with mass spectrometry to detect activity of plant-polysaccharide degradative enzymes from the fungus Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Thomas, Baptiste; Riese, Michel; Davis, Adrienne L.; Gray, Christopher J.; Archer, David B.; Flitsch, Sabine L.

    2017-01-01

    Renewables-based biotechnology depends on enzymes to degrade plant lignocellulose to simple sugars that are converted to fuels or high-value products. Identification and characterization of such lignocellulose degradative enzymes could be fast-tracked by availability of an enzyme activity measurement method that is fast, label-free, uses minimal resources and allows direct identification of generated products. We developed such a method by applying carbohydrate arrays coupled with MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry to identify reaction products of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. We describe the production and characterization of plant polysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides and their attachment to hydrophobic self-assembling monolayers on a gold target. We verify effectiveness of this array for detecting exo- and endo-acting glycoside hydrolase activity using commercial enzymes, and demonstrate how this platform is suitable for detection of enzyme activity in relevant biological samples, the culture filtrate of A. niger grown on wheat straw. In conclusion, this versatile method is broadly applicable in screening and characterisation of activity of CAZymes, such as fungal enzymes for plant lignocellulose degradation with relevance to biotechnological applications as biofuel production, the food and animal feed industry. PMID:28220903

  20. A derivatization-enhanced detection strategy in mass spectrometry: analysis of 4-hydroxybenzoates and their metabolites after keratinocytes are exposed to UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Ying-Chi; Feng, Chia-Hsien; Tseng, Wei-Lung; Lu, Chi-Yu

    2017-01-01

    4-Hydroxybenzoate is a phenolic derivative of alkyl benzoates and is a widely used preservative in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The presence of 4-hydroxybenzoates in the human body may result from the use of pharmaceutical and personal care products. These compounds are also known to exhibit estrogenic and genotoxic activities. The potential adverse effects of these compounds include endocrine disruption, oxidative and DNA damage, contact dermatitis, and allergic reactions. This study used two mass spectrometry methods that are applicable when using a derivatization-enhanced detection strategy (DEDS) to screen 4-hydroxybenzoates and their metabolites. Chemical derivatization was used to enhance the detection of these compounds. To evaluate the metabolic process triggered by UV radiation, human keratinocyte HaCaT cells treated with these 4-hydroxybenzoates were further exposed to UVA, UVB and UVC radiation. Metabolites transformed by human keratinocytes in the chemical derivatization procedure were identified by a nano ultra-performance liquid chromatographic system (nanoUPLC) coupled with LTQ Orbitrap. The experiments confirmed the feasibility of this method for identifying 4-hydroxybenzoate metabolites and for high-throughput screening of 4-hydroxybenzoate in commercial products (50 samples) by the DEDS. PMID:28057923

  1. A new method for rapid and quantitative detection of the Bacillus cereus emetic toxin cereulide in food products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Mizuka; Kawai, Takao; Kitagawa, Mikiya; Kumeda, Yuko

    2013-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus emetic toxin cereulide causes foodborne intoxication, which may occasionally result in severe disease, and even death. To differentially diagnose the emetic-type of foodborne disease caused by B. cereus and assess the safety of commercial food, we developed a rapid method to quantitate cereulide. This method was combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis for the extraction of cereulide from food using a normal-phase silica gel cartridge. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.1 and 0.5 ng of cereulide ml(-1), respectively. Spiked cereulide was reproducibly recovered with over 67% efficiency from nine diverse foods implicated in cereulide food poisoning. The recovery rate, reproducibility, and intermediate precision for this single laboratory validation using boiled rice were 87.1%, 4.4%, and 7.0%, respectively. Further, we detected a wide range of cereulide concentrations in leftover food and vomitus samples from two emetic foodborne outbreaks. LC-MS/MS analysis correlated closely with those acquired using the HEp-2 cell assay, and quantitated cereulide from 10 food samples at least five times faster than the bioassay. This new method will provide clinicians with an improved tool for more rapidly and quantitatively determining the presence of cereulide in food and diagnosing food poisoning caused by cereulide.

  2. Direct identification of phenolic constituents in Boldo Folium (Peumus boldus Mol.) infusions by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simirgiotis, M J; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G

    2010-01-22

    A very simple and direct method was developed for the qualitative analysis of polyphenols in boldo (Peumus boldus Mol., Monimiaceae) leaves infusions by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS(n)). The phenolic constituents identified in infusions of the crude drug Boldo Folium were mainly proanthocyanidins and flavonol glycosides. In the infusions, 41 compounds were detected in male and 43 compounds in female leaf samples, respectively. Nine quercetin glycosides, eight kaempferol derivatives, nine isorhamnetin glycosides, three phenolic acids, one caffeoylquinic acid glycoside and twenty one proanthocyanidins were identified by HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS for the first time in the crude drug. Isorhamnetin glucosyl-di-rhamnoside was the most abundant flavonol glycoside in the male boldo sample, whereas isorhamnetin di-glucosyl-di-rhamnoside was the main phenolic compound in female boldo leaves infusion. The results suggest that the medicinal properties reported for this popular infusion should be attributed not only to the presence of catechin and boldine but also to several phenolic compounds with known antioxidant activity. The HPLC fingerprint obtained can be useful in the authentication of the crude drug Boldo Folium as well as for qualitative analysis and differentiation of plant populations in the tree distribution range. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana.

  4. Detection of plant volatiles after leaf wounding and darkening by proton transfer reaction "time-of-flight" mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Brilli

    Full Text Available Proton transfer reaction-time of flight (PTR-TOF mass spectrometry was used to improve detection of biogenic volatiles organic compounds (BVOCs induced by leaf wounding and darkening. PTR-TOF measurements unambiguously captured the kinetic of the large emissions of green leaf volatiles (GLVs and acetaldehyde after wounding and darkening. GLVs emission correlated with the extent of wounding, thus confirming to be an excellent indicator of mechanical damage. Transient emissions of methanol, C5 compounds and isoprene from plant species that do not emit isoprene constitutively were also detected after wounding. In the strong isoprene-emitter Populus alba, light-dependent isoprene emission was sustained and even enhanced for hours after photosynthesis inhibition due to leaf cutting. Thus isoprene emission can uncouple from photosynthesis and may occur even after cutting leaves or branches, e.g., by agricultural practices or because of abiotic and biotic stresses. This observation may have important implications for assessments of isoprene sources and budget in the atmosphere, and consequences for tropospheric chemistry.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative determination of seven triterpene acids in Eriobotrya japonica Lindl. by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Er-Na; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2009-01-01

    The leaves of Eriobotrya japonica are used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, chronic bronchitis, coughs and skin diseases. No method is currently available, however, by which to assess the quality of the crude herb on the basis of the quantitative profile of the main bioactive triterpene acids present. To develop a simple and accurate HPLC-UV (photodiode array detection) method for the simultaneous quantification of seven triterpene acids in the leaves of E. japonica. Separations were performed on an Ultimate XB-C18 column by gradient elution using methanol:formic acid. Analytes were identified by HPLC coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry experiments. The quantitative HPLC-UV method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, and limits of detection and quantification. Calibration curves presented good linear regression (r > 0.9992) within test ranges. The precision and accuracy of the method were acceptable with overall intra-day and inter-day variations of 1.35-3.30 and 1.98-4.43%, respectively, and overall recoveries of 95.60-102.67% for the seven compounds analysed. The method was successfully applied to the quantification of seven triterpene acids in eleven samples of E. japonica collected from different provinces of China. The developed assay could be considered as a suitable quality control method for E. japonica.

  6. Development and Validation of a High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry Based Urine Metabolomic Test for the Detection of Colonic Adenomatous Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Deng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. The detection and removal of the precursors to colorectal cancer, adenomatous polyps, is the key for screening. The aim of this study was to develop a clinically scalable (high throughput, low cost, and high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS-based urine metabolomic test for the detection of adenomatous polyps. Methods: Prospective urine and stool samples were collected from 685 participants enrolled in a colorectal cancer screening program to undergo colonoscopy examination. Statistical analysis was performed on 69 urine metabolites measured by one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify key metabolites. A targeted MS assay was then developed to quantify the key metabolites in urine. A MS-based urine metabolomic diagnostic test for adenomatous polyps was established using 67% samples (un-blinded training set and validated using the remaining 33% samples (blinded testing set. Results: The MS-based urine metabolomic test identifies patients with colonic adenomatous polyps with an AUC of 0.692, outperforming the NMR based predictor with an AUC of 0.670. Conclusion: Here we describe a clinically scalable MS-based urine metabolomic test that identifies patients with adenomatous polyps at a higher level of sensitivity (86% over current fecal-based tests (<18%.

  7. Quantitative analysis of phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and kynurenine in rat model for tauopathies by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galba, Jaroslav; Michalicova, Alena; Parrak, Vojtech; Novak, Michal; Kovac, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    We developed and validated a simple and sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method for the analysis of phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) in rat plasma. Analytes were separated on Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (2.1 mm×50 mm, 1.8 μm particle size) using a 4 min ammonium acetate (pH 5) gradient and detected by fluorescence and positive ESI mass spectrometry. Sample preparation involved dilution of plasma, deproteinization by trichloroacetic acid and centrifugation. The procedure was validated in compliance with the FDA guideline. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were 0.3 μM for Kyn and from 1.5 to 3 μM for Phe, Tyr, Trp. The method showed excellent linearity with regression coefficients higher than 0.99. The accuracy was within the range of 86-108%. The inter-day precision (n=5 days), expressed as % RSD, was in the range 1-13%. The benefit of using UHPLC is a short analysis period and thus, a very good sample throughput. Using this method, we analyzed plasma samples and detected significant changes of Kyn and Phe in transgenic rat model for tauopathies.

  8. Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mario; Heinritzi, Martin; Herzog, Stephan; Leiminger, Markus; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Kürten, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation, but their concentrations are usually low with typical mixing ratios in the pptv range or even smaller. Therefore, the demand for highly sensitive gas-phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas-phase sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine (DMA, (CH3)2NH) using the NO3-•(HNO3)1 - 2• (DMA) cluster ion signal. Calibration measurements were made at the CLOUD chamber during two different measurement campaigns. Good linearity between 0 and ˜ 120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  9. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1991-03-29

    A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

  10. Identification of aroma-active volatiles in banana Terra spirit using multidimensional gas chromatography with simultaneous mass spectrometry and olfactometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobiango, Michely; Mastello, Raíssa Bittar; Chin, Sung-Tong; Oliveira, Evelyn de Souza; Cardeal, Zenilda de Lourdes; Marriott, Philip John

    2015-04-03

    Fruit spirits have been produced and consumed throughout the world for centuries. However, the aroma composition of banana spirits is still poorly characterised. We have investigated the aroma-impact compounds of the banana Terra spirit for the first time, using multidimensional gas chromatography (MDGC and GC × GC) in a multi-hyphenated system - i.e., coupled to flame ionisation detection (FID), mass spectrometry (MS), and olfactometry (O). Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was used to isolate the headspace aroma compounds of the banana spirit. The detection frequency (DF) technique was applied and aroma regions, detected in the first column separation at >60% Nasal Impact Frequency (NIF), were screened as target potent odour regions in the sample. Using a polar/non-polar phase column set, the potent odour regions were further subjected to MDGC separation with simultaneous O and MS detection for correlation of the aroma perception with MS data for individual resolved aroma-impact compounds. GC-O analysis enabled 18 aroma-impact regions to be located as providing volatiles of interest for further study; for example, those comprising perceptions of flower, whisky, green, amongst others. Compounds were tentatively identified through MS data matching and retention indices in both first and second dimensions. The principal volatile compounds identified in this work, which are responsible for the characteristic aroma of the banana spirit, are 3-methylbutan-1-ol, 3-methylbutan-1-ol acetate, 2-phenylethyl acetate and phenylethyl alcohol. This is the first such study to reveal the major aroma compounds that contribute to banana spirit aroma.

  11. Rapid detection of enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases directly from positive blood cultures by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviaño, M; Fernández, B; Fernández, A; Barba, M J; Mouriño, C; Bou, G

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria that produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are an increasing healthcare problem and their rapid detection is a challenge that must be overcome in order to optimize antimicrobial treatment and patient care. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to determine resistance to β-lactams, including carbapenems in Enterobacteriaceae, but the methodology has not been fully validated as it remains time-consuming. We aimed to assess whether MALDI-TOF can be used to detect ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from positive blood culture bottles in clinical practice. In the assay, 141 blood cultures were tested, 13 of them were real bacteraemias and 128 corresponded to blood culture bottles seeded with bacterial clinical isolates. Bacteraemias were analysed by MALDI-TOF after a positive growth result and the 128 remaining blood cultures 24 h after the bacterial seeding. β-lactamase activity was determined through the profile of peaks associated with the antibiotics cefotaxime and ceftazidime and its hydrolyzed forms. Clavulanic acid was added to rule out the presence of non-ESBL mechanisms. Overall data show a 99% (103 out of 104) sensitivity in detecting ESBL in positive blood cultures. Data were obtained in 90 min (maximum 150 min). The proposed methodology has a great impact on the early detection of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from positive blood cultures, being a rapid and efficient method and allowing early administration of an appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  12. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones.

  13. Development of a new multi-analyte assay for the simultaneous detection of opioids in serum and other body fluids using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, K; Röhrich, J; Breitmeier, D; Ferner, M; Laufenberg-Feldmann, R; Urban, R

    2015-09-15

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using electrospray ionization in positive ionization mode was developed for the simultaneous detection of multiple opioid-type drugs in plasma. The presented assay allows the quantitative determination of alfentanil, buprenorphine, codeine, desomorphine, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, dihydrocodeine, dihydromorphine, ethylmorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, naloxone, naltrexone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, pentazocine, pethidine, pholcodine, piritramide, remifentanil, sufentanil, and tramadol as well as the metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, bisnortilidine, morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, naltrexol, norbuprenorphine, norfentanyl, norpethidine, nortilidine, and O-desmethyltramadol. Serum and blood samples were purified by solid-phase extraction. The analytes were separated on a phenyl-hexyl (100mm) column by formic acid/acetonitrile gradient elution using an UPLC 1290 Infinity coupled with a 6490 Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer. The limits of detection ranged from 0.02 to 0.6ng/mL and the lower limits of quantification ranged from 0.1 to 2.0ng/mL. The calibration curves were linear between Calibration Levels 1-6 for all 35 substances. Recovery rates ranged between 51 and 88% for all compounds except alfentanil, bisnortilidine, pethidine, and morphine-3-glucuronide. The matrix effect ranged from 86% for ethylmorphine to 105% for desomorphine. Using the validation procedure proposed by the German Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry, acceptable precision and accuracy data for almost all analytes were obtained. The method was successfully applied to 206 authentic serum samples provided by the palliative and intensive care units of the University Medical Center and the police authorities. Furthermore, a suspected fatal intoxication is demonstrated by an analysis of the sufentanil in post mortem body fluids and tissues.

  14. A Simultaneous Analytical Method to Profile Non-Volatile Components with Low Polarity Elucidating Differences Between Tobacco Leaves Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishida Naoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive analytical method using liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detector (LC/APCI-MSD was developed to determine key non-volatile components with low polarity elucidating holistic difference among tobacco leaves. Nonaqueous reversed-phase chromatography (NARPC using organic solvent ensured simultaneous separation of various components with low polarity in tobacco resin. Application of full-scan mode to APCI-MSD hyphenated with NARPC enabled simultaneous detection of numerous intense product ions given by APCI interface. Parameters for data processing to filter, feature and align peaks were adjusted in order to strike a balance between comprehensiveness and reproducibility in analysis. 63 types of components such as solanesols, chlorophylls, phytosterols, triacylglycerols, solanachromene and others were determined on total ion chromatograms according to authentic components, wavelength spectrum and mass spectrum. The whole area of identified entities among the ones detected on total ion chromatogram reached to over 60% and major entities among those identified showed favorable linearity of determination coefficient of over 0.99. The developed method and data processing procedure were therefore considered feasible for subsequent multivariate analysis. Data matrix consisting of a number of entities was then subjected to principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical clustering analysis. Cultivars of tobacco leaves were distributed far from each cultivar on PCA score plot and each cluster seemed to be characterized by identified non-volatile components with low polarity. While fluecured Virginia (FCV was loaded by solanachromene, phytosterol esters and triacylglycerols, free phytosterols and chlorophylls loaded Burley (BLY and Oriental (ORI respectively. Consequently the whole methodology consisting of comprehensive method and data processing procedure proved useful to determine key

  15. Multi-detection of corticosteroids in sports doping and veterinary control using high-resolution liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touber, M.E.; Engelen, M.C.; Georgakopoulus, C.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    A liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) method was developed using the latest high-resolution LC column technology, the ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC (TM)), and electrospray ionization (ESI) in the positive ion mode. Gradient UPLC separation conditions wer

  16. Applying the tools of chemistry (mass spectrometry and covalent modification by small molecule reagents) to the detection of prions and the study of their structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prions are molecular pathogens, able to convert a normal cellular prion protein PrPC into a prion PrPSc. The information necessary for this conversion is contained in the conformation of PrPSc. Mass spectrometry and small-molecule covalent reactions have recently been used to study prions. This w...

  17. Urine testing for designing steroids by liquid chromatography and androgen bioaasay detection and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Engelen, M.C.; Rutgers, P.; Hamers, A.R.M.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    New anabolic steroids show up occasionally in sports doping and in veterinary control. The discovery of these designer steroids is facilitated by findings of illicit preparations, thus allowing bioactivity testing, structure elucidation using NMR and mass spectrometry, and final incorporation in uri

  18. Utilization of Negative Ion ESI-MS and Tandem Mass Spectrometry to Detect and Confirm the NADH-Boric Acid Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Danny H.; Eckhert, Curtis D.; Faull, Kym F.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now widely used in the chemical, physical, engineering, and life sciences, with rapidly growing applications in many areas including clinical, forensic, pharmaceutical, and environmental fields. The increase in use of MS in both academic and industrial settings for research and…

  19. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the detection and quantitation of monofluoroacetate in plants toxic to livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatiza...

  20. Urine testing for designing steroids by liquid chromatography and androgen bioaasay detection and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Engelen, M.C.; Rutgers, P.; Hamers, A.R.M.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    New anabolic steroids show up occasionally in sports doping and in veterinary control. The discovery of these designer steroids is facilitated by findings of illicit preparations, thus allowing bioactivity testing, structure elucidation using NMR and mass spectrometry, and final incorporation in uri

  1. Utilization of Negative Ion ESI-MS and Tandem Mass Spectrometry to Detect and Confirm the NADH-Boric Acid Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Danny H.; Eckhert, Curtis D.; Faull, Kym F.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now widely used in the chemical, physical, engineering, and life sciences, with rapidly growing applications in many areas including clinical, forensic, pharmaceutical, and environmental fields. The increase in use of MS in both academic and industrial settings for research and…

  2. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    . The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  3. Phosphopeptide detection and sequencing by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Keiryn L; Stensballe, Allan; Podtelejnikov, Alexandre V

    2002-01-01

    , the localization of phosphorylation sites. Ion signals corresponding to (b-17), (b-18) and (y-17) fragment ions were also observed. The abundant neutral loss of phosphoric acid (-98 Da) is useful for femtomole level detection of phosphoserine-peptides in crude peptide mixtures generated by gel in situ digestion...

  4. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an......Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  5. Correlation of precursor and product ions in single-stage high resolution mass spectrometry. A tool for detecting diagnostic ions and improving the precursor elemental composition elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borràs, S. [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, A., E-mail: anton.kaufmann@klzh.ch [Official Food Control Authority, Fehrenstrasse 15, 8032 Zürich (Switzerland); Companyó, R. [Departament de Química Analítica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► We are describing a technique to spot ions which are derived from each other. ► Single stage high resolution data is used. ► This “in silicon” technique is compared to conventional precursor scan. ► Some applications for this technique are presented. -- Abstract: Monitoring of common diagnostic fragments is essential for recognizing molecules which are members of a particular compound class. Up to now, unit resolving tandem quadrupole mass spectrometers, operating in the precursor ion scan mode, have been typically used to perform such analysis. By means of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) a much more sensitive and selective detection can be achieved. However, using a single-stage HRMS instrument, there is no unequivocal link to the corresponding precursor ion, since such instrumentation does not permit a previous precursor selection. Thus, to address this limitation, an in silico approach to locate precursor ions, based on diagnostic fragments, was developed. Implemented as an Excel macro, the algorithm rapidly assembles and surveys exact mass data to provide a list of feasible precursor candidates according to the correlation of the chromatographic peak shape profile and other additional filtering criteria (e.g. neutral losses and isotopes). The macro was tested with two families of veterinary drugs, sulfonamides and penicillins, which are known to yield diagnostic product ions when fragmented. Data sets obtained from different food matrices (fish and liver), both at high and low concentration of the target compounds, were investigated in order to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the reported approach. Finally, other possible applications of this technique, such as the elucidation of elemental compositions based on product ions and corresponding neutral losses, were also presented and discussed.

  6. Quantitative characterization of gold nanoparticles by field-flow fractionation coupled online with light scattering detection and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Mortensen, Alicja; Sloth, Jens J; Koch, Christian Bender; Larsen, Erik H

    2011-04-01

    An analytical platform coupling asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was established and used for separation and quantitative determination of size and mass concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspension. Mixtures of three polystyrene (PS) NPs between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and mixtures of three gold (Au) NPs between 10 and 60 nm in diameter were separated by AF(4). The geometric diameters of the separated PS NPs and the hydrodynamic diameters of the Au and PS NPs were determined online by MALS and DLS, respectively. The three separated Au NPs were quantified by ICPMS and recovered at 50-95% of the injected masses, which ranged between approximately 8-80 ng of each nanoparticle size. Au NPs adhering to the membrane in the separation channel was found to be a major cause for incomplete recoveries. The lower limit of detection (LOD) ranged between 0.02 ng Au and 0.4 ng Au, with increasing LOD by increasing nanoparticle diameter. The analytical platform was applied to characterization of Au NPs in livers of rats, which were dosed with 10 nm, 60 nm, or a mixture of 10 and 60 nm nanoparticles by intravenous injection. The homogenized livers were solubilized in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and the recovery of Au NPs from the livers amounted to 86-123% of their total Au content. In spite of successful stabilization with bovine serum albumin even in alkaline medium, separation of the Au NPs by AF(4) was not possible due to association with undissolved remains of the alkali-treated liver tissues as demonstrated by electron microscopy images.

  7. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-06-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird's view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive.

  8. Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault: Detection and Stability of Benzodiazepines in Spiked Drinks Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Lata; Sharratt, Sarah D.; Cole, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA). Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the ‘spiking’ of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam) into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink), a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O) chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16–24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C) over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O). The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types. PMID:24586489

  9. Drug facilitated sexual assault: detection and stability of benzodiazepines in spiked drinks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Gautam

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA. Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the 'spiking' of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink, a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16-24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O. The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types.

  10. Drug facilitated sexual assault: detection and stability of benzodiazepines in spiked drinks using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Lata; Sharratt, Sarah D; Cole, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are detected in a significant number of drug facilitated sexual assaults (DFSA). Whilst blood and urine from the victim are routinely analysed, due to the delay in reporting DFSA cases and the short half lives of most of these drugs in blood and urine, drug detection in such samples is problematic. Consideration of the drinks involved and analysis for drugs may start to address this. Here we have reconstructed the 'spiking' of three benzodiazepines (diazepam, flunitrazepam and temazepam) into five drinks, an alcopop (flavoured alcoholic drink), a beer, a white wine, a spirit, and a fruit based non-alcoholic drink (J2O) chosen as representative of those drinks commonly used by women in 16-24 year old age group. Using a validated GC-MS method for the simultaneous detection of these drugs in the drinks we have studied the storage stability of the benzodiazepines under two different storage conditions, uncontrolled room temperature and refrigerator (4°C) over a 25 day period. All drugs could be detected in all beverages over this time period. Diazepam was found to be stable in all of the beverages, except the J2O, under both storage conditions. Flunitrazepam and temazepam were found not to be stable but were detectable (97% loss of temazepam and 39% loss of flunitrazepam from J2O). The recommendations from this study are that there should be a policy change and that drinks thought to be involved in DFSA cases should be collected and analysed wherever possible to support other evidence types.

  11. Human sports drug testing by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Since the installation of anti-doping rules and regulations and their international enforcement in the mid-1960s, mass spectrometry has been an integral part of doping control procedures. Although its utility was limited in the first decade, instrumental improvements and method optimizations have made mass spectrometry, in all its facets, an indispensable tool in modern sports drug testing. In this review, milestones in doping control analysis accomplished in Germany and reaching from the early developments to the current use of hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques concerning low- and high molecular mass analytes are presented. The considered drug classes include anabolic agents, peptidic drugs, nucleotide-derived therapeutics, approved and non-approved organic as well as inorganic analytes, and particular focus is put on drug class- and instrument-driven strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:16-46, 2017.

  12. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an i

  13. Diagnosing Prion Diseases: Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass spectrometry is an established means of quantitating the prions present in infected hamsters. Calibration curves relating the area ratios of the selected analyte peptides and their oxidized analogs to stable isotope labeled internal standards were prepared. The limit of detection (LOD) and limi...

  14. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an i

  15. Mass Spectrometry Imaging for the Classification of Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can detect and identify many different molecules without the need for labeling. In addition, it can provide their spatial distributions as ‘molecular maps’. These features make MSI well suited for studying the molecular makeup of tumor tissue. Currently, there is an

  16. Analysis of proteins using DIGE and MALDI mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work the sensitivity of the quantitative proteomics approach 2D-DIGE/MS (twoDimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis / Mass Spectrometry) was tested by detecting decreasing amounts of a specific protein at the low picomole and sub-picomole range. Sensitivity of the 2D-D...

  17. Development of stereotactic mass spectrometry for brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Nathalie Y R; Golby, Alexandra J; Ligon, Keith L; Norton, Isaiah; Mohan, Vandana; Wiseman, Justin M; Tannenbaum, Allen; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery remains the first and most important treatment modality for the majority of solid tumors. Across a range of brain tumor types and grades, postoperative residual tumor has a great impact on prognosis. The principal challenge and objective of neurosurgical intervention is therefore to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the potential for neurological deficit by preserving critical tissue. To introduce the integration of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry into surgery for in vivo molecular tissue characterization and intraoperative definition of tumor boundaries without systemic injection of contrast agents. Using a frameless stereotactic sampling approach and by integrating a 3-dimensional navigation system with an ultrasonic surgical probe, we obtained image-registered surgical specimens. The samples were analyzed with ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and validated against standard histopathology. This new approach will enable neurosurgeons to detect tumor infiltration of the normal brain intraoperatively with mass spectrometry and to obtain spatially resolved molecular tissue characterization without any exogenous agent and with high sensitivity and specificity. Proof of concept is presented in using mass spectrometry intraoperatively for real-time measurement of molecular structure and using that tissue characterization method to detect tumor boundaries. Multiple sampling sites within the tumor mass were defined for a patient with a recurrent left frontal oligodendroglioma, World Health Organization grade II with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, and mass spectrometry data indicated a correlation between lipid constitution and tumor cell prevalence. The mass spectrometry measurements reflect a complex molecular structure and are integrated with frameless stereotaxy and imaging, providing 3-dimensional molecular imaging without systemic injection of any agents, which can be implemented for surgical margins delineation of

  18. Determination of moulds and mycotoxins in dry dog and cat food using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błajet-Kosicka, A; Kosicki, R; Twarużek, M; Grajewski, J

    2014-01-01

    In this study moulds and 12 mycotoxins in dry pet food samples (25 for dogs and 24 for cats) were determined. Primary moulds identified were Aspergillus, Mucor and Penicillium, found in 55% of the samples. Deoxynivalenol and zearalenone (ZEN) were detected in all samples with mean respective concentrations being 97.3 and 38.3 µg kg(-1) in cat food and 114 and 20.1 µg kg(-1) in dog food. T-2 and HT-2 toxins were present in 88% and 84% of the samples, respectively. Two samples contained fumonisins, with a maximum concentration of 108 µg kg(-1). Aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A were detected in 8% and 45% of the samples, respectively. The measured mould and mycotoxin levels were consistent with results obtained by other studies. However, potential exposure to relatively high concentrations of an oestrogen mycotoxin as is ZEN, especially when in combination with other mycotoxins, needs attention.

  19. Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dobi, A; Slutsky, S; Yen, Y -R; Aharmin, B; Auger, M; Barbeau, P S; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Cleveland, B; Conley, R; Cook, J; Cook, S; Counts, I; Craddock, W; Daniels, T; Davis, C G; Davis, J; deVoe, R; Dixit, M; Dolinski, M J; Donato, K; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Franco, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Green, C; Hagemann, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Hodgson, J; Juget, F; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K; Leonard, D S; Lutter, G; Mackay, D; MacLellan, R; Marino, M; Mong, B; Díez, M Montero; Morgan, P; Müller, A R; Neilson, R; Odian, A; O'Sullivan, K; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Pushkin, K; Rivas, A; Rollin, E; Rowson, P C; Sabourov, A; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Swift, M; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Vuilleumier, J -M; Weber, M; Wichoski, U; Wodin, J; Wright, J D; Yang, L

    2011-01-01

    We describe purity measurements of the natural and enriched xenon stockpiles used by the EXO-200 double beta decay experiment based on a mass spectrometry technique. The sensitivity of the spectrometer is enhanced by several orders of magnitude by the presence of a liquid nitrogen cold trap, and many impurity species of interest can be detected at the level of one part-per-billion or better. We have used the technique to screen the EXO-200 xenon before, during, and after its use in our detector, and these measurements have proven useful. This is the first application of the cold trap mass spectrometry technique to an operating physics experiment.

  20. Detection of dioxins Trichloro dibenzo-p-dioxins and Trichloro dibenzofurans in beef with Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraningsih . .

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is to investigate the residue level of TCDDs/TCDFs in beef collected from Animal Slaughter Houses in Giwangan (Yogyakarta, Klaten (Central Java and Kupang (East Nusatenggara. Residue of persistent organic pollutants (POPs was also analysed with GC-ECD, and dioxins with GC-MSMS. Fifty samples were collected form Giwangan (20, Klaten (15 and Kupang (15. Results shows that POPs were detected in beef samples including aldrin, dieldrin, DDT, endrin and heptachlor. The highest total residues of POPs were detected in beef from Giwangan (Yogyakarta at 93.11 hg/g, followed by Klaten (17.79 hg/g and Kupang (12.87 hg/g. Residues of POPs were below the maximum residue limit stated by the SNI 7313: 2008. Average of total TEQ for TCDDs/TCDFs in beef from Giwangan was 13,624.38 rg/g with a range between 4,496.66 to 20,642.40 rg/g was higher than that from Kupang at 1,623.98 rg/g with a range between 0.83 to 6,471.07 rg/g. On the other hand, dioxins were not detected in beef from Klaten. The total TEQ of TCDDs/TCDFs in beef samples from Giwangan was 54,497.52 rg/g and Kupang was 6,495.9 rg/g. These results indicated that there was an association between the presence of endrin and heptachlor with the presence of TCDDs/TCDFs residues in beef that this is may be new information for further studied.

  1. Detection of 22 antiepileptic drugs by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry applicable to routine therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mai; Hashi, Sachiyo; Nakanishi, Haruka; Masuda, Satohiro; Katsura, Toshiya; Yano, Ikuko

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method of 22 antiepileptics for routine therapeutic monitoring. The antiepileptics used in the analyses were carbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, clonazepam, diazepam, N-desmethyldiazepam, ethosuximide, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, N-desmethylmesuximide, nitrazepam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, vigabatrin and zonisamide. After protein precipitation of 50 μL plasma with methanol, the supernatant was diluted with water or was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with mobile phase in the case of benzodiazepines. Separation was achieved on an Acquity UPLC BEH C₁₈ column with a gradient mobile phase of 10 mm ammonium acetate containing 0.1% formic acid and methanol at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. An Acquity TQD instrument in multiple reaction monitoring mode with ion mode switching was used for detection. All antiepileptics were detected and quantified within 10 min, with no endogenous interference. All the calibration curves showed good linearity in the therapeutic range (r²  < 0.99). The precision and accuracy values for intra- and inter-assays were within ±15% except for phenobarbital and tiagabine. A good correlation was observed between the concentration of clinical samples measured by the new method described here and the conventional methods. The values of carbamazepine and phenytoin by UPLC-MS/MS were lower than those detected by the immunoassays, which might be caused by the cross-reaction of antibodies with their metabolites. In conclusion, we developed a simple and selective UPLC-MS/MS method suitable for routine therapeutic monitoring of antiepileptics.

  2. Analysis of abiraterone stress degradation behavior using liquid chromatography coupled to ultraviolet detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedr, Alaa; Darwish, Ibrahim; Bamane, Faida

    2013-02-23

    A validated stability-indicating LC-UV-ESI-MS analytical method was established to analyze abiraterone (ABR) and its potential degradation products (DPs) and was performed according to ICH guidelines. Trace amounts of DPs that might be released under different environmental conditions were determined. Stress conditions, including the effect of heat, acid-base hydrolysis, oxidation and UV-light were investigated. ABR was found to be sensitive to UV light and oxidation. Five potential mono-oxygenated ABR products were generated upon exposure to UV-irradiation. Di-, tri-, and tetra-oxygenated ABR were detected and progressively increased in quantity upon longer exposure to UV light. The ESI-MS response factors (RF) of potential DPs and ABR were not comparable. The ESI-MS response factor of each single potential degradation product was derived from the LC-UV analysis of concentrated solutions of pure and degraded ABR. The ESI-MS limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of ABR were 30 and 80 pg/μL, respectively. The intra-day RSD was 0.20%, and the inter-day RSD was 0.30%.

  3. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of durum wheat contamination or adulteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Rosita; Cusano, Erica; Perissi, Andrea; Ferron, Francisco; Severino, Valeria; Parente, Augusto; Chambery, Angela

    2014-12-01

    In this work, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization (UPLC-ESI)-MS/MS methodology based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for the selective and sensitive detection and quantification of durum wheat adulteration has been developed and fully validated. The targeted analysis was performed by monitoring specific transitions at m/z 543.7 > 657.4 and m/z 543.7 > 299.2 of a species-specific marker derived from a tryptic peptide of puroindoline a (Pin-a), a cysteine-rich protein selectively present only in common wheat. In addition, two transitions at m/z 500.4 > 725.4 and m/z 500.4 > 561.9 of a reference peptide belonging to purothionin A-1, present in both species, were also monitored. The calibration curves obtained on binary mixtures with known percentages of common/durum wheat flours showed linearity (coefficient of regression, r ≥ 0.99) over concentrations that ranged between 80 and 1%. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for the Pin-a marker in wheat flours were 0.01 and 0.03%, respectively. The identified Pin-a marker was also found to be highly diagnostic for the quantification of common wheat in raw materials (kernels) and processed products (pasta), thus offering new opportunities to assess food authenticity.

  4. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  5. Rapid detection by direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) of psychoactive plant drugs of abuse: the case of Mitragyna speciosa aka "Kratom".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Ashton D; Cody, Robert B; Dane, A John; Musah, Rabi A

    2014-09-01

    Mitragyna speciosa, also known commonly as "Kratom" or "Ketum", is a plant with psychoactive properties that have been attributed to the presence of various indole alkaloids such as mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. M. speciosa use is gaining popularity internationally as a natural and legal alternative to narcotics. As a drug of abuse, its detection and identification are not straightforward, since M. speciosa plant material is not particularly distinctive. Here, we show that direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) can be used not only to rapidly identify M. speciosa plant material and distinguish it from other plants, but also to distinguish between M. speciosa plant varieties, based on differences between their chemical profiles. The method is rapid and the analysis expeditious. Plant material such as that found at a crime scene can be analyzed directly with no sample pre-preparation steps. Furthermore, we show that the basis set of principal components that permit characterization of the plant material can be used to positively identify M. speciosa.

  6. Determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: alachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA); alachlor oxanilic acid; acetochlor ESA; acetochlor oxanilic acid; metolachlor ESA; and metolachlor oxanilic acid. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The average HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.5 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 84 to 112%, with relative standard deviations of 18% or less. The average HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.2 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 81 to 118%, with relative standard deviations of 20% or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 ??g/l, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was at 0.05 ??g/l. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. A novel quantitation approach for maximizing detectable targets for offensive/volatile odorants with diverse functional groups by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    A multitude of analytical systems are needed to analyze diverse odorants with various functionalities. In this study, an experimental method was developed to assess the maximum covering range of odorants using a single experimental setup consisting of a thermal desorber-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system. To this end, a total of 20 offensive odorants (aldehyde, ketone, ester, alcohol, aromatic, sulfide, amine, and carboxyl) were selected and tested by a single system. The analytical results of standards and environmental samples were evaluated in a number of respects. In the analysis of the standards, all targets were quantified via Carbopack (C + B + X) tube sampling while operating the thermal desorber at -25 °C. The method detection limits of 18 targets (exception of 2 out of the 20 targets: acetaldehyde and methanethiol) were excellent (mean 0.04 ± 0.03 ppb) in terms of their odor threshold values (74.7 ± 140 ~ 624 ± 1,729 ppb). The analysis of organic fertilizer plant samples at a pig farm (slurry treatment facility, compost facility, and ambient air) confirmed the presence of 18 odorants from 0.03 ppb (dimethyldisulfide, ambient sample) to 522 ppb (methyl ethyl ketone, slurry treatment facility). As such, our method allowed simultaneous quantitation of most key odorants with sufficient reliability and sensitivity.

  8. Determination of the polyphenolic content of a Capsicum annuum L. extract by liquid chromatography coupled to photodiode array and mass spectrometry detection and evaluation of its biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Meriem; Soukup, Jan; Donato, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Paola; Riazi, Ali; Jandera, Pavel; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the polyphenolic profile of a pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) extract from Algeria and evaluate its biological activity. The total polyphenol content of the extract was determined as 1.373 mg of gallic acid equivalents (±0.0046), whereas the flavonoids were determined as 0.098 mg of quercetin (±0.0015). The determination of the complete polyphenolic profile of the extract was achieved by liquid chromatography with an RP-amide column in combination with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detection through an electrospray ionization interface. A total of 18 compounds were identified, of which five were reported for the first time in the sample tested. Quercetin rhamnoside was the most abundant compound (82.6 μg/g of fresh pepper) followed by quercetin glucoside (19.86 μg/g). The antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effects were also determined. For the antimicrobial tests assessed against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, kaempferol showed the strongest inhibitory effect followed by quercetin and caffeic acids. In the study of the cytotoxicity of the extract, the cancer cells (U937) were more affected than the normal cells (peripheral blood mononucleated cells), with more than 62% inhibition at the highest concentration.

  9. A novel quantitation approach for maximizing detectable targets for offensive/volatile odorants with diverse functional groups by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-07-11

    A multitude of analytical systems are needed to analyze diverse odorants with various functionalities. In this study, an experimental method was developed to assess the maximum covering range of odorants using a single experimental setup consisting of a thermal desorber-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system. To this end, a total of 20 offensive odorants (aldehyde, ketone, ester, alcohol, aromatic, sulfide, amine, and carboxyl) were selected and tested by a single system. The analytical results of standards and environmental samples were evaluated in a number of respects. In the analysis of the standards, all targets were quantified via Carbopack (C + B + X) tube sampling while operating the thermal desorber at -25 °C. The method detection limits of 18 targets (exception of 2 out of the 20 targets: acetaldehyde and methanethiol) were excellent (mean 0.04 ± 0.03 ppb) in terms of their odor threshold values (74.7 ± 140 ~ 624 ± 1,729 ppb). The analysis of organic fertilizer plant samples at a pig farm (slurry treatment facility, compost facility, and ambient air) confirmed the presence of 18 odorants from 0.03 ppb (dimethyldisulfide, ambient sample) to 522 ppb (methyl ethyl ketone, slurry treatment facility). As such, our method allowed simultaneous quantitation of most key odorants with sufficient reliability and sensitivity.

  10. Efficient and sensitive detection of residues of nine coccidiostats in egg and muscle by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, M; Pierret, G; Delahaut, Ph

    2004-12-25

    We present a method based on electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for determining in muscle and eggs the following nine coccidiostats: halofuginone, diclazuril, dinitrocarbanilide (the main metabolite of nicarbazin), robenidine, monensin, lasalocid, narasin, salinomycin, and maduramicin. Dinitrocarbanilide-d8, nigericin, and diclazuril-bis were used as internal standards. The method uses extraction in acetonitrile followed by a clean-up on an SiOH solid-phase extraction column. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation was performed on a Purospher C(18) column (125 mm x 3 mm i.d.) protected by a guard column, the mobile phase being a water-acetonitrile gradient (each gradient component containing 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). For unequivocal identification of each analyte, two ions were detected and chosen for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Validation was carried out on spiked muscle and egg samples. The method described meets all the criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC and is easy to use in routine analysis. Validation results are presented with the measured CCalpha and CCbeta values. This whole method allows extraction and analysis of up to 24 samples per day.

  11. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprints and primary structure identification of corn peptides by HPLC-diode array detection and HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corn peptides (CPs are reported to have many biological functions, such as facilitating alcohol metabolism, antioxidation, antitumor, antihypertension, and hepatoprotection. To develop a method for quality control, the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system was applied. Twenty-eight common peaks were found in all the CPs of corn samples from Enshi, China, based on which, a fingerprinting chromatogram was established for use in quality control in future research. Subsequently, the major chemical constituents of these common peaks were identified respectively using the HPLC-diode-array detection electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (DAD-ESI-MS/MS system, and 48 peptide fractions were determined ultimately. This was the first time for the majority of these peptides to be reported, and many of them contained amino acids of glutamine (Q, L and A, which might play an important role in the exhibition of the bioactivities of CPs. Many peptides had a similar primary structure to the peptides which had been proven to be bioactive such as facilitating alcohol metabolism, scavenging free radicals, and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. This systematical analysis of the primary structure of CPs facilitated subsequent studies on the relationship between the structures and functions, and could accelerate holistic research on CPs.

  12. Rapid determination of plutonium isotopes in environmental samples using sequential injection extraction chromatography and detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    This article presents an automated method for the rapid determination of 239Pu and 240Pu in various environmental samples. The analytical method involves the in-line separation of Pu isotopes using extraction chromatography (TEVA) implemented in a sequential injection (SI) network followed by detection of isolated analytes with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method has been devised for the determination of Pu isotopes at environmentally relevant concentrations, whereby it has been successfully applied to the analyses of large volumes/amounts of samples, for example, 100-200 g of soil and sediment, 20 g of seaweed, and 200 L of seawater following analyte preconcentration. The investigation of the separation capability of the assembled SI system revealed that up to 200 g of soil or sediment can be treated using a column containing about 0.70 g of TEVA resin. The analytical results of Pu isotopes in the reference materials showed good agreement with the certified or reference values at the 0.05 significance level. Chemical yields of Pu ranged from 80 to 105%, and the decontamination factors for uranium, thorium, mercury and lead were all above 10(4). The duration of the in-line extraction chromatographic run was determination of Pu isotopes in environmental risk assessment and emergency preparedness scenarios.

  13. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in comparison with neutron activation and ion chromatography with UV/VIS detection for the determination of lanthanides in plant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulska, Ewa; Danko, Bożena; Dybczyński, Rajmund S; Krata, Agnieszka; Kulisa, Krzysztof; Samczyński, Zbigniew; Wojciechowski, Marcin

    2012-08-15

    Analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for determination of lanthanides in plant materials was investigated and compared with neutron activation analysis (NAA) as well as ion chromatography (IC) with UV-VIS detection. Two sample preparation protocols were tested: (i) microwave assisted digestion by concentrated nitric acid; (ii) microwave digestion involving silica and fluoride removal, followed by the selective and quantitative lanthanides group separation from the plant matrix. Several Certified Reference Materials (CRM) of plant origin were used for the evaluation of the accuracy of the applied analytical procedures. The consistency of results, obtained by various methods, enabled to establish the tentative recommended values (TRV) for several missing elements in one of CRMs. The ICP-MS, due to its very high sensitivity, has the potential to contribute to this aim. The discrepancy of the results obtained by various methods was discussed in a view of possible matrix effects related to the composition of investigated materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly Selective Screening of Estrogenic Compounds in Consumer-Electronics Plastics by Liquid Chromatography in Parallel Combined with Nanofractionation-Bioactivity Detection and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Willem; Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Hamers, Timo; Somsen, Govert W; Lamoree, Marja H; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-11-15

    The chemical safety of consumer products is an issue of emerging concern. Plastics are widely used, e.g. as casings of consumer electronics (TVs, computers, routers, etc.), which are present in houses and offices in continuously increasing numbers. In this study, we investigate the estrogenic activity of components of plastics coming from electronics' casings. A recently developed fractionation platform for effect-directed analysis (EDA) was used. This platform combines reversed-phase liquid chromatography in parallel with bioassay detection via nanofractionation and with online high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the identification of bioactives. Four out of eight of the analyzed plastics samples showed the presence of estrogenic compounds. Based on the MS results these were assigned to bisphenol A (BPA), 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, and a possible bisphenol A analog. All samples contained flame retardants, but these did not show any estrogenicity. The observed BPA, however, could be an impurity of tetrabromo-BPA (TBBPA) or TBBPA-based flame retardants. Due to the plausible migration of additives from plastics into the environment, plastics from consumer electronics likely constitute a source of estrogenic compound contamination in the indoor environment.

  15. Stability-indicating RP-LC method for the determination of vildagliptin and mass spectrometry detection for a main degradation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Amanda Thomas; Salamon, Bárbara; Schapoval, Elfrides Eva Sherman; Steppe, Martin

    2012-05-01

    A simple, precise and stability-indicating reversed-phase liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for the determination of vildagliptin (VLG) in pharmaceutical dosage form. The chromatographic separation was obtained within 6 min and was linear in the range of 20-80 µg/mL (r(2) = 0.9999). Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.63 and 2.82 µg/mL, respectively. The method was validated in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization acceptance criteria for specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, robustness and system suitability. Stress studies were carried out and no interference of the degradation products was observed. The excipients did not interfere in the determination of VLG. Furthermore, the main degradation product obtained from the stress studies (thermal, oxidative and alkaline hydrolysis) was evaluated for mass spectrometry and its molecular structure was predicted. The proposed method was successfully applied for the quantitative analysis of VLG in tablet dosage form, which will help to improve quality control and contribute to stability studies of pharmaceutical tablets containing this drug.

  16. Chemical analysis of raw and processed Fructus arctii by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunming Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, raw and processed herbs are used to treat the different diseases. Fructus Arctii, the dried fruits of Arctium lappa l. (Compositae, is widely used in the TCM. Stir-frying is the most common processing method, which might modify the chemical compositions in Fructus Arctii. Materials and Methods: To test this hypothesis, we focused on analysis and identification of the main chemical constituents in raw and processed Fructus Arctii (PFA by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results: The results indicated that there was less arctiin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. however, there were higher levels of arctigenin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. Conclusion: We suggest that arctiin reduced significantly following the thermal conversion of arctiin to arctigenin. In conclusion, this finding may shed some light on understanding the differences in the therapeutic values of raw versus PFA in TCM.

  17. High-internal-phase-emulsion polymeric monolith coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for enrichment and sensitive detection of trace cytokinins in plant samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fuyou; Sun, Lin; Zhen, Xian; Nie, Honggang; Zheng, Yanjie; Ruan, Guihua; Li, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    High-internal-phase-emulsion polymers (polyHIPEs) show great promise as solid-phase-extraction (SPE) materials because of the tremendous porosity and highly interconnected framework afforded by the high-internal-phase-emulsion (HIPE) technique. In this work, polyHIPE monolithic columns as novel SPE materials were prepared and applied to trace enrichment of cytokinins (CKs) from complex plant samples. The polyHIPE monoliths were synthesized via the in-situ polymerization of the continuous phase of a HIPE containing styrene (STY) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in a stainless column, and revealed highly efficient and selective enrichment ability for aromatic compounds. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a method using a monolithic polyHIPE column combined with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was developed for the simultaneous extraction and sensitive determination of trans-zeatin (tZ), meta-topolin (mT), kinetin (K), and kinetin riboside (KR). The proposed method had good linearity, with correlation coefficients (R (2)) from 0.9957 to 0.9984, and low detection limits (LODs, S/N = 3) in the range 2.4-47 pg mL(-1) for the four CKs. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CKs in real plant samples, and obtained good recoveries ranging from 68.8 % to 103.0 % and relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 16 %.

  18. Age-Related Changes to Human Stratum Corneum Lipids Detected Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Following in Vivo Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Nichola J; Johnson, Daniel J; Wibawa, Judata; Marlow, Ian; Bell, Mike; Barrett, David A; Scurr, David J

    2016-04-19

    This work demonstrates the ability to detect changes in both quantity and spatial distribution of human stratum corneum (SC) lipids from samples collected in vivo. The SC functions as the predominant barrier to the body, protecting against the penetration of xenobiotic substances. Changes to the SC lipid composition have been associated with barrier impairment and consequent skin disorders, and it is therefore important to monitor and quantify changes to this structure. This work demonstrates the first reported use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess physiological changes to human SC as a function of depth. This technique provides exceptional sensitivity and chemical specificity, allowing analysis of single tape stripped samples taken from volunteers. Using this methodology we were able to successfully identify chemical differences in human SC resulting from both intrinsic and extrinsic (photo) aging. Samples were collected from women of two age groups (under 27 and postmenopausal) and from two body sites with varying UV exposure (inner forearm and dorsal hand), and differences were identified using multivariate data analysis. The key finding was the significant aged-related increase and change in spatial distribution of the sterol cholesterol sulfate, a membrane stabilizing lipid. Significant changes in the prevalence of both lignoceric acid (C24:0) and hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) were also observed. This work describes previously unreported age-related chemical changes to human SC, providing an insight into aging mechanisms which may improve the design of both pharmaceutical and cosmetic topical products.

  19. Detection and confirmation of milk adulteration with cheese whey using proteomic-like sample preparation and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Motta, T M; Hoff, R B; Barreto, F; Andrade, R B S; Lorenzini, D M; Meneghini, L Z; Pizzolato, T M

    2014-03-01

    Caseinomacropeptide (CMP) is a peptide released by chymosin in cheese production, remaining in whey. Thus, CMP can be used as a biomarker to fluid milk adulteration through whey addition. Commonly, CMP is analyzed by reversed phase (RP-HPLC) or size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). However, some psychrotropic microorganisms - specially Pseudomonas fluorescens - when present in storaged milk, can produce, by enzymatic pathway, a CMP-like peptide generally called pseudo-CMP. These two peptides differ from each other only by one amino acid. RP-HPLC and SEC methods are unable to distinguish these two peptides, which demand development of a confirmatory method with high selectivity. Considering the several degrees of glycosilation and phosphorylation sites in CMP, allied with possible genetic variation (CMP A and CMP B), analytical methods able to differentiate these peptides are extremely complex. In the present work, we developed a proteomic-like technique for separation and characterization of these peptides, using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization able to differentiate and subsequently quantify CMP and pseudo-CMP in milk samples in order to identify adulteration or contamination of these products. The method shows satisfactory precision (<11%) with a detection limit of 1.0 µg mL(-1) and quantification limit of 5.0 µg mL(-1). Specificity, matrix effects and applicability to real samples analysis were also performed and discussed.

  20. Carbon isotopic ratio analysis by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) administration to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudan, Christophe; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2007-01-01

    Since GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyric acid) is naturally produced in the human body, clinical and forensic toxicologists must be able to discriminate between endogenous levels and a concentration resulting from exposure. To suggest an alternative to the use of interpretative concentration cut-offs, the detection of exogenous GHB in urine specimens was investigated by means of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). GHB was isolated from urinary matrix by successive purification on Oasis MCX and Bond Elute SAX solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractioning using an Atlantis dC18 column eluted with a mixture of formic acid and methanol. Subsequent intramolecular esterification of GHB leading to the formation of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) was carried out to avoid introduction of additional carbon atoms for carbon isotopic ratio analysis. A precision of 0.3 per thousand was determined using this IRMS method for samples at GHB concentrations of 10 mg/L. The (13)C/(12)C ratios of GHB in samples of subjects exposed to the drug ranged from -32.1 to -42.1 per thousand, whereas the results obtained for samples containing GHB of endogenous origin at concentration levels less than 10 mg/L were in the range -23.5 to -27.0 per thousand. Therefore, these preliminary results show that a possible discrimination between endogenous and exogenous GHB can be made using carbon isotopic ratio analyses.

  1. Multiplex liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of wheat, oat, barley and rye prolamins towards the assessment of gluten-free product safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Anita; Mattarozzi, Monica; Giannetto, Marco; Careri, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Celiac patients should feel confident in the safety of foods labelled or expected to be gluten-free. In this context, a targeted proteomic approach based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) technique was proposed to assess the presence of celiotoxic cereals, namely wheat, oats, barley and rye, in raw and processed food products. To this aim, unique marker peptides were properly selected in order to distinguish between the different cereal types. A revised cocktail solution based on reducing and denaturing agents was exploited for prolamin extraction from raw and processed food; in addition, defatting with hexane was carried out for sample clean-up, allowing to largely reduce problems related to matrix effect. Method validation on fortified rice flour showed good analytical performance in terms of sensitivity (limits of detection in the 2-18 mg kg(-1) range). However, poor trueness was calculated for self-made incurred bread (between 3 and 30% depending on the peptide), probably due to baking processes, which reduce gluten extractability. Thus, it is evident that in the case of processed foods further insights into sample treatment efficiency and reference materials for protein calibration are required to obtain accurate gluten determination. Finally, the developed method was applied for the analysis of market food products, offering the possibility to discriminate among cereals, with good agreement with labelled ingredients for gluten-containing foodstuffs.

  2. Analysis of sulfonamides, tilmicosin and avermectins residues in typical animal matrices with multi-plug filtration cleanup by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuhong; Jatamunua, Freedom; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Yanjie; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Shan, Jihao; Jiang, Yanbin; Pan, Canping

    2017-05-15

    The frequent use of various veterinary drugs could lead to residue bioaccumulation in animal tissues, which could cause dietary risks to human health. In order to quickly analyze the residues, a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for detecting Sulfonamides, Tilmicosin and Avermectins (AVMs) residues in animal samples. For sample preparation, modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods were used. For sample cleanup, n-Hexane delipidation and multi-plug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) method based on primary-secondary amine (PSA) and octadecyl-silica (C18) were used, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. It was validated on 7 animal matrices (bovine, caprine, swine meat and their kidneys, milk) at two fortified concentration levels of 5 and 100μg/kg. The recoveries ranged from 82 to 107% for all analytes with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 15%. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with coefficients of determination above 0.998 for all analytes within concentration levels of 5-500μg/kg. The developed method was successfully used to analysis veterinary drugs of real animal samples from local markets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous determination of 17 sulfonamides and the potentiators ormetoprim and trimethoprim in salmon muscle by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Ross A; Burns, B Garth; van de Riet, Jeffrey M; North, David H; Darvesh, Rozina

    2007-01-01

    A simple, robust method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of 17 sulfonamides [sulfanilamide (SNL), sulfacetamide (SAA), sulfaguanidine (SGD), sulfapyridine (SPY), sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethoxazole (SOZ), sulfamoxole (SXL), sulfisoxazole (SXZ), sulfamethizole (SML), sulfamethazine (SMZ), sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMP), sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), sulfachloropyridazine (SCP), sulfaquinoxaline (SQX), and sulfadimethoxine (SDM)] and 2 potentiators [ormetoprim (OMP) and trimethoprim (TMP)] in fish tissue has been developed. The analytes were extracted from homogenized fish tissue with water-acetonitrile (50 + 50). The extract was clarified by centrifugation and a portion defatted with hexane. The analytes were partitioned into chloroform and evaporated to dryness. The redissolved residue was applied to a C18 reversed-phase column with a water-acetonitrile (0.1% acetic acid) gradient. All of the compounds were completely separated and detected in TMP to approximately 30% for SAA. Relative standard deviations for repeat analysis varied from 4% for SMZ and SCP to 23% for SAA.

  4. Chemical analysis of raw and processed Fructus arctii by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunming; Liu, Qidi; Cai, Hao; Cao, Gang; Lu, Tulin; Shen, Baojia; Shu, Yachun; Cai, Baochang

    2014-01-01

    Background: In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), raw and processed herbs are used to treat the different diseases. Fructus Arctii, the dried fruits of Arctium lappa l. (Compositae), is widely used in the TCM. Stir-frying is the most common processing method, which might modify the chemical compositions in Fructus Arctii. Materials and Methods: To test this hypothesis, we focused on analysis and identification of the main chemical constituents in raw and processed Fructus Arctii (PFA) by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results: The results indicated that there was less arctiin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. however, there were higher levels of arctigenin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. Conclusion: We suggest that arctiin reduced significantly following the thermal conversion of arctiin to arctigenin. In conclusion, this finding may shed some light on understanding the differences in the therapeutic values of raw versus PFA in TCM. PMID:25422559

  5. Fast preconcentration of trace rare earth elements from environmental samples by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid grafted magnetic nanoparticles followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2017-10-01

    In this work, di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (P204) grafted magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by fabricating P204 onto Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles based on Lewis acid-base interaction between Ti and phosphate group under weakly acidic condition. The prepared Fe3O4@TiO2@P204 nanoparticles exhibited excellent selectivity for rare earth elements, and good anti-interference ability. Based on it, a method of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for fast preconcentration and determination of trace rare earth elements in environmental samples. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limits of rare earth elements were in the range of 0.01 (Tm)-0.12 (Nd) ng L- 1 with an enrichment factor of 100-fold, and the relative standard deviations ranged from 4.9 (Pr) to 10.7% (Er). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of rare earth elements in environmental samples, including river water, lake water, seawater and sediment.

  6. Identification of Proteins and Peptide Biomarkers for Detecting Banned Processed Animal Proteins (PAPs) in Meat and Bone Meal by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbaix, Hélène; Budinger, Dimitri; Dieu, Marc; Fumière, Olivier; Gillard, Nathalie; Delahaut, Philippe; Mauro, Sergio; Raes, Martine

    2016-03-23

    The outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the United Kingdom in 1986, with processed animal proteins (PAPs) as the main vector of the disease, has led to their prohibition in feed. The progressive release of the feed ban required the development of new analytical methods to determine the exact origin of PAPs from meat and bone meal. We set up a promising MS-based method to determine the species and the source (legal or not) present in PAPs: a TCA-acetone protein extraction followed by a cleanup step, an in-solution tryptic digestion of 5 h (with a 1:20 protein/trypsin ratio), and mass spectrometry analyses, first without any a priori, with a Q-TOF, followed by a targeted triple-quadrupole analysis. Using this procedure, we were able to overcome some of the major limitations of the official methods to analyze PAPs, detecting and identifying prohibited animal products in feedstuffs by the monitoring of peptides specific for cows, pigs, and sheep in PAPs.

  7. A history of mass spectrometry in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downard, K.M.; de Laeter, J.R. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    An interest in mass spectrometry in Australia can be traced back to the 1920s with an early correspondence with Francis Aston who first visited these shores a decade earlier. The region has a rich tradition in both the development of the field and its application, from early measurements of ionization and appearance potentials by Jim Morrison at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) around 1950 to the design and construction of instrumentation including the first use of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for tandem mass spectrometry, the first suite of programs to simulate ion optics (SIMION), the development of early TOF/TOF instruments and orthogonal acceleration and the local design and construction of several generations of a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) instrument. Mass spectrometry has been exploited in the study and characterization of the constituents of this nation's unique flora and fauna from Australian apples, honey, tea plant and eucalyptus oil, snake, spider, fish and frog venoms, coal, oil, sediments and shale, environmental studies of groundwater to geochronological dating of limestone and granite, other terrestrial and meteoritic rocks and coral from the Great Barrier Reef. This article traces the history of mass spectrometry in its many guises and applications in the island continent of Australia. It focuses on contributions of scientists who played a major role in the early establishment of mass spectrometry in Australia. In general, those who are presently active in the field, and whose histories are incomplete, have been mentioned at best only briefly despite their important contributions to the field.

  8. A rapid and sensitive detection of D-Aspartic acid in Crystallin by chiral derivatized liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hajime; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Ito, Keisuke; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-10-07

    A method for the determination of D-Aspartic acid (D-Asp) and its D/L ratio in peptides and proteins has been developed. This method was carried out with good separation of the D/L chiral peptide pairs by combination of a chiral derivatization and an ADME column separation. Furthermore, a cationic derivatization reagent, DBD-Py-NCS, increased the sensitivity of the ESI-MS/MS detection. To confirm the comprehensive peptide analysis, synthesized α-Crystallin tryptic peptides, which included D-Asp residues, were analyzed. The 5 pairs of D/L-Asp that included peptide diastereomers were well separated. Their peak resolutions were more than 1.5 and the results were reproducible (RSD<0.05, n=5). As an application of this method, we analyzed the α-Crystallin standard and UV irradiated α-Crystallin. After trypsin digestion and DBD-Py-NCS derivatization, the tryptic peptide derivatives were applied to LC-MS/MS. Based on the results of peptide sequence identification, almost all the tryptic peptides of the αA- and αB-Crystallin homologous subunits of α-Crystallin were detected as DBD-Py NCS derivatives. However, there was no D-Asp residue in the standard proteins. In the case of the UV irradiated α-Crystallin, Asp(76) and Asp(84) in the αA-Crystallin and Asp(96) in αB-Crystallin were racemized to D-Asp. These results show that this proposed chiral peptide LC-MS/MS method using chiral derivatization provides a rapid and sensitive analysis for post translational Asp racemization sites in aging proteins.

  9. Determination of nitroalkanes in mainstream cigarette smoke by heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography system coupled with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Jizhao; Shang, Jingjing; Ding, Li; Zhao, Ge; Xie, Fuwei; Jia, Yunzhen; Qin, Yaqiong; Yu, Yongjie; Chen, Li; Zhang, Shusheng

    2015-12-11

    In this paper, heart-cutting two-dimensional GC/MS (GC-GC/MS) method in combination with a simple sample collection procedure was developed for the determination of 6 nitroalkanes in mainstream cigarette smoke. The method could remove large amounts of impurities on-line in the first polar column by heart-cuts and separate from the left interferences in a second mid-polar column. And the target compounds could be focused at the inlet of the second column by cryo-concentration. Compared to conventional GC/MS, GC-GC/MS achieved a lower noise level and sensitivity at least an order of magnitude higher. Furthermore, the GC-GC/MS method could avoid the false negative and false positive results that appeared in the compared conventional GC/MS analysis. By trapping the vapor phase of 20 cigarettes smoke, the LODs and LOQs of the nitroalkanes were 1.3 to 9.8 and 4.3 to 32.6ng/cigarette, respectively, and all linear correlation efficiencies were larger than 0.999. The validation results also indicate that the method has high accuracy (spiked recoveries between 84% and 102%) and good repeatability (RSD between 7.2% and 9.4%). The developed method was applied to analyze 1 Kentucky reference cigarette (3R4F) and 10 Chinese commercial brands of cigarettes. The research results indicated that nitromethane, nitroethane, 2-nitropropane and 1-nitro-n-pentane were detected in mainstream cigarette smoke, but 1-nitro-n-butane and 2-nitropropane, which were reported by one previous study, were not detected in all cigarette samples. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  11. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  12. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  13. Mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak Dutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 2DE and 2D-DIGE based proteomics analysis of serum from women with endometriosis revealed several proteins to be dysregulated. A complete list of these proteins along with their mass spectrometry data and subsequent bioinformatics analysis are presented here. The data is related to “Investigation of serum proteome alterations in human endometriosis” by Dutta et al. [1].

  14. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  15. Four decades of joy in mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibbering, Nico M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Tremendous developments in mass spectrometry have taken place in the last 40 years. This holds for both the science and the instrumental revolutions in this field. In chemistry the research was heavily focused on organic molecules that upon electron ionization fragmented via complex mechanistic path

  16. Polymer and Additive Mass Spectrometry Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-06

    The use of mass spectrometry in fields related to polymers has increased significantly over the past three decades and will be explored in this literature review. The importance of this technique is highlighted when exploring how polymers degrade, verifying purchased materials, and as internal requirements change. The primary focus will be on four ionization techniques and the triple quadrupole and quadrupole / time-of-flight mass spectrometers. The advantages and limitations of each will also be explored.

  17. Multiple ligand detection and affinity measurement by ultrafiltration and mass spectrometry analysis applied to fragment mixture screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; Fu, Xu; Shen, Jie; Chen, Xin; Wang, Quan; Bi, Xin; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Lixin; Liang, Guangxin; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-07-30

    Binding affinity of a small molecule drug candidate to a therapeutically relevant biomolecular target is regarded the first determinant of the candidate's efficacy. Although the ultrafiltration-LC/MS (UF-LC/MS) assay enables efficient ligand discovery for a specific target from a mixed pool of compounds, most previous analysis allowed for relative affinity ranking of different ligands. Moreover, the reliability of affinity measurement for multiple ligands with UF-LC/MS has hardly been strictly evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of K(d) determination through UF-LC/MS by comparison with classical ITC measurement. A single-point K(d) calculation method was found to be suitable for affinity measurement of multiple ligands bound to the same target when binding competition is minimized. A second workflow based on analysis of the unbound fraction of compounds was then developed, which simplified sample preparation as well as warranted reliable ligand discovery. The new workflow implemented in a fragment mixture screen afforded rapid and sensitive detection of low-affinity ligands selectively bound to the RNA polymerase NS5B of hepatitis C virus. More importantly, ligand identification and affinity measurement for mixture-based fragment screens by UF-LC/MS were in good accordance with single ligand evaluation by conventional SPR analysis. This new approach is expected to become a valuable addition to the arsenal of high-throughput screening techniques for fragment-based drug discovery.

  18. Laser mass spectrometry for biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Various matrix materials were used for laser desorption of biological molecules which include large polypeptides and oligonucleotides. Both matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and matrix assisted desorption with post-ionization (MADPI) have been used. Detection sensitivity of femtomole of both oligomer and protein has been achieved. Both positive and negative ions were observed with little fragmentation.

  19. Laser mass spectrometry for biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Various matrix materials were used for laser desorption of biological molecules which include large polypeptides and oligonucleotides. Both matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and matrix assisted desorption with post-ionization (MADPI) have been used. Detection sensitivity of femtomole of both oligomer and protein has been achieved. Both positive and negative ions were observed with little fragmentation.

  20. Detection and Identification of Heme c-Modified Peptides by Histidine Affinity Chromatography, High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Park, Jea H.; Belchik, Sara M.; Shi, Liang; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2012-12-07

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (proteins with covalently attached heme c moieties) play important roles in extracellular metal respiration in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-(LC-MS/MS) characterization of c-type cytochromes is hindered by the presence of multiple heme groups, since the heme c modified peptides are typically not observed, or if observed, not identified. Using a recently reported histidine affinity chromatography (HAC) procedure, we enriched heme c tryptic peptides from purified bovine heart cytochrome c, a bacterial decaheme cytochrome, and subjected these samples to LC-MS/MS analysis. Enriched bovine cytochrome c samples yielded three- to six-fold more confident peptide-spectrum matches to heme-c containing peptides than unenriched digests. In unenriched digests of the decaheme cytochrome MtoA from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1, heme c peptides for four of the ten expected sites were observed by LC-MS/MS; following HAC fractionation, peptides covering nine out of ten sites were obtained. Heme c peptide spiked into E. coli lysates at mass ratios as low as 10-4 was detected with good signal-to-noise after HAC and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to HAC, we have developed a proteomics database search strategy that takes into account the unique physicochemical properties of heme c peptides. The results suggest that accounting for the double thioether link between heme c and peptide, and the use of the labile heme fragment as a reporter ion, can improve database searching results. The combination of affinity chromatography and heme-specific informatics yielded increases in the number of peptide-spectrum matches of 20-100-fold for bovine cytochrome c.

  1. Detection and identification of heme c-modified peptides by histidine affinity chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and database searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Eric D; Anderson, Brian J; Park, Jea; Belchik, Sara M; Shi, Liang; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2012-12-07

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (proteins with covalently attached heme c moieties) play important roles in extracellular metal respiration in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) characterization of c-type cytochromes is hindered by the presence of multiple heme groups, since the heme c modified peptides are typically not observed or, if observed, not identified. Using a recently reported histidine affinity chromatography (HAC) procedure, we enriched heme c tryptic peptides from purified bovine heart cytochrome c, two bacterial decaheme cytochromes, and subjected these samples to LC-MS/MS analysis. Enriched bovine cytochrome c samples yielded 3- to 6-fold more confident peptide-spectrum matches to heme c containing peptides than unenriched digests. In unenriched digests of the decaheme cytochrome MtoA from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1, heme c peptides for 4 of the 10 expected sites were observed by LC-MS/MS; following HAC fractionation, peptides covering 9 out of 10 sites were obtained. Heme c peptide spiked into E. coli lysates at mass ratios as low as 1×10(-4) was detected with good signal-to-noise after HAC and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to HAC, we have developed a proteomics database search strategy that takes into account the unique physicochemical properties of heme c peptides. The results suggest that accounting for the double thioether link between heme c and peptide, and the use of the labile heme fragment as a reporter ion, can improve database searching results. The combination of affinity chromatography and heme-specific informatics yielded increases in the number of peptide-spectrum matches of 20-100-fold for bovine cytochrome c.

  2. [Determination of flavonol glycosides in tea samples by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhicong; Sha, Yuebing; Yu, Xiaobo; Liang, Yuerong

    2015-09-01

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-PDA-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of flavonol glycosides in tea samples. The chromatographic separation was performed on an UPLC HSS T3 column by gradient elution with the mobile phases of acetonitrile and water both containing 0.1% (v/v) formic acid. A total of 15 flavonol glycosides which include 3 myricetin glycosides, 6 quercetin glycosides and 6 kaempferol glycosides were positively identified in green and black tea samples by comparing the retention times and mass spectra of the samples with standards and publications. The quantities of flavonol glycosides were relatively calculated with the stand- ard quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside (Q-GRh) which was calibrated with external quantification method using multi-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The results showed that there were different flavonol glycoside distributions in green tea and black tea. The total amount of flavonol glycosides in green tea was 1. 7 times of that in black tea. The major flavonol glycosides in green tea were myricetin-3-galactoside (M-Ga), myricetin-3-glucoside (M-G), quercetin-3-glucosyl-rhamnosyl-galactoside (Q-GaRhG), quercetin-3-glucosyl-rhamnosyl-glucoside (Q-GRhG), kaempferol-3-glucosyl-rhamnosyl-galactoside (K-GaRhG) and kaempferol-3-glucosyl- rhamnosyl-glucoside (K-GRhG), but for black tea, the major flavonol glycosides were quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside (Q-GRh), quercetin-3-glucoside (Q-G), kaempferol-3-rhamnosylglucoside (K-GRh) and kaempferol-3-galactoside (K-Ga). The present method is accurate, convenient for the rapid identification of flavonol glycosides and analysis of constituent distribution for green and black teas.

  3. 4-Chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid is an efficient soft matrix for cyanocobalamin detection in foodstuffs by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Palmisano, Francesco; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2016-09-01

    4-Chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA) is a very useful matrix able to give the protonated adduct [M+H](+) of intact cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) as the base peak (m/z 1355.58) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The only fragment observed is [M-CN + H](+•) formed through the facile (•) CN neutral loss reflecting the fairly low Co-C bond energy. All other investigated proton transfer matrices, including α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, para-nitroaniline and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, give rise to a complete decyanation of CNCbl with concomitant formation of [M-CN + H](+•) , [M-CN + Na](+•) and [M-CN + K](+•) adducts at m/z 1329.57, 1351.55 and 1367.51, respectively. Depending on the matrix used, a variable degree of fragmentation involving the α-side axial ligand was observed. A plausible explanation of the specific behaviour of 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid as a soft matrix is discussed. Tandem mass spectra of both [M + H](+) and [M-CN + H](+•) ions were obtained and product ions successfully assigned. The possibility of detecting the protonated adduct of intact CNCbl was exploited in foodstuff samples such as cow milk and hen egg yolk by MALDI tandem MS upon sample extraction. We believe that our data provide strong basis for the application of MALDI tandem MS in the qualitative analysis of natural CNCbl, including fish, liver and meat samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Characterization of flagellar cysteine-rich sperm proteins involved in motility, by the combination of cellular fractionation, fluorescence detection, and mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrillana, María E; Monclus, María A; Sáez Lancellotti, Tania E; Boarelli, Paola V; Clementi, Marisa A; Vincenti, Amanda E; Yunes, Roberto F M; Fornés, Miguel W

    2011-09-01

    Mammalian sperm proteins undergo thiol group (SH) oxidation to form dis