WorldWideScience

Sample records for detailed aerodynamic measurements

  1. Analysis of detailed aerodynamic field measurements using results from an aeroelastic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Energy Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands); Feigl, L. [Ecotecnia S. coop.c.l. (Spain); Rooij, R. van; Bruining, A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    In this article an analysis is given of aerodynamic field measurements on wind turbine blades. The analysis starts with a consistency check on the measurements, by relating the measured local aerodynamic segment forces to the overall rotor loads. It is found that the results are very consistent. Moreover, a comparison is made between measured results and results calculated from an aeroelastic code. On the basis of this comparison, the aerodynamic modelling in the aeroelastic code could be improved. This holds in particular for the modelling of 3D stall effects, not only on the lift but also on the drag, and for the modelling of tip effects (author)

  2. INTEGRATED AERODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUTTE, HK

    1992-01-01

    The myoelastic-aerodynamic model of phonation implies that aerodynamic factors are crucial to the evaluation of voice function, Subglottal pressure and mean flow rate represent the vocal power source. If they can be related to the magnitude of the radiated sound power, they may provide an index of v

  3. Final Results from Mexnext-I. Analysis of detailed aerodynamic measurements on a 4.5 m diameter rotor placed in the large German Dutch Wind Tunnel DNW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G.; Boorsma, K. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Munduate, X. [National Renewable Energy Center, CENER, Pamplona (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    The paper presents the final results from the first phase of IEA Task 29 'Mexnext'. Mexnext was a joint project in which 20 parties from 11 different countries cooperated. The main aim of Mexnext was to analyse the wind tunnel measurements which have been taken in the EU project 'MEXICO'. In the MEXICO project 10 institutes from 6 countries cooperated in doing experiments on an instrumented, three-bladed wind turbine of 4.5 m diameter placed in the 9.5 by 9.5 m{sup 2} open section of the Large Low-speed Facility (LLF) of the test facility DNW (German-Dutch Wind Tunnels). Pressure distributions on the blades were obtained from 148 Kulite pressure sensors, distributed over 5 sections at 25, 35, 60, 82 and 92% radial position respectively. Blade loads were monitored through two strain-gauge bridges at each blade root. Most interesting however are the extensive PIV flow field measurements, which have been taken simultaneously with the pressure and load measurements. As a result of the international collaboration within this task a very thorough analysis of the data could be carried out and a large number of codes were validated not only in terms of loads but also in terms of underlying flow field. The paper will present several results from Mexnext-I, i.e. validation results and conclusion on modelling deficiencies and directions for model improvement. The future plans of the Mexnext consortium are also briefly discussed. Amongst these are Mexnext-II, a project in which also aerodynamic measurements other than MEXICO are included, and 'New MEXICO' in which additional measurement on the MEXICO model are performed.

  4. Detailed IR aperture measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Garcia Morales, Hector; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Mirarchi, Daniele; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Carlo; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Wretborn, Sven Joel; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    MD 1673 was carried out on October 5 2016, in order to investigate in more detail the available aperture in the LHC high-luminosity insertions at 6.5 TeV and β∗=40 cm. Previous aperture measurements in 2016 during commissioning had shown that the available aperture is at the edge of protection, and that the aperture bottleneck at β∗=40 cm in certain cases is found in the separation plane instead of in the crossing plane. Furthermore, the bottlenecks were consistently found in close to the upstream end of Q3 on the side of the incoming beam, and not in Q2 on the outgoing beam as expected from calculations. Therefore, this MD aimed at measuring IR1 and IR5 separately (at 6.5 TeV and β∗=40 cm, for 185 µrad half crossing angle), to further localize the bottlenecks longitudinally using newly installed BLMs, investigate the difference in aperture between Q2 and Q3, and to see if any aperture can be gained using special orbit bumps.

  5. Detailing 'measures that matter'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavisides, Bob

    2010-04-01

    In a paper originally presented at last October's Healthcare Estates conference in Harrogate, Bob Heavisides, director of facilities at the Milton Keynes NHS Foundation Trust, explains how estates and facilities directors can provide a package of information based on a number of "measures that matter" to demonstrate to their boards that safe systems of work, operational efficiency and effectiveness, and operational parameters, are within, or better than, equivalent-sized Trusts.

  6. Full-scale measurements of aerodynamic induction in a rotor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr; Hansen, Kurt S.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable modelling of aerodynamic induction is imperative for successful prediction of wind turbine loads and wind turbine dynamics when based on state-of- the-art aeroelastic tools. Full-scale LiDAR based wind speed measurements, with high temporal and spatial resolution, have been conducted in the rotor plane of an operating 2MW/80m wind turbine to perform detailed analysis the aerodynamic induction. The experimental setup, analyses of the spatial structure of the aerodynamic induction and subsequent comparisons with numerical predictions, using the HAWC2 aerolastic code, are presented.

  7. Full-scale measurements of aerodynamic induction in a rotor plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2014-01-01

    in the rotor plane of an operating 2MW/80m wind turbine to perform detailed analysis the aerodynamic induction. The experimental setup, analyses of the spatial structure of the aerodynamic induction and subsequent comparisons with numerical predictions, using the HAWC2 aerolastic code, are presented.......Reliable modelling of aerodynamic induction is imperative for successful prediction of wind turbine loads and wind turbine dynamics when based on state-of- the-art aeroelastic tools. Full-scale LiDAR based wind speed measurements, with high temporal and spatial resolution, have been conducted...

  8. Aerodynamics of indirect thrust measurement by the impulse method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Kang Wu; Hai-Xing Wang; Xian Meng; Xi Chen; Wen-Xia Pan

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamic aspects of indirect thrust measurement by the impulse method have been studied both experimentally and numerically.The underlying basic aerodynamic principle is outlined, the phenomena in subsonic,supersonic and arc-heated jets are explored, and factors affecting the accuracy of the method are studied and discussed.Results show that the impulse method is reliable for indirect thrust measurement if certain basic requirements are met,and a simple guideline for its proper application is given.

  9. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices in low speed aerodynamic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    Low Reynolds number experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of current interest in understanding biological flight mechanics, and due to their application to Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements have described the structures left by bats and birds, and provided insight to the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions due to significant experimental challenges associated with the highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows, and the low wake velocities associated with lifting bodies that only weigh a few grams. This requires the high-speed resolution of small flow features in a large field of view using limited laser energy and finite camera resolution. Cross-stream measurements are further complicated by the high out-of-plane flow which requires thick laser sheets and short interframe times. To quantify and address these challenges we present data from a model study on the wake behind a fixed wing at conditions comparable to those found in biological flight. We present a detailed analysis of the PIV wake measurements, discuss the criteria necessary for accurate measurements, and present a new dual-plane PIV configuration to resolve these issues.

  10. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second

  11. Engineering models in wind energy aerodynamics: Development, implementation and analysis using dedicated aerodynamic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of aerodynamics is of major importance for the successful deployment of wind energy. As a matter of fact there are two aerodynamic areas in the wind energy technology: Rotor aerodynamics and wind farm aerodynamics. The first subject considers the flow around the rotor and the second subj

  12. Measured Aerodynamic Interaction of Two Tiltrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Wadcock, Alan J.; Derby, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction of two model tilrotors in helicopter-mode formation flight is investigated. Three cenarios representing tandem level flight, tandem operations near the ground, and a single tiltrotor operating above thc ground for varying winds are examined. The effect of aircraft separation distance on the thrust and rolling moment of the trailing aircraft with and without the presence of a ground plane are quantified. Without a ground plane, the downwind aircraft experiences a peak rolling moment when the right (left) roto- of the upwind aircraft is laterally aligned with the left (right) rotor of the downwind aircraft. The presence of the ground plane causes the peak rolling moment on the downwind aircraft to occur when the upwind aircraft is further outboard of the downwind aircraft. Ground plane surface flow visualization images obtained using rufts and oil are used to understand mutual interaction between the two aircraft. These data provide guidance in determining tiltrotor flight formations which minimize disturbance to the trailing aircraft.

  13. Aerodynamic Performance and Turbulence Measurements in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Lucci, Barbara L.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine vane aerodynamics were measured in a three vane linear cascade. Surface pressures and blade row losses were obtained over a range of Reynolds and Mach number for three levels of turbulence. Comparisons are made with predictions using a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes analysis. Turbulence intensity measurement were made upstream and downstream of the vane. The purpose of the downstream measurements was to determine how the turbulence was affected by the strong contraction through 75 deg turning.

  14. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  15. Determining Aerodynamic Loads Based on Optical Deformation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshu; Barrows, D. A.; Burner, A. W.; Rhew, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a videogrammetric technique for determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements. The data reduction methods are developed to extract the normal force and pitching moment from beam deformation data. The axial force is obtained by measuring the axial translational motion of a movable shaft in a spring/bearing device. Proof-of-concept calibration experiments are conducted to assess the accuracy of this optical technique.

  16. Deformation Measurements of Smart Aerodynamic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Burner, Alpheus

    2005-01-01

    Video Model Deformation (VMD) and Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) were used to acquire wind tunnel model deformation measurements of the Northrop Grumman-built Smart Wing tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The F18-E/F planform Smart Wing was outfitted with embedded shape memory alloys to actuate a seamless trailing edge aileron and flap, and an embedded torque tube to generate wing twist. The VMD system was used to obtain highly accurate deformation measurements at three spanwise locations along the main body of the wing, and at spanwise locations on the flap and aileron. The PMI system was used to obtain full-field wing shape and deformation measurements over the entire wing lower surface. Although less accurate than the VMD system, the PMI system revealed deformations occurring between VMD target rows indistinguishable by VMD. This paper presents the VMD and PMI techniques and discusses their application in the Smart Wing test.

  17. Detailed measurement on a HESCO diffuser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Holm, Dorte; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2007-01-01

    the inlet velocity is a very important boundary condition both in CFD calculation and general flow measurements. If only the volume flow and the geometrical area are used, a relatively large error in the inlet velocity may result. From the detailed measurements it was possible to establish an expression......This paper focuses on measuring the inlet velocity from a HESCO diffuser used in the IEA Annex 20 work as a function of the volume flow it provides. The aim of the present work is to establish a relation between the inlet velocity, the effective area and the airflow. This is important because...

  18. Detailed Aerosol Characterization using Polarimetric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasekamp, Otto; di Noia, Antonio; Stap, Arjen; Rietjens, Jeroen; Smit, Martijn; van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are believed to cause the second most important anthropogenic forcing of climate change after greenhouse gases. In contrast to the climate effect of greenhouse gases, which is understood relatively well, the negative forcing (cooling effect) caused by aerosols represents the largest reported uncertainty in the most recent assessment of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. There is growing consensus in the aerosol remote sensing community that multi-angle measurements of intensity and polarization are essential to unambiguously determine all relevant aerosol properties. This presentations adresses the different aspects of polarimetric remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, including retrieval algorithm development, validation, and data needs for climate and air quality applications. During past years, at SRON-Netherlands Instite for Space Research retrieval algorithms have been developed that make full use of the capabilities of polarimetric measurements. We will show results of detailed aerosol properties from ground-based- (groundSPEX), airborne- (NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter), and satellite (POLDER) measurements. Also we will discuss observational needs for future instrumentation in order to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in climate change and air quality.

  19. Wing kinematics measurement and aerodynamics of a dragonfly in turning flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo

    2017-02-03

    This study integrates high-speed photogrammetry, 3D surface reconstruction, and computational fluid dynamics to explore a dragonfly (Erythemis Simplicicollis) in free flight. Asymmetric wing kinematics and the associated aerodynamic characteristics of a turning dragonfly are analyzed in detail. Quantitative measurements of wing kinematics show that compared to the outer wings, the inner wings sweep more slowly with a higher angle of attack during the downstroke, whereas they flap faster with a lower angle of attack during the upstroke. The inner-outer asymmetries of wing deviations result in an oval wingtip trajectory for the inner wings and a figure-eight wingtip trajectory for the outer wings. Unsteady aerodynamics calculations indicate significantly asymmetrical force production between the inner and outer wings, especially for the forewings. Specifically, the magnitude of the drag force on the inner forewing is approximately 2.8 times greater than that on the outer forewing during the downstroke. In the upstroke, the outer forewing generates approximately 1.9 times greater peak thrust than the inner forewing. To keep the body aloft, the forewings contribute approximately 64% of the total lift, whereas the hindwings provide 36%. The effect of forewing-hindwing interaction on the aerodynamic performance is also examined. It is found that the hindwings can benefit from this interaction by decreasing power consumption by 13% without sacrificing force generation.

  20. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  1. FIM measurement properties and Rasch model details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B D; Linacre, J M; Smith, R M; Heinemann, A W; Granger, C V

    1997-12-01

    To summarize, we take issue with the criticisms of Dickson & Köhler for two main reasons: 1. Rasch analysis provides a model from which to approach the analysis of the FIM, an ordinal scale, as an interval scale. The existence of examples of items or individuals which do not fit the model does not disprove the overall efficacy of the model; and 2. the principal components analysis of FIM motor items as presented by Dickson & Köhler tends to undermine rather than support their argument. Their own analyses produce a single major factor explaining between 58.5 and 67.1% of the variance, depending upon the sample, with secondary factors explaining much less variance. Finally, analysis of item response, or latent trait, is a powerful method for understanding the meaning of a measure. However, it presumes that item scores are accurate. Another concern is that Dickson & Köhler do not address the issue of reliability of scoring the FIM items on which they report, a critical point in comparing results. The Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMRSM) expends extensive effort in the training of clinicians of subscribing facilities to score items accurately. This is followed up with a credentialing process. Phase 1 involves the testing of individual clinicians who are submitting data to determine if they have achieved mastery over the use of the FIM instrument. Phase 2 involves examining the data for outlying values. When Dickson & Köhler investigate more carefully the application of the Rasch model to their FIM data, they will discover that the results presented in their paper support rather than contradict their application of the Rasch model! This paper is typical of supposed refutations of Rasch model applications. Dickson & Köhler will find that idiosyncrasies in their data and misunderstandings of the Rasch model are the only basis for a claim to have disproven the relevance of the model to FIM data. The Rasch model is a mathematical theorem (like

  2. Wing motion measurement and aerodynamics of hovering true hoverflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiao Lei; Liu, Yan Peng; Sun, Mao

    2011-09-01

    Most hovering insects flap their wings in a horizontal plane (body having a large angle from the horizontal), called `normal hovering'. But some of the best hoverers, e.g. true hoverflies, hover with an inclined stroke plane (body being approximately horizontal). In the present paper, wing and body kinematics of four freely hovering true hoverflies were measured using three-dimensional high-speed video. The measured wing kinematics was used in a Navier-Stokes solver to compute the aerodynamic forces of the insects. The stroke amplitude of the hoverflies was relatively small, ranging from 65 to 85 deg, compared with that of normal hovering. The angle of attack in the downstroke (∼50 deg) was much larger that in the upstroke (∼20 deg), unlike normal-hovering insects, whose downstroke and upstroke angles of attack are not very different. The major part of the weight-supporting force (approximately 86%) was produced in the downstroke and it was contributed by both the lift and the drag of the wing, unlike the normal-hovering case in which the weight-supporting force is approximately equally contributed by the two half-strokes and the lift principle is mainly used to produce the force. The mass-specific power was 38.59-46.3 and 27.5-35.4 W kg(-1) in the cases of 0 and 100% elastic energy storage, respectively. Comparisons with previously published results of a normal-hovering true hoverfly and with results obtained by artificially making the insects' stroke planes horizontal show that for the true hoverflies, the power requirement for inclined stroke-plane hover is only a little (<10%) larger than that of normal hovering.

  3. Evaluating parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer using field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomin Liu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameterizations of aerodynamic resistance to heat and water transfer have a significant impact on the accuracy of models of land – atmosphere interactions and of estimated surface fluxes using spectro-radiometric data collected from aircrafts and satellites. We have used measurements from an eddy correlation system to derive the aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer over a bare soil surface as well as over a maize canopy. Diurnal variations of aerodynamic resistance have been analyzed. The results showed that the diurnal variation of aerodynamic resistance during daytime (07:00 h–18:00 h was significant for both the bare soil surface and the maize canopy although the range of variation was limited. Based on the measurements made by the eddy correlation system, a comprehensive evaluation of eight popularly used parameterization schemes of aerodynamic resistance was carried out. The roughness length for heat transfer is a crucial parameter in the estimation of aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer and can neither be taken as a constant nor be neglected. Comparing with the measurements, the parameterizations by Choudhury et al. (1986, Viney (1991, Yang et al. (2001 and the modified forms of Verma et al. (1976 and Mahrt and Ek (1984 by inclusion of roughness length for heat transfer gave good agreements with the measurements, while the parameterizations by Hatfield et al. (1983 and Xie (1988 showed larger errors even though the roughness length for heat transfer has been taken into account.

  4. Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

  5. Preliminary measurements of aerodynamic damping of a transonic compressor rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, E. F.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Dugundji, J.

    1980-01-01

    The aeroelastic behavior of a transonic compressor rotor operated in the MIT Blowdown Compressor Facility has been examined by means of piezoelectric motion sensors at the base of each of the 23 blades. Excitation has been observed due to rotating stall, due to an incipient flutter, and due to the facility startup transient. A method has been found for determining the aerodynamic damping force by modal analysis of the blade motion. Application of this technique to the example of excitation by rotating stall has led to the conclusions that the blade loading decreases in the stall cell, and that the damping force on the blades in the clean flow is in phase with blade velocity but opposite it in sign, leading to a logarithmic decrement of 0.2. This method of force derivation has quite general applicability as it requires only blade motion data such as are routinely acquired with strain gages. It is argued that models are needed for aerodynamic damping which focus on the effects of near neighbors of a given blade, since flutter often results in large response of isolated blades or small groups of blades.

  6. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Ifju, P G [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, MAE-A 231, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Saellstroem, E; Ukeiley, L, E-mail: diccidwp@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Shalimar, FL 32579 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  7. Understanding and Exploiting Wind Tunnels with Porous Flexible Walls for Aerodynamic Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kenneth Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic behavior of wind tunnels with porous, flexible walls formed from tensioned Kevlar has been characterized and new measurement techniques in such wind tunnels explored. The objective is to bring the aerodynamic capabilities of so-called Kevlar-wall test sections in-line with those of traditional solid-wall test sections. The primary facility used for this purpose is the 1.85-m by 1.85-m Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech, and supporting data is provided by the 2-m by 2-m L...

  8. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by

  9. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by bal

  10. Aerodynamic Measurements of an Incidence Tolerant Blade in a Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the recent facility modifications to NASA s Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility and aerodynamic measurements on the VSPT incidence-tolerant blade are presented. This work supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50% speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Details of the modifications are described. An incidence-tolerant blade was developed under an RTPAS study contract and tested in the cascade to look at the effects of large incidence angle and Reynolds number variations. Recent test results are presented which include midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements obtained at three inlet angles representing the cruise, take-off, and maximum incidence flight mission points. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with exit Reynolds numbers varying from 2.12 106 to 2.12 105 and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.72 and 0.35. Three-dimensional flowfield measurements were also acquired at the cruise and take-off points. The flowfield measurements were acquired using a five-hole and three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6% axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  11. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice-accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional (3-D) features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-in. chord, two-dimensional (2-D) straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice-accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 × 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-in. chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For five of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3 percent with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately 1 deg or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several

  12. An alternative measure of solar activity from detailed sunspot datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Muraközy, Judit; Ludmány, András

    2016-01-01

    The sunspot number is analyzed by using detailed sunspot data, including aspects of observability, sunspot sizes, and proper identification of sunspot groups as discrete entities of the solar activity. The tests show that besides the subjective factors there are also objective causes of the ambiguities in the series of sunspot numbers. To introduce an alternative activity measure the physical meaning of the sunspot number has to be reconsidered. It contains two components whose numbers are governed by different physical mechanisms, this is one source of the ambiguity. This article suggests an activity index, which is the amount of emerged magnetic flux. The only long-term proxy measure is the detailed sunspot area dataset with proper calibration to the magnetic flux amount. The Debrecen sunspot databases provide an appropriate source for the establishment of the suggested activity index.

  13. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  14. Moving Model Test of High-Speed Train Aerodynamic Drag Based on Stagnation Pressure Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingzhi; Du, Juntao; Li, Zhiwei; Huang, Sha; Zhou, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A moving model test method based on stagnation pressure measurements is proposed to measure the train aerodynamic drag coefficient. Because the front tip of a high-speed train has a high pressure area and because a stagnation point occurs in the center of this region, the pressure of the stagnation point is equal to the dynamic pressure of the sensor tube based on the obtained train velocity. The first derivation of the train velocity is taken to calculate the acceleration of the train model ejected by the moving model system without additional power. According to Newton's second law, the aerodynamic drag coefficient can be resolved through many tests at different train speeds selected within a relatively narrow range. Comparisons are conducted with wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations, and good agreement is obtained, with differences of less than 6.1%. Therefore, the moving model test method proposed in this paper is feasible and reliable.

  15. Advanced Aerodynamic Measurement Technology (Technologies avancees de mesure aerodynamique)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    19th AIAA Advanced Measurement and Ground Testing Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, June 17- 20, 1996. 17 Hart , R.C., Balla, R.J. and Herring...Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt Linder Höhe, D-51147 Köln, Germany and F. Grisch, P. Bouchardy Office National d’Etudees et de...trpy) in Du Pont Chroma Clear, (5) Ru(trpy)/Zeolite in GP-197, (6) EuTTA in dope, (7) Ru(bpy) in Du Pont Chroma Clear, (8) Perylenedicarboximide in

  16. Design Of An Aerodynamic Measurement System For Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and validation of a measurement system for aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles. An aerodynamic balance was designed in order to measure the lift, drag forces and pitching moment for different airfoils. During the design process, several aspects were analyzed in order to produce an efficient design, for instance the range of changes of the angle of attack with and a small increment and the versatility of being adapted to different type of airfoils, since it is a wire balance it was aligned and calibrated as well. Wind tunnel tests of a two dimensional NACA four digits family airfoil and four different modifications of this airfoil were performed to validate the aerodynamic measurement system. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, four different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack experimentally for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off, called the no blowing condition, by means of wind tunnel tests. The experiments were performed in a closed circuit wind tunnel with an open test section. Finally, results of the wind tunnel tests were compared with numerical results obtained by means of computational fluid dynamics as well as with other experimental references and found to be in good agreement.

  17. Detailed signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuechao; Li, Sining; Lu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Lidar is short for light detection and ranging, which is a tool to help measuring some useful information of atmosphere. In the recent years, more and more attention was paid to the research of wind measurement by lidar. Because the accurate wind information can be used not only in weather report, but also the safety guarantee of the airplanes. In this paper, a more detailed signal model of wind measurement lidar is proposed. It includes the laser transmitting part which describes the broadening of the spectral, the laser attenuation in the atmosphere, the backscattering signal and the detected signal. A Voigt profile is used to describe the broadening of the transmitting laser spectral, which is the most common situation that is the convolution of different broadening line shapes. The laser attenuation includes scattering and absorption. We use a Rayleigh scattering model and partially-Correlated quadratic-Velocity-Dependent Hard-Collision (pCqSDHC) model to describe the molecule scattering and absorption. When calculate the particles scattering and absorption, the Gaussian particles model is used to describe the shape of particles. Because of the Doppler Effect occurred between the laser and atmosphere, the wind velocity can be calculated by the backscattering signal. Then, a two parameter Weibull distribution is used to describe the wind filed, so that we can use it to do the future work. After all the description, the signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar is decided. And some of the simulation is given by MATLAB. This signal model can describe the system more accurate and more detailed, so that the following work will be easier and more efficient.

  18. Detailed Uncertainty Analysis of the ZEM-3 Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are critical to the investigation of all thermoelectric systems. Therefore, it stands that the measurement uncertainty must be well understood to report ZT values which are accurate and trustworthy. A detailed uncertainty analysis of the ZEM-3 measurement system has been performed. The uncertainty analysis calculates error in the electrical resistivity measurement as a result of sample geometry tolerance, probe geometry tolerance, statistical error, and multi-meter uncertainty. The uncertainty on Seebeck coefficient includes probe wire correction factors, statistical error, multi-meter uncertainty, and most importantly the cold-finger effect. The cold-finger effect plagues all potentiometric (four-probe) Seebeck measurement systems, as heat parasitically transfers through thermocouple probes. The effect leads to an asymmetric over-estimation of the Seebeck coefficient. A thermal finite element analysis allows for quantification of the phenomenon, and provides an estimate on the uncertainty of the Seebeck coefficient. The thermoelectric power factor has been found to have an uncertainty of +9-14 at high temperature and 9 near room temperature.

  19. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  20. Detailed Measurements of Structure Functions from Nucleons and Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment will study deep inelastic muon nucleon scattering in a wide range of Q|2~(1-200 (GeV/c)|2) and x~(0.005-0.75). The main aims of the experiment are: \\item a)~~~~Detailed measurements of the nuclear dependence of the structure function F^2|A, of R~=~@s^L/@s^T and of the cross-section for J/@y production. They will provide a basis for the understanding of the EMC effect: the modification of quark and gluon distributions due to the nuclear environment. \\item b)~~~~A simultaneous high luminosity measurement of the structure function F^2 on hydrogen and deuterium. This will provide substantially improved accuracy in the knowledge of the neutron structure function F^2|n, of F^2|p-F^2|n and F^2|n/F^2|p and their Q|2 dependence. Furthermore, the data will allow a determination of the strong coupling constant @a^s(Q|2) with reduced experimental and theoretical uncertainties as well as of the ratio of the down to up quark distributions in the valence region. Due to the large x range covered by the experim...

  1. The impact of model detail on power grid resilience measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S.; Kleis, K.; Schultz, P.; Kurths, J.; Hellmann, F.

    2016-05-01

    Extreme events are a challenge to natural as well as man-made systems. For critical infrastructure like power grids, we need to understand their resilience against large disturbances. Recently, new measures of the resilience of dynamical systems have been developed in the complex system literature. Basin stability and survivability respectively assess the asymptotic and transient behavior of a system when subjected to arbitrary, localized but large perturbations in frequency and phase. To employ these methods that assess power grid resilience, we need to choose a certain model detail of the power grid. For the grid topology we considered the Scandinavian grid and an ensemble of power grids generated with a random growth model. So far the most popular model that has been studied is the classical swing equation model for the frequency response of generators and motors. In this paper we study a more sophisticated model of synchronous machines that also takes voltage dynamics into account, and compare it to the previously studied model. This model has been found to give an accurate picture of the long term evolution of synchronous machines in the engineering literature for post fault studies. We find evidence that some stable fix points of the swing equation become unstable when we add voltage dynamics. If this occurs the asymptotic behavior of the system can be dramatically altered, and basin stability estimates obtained with the swing equation can be dramatically wrong. We also find that the survivability does not change significantly when taking the voltage dynamics into account. Further, the limit cycle type asymptotic behaviour is strongly correlated with transient voltages that violate typical operational voltage bounds. Thus, transient voltage bounds are dominated by transient frequency bounds and play no large role for realistic parameters.

  2. Power and loads for wind turbines in yawed conditions. Analysis of field measurements and aerodynamic predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorsma, K. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    A description is given of the work carried out within the framework of the FLOW (Far and Large Offshore Wind) project on single turbine performance in yawed flow conditions. Hereto both field measurements as well as calculations with an aerodynamic code are analyzed. The rotors of horizontal axis wind turbines follow the changes in the wind direction for optimal performance. The reason is that the power is expected to decrease for badly oriented rotors. So, insight in the effects of the yaw angle on performance is important for optimization of the yaw control of each individual turbine. The effect of misalignment on performance and loads of a single 2.5 MW wind turbine during normal operation is investigated. Hereto measurements at the ECN Wind Turbine Test Site Wieringermeer (EWTW) are analyzed from December 2004 until April 2009. Also, the influence of yaw is studied using a design code and results from this design code are compared with wind tunnel measurements.

  3. Interference-free measurements of the subsonic aerodynamics of slanted-base ogive cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Alcorn, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    Drag, lift, pitching moment, and base-pressure measurements have been made, free of support interference, on a range of slanted-base ogive cylinders, using the NASA Langley Research Center 13-in magnetic suspension and balance system. Test Mach numbers were in the range 0.04-0.2. Two types of wake flow were observed, a quasi-symmetric turbulent closure or a longitudinal vortex flow. Aerodynamic characteristics differ dramatically between the two wake types. Drag measurements are shown to be in agreement with previous tests. A hysteretic behavior of the wake with varying Reynold's number has been discovered for the 45-deg base. An interaction between forebody boundary-layer state and wake flow and base pressures has been detected for higher slant angles.

  4. Change of measure up to a random time: Details

    OpenAIRE

    D\\"orte Kreher

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends results of Mortimer and Williams (1991) about changes of probability measure up to a random time under the assumptions that all martingales are continuous and that the random time avoids stopping times. We consider locally absolutely continuous measure changes up to a random time, changes of probability measure up to and after an honest time, and changes of probability measure up to a pseudo-stopping time. Moreover, we apply our results to construct a change of probability ...

  5. Detailed Measurement of Horizontal Groundwater Velocities Without a Borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, M.; Calje, R.; Van der Made, K. J.; Schaars, F.

    2014-12-01

    A new methodology has been developed to measure horizontal groundwater velocities in unconsolidated aquifers. Groundwater velocities are measured with a heat tracer experiment. Temperature is measured along fiber optic cables using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system. Fiber optic cables and a separate heating cable are pushed into the ground to depths of tens of meters. The groundwater is heated with the heating cable and the response is measured along several nearby fiber optic cables. The measured temperature responses are used to estimate the distribution of the magnitude and direction of the horizontal groundwater velocity over the entire depth of the cables. The methodology has been applied in a phreatic aquifer in the dune area along the Dutch coast. Significant variations of groundwater velocities with depth were observed even though the dune sand is relatively homogeneous. Major advantages of the new methodology are that the fiber optic cables are in direct contact with the groundwater and that the cables and installation are relatively cheap. No expensive boreholes are needed and consequently measurements are not affected by movement and mixing of water inside a borehole.

  6. Detailed Network Measurements Using Sparse Graph Counters: The Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yi; Prabhakar, Balaji

    2007-01-01

    Measuring network flow sizes is important for tasks like accounting/billing, network forensics and security. Per-flow accounting is considered hard because it requires that many counters be updated at a very high speed; however, the large fast memories needed for storing the counters are prohibitively expensive. Therefore, current approaches aim to obtain approximate flow counts; that is, to detect large elephant flows and then measure their sizes. Recently the authors and their collaborators have developed [1] a novel method for per-flow traffic measurement that is fast, highly memory efficient and accurate. At the core of this method is a novel counter architecture called "counter braids.'' In this paper, we analyze the performance of the counter braid architecture under a Maximum Likelihood (ML) flow size estimation algorithm and show that it is optimal; that is, the number of bits needed to store the size of a flow matches the entropy lower bound. While the ML algorithm is optimal, it is too complex to im...

  7. Measuring Shear Stress with a Microfluidic Sensor to improve Aerodynamic Efficiency Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Skin friction drag is directly proportional to the local shear stress of a surface and can be the largest factor in an aerodynamic body's total parasitic drag. The...

  8. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  9. Inflow Characterization and Aerodynamics Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.; Fingersh, L.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Post processing techniques for aerodynamic data acquired from a Siemens SWT-2.3-101 turbine have been developed and applied in this paper. The turbine is installed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as part of Cooperative Research And Development Agreement between Siemens Wind Power and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. The results indicate that the use of these corrections is essential for accurate analysis of the data. An example of local inflow angles, velocities, and inflow velocity over the rotor plane derived from measurements from a 5-hole probe is also presented. Finally the pressure measurements are used to characterize unsteady phenomenon, namely, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall on an inboard station. The results show that the rotational augmentation can considerably increase the attached flow regime compared to the 2D CFD results. The dynamic stall event was seen to significantly delay the stall. Furthermore, the nondimensionalized vortex convection derived from the dynamic stall event was found to agree well with results from others studies.

  10. Wing-kinematics measurement and aerodynamics in a small insect in hovering flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin; Sun, Mao

    2016-05-11

    Wing-motion of hovering small fly Liriomyza sativae was measured using high-speed video and flows of the wings calculated numerically. The fly used high wingbeat frequency (≈265 Hz) and large stroke amplitude (≈182°); therefore, even if its wing-length (R) was small (R ≈ 1.4 mm), the mean velocity of wing reached ≈1.5 m/s, the same as that of an average-size insect (R ≈ 3 mm). But the Reynolds number (Re) of wing was still low (≈40), owing to the small wing-size. In increasing the stroke amplitude, the outer parts of the wings had a "clap and fling" motion. The mean-lift coefficient was high, ≈1.85, several times larger than that of a cruising airplane. The partial "clap and fling" motion increased the lift by ≈7%, compared with the case of no aerodynamic interaction between the wings. The fly mainly used the delayed stall mechanism to generate the high-lift. The lift-to-drag ratio is only 0.7 (for larger insects, Re being about 100 or higher, the ratio is 1-1.2); that is, although the small fly can produce enough lift to support its weight, it needs to overcome a larger drag to do so.

  11. Simultaneous measurement of aerodynamic and heat transfer data for large angle blunt cones in hypersonic shock tunnel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Niranjan Sahoo; S Saravanan; G Jagadeesh; K P J Reddy

    2006-10-01

    Aerodynamic forces and fore-body convective surface heat transfer rates over a 60° apex-angle blunt cone have been simultaneously measured at a nominal Mach number of 5·75 in the hypersonic shock tunnel HST2. An aluminum model incorporating a three-component accelerometer-based balance system for measuring the aerodynamic forces and an array of platinum thin-film gauges deposited on thermally insulating backing material flush mounted on the model surface is used for convective surface heat transfer measurement in the investigations. The measured value of the drag coefficient varies by about $\\pm 6$% from the theoretically estimated value based on the modified Newtonian theory, while the axi-symmetric Navier–Stokes computations overpredict the drag coefficient by about 9%. The normalized values of measured heat transfer rates at 0° angle of attack are about 11% higher than the theoretically estimated values. The aerodynamic and the heat transfer data presented here are very valuable for the validation of CFD codes used for the numerical computation of flow fields around hypersonic vehicles.

  12. Coating thickness measurements on gas-borne nanoparticles by combined mobility and aerodynamic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Frederik, E-mail: frederik.weis@kit.edu; Seipenbusch, Martin; Kasper, Gerhard [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Mechanical Process Engineering and Mechanics (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    An on-line method is described and validated to measure the thickness of coatings on gas-borne nanoparticles. The method is essentially a tandem technique which measures the aerodynamic diameter of a particle twice—before and after coating—by a single-stage low-pressure impactor (SS-LPI) for the same mobility equivalent diameter preselected via differential mobility analyzer (DMA). A shell thickness is then derived from the change in effective particle density determined by the SS-LPI. The method requires a difference in mass density between carrier particle and coating material. Its theoretical sensitivity is shown to range between about 0.1 and 1 nm, depending on the density ratio. One advantage of this approach is that both DMA and SS-LPI are situated in series but downstream of the coating step, so as not to interfere with the coating process. The method was validated against transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements, using spherical silica–titania particles coated with conformal shells of molybdenum and bismuth oxide by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For such spherical particles, the agreement with TEM was excellent. The technique was able to provide layer thicknesses for sub-nanometer layers barely or not resolved by TEM. The paper also discusses the impact of ‘non-ideal’ phenomena such as the formation of doublet particles by coagulation, the effect of multiply charged particles, or the onset of homogeneous decomposition of the coating precursor. With supporting experimental data, it is shown that such phenomena can be interpreted reliably from certain features of the impactor penetration curve. The on-line method can thus be used for fast screening of process parameters and reliable process monitoring for gas-phase synthesis of composite nanopowders.

  13. MEASUREMENT OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A HANG-GLIDER-WING BY GROUND RUN TESTS USING A TEST VEHICLE

    OpenAIRE

    Hozumi, Koki; KOMODA, Masaki; Ono, Takatsugu; TSUKANO, Yukichi; 穂積, 弘毅; 古茂田, 真幸; 小野, 孝次; 塚野, 雄吉

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate longitudinal force and moment characteristics of a hang-glider-wing, ground run tests were conducted using a test vehicle. A hang-glider-wing was installed on a test vehicle using a six-components-balance for wind tunnel use. Aerodynamic force and moment were measrued during the vehicle run at various constant speeds. Geometrical twist distribution along the wing span was recorded as well. Measured force and moment data were corrected for possible ground effect and upw...

  14. Non-contact property measurements of liquid and supercooled ceramics with a hybrid electrostatic-aerodynamic levitation furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Paradis, Paul-Francois; 石川 毅彦; 依田 真一

    2005-01-01

    The use of an hybrid pressurized electrostatic-aerodynamic levitation furnace and procedures developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency overcame the contamination problems associated with the processing of ceramics under extreme temperature conditions. This made possible property measurements over wide temperature ranges that cover the superheated as well as the supercooled states. In this study, samples of various ceramics were levitated and their densities were found as a function ...

  15. Detailed assessment of diesel spray atomization models using visible and X-ray extinction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnotti, G. M.; Genzale, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    The physical mechanisms characterizing the breakup of a diesel spray into droplets are still unknown. This gap in knowledge has largely been due to the challenges of directly imaging this process or quantitatively measuring the outcomes of spray breakup, such as droplet size. Recent x-ray measurements by Argonne National Laboratory, utilized in this work, provide needed information about the spatial evolution of droplet sizes in selected regions of the spray under a range of injection pressures (50–150 MPa) and ambient densities (7.6–22.8 kg/m3) relevant for diesel operating conditions. Ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) measurements performed at the Advanced Photon Source are presented, which quantify Sauter mean diameters (SMD) within optically thick regions of the spray that are inaccessible by conventional droplet sizing measurement techniques, namely in the near-nozzle region, along the spray centerline, and within the core of the spray. To quantify droplet sizes along the periphery of the spray, a complementary technique is proposed and introduced, which leverages the ratio of path-integrated x-ray and visible laser extinction (SAMR) measurements to quantify SMD. The SAMR and USAXS measurements are then utilized to evaluate current spray models used for engine computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. We explore the ability of a carefully calibrated spray model, premised on aerodynamic wave growth theory, to capture the experimentally observed trends of SMD throughout the spray. The spray structure is best predicted with an aerodynamic primary and secondary breakup process that is represented with a slower time constant and larger formed droplet size than conventionally recommended for diesel spray models. Additionally, spray model predictions suggest that droplet collisions may not influence the resultant droplet size distribution along the spray centerline in downstream regions of the spray.

  16. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  17. Analysis of Detailed Energy Audits and Energy Use Measures of University Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Valančius

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explains the results of a detailed energy audit of the buildings of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University. Energy audits were performed with reference to the international scientific project. The article presents the methodology and results of detailed measurements of energy balance characteristics.Article in Lithuanian

  18. New rotation-balance apparatus for measuring airplane spin aerodynamics in the wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, G. N.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced rotation-balance apparatus has been developed for the Ames 12-ft pressure tunnel to study the effects of spin rate, angles of attack and sideslip, and, particularly, Reynolds number on the aerodynamics of fighter and general aviation aircraft in a steady spin. Angles of attack to 100 deg and angles of sideslip to 30 deg are possible with spin rates to 42 rad/sec (400 rpm) and Reynolds numbers to 30 million/m on fighter models with wing spans that are typically 0.7 m. A complete description of the new rotation-balance apparatus, the sting/balance/model assembly, and the operational capabilities is given.

  19. IEA joint action. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    In the period 1992-1997 the IEA Annex XIV `Field Rotor Aerodynamics` was carried out. Within its framework 5 institutes from 4 different countries participated in performing detailed aerodynamic measurements on full-scale wind turbines. The Annex was successfully completed and resulted in a unique database of aerodynamic measurements. The database is stored on an ECN disc (available through ftp) and on a CD-ROM. It is expected that this base will be used extensively in the development and validation of new aerodynamic models. Nevertheless at the end of IEA Annex XIV, it was recommended to perform a new IEA Annex due to the following reasons: In Annex XIV several data exchange rounds appeared to be necessary before a satisfactory result was achieved. This is due to the huge amount of data which had to be supplied, by which a thorough inspection of all data is very difficult and very time consuming; Most experimental facilities are still operational and new, very useful, measurements are expected in the near future; The definition of angle of attack and dynamic pressure in the rotating environment is less straightforward than in the wind tunnel. The conclusion from Annex XIV was that the uncertainty which results from these different definitions is still too large and more investigation in this field is required. (EG)

  20. Two dimensional unsteady aerodynamic force measurement by combination of complex model information under wind action; Sofuji no shindo modo joho wo riyoshita hiteijo kukiryoku suiteiho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H.; Miyata, T. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakajima, S. [Yokohama National Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Graduate School

    1996-04-21

    In wind resistance design of long span bridge, as the vibration found in long span bridges is very complicated, the estimation with high precision of the unsteady aerodynamic force acting on structures in complicated motion becomes more and more important. In this paper, as a problem to directly identify the parameter by using the observation hysteresis response obtained from wind tunnel test, the problems existing in combining the system identification into unsteady aerodynamic force estimation were indicated. Then, newly developed flexible method in extension relating to two dimensional aerodynamic force measurement concerning composite flutter was proposed. Using the wind tunnel test response observation data obtained from two dimensional rigid model, and from the estimated results of unsteady aerodynamic force, it is possible to obtain stable results in the relationship among the plural eigenvalues displaying identified vibration frequency and attenuation rate with the reduced wind velocity. As a new unsteady aerodynamic force measuring method, the method proposed by this study is considered to be very useful. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Economic gains from targeting measures based on detailed nitrate reduction maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Hansen, Anne Lausten

    2015-01-01

    is the highest. The purpose of the NiCA project has been to estimate the nitrate reduction potential in greater detail than before using a plot size of 1-25 ha. This article builds on these findings and presents the possible economic gains to the farmer when using this information. Targeted measures......-reduction map is used on 10 farms in the Norsminde Catchment near Århus, Denmark. The findings suggest that the average farm would gain approximately 100-150 DKK per ha per year from targeted measures as opposed to not knowing where to place the measures. The analysis indicates that the economic gain is higher...... than the costs of providing the detailed maps, which are estimated to be 40-60 DKK/ha/year. When reduction requirements are increased, the economic gains are higher. When combined with new measures like mini wetlands and early sowing, the economic advantage is increased further. The paper also shows...

  2. Economic gains from targeting measures based on detailed nitrate reduction maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Hansen, Anne Lausten

    2015-01-01

    is the highest. The purpose of the NiCA project has been to estimate the nitrate reduction potential in greater detail than before using a plot size of 1-25 ha. This article builds on these findings and presents the possible economic gains to the farmer when using this information. Targeted measures......-reduction map is used on 10 farms in the Norsminde Catchment near Århus, Denmark. The findings suggest that the average farm would gain approximately 100-150 DKK per ha per year from targeted measures as opposed to not knowing where to place the measures. The analysis indicates that the economic gain is higher...... than the costs of providing the detailed maps, which are estimated to be 40-60 DKK/ha/year. When reduction requirements are increased, the economic gains are higher. When combined with new measures like mini wetlands and early sowing, the economic advantage is increased further. The paper also shows...

  3. Supercontinuum generation in ZBLAN fibers—detailed comparison between measurement and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Agger, Christian; Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune; Steffensen, Henrik; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Carsten L.; Thøgersen, Jan; Keiding, Søren Rud; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison between modeling and experiments on supercontinuum (SC) generation in a commercial ZBLAN step-index fiber. Special emphasis is put on identifying accurate material parameters by incorporating measurements of the ZBLAN Raman gain, fiber dispersion, and loss. This identification of accurate parameters is of great importance to substantiate numerical simulations of SC generation in soft-glass fibers. Good agreement between measurement and simulation is obtained w...

  4. Development of measurement frame for detailed measurements of hysteresis cycles of ferromagnetic sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Yamin, Sumera

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the electromagnetic design of a new concept of permeameter capable of providing a measurement of the magnetic permeability of sheet strips up to 1.5 mm thick. The measurements are performed in DC. A specific feature of the device is its ability to follow the history of the excitation, representing an ideal tool to experimentally characterize hysteresis cycles as a function of the initial magnetization status of the material. The first preliminary results taken with measurement frame are also presented.

  5. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  6. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  7. NASP aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the critical aerodynamic technologies needed to support the development of a class of aircraft represented by the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The air-breathing, single-stage-to-orbit mission presents a severe challenge to all of the aeronautical disciplines and demands an extension of the state-of-the-art in each technology area. While the largest risk areas are probably advanced materials and the development of the scramjet engine, there remains a host of design issues and technology problems in aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and propulsion integration. The paper presents an overview of the most significant propulsion integration problems, and defines the most critical fluid flow phenomena that must be evaluated, defined, and predicted for the class of aircraft represented by the Aero-Space Plane.

  8. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  9. 复杂几何细节对增升装置气动性能影响研究%Study on Influence of Complex Geometry Details on the Aerodynamic Performance of High-lift System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱亚松; 白俊强; 李亚林; 周涛

    2012-01-01

    By numerical simulation, the influence of the main-wing root geometry details, wing-mounted engine nacelle, slat tracks and flap track fairings on the aerodynamic performance of a high-lift system is investigated. The results show that a separated low-power vortex is generated by the wing-root fairing which is left at the main-wing root when the slat is cut, and the aerodynamic performance of the lift system is damaged seriously by this vortex. Cutting most of the wing-root fairing as part of the slat can eliminate the condition needed to generate the separated low-power vortex. Remarkable decrease of the stall angle and maxim lift coefficient is caused by a large size wing-mounted engine nacelle. This is mainly because of the flow mechanism that a large space filled with low-speed fluid above the upper surface of the main wing is generated by the separated fluid which comes from the nacelle upper surface, pylon and the gaps between the pylon and slat. Strong vortices generated by the nacelle strake with proper shape and setting at proper positions can eliminate most of the low-speed fluid and recover part of the aerodynamic performance loss. Low-momentum wake flow generated by the slat tracks mixed with the boundary layer of the main wing causes the loss of the lift. Large fluid separation may be caused by the slat track at high angles of attack, which will result in a remarkable loss of the aerodynamic performance. The flap slot section area may be diminished as a result of the blockage effect of the large size geometry the of flap track fairings, which may cause the high speed flow of the flap slot to move faster, thus blowing away the separation flow on the flap surface.%采用数值模拟的方法研究了主翼翼根几何形状、翼吊发动机短舱、缝翼滑轨及襟翼滑轨舱等几何细节对增升装置气动性能的影响.研究结果表明:切割前缘缝翼时,将大部分翼根整流包留在主翼上会在大迎角下产生低能量的分离

  10. Restoring Detailed Geomagnetic and Environmental Information from Continuous Sediment Paleomagnetic Measurement through Optimised Deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, C.; Oda, H.

    2013-12-01

    The development of pass-through cryogenic magnetometers has greatly improved our efficiency in collecting paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data from continuous samples such as sediment half-core sections and u-channels. During a pass-through measurement, the magnetometer sensor response inevitably convolves with remanence of the continuous sample. The convolution process results in smoothed measurement and can seriously distort the paleomagnetic signal due to differences in sensor response along different measurement axes. Previous studies have demonstrated that deconvolution can effectively overcome the convolution effect of sensor response and improve the resolution for continuous paleomagnetic data. However, the lack of an easy-to-use deconvolution tool and the difficulty in accurately measuring the magnetometer sensor response have greatly hindered the application of deconvolution. Here, we acquire reliable estimate of sensor response of a pass-through cryogenic magnetometer at the Oregon State University by integrating repeated measurements of a magnetic point source. The point source is fixed in the center of a well-shaped polycarbonate cube with 5 mm edge length, and measured at every 1 mm position along a 40-cm interval while placing the polycarbonate cube at each of the 5 × 5 grid positions over a 2 × 2 cm2 area on the cross section. The acquired sensor response reveals that cross terms (i.e. response of pick-up coil for one axis to magnetic signal along other axes) that were often omitted in previous deconvolution practices are clearly not negligible. Utilizing the detailed estimate of magnetometer sensor response, we present UDECON, a graphical tool for convenient application of optimised deconvolution based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) minimization (Oda and Shibuya, 1996). UDECON directly reads a paleomagnetic measurement file, and allows user to view, compare, and save data before and after deconvolution. Optimised deconvolution

  11. Measurement fidelity of heart rate variability signal processing: the devil is in the details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrin, Denise C; McGrath, Jennifer J; Giovanniello, Sabrina; Poirier, Paul; Lambert, Marie

    2012-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a particularly valuable quantitative marker of the flexibility and balance of the autonomic nervous system. Significant advances in software programs to automatically derive HRV have led to its extensive use in psychophysiological research. However, there is a lack of systematic comparisons across software programs used to derive HRV indices. Further, researchers report meager details on important signal processing decisions making synthesis across studies challenging. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the measurement fidelity of time- and frequency-domain HRV indices derived from three predominant signal processing software programs commonly used in clinical and research settings. Triplicate ECG recordings were derived from 20 participants using identical data acquisition hardware. Among the time-domain indices, there was strong to excellent correspondence (ICC(avg)=0.93) for SDNN, SDANN, SDNNi, rMSSD, and pNN50. The frequency-domain indices yielded excellent correspondence (ICC(avg)=0.91) for LF, HF, and LF/HF ratio, except for VLF which exhibited poor correspondence (ICC(avg)=0.19). Stringent user-decisions and technical specifications for nuanced HRV processing details are essential to ensure measurement fidelity across signal processing software programs.

  12. Derivation and use of simple relationships between aerodynamic and optical particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple relationship, referred to as a mass conversion factor (MCF), is presented to convert optically based particle measurements to mass concentration. It is calculated from filter-based samples and optical particle counter (OPC) data on a daily or sample period basis. The MCF allows for greater ...

  13. Measurement of Plasma Density Produced in Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Active Aerodynamic Control with Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHANG Yi; XU Yan-Ji; LIN Bin; LI Yu-Tong; ZHU Jun-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an interferometer to investigate the changes of the refractive index caused by dielectric barrier discharge plasma.The electronic density of the plasma produced is measured and analyzed tentatively.The results show that density of the plasma increases linearly with exciting voltages.

  14. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  15. Aerodynamical errors on tower mounted wind speed measurements due to the presence of the tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Dahlberg, J.Aa. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Field measurements of wind speed from two lattice towers showed large differences for wind directions where the anemometers of both towers should be unaffected by any upstream obstacle. The wind speed was measured by cup anemometers mounted on booms along the side of the tower. A simple wind tunnel test indicates that the boom, for the studied conditions, could cause minor flow disturbances. A theoretical study, by means of simple 2D flow modelling of the flow around the mast, demonstrates that the tower itself could cause large wind flow disturbances. A theoretical study, based on simple treatment of the physics of motion of a cup anemometer, demonstrates that a cup anemometer is sensitive to velocity gradients across the cups and responds clearly to velocity gradients in the vicinity of the tower. Comparison of the results from the theoretical study and field tests show promising agreement. 2 refs, 8 figs

  16. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Huffman; Treutlein, B.; U. Pöschl

    2009-01-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure ...

  17. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to document the impact of incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the three-dimensional flow field and midspan loss and turning of a two-dimensional section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Aerodynamic measurements were obtained in a transonic linear cascade at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Steady-state data were obtained for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×105 to 2.12×106. Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan tota lpressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial-chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8deg and -36.7deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures.

  18. The Experimental Measurement of Aerodynamic Heating About Complex Shapes at Supersonic Mach Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Richard D.; Freeman, Delma C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 a wind tunnel test program was implemented to update the experimental data available for predicting protuberance heating at supersonic Mach numbers. For this test the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel was also used. The significant differences for this current test were the advances in the state-of-the-art in model design, fabrication techniques, instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities. This current paper provides a focused discussion of the results of an in depth analysis of unique measurements of recovery temperature obtained during the test.

  19. Evaluation of Rotor Structural and Aerodynamic Loads Using Measured Blade Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    German-Dutch wind tunnel (DNW) by a joint research team from the German DLR, the French ONERA , NASA Langley, DNW, and the U.S. Army [1]. The main...is based on the ONERA -EDLIN unsteady airfoil theory combined with C81 airfoil table look-up. For the vortex wake representation, the free wake...acknowledge the support of HART I partners – DLR, DNW, NASA, ONERA , and AFDD. The authors acknowledge Benton Lau who began the blade property measurement but

  20. Wind Turbine Rotor Simulation via CFD Based Actuator Disc Technique Compared to Detailed Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail Mahmoodi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a generalized Actuator Disc (AD is used to model the wind turbine rotor of the MEXICO experiment, a collaborative European wind turbine project. The AD model as a combination of CFD technique and User Defined Functions codes (UDF, so-called UDF/AD model is used to simulate loads and performance of the rotor in three different wind speed tests. Distributed force on the blade, thrust and power production of the rotor as important designing parameters of wind turbine rotors are focused to model. A developed Blade Element Momentum (BEM theory as a code based numerical technique as well as a full rotor simulation both from the literature are included into the results to compare and discuss. The output of all techniques is compared to detailed measurements for validation, which led us to final conclusions.

  1. A detailed procedure for measuring turbulent velocity fluctuations using constant-voltage anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Taifour, Abdelouahab; Weiss, Julien; Sadeghi, Atabak; Vétel, Jérôme; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2015-09-01

    A detailed procedure to use a constant-voltage anemometer (CVA) for the accurate measurement of turbulent flows is proposed. The procedure is based on the usual small-perturbation analysis of hot-wire signals. It consists in three steps: (1) the calibration of internal elements, required to estimate the two main electrical parameters of the CVA circuitry that are needed in the data analysis, (2) a flow calibration to relate the CVA output voltage and the hot-wire time constant to the flow velocity, and (3) a data-processing algorithm to recover the fluctuating flow quantities from the output voltage. The procedure is tested in two classical turbulent flows: a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer and a round jet. In both cases, the CVA results are shown to be essentially indistinguishable from the results obtained with a research-grade constant-temperature anemometer.

  2. Design of an instrument for real-time detection of bioaerosols using simultaneous measurement of particle aerodynamic size and intrinsic fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, P P; Ho, J; Quant, F R

    1997-04-01

    A prototype instrument has been constructed to measure individual airborne particles based on their aerodynamic size and their intrinsic fluorescence at selected excitation and emission wavelength bands. The instrument combines features of an aerodynamic particle sizing device with capabilities similar to those of a liquid flow cytometer. The goal of the instrument is to provide real-time data indicative of particle characteristics, and it is especially targeted to respond to bioaerosols from 0.5 to 10 micrometers (aerodynamic diameter) with intrinsic fluorescence exited at a wavelength of 325 nm and emitting from 420 to 580 nm. This size range covers individual airborne bacteria and bacteria clusters, and the fluorescence sensitivity is selected for biological molecules commonly found in cellular systems, for example, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] and riboflavin. Initial tests with nebulised Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG, ATCC 9372) spores have shown that, for both individual spores and spore clumps, a low level of fluorescence is detected from 17% of the particles. This detection percentage is on the same order as previous experiments that have measured viability of about 12% for mechanically dispersed BG spores (Ho and Fisher (1993) Defense Research Establishment Suffield Memorandum 1421) and suggests a need for further investigation into the possible relationship between the detected fluorescence and viability of bacterial spores.

  3. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Martin O L

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis W

  4. On the effect of accelerated winds on the wave growth through detailed laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Hernández, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    The possible influence of accelerated winds on air-water momentum fluxes is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide information corresponding to rather short non-dimensional fetch not previously reported. Wave evolution along the tank is determined through a series of wave gauges, and the wind-induced surface drift is obtained at one of the first measuring stations at the beginning of the tank. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Data from the constant high winds provided us with reference equilibrium conditions for at least 3 different wind speed. We, nevertheless, focus in the recordings while wind was being constantly accelerated expecting some contribution to the understanding of gustiness, the implied wind wave growth and the onset of surface drift. Wind-wave growth is observed to lag behind the wind stress signal, and furthermore, a two regime wind stress is noticed, apparently well correlated with a) the incipient growth and appearance of the first waves and b) the arrival of waves from the up-wind section of the tank. Results of non-dimensional wave energy as a function of non-dimensional fetch represent an extension of at least 2 decades shorter non-dimensional fetch to the wave growth curves typically found in the literature. The linear tendency of wave growth compares very well only when wind is reaching its maximum, while during the accelerated wind

  5. An Empirical Investigation Of Variability In Contrast-Detail Diagram Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Leh-Nien D.; Doi, Kunio; Ishida, Masamitsu; Metz, Charles E.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Kodera, Yoshie

    1983-12-01

    The contrast-detail (C-D) diagram has been used widely yin the evaluation of imaging systems including screen-film combinations, computed tomography, and digital radiography. Despite its apparent simplicity and efficiency in generating observer performance data, the relationship between this method and the more rigorous ROC or forced-choice procedures is not well understood. With a high-quality image processing/simulation system, we made images by superimposing digitally simulated square patterns on radiographic noise. We then studied the statistical variability in the C-D diagram due to within- and between-reader differences, and the effect of different numbers of image samples. Results indicate that the percent standard deviations due to each of these variations are about 10-20%. We also compared the visibility thresholds measured by the C-D diagram method and by an 18-alternative forced-choice (18AFC) procedure. Although the thresholds defined in these two methods are fundamentally different, we found that the threshold contrasts measured by the two procedures have similar values.

  6. Detailed Measurements of Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm J. Andrews, Ph.D.

    2004-12-14

    This project has two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. Also, studies of multi-layer mixing with the existing water channel facility. Over the last twelve (12) months there has been excellent progress, detailed in this report, with both tasks. As of December 10, 2004, the air/helium facility is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Currently experiments with air/helium up to Atwood numbers of 0.25 (the maximum is 0.75, but the highest Reynolds numbers are at 0.25) are being performed. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget, and we expect this to continue for 2005. With interest expressed from LLNL we have continued with initial condition studies using the water channel. This work has also progressed well, with one of the graduate Research Assistants (Mr. Nick Mueschke) visiting LLNL the past two summers to work with Dr. O. Schilling. Several journal papers are in preparation that describe the work. Two MSc.'s have been completed (Mr. Nick Mueschke, and Mr. Wayne Kraft, 12/1/03). Nick and Wayne are both pursuing Ph.D.s' funded by this DOE Alliances project. Presently three (3) Ph.D. graduate Research Assistants are supported on the project, and two (2) undergraduate Research Assistants. During the year two (2) journal papers and two (2) conference papers have been published, ten (10) presentations made at conferences, and three (3) invited presentations.

  7. Global Snow Mass Measurements and the Effect of Stratigraphic Detail on Inversion of Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; Davenport, Ian; Gurney, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Snow provides large seasonal storage of freshwater, and information about the distribution of snow mass as snow water equivalent (SWE) is important for hydrological planning and detecting climate change impacts. Large regional disagreements remain between estimates from reanalyses, remote sensing and modelling. Assimilating passive microwave information improves SWE estimates in many regions, but the assimilation must account for how microwave scattering depends on snow stratigraphy. Physical snow models can estimate snow stratigraphy, but users must consider the computational expense of model complexity versus acceptable errors. Using data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Cold Land Processes Experiment and the Helsinki University of Technology microwave emission model of layered snowpacks, it is shown that simulations of the brightness temperature difference between 19 and 37 GHz vertically polarised microwaves are consistent with advanced microwave scanning radiometer-earth observing system and special sensor microwave imager retrievals once known stratigraphic information is used. Simulated brightness temperature differences for an individual snow profile depend on the provided stratigraphic detail. Relative to a profile defined at the 10-cm resolution of density and temperature measurements, the error introduced by simplification to a single layer of average properties increases approximately linearly with snow mass. If this brightness temperature error is converted into SWE using a traditional retrieval method, then it is equivalent to ±13 mm SWE (7 % of total) at a depth of 100 cm. This error is reduced to ±5.6 mm SWE (3 % of total) for a two-layer model.

  8. From Agglomerates of Spheres to Irregularly Shaped Particles: Determination of Dynamic Shape Factors from Measurements of Mobility and Vacuum Aerodynamic Diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Cai, Yong; Imre, Dan G.

    2006-03-01

    With the advert of aerosol instrumentation it has become possible to simultaneously measure individual particle mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. For spherical particles these two diameters yield individual particle density. In contrast, assigning a physical meaning to the mobility or aerodynamic diameter of aspherical particles is not straightforward. This paper presents an experimental exploration of the effect of particle shape on the relationship between mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. We make measurements on systems of three types: 1) Agglomerates of spheres, for which the density and the volume are known; 2) Ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, succinic acid and lauric acid irregularly shaped particles of known density; and 3) Internally mixed particles, containing organics and ammonium sulfate, of unknown density and shape. For agglomerates of spheres we observed alignment effects in the DMA and report the first measurements of the dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in free molecular regime. We present here the first experimental determination of the DSF of ammonium sulfate particles. We find for ammonium sulfate particles a DSF that increases from 1.03 to 1.07 as particle mobility diameter increases from 160 nm to 500 nm. Three types of NaC1 particles were generated and characterized: nearly spherical particles with DSF of ~1.02; cubic with DSF that increases from 1.065 to 1.17 as particle mobility diameter increases from 200 nm to 900 nm; and compact agglomerates with DSF 1.3-1.4. Organic particles were found very nearly spherical. The data suggest that particles composed of binary mixtures of ammonium sulfate and succinic acid have lower dynamic shape factors than pure ammonium sulfate particles. However, for internally mixed ammonium sulfate and lauric acid particles we cannot distinguish between nearly spherical particles with low density and particles with DSF of 1.17.

  9. Improving wildlife habitat model performance: Sensitivity to the scale and detail of vegetation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lance Jay, Jr.

    Monitoring the impacts of resource use and landscape change on wildlife habitat over large areas is a daunting assignment. Forest land managers could benefit from linking the frequent decisions of resource use (timber harvesting) with a system of wildlife habitat accounting, but to date these tools are not widely available. I examined aspects of wildlife habitat modeling that: (in Chapter 2) could potentially lead to the establishment of wildlife habitat accounting within a resource decision support tool, (in Chapter 3) improve our theoretical understanding and methods to interpret the accuracy of wildlife habitat models, (in Chapter 4) explore the effects of vegetation classification systems on wildlife habitat model results, and (in Chapter 5) show that forest structural estimates from satellite imagery can improve potential habitat distribution models (GAP) for forest bird species. The majority of the analyses in this dissertation were done using a forest resource inventory developed by the State of Michigan (IFMAP). Paired with field vegetation and bird samples from sites across the lower peninsula of Michigan, we compared the relative accuracy of wildlife habitat relationship models built with plot-scale vegetation samples and stand-scale forest inventory maps. Recursive partitioning trees were used to build wildlife habitat models for 30 bird species. The habitat distribution maps from the Michigan Gap Analysis (MIGAP) were used as a baseline for comparison of model accuracy results. Both the plot and stand-scale measurements achieved high accuracy and there were few large differences between plot and stand-scale models for any individual species. Where the plot and stand-scale models were different, they tended to be species associated with mixed habitats. This may be evidence that scale of vegetation measurement has a larger influence on species associated with edges and ecotones. Habitat models that were built solely with land cover data were less accurate

  10. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  11. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature...

  12. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature...

  13. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-of...

  14. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis Wind...... Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method...

  15. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  16. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  17. Detail of photo 7903109 stack of superconducting cables in the modulus measuring device

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The picture shows an assembly of insulated superconducting cables of the type used in the Po dipole magnet inserted in the elastic modulus measuring device (photos 7903547X and 7903169) in order to measures its mechanical properties under azimuthal compression. See also 7903547X, 7903169, 8307552X.

  18. Technical notes: A detailed study for the provision of measurement uncertainty and traceability for goniospectrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peltoniemi, J.I.; Hakala, T.; Suomalainen, J.M.; Honkavaara, E.; Markelin, L.; Gritsevich, M.; Eskelinen, J.; Jaanson, P.; Ikonen, E.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement uncertainty and traceability of the Finnish Geodetic Institutes¿s field gonio-spectro-polarimeter FIGIFIGO have been assessed. First, the reference standard (Spectralon sample) was measured at the National Standard Laboratory of MIKES-Aalto. This standard was transferred to FGI¿s fie

  19. Nucleic Acid Base Analog FRET-Pair Facilitating Detailed Structural Measurements in Nucleic Acid Containing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börjesson, Karl; Preus, Søren; El-Sagheer, Afaf

    2009-01-01

    distances covering up to more than one turn of the DNA duplex. Importantly, we show that the rigid stacking of the two base analogs, and consequently excellent control of their exact positions and orientations, results in a high control of the orientation factor and hence very distinct FRET changes...... as the number of bases separating tCO and tC(nitro) is varied. A set of DNA strands containing the FRET-pair at wisely chosen locations will, thus, make it possible to accurately distinguish distance- from orientation-changes using FRET. In combination with the good nucleobase analog properties, this points...... toward detailed studies of the inherent dynamics of nucleic acid structures. Moreover, the placement of FRET-pair chromophores inside the base stack will be a great advantage in studies where other (biomacro)molecules interact with the nucleic acid. Lastly, our study gives possibly the first truly solid...

  20. Detailed report of the MuLan measurement of the positive muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi constant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, V.; Battu, S.; Carey, R. M.; Chitwood, D. B.; Crnkovic, J.; Debevec, P. T.; Dhamija, S.; Earle, W.; Gafarov, A.; Giovanetti, K.; Gorringe, T. P.; Gray, F. E.; Hartwig, Z.; Hertzog, D. W.; Johnson, B.; Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Kizilgul, S.; Kunkle, J.; Lauss, B.; Logashenko, I.; Lynch, K. R.; McNabb, R.; Miller, J. P.; Mulhauser, F.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Peng, Q.; Phillips, J.; Rath, S.; Roberts, B.L.; Webber, D. M.; Winter, P.; Wolfe, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis, and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100% polarized surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing plastic scintil

  1. Technique for direct measurement of thermal conductivity of elastomers and a detailed uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralphs, Matthew I.; Smith, Barton L.; Roberts, Nicholas A.

    2016-11-01

    High thermal conductivity thermal interface materials (TIMs) are needed to extend the life and performance of electronic circuits. A stepped bar apparatus system has been shown to work well for thermal resistance measurements with rigid materials, but most TIMs are elastic. This work studies the uncertainty of using a stepped bar apparatus to measure the thermal resistance and a tensile/compression testing machine to estimate the compressed thickness of polydimethylsiloxane for a measurement on the thermal conductivity, k eff. An a priori, zeroth order analysis is used to estimate the random uncertainty from the instrumentation; a first order analysis is used to estimate the statistical variation in samples; and an a posteriori, Nth order analysis is used to provide an overall uncertainty on k eff for this measurement method. Bias uncertainty in the thermocouples is found to be the largest single source of uncertainty. The a posteriori uncertainty of the proposed method is 6.5% relative uncertainty (68% confidence), but could be reduced through calibration and correlated biases in the temperature measurements.

  2. Detailed heat transfer measurements of impinging jet arrays issued from grooved surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lo May; Chang, Shyy Woei [Department of Marine Engineering National Kaohsiung Institute of Marine Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    Heat transfer augmentation of impinging jet-array with very small separation distances (S/D{sub j}<1) is attempted by using the grooved orifice plate through which the nozzles with different diameters are fitted. The combined effects of groove and nozzle-size distribution in an array have demonstrated considerable influences on heat transfers via their impacts on inter-jet reactions. With a specified coolant flow rate; the detailed heat transfer distributions over the impinging surfaces of three tested arrays are compared to reveal the optimal selections of separation distance and array configuration. Heat transfer modifications caused by varying jet Reynolds number (Re) and separation distance (S/D{sub j}) over the ranges of 1000{<=}Re{<=}4000 and 0.1{<=}S/D{sub j}{<=}8 are examined for each test array. In conformity with the experimentally revealed heat transfer physics, a regression-type analysis is performed to develop the correlations of spatially-averaged Nusselt numbers, which permit the individual and interactive effect of Re and S/D{sub j} to be evaluated. (authors)

  3. Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, School of Chemistry, NUI Galway (Ireland); Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Zinner, C.M. [Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Bourque, G. [Rolls-Royce Canada Limited, 9500 Cote de Liesse, Lachine, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

  4. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade at Low Inlet Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel-McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements obtained in a transonic linear cascade were used to assess the impact of large incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the 3-D flow field and midspan loss and turning of a 2-D section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Steady-state data were obtained for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 deg to -51.0 deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6). Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan total-pressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8 deg and -36.7 deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The measurements reflect strong secondary flows associated with the high aerodynamic loading levels at large positive incidence angles and an increase in loss levels with decreasing Reynolds number. The secondary flows decrease with negative incidence as the blade becomes unloaded. Transitional flow is admitted in this low inlet turbulence dataset, making it a challenging CFD test case. The dataset will be used to advance understanding of the aerodynamic

  5. Supercontinuum generation in ZBLAN fibers—detailed comparison between measurement and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Christian; Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune

    2012-01-01

    . This identification of accurate parameters is of great importance to substantiate numerical simulations of SC generation in soft-glass fibers. Good agreement between measurement and simulation is obtained when pumping both in the normal and anomalous dispersion regimes. © 2012 Optical Society of America...

  6. Measurement error in cross-country productivity comparisons : Is more detailed data better?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inklaar, R.; Timmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Relative productivity levels are used intensively in analyzing cross-country growth, but often based on crude measures and with little information on their reliability. In this paper, we provide a new framework to estimate purchasing power parities and productivity levels with associated standard er

  7. Detailed measurements and modelling of thermo active components using a room size test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of thermo active components based on prefabricated hollow core concrete decks. Recent years have given an increased awareness of the use of thermo active components as an alternative to mechanical cooling systems in office buildings. The investigation covers...... measurements in an office sized test facility with thermo active ceiling and floor as well as modelling of similar conditions in a computer program designed for analysis of building integrated heating and cooling systems. A method for characterizing the cooling capacity of thermo active components is described...... based on measurements of the energy balance of the thermo active deck. A cooling capacity of around 60W/m² at a temperature difference of 10K between room and fluid temperature has been found. It is also shown, that installing a lowered acoustic ceiling covering around 50% of the ceiling surface area...

  8. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform

    CERN Document Server

    Lentink, David; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on tethered experiments with robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for nonintrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is ...

  9. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  10. Combining Unsteady Blade Pressure Measurements and a Free-Wake Vortex Model to Investigate the Cycle-to-Cycle Variations in Wind Turbine Aerodynamic Blade Loads in Yaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutaz Elgammi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of the unsteady aerodynamic flow phenomenon on wind turbines is challenging and still subject to considerable uncertainty. Under yawed rotor conditions, the wind turbine blades are subjected to unsteady flow conditions as a result of the blade advancing and retreating effect and the development of a skewed vortical wake created downstream of the rotor plane. Blade surface pressure measurements conducted on the NREL Phase VI rotor in yawed conditions have shown that dynamic stall causes the wind turbine blades to experience significant cycle-to-cycle variations in aerodynamic loading. These effects were observed even though the rotor was subjected to a fixed speed and a uniform and steady wind flow. This phenomenon is not normally predicted by existing dynamic stall models integrated in wind turbine design codes. This paper couples blade pressure measurements from the NREL Phase VI rotor to a free-wake vortex model to derive the angle of attack time series at the different blade sections over multiple rotor rotations and three different yaw angles. Through the adopted approach it was possible to investigate how the rotor self-induced aerodynamic load fluctuations influence the unsteady variations in the blade angles of attack and induced velocities. The hysteresis loops for the normal and tangential load coefficients plotted against the angle of attack were plotted over multiple rotor revolutions. Although cycle-to-cycle variations in the angles of attack at the different blade radial locations and azimuth positions are found to be relatively small, the corresponding variations in the normal and tangential load coefficients may be significant. Following a statistical analysis, it was concluded that the load coefficients follow a normal distribution at the majority of blade azimuth angles and radial locations. The results of this study provide further insight on how existing engineering models for dynamic stall may be improved through

  11. Actuator line/Navier–Stokes computations for the MEXICO rotor: comparison with detailed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2012-01-01

    In the European collaborative MEXICO (Model Experiments in Controlled Conditions) project, a series of experiments was carried out on a 4.5 m diameter wind turbine rotor to validate numerical diagnostics tools. Here, some of the measured data are compared with computations of the combined actuator...... line/Navier–Stokes (AL/NS) model developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The AL/NS model was combined with a large eddy simulation technique and used to compute the flow past the MEXICO rotor in free air and in the DNW German‐Dutch wind tunnel for three commonly defined test cases at wind...

  12. Design details of Intelligent Instruments for PLC-free Cryogenic measurements, control and data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Chaudhary, Anup; Datta, T. S.; Maity, T.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic network for linear accelerator operations demand a large number of Cryogenic sensors, associated instruments and other control-instrumentation to measure, monitor and control different cryogenic parameters remotely. Here we describe an alternate approach of six types of newly designed integrated intelligent cryogenic instruments called device-servers which has the complete circuitry for various sensor-front-end analog instrumentation and the common digital back-end http-server built together, to make crateless PLC-free model of controls and data acquisition. These identified instruments each sensor-specific viz. LHe server, LN2 Server, Control output server, Pressure server, Vacuum server and Temperature server are completely deployed over LAN for the cryogenic operations of IUAC linac (Inter University Accelerator Centre linear Accelerator), New Delhi. This indigenous design gives certain salient features like global connectivity, low cost due to crateless model, easy signal processing due to integrated design, less cabling and device-interconnectivity etc.

  13. Some details on the method for measuring activity changes of neuronal populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalauzi Aleksandar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple, complex action potentials (AP and interspike recorded background activity (RBA were detected and extracted from 12 rat cerebellar cortical recordings. For each recording, an averaged simple action potential (SAP was formed. Fourier amplitude spectra of SAP and RBA were similar in all recordings. For one of the recordings, a series of RBA simulations (SBA was generated, superimposing random SAPs, varying the superposition frequency (fsup. Average Fourier amplitude, Amp(SBA, was calculated, in order to use Amp(SBA=f(fsup as a calibration line for reading fsup of RBA, which is a measure of the population activity. A probability distribution for SAP intensities was derived and a family of calibration lines constructed. As all lines were linear and parallel (slope S in log-log plots, a population activity change could be calculated as fsup2/fsup1=[Amp2(RBA/Amp(RBA]1/S.

  14. Economic gains fromtargeted measures related to non-point pollution in agriculture based on detailed nitrate reduction maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Hansen, Anne Lausten

    2016-01-01

    -loss level. Targeted measures are especially relevant where the subsurface N-reduction varies significantly within the same farm and national analyses have shown that a cost reduction of around 20–25% using targeted measures is likely. The analyses show an increasing potential with increasing variation in N...... and the average farm would gain approximately 14–21 €/ha/year from the targeted measures approach. The analysis indicates that the economic gain is greater than the costs of providing the detailed maps of 5–10 €/ha/year. When N-loss reduction requirements are increased, the economic gains are greater......From 1990 to 2003, Denmark reduced N-leaching from the root zone by 50%. However, more measures are required, and in recent years, the focus has been on how to differentiate measures in order to ensure that they are implemented where the effect on N-loss reductions per ha is the greatest...

  15. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  16. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  17. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Strain Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2017-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm.

  18. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs), which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h) with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol

  19. Unraveling of a detailed-balance-preserved quantum master equation and continuous feedback control of a measured qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, JunYan; Jin, Jinshuang; Wang, Shi-Kuan; Hu, Jing; Huang, Yixiao; He, Xiao-Ling

    2016-03-01

    We present a generic unraveling scheme for a detailed-balance-preserved quantum master equation applicable for stochastic point processes in mesoscopic transport. It enables us to investigate continuous measurement of a qubit on the level of single quantum trajectories, where essential correlations between the inherent dynamics of the qubit and detector current fluctuations are revealed. Based on this unraveling scheme, feedback control of the charge qubit is implemented to achieve a desired pure state in the presence of the detailed-balance condition. With sufficient feedback strength, coherent oscillations of the measured qubit can be maintained for arbitrary qubit-detector coupling. Competition between the loss and restoration of coherence entailed, respectively, by measurement back action and feedback control is reflected in the noise power spectrum of the detector's output. It is demonstrated unambiguously that the signal-to-noise ratio is significantly enhanced with increasing feedback strength and could even exceed the well-known Korotkov-Averin bound in quantum measurement. The proposed unraveling and feedback scheme offers a transparent and straightforward approach to effectively sustaining ideal coherent oscillations of a charge qubit in the field of quantum computation.

  20. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic...

  1. Aerodynamic structures and processes in rotationally augmented flow fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreck, S.J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Robinson, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    . Experimental measurements consisted of surface pressure data statistics used to infer sectional boundary layer state and to quantify normal force levels. Computed predictions included high-resolution boundary layer topologies and detailed above-surface flow field structures. This synergy was exploited...... to reliably identify and track pertinent features in the rotating blade boundary layer topology as they evolved in response to varying wind speed. Subsequently, boundary layer state was linked to above-surface flow field structure and used to deduce mechanisms; underlying augmented aerodynamic force...

  2. Phonatory aerodynamics in connected speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie L; Hirai, Ryoji; Dastolfo, Christina; Rosen, Clark A; Yu, Lan; Gillespie, Amanda I

    2015-12-01

    1) Present phonatory aerodynamic data for healthy controls (HCs) in connected speech; 2) contrast these findings between HCs and patients with nontreated unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP); 3) present pre- and post-vocal fold augmentation outcomes for patients with UVFP; 4) contrast data from patients with post-operative laryngeal augmentation to HCs. Retrospective, single-blinded. For phase I, 20 HC participants were recruited. For phase II, 20 patients with UVFP were age- and gender-matched to the 20 HC participants used in phase I. For phase III, 20 patients with UVFP represented a pre- and posttreatment cohort. For phase IV, 20 of the HC participants from phase I and 20 of the postoperative UVFP patients from phase III were used for direct comparison. Aerodynamic measures captured from a sample of the Rainbow Passage included: number of breaths, mean phonatory airflow rate, total duration of passage, inspiratory airflow duration, and expiratory airflow duration. The VHI-10 was also obtained pre- and postoperative laryngeal augmentation. All phonatory aerodynamic measures were significantly increased in patients with preoperative UVFP than the HC group. Patients with laryngeal augmentation took significantly less breaths, had less mean phonatory airflow rate during voicing, and had shorter inspiratory airflow duration than the preoperative UVFP group. None of the postoperative measures returned to HC values. Significant improvement in the Voice Handicap Index-10 scores postlaryngeal augmentation was also found. Methodology described in this study improves upon existing aerodynamic voice assessment by capturing characteristics germane to UVFP patient complaints and measuring change before and after laryngeal augmentation in connected speech. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Physical properties of core-concrete systems: Al2O3-ZrO2 molten materials measured by aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Yuji; Kargl, F.; Nakamori, F.; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    During a molten core-concrete interaction, molten oxides consisting of molten core materials (UO2 and ZrO2) and concrete (Al2O3, SiO2, CaO) are formed. Reliable data on the physical properties of the molten oxides will allow us to accurately predict the progression of a nuclear reactor core meltdown accident. In this study, the viscosities and densities of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x (x = 0.356 and 0.172) were measured using an aerodynamic levitation technique. The densities of two small samples were estimated from their masses and their volumes (calculated from recorded images of the molten samples). The droplets were forced to oscillate using speakers, and their viscosities were evaluated from the damping behaviors of their oscillations. The results showed that the viscosity of molten (ZrO2)x(Al2O3)1-x compared to that of pure molten Al2O3 is 25% lower for x = 0.172, while it is unexpectedly 20% higher for x = 0.356.

  4. Detailed Report of the MuLan Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Tishchenko, V; Carey, R M; Chitwood, D B; Crnkovic, J; Debevec, P T; Dhamija, S; Earle, W; Gafarov, A; Giovanetti, K; Gorringe, T P; Gray, F E; Hartwig, Z; Hertzog, D W; Johnson, B; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Kizilgul, S; Kunkle, J; Lauss, B; Logashenko, I; Lynch, K R; McNabb, R; Miller, J P; Mulhauser, F; Onderwater, C J G; Peng, Q; Phillips, J; Rath, S; Roberts, B L; Webber, D M; Winter, P; Wolfe, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100%-polarized, surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing, plastic scintillator array. The measurement employed two target arrangements; a magnetized ferromagnetic target with a ~4 kG internal magnetic field and a crystal quartz target in a 130 G external magnetic field. Approximately 1.6 x 10^{12} positrons were accumulated and together the data yield a muon lifetime of tau_{mu}(MuLan) = 2196980.3(2.2) ps (1.0 ppm), thirty times more precise than previous generations of lifetime experiments. The lifetime measurement yields the most accurate value of the Fermi constant G_F (MuLan) = 1.1663787(6) x 10^{-5} GeV^{-2} (0.5 ppm). It also enables new precision studies of weak interactions via lifetime measurements of muonic atoms.

  5. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-06

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  6. Aerodynamic noise characterization of a full-scale wind turbine through high-frequency surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterize the high-frequency surface pressure fluctuations on a full-scale wind turbine blade and in particular the influence of the atmospheric turbulence. As these fluctuations are highly correlated to the sources of both turbulent inflow noise...... wind turbine with a 80 m diameter rotor as well as measurements of an airfoil section tested in a wind tunnel. The turbine was extensively equipped in order to monitor the local inflow onto the rotating blades. Further a section of the 38 m long blade was instrumented with 50 microphones flush......-mounted relative to the blade surface. The measurements of surface pressure spectra are compared with the results of two engineering models for trailing edge noise and for turbulent inflow noise. The measured pressure fluctuations are related to the local inflow angle and are also compared to measurements...

  7. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  8. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  9. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs, including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs, which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm, but not for coarse particles (1–20 μm.

    Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August–December 2006, the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10−2 cm−3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m−3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10−2 cm−3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively.

    The observed number

  10. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs, including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs, which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm, but not for coarse particles (1–20 μm.

    Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August–December 2006, the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10−2 cm−3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 μg m−3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10−2 cm−3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively.

    The observed number concentrations and

  11. Application of detailed temperature profile measurements for improving data quality check by Bowen Ratio/Energy Balance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozníková, Gabriela; Fischer, Milan; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    Water plays a key role in the functionality and sustainability of the ecosystems. In the light of the predicted climate change research should be focused on the water cycle and its individual components. Apart from the runoff, the major component of the water balance which drives the water from the ecosystems is represented by the evapotranspiration (ET). One of the standard methods for measuring ET is Bowen Ratio/Energy Balance method (BREB). It is based on the assumption that the water vapour and heat are transported by identical eddies with equal efficiency. In fact, this basic premise is based on a more complicated Monin-Obukhov similarity theory that explains the relationship between the profiles of wind, temperature and water vapour in the surface layer of the atmosphere. When BREB method is used we assume that the profiles of temperature and air humidity are ideally logarithmic or at least consistent. However, as this method is usually based on the measurements of temperature and humidity in only two heights, it is difficult to verify this assumption. We therefore conducted a field experiment using 4m high measurement-mast with 20 thermocouples connected to data-logger for detailed measurement of air temperature profile above different covers, e.g. grassland, spring barley, poplar plantation. The main goal of our effort was to capture so called "kink" in the profile of the temperature and verify if the assumptions made by BREB hold under various weather conditions and over different canopies testing the basic requirements of the BREB method use. Finally we devised a technique improving data selection for subsequent ET calculation. This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248,PASED - project supported by Czech program KONTAKT II No. LH12037 "Development of models for assessment of abiotic stresses in selected bioenergy plants" and LD130030 project supporting COST action ES1106.

  12. Detailed measurement of the flow field in an axial transonic compressor; Mesure detaillee des ecoulements dans un compresseur axial transsonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradin, C.

    1998-07-01

    The prediction of flow structure and performances of an axial transonic compressor requires accurate solvers. Taking into account the complex flow patterns, it is important to validate codes by comparing it with experimental results. It is well understood that the availability of experimental data is fundamentally important for the improvement of the solvers. An axial transonic compressor has been fitted in the ERECA test facility of ONERA. The rotor of this compressor is isolated from stators. This experimental configuration allows to obtain a steady flow into the relative frame linked to the rotor. Due to this fact, experimental tests became easier because the basic phenomena are not hidden by mutual interactions rotor-stator. Measurements have been made in a test section far upstream the rotor, to provide the inlet conditions in the computation domain. Non intrusive and fast response measurement techniques allow to obtain the detailed flow structure in several test sections located in the rotor and far downstream it. All tests were carried out at four operating conditions of the compressor. Results provide good test cases for numerical prediction methods using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solvers. (author)

  13. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details ... Intra‑Operative Airway Management in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma having Reduction and ... Clinical Parameters and Challenges of Managing Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis in a ...

  14. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details. Log in or ... Difficult airway management in a patient with giant malignant goitre scheduled for thyroidectomy - case report ... Airway Management Dilemma in a Patient with Maxillofacial Injury

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details ... Sequencing for Batch Production in a Group Flowline Machine Shop ... Sampling Plans for Monitoring Quality Control Process at a Plastic Manufacturing Firm in Nigeria: A Case Study

  16. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  17. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-12-06

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-off, a dronefly increases its stroke amplitude gradually in the first 10-14 wingbeats and becomes airborne at about the 12th wingbeat. The aerodynamic force increases monotonously from zero to a value a little larger than its weight, and the leg force decreases monotonously from a value equal to its weight to zero, showing that the droneflies do not jump and only use aerodynamic force of flapping wings to lift themselves into the air. Compared with take-offs in insects in previous studies, in which a very large force (5-10 times of the weight) generated either by jumping legs (locusts, milkweed bugs and fruit flies) or by the 'fling' mechanism of the wing pair (butterflies) is used in a short time, the take-off in the droneflies is relatively slow but smoother.

  18. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  19. Low Speed Aerodynamics of the X-38 CRV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komerath, N. M.; Funk, R.; Ames, R. G.; Mahalingam, R.; Matos, C.

    1998-01-01

    This project was performed in support of the engineering development of the NASA X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)system. Wind tunnel experiments were used to visualize various aerodynamic phenomena encountered by the CRV during the final stages of descent and landing. Scale models of the CRV were used to visualize vortex structures above and below the vehicle, and in its wake, and to quantify their trajectories. The effect of flaperon deflection on these structures was studied. The structure and dynamics of the CRV's wake during the drag parachute deployment stage were measured. Regions of high vorticity were identified using surveys conducted in several planes using a vortex meter. Periodic shedding of the vortex sheets from the sides of the CRV was observed using laser sheet videography as the CRV reached high angles of attack during the quasi-steady pitch-up prior to parafoil deployment. Using spectral analysis of hot-film anemometer data, the Strouhal number of these wake fluctuations was found to be 0.14 based on the model span. Phenomena encountered in flight test during parafoil operation were captured in scale-model tests, and a video photogrammetry technique was implemented to obtain parafoil surface shapes during flight in the tunnel. Forces on the parafoil were resolved using tension gages on individual lines. The temporal evolution of the phenomenon of leading edge collapse was captured. Laser velocimetry was used to demonstrate measurement of the porosity of the parafoil surface. From these measurements, several physical explanations have been developed for phenomena observed at various stages of the X-38 development program. Quantitative measurement capabilities have also been demonstrated for continued refinement of the aerodynamic technologies employed in the X-38 project. Detailed results from these studies are given in an AIAA Paper, two slide presentations, and other material which are given on a Web-based archival resource. This is the Digital

  20. Analysis of Common Aerodynamic Measures for Wind Resistant Design of Long Span Bridges%大跨度桥梁抗风设计常用气动措施分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡长灿; 詹昊

    2015-01-01

    为提高大跨度桥梁的抗风性能,对该类桥梁抑制涡激共振和提高颤振稳定性的常用气动措施及其机理进行初步分析。桥梁涡激共振和颤振稳定性与旋涡的产生和漂移有关,因此气动优化的一般原则是改善结构迎风面和背风面的气动外形以延缓或避免流动分离、减小分离涡尺度、阻碍旋涡漂移路径。抑制桥梁涡激振动一般采用设置倒角、安装风嘴和优化风嘴形状、安装导流板等气动措施;提高桥梁颤振稳定性一般采用安装风嘴和优化风嘴形状、安装稳定板和气动翼板等气动措施。研究表明采用气动措施后,大跨度桥梁的气动性能得到改善。%To improve the wind resistant performance of long span bridges ,the common aero‐dynamic measures and their mechanism for suppressing the vortex‐induced resonance and for im‐proving the flutter stability of the bridges are preliminarily analyzed .Since the vortex‐induced res‐onance and flutter stability of the bridges are correlated with the vortex generation and vortex drift ,the general principle of optimizing the aerodynamic measures is to improve the windward and leeward structural aerodynamic profiles in order to delay or avoid the flow separation ,reduce the separated vortex scales and impede the vortex drift paths .As regards the aerodynamic measures for suppressing the vortex‐induced vibration of the bridges ,the rounded corners and wind fairings are generally installed ,the shapes of the wind fairings are optimized and the guide vanes are in‐stalled while as regards the measures for improving the flutter stability ,the wind fairings are gen‐erally installed ,the shapes of the wind fairings are optimized and the stabilizers and aerodynamic wing plates are installed .Researches indicate that the aerodynamic performance of the long span bridges can be improved after these measures have been taken .

  1. Detailed off-gas measurements for improved modelling of the aeration performance at the WWTP of Eindhoven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerlinck, Y; Bellandi, G; Amaral, A; Weijers, S; Nopens, I

    2016-01-01

    At wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the aerobic conversion processes in the bioreactor are driven by the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO). Within these conversion processes, the oxygen transfer is a rate limiting step as well as being the largest energy consumer. Despite this high importance, WWTP models often lack detail on the aeration part. An extensive measurement campaign with off-gas tests was performed at the WWTP of Eindhoven to provide more information on the performance and behaviour of the aeration system. A high spatial and temporal variability in the oxygen transfer efficiency was observed. Applying this gathered system knowledge in the aeration model resulted in an improved prediction of the DO concentrations. Moreover, an important consequence of this was that ammonium predictions could be improved by resetting the ammonium half-saturation index for autotrophs to its default value. This again proves the importance of balancing sub-models with respect to the need for model calibration as well as model predictive power.

  2. How stealthy are PEG-PLA nanoparticles? An NIR in vivo study combined with detailed size measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schädlich, Andreas; Rose, Cornelia; Kuntsche, Judith;

    2011-01-01

    Detailed in vivo and ex vivo analysis of nanoparticle distribution, accumulation and elimination processes were combined with comprehensive particle size characterizations.......Detailed in vivo and ex vivo analysis of nanoparticle distribution, accumulation and elimination processes were combined with comprehensive particle size characterizations....

  3. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and operate a wind farm optimally it is necessary to know in detail how the wind behaves and interacts with the turbines in a farm. This not only requires knowledge about meteorology, turbulence and aerodynamics, but it also requires access to powerful computers and efficient...... software. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence was established in 2010 in order to create a world-leading cross-disciplinary flow center that covers all relevant disciplines within wind farm meteorology and aerodynamics....

  4. Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    Scientific esearch, EUropean Office of JAeropace Research and Develonment. /E 0-2 have required much labour and incurred the risk of introducing errors... influences the oscillatory atnd derivative pressures. Components p’/#0 and p"/#0 are, in goneral,-depende’it on the frequency of oscillation, and their...reference ooordinate * oad to provide a tim-varying vlectrical signal which is used as a phase reference for hormonic analyals. Wben the model cannot

  5. The aerodynamic cost of head morphology in bats: maybe not as bad as it seems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Vanderelst

    Full Text Available At first sight, echolocating bats face a difficult trade-off. As flying animals, they would benefit from a streamlined geometric shape to reduce aerodynamic drag and increase flight efficiency. However, as echolocating animals, their pinnae generate the acoustic cues necessary for navigation and foraging. Moreover, species emitting sound through their nostrils often feature elaborate noseleaves that help in focussing the emitted echolocation pulses. Both pinnae and noseleaves reduce the streamlined character of a bat's morphology. It is generally assumed that by compromising the streamlined charactered of the geometry, the head morphology generates substantial drag, thereby reducing flight efficiency. In contrast, it has also been suggested that the pinnae of bats generate lift forces counteracting the detrimental effect of the increased drag. However, very little data exist on the aerodynamic properties of bat pinnae and noseleaves. In this work, the aerodynamic forces generated by the heads of seven species of bats, including noseleaved bats, are measured by testing detailed 3D models in a wind tunnel. Models of Myotis daubentonii, Macrophyllum macrophyllum, Micronycteris microtis, Eptesicus fuscus, Rhinolophus formosae, Rhinolophus rouxi and Phyllostomus discolor are tested. The results confirm that non-streamlined facial morphologies yield considerable drag forces but also generate substantial lift. The net effect is a slight increase in the lift-to-drag ratio. Therefore, there is no evidence of high aerodynamic costs associated with the morphology of bat heads.

  6. Cable Aerodynamic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth

    to a categorization of the different control technics together with an identification of two key mechanisms for reduction of the design drag force. During this project extensive experimental work examining the aerodynamics of the currently used cable surface modifications together with new innovative proposals have...

  7. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  8. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  9. Axial Compressor Stall and Surge Prediction by Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hönen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with experimental investigations and analyses of unsteady pressure distributions in different axial compressors. Based on measurements in a single stage research compressor the influence of increasing aerodynamic load onto the pressure and velocity fluctuations is demonstrated. Detailed measurements in a 14-stage and a 17-stage gas turbine compressor are reported. For both compressors parameters could be found which are clearly influenced by the aerodynamic load.

  10. An aerodynamic study on flexed blades for VAWT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Daniel; Farrugia, Russell; Sant, Tonio; Mollicone, Pierluigi

    2014-12-01

    There is renewed interest in aerodynamics research of VAWT rotors. Lift type, Darrieus designs sometimes use flexed blades to have an 'egg-beater shape' with an optimum Troposkien geometry to minimize the structural stress on the blades. While straight bladed VAWTs have been investigated in depth through both measurements and numerical modelling, the aerodynamics of flexed blades has not been researched with the same level of detail. Two major effects may have a substantial impact on blade performance. First, flexing at the equator causes relatively strong trailing vorticity to be released. Secondly, the blade performance at each station along the blade is influenced by self-induced velocities due to bound vorticity. The latter is not present in a straight bladed configuration. The aim of this research is to investigate these effects in relation to an innovative 4kW wind turbine concept being developed in collaboration with industry known as a self-adjusting VAWT (or SATVAWT). The approach used in this study is based on experimental and numerical work. A lifting line free-wake vortex model was developed. Wind tunnel power and hot-wire velocity measurements were performed on a scaled down, 60cm high, three bladed model in a closed wind tunnel. Results show a substantial axial wake induction at the equator resulting in a lower power generation at this position. This induction increases with increasing degree of flexure. The self-induced velocities caused by blade bound vorticity at a particular station was found to be relatively small.

  11. Survey of research on unsteady aerodynamic loading of delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, H.; Vaneck, T.; Katz, J.; Jarrah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    For aeronautical applications, there has been recent interest in accurately determining the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by low-aspect-ratio wings performing transient maneuvers which go to angles of attack as high as 90 deg. Focusing on the delta planform with sharp leading edges, the paper surveys experimental and theoretical investigations dealing with the associated unsteady flow phenomena. For maximum angles above a value between 30 and 40 deg, flow details and airloads are dominated by hysteresis in the 'bursting' instability of intense vortices which emanate from the leading edge. As examples of relevant test results, force and moment histories are presented for a model series with aspect ratios 1, 1.5 and 2. Influences of key parameters are discussed, notably those which measure unsteadiness. Comparisons are given with two theories: a paneling approximation that cannot capture bursting but clarifies other unsteady influences, and a simplified estimation scheme which uses measured bursting data.

  12. Survey of research on unsteady aerodynamic loading of delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, H.; Vaneck, T.; Katz, J.; Jarrah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    For aeronautical applications, there has been recent interest in accurately determining the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by low-aspect-ratio wings performing transient maneuvers which go to angles of attack as high as 90 deg. Focusing on the delta planform with sharp leading edges, the paper surveys experimental and theoretical investigations dealing with the associated unsteady flow phenomena. For maximum angles above a value between 30 and 40 deg, flow details and airloads are dominated by hysteresis in the 'bursting' instability of intense vortices which emanate from the leading edge. As examples of relevant test results, force and moment histories are presented for a model series with aspect ratios 1, 1.5 and 2. Influences of key parameters are discussed, notably those which measure unsteadiness. Comparisons are given with two theories: a paneling approximation that cannot capture bursting but clarifies other unsteady influences, and a simplified estimation scheme which uses measured bursting data.

  13. STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF VAN-BODY TRUCKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the van-body truck were studied by means of theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiments. The concept of critical length was presented for the van-body truck in wind tunnel experiments, the proper critical Reynolds number was found and the effects of ground parameters in ground effect simulation on the aerodynamic measurements were examined. It shows that two structure parameters, van height and the gap between the cab and the van, can obviously influence the aerodynamic characteristics, and the additional aerodynamic devices, the wind deflector and the vortex regulator in the rear, can considerably reduce the aerodynamic drag of the van-body truck. Numerical simulations provided rich information of the flow fields around the van-body trucks.

  14. Wind-tunnel/flight correlation study of aerodynamic characteristics of a large flexible supersonic cruise airplane (XB-70-1). 3: A comparison between characteristics predicted from wind-tunnel measurements and those measured in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, H. H.; Peterson, J. B., Jr.; Daugherty, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A program was undertaken by NASA to evaluate the accuracy of a method for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of large supersonic cruise airplanes. This program compared predicted and flight-measured lift, drag, angle of attack, and control surface deflection for the XB-70-1 airplane for 14 flight conditions with a Mach number range from 0.76 to 2.56. The predictions were derived from the wind-tunnel test data of a 0.03-scale model of the XB-70-1 airplane fabricated to represent the aeroelastically deformed shape at a 2.5 Mach number cruise condition. Corrections for shape variations at the other Mach numbers were included in the prediction. For most cases, differences between predicted and measured values were within the accuracy of the comparison. However, there were significant differences at transonic Mach numbers. At a Mach number of 1.06 differences were as large as 27 percent in the drag coefficients and 20 deg in the elevator deflections. A brief analysis indicated that a significant part of the difference between drag coefficients was due to the incorrect prediction of the control surface deflection required to trim the airplane.

  15. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  16. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  17. Computational electromagnetic-aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Joseph J S

    2016-01-01

    Presents numerical algorithms, procedures, and techniques required to solve engineering problems relating to the interactions between electromagnetic fields, fluid flow, and interdisciplinary technology for aerodynamics, electromagnetics, chemical-physics kinetics, and plasmadynamics This book addresses modeling and simulation science and technology for studying ionized gas phenomena in engineering applications. Computational Electromagnetic-Aerodynamics is organized into ten chapters. Chapter one to three introduce the fundamental concepts of plasmadynamics, chemical-physics of ionization, classical magnetohydrodynamics, and their extensions to plasma-based flow control actuators, high-speed flows of interplanetary re-entry, and ion thrusters in space exploration. Chapter four to six explain numerical algorithms and procedures for solving Maxwell’s equation in the time domain for computational electromagnetics, plasma wave propagation, and the time-dependent c mpressible Navier-Stokes equation for aerodyn...

  18. Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya R

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relati...

  19. Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-06

    Report: Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) T. C. Adamson, Jr. and R. IA. Howe 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...6] pulse applied. If the Mxyz system as shown is Fig. 3 r 3. , is used, then we have R21= k costo -t4 ksin yot 1 6r= ro 1 (4) -- (6k 2 - 5 -30k 2 sin

  20. Investigation of the Aerodynamic Character in Turbine Cascades with Aft-loaded Profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周逊; 韩万金

    2004-01-01

    For evaluate the aerodynamic character of the turbine cascades which have the aft-loaded profile, the experimental investigation was carried out on the low speed annular wind tunnel. And the detailed measurements of the aerodynamic parameters were made from upstream to downstream of the two type turbine cascades, the one is the conventional straight blades cascade, the other is the curved blades cascades. The static pressure distributions on the endwall and the blade surface were also carried out. The influence of the aft-loaded profile and the curved blade on the development of loss and the pressure distribution was discussed, and analyses the different flow phenomena and mechanism in two type turbine cascades.

  1. Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Symmetric NACA Section with Simulated Ice Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, N.; Cervantes, M. J.; Trivedi, C.; Aidanpää, Jan-Olof

    2016-09-01

    To develop a numerical model of icing on wind turbine blades, a CFD simulation was conducted to investigate the effect of critical ice accretions on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.610 m chord NACA 0011 airfoil section. Aerodynamic performance coefficients and pressure profile were calculated and compared with the available measurements for a chord Reynolds number of 1.83x106. Ice shapes were simulated with flat plates (spoiler-ice) extending along the span of the wing. Lift, drag, and pressure coefficients were calculated in zero angle of attack through the steady state and transient simulations. Different approaches of numerical studies have been applied to investigate the icing conditions on the blades. The simulated separated flow over the sharp spoilers is challenging and can be seen as a worst test case for validation. It allows determining a reliable strategy to simulate real ice shapes [1] for which the detailed validation cannot easily be provided.

  2. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of cream formulation of fenugreek seed extract on some mechanical parameters of ... Little marvel) exposed to climate change in Riyadh city, KSA ... The status of rabies in Ethiopia: A retrospective record review ... Magnitude and variation of traffic air pollution as measured by CO in the City of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  3. Aerodynamic control in compressible flow using microwave driven discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Brendan

    A new aerodynamic control scheme based on heating of the free stream flow is developed. The design, construction, and operation of a unique small scale wind tunnel to perform experiments involving this control scheme is detailed. Free stream heating is achieved by means of microwave driven discharges, and the resulting flow perturbations are used to alter the pressure distribution around a model in the flow. The experimental facility is also designed to allow the injection of an electron beam into the free stream for control of the discharge. Appropriate models for the fluid flow and discharge physics are developed, and comparisons of calculations based on those models are made with experimental results. The calculations have also been used to explore trends in parameters beyond the range possible in the experiments. The results of this work have been (1) the development of an operating facility capable of supporting free stream heat addition experiments in supersonic flow, (2) the development of a compatible instrumented model designed to make lift and drag measurements in a low pressure, high electrical noise environment, (3) a theoretical model to predict the change in breakdown threshold in the presence of an electron beam or other source of ionization, and (4) successful demonstration of aerodynamic control using free stream heat addition.

  4. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  5. Aerodynamic data of space vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The capacity and quality of the atmospheric flight performance of space flight vehicles is characterized by their aerodynamic data bases. A complete aerodynamic data base would encompass the coefficients of the static longitudinal and lateral motions and the related dynamic coefficients. In this book the aerodynamics of 27 vehicles are considered. Only a few of them did really fly. Therefore the aerodynamic data bases are often not complete, in particular when the projects or programs were more or less abruptly stopped, often due to political decisions. Configurational design studies or the development of demonstrators usually happen with reduced or incomplete aerodynamic data sets. Therefore some data sets base just on the application of one of the following tools: semi-empirical design methods, wind tunnel tests, numerical simulations. In so far a high percentage of the data presented is incomplete and would have to be verified. Flight mechanics needs the aerodynamic coefficients as function of a lot of var...

  6. Wind tunnel test on aerodynamic characteristic of CRH2 train based on pressure measure ment methodology%基于测压方法的 CRH2列车气动特性风洞试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹云峰; 何旭辉; 史康; 周佳; 谭立新

    2015-01-01

    针对风洞试验中通过天平测量列车气动力存在的缺陷,尝试通过测压积分获得列车气动力以提高脉动气动力测试精度,并对来流均匀的侧风作用下的 CRH2列车非定常空气动力特性进行分析。研究结果表明,当列车表面风压测点数量适当时,测压积分可获得与天平测力精度相当的定常气动力;即使是在均匀来流作用下,列车受到的气动力也表现出明显的非定常特性,极大气动力约为均值的1.7倍;0~10 Hz 低频段最大谱值发生在90°风向角,最小谱值则发生在0°风向角,10 Hz 以上高频段谱值分布情况则恰好相反,当风向角小于60°时,0~10 Hz 低频段能量占总能量的比重小于50%。%Due to the shortcomings in the aerodynamic forces measurements with a dynamometer for high speed train,a new methodology based on pressure measurements has been developed in order to improve the testing ac-curacy of fluctuating aerodynamic forces.The unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of CRH2 train under uniform cross wind were analyzed.The test results indicate that when the pressure taps distribution is appropriate and dense enough,pressure complementary calculations can also give the density of steady aerodynamic forces as ac-curately as the force test.In addition,the aerodynamic forces on the train have strong unsteady characteristics e-ven under uniform cross wind,and extreme aerodynamic forces are about 1.7 times of their mean values.The maximum spectral value in the low frequency range between 0 and 10 Hz occurs at 90°yaw angle,and the mini-mum value is found at 0°yaw angle.While the spectral value distributions in the high frequency greater than 10 Hz are just contrary.When the yaw angle is less than 60°,the proportion of low frequency energy in total is less than 50%.

  7. Mechanics and aerodynamics of insect flight control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G K

    2001-11-01

    Insects have evolved sophisticated fight control mechanisms permitting a remarkable range of manoeuvres. Here, I present a qualitative analysis of insect flight control from the perspective of flight mechanics, drawing upon both the neurophysiology and biomechanics literatures. The current literature does not permit a formal, quantitative analysis of flight control, because the aerodynamic force systems that biologists have measured have rarely been complete and the position of the centre of gravity has only been recorded in a few studies. Treating the two best-known insect orders (Diptera and Orthoptera) separately from other insects, I discuss the control mechanisms of different insects in detail. Recent experimental studies suggest that the helicopter model of flight control proposed for Drosophila spp. may be better thought of as a facultative strategy for flight control, rather than the fixed (albeit selected) constraint that it is usually interpreted to be. On the other hand, the so-called 'constant-lift reaction' of locusts appears not to be a reflex for maintaining constant lift at varying angles of attack, as is usually assumed, but rather a mechanism to restore the insect to pitch equilibrium following a disturbance. Differences in the kinematic control mechanisms used by the various insect orders are related to differences in the arrangement of the wings, the construction of the flight motor and the unsteady mechanisms of lift production that are used. Since the evolution of insect flight control is likely to have paralleled the evolutionary refinement of these unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms, taxonomic differences in the kinematics of control could provide an assay of the relative importance of different unsteady mechanisms. Although the control kinematics vary widely between orders, the number of degrees of freedom that different insects can control will always be limited by the number of independent control inputs that they use. Control of the moments

  8. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR CALCULATING FAN AERODYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dostal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results obtained between 2010 and 2014 in the field of fan aerodynamics at the Department of Composite Technology at the VZLÚ aerospace research and experimental institute in Prague – Letnany. The need for rapid and accurate methods for the preliminary design of blade machinery led to the creation of a mathematical model based on the basic laws of turbomachine aerodynamics. The mathematical model, the derivation of which is briefly described below, has been encoded in a computer programme, which enables the theoretical characteristics of a fan of the designed geometry to be determined rapidly. The validity of the mathematical model is assessed continuously by measuring model fans in the measuring unit, which was developed and manufactured specifically for this purpose. The paper also presents a comparison between measured characteristics and characteristics determined by the mathematical model as the basis for a discussion on possible causes of measured deviations and calculation deviations.

  9. Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis of space mission vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Viviani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Presenting an up-to-date view on the most important space vehicle configurations, this book contains detailed analyses for several different type of space mission profiles while considering important factors such as aerodynamic loads, aerodynamic heating, vehicle stability and landing characteristics. With that in mind, the authors provide a detailed overview on different state-of-the-art themes of hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, and consider different space vehicle shapes useful for different space mission objectives. These include: ·        Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) ·        Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) ·        Sample Return Vehicle (SRV) ·        Flying Test Bed (FTB). Throughout Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Analysis of Space Mission Vehicles many examples are given, with detailed computations and results for the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of all such configurations. Moreover, a final chapter on future launchers is provided and an Appendix on...

  10. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Imanol; Aguado, Maite

    2013-06-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the ratio between the first two coefficients in the Fourier series decomposition of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force.

  11. Measurements of the Ice Water Content of Cirrus in the Tropics and Subtropics. I; Instrument Details and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D.; Pittman, J. V.; Allen, N.; Demusz, J.; Greenberg, M.; Rivero, M.; Anderson, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe an instrument mounted in a pallet on the NASA WB-57 aircraft that is designed to measure the sum of gas phase and solid phase water, or total water, in cirrus clouds. Using an isokinetic inlet, a 600-watt heater mounted directly in the flow, and Lyman-alpha photofragment fluorescence technique for detection, accurate measurements of total water have been made over almost three orders of magnitude. Isokinetic flow is achieved with an actively controlled roots pump by referencing aircraft pressure, temperature, and true air speed, together with instrument flow velocity, temperature, and pressure. During CRYSTAL FACE, the instrument operated at duct temperatures sufficiently warm to completely evaporate particles up to 150 microns diameter. In flight diagnostics, intercomparison with water measured by absorption in flight, as well as intercomparisons in clear air with water vapor measured by the Harvard water vapor instrument and the JPL infrared tunable diode laser hygrometer validate the detection sensitivity of the instrument and illustrate minimal hysteresis from instrument surfaces. The simultaneous measurement of total water and water vapor in cirrus clouds yields their ice water content.

  12. Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer/Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, D

    2010-06-18

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) is a single instrument that cycles through a series of complementary measurements of the physical properties of size-resolved submicron particles. In 2008, the TDMA was augmented through the addition of an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), which extends the upper limit of the measured size distribution into the supermicron range. These two instruments are operated in parallel, but because they are controlled by a common computer and because the size distributions measured by the two are integrated in the produced datastreams, they are described together here. Throughout the day, the TDMA sequentially measures submicron aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopic growth distributions. More specifically, the instrument is operated as a scanning DMA to measure size distributions and as a TDMA to measure size-resolved hygroscopicity. A typical measurement sequence requires roughly 45 minutes. Each morning additional measurements are made of the relative humidity (RH) dependent hygroscopicity and temperature-dependent volatility of size-resolved particles. When the outside temperature and RH are within acceptable ranges, the hydration state of size-resolved particles is also characterized. The measured aerosol distributions complement the array of aerosol instruments in the Aerosol Observing System (AOS) and provide additional details of the light-scattering and cloud-nucleating characteristics of the aerosol.

  13. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  14. The Mechanism of Aerodynamic Hysteresis for Sinusoidally Oscillating Delta Wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄国创; 王玉明; 曹桂兴

    1994-01-01

    An unsteady model of vortex system is developed to simulate the phenomena of aerodynamic hysteresis of sinusoidally oscillating delta wings.The dynamic behavior of leading-edge separation vortices simulated by the present method is in qualitative agreement with that of flow visualization by Gad-el-Hak and Ho.The calculated lift hysteresis loops are in quantitative agreement with the force measurements in the tunnel.The aerodynamic mechanism of the hysteresis phenomena is further investigated by the present method.

  15. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    OpenAIRE

    Pindado Carrion, Santiago; Pérez Sarasola, Imanol; Aguado Roca, Maite

    2013-01-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the r...

  16. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....

  17. Aerodynamic and Performance Behavior of a Three-Stage High Efficiency Turbine at Design and Off-Design Operating Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the aerodynamic and performance behavior of a three-stage high pressure research turbine with 3-D curved blades at its design and off-design operating points. The research turbine configuration incorporates six rows beginning with a stator row. Interstage aerodynamic measurements were performed at three stations, namely downstream of the first rotor row, the second stator row, and the second rotor row. Interstage radial and circumferential traversing presented a detailed flow picture of the middle stage. Performance measurements were carried out within a rotational speed range of 75% to 116% of the design speed. The experimental investigations have been carried out on the recently established multi-stage turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory, TPFL, of Texas A&M University.

  18. Aerodynamics of Small Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas J.

    In this review we describe the aerodynamic problems that must be addressed in order to design a successful small aerial vehicle. The effects of Reynolds number and aspect ratio (AR) on the design and performance of fixed-wing vehicles are described. The boundary-layer behavior on airfoils is especially important in the design of vehicles in this flight regime. The results of a number of experimental boundary-layer studies, including the influence of laminar separation bubbles, are discussed. Several examples of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in this regime are described. Also, a brief survey of analytical models for oscillating and flapping-wing propulsion is presented. These range from the earliest examples where quasi-steady, attached flow is assumed, to those that account for the unsteady shed vortex wake as well as flow separation and aeroelastic behavior of a flapping wing. Experiments that complemented the analysis and led to the design of a successful ornithopter are also described.

  19. Introduction to transonic aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Written to teach students the nature of transonic flow and its mathematical foundation, this book offers a much-needed introduction to transonic aerodynamics. The authors present a quantitative and qualitative assessment of subsonic, supersonic, and transonic flow around bodies in two and three dimensions. The book reviews the governing equations and explores their applications and limitations as employed in modeling and computational fluid dynamics.  Some concepts, such as shock and expansion theory, are examined from a numerical perspective. Others, including shock-boundary-layer interaction, are discussed from a qualitative point of view. The book includes 60 examples and more than 200 practice problems. The authors also offer analytical methods such as Method of Characteristics (MOC) that allow readers to practice with the subject matter.  The result is a wealth of insight into transonic flow phenomena and their impact on aircraft design, including compressibility effects, shock and expansion waves, sho...

  20. The use of ultraviolet Thomson scattering as a versatile diagnostic for detailed measurements of a collisional laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, M.D.

    1993-01-08

    Collective Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic waves at 266nm is used to obtain spatially resolved, two-dimensional electron density, sound speed, and radial drift profiles of a collisional laser plasma. An ultraviolet diagnostic wavelength minimizes the complicating effects of inverse bremsstrahlung and refractive turning in the coronal region of interest, where the electron densities approach n{sub c}/10. Laser plasmas of this type are important because they model some of the aspects of the plasmas found in high-gain laser-fusion pellets irradiated by long pulse widths where the laser light is absorbed mostly in the corona. The experimental results and LASNEX simulations agree within a percent standard deviation of 40% for the electron density and 50% for the sound speed and radial drift velocity. Thus it is shown that the hydrodynamics equations with classical coefficients and the numerical approximations in LASNEX are valid models of laser-heated, highly collisional plasmas. The versatility of Thomson scattering is expanded upon by extending existing theory with a Fokker-Planck based model to include plasmas that are characterized by (0 {le} k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ii} {le} {infinity}) and ZT{sub e}/T{sub i}, where k{sub ia} is the ion- acoustic wave number, {lambda}{sub ii} is the ion-ion mean free path, Z is the ionization state of the plasma, and T{sub e}, T{sub i} are the electron and ion temperatures in electron volts respectively. The model is valid for plasmas in which the electrons are approximately collisionless, (k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ei}, k{sub ia}{lambda}{sub ee} {ge} 1), and quasineutrality holds, ({alpha} {much_gt}1), where {alpha} = 1/k{lambda}{sub DE} and {lambda}{sub DE} is the electron Debye length. This newly developed model predicts the lineshape of the ion-acoustic Thomson spectra and when fit to experimental data provides a direct measurement of the relative thermal flow velocity between the electrons and ions.

  1. An Experimental Study on the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performances of Maple-Seed-Inspired UAV Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Ning, Zhe

    2016-11-01

    Due to the auto-rotating trait of maple seeds during falling down process, flow characteristics of rotating maple seeds have been studied by many researchers in recent years. In the present study, an experimental investigation was performed to explore maple-seed-inspired UAV propellers for improved aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performances. Inspired by the auto-rotating trait of maple seeds, the shape of a maple seed is leveraged for the planform design of UAV propellers. The aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performances of the maple-seed-inspired propellers are examined in great details, in comparison with a commercially available UAV propeller purchased on the market (i.e., a baseline propeller). During the experiments, in addition to measuring the aerodynamic forces generated by the maple-seed-inspired propellers and the baseline propeller, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to quantify the unsteady flow structures in the wakes of the propellers. The aeroacoustic characteristics of the propellers are also evaluated by leveraging an anechoic chamber available at the Aerospace Engineering Department of Iowa State University. The research work is supported by National Science Foundation under Award Numbers of OSIE-1064235.

  2. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  3. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.; Polen, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for reducing the computational complexity of multidisciplinary design optimization (DO) of aerodynamic structures are described and demonstrated. The basic principles of aerodynamic and structural DO are reviewed; the formulation of the combined DO problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to (1) the application of perturbation methods to cross-sensitivity computations and (2) numerical approximation procedures. Trial DOs of a simple sailplane design are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The IBM 3090 CPU time for the entire integrated DO was reduced from an estimated 10 h to about 6 min.

  4. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  5. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959–2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and detailed neutron-probe density measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Overly

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS radar layers and detailed neutron-probe (NP density profiles. ASIRAS-NP accumulation rates are not statistically different (C.I. 95 % from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. Below 3000 m elevation, ASIRAS-NP increases by 20 % for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Above 3000 m elevation, accumulation increases by 13 % for 1995–2004 compared to 1985–1994. Model snow accumulation results from the calibrated Fifth Generation Mesoscale Model modified for polar climates (Polar MM5 underestimate mean annual accumulation by 16 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modelled density profiles in place of detailed NP data. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980 model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980 density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the IceBridge campaign.

  6. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  7. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  8. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2010-01-01

    This introduction to the principles of unsteady aerodynamics covers all the core concepts, provides readers with a review of the fundamental physics, terminology and basic equations, and covers hot new topics such as the use of flapping wings for propulsion.

  9. Inferring electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave intensity from low altitude POES proton flux measurements: A detailed case study with conjugate Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing; Fu, Song; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the magnetospheric particle dynamics and can lead to resonant pitch-angle scattering and ultimate precipitation of ring current protons. Commonly, the statistics of in situ EMIC wave measurements is adopted for quantitative investigation of wave-particle interaction processes, which however becomes questionable for detailed case studies especially during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Here we establish a novel technique to infer EMIC wave amplitudes from low-altitude proton measurements onboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). The detailed procedure is elaborated regarding how to infer the EMIC wave intensity for one specific time point. We then test the technique with a case study comparing the inferred root-mean-square (RMS) EMIC wave amplitude with the conjugate Van Allen Probes EMFISIS wave measurements. Our results suggest that the developed technique can reasonably estimate EMIC wave intensities from low-altitude POES proton flux data, thereby providing a useful tool to construct a data-based, near-real-time, dynamic model of the global distribution of EMIC waves once the proton flux measurements from multiple POES satellites are available for any specific time period.

  10. Introduction to wind turbine aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffarczyk, Alois Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wind-Turbine Aerodynamics is a self-contained textbook which shows how to come from the basics of fluid mechanics to modern wind turbine blade design. It presents a fundamentals of fluid dynamics and inflow conditions, and gives a extensive introduction into theories describing the aerodynamics of wind turbines. After introducing experiments the book applies the knowledge to explore the impact on blade design.The book is an introduction for professionals and students of very varying levels.

  11. Does an active adjustment of aerodynamic drag make sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The article concerns evaluation of the possible impact of the gap between the tractor and semitrailer on the aerodynamic drag coefficient. The aim here is not to adjust this distance depending on the geometrical shape of the tractor and trailer, but depending solely on the speed of articulated vehicle. All the tests have form of numerical simulations. The method of simulation is briefly explained in the article. It considers various issues such as the range and objects of tests as well as the test conditions. The initial (pre-adaptive) and final (after adaptation process) computational meshes have been presented as illustrations. Some of the results have been presented in the form of run chart showing the change of value of aerodynamic drag coefficients in time, for different geometric configurations defined by a clearance gap between the tractor and semitrailer. The basis for a detailed analysis and conclusions were the averaged (in time) aerodynamic drag coefficients as a function of the clearance gap.

  12. Aerodynamic performances of cruise missile flying above local terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Saad, M. R.; Che Idris, A.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Sujipto, S.

    2016-10-01

    Cruise missile can be classified as a smart bomb and also Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) due to its ability to move and manoeuvre by itself without a pilot. Cruise missile flies in constant velocity in cruising stage. Malaysia is one of the consumers of cruise missiles that are imported from other nations, which can have distinct geographic factors including their local terrains compared to Malaysia. Some of the aerodynamic performances of missile such as drag and lift coefficients can be affected by the local geographic conditions in Malaysia, which is different from the origin nation. Therefore, a detailed study must be done to get aerodynamic performance of cruise missiles that operate in Malaysia. The effect of aerodynamic angles such as angle of attack and side slip can be used to investigate the aerodynamic performances of cruise missile. Hence, subsonic wind tunnel testings were conducted to obtain the aerodynamic performances of the missile at various angle of attack and sideslip angles. Smoke visualization was also performed to visualize the behaviour of flow separation. The optimum angle of attack found was at α=21° and side slip, β=10° for optimum pitching and yawing motion of cruise missile.

  13. Aerodynamics of badminton shuttlecocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aekaansh; Desai, Ajinkya; Mittal, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the aerodynamics of shuttlecocks used in the sport of badminton. The speed of the shuttlecock considered is in the range of 25-50 m/s. The relative contribution of various parts of the shuttlecock to the overall drag is studied. It is found that the feathers, and the net in the case of a synthetic shuttlecock, contribute the maximum. The gaps, in the lower section of the skirt, play a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid and causing a difference between the pressure inside and outside the skirt. This pressure difference leads to drag. This is confirmed via computations for a shuttlecock with no gaps. The synthetic shuttle experiences more drag than the feather model. Unlike the synthetic model, the feather shuttlecock is associated with a swirling flow towards the end of the skirt. The effect of the twist angle of the feathers on the drag as well as the flow has also been studied.

  14. Main: Clone Detail [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Clone Detail Mapping Pseudomolecule data detail Detail information Mapping to the TIGR japonica Pseudomolecu...les kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail.zip kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail ...

  15. Numerical Computations of Transonic Critical AerodynamicBehavior of a Realistic Artillery Projectile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. M. Kridi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of aerodynamic coefficients by shell designers is a critical step in the development of any projectile design. Of particular interest is the determination of the aerodynamic coefficients at transonic speeds. It is in this speed regime that the critical aerodynamic behavior occurs and a rapid change in the aerodynamic coefficients is observed. Two-dimensional, transonic, flow field computations over projectiles have been made using Euler equations which were used for solution with no special treatment required. In this work a solution algorithm is based on finite difference MacCormack’s technique for solving mixed subsonic-supersonic flow problem. Details of the asymmetrically located shock waves on the projectiles have been determined. Computed surface pressures have been compared with experimental data and are found to be in good agreement. The pitching moment coefficient, determined from the computed flow fields, shows the critical aerodynamic behavior observed in free flights.

  16. Nonpotential aerodynamics for windmills in shear wind, semi-annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morino, L.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical formulation is completed and extended to unsteady flows for analysis of lifting-surface Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) aerodynamics. Its formulation is underway. A numerical formulation of Windmill Incompressible Lifting Surface Aerodynamics (WIlSA) is completed. This program is a modification of the program for Incompressible Lifting Surface aerodynamics. WILSA is completed, debugged, and exercised, and the results are detailed in an attachment. The power coefficient is presented as a function of angular speed. The theoretical formulation for the complex-configuration aerodynamic analysis of WECS includes the unsteadiness of the vorticity in the wake. A numerical formulation of the complex program, Windmill Incompressible Complex Configuration Aerodynamics (WICCA), is completed, debugged, and exercised and the results are presented in an attachment. Modification of WICCA for inclusion of the hub is completed and debugged. A completed preliminary simple formulation for inclusion of the boundary layer effects is provided.

  17. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade. Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50 deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10 (exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  18. Aerodynamic Investigation of Incidence Angle Effects in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVetta, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic measurements showing the effects of large incidence angle variations on an HPT turbine blade set are presented. Measurements were made in NASA's Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility which has been used in previous studies to acquire detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer measurements for CFD code validation. The current study supports the development of variable-speed power turbine (VSPT) speed-change technology for the NASA Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) vehicle. In order to maintain acceptable main rotor propulsive efficiency, the VSPT operates over a nearly 50 percent speed range from takeoff to altitude cruise. This results in 50deg or more variations in VSPT blade incidence angles. The cascade facility has the ability to operate over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, but had to be modified in order to accommodate the negative incidence angle variation required by the LCTR VSPT operation. Using existing blade geometry with previously acquired aerodynamic data, the tunnel was re-baselined and the new incidence angle range was exercised. Midspan exit total pressure and flow angle measurements were obtained at seven inlet flow angles. For each inlet angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with inlet Reynolds numbers varying from 6.83×10(exp 5) to 0.85×10(exp 5) and two isentropic exit Mach numbers of 0.74 and 0.34. The midspan flowfield measurements were acquired using a three-hole pneumatic probe located in a survey plane 8.6 percent axial chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressure distributions were also acquired for each flow condition.

  19. Measurement of Aerodynamic Forces for Various Mean Angles of Attack on an Airfoil Oscillating in Pitch and on Two Finite-span Wings Oscillating in Bending with Emphasis on Damping in the Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, A Gerald

    1957-01-01

    The oscillating air forces on a two-dimensional wing oscillating in pitch about the midchord have been measured at various mean angles of attack and at Mach numbers of 0.35 and 0.7. The magnitudes of normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients were much higher at high angles of attack than at low angles of attack for some conditions. Large regions of negative damping in pitch were found, and it was shown that the effect of increasing the Mach number 0.35 to 0.7 was to decrease the initial angle of attack at which negative damping occurred. Measurements of the aerodynamic damping of a 10-percent-thick and of a 3-percent-thick finite-span wing oscillating in the first bending mode indicate no regions of negative damping for this type of motion over the range of variables covered. The damping measured at high angles of attack was generally larger than that at low angles of attack. (author)

  20. Discrete vortex method simulations of aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan

    , and to determine aerodynamic forces and the corresponding flutter limit. A simulation of the three-dimensional bridge responseto turbulent wind is carried out by quasi steady theory by modelling the bridge girder as a line like structure [2], applying the aerodynamic load coefficients found from the current version...... of DVMFLOW in a strip wise fashion. Neglecting the aerodynamic admittance, i.e. the correlation of the instantaneous lift force to the turbulent fluctuations in the vertical velocities, leads to higher response to high frequency atmospheric turbulence than would be obtained from wind tunnel tests....... In the present work we have extended the laminar oncoming flow in DVMFLOW to a turbulent one, modelled by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles synthesized from prescribed atmospheric turbulence velocity spectra [3] . The discrete spectrum is sampled from the continuous spectrum subject to a lower cutoff...

  1. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  2. Fundamentals of modern unsteady aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gülçat, Ülgen

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the author introduces the concept of unsteady aerodynamics and its underlying principles. He provides the readers with a comprehensive review of the fundamental physics of free and forced unsteadiness, the terminology and basic equations of aerodynamics ranging from incompressible flow to hypersonics. The book also covers modern topics related to the developments made in recent years, especially in relation to wing flapping for propulsion. The book is written for graduate and senior year undergraduate students in aerodynamics and also serves as a reference for experienced researchers. Each chapter includes ample examples, questions, problems and relevant references.   The treatment of these modern topics has been completely revised end expanded for the new edition. It now includes new numerical examples, a section on the ground effect, and state-space representation.

  3. Aerodynamic Experiments on DelFly II: Unsteady Lift Enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Clercq, K.M.E.; De Kat, R.; Remes, B.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Bijl, H.

    2009-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry measurements and simultaneous force measurements have been performed on the DelFly II flapping-wing MAV, to investigate the flow-field behavior and the aerodynamic forces generated. For flapping wing motion it is expected that both the clap and peel mechanism and the occur

  4. Laryngeal Aerodynamics in Healthy Older Adults and Adults with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheron, Deborah; Stathopoulos, Elaine T.; Huber, Jessica E.; Sussman, Joan E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study compared laryngeal aerodynamic function of healthy older adults (HOA) to adults with Parkinson's disease (PD) while speaking at a comfortable and increased vocal intensity. Method: Laryngeal aerodynamic measures (subglottal pressure, peak-to-peak flow, minimum flow, and open quotient [OQ]) were compared between HOAs and…

  5. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  6. The aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we present state-of-the-art of research in wind turbine aerodynamics. We start be giving a brief historical review and a survey over aerodynamic research in wind energy. Next, we focus on some recent research results obtained by our wind energy group at Department of Mechanical...... Engineering at DTU. In particular, we show some new results on the classical problem of the ideal rotor and present a series of new results from an on-going research project dealing with the modelling and simulation of turbulent flow structures in the wake behind wind turbines....

  7. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between

  8. Aerodynamic map for soft and hard hypersonic level flight in near space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruifeng Hu; Ziniu Wu; Zhe Wu; Xiaoxin Wang; Zhongwei Tian

    2009-01-01

    In this note, we design a velocity-altitude map for hypersonic level flight in near space of altitude 20-100 km. This map displays aerodynamic-related parameters associated with near space level flight, schematically or quantitatively. Various physical conditions for the near-space level flight are then characterized, including laminar or turbulent flow, rarefaction or continuous flow, aerodynamic heating, as well as conditions for sustaining level flight with and without orbital effect. This map allows one to identify conditions to have soft flight or hard flight, and this identification would be helpful for making correct planning on detailed studies of aerodynamics or making initial design of near space vehicles.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; He, Kai-Feng; Qian, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Cheng, Yan-Qing; Wu, Kai-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    In view of engineering application, it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components: the static aerodynamics, the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations, and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow. The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms, while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration, the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch, yaw, roll, and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations. The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics, respectively. The results show that: (1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points, but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence, stability, and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously. Furthermore, the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected. It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft. Finally, the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamics modeling for flight dynamics application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Kai-Feng He; Wei-Qi Qian; Tian-Jiao Zhang; Yan-Qing Cheng; Kai-Yuan Wu

    2012-01-01

    In view of engineering application,it is practicable to decompose the aerodynamics into three components:the static aerodynamics,the aerodynamic increment due to steady rotations,and the aerodynamic increment due to unsteady separated and vortical flow.The first and the second components can be presented in conventional forms,while the third is described using a one-order differential equation and a radial-basis-function (RBF) network. For an aircraft configuration,the mathematical models of 6-component aerodynamic coefficients are set up from the wind tunnel test data of pitch,yaw,roll,and coupled yawroll large-amplitude oscillations.The flight dynamics of an aircraft is studied by the bifurcation analysis technique in the case of quasi-steady aerodynamics and unsteady aerodynamics,respectively.The results show that:(1) unsteady aerodynamics has no effect upon the existence of trim points,but affects their stability; (2) unsteady aerodynamics has great effects upon the existence,stability,and amplitudes of periodic solutions; and (3) unsteady aerodynamics changes the stable regions of trim points obviously.Furthermore,the dynamic responses of the aircraft to elevator deflections are inspected.It is shown that the unsteady aerodynamics is beneficial to dynamic stability for the present aircraft.Finally,the effects of unsteady aerodynamics on the post-stall maneuverability are analyzed by numerical simulation.

  11. Adjoint gradient-based approach for aerodynamic optimization of transport aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Caslav

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic design of transport aircraft has been steadily improved over past several decades, to the point where today highly-detailed shape control is needed to achieve further improvements. Aircraft manufacturers are therefore increasingly looking into formal optimization methods, driving high-fidelity CFD analysis of finely-parametrized candidate designs. We present an adjoint gradient-based approach for maximizing the aerodynamic performance index relevant to cruise-climb mission segment...

  12. Analysis of Dynamic Interactions between Different Drivetrain Components with a Detailed Wind Turbine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, A.; Morisse, M.; Mertens, A.; Wenske, J.

    2016-09-01

    The presented work describes a detailed analysis of the dynamic interactions among mechanical and electrical drivetrain components of a modern wind turbine under the influence of parameter variations, different control mechanisms and transient excitations. For this study, a detailed model of a 2MW wind turbine with a gearbox, a permanent magnet synchronous generator and a full power converter has been developed which considers all relevant characteristics of the mechanical and electrical subsystems. This model includes an accurate representation of the aerodynamics and the mechanical properties of the rotor and the complete mechanical drivetrain. Furthermore, a detailed electrical modelling of the generator, the full scale power converter with discrete switching devices, its filters, the transformer and the grid as well as the control structure is considered. The analysis shows that, considering control measures based on active torsional damping, interactions between mechanical and electrical subsystems can significantly affect the loads and thus the individual lifetime of the components.

  13. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  14. Research on the Aerodynamic Lift of Vehicle Windshield Wiper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhengqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, research on the aerodynamic lift of vehicle windshield wipers is confined to the steady results, and there are very few test results. In the face of this truth, a wind tunnel test is conducted by using the Multipoint Film Force Test System (MFF. In this test, the aerodynamic lift of four kinds of wiper is measured at different wind speeds and different rotation angles. And then, relevant steady-state numerical simulations are accomplished and the mechanism of the aerodynamic lift is analyzed. Furthermore, combined with dynamic meshing and user-defined functions (UDF, transient aerodynamic characteristics of wipers are obtained through numerical simulations. It is found that the aerodynamic lift takes great effect on the stability of wipers, and there is maximum value of the lift near a certain wind speed and rotation angle. The lift force when wipers are rotating with the free stream is less than steady, and the force when rotating against the free stream is greater than steady.

  15. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Technology Development Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Calomino, Anthony M.; Wright, Henry S.; Wusk, Mary E.; Hughes, Monica F.

    2013-01-01

    The successful flight of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)-3 has further demonstrated the potential value of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology. This technology development effort is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). This paper provides an overview of a multi-year HIAD technology development effort, detailing the projects completed to date and the additional testing planned for the future.

  16. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  17. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  18. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  19. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  20. The Convected Kappa Distribution Function at Jupiter: Details from the Voyager and Galileo Missions and a Comparison to Cassini Saturn Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Mauk, B.; Carbary, J. F.; Hill, M. E.; Dialynas, K.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Voyager and Galileo Missions allowed detailed measurements of 20 keV-2 MeV hot ion distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere and beyond using the LECP detector on Voyager and EPD on Galileo. The normalized convected kappa distribution function, with isotropy assumed in the plasma convection frame, has well fit hot ion observed fluxes and thus has produced meaningful and ordered physical plasma parameters including the vector bulk velocity, the characteristic energy (temperature) of the distribution, and the high energy spectral index. The kappa model produces temperatures that indicate expansion and adiabatic cooling of hot ions in the nightside, but not in the dayside. Further, there are significant variations in the plasma parameters with time and local time. There is also a boundary layer present near but within the dawn magnetopause where distribution functions were generated from data analysis of the very distant Voyager 2 crossing of this region. Here the flow is apparently entrained into the magnetosheath flow, but temperatures are hot and consistent with rapid transport of plasma from regions of the magnetosphere closer to Jupiter. These observations have led to the proposal of an empirical model of the general convection pattern at Jupiter. Remarkably, application of the convected kappa distribution model to Saturn using Cassini INCA and CHEMS measurements produces a convection pattern and kappa distribution temperature profiles that are remarkably similar when scaled by the sub-solar magnetopause distance and radial size of the planets.

  1. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States); Migliore, P.G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  2. Effects of ice accretion on the aerodynamics of bridge cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demartino, C.; Koss, Holger; Georgakis, Christos T.;

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable wind induced vibrations of bridge cables can occur when atmospheric conditions are such to generate ice accretion. This paper contains the results of an extensive investigation of the effects of ice accretion due to in-cloud icing, on the aerodynamic characteristics of bridge hangers...... and stay cables. The aim of this paper is twofold; first, it was investigated the ice accretion process and the final shape of the ice accreted; then the aerodynamics of the ice accreted bridge cables was characterized, and related to the ice shape. Different climatic conditions, i.e. combinations...... of the ice accretions is given in the paper. Only for the bridge hanger case, a short description of the evolution of the ice accretions is given. The aerodynamic force coefficients were then measured with varying yaw angle, angle of attack and wind speed, and are presented and discussed in the paper...

  3. Improved blade element momentum theory for wind turbine aerodynamic computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance predictions and design applications for wind turbines. However, the classic BEM method is not quite accurate which often tends to under-predict the aerodynamic forces near root and over-predict its performance near tip...... for the MEXICO rotor. Results show that the improved BEM theory gives a better prediction than the classic BEM method, especially in the blade tip region, when comparing to the MEXICO measurements. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Separation of rolling noise and aerodynamic noise by in-service measurement of combined roughness and transfer functions on a high speed slab track

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.W.; Dittrich, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Combined sound and vibration measurements during train pass-bys can be used to quantify contributions from the excitation and transmission of rolling noise. This is useful for the identification of sound sources and the assessment of the track contribution. In this paper, a practical application on

  5. Separation of rolling noise and aerodynamic noise by in-service measurement of combined roughness and transfer functions on a high speed slab track

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.W.; Dittrich, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Combined sound and vibration measurements during train pass-bys can be used to quantify contributions from the excitation and transmission of rolling noise. This is useful for the identification of sound sources and the assessment of the track contribution. In this paper, a practical application on

  6. An improved quasi-steady aerodynamic model for insect wings that considers movement of the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Kim, Joong-Kwan; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2015-07-30

    A quasi-steady aerodynamic model in consideration of the center of pressure (C.P.) was developed for insect flight. A dynamically scaled-up robotic hawkmoth wing was used to obtain the translational lift, drag, moment and rotational force coefficients. The translational force coefficients were curve-fitted with respect to the angles of attack such that two coefficients in the Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy model were obtained. The rotational force coefficient was also compared to that derived by the standard Kutta-Joukowski theory. In order to build the accurate pitching moment model, the locations of the C.Ps. and its movements depending on the pitching velocity were investigated in detail. We found that the aerodynamic moment model became suitable when the rotational force component was assumed to act on the half-chord. This implies that the approximation borrowed from the conventional airfoil concept, i.e., the 'C.P. at the quarter-chord' may lead to an incorrect moment prediction. In the validation process, the model showed excellent time-course force and moment estimations in comparison with the robotic wing measurement results. A fully nonlinear multibody flight dynamic simulation was conducted to check the effect of the traveling C.P. on the overall flight dynamics. This clearly showed the importance of an accurate aerodynamic moment model.

  7. Aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinzi

    This work investigates the aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades via the blade element momentum (BEM) based approach and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based approach. From this research, it is possible to draw a series of detailed guidelines on small wind turbine blade design and analysis. The research also provides a platform for further comprehensive study using these two approaches. The wake induction corrections and stall corrections of the BEM method were examined through a case study of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine. A hybrid stall correction model was proposed to analyse wind turbine power performance. The proposed model shows improvement in power prediction for the validation case, compared with the existing stall correction models. The effects of the key rotor parameters of a small wind turbine as well as the blade chord and twist angle distributions on power performance were investigated through two typical wind turbines, i.e. a fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine and a fixed-pitch fixed-speed (FPFS) wind turbine. An engineering blade design and analysis code was developed in MATLAB to accommodate aerodynamic design and analysis of the blades.. The linearisation for radial profiles of blade chord and twist angle for the FPFS wind turbine blade design was discussed. Results show that, the proposed linearisation approach leads to reduced manufacturing cost and higher annual energy production (AEP), with minimal effects on the low wind speed performance. Comparative studies of mesh and turbulence models in 2D and 3D CFD modelling were conducted. The CFD predicted lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil S809 were compared with wind tunnel test data and the 3D CFD modelling method of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine were validated against measurements. Airfoil aerodynamic characterisation and wind turbine power performance as well as 3D flow details were studied. The detailed flow

  8. Laryngeal Aerodynamics Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham-Rowan, Mary; Fowler, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in laryngeal aerodynamic measures during connected speech associated with oral contraceptive (OC) use. Eight women taking an OC, and eight others not taking an OC, participated in the study. Three trials of syllable /p[subscript alpha] /repetitions were obtained using a…

  9. The influence of aerodynamic coefficients on the elements of classic projectile paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir D. Jerković

    2011-04-01

    flight The velocity of the projectile flight in relation to the Earth represents the relative velocity, and the time derivatives of the velocity projections to coordinate frame axis represent the relative acceleration components. The mass of classic axisymetric projectile is constant during the flight, because there is no mass change caused by the rocket engine. The values of components of aerodynamic force and moment depend on the angle of attack being the basic parameter. The projections of the total aerodynamic force, because of the nature of its effect on the projectile, are given in an aeroballistics coordinate frame with the coordinate origin positioned in the center of gravity. The determination of aerodynamic coefficients with respect to projectile construction, i. e. the projectile geometry, is based on the theoretical approach of fluid mechanic equation and it leads to numerical solving of the partial differential equation system with the given boundary conditions and experimental results of tunnel research, i. e. measured flight parameters. In this part of the article, the aim is to describe the functions of dependence of aerodynamic coefficients on given parameters. Flight simulation of the classic projectile The determination of aerodynamic coefficients, i. e. the determination of the motion trajectory elements and stability parameters according to the model of six degrees of freedom, is done on the classic 40mm axisymmetric projectile model, the shape of which is based on the geometric characteristics of the front ogive part and the back cone with the flat bottom. The equations of the model of six degrees of freedom are given in the aeroballistics coordinate frame. The initial data in the simulation are given for the values of aerodynamic coefficients and derivatives obtained by the calculations and experiments. The analysis of the change of trajectory elements and stability characteristics is done with respect to two given kinds of aerodynamic

  10. Aerodynamic Size Classification of Glass Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laosmaa, Pekka J. J.

    The objective of this research was to examine a technique by which fibers may be aerodynamically classified by diameter and/or length. In this study a system for fiber preparation and generation as well as an in situ fiber classifier were constructed and evaluated. A recently developed technique, the size classification of particles by opposing jets, was modified. The research set-up consisted of (1) a vibrating bed fiber generator, which also functioned as a preselector, (2) an opposing-jet classifier equipped with electrodes and high voltage power supplies to create fiber-aligning electric fields inside the classifier and (3) an optoelectric fiber sensor to measure the concentration and length of fibers. The classified fibers were also collected on filters for the counting and dimensional analysis of the fibers. Some flow instability problems were found during the initial tests of the classifier. They were attributed to random flow fluctuations in the nozzles caused by very small perturbations upstream of the nozzles. Within a critical range of flow Reynolds numbers the flow becomes "intermittent", i.e. it alternates in time between being laminar and turbulent in a random sequence. Small disturbances upstream of the point of consideration can "trigger" the changes from laminar to turbulent flow and the initial disturbance may be "amplified", sending a turbulent flash through the flow system. The classifier performed well with test aerosols after the nozzle flowrate had been decreased to correspond to a lower and less critical Reynolds number and after some modifications had been made to smooth the flow inside the classifier inlet chambers. The cut-off of test aerosols was sharp, but the loss of particles greater than 2.5 (mu)m in aerodynamic diameter was unsatisfactorily high. The classifier was able to classify fibers by aerodynamic diameter, but not as predicted through calculations. The results were difficult to interpret because of the high loss of fibers

  11. Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

    2000-12-05

    Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

  12. Noise Trends of a 0.5 M (20 In.) Diameter Supersonic Throughflow Fan as Measured in an Unmodified Compressor Aerodynamic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.; Moore, Royce D.

    1993-01-01

    The tone noise levels of a supersonic throughflow fan were measured at subsonic and supersonic axial duct Mach numbers. The noise in the inlet plenum showed no blade passing and harmonic tones at subsonic or supersonic axial flow conditions. At subsonic axial flow conditions, the supersonic throughflow fan showed no inlet plenum tones at fan operating conditions where tone noise had been previously measured for a subsonic fan design. This lower inlet-quadrant noise level for the supersonic throughflow fan was the result of high subsonic inlet velocities acting to reduce the noise propagating out the inlet. The fan noise, which was prevented from propagating upstream by the high subsonic inlet velocities, appeared to increase the noise in the exhaust duct at subsonic throughflow conditions. The exhaust duct noise decreased at supersonic axial throughflow Mach numbers, with the lowest blade passing and harmonic tones levels being observed at the design axial Mach number of 2.0. Multiple pure tone noise was observed in the inlet duct at subsonic axial flow Mach numbers but was seen only in the exhaust duct at supersonic axial flow conditions.

  13. 红外热图在高超声速低密度风洞测热试验中的应用概述%The summarization of infrared thermography on aerodynamic heating measurement in hypersonic low density wind tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 祝智伟; 李志辉

    2013-01-01

    Such problems as surface temperature measurement under great measurement angle,the measurement accuracy,and the corresponding relation between model spatial coordinates and the pixels in infrared thermography etc.,are studied in heating rate measurement by infrared thermography in hypersonic low-density wind tunnel.The studies in the recent years have been summarized and some practical and simple methods are given.To validate these above-mentioned techniques,aerodynamic heating rates on a thin skin flat plate with a wedge were measured by means of both infrared thermography and thermocouple,the ones on a sphere-cylinder model were measured using infrared thermograpy and compared with DMSC theoretical method in hypersonic low density model wind tunnel,and the results agreed well with each other.As a result,the solutions to the problems will push forward infrared thermography to the engineering and practical application.%围绕大极角情况下模型表面温度的测量、红外热图测热精度的提高、模型物面坐标与红外热图像素位置对应关系等问题,对近年来在高超声速偌氏密度风洞开展的红外热图测热工作进行了总结,给出了一些实用、简单、经济的方法.为验证上述技术,在高超声速低密度风洞开展了用红外热图技术与热电偶同时测量一平板带劈薄壁模型表面的气动加热率分布以及半球圆柱模型红外测热数据与DMSC计算结果的比较.不同手段获得的数据与红外测热数据相互验证的结果表明:这些技术的解决,有利于红外热图技术向工程化实用化迈进.

  14. Passive flow control by membrane wings for aerodynamic benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpe, Amory; Zhang, Zheng; Hubner, James; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The coupling of passive structural response of flexible membranes with the flow over them can significantly alter the aerodynamic characteristic of simple flat-plate wings. The use of flexible wings is common throughout biological flying systems inspiring many engineers to incorporate them into small engineering flying systems. In many of these systems, the motion of the membrane serves to passively alter the flow over the wing potentially resulting in an aerodynamic benefit. In this study, the aerodynamic loads and the flow field for a rigid flat-plate wing are compared to free trailing-edge membrane wings with two different pre-tensions at a chord-based Reynolds number of approximately 50,000. The membrane was silicon rubber with a scalloped free trailing edge. The analysis presented includes load measurements from a sting balance along with velocity fields and membrane deflections from synchronized, time-resolved particle image velocimetry and digital image correlation. The load measurements demonstrate increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift, while the synchronized flow and membrane measurements show how the membrane motion serves to force the flow. This passive flow control introduced by the membranes motion alters the flows development over the wing and into the wake region demonstrating how, at least for lower angles of attack, the membranes motion drives the flow as opposed to the flow driving the membrane motion.

  15. Research on the Aerodynamic Resistance of Trickle Biofilter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvydas Zagorskis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A four – section trickle biofilter was constructed for experimental research. The filter was filled with the packing material of artificial origin. The material consists of plastic balls having a large surface area. The dependence of biofilter aerodynamic resistance on supply air flow rate and the number of filter sections was determined. The aerodynamic resistance of the biofilter was measured in two cases. In the first case, the packing material of the filter was dry, whereas in the second case it was wet. The experimental research determined that an increase in the air flow rate from 0.043 m/s to 0.076 m/s causes an increase in biofilter aerodynamic resistance from 30.5 to 62.5 Pa after measuring four layers of dry packing material. In case of wet packing material, biofilter aerodynamic resistance after measuring four layers of plastic balls increases from 42.1 to 90.4 Pa.Article in Lithuanian

  16. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamic and structural characteristics of a corrugated wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Kyle

    Previous experimental studies on static, bio-inspired corrugated wings have shown that they produce favorable aerodynamic properties such as delayed stall compared to streamlined wings and flat plates at high Reynolds numbers (Re ≥ 4x104). The majority of studies have been carried out with scaled models of dragonfly forewings from the Aeshna Cyanea in either wind tunnels or water channels. In this thesis, the aerodynamics of a corrugated airfoil was studied using computational fluid dynamics methods at a low Reynolds number of 1000. Structural analysis was also performed using the commercial software SolidWorks 2009. The flow field is described by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on an overlapping grid using the pressure-Poisson method. The equations are discretized in space with second-order accurate central differences. Time integration is achieved through the second-order Crank-Nicolson implicit method. The complex vortex structures that form in the corrugated airfoil valleys and around the corrugated airfoil are studied in detail. Comparisons are made with experimental measurements from corrugated wings and also with simulations of a flat plate. Contrary to the studies at high Reynolds numbers, our study shows that at low Reynolds numbers the wing corrugation does not provide any aerodynamic benefit compared to a smoothed flat plate. Instead, the corrugated profile generates more pressure drag which is only partially offset by the reduction of friction drag, leading to more total drag than the flat plate. Structural analysis shows that the wing corrugation can increase the resistance to bending moments on the wing structure. A smoothed structure has to be three times thicker to provide the same stiffness. It was concluded the corrugated wing has the structural benefit to provide the same resistance to bending moments with a much reduced weight.

  17. Simulating Magneto-Aerodynamic Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-20

    2005. 19. Boeuf, J.P., Lagmich, Y., Callegari, Th., and Pitchford , L.C., Electro- hydrodynamic Force and Acceleration in Surface Discharge, AIAA 2006...Plasmadynamics and Laser Award, 2004 AFRL Point of Contact Dr. Donald B. Paul , AFRL/VA WPAFB, OH 937-255-7329, met weekly. Dr. Alan Garscadden, AFRL/PR...validating database for numerical simulation of magneto-aerodynamic actuator for hypersonic flow control. Points of contact at the AFRL/VA are Dr. D. Paul

  18. Iterative learning control applied to a non-linear vortex panel model for improved aerodynamic load performance of wind turbines with smart rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Mark W.; Tutty, Owen R.; Rogers, Eric; Sandberg, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of smart devices in wind turbine rotor blades could, in conjunction with collective and individual pitch control, improve the aerodynamic performance of the rotors. This is currently an active area of research with the primary objective of reducing the fatigue loads but mitigating the effects of extreme loads is also of interest. The aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine blade contain periodic and non-periodic components and one approach is to consider the application of iterative learning control algorithms. In this paper, the control design is based on a simple, in relative terms, computational fluid dynamics model that uses non-linear wake effects to represent flow past an airfoil. A representation for the actuator dynamics is included to undertake a detailed investigation into the level of control possible and on how performance can be effectively measured.

  19. Experimental study of aerodynamic interference effects on aerostatic coefficients of twin deck bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiwen LIU; Zhengqing CHEN; Gao LIU; Xinpeng SHAO

    2009-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on aero-static coefficients of twin deck bridges with large span were investigated in detail by means of wind tunnel test.The distances between the twin decks and wind attack angles were changed during the wind tunnel test to study the effects on aerodynamic interferences of aerostatic coefficients of twin decks. The research results have shown that the drag coefficients of the leeward deck are much smaller than that of a single leeward deck. The drag coefficients of a windward deck decrease slightly com-pared with that of a single deck. The lift and torque coefficients of windward and leeward decks are also affected slightly by the aerodynamic interference of twin decks. And the aerodynamic interference effects on lift and torque coefficients of twin decks can be neglected.

  20. Aerodynamic coefficients of plain and helically filleted twin circular cylinders for varying wind angles of attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acampora, Antonio; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2013-01-01

    Moderate vibrations continue to be recorded on the Øresund Bridge twin-stay cables. System identification techniques have been applied to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the cables based on ambient vibration measurements. As might be expected, the measured aerodynamic damping ratios...... vary from those estimated through use of aerodynamic coefficients of single circular cylinders, as reported in literature. To address this issue, wind tunnel tests were performed on a 1:2.3 scale section model of the Øresund Bridge cables, with and without the presence of helical fillets. In this paper...

  1. Detailing the relation between renal T2* and renal tissue pO2 using an integrated approach of parametric magnetic resonance imaging and invasive physiological measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Andreas; Arakelyan, Karen; Hentschel, Jan; Cantow, Kathleen; Flemming, Bert; Ladwig, Mechthild; Waiczies, Sonia; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to detail the relation between renal T2* and renal tissue pO2 using an integrated approach that combines parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative physiological measurements (MR-PHYSIOL). Experiments were performed in 21 male Wistar rats. In vivo modulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was achieved by brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. Renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), local cortical and medullary tissue pO2, and blood flux were simultaneously recorded together with T2*, T2 mapping, and magnetic resonance-based kidney size measurements (MR-PHYSIOL). Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out on a 9.4-T small-animal magnetic resonance system. Relative changes in the invasive quantitative parameters were correlated with relative changes in the parameters derived from MRI using Spearman analysis and Pearson analysis. Changes in T2* qualitatively reflected tissue pO2 changes induced by the interventions. T2* versus pO2 Spearman rank correlations were significant for all interventions, yet quantitative translation of T2*/pO2 correlations obtained for one intervention to another intervention proved not appropriate. The closest T2*/pO2 correlation was found for hypoxia and recovery. The interlayer comparison revealed closest T2*/pO2 correlations for the outer medulla and showed that extrapolation of results obtained for one renal layer to other renal layers must be made with due caution. For T2* to RBF relation, significant Spearman correlations were deduced for all renal layers and for all interventions. T2*/RBF correlations for the cortex and outer medulla were even superior to those between T2* and tissue pO2. The closest T2*/RBF correlation occurred during hypoxia and recovery. Close correlations were observed between T2* and kidney size during hypoxia and recovery and for occlusion and recovery. In both cases, kidney size correlated well with renal vascular conductance

  2. Aerodynamics of a Gulfstream G550 Nose Landing Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss detailed steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a Gulfstream G550 nose landing gear model. The quarter-scale, high-fidelity model includes part of the lower fuselage and the gear cavity. The full model configuration allowed for removal of various gear components (e.g. light cluster, steering mechanism, hydraulic lines, etc.) in order to document their effects on the local flow field. The measurements were conducted at a Reynolds number of 7.3 x 10(exp 4) based on the shock strut (piston) diameter and a freestream Mach number of 0.166. Additional data were also collected at lower Mach numbers of 0.12 and 0.145 and correspondingly lower Reynolds numbers. The boundary layer on the piston was tripped to enable turbulent flow separation, so as to better mimic the conditions encountered during flight. Steady surface pressures were gathered from an extensive number of static ports on the wheels, door, fuselage, and within the gear cavity. To better understand the resultant flow interactions between gear components, surface pressure fluctuations were collected via sixteen dynamic pressure sensors strategically placed on various subcomponents of the gear. Fifteen of the transducers were flush mounted on the gear surface at fixed locations, while the remaining one was a mobile transducer that could be placed at numerous varying locations. The measured surface pressure spectra are mainly broadband in nature, lacking any local peaks associated with coherent vortex shedding. This finding is in agreement with off-surface flow measurements using PIV that revealed the flow field to be a collection of separated shear layers without any dominant vortex shedding processes.

  3. Improvement in Capsule Abort Performance Using Supersonic Aerodynamic Interaction by Fences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hiroto; Wang, Yunpeng; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Doi, Katsunori; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    The space transportation system will need advanced abort systems to secure crew against serious accidents. Here this study deals with the capsule-type space transportation systems with a Launch Abort System (LAS). This system is composed of a conic capsule as a Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) and a cylindrical rocket as a Service Module (SM), and the capsule is moved away from the rocket by supersonic aerodynamic interactions in an emergency. We propose a method to improve the performance of the LAV by installing fences at the edges of surfaces on the rocket and capsule sides. Their effects were investigated by experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Experimental results show that the fences on the rocket and capsule surfaces increase the aerodynamic thrust force on the capsule by 70% in a certain clearance between the capsule and rocket. Computational results show the detailed flow fields where the centripetal flow near the surface on the rocket side is induced by the fence on the rocket side and the centrifugal flow near the surface on the capsule side is blocked by the fence on the capsule side. These results can confirm favorable effects of the fences on the performance of the LAS.

  4. Improvement in Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    To determine the parameters which can improve the overall performance of a paraglider wing canopy, we have been investigating the fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of an inflatable cell model which is designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the wing canopy. This paper describes the results of a series of wind tunnel experiments. It is shown that significant drag reduction can be achieved by adopting an appropriately designed shape for the soft cloth comprising the upper surface. A trade-off relationship between the aerodynamic quality (characterized by the lift-to-drag ratio) and structural strength (characterized by the internal air pressure coefficient) of the canopy is also examined in detail.

  5. Kinematics and Aerodynamics of Backward Flying Dragonflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Zeyghami, Samane; Dong, Haibo

    2015-11-01

    Highly maneuverable insects such as dragonflies have a wide range of flight capabilities; precise hovering, fast body reorientations, sideways flight and backward takeoff are only a few to mention. In this research, we closely examined the kinematics as well as aerodynamics of backward takeoff in dragonflies and compared them to those of forward takeoff. High speed videography and accurate 3D surface reconstruction techniques were employed to extract details of the wing and body motions as well as deformations during both flight modes. While the velocities of both forward and backward flights were similar, the body orientation as well as the wing kinematics showed large differences. Our results indicate that by tilting the stroke plane angle of the wings as well as changing the orientation of the body relative to the flight path, dragonflies control the direction of the flight like a helicopter. In addition, our detailed analysis of the flow in these flights shows important differences in the wake capture phenomena among these flight modes. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  6. Review paper on wind turbine aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the development and description of the aerodynamic models used to estimate the aerodynamic loads on wind turbine constructions. This includes a status of the capabilities of computation fluid dynamics and the need for reliable airfoil data for the simpler engineering models....... Also a discussion of the use of passive and active aerodynamic devices is included such as, e.g., Vortex Generators and distributed active flaps. Finally the problem of wakes in wind farms is addressed and a section of the likely future development of aerodynamic models for wind turbines is included...

  7. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project will focus on the development and demonstration of hypersonic inflatable aeroshell technologies...

  8. Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities, Equipment, and Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The following facilities, equipment, and capabilities are available in the Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities and Equipment (1) Subsonic, open-jet wind tunnel with...

  9. Aerodynamic Aspects of Wind Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the most important aerodynamic research topics in the field of wind energy. Wind turbine aerodynamics concerns the modeling and prediction of aerodynamic forces, such as performance predictions of wind farms, and the design of specific parts of wind turbines, such as rotor......-blade geometry. The basics of the blade-element momentum theory are presented along with guidelines for the construction of airfoil data. Various theories for aerodynamically optimum rotors are discussed, and recent results on classical models are presented. State-of-the-art advanced numerical simulation tools...

  10. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 45 deg Swept Wing Fuselage Model with a Finned and Unfinned Body Pylon Mounted Beneath the Fuselage or Wing, Including Measurements of Body Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornom, Dewey E.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation of a model of a standard size body in combination with a representative 45 deg swept-wing-fuselage model has been conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.80 to 1.43. The body, with a fineness ratio of 8.5, was tested with and without fins, and was pylon-mounted beneath the fuselage or wing. Force measurements were obtained on the wing-fuselage model with and without the body, for an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to approximately 12 deg and an angle-of-sideslip range from -8 deg to 8 deg. In addition, body loads were measured over the same angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip range. The Reynolds number for the investigation, based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord, varied from 1.85 x 10(exp 6) to 2.85 x 10(exp 6). The addition of the body beneath the fuselage or the wing increased the drag coefficient of the complete model over the Mach number range tested. On the basis of the drag increase per body, the under-fuselage position was the more favorable. Furthermore, the bodies tended to increase the lateral stability of the complete model. The variation of body loads with angle of attack for the unfinned bodies was generally small and linear over the Mach number range tested with the addition of fins causing large increases in the rates of change of normal-force coefficient and nose-down pitching-moment coefficient. The variation of body side-force coefficient with sideslip for the unfinned body beneath the fuselage was at least twice as large as the variation of this load for the unfinned body beneath the wing. The addition of fins to the body beneath either the fuselage or the wing approximately doubled the rate of change of body side-force coefficient with sideslip. Furthermore, the variation of body side-force coefficient with sideslip for the body beneath the wing was at least twice as large as the variation of this load with angle of attack.

  11. Innovation in Aerodynamic Design Features of Soviet Missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations of some tactical and strategic missile systems developed by the former Soviet Union have been included in the basic missile research programs of the NACA/NASA. Studies of the Soviet missiles sometimes revealed innovative design features that resulted in unusual or unexpected aerodynamic characteristics. In some cases these characteristics have been such that the measured performance of the missile exceeds what might have been predicted. In other cases some unusual design features have been found that would alleviate what might otherwise have been a serious aerodynamic problem. In some designs, what has appeared to be a lack of refinement has proven to be a matter of expediency. It is a purpose of this paper to describe some examples of unusual design features of some Soviet missiles and to illustrate the effectiveness of the design features on the aerodynamic behavior of the missile. The paper draws on the experience of the author who for over 60 years was involved in the aerodynamic wind tunnel testing of aircraft and missiles with the NACA/NASA.

  12. Experimental Study of Aerodynamic Behavior in Wind Tunnels with Ornithopter and Plane Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Francoise SCIBILIA; Jan WOJCIECHOWSKI

    2006-01-01

    There are similarities between planes and birds. In fact aerodynamics bases are the same. In order to make some comparisons, this paper presents two series of experiments: one in a wind tunnel with an ornithopter model for measurements of aerodynamic forces with flapping wings. The wing movement has two degrees of freedom flapping around the longitudinal axis of the model and feathering around the wing axis. Measurements of aerodynamic forces: lift and drag in static case averaging values during many cycles of movement and in dynamic case have been performed. The other part of the paper concerns velocity and turbulence measurements on a metal plane wall jet in a wind tunnel with and without a rough surface, with and without acoustic vibrations in order to simulate a plane wing. Aerodynamic characteristics have been obtained in all cases.

  13. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    ; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970, Lifting surface theory for the problem of an arbitrarily yawed sinusoidal gust incident on a thin aerofoil in incompressible flow). Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil...... (Sears, W. R.: 1941; and Graham, J. M. R.: 1970). An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input (Amiet, R. K.: 1975, Acoustic radiation from an airfoil in a turbulent stream). The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models...... and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model...

  14. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  15. The basic aerodynamics of floatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M.J.; Wood, D.H.

    1983-09-01

    The original derivation of the basic theory governing the aerodynamics of both hovercraft and modern floatation ovens, requires the validity of some extremely crude assumptions. However, the basic theory is surprisingly accurate. It is shown that this accuracy occurs because the final expression of the basic theory can be derived by approximating the full Navier-Stokes equations in a manner that clearly shows the limitations of the theory. These limitations are used in discussing the relatively small discrepancies between the theory and experiment, which may not be significant for practical purposes.

  16. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices using dual-plane PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-11-01

    Low Reynolds number aerodynamic experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of particular interest due to their application to micro air vehicles which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements described the structures left by bats and birds and provided insight into the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions based on said measurements. The highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows associated with flapping flight are major challenges for accurate measurements. The challenge of animal flight measurements is finding small flow features in a large field of view at high speed with limited laser energy and camera resolution. Cross-stream measurement is further complicated by the predominately out-of-plane flow that requires thick laser sheets and short inter-frame times, which increase noise and measurement uncertainty. Choosing appropriate experimental parameters requires compromise between the spatial and temporal resolution and the dynamic range of the measurement. To explore these challenges, we do a case study on the wake of a fixed wing. The fixed model simplifies the experiment and allows direct measurements of the aerodynamic forces via load cell. We present a detailed analysis of the wake measurements, discuss the criteria for making accurate measurements, and present a solution for making quantitative aerodynamic load measurements behind free-flyers.

  17. Biomimetic Approach for Accurate, Real-Time Aerodynamic Coefficients Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodynamic and structural reliability and efficiency depends critically on the ability to accurately assess the aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting...

  18. Design of a wind tunnel scale model of an adaptive wind turbine blade for active aerodynamic load control experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulskamp, A.W.; Beukers, A.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Van Wingerden, J.W.; Barlas, T.

    2007-01-01

    Within wind energy research there is a drive towards the development of a “smart rotor”; a rotor of which the loading can be measured and controlled through the application of a sensor system, a control system and an aerodynamic device. Most promising solutions from an aerodynamic point of view are

  19. Design of a wind tunnel scale model of an adaptive wind turbine blade for active aerodynamic load control experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulskamp, A.W.; Beukers, A.; Bersee, H.E.N.; Van Wingerden, J.W.; Barlas, T.

    2007-01-01

    Within wind energy research there is a drive towards the development of a “smart rotor”; a rotor of which the loading can be measured and controlled through the application of a sensor system, a control system and an aerodynamic device. Most promising solutions from an aerodynamic point of view are

  20. The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Lees

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of wing morphologies in birds reflects their variety of flight styles and the associated aerodynamic and inertial requirements. Although the aerodynamics underlying wing morphology can be informed by aeronautical research, important differences exist between planes and birds. In particular, birds operate at lower, transitional Reynolds numbers than do most aircraft. To date, few quantitative studies have investigated the aerodynamic performance of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces and none have focused upon the differences between wings from different flight style groups. Dried wings from 10 bird species representing three distinct flight style groups were mounted on a force/torque sensor within a wind tunnel in order to test the hypothesis that wing morphologies associated with different flight styles exhibit different aerodynamic properties. Morphological differences manifested primarily as differences in drag rather than lift. Maximum lift coefficients did not differ between groups, whereas minimum drag coefficients were lowest in undulating flyers (Corvids. The lift to drag ratios were lower than in conventional aerofoils and data from free-flying soaring species; particularly in high frequency, flapping flyers (Anseriformes, which do not rely heavily on glide performance. The results illustrate important aerodynamic differences between the wings of different flight style groups that cannot be explained solely by simple wing-shape measures. Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristic of Three Typical Passenger Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yiping wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiment were employed to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of three typical rear shapes: fastback, notchback and squareback. The object was to investigate the sensibility of aerodynamic characteristic to the rear shape, and provide more comprehensive experimental data as a reference to validate the numerical simulation. In the wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamic six components of the three models with the yaw angles range from -15 and 15 were measured. The realizable k-ε model was employed to compute the aerodynamic drag, lift and surface pressure distribution at a zero yaw angle. In order to improve the calculation efficiency and accuracy, a hybrid Tetrahedron-Hexahedron-Pentahedral-Prism mesh strategy was used to discretize the computational domain. The computational results showed a good agreement with the experimental data and the results revealed that different rear shapes would induce very different aerodynamic characteristic, and it was difficult to determine the best shape. For example, the fastback would obtain very low aerodynamic drag, but it would induce positive lift which was not conducive to stability at high speed, and it also would induce bad crosswind stability. In order to reveal the internal connection between the aerodynamic drag and wake vortices, the turbulent kinetic, recirculation length, position of vortex core and velocity profile in the wake were investigated by numerical simulation and PIV experiment.

  2. The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Nudds, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of wing morphologies in birds reflects their variety of flight styles and the associated aerodynamic and inertial requirements. Although the aerodynamics underlying wing morphology can be informed by aeronautical research, important differences exist between planes and birds. In particular, birds operate at lower, transitional Reynolds numbers than do most aircraft. To date, few quantitative studies have investigated the aerodynamic performance of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces and none have focused upon the differences between wings from different flight style groups. Dried wings from 10 bird species representing three distinct flight style groups were mounted on a force/torque sensor within a wind tunnel in order to test the hypothesis that wing morphologies associated with different flight styles exhibit different aerodynamic properties. Morphological differences manifested primarily as differences in drag rather than lift. Maximum lift coefficients did not differ between groups, whereas minimum drag coefficients were lowest in undulating flyers (Corvids). The lift to drag ratios were lower than in conventional aerofoils and data from free-flying soaring species; particularly in high frequency, flapping flyers (Anseriformes), which do not rely heavily on glide performance. The results illustrate important aerodynamic differences between the wings of different flight style groups that cannot be explained solely by simple wing-shape measures. Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver.

  3. Aerodynamics of wind turbines emerging topics

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines with topics ranging from Fundamental to Application of horizontal axis wind turbines, this book presents advanced topics including: Basic Theory for Wind turbine Blade Aerodynamics, Computational Methods, and Special Structural Reinforcement Technique for Wind Turbine Blades.

  4. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  5. Migration on Wings Aerodynamics and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This book is an effort to explore the technical aspects associated with bird flight and migration on wings. After a short introduction on the birds migration, the book reviews the aerodynamics and Energetics of Flight and presents the calculation of the Migration Range. In addition, the authors explains aerodynamics of the formation flight and finally introduces great flight diagrams.

  6. Leading Edge Device Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gabriel COJOCARU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leading edge devices are conventionally used as aerodynamic devices that enhance performances during landing and in some cases during takeoff. The need to increase the efficiency of the aircrafts has brought the idea of maintaining as much as possible a laminar flow over the wings. This is possible only when the leading edge of the wings is free from contamination, therefore using the leading edge devices with the additional role of shielding during takeoff. Such a device based on the Krueger flap design is aerodynamically analyzed and optimized. The optimization comprises three steps: first, the positioning of the flap such that the shielding criterion is kept, second, the analysis of the flap size and third, the optimization of the flap shape. The first step is subject of a gradient based optimization process of the position described by two parameters, the position along the line and the deflection angle. For the third step the Adjoint method is used to gain insight on the shape of the Krueger flap that will extend the most the stall limit. All these steps have been numerically performed using Ansys Fluent and the results are presented for the optimized shape in comparison with the baseline configuration.

  7. Perching aerodynamics and trajectory optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    Advances in smart materials, actuators, and control architecture have enabled new flight capabilities for aircraft. Perching is one such capability, described as a vertical landing maneuver using in-flight shape reconfiguration in lieu of high thrust generation. A morphing, perching aircraft design is presented that is capable of post stall flight and very slow landing on a vertical platform. A comprehensive model of the aircraft's aerodynamics, with special regard to nonlinear affects such as flow separation and dynamic stall, is discussed. Trajectory optimization using nonlinear programming techniques is employed to show the effects that morphing and nonlinear aerodynamics have on the maneuver. These effects are shown to decrease the initial height and distance required to initiate the maneuver, reduce the bounds on the trajectory, and decrease the required thrust for the maneuver. Perching trajectories comparing morphing versus fixed-configuration and stalled versus un-stalled aircraft are presented. It is demonstrated that a vertical landing is possible in the absence of high thrust if post-stall flight capabilities and vehicle reconfiguration are utilized.

  8. Uncertainty Quantification in Numerical Aerodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    We consider uncertainty quantification problem in aerodynamic simulations. We identify input uncertainties, classify them, suggest an appropriate statistical model and, finally, estimate propagation of these uncertainties into the solution (pressure, velocity and density fields as well as the lift and drag coefficients). The deterministic problem under consideration is a compressible transonic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Strokes flow around an airfoil with random/uncertain data. Input uncertainties include: uncertain angle of attack, the Mach number, random perturbations in the airfoil geometry, mesh, shock location, turbulence model and parameters of this turbulence model. This problem requires efficient numerical/statistical methods since it is computationally expensive, especially for the uncertainties caused by random geometry variations which involve a large number of variables. In numerical section we compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and gradient-enhanced version of Kriging, radial basis functions and point collocation polynomial chaos, in their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry [D.Liu et al \\'17]. For modeling we used the TAU code, developed in DLR, Germany.

  9. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  10. Visual overview, oral detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    and with the coordinating nurse, who is the main keeper of the whiteboard. On the basis of observations, we find that coordination is accomplished through a highly intertwined process of technologically mediated visual overview combined with orally communicated details. The oral details serve to clarify and elaborate...

  11. LOCKE Detailed Specification Tables

    CERN Document Server

    Menezo, Lucia G; Gregorio, Jose-Angel

    2012-01-01

    This document shows the detailed specification of LOCKE coherence protocol for each cache controller, using a table-based technique. This representation provides clear, concise visual information yet includes sufficient detail (e.g., transient states) arguably lacking in the traditional, graphical form of state diagrams.

  12. Detail and survey radioautographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, Wm.W.

    1949-04-19

    The much used survey or contact type of radioautograph is indispensible for a study of the gross distribution of radioactive materials. A detail radioautograph is equally indispensible. The radioautograph makes possible the determination of plutonium with respect to cells. Outlines of survey and detail techniques are given.

  13. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  14. Application of 3D printing technology in aerodynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasek, K.; Wiklak, P.

    2014-08-01

    3D printing, as an additive process, offers much more than traditional machining techniques in terms of achievable complexity of a model shape. That fact was a motivation to adapt discussed technology as a method for creating objects purposed for aerodynamic testing. The following paper provides an overview of various 3D printing techniques. Four models of a standard NACA0018 aerofoil were manufactured in different materials and methods: MultiJet Modelling (MJM), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). Various parameters of the models have been included in the analysis: surface roughness, strength, details quality, surface imperfections and irregularities as well as thermal properties.

  15. Temperature decline thermography for laminar-turbulent transition detection in aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoesslin, Stefan; Stadlbauer, Martin; Gruendmayer, Juergen; Kähler, Christian J.

    2017-09-01

    Detailed knowledge about laminar-turbulent transition and heat transfer distribution of flows around complex aerodynamic components are crucial to achieve highest efficiencies in modern aerodynamical systems. Several measurement techniques have been developed to determine those parameters either quantitatively or qualitatively. Most of them require extensive instrumentation or give unreliable results as the boundary conditions are often not known with the required precision. This work introduces the simple and robust temperature decline method to qualitatively detect the laminar-turbulent transition and the respective heat transfer coefficients on a surface exposed to an air flow, according to patent application Stadlbauer et al. (Patentnr. WO2014198251 A1, 2014). This method provides results which are less sensitive to control parameters such as the heat conduction into the blade material and temperature inhomogeneities in the flow or blade. This method was applied to measurements with NACA0018 airfoils exposed to the flow of a calibration-free jet at various Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. For data analysis, a post-processing method was developed and qualified to determine a quantity proportional to the heat transfer coefficient into the flow. By plotting this quantity for each pixel of the surface, a qualitative, two-dimensional heat transfer map was obtained. The results clearly depicted the areas of onset and end of transition over the full span of the model and agreed with the expected behavior based on the respective flow condition. To validate the approach, surface hotfilm measurements were conducted simultaneously on the same NACA profile. Both techniques showed excellent agreement. The temperature decline method allows to visualize laminar-turbulent transitions on static or moving parts and can be applied on a very broad range of scales—from tiny airfoils up to large airplane wings.

  16. Aerodynamic seals for rotary machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Cirri, Massimiliano; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Williams, John Robert

    2016-02-09

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having multiple labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device segment also includes multiple flexures connected to the shoe plate and to a top interface element, wherein the multiple flexures are configured to allow the high pressure fluid to occupy a forward cavity and the low pressure fluid to occupy an aft cavity. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal attached to the top interface element at one first end and positioned about the flexures and the shoe plate at one second end.

  17. Aerodynamic research on tipvane windturbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbussel, G. J. W.; Vanholten, T.; Vankuik, G. A. M.

    1982-09-01

    Tipvanes are small auxiliary wings mounted at the tips of windturbine blades in such a way that a diffuser effect is generated, resulting in a mass flow augmentation through the turbine disc. For predicting aerodynamic loads on the tipvane wind turbine, the acceleration potential is used and an expansion method is applied. In its simplest form, this method can essentially be classified as a lifting line approach, however, with a proper choice of the basis load distributions of the lifting line, the numerical integration of the pressurefield becomes one dimensional. the integration of the other variable can be performed analytically. The complete analytical expression for the pressure field consists of two series of basic pressure fields. One series is related to the basic load distributions over the turbineblade, and the other series to the basic load distribution over the tipvane.

  18. The Aerodynamics of Frisbee Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Baumback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This project will describe the physics of a common Frisbee in flight. The aerodynamic forces acting on the Frisbee are lift and drag, with lift being explained by Bernoulli‘s equation and drag by the Prandtl relationship. Using V. R. Morrison‘s model for the 2-dimensional trajectory of a Frisbee, equations for the x- and y- components of the Frisbee‘s motion were written in Microsoft Excel and the path of the Frisbee was illustrated. Variables such as angle of attack, area, and attack velocity were altered to see their effect on the Frisbee‘s path and to speculate on ways to achieve maximum distance and height.

  19. On cup anemometer rotor aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup.

  20. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  1. The basic aerodynamics of floatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M. J.; Wood, D. H.

    1983-09-01

    It is pointed out that the basic aerodynamics of modern floatation ovens, in which the continuous, freshly painted metal strip is floated, dried, and cured, is the two-dimensional analog of that of hovercraft. The basic theory for the static lift considered in connection with the study of hovercraft has had spectacular success in describing the experimental results. This appears surprising in view of the crudity of the theory. The present investigation represents an attempt to explore the reasons for this success. An outline of the basic theory is presented and an approach is shown for deriving the resulting expressions for the lift from the full Navier-Stokes equations in a manner that clearly indicates the limitations on the validity of the expressions. Attention is given to the generally good agreement between the theory and the axisymmetric (about the centerline) results reported by Jaumotte and Kiedrzynski (1965).

  2. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pindado

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups’ front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer’s performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal, tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups’ center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor’s cup.

  3. Diving-flight aerodynamics of a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ponitz

    Full Text Available This study investigates the aerodynamics of the falcon Falco peregrinus while diving. During a dive peregrines can reach velocities of more than 320 km h⁻¹. Unfortunately, in freely roaming falcons, these high velocities prohibit a precise determination of flight parameters such as velocity and acceleration as well as body shape and wing contour. Therefore, individual F. peregrinus were trained to dive in front of a vertical dam with a height of 60 m. The presence of a well-defined background allowed us to reconstruct the flight path and the body shape of the falcon during certain flight phases. Flight trajectories were obtained with a stereo high-speed camera system. In addition, body images of the falcon were taken from two perspectives with a high-resolution digital camera. The dam allowed us to match the high-resolution images obtained from the digital camera with the corresponding images taken with the high-speed cameras. Using these data we built a life-size model of F. peregrinus and used it to measure the drag and lift forces in a wind-tunnel. We compared these forces acting on the model with the data obtained from the 3-D flight path trajectory of the diving F. peregrinus. Visualizations of the flow in the wind-tunnel uncovered details of the flow structure around the falcon's body, which suggests local regions with separation of flow. High-resolution pictures of the diving peregrine indicate that feathers pop-up in the equivalent regions, where flow separation in the model falcon occurred.

  4. Ontogeny of aerodynamics in mallards: comparative performance and developmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Terry R; Heers, Ashley M; Tobalske, Bret W

    2012-11-01

    Wing morphology correlates with flight performance and ecology among adult birds, yet the impact of wing development on aerodynamic capacity is not well understood. Recent work using chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar), a precocial flier, indicates that peak coefficients of lift and drag (C(L) and C(D)) and lift-to-drag ratio (C(L):C(D)) increase throughout ontogeny and that these patterns correspond with changes in feather microstructure. To begin to place these results in a comparative context that includes variation in life-history strategy, we used a propeller and force-plate model to study aerodynamic force production across a developmental series of the altricial-flying mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). We observed the same trend in mallards as reported for chukar in that coefficients of vertical (C(V)) and horizontal force (C(H)) and C(V):C(H) ratio increased with age, and that measures of gross-wing morphology (aspect ratio, camber and porosity) in mallards did not account for intraspecific trends in force production. Rather, feather microstructure (feather unfurling, rachis width, feather asymmetry and barbule overlap) all were positively correlated with peak C(V):C(H). Throughout ontogeny, mallard primary feathers became stiffer and less transmissive to air at both macroscale (between individual feathers) and microscale (between barbs/barbules/barbicels) levels. Differences between species were manifest primarily as heterochrony of aerodynamic force development. Chukar wings generated measurable aerodynamic forces early (aerodynamic force production until just prior to fledging (day 60), and showed dramatic improvement within a condensed 2-week period. These differences in timing may be related to mechanisms of escape used by juveniles, with mallards swimming to safety and chukar flap-running up slopes to take refuge. Future comparative work should test whether the need for early onset of aerodynamic force production in the chukar, compared with delayed, but

  5. Detailed Soils 24K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital soil survey and is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The information was...

  6. Periodic Unsteady Flow Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer: Studies on a Curved Surface, Combined Part I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic and heat transfer investigations were done on a constant curvature curved plate in a subsonic wind tunnel facility for various wake passing frequencies and zero pressure gradient conditions. Steady and unsteady boundary layer transition measurements were taken on the concave surface of the curved plate at different wake passing frequencies where a rotating squirrel-cage generated the unsteady wake flow. The data were analyzed using timeaveraged and ensemble-averaged techniques to provide insight into the growth of the boundary layer and transition. Ensemble-averaged turbulence intensity contours in the temporal spatial domain showed that transition was induced for increasing wake passing frequency and structure. The local heat transfer coefficient distribution for the concave and convex surface was determined at those wake passing frequencies using a liquid crystal heat transfer measurement technique. Detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer investigations showed that higher wake passing frequency caused transition to occur earlier on the concave surface. Local Stanton numbers were also calculated on the concave surface and compared with Stanton numbers predicted using a differential boundary layer and heat transfer calculation method. On the convex side, no effect of wake passing frequency on heat transfer was observed due to a separation bubble that induced transition.

  7. Influence of a humidor on the aerodynamics of baseballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Bohn, John L.

    2008-11-01

    We investigate whether storing baseballs in a controlled humidity environment significantly affects their aerodynamic properties. We measure the change in diameter and weight of baseballs as a function of relative humidity in which the balls are stored. The trajectories of pitched and batted baseballs are modeled to assess the difference between those stored at 30% relative humidity versus 50% relative humidity. We find that a drier baseball will curve slightly more than a humidified one for a given pitch velocity and rotation rate. We also find that aerodynamics alone would add 2ft to the distance a wetter baseball ball is hit. This increased distance is compensated by a 6ft reduction in the batted distance due to the change in the coefficient of restitution of the ball. We discuss consequences of these results for baseball played at Coors Field in Denver, where baseballs have been stored in a humidor at 50% relative humidity since 2002.

  8. Experimental Investigation on Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Paraglider Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashud, Mohammad; Umemura, Akira

    The fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of a paraglider’s canopy are investigated in wind tunnel experiments using an inflatable cell model designed to represent the dynamic behaviors of each cell comprising the canopy. At attack angles greater than a few degrees, the cell model inflates fully. To characterize its aerodynamic characteristics, we focus our attention on the flow around the inflated cell model at the plane of symmetry of the model. The cross-sectional profile of the inflated cell model, streamline pattern, internal air pressure and external surface pressure distribution are measured at various attack angles in order to identify the function of air intake and to obtain the lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil with an open air intake. The results reveal the mechanism of how the cell inflates into a stable wing shape and bears the buckling force caused by the cables suspending a pay load.

  9. Aerodynamics of ski jumping: experiments and CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meile, W.; Reisenberger, E.; Brenn, G. [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Graz (Austria); Mayer, M. [VRVis GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Schmoelzer, B.; Mueller, W. [Medical University of Graz, Department for Biophysics, Graz (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a model ski jumper is investigated experimentally at full-scale Reynolds numbers and computationally applying a standard RANS code. In particular we focus on the influence of different postures on aerodynamic forces in a wide range of angles of attack. The experimental results proved to be in good agreement with full-scale measurements with athletes in much larger wind tunnels, and form a reliable basis for further predictions of the effects of position changes on the performance. The comparison of CFD results with the experiments shows poor agreement, but enables a clear outline of simulation potentials and limits when accurate predictions of effects from small variations are required. (orig.)

  10. HF wedge #1" detail of the wedge tip taken at VNIITF in the construction workshop. The jig mounted on top is used to measure the conformity to the drawings.

    CERN Multimedia

    Official photographer of VNIITF (photo scanned by T. Camporesi)

    2001-01-01

    The photo has been taken as documetation of the acceptance procedure of the first wedge for the very forward calorimeter of CMS (HF). The detail shows the holes where the quartz fibers are going to be stuffed and the jig used to measure that the geometry was within the specified tolerances and that the geometry alignement track was conforming to the specifications.

  11. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. The results of the Phase I investigation of concepts for morphing aircraft are...

  12. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

  13. Prediction of Unsteady Transonic Aerodynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An accurate prediction of aero-elastic effects depends on an accurate prediction of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Perhaps the most difficult speed regime is...

  14. Aerodynamic Efficiency Enhancements for Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for aerodynamics-based efficiency enhancements for air vehicles is presented. Concepts are presented for morphing aircraft, to enable the aircraft to...

  15. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 10th, Palo Alto, CA, June 22-24, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 AND 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to vortex physics and aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; STOL/VSTOL/rotors; missile and reentry vehicle aerodynamics; CFD as applied to aircraft; unsteady aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; low-speed/high-lift aerodynamics; airfoil/wing aerodynamics; measurement techniques; CFD-solvers/unstructured grid; airfoil/drag prediction; high angle-of-attack aerodynamics; and CFD grid methods. Particular attention is given to transonic-numerical investigation into high-angle-of-attack leading-edge vortex flow, prediction of rotor unsteady airloads using vortex filament theory, rapid synthesis for evaluating the missile maneuverability parameters, transonic calculations of wing/bodies with deflected control surfaces; the static and dynamic flow field development about a porous suction surface wing; the aircraft spoiler effects under wind shear; multipoint inverse design of an infinite cascade of airfoils, turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows; numerical investigation of tail buffet on the F-18 aircraft; the surface grid generation in a parameter space; and the flip flop nozzle extended to supersonic flows.

  16. Unsteady aerodynamic modelling of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coton, F.N.; Galbraith, R.A. [Univ. og Glasgow, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The following current and future work is discussed: Collaborative wind tunnel based PIV project to study wind turbine wake structures in head-on and yawed flow. Prescribed wake model has been embedded in a source panel representation of the wind tunnel walls to allow comparison with experiment; Modelling of tower shadow using high resolution but efficient vortex model in tower shadow domain; Extension of model to yawing flow; Upgrading and tuning of unsteady aerodynamic model for low speed, thick airfoil flows. Glasgow has a considerable collection of low speed dynamic stall data. Currently, the Leishman - Beddoes model is not ideally suited to such flows. For example: Range of stall onset criteria used for dynamic stall prediction including Beddoes. Wide variation of stall onset prediction. Beddoes representation was developed primarily with reference to compressible flows. Analyses of low speed data from Glasgow indicate deficiencies in the current model; Predicted versus measured response during ramp down motion. Modification of the Beddoes representation is required to obtain a fit with the measured data. (EG)

  17. Fluidic Actuation and Control of Munition Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    RESULTS II. TECHNICAL BACKGOUND II.1 Aerodynamic Flow Control Active aerodynamic flow control techniques in recent years have primarily focused on... techniques used in previous studies have steady and unsteady blowing (Hsaio et. al., 1990), vibrating ribbons or flaps (Huang et. al., 1987), and usage...with 4 cables, and increased the tunnel speed until the lift produced by the wings balanced the model weight. Kiya et. al. (1990) used four piano

  18. The Aerodynamics of High Speed Aerial Weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Simon A.

    1999-01-01

    The focus of this work is the investigation of the complex compressible flow phenomena associated with high speed aerial weapons. A three dimen- sional multiblock finite volume flow solver was developed with the aim of studying the aerodynamics of missile configurations and their component structures. The first component of the study involved the aerodynamic investigation of the isolated components used in the design of conventional missile config- urations. The computati...

  19. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Takeshi; SEO, KAZUYA

    2013-01-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through...

  20. Quantum yield measurements of short-lived photoactivation intermediates in DNA photolyase: toward a detailed understanding of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdin, Martin; Lukacs, Andras; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Eker, André P M; Brettel, Klaus; Vos, Marten H

    2010-03-11

    The light-dependent DNA repair enzyme photolyase contains a unique evolutionary conserved triple tryptophan electron transfer chain (W382-W359-W306 in photolyase from E. coli) that bridges the approximately 15 A distance between the buried flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and the surface of the protein. Upon excitation of the semireduced flavin (FADH(o)), electron transfer through the chain leads to formation of fully reduced flavin (FADH(-); required for DNA repair) and oxidation of the most remote tryptophan residue W306, followed by its deprotonation. The thus-formed tryptophanyl radical W306(o)(+) is reduced either by an extrinsic reductant or by reverse electron transfer from FADH(-). Altogether the kinetics of these charge transfer reactions span 10 orders of magnitude, from a few picoseconds to tens of milliseconds. We investigated electron transfer processes in the picosecond-nanosecond time window bridging the time domains covered by ultrafast pump-probe and "classical" continuous probe techniques. Using a recent dedicated setup, we directly show that virtually no absorption change between 300 ps and 10 ns occurs in wild-type photolyase, implying that no charge recombination takes place in this time window. In contrast, W306F mutant photolyase showed a partial absorption recovery with a time constant of 0.85 ns. In wild-type photolyase, the quantum yield of FADH(-) W306(o)(+) was found at 19 +/- 4%, in reference to the established quantum yield of the long-lived excited state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+). With this yield, the optical spectrum of the excited state of FADH(o) can be constructed from ultrafast spectroscopic data; this spectrum is dominated by excited state absorption extending from below 450 to 850 nm. The new experimental results, taken together with previous data, allow us to propose a detailed kinetic and energetic scheme of the electron transfer chain.

  1. Aerodynamic effects on the heat absorption of film-cooled turbine blades. Development of the measurement technique. Final report; Einfluss der Aerodynamik auf die Waermeaufnahme filmgekuehlter Turbinenschaufeln. Entwicklung der Messtechnik. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, S.; Schiele, R.; Schulz, A.

    1996-12-31

    A measuring system is to be developed that enables high-resolution heat transfer measurements on turbine blades. The method of measurement is both theoretical and experimental. Heat transfer is calculated on the basis of the temperature field in the blade via the temperature gradients normal to the blade surface. The temperature field is calculated using a finite element method. The thermal boundary conditions for the calulations are derived from the experiment. The spatial resolution of the method depends primarily on the temperature measurement at the blade surface. In the experiments, an IR scanner was used for detailed surface temperature measurements, and a resolution of 0.5 mm was achieved in both spatial directions. Higher resolutions may be obtained by using objectives with a better focus. For maximum accuracy of the measurements, the data prvided by the thermocamera were calibrated by a comparison with thermoelements using a method developed at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des vorliegenden Forschungsvorhabens soll die Entwicklung einer Messtechnik vorangetrieben werden, die die Ermittlung des Waermeuebergangs an ausgefuehrten Turbinenschaufeln mit hoher Aufloesung ermoeglicht. Die Messmethode hat sowohl experimentellen als auch theoretischen Charakter. Mit ihr wird der Waermeuebergang ueber den Umweg der Berechnung des Temperaturfeldes in der Schaufel aus den Temperaturgradienten normal zur Schaufeloberflaeche gebildet. Die Berechnung des Temperaturfeldes erfolgt mit Hilfe eines Finite-Elemente-Verfahrens. Die thermischen Randbedingungen fuer die Berechnung kommen aus dem Experiment. Das raeumliche Aufloesungsvermoegen des Verfahrens haengt im wesentlichen von der Temperaturmessung an der Schaufeloberflaeche ab. Im Rahmen des Vorhabens wurde daher ein Infrarotscanner eingesetzt, mit dem die Oberflaechentemperaturen detailliert erfasst werden. In dem verwendeten Aufbau betraegt die Aufloesung in beiden

  2. Error Estimate of the Ares I Vehicle Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics Based on Turbulent Navier-Stokes Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Ghaffari, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics for the Ares I class of vehicles, along with the associated error estimate derived from an iterative convergence grid refinement, are presented. Computational results are based on the unstructured grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver USM3D, with an assumption that the flow is fully turbulent over the entire vehicle. This effort was designed to complement the prior computational activities conducted over the past five years in support of the Ares I Project with the emphasis on the vehicle s last design cycle designated as the A106 configuration. Due to a lack of flight data for this particular design s outer mold line, the initial vehicle s aerodynamic predictions and the associated error estimates were first assessed and validated against the available experimental data at representative wind tunnel flow conditions pertinent to the ascent phase of the trajectory without including any propulsion effects. Subsequently, the established procedures were then applied to obtain the longitudinal aerodynamic predictions at the selected flight flow conditions. Sample computed results and the correlations with the experimental measurements are presented. In addition, the present analysis includes the relevant data to highlight the balance between the prediction accuracy against the grid size and, thus, the corresponding computer resource requirements for the computations at both wind tunnel and flight flow conditions. NOTE: Some details have been removed from selected plots and figures in compliance with the sensitive but unclassified (SBU) restrictions. However, the content still conveys the merits of the technical approach and the relevant results.

  3. Frequency-domain characteristics of aerodynamic loads of offshore floating vertical axis wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Michael; Collu, M.

    2015-01-01

    The re-emerging interest in vertical axis wind turbines for floating offshore applications has led to a need to investigate the relatively complex dynamics of such floating offshore structures. Through the use of a coupled model of dynamics this article investigates the frequency-domain character......The re-emerging interest in vertical axis wind turbines for floating offshore applications has led to a need to investigate the relatively complex dynamics of such floating offshore structures. Through the use of a coupled model of dynamics this article investigates the frequency-domain...... characteristics of floating vertical axis wind turbine aerodynamic loads. The impact of platform induced motion on aerodynamic loads is discussed in detail, with results indicating an increase in aerodynamic loads of several orders of magnitude over the range of frequencies usually containing significant wave...

  4. Spacecraft aerodynamics and trajectory simulation during aerobraking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-pu ZHANG; Bo HAN; Cheng-yi ZHANG

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC)approach to simulate rarefied aerodynamic characteristics during the aerobraking process of the NASA Mars Global Surveyor(MGS)spacecraft.The research focuses on the flowfield and aerodynamic characteristics distribution under various free stream densities.The variation regularity of aerodynamic coefficients is analyzed.The paper also develops an aerodynamics-aeroheating-trajectory integrative simulation model to preliminarily calculate the aerobraking orbit transfer by combining the DSMC technique and the classical kinematics theory.The results show that the effect of the planetary atmospheric density,the spacecraft yaw,and the pitch attitudes on the spacecraft aerodynamics is significant.The numerical results are in good agreement with the existing results reported in the literature.The aerodynamics-aeroheating-trajectory integrative simulation model can simulate the orbit tran,sfer in the complete aerobraking mission.The current results of the spacecraft trajectory show that the aerobraking maneuvers have good performance of attitude control.

  5. The combustion chemistry of a fuel tracer: Measured flame speeds and ignition delays and a detailed chemical kinetic model for the oxidation of acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, S.; Black, G.; Simmie, J.M.; Curran, H.J. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Chaumeix, N.; Yahyaoui, M. [Institut de Combustion Aerothermique Reactivite et Environnement, CNRS, Orleans (France); Donohue, R. [Information Technology, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-02-15

    Acetone ignition delay and stretch-free laminar flame speed measurements have been carried out and a kinetic model has been developed to simulate these and literature data for acetone and for ketene, which was found to be an important intermediate in its oxidation. The mechanism has been based on one originally devised for dimethyl ether and modified through validation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane sub-mechanisms. Acetone oxidation in argon was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1340-1930 K, at 1 atm and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2; it is also shown that the addition of up to 15% acetone to a stoichiometric n-heptane mixture has no effect on the measured ignition delay times. Flame speeds at 298 K and 1 atm of pure acetone in air were measured in a spherical bomb; a maximum flame speed of {proportional_to}35 cm s{sup -1} at {phi}=1.15 is indicated. (author)

  6. Three Latin Phonological Details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgit Anette

    2006-01-01

    The present paper deals with three minor details of Latin phonology: 1) the development of the initial sequence *u¿l¿-, where it is suggested that an apparent vacillation between ul- and vol-/vul- represents sandhi variants going back to the proto-language, 2) the adjectives ama¯rus ‘bitter' and ...

  7. Small, high pressure ratio compressor: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, C. A.; Erwin, J. R.; Perrone, G. L.; Nelson, E. L.; Tu, R. K.; Bosco, A.

    1973-01-01

    The Small, High-Pressure-Ratio Compressor Program was directed toward the analysis, design, and fabrication of a centrifugal compressor providing a 6:1 pressure ratio and an airflow rate of 2.0 pounds per second. The program consists of preliminary design, detailed areodynamic design, mechanical design, and mechanical acceptance tests. The preliminary design evaluate radial- and backward-curved blades, tandem bladed impellers, impeller-and diffuser-passage boundary-layer control, and vane, pipe, and multiple-stage diffusers. Based on this evaluation, a configuration was selected for detailed aerodynamic and mechanical design. Mechanical acceptance test was performed to demonstrate that mechanical design objectives of the research package were met.

  8. Intercomparison of Methods for the Simultaneous Estimation of Zero-Plane Displacement and Aerodynamic Roughness Length from Single-Level Eddy-Covariance Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, A.; Boer, van de A.; Moene, A.F.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-01-01

    We applied three approaches to estimate the zero-plane displacement d through the aerodynamic measurement height z (with z = zm - d and zm being the measurement height above the surface), and the aerodynamic roughness length z0, from single-level eddy covariance data. Two approaches (one iterative a

  9. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Irikado, Tomoko; Fukuzoe, Moriyasu; Shima, Eiji

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted with different body configurations, attack angles, and roll angles. A six component balance, oilflow visualization, Schlieren images were used throughout the experiments. It was found that, at zero angle-of-attack, the flow around the body were perturbed and its drag (axial force) characteristics were significantly influenced by protruding body components such as flanges, cable ducts, and attitude control units of SMSJ (Solid Motor Side Jet), while the nozzle had a minor role. With angle-of-attack of five degree, normal force of CNα = 3.50±0.03 was measured along with complex flow features observed in the full-component model; whereas no crossflow separations were induced around the no-protuberance model with CNα = 2.58±0.10. These values were almost constant with respect to the angle-of-attack in both of the cases. Furthermore, presence of roll angle made the flow more complicated, involving interactions of separation vortices. These data provide us with fundamental and important aerodynamic insights of the Advanced Solid Rocket, and they will be utilized as reference data for the corresponding numerical analysis.

  10. Parameterization of Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness of Natural Regions Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard; Stewart, Pamela

    1998-01-01

    Parameterizations of the frontal area index and canopy area index of natural or randomly distributed plants are developed, and applied to the estimation of local aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery. The formulas are expressed in terms of the subpixel fractional vegetation cover and one non-dimensional geometric parameter that characterizes the plant's shape. Geometrically similar plants and Poisson distributed plant centers are assumed. An appropriate averaging technique to extend satellite pixel-scale estimates to larger scales is provided. The parameterization is applied to the estimation of aerodynamic roughness using satellite imagery for a 2.3 sq km coniferous portion of the Landes Forest near Lubbon, France, during the 1986 HAPEX-Mobilhy Experiment. The canopy area index is estimated first for each pixel in the scene based on previous estimates of fractional cover obtained using Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. Next, the results are incorporated into Raupach's (1992, 1994) analytical formulas for momentum roughness and zero-plane displacement height. The estimates compare reasonably well to reference values determined from measurements taken during the experiment and to published literature values. The approach offers the potential for estimating regionally variable, vegetation aerodynamic roughness lengths over natural regions using satellite imagery when there exists only limited knowledge of the vegetated surface.

  11. Analysis of Aerodynamic Noise Generated from Inclined Circular Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YasutakeHaramoto; ShoujiYasuda; 等

    2000-01-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery.The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel.in this study,aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numericaslly by the following two step method,First,the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme.Next.the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder.based on modified Lighthill-Curl's equation.It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow.In other works,the Peak level of the radiated noise decreases apidly with inclination of the circular cylinder.The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value .and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum fequency of the sound pressue level and tendency of noise reduction,So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  13. Analysis of aerodynamic noise generated from inclined circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramoto, Yasutake; Yasuda, Shouji; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2000-06-01

    Making clear the generation mechanism of fluid dynamic noise is essential to reduce noise deriving from turbomachinery. The analysis of the aerodynamic noise generated from circular cylinder is carried out numerically and experimentally in a low noise wind tunnel. In this study, aerodynamic sound radiated from a circular cylinder in uniform flow is predicted numerically by the following two step method. First, the three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is solved using the high order accurate upwind scheme. Next, the sound pressure level at the observed point is calculated from the fluctuating surface pressure on the cylinder, based on modified Lighthill-Curl’s equation. It is worth to note that the noise generated from the model is reduced rapidly when it is inclined against the mean flow. In other words, the peak level of the radiated noise decreases rapidly with inclination of the circular cylinder. The simulated SPL for the inclined circular cylinder is compared with the measured value, and good agreement is obtained for the peak spectrum frequency of the sound pressure level and tendency of noise reduction. So we expect that the change of flow structures makes reduction of the aerodynamic noise from the inclined models.

  14. The Mechanical Impact of Aerodynamic Stall on Tunnel Ventilation Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Sheard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work aimed at establishing the ability of a tunnel ventilation fan to operate without risk of mechanical failure in the event of aerodynamic stall. The research establishes the aerodynamic characteristics of a typical tunnel ventilation fan when operated in both stable and stalled aerodynamic conditions, with and without an anti-stall stabilisation ring, with and without a “nonstalling” blade angle and at full, half, and one quarter design speed. It also measures the fan’s peak stress, thus facilitating an analysis of the implications of the experimental results for mechanical design methodology. The paper concludes by presenting three different strategies for tunnel ventilation fan selection in applications where the selected fan will most likely stall. The first strategy selects a fan with a low-blade angle that is nonstalling. The second strategy selects a fan with a high-pressure developing capability. The third strategy selects a fan with a fitted stabilisation ring. Tunnel ventilation system designers each have their favoured fan selection strategy. However, all three strategies can produce system designs within which a tunnel ventilation fan performs reliably in-service. The paper considers the advantages and disadvantages of each selection strategy and considered the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  15. Aerodynamics of two-dimensional flapping wings in tandem configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lua, K. B.; Lu, H.; Zhang, X. H.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a fundamental investigation on the aerodynamics of two-dimensional flapping wings in tandem configuration in forward flight. Of particular interest are the effects of phase angle (φ) and center-to-center distance (L) between the front wing and the rear wing on the aerodynamic force generation at a Reynolds number of 5000. Both experimental and numerical methods were employed. A force sensor was used to measure the time-history aerodynamic forces experienced by the two wings and digital particle image velocimetry was utilized to obtain the corresponding flow structures. Both the front wing and the rear wing executed the same simple harmonic motions with φ ranging from -180° to 180° and four values of L, i.e., 1.5c, 2c, 3c, and 4c (c is the wing chord length). Results show that at fixed L = 2c, tandem wings perform better than the sum of two single wings that flap independently in terms of thrust for phase angle approximately from -90° to 90°. The maximum thrust on the rear wing occurs during in-phase flapping (φ = 0°). Correlation of transient thrust and flow structure indicates that there are generally two types of wing-wake interactions, depending on whether the rear wing crosses the shear layer shed from the front wing. Finally, increasing wing spacing has similar effect as reducing the phase angle, and an approximate mathematical model is derived to describe the relationship between these two parameters.

  16. Aerodynamics of a hybrid airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andan, Amelda Dianne; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of a numerical study of the aerodynamic parameters of a wingless and a winged-hull airship. The total forces and moment coefficients of the airships have been computed over a range of angles. The results obtained show that addition of a wing to a conventional airship increases the lift has three times the lifting force at positive angle of attack as compared to a wingless airship whereas the drag increases in the range of 19% to 58%. The longitudinal and directional stabilities were found to be statically stable, however, both the conventional airship and the hybrid or winged airships were found to have poor rolling stability. Wingless airship has slightly higher longitudinal stability than a winged airship. The winged airship has better directional stability than the wingless airship. The wingless airship only possesses static rolling stability in the range of yaw angles of -5° to 5°. On the contrary, the winged airship initially tested does not possess rolling stability at all. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations show that modifications to the wing placement and its dihedral have strong positive effect on the rolling stability. Raising the wings to the center of gravity and introducing a dihedral angle of 5° stabilizes the rolling motion of the winged airship.

  17. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  18. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  19. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Zobeck, Ted M.; Kocurek, Gary; Yang, Zong-Liang; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2016-02-01

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely, clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  20. New insights into the wind-dust relationship in sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment from wind tunnel experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad

    2016-01-22

    Numerous parameterizations have been developed for predicting wind erosion, yet the physical mechanism of dust emission is not fully understood. Sandblasting is thought to be the primary mechanism, but recent studies suggest that dust emission by direct aerodynamic entrainment can be significant under certain conditions. In this work, using wind tunnel experiments, we investigated some of the lesser understood aspects of dust emission in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment for three soil types, namely clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam. First, we explored the role of erodible surface roughness on dust emitted by aerodynamic entrainment. Second, we compared the emitted dust concentration in sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment under a range of wind friction velocities. Finally, we explored the sensitivity of emitted dust particle size distribution (PSD) to soil type and wind friction velocity in these two processes. The dust concentration in aerodynamic entrainment showed strong positive correlation, no significant correlation, and weak negative correlation, for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively, with the erodible soil surface roughness. The dust in aerodynamic entrainment was significant constituting up to 28.3, 41.4, and 146.4% compared to sandblasting for the clay, silty clay loam, and clay loam, respectively. PSD of emitted dust was sensitive to soil type in both sandblasting and aerodynamic entrainment. PSD was sensitive to the friction velocity in aerodynamic entrainment but not in sandblasting. Our results highlight the need to consider the details of sandblasting and direct aerodynamic entrainment processes in parameterizing dust emission in global/regional climate models.

  1. Measures of Effectiveness-CONUS Reorganization 1973 (As Pertains to FORSCOM, TRADOC, HSC, OTEA and CAA). Volume 2. Detailed Evaluation Plan and Appendixes A to E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    the on-going effectiveness of the Army in performing its missions and functions. • To serve as a foundation for taking corrective actions in...an ad hoc group estab- lished for this purpose, Army Audit Agency or IG representatives, or some other independent review source. A substantial...MHnppBWPPP jj qpipBwgip^ Bpp ^jpff gggy ■»--ii"«Hrs.-!■>-»:-■<*■--■ ■.^-.;r^~:’’r^T~~’j^"-<’- ̂ p^WSjgHlWfl PERFORMANCE MEASURE 1.1 The percentage

  2. Electric Energy Consumption of the Full Scale Research Biogas Plant “Unterer Lindenhof”: Results of Longterm and Full Detail Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jungbluth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work thoroughly evaluates the electric power consumption of a full scale, 3 × 923 m3 complete stirred tank reactor (CSTR research biogas plant with a production capacity of 186 kW of electric power. The plant was fed with a mixture of livestock manure and renewable energy crops and was operated under mesophilic conditions. This paper will provide an insight into precise electric energy consumption measurements of a full scale biogas plant over a period of two years. The results showed that a percentage of 8.5% (in 2010 and 8.7% (in 2011 of the produced electric energy was consumed by the combined heat and power unit (CHP, which was required to operate the biogas plant. The consumer unit agitators with 4.3% (in 2010 and 4.0% (in 2011 and CHP unit with 2.5% (in 2010 and 2011 accounted for the highest electrical power demand, in relation to the electric energy produced by the CHP unit. Calculations show that 51% (in 2010 and 46% (in 2011 of the total electric energy demand was due to the agitators. The results finally showed the need for permanent measurements to identify and quantify the electric energy saving potentials of full scale biogas plants.

  3. The use of refined model of aerodynamic moment in the problem of reconstruction of the Foton satellite rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Vas. V.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2011-04-01

    A new mathematical model of the uncontrolled rotational motion of the Foton satellite is presented. The model is based on the Euler dynamic equations of rigid body motion and takes into account the action upon the satellite of four external mechanical moments: gravitational, restoring aerodynamic, moment with constant components in the satellite-fixed coordinate system, and moment arising due to interaction of the Earth's magnetic field with the satellite's proper magnetic moment. To calculate the aerodynamic moment a special geometrical model of the outer satellite shell is used. Detailed form of the formulas giving above-mentioned moments in the equations of satellite motion is agreed with the form of the considered motion. Model testing is performed by determining with its help the rotational motion of the Foton M-2 satellite (it was in orbit from May 31, 2005 to June 16, 2005) using the data of the onboard measurements of the Earth's magnetic field strength. The use of the new model has led to a relatively small improvement in the accuracy of the motion determination, but allowed us to obtain physically real estimates of some parameters.

  4. Detailed L3 measurements of Bose-Einstein correlations and a region of anti-correlations in hadronic $Z^0$ decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, T; Kittel, W; Novak, T

    2010-01-01

    L3 preliminary data of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations are reported for hadronic Z^0 decays in e+e- annihilation at LEP. The invariant relative momentum Q is identified as the eigenvariable of the measured correlation function. Significant anti-correlations are observed in the Bose-Einstein correlation function in a broad region of 0.5 - 1.6 GeV with a minimum at Q close to 0.8 GeV. Absence of Bose-Einstein correlations is demonstrated in the region above Q >= 1.6 GeV. The effective source size is found to decrease with increasing value of the transverse mass of the pair, similarly to hadron-hadron and heavy ion reactions. These feautes and our data are described well by the non-thermal tau-model, which is based on strong space-time momentum-correlations.

  5. Z' phenomenology: Constraints from low-energy measurements, and detailed study at TeV-scale lepton and hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, Matthew Harold [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, I discuss the phenomenology of new massive neutral gauge bosons, or Z' bosons, concentrating on experimental tests by which the properties of a Z' boson could be determined. In Chapter I, I briefly review the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and discuss the motivation for extending it. I review some of the extensions to the Standard Model that predict the existence of Z' bosons, and present a general, model-independent parameterization of the Z's properties, as well as a simpler parameterization that applies to the most important class of models. In Chapter II, I discuss present-day limits on the existence of Z' bosons, both from direct searches, and from indirect higher-order tests. In Chapter III, I discuss the production and discovery of a Z' at a future hadron collider, such as the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Discovery of a Z' at the LHC may be possible if its mass is less than 5 TeV. I also discuss the experimental tests of its properties that could be performed at such a collider, emphasizing the measurement of leptonic asymmetries. Finally, the Chapter IV, I discuss the experimental tests that could be performed at an e+ e- collider with √s = MZ'. I include several higher-order effects, such as initial-state radiation and beamstrahlung, whose inclusion is necesary for a realistic description of the experimental environment at a very high energy e+ e- collider. The combination of leptonic and hadronic experiments permits the measurement of all of the parameters.

  6. Z{prime} phenomenology: Constraints from low-energy measurements, and detailed study at TeV-scale lepton and hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, M.H.

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, I discuss the phenomenology of new massive neutral gauge bosons, or Z{prime} bosons, concentrating on experimental tests by which the properties of a Z{prime} boson could be determined. In Chapter I, I briefly review the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and discuss the motivation for extending it. I review some of the extensions to the Standard Model that predict the existence of Z{prime} bosons, and present a general, model-independent parameterization of the Z{prime}s properties, as well as a simpler parameterization that applies to the most important class of models. In Chapter II, I discuss present-day limits on the existence of Z{prime} bosons, both from direct searches, and from indirect higher-order tests. In Chapter III, I discuss the production and discovery of a Z{prime} at a future hadron collider, such as the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Discovery of a Z{prime} at the LHC may be possible if its mass is less than 5 TeV. I also discuss the experimental tests of its properties that could be performed at such a collider, emphasizing the measurement of leptonic asymmetries. Finally, the Chapter IV, I discuss the experimental tests that could be performed at an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with {radical}s = M{sub Z{prime}}. I include several higher-order effects, such as initial-state radiation and beamstrahlung, whose inclusion is necesary for a realistic description of the experimental environment at a very high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider. The combination of leptonic and hadronic experiments permits the measurement of all of the parameters.

  7. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  8. Discrete vortex method simulations of the aerodynamic admittance in bridge aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj; Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Larsen, Allan;

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics. The method introduces a model for describing oncoming turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence...

  9. Aerodynamics support of research instrument development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. Scott

    1990-01-01

    A new velocimetry system is currently being developed at NASA LaRC. The device, known as a Doppler global velocimeter (DGV), can record three velocity components within a plane simultaneously and in near real time. To make measurements the DGV, like many other velocimetry systems, relies on the scattering of light from numerous small particles in a flow field. The particles or seeds are illuminated by a sheet of laser light and viewed by two CCD cameras. The scattered light from the particles will have a frequency which is a function of the source laser light frequency, the viewing angle, and most importantly the seed velocities. By determining the scattered light intensity the velocity can be measured at all points within the light sheet simultaneously. Upon completion of DGV component construction and initial check out a series of tests in the Basic Aerodynamic Research (wind) Tunnel (BART) are scheduled to verify instrument operation and accuracy. If the results are satisfactory, application of the DGV to flight measurements on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) are planned. The DGV verification test in the BART facility will utilize a 75 degree swept delta wing model. A major task undertaken this summer included evaluation of previous results for this model. A specific series of tests matching exactly the previous tests and exploring new DGV capabilities were developed and suggested. Another task undertaken was to study DGV system installation possibilities in the F-18 HARV aircraft. In addition, a simple seeding system modification was developed and utilized to make Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the BART facility.

  10. Experimental study on the aerodynamic performance of a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Gotoh, Futoshi (Gunma Univ., Kiryu (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a Savonius rotor has been studied by measuring the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces at various rotor angles and tip-speed ratios. It is found that the pressure distributions on the rotating rotor differ remarkably from those on the still rotor especially on the convex side of the advancing blade, where a low pressure region is formed by the moving wall effect of the blade. The torque and power performances, evaluated by integrating the pressure, are in close agreement with those by the direct torque measurement. The drag and side force performance is also studied.

  11. [Evaluation of the Fundamental Performance of 4 Latex Agglutination Reagents to Measure Anti-TP Antibody Concentration and Detailed Investigation of Decision-Mismatched Samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Atsushi; Niizeki, Noriyasu; Kurose, Hitomi; Yonezawa, Takatoshi; Sasaki, Rie; Tachibana, Mineji; Tomoda, Yutaka; Kino, Shuichi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Serological diagnosis of syphilis can be made by using the serological test for syphilis (STS) method for detecting a lipid antibody and Treponema pallidum (TP) method for detecting the anti-TP-specific antibody. In STS and TP methods, the basis using latex agglutination reaction has been used in many facilities. However, in latex agglutination, false-positive results due to non-specific reaction have sometimes been obtained in reactions of a routine laboratory test reagent detecting the anti-TP antibody used in our medical laboratory. We evaluated the fundamental performance of 4 reagents to measure anti-TP antibody concentration using latex agglutination: Reagents A, B, C and D produced by SEKISUI MEDICAL, FUJI REBIO, DENKA SEIKEN and SHINO TEST, respectively. We examined the correlations between Reagent A (routine laboratory test reagent) and Reagents B, C, and D in sera from 68 patients, and we performed additional investigation by using a neutralization test, immunochromatography, Western blotting, FTA-ABS (IgG), and STS method by an automatic analyzer for 13 decision-mismatched samples. The fundamental performance of each reagent was as good as that previously reported. Eight of the 13 decision-mismatched samples were false positives due to non-specific reaction of Reagent A. In latex agglutination non-specific reaction is inevitable. However, this study strongly suggests that using a neutralization test and immunochromatography that can be performed quickly is sufficient to verify whether positive reactions are true or false.

  12. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H{sup −} ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrie, S. R., E-mail: scott.lawrie@stfc.ac.uk [STFC ISIS Pulsed Spallation Neutron and Muon Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford (United Kingdom); John Adams Institute of Accelerator Science, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T. [STFC ISIS Pulsed Spallation Neutron and Muon Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H{sup −} beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  13. Aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed bridges under erection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-jun; SUN Bing-nan; XIANG Hai-fan

    2005-01-01

    In this work, nonlinear multimode aerodynamic analysis of the Jingsha Bridge under erection over the Yangtze River is conducted, and the evolutions of structural dynamic characteristics and the aerodynamic stability with erection are numerically generated. Instead of the simplified method, nonlinear multimode aerodynamic analysis is suggested to predict the aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed bridges under erection. The analysis showed that the aerodynamic stability maximizes at the relatively early stages, and decreases as the erection proceeds. The removal of the temporary piers in side spans and linking of the main girder to the anchor piers have important influence on the dynamic characteristics and aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed bridges under erection.

  14. Aerodynamics of bridge hangers in smooth and turbulent flow and implications on aeroelastic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demartino, Cristoforo; Ricciardelli, Francesco; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2015-01-01

    and Georgakis, measuring roughness and shape deviation of the wind tunnel model, justified the measured aerodynamic coefficients. Flamand et al. [4], using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), measured the spatial and temporal correlation of the pressure pattern along the HDPE tube with surface...... of a full scale yawed bridge cable section model, for varying Reynolds numbers and wind angles-of-attack, using passive dynamic wind tunnel tests. They demonstrated that the in-plane aerodynamic damping of a bridge cable section and the overall dynamic response are strongly affected by changes in the angle...... by an extruded High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) circular sheath [1]. In the last 20 years, several bridge cable manufacturers have introduced surface modifications on HDPE sheath in order to reduce the drag and to ensure the aerodynamic stability in all climatic conditions. In the case of plain HDPE sheaths...

  15. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace.

  16. Detailed Debunking of Denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enting, I. G.; Abraham, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The disinformation campaign against climate science has been compared to a guerilla war whose tactics undermine the traditional checks and balances of science. One comprehensive approach has to been produce archives of generic responses such as the websites of RealClimate and SkepticalScience. We review our experiences with an alternative approach of detailed responses to a small number of high profile cases. Our particular examples were Professor Ian Plimer and Christopher Monckton, the Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, each of whom has been taken seriously by political leaders in our respective countries. We relate our experiences to comparable examples such as John Mashey's analysis of the Wegman report and the formal complaints about Lomborg's "Skeptical Environmentalist" and Durkin's "Great Global Warming Swindle". Our two approaches used contrasting approaches: an on-line video of a lecture vs an evolving compendium of misrepresentations. Additionally our approaches differed in the emphasis. The analysis of Monckton concentrated on the misrepresentation of the science, while the analysis of Plimer concentrated on departures from accepted scientific practice: fabrication of data, misrepresentation of cited sources and unattributed use of the work of others. Benefits of an evolving compendium were the ability to incorporate contributions from members of the public who had identified additional errors and the scope for addressing new aspects as they came to public attention. `Detailed debunking' gives non-specialists a reference point for distinguishing non-science when engaging in public debate.

  17. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1215 ft/sec Tip Speed Transonic Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1215 ft/sec tip speed transonic fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which for this model did not include a split flow path with core and bypass ducts. As a result, it was only necessary to adjust fan rotational speed in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the flow fields at all operating conditions reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems.

  18. Aerodynamic modelling and optimization of axial fans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noertoft Soerensen, Dan

    1998-01-01

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics of low speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed. The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby the rotor is divided into a number of annular stream tubes. For each of these stream tubes relations for velocity, pressure and radial position are derived from the conservation laws for mass, tangential momentum and energy. The equations are solved using the Newton-Raphson methods, and solutions converged to machine accuracy are found at small computing costs. The model has been validated against published measurements on various fan configurations, comprising two rotor-only fan stages, a counter-rotating fan unit and a stator-rotor stator stage. Comparisons of local and integrated properties show that the computed results agree well with the measurements. Optimizations have been performed to maximize the mean value of fan efficiency in a design interval of flow rates, thus designing a fan which operates well over a range of different flow conditions. The optimization scheme was used to investigate the dependence of maximum efficiency on 1: the number of blades, 2: the width of the design interval and 3: the hub radius. The degree of freedom in the choice of design variable and constraints, combined with the design interval concept, provides a valuable design-tool for axial fans. To further investigate the use of design optimization, a model for the vortex shedding noise from the trailing edge of the blades has been incorporated into the optimization scheme. The noise emission from the blades was minimized in a flow rate design point. Optimizations were performed to investigate the dependence of the noise on 1: the number of blades, 2: a constraint imposed on efficiency and 3: the hub radius. The investigations showed, that a significant reduction of noise could be achieved, at the expense of a small reduction in fan efficiency. (EG) 66 refs.

  19. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary objective of this paper is to provide answtfrs to the questions like what is aerodynamic jump, what liauses it, !lnd wh~t aspects df the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for .

  20. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  1. Aerodynamic properties of spherical balloon wind sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Demandel, R. E.; Krivo, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A first-order theory of the fluctuating lift and drag coefficients associated with the aerodynamically induced motions of rising and falling spherical wind sensors is developed. The equations of motion of a sensor are perturbed about an equilibrium state in which the buoyancy force balances the mean vertical drag force. It is shown that, to within first order in perturbation quantities, the aerodynamic lift force is confined to the horizontal, and the fluctuating drag force associated with fluctuations in the drag coefficient acts along the vertical. The perturbation equations are transformed with Fourier-Stieltjes integrals. The resulting equations lead to relationships between the power spectra of the aerodynamically induced velocity components and the spectra of the fluctuating lift and drag coefficients.

  2. Baseball Aerodynamics: What do we know and how do we know it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Baseball aerodynamics is governed by three phenomenological quantities: the coefficients of drag, lift, and moment, the latter determining the spin decay time constant. In past years, these quantities were studied mainly in wind tunnel experiments, whereby the forces on the baseball are measured directly. More recently, new tools are being used that focus on measuring accurate baseball trajectories, from which the forces can be inferred. These tools include high-speed motion analysis, video tracking of pitched baseballs (the PITCHf/x system), and Doppler radar tracking. In this contribution, I will discuss what these new tools are teaching us about baseball aerodynamics.

  3. Global detailed gravimetric geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 x 1-deg mean free-air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is plus or minus 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe and Australia.

  4. Consider the details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Hertzum, Morten

    2013-01-01

    levels of distance in our study. For revision time, the electronic whiteboard is slower on one subtask but there is no difference on another subtask. Participants prefer the electronic whiteboard. Given the font size of the electronic whiteboard, the inferior reading accuracy is unsurprising......Electronic whiteboards are replacing dry-erase whiteboards in many contexts. In this study we compare electronic and dry-erase whiteboards in emergency departments (EDs) with respect to reading distance and revision time. We find inferior reading accuracy for the electronic whiteboard at all three...... but the reduced possibilities for acquiring information at a glance when clinicians pass the whiteboard may adversely affect their overview. Conversely, the similar revision times for one subtask show that logon may be done quickly. We discuss how details such as font size and logon may impact the high-level...

  5. Aerodynamics and thermal physics of helicopter ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yiqiang

    Ice accretion on aircraft introduces significant loss in airfoil performance. Reduced lift-to- drag ratio reduces the vehicle capability to maintain altitude and also limits its maneuverability. Current ice accretion performance degradation modeling approaches are calibrated only to a limited envelope of liquid water content, impact velocity, temperature, and water droplet size; consequently inaccurate aerodynamic performance degradations are estimated. The reduced ice accretion prediction capabilities in the glaze ice regime are primarily due to a lack of knowledge of surface roughness induced by ice accretion. A comprehensive understanding of the ice roughness effects on airfoil heat transfer, ice accretion shapes, and ultimately aerodynamics performance is critical for the design of ice protection systems. Surface roughness effects on both heat transfer and aerodynamic performance degradation on airfoils have been experimentally evaluated. Novel techniques, such as ice molding and casting methods and transient heat transfer measurement using non-intrusive thermal imaging methods, were developed at the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility at Penn State. A novel heat transfer scaling method specifically for turbulent flow regime was also conceived. A heat transfer scaling parameter, labeled as Coefficient of Stanton and Reynolds Number (CSR = Stx/Rex --0.2), has been validated against reference data found in the literature for rough flat plates with Reynolds number (Re) up to 1x107, for rough cylinders with Re ranging from 3x104 to 4x106, and for turbine blades with Re from 7.5x105 to 7x106. This is the first time that the effect of Reynolds number is shown to be successfully eliminated on heat transfer magnitudes measured on rough surfaces. Analytical models for ice roughness distribution, heat transfer prediction, and aerodynamics performance degradation due to ice accretion have also been developed. The ice roughness prediction model was

  6. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). The aerodynamic and mechanical design of the QCSEE over-the-wing fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical design of a fixed-pitch 1.36 pressure ratio fan for the over-the-wing (OTW) engine is presented. The fan has 28 blades. Aerodynamically, the fan blades were designed for a composite blade, but titanium blades were used in the experimental fan as a cost savings measure.

  7. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    OpenAIRE

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary...

  8. Wind turbine aerodynamic response under atmospheric icing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etemaddar, M.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2014-01-01

    -four hours of icing, with time varying wind speed and atmospheric icing conditions, was simulated on a rotor. Computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, was used to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of the blade after icing. The results were also validated against wind tunnel measurements performed at LM......). However, the thrust of the iced rotor in below rated wind speed is smaller than the clean rotor up to 14%, but after rated wind speed, it is up to 40% bigger than the clean rotor. Finally, it is briefly indicated how the results of this paper can be used for condition monitoring and ice detection...

  9. Atomic fluorescence study of high temperature aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.; Sethi, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet laser induced atomic fluorescence has been used to characterize supersonic jet aerodynamic levitation experiments. The levitated specimen was a 0.4 cm sapphire sphere that was separately heated at temperatures up to 2327 K by an infrared laser. The supersonic jet expansion and thermal gradients in the specimen wake were studied by measuring spatial variations in the concentration of atomic Hg added to the levitating argon gas stream. Further applications of atomic fluorescence in containerless experiments, such as ideal gas fluorescence thermometry and containerless process control are discussed.

  10. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Eli

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used to synthesize control laws for NASA's drone for aerodynamic and structural testing-aerodynamic research wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared with other control laws that relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed. It is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results that are superior to those results given in the literature and are based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented, together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness as compared with the more traditional measure involving phase and gain margins.

  11. An Assessment of NASA Glenn's Aeroacoustic Experimental and Predictive Capabilities for Installed Cooling Fans. Part 1; Aerodynamic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Koch, L. Danielle; Wernet, Mark P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by the need for low production costs, electronics cooling fans have evolved differently than the bladed components of gas turbine engines which incorporate multiple technologies to enhance performance and durability while reducing noise emissions. Drawing upon NASA Glenn's experience in the measurement and prediction of gas turbine engine aeroacoustic performance, tests have been conducted to determine if these tools and techniques can be extended for application to the aerodynamics and acoustics of electronics cooling fans. An automated fan plenum installed in NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory was used to map the overall aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a spaceflight qualified 80 mm diameter axial cooling fan. In order to more accurately identify noise sources, diagnose performance limiting aerodynamic deficiencies, and validate noise prediction codes, additional aerodynamic measurements were recorded for two operating points: free delivery and a mild stall condition. Non-uniformities in the fan s inlet and exhaust regions captured by Particle Image Velocimetry measurements, and rotor blade wakes characterized by hot wire anemometry measurements provide some assessment of the fan aerodynamic performance. The data can be used to identify fan installation/design changes which could enlarge the stable operating region for the fan and improve its aerodynamic performance and reduce noise emissions.

  12. Aerodynamic Loads at Mach Numbers from 0.70 to 2.22 on an Airplane Model Having a Wing and Canard of Triangular Plan Form and Either Single or Twin Vertical Tails. Supplement 2; Tabulated Data for the Model with Twin Vertical Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Menees, Gene P.

    1961-01-01

    Tabulated results of a wind-tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic loads on a canard airplane model with twin vertical tails are presented for Mach numbers from 0.70 to 2.22. The Reynolds number for the measurements was 2.9 x 10(exp 6) based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord. The results include local static-pressure coefficients measured on the wing, body, and one of the vertical tails for angles of attack from -4 degrees to 16 degree angles of sideslip of 0 degrees and 5.3 degrees, and nominal canard deflections of O degrees and 10 degrees. Also included are section force and moment coefficients obtained from integrations of the local pressures and model-component force and moment coefficients obtained from integrations of the section coefficients. Geometric details of the model are shown and the locations of the pressure orifices are shown. An index to the data contained herein is presented and definitions of nomenclature are given. Detailed descriptions of the model and experiments and a brief discussion of some of the results are given. Tabulated results of measurements of the aerodynamic loads on the same canard model but having a single vertical tail instead of twin vertical tails are presented.

  13. Determination of the stagnation point in pulverized coal swirl flames by detailed analysis of laser velocity measurements; Staupunktbestimmung in Kohlenstaub-Drallflammen mittels detaillierter Analyse von LDA-Daten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohliger, A.; Stadler, H.; Foerster, M.; Kneer, R. [RWTH Aachen University (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Waerme- und Stoffuebertragung

    2009-07-01

    When Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) is used for experimental investigation of flow fields in pulverised coal flames, the measured coal particle velocities are usually averaged in order to determine the gas velocity. This paper shows that this approach can lead to a misinterpretation of the data. In the burner vicinity of the investigated flame, where high accelerations in the gas phase occur, a discrepancy appears between the measured velocity distribution and the expected normal distribution. Thus, a detailed analysis of the measured particle data is conducted and compared to conventional averaging. The difference can be attributed to large particles from the inner recirculation zone of the flame, which do not follow the gas flow properly. (orig.)

  14. Variable-complexity aerodynamic-structural design of a high-speed civil transport wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, M. G.; Huang, X.; Mason, W. H.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-complexity strategy of combining simple and detailed analysis methods is presented for the design optimization of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) wing. Two sets of results are shown: the aerodynamic design of the wing using algebraic weight equations for structural considerations, and optimization results of the internal wing structure for a fixed wing configuration. We show example results indicating that using simple analysis methods alone for the calculation of a critical constraint can allow an optimizer to exploit weaknesses in the analysis. The structural optimization results provide a valuable check for the weight equations used in the aerodynamic design. In addition, these results confirm the need for using simple, algebraic models in conjunction with more detailed analysis methods. A strategy of interlaced aerodynanic-structural design is proposed.

  15. Investigation of estimating accuracy for aerodynamic characteristics of a scaled supersonic experimental airplane using IMU data based on flight simulation

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a pre-flight estimation method for aerodynamic characteristics and investigates the accuracy of the estimated aerodynamic characteristics of the scaled supersonic experimental airplane, using IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) data obtained in a flight simulation. The results demonstrate that the required accuracy is not achieved and that the main sources of error are in the estimation of dynamic pressure, misalignment between the body axis and IMU chassis axis, and IMU disc...

  16. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamics in the wake of a freely flying European starling (Sturnus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadar Ben-Gida

    Full Text Available Wing flapping is one of the most widespread propulsion methods found in nature; however, the current understanding of the aerodynamics in bird wakes is incomplete. The role of the unsteady motion in the flow and its contribution to the aerodynamics is still an open question. In the current study, the wake of a freely flying European starling has been investigated using long-duration high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV in the near wake. Kinematic analysis of the wings and body of the bird has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV measurements. The wake evolution of four complete wingbeats has been characterized through reconstruction of the time-resolved data, and the aerodynamics in the wake have been analyzed in terms of the streamwise forces acting on the bird. The profile drag from classical aerodynamics was found to be positive during most of the wingbeat cycle, yet kinematic images show that the bird does not decelerate. It is shown that unsteady aerodynamics are necessary to satisfy the drag/thrust balance by approximating the unsteady drag term. These findings may shed light on the flight efficiency of birds by providing a partial answer to how they minimize drag during flapping flight.

  17. Compendium of Student, Teacher, and Classroom Measures Used in NCEE Evaluations of Educational Interventions: Volume II. Technical Details, Measure Profiles, and Glossary (Appendices A-G). NCEE 2010-4013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Lizabeth M.; Cabili, Charlotte; Henderson, Jamila; Esposito, Andrea Mraz; Coolahan, Kathleen; Henke, Juliette; Asheer, Subuhi; O'Toole, Meghan; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Boller, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This report contains resources to help researchers and policymakers review measures used in NCEE evaluations of educational interventions. The measures included in the Compendium are applicable to settings for preschool through grade 12. The Compendium discusses criteria and their importance in selecting measures for assessing intervention impacts…

  18. Continuous Aerodynamic Modelling of Entry Shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, D.; Mooij, E.

    2011-01-01

    During the conceptual design phase of a re-entry vehicle, the vehicle shape can be varied and its impact on performance evaluated. To this end, the continuous modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics as a function of the shape is useful in exploring the full design space. Local inclination method

  19. An aerodynamic load criterion for airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple aerodynamic bending moment envelope is derived for conventionally shaped airships. This criterion is intended to be used, much like the Naval Architect's standard wave, for preliminary estimates of longitudinal strength requirements. It should be useful in tradeoff studies between speed, fineness ratio, block coefficient, structure weight, and other such general parameters of airship design.

  20. Special Course on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    EFFECTIVENESS MACH EFFECTS 0 PITCH. ROLL AND YAW CONTROL EFFECTIVENEWI DEGRAES AS AERODYNAMIC EFFECTIVENESS VARIES WITH: MACH WARER INCREASES * ANGLE OF...34badness" will be essentially a matter of the pilot’s judgement in any given case. The assessment of handling qualities by monitoring pilot performance

  1. Aerodynamic analysis of an isolated vehicle wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewicz, P.; Kulak, M.; Karczewski, M.

    2014-08-01

    Increasing fuel prices force the manufacturers to look into all aspects of car aerodynamics including wheels, tyres and rims in order to minimize their drag. By diminishing the aerodynamic drag of vehicle the fuel consumption will decrease, while driving safety and comfort will improve. In order to properly illustrate the impact of a rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body, precise analysis of an isolated wheel should be performed beforehand. In order to represent wheel rotation in contact with the ground, presented CFD simulations included Moving Wall boundary as well as Multiple Reference Frame should be performed. Sliding mesh approach is favoured but too costly at the moment. Global and local flow quantities obtained during simulations were compared to an experiment in order to assess the validity of the numerical model. Results of investigation illustrates dependency between type of simulation and coefficients (drag and lift). MRF approach proved to be a better solution giving result closer to experiment. Investigation of the model with contact area between the wheel and the ground helps to illustrate the impact of rotating wheel aerodynamics on the car body.

  2. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  3. Aerodynamics and flow characterisation of multistage rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G.; Prakash, M. V. S.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to conduct a systematic flow analysis on single, double and multistage rockets using ANSYS software. Today non-air breathing propulsion is increasing dramatically for the enhancement of space exploration. The rocket propulsion is playing vital role in carrying the payload to the destination. Day to day rocket aerodynamic performance and flow characterization analysis has becoming challenging task to the researchers. Taking this task as motivation a systematic literature is conducted to achieve better aerodynamic and flow characterization on various rocket models. The analyses on rocket models are very little especially in numerical side and experimental area. Each rocket stage analysis conducted for different Mach numbers and having different flow varying angle of attacks for finding the critical efficiency performance parameters like pressure, density and velocity. After successful completion of the analysis the research reveals that flow around the rocket body for Mach number 4 and 5 best suitable for designed payload. Another major objective of this paper is to bring best aerodynamics flow characterizations in both aero and mechanical features. This paper also brings feature prospectus of rocket stage technology in the field of aerodynamic design.

  4. Estimation of morphing airfoil shapes and aerodynamic loads using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan Scott

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape, as well as the aerodynamic loads, in real time. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors (AHS) developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this study, AHS measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the AHS measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network (ANN) based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Additionally, an aerodynamic formulation based on the finite-state inflow theory has been developed to calculate the aerodynamic loads on thin airfoils with arbitrary camber deformations. Various aerodynamic properties approximated from the AHS/ANN system will be compared with the results of the finite-state inflow aerodynamic formulation in order to validate the approximation approach.

  5. Implementing a Remote Laboratory Experience into a Joint Engineering Degree Program: Aerodynamic Levitation of a Beach Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, S. R.; Fahmy, Y.; Buckner, G. D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper details a successful and inexpensive implementation of a remote laboratory into a distance control systems course using readily available hardware and software. The physical experiment consists of a beach ball and a dc blower; the control objective is to make the height of the aerodynamically levitated beach ball track a reference…

  6. The Betz–Joukowsky limit: on the contribution to rotor aerodynamics by the British, German and Russian scientific schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery L.; van Kuik, Gijs A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The derivation of the efficiency of an ideal wind turbine has been attributed to the three famous scientists of the three aerodynamic research schools in Europe during the first decades of the previous century: Lanchester, Betz and Joukowsky. However, detailed reading of their classical papers has...

  7. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  8. Training Data Requirement for a Neural Network to Predict Aerodynamic Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor); Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angle of attack, speed brake deflection angle, Mach number, and side slip angle. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. We previously demonstrated that a neural network is a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients. We encountered few under fitted and/or over fitted results during prediction. The training data for the neural network are derived from wind tunnel test measurements and numerical simulations. The basic questions that arise are: how many training data points are required to produce an efficient neural network prediction, and which type of transfer functions should be used between the input-hidden layer and hidden-output layer. In this paper, a comparative study of the efficiency of neural network prediction based on different transfer functions and training dataset sizes is presented. The results of the neural network prediction reflect the sensitivity of the architecture, transfer functions, and training dataset size.

  9. Aerodynamics of a comb-like plate mimicking a fairyfly wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghun; Jung, Cheolgyun; Kim, Daegyoum

    2016-11-01

    There have been many studies on the aerodynamics of a wing with smooth surface in a wide range of the Reynolds number. Unlike smooth wings of common insects or birds, however, fairyfly has a distinctive wing geometry; a frame with several bristles. Motivated by the peculiar wing geometry of the fairyfly we experimentally investigated the fluid dynamics of a translating comb-like wing in a wide range of Reynolds number in O(1) - O(103). We conducted the same experiment in several fluids of different viscosities in order to investigate the effects of the Reynolds number on the aerodynamic performance. Aerodynamic force of various wing shapes was measured, and it was correlated with the flow structure generated by the wing. Corresponding author.

  10. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings.

  11. Effects of fluid-structure interaction on the aerodynamics of an insect wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an insect wing structure is modeled based on data obtained from measurements on real hawkmoth (Manduca Sexta) wings. The aerodynamics of insect wings is simulated by an extended unsteady vortex-lattice method. The finite-element model of a flexible hawkmoth wing is built and validated. A computer program, which couples the finite-element model with the aerodynamic model, is used to study the effects of fluid-structure interaction. Some important features due to the fluid-structure interaction in hovering and forward flight are observed in the present study.

  12. Experimental investigation on tip vortices and aerodynamics of a wing with ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruimin; Sun; Daichin

    2011-01-01

    The tip vortices and aerodynamics of a NACA0012 wing in the vicinity of the ground were studied in a wind tunnel.The wing tip vortex structures and lift/drag forces were measured by a seven-hole probe and a force balance,respectively.The evolution of the flow structures and aerodynamics with a ground height were analyzed.The vorticity of tip vortices was found to reduce with the decreasing of the ground height,and the position of vortex-core moved gradually to the outboard of the wing tip.Therefore,the d...

  13. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  14. Aerodynamic study of sounding rocket flows using Chimera and patched multiblock meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alves de Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic flow simulations over a typical sounding rocket are presented in this paper. The work is inserted in the effort of developing computational tools necessary to simulate aerodynamic flows over configurations of interest for Instituto de Aeronáutica e Espaço of Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Aeroespacial. Sounding rocket configurations usually require fairly large fins and, quite frequently, have more than one set of fins. In order to be able to handle such configurations, the present paper presents a novel methodology which combines both Chimera and patched multiblock grids in the discretization of the computational domain. The flows of interest are modeled using the 3-D Euler equations and the work describes the details of discretization procedure, which uses a finite difference approach for structure, body-conforming, multiblock grids. The method is used to calculate the aerodynamics of a sounding rocket vehicle. The results indicate that the present approach can be a powerful aerodynamic analysis and design tool.

  15. SIMULATION OF COOLING TOWER AND INFLUENCE OF AERODYNAMIC ELEMENTS ON ITS WORK UNDER CONDITIONS OF WIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Cooling Towers (CT may utilize different aerodynamic elements (deflectors, windbreak walls etc. aimed to improvement of its heat performance especially at the windy conditions. In this paper the effect of flow rotation in overshower zone of CT and windbreak walls on a capacity of tower evaporating unit in the windy condition is studied numerically. Geometry of the model corresponds to real Woo-Jin Power station, China. Analogy of heat and mass transfer was used that allowed to consider aerodynamic of one-dimension flow and carried out detailed 3D calculations applying modern PC. Heat transfer coefficient of irrigator and its hydrodynamic resistance were established according to experimental data on total air rate in cooling tower. Numerical model is tested and verified with experimental data.Nonlinear dependence of CT thermal performance on wind velocity is demonstrated with the minimum (critical wind velocity at ucr ~ 8 m/s for simulated system. Application of windbreak walls does not change the value of the critical wind velocity, but may improves performance of cooling unit at moderate and strong wind conditions. Simultaneous usage of windbreak walls and overshower deflectors may increase efficiency up to 20–30 % for the deflectors angle a = 60o. Simulation let one analyze aerodynamic patterns, induced inside cooling tower and homogeneity of velocities’ field in irrigator’s area.Presented results may be helpful for the CT aerodynamic design optimization, particularly, for perspective hybrid type CTs.

  16. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration at supersonic speeds in the NASA LaRC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The Mach 3 staging was dominated by shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. The inference space was partitioned into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The underlying aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle were estimated using piecewise-continuous lower-order polynomial functions. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. Augmenting the central composite designs to full third-order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria was evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting lower-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  17. Two cases of aerodynamic adjustment of sastrugi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Amory

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In polar regions, sastrugi are a direct manifestation of wind driven snow and form the main surface roughness elements. In turn, sastrugi influence the local wind field and associated aeolian snow mass fluxes. Little attention has been paid to these feedback processes, mainly because of experimental difficulties, and, as a result most polar atmospheric models currently ignore sastrugi. More accurate quantification of the influence of sastrugi remains a major challenge. In the present study, wind profiles and aeolian snow mass fluxes were analyzed jointly on a sastrugi covered snowfield in Antarctica. Neutral stability 10 m air-snow drag coefficients CDN10 were computed from six level wind speed profiles collected in Adélie Land during austral winter 2013. The aeolian snow mass flux in the first meter above the surface of the snow was also measured using a windborne snow acoustic sensor. This paper focuses on two cases during which sastrugi responses to shifts in wind direction were evidenced by variations in snow mass flux and drag coefficients. Using this dataset, it was shown that (i the timescale of sastrugi aerodynamic adjustment can be as short as 3 h for friction velocities of 1 m s−1 or above and during strong windborne snow conditions, (ii CDN10 values were in the range of 1.3–1.5 × 103 when the wind was well aligned with the sastrugi and increased to 3 × 103 or higher when the wind only shifted 20–30°, (iii CDN10 can increase (to 120 % and the aeolian snow mass flux can decrease (to 80 % in response to a shift in wind direction, and (iv knowing CDN10 is not sufficient to estimate the erosion flux that results from drag partitioning at the surface because CDN10 includes the contribution of the sastrugi form drag. These results not only support the existence of feedback mechanisms linking sastrugi, aeolian particle transport and surface drag properties over snow surface but also provide orders of magnitude, although further

  18. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MARINTEK Braceless Semisubmersible Wave Tank Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gordon; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Model scale experiments of floating offshore wind turbines are important for both platform design for the industry as well as numerical model validation for the research community. An important consideration in the wave tank testing of offshore wind turbines are scaling effects, especially the tension between accurate scaling of both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. The recent MARINTEK braceless semisubmersible wave tank experiment utilizes a novel aerodynamic force actuator to decouple the scaling of the aerodynamic forces. This actuator consists of an array of motors that pull on cables to provide aerodynamic forces that are calculated by a blade-element momentum code in real time as the experiment is conducted. This type of system has the advantage of supplying realistically scaled aerodynamic forces that include dynamic forces from platform motion, but does not provide the insights into the accuracy of the aerodynamic models that an actual model-scale rotor could provide. The modeling of this system presents an interesting challenge, as there are two ways to simulate the aerodynamics; either by using the turbulent wind fields as inputs to the aerodynamic model of the design code, or by surpassing the aerodynamic model and using the forces applied to the experimental turbine as direct inputs to the simulation. This paper investigates the best practices of modeling this type of novel aerodynamic actuator using a modified wind turbine simulation tool, and demonstrates that bypassing the dynamic aerodynamics solver of design codes can lead to erroneous results.

  19. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  20. Aerodynamics of a single-degree-of-freedom toy ornithopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Alarcon, Ramiro; Balakumar, B. J.; Allen, James J.

    2009-11-01

    The flow field around a flight-worthy toy ornithopter is investigated using PIV diagnostics in combination with load cells to understand the aerodynamics during nominally steady flight and turning. Phase-locked measurements of the wake and inflow are performed using an automated PIV system around the flapping wings of the ornithopter with the ornithopter fixed to a load-cell inside a 1.3m x 1.2m wind tunnel test section. The mildly oscillating free flight of the ornithopter is compared to the wake measurements to understand the causes of the unsteadiness. Further, the modulation of the wake that causes the turning motion of the ornithopter is explained using the wake structure measurements.

  1. Acoustic and aerodynamic study of a pusher-propeller aircraft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Horne, W. Clifton

    1990-01-01

    An aerodynamic and acoustic study was made of a pusher-propeller aircraft model in the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft Wind Tunnel. The test section was changed to operate as an open jet. The 591 mm diameter unswept propeller was operated alone and in the wake of three empennages: an I tail, Y tail, and a V tail. The radiated noise and detailed wake properties were measured. Results indicate that the unsteady blade loading caused by the blade interactions with the wake mean velocity distribution had a strong effect on the harmonics of blade passage noise. The blade passage harmonics above the first were substantially increased in all horizontal directions by the empennage/propeller interaction. Directivity in the plane of the propeller was maximum perpendicular to the blade surface. Increasing the tail loading caused the propeller harmonics to increase 3 to 5 dB for an empennage/propeller spacing of 0.38 mean empennage chords. The interaction noise became weak as empennage propeller spacing was increased beyond 1.0 mean empennage chord lengths. Unlike the mean wake deficit, the wake turbulence had only a small effect on the propeller noise, that effect being a small increase in the broadband noise.

  2. Aerodynamic characteristics of anemometer cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevoort, M J; Joyner, U T

    1934-01-01

    The static lift and drag forces on three hemispherical and two conical cups were measured over a range of angles of attack from 0 degrees to 180 degrees and a range of Reynolds Numbers from very small up to 400,000. The problems of supporting the cup for measurement and the effect of turbulence were also studied. The results were compared with those of other investigators.

  3. The role of free stream turbulence and blade surface conditions on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor Hugo

    Wind turbines operate within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) which gives rise to turbulence among other flow phenomena. There are several factors that contribute to turbulent flow: The operation of wind turbines in two layers of the atmosphere, the surface layer and the mixed layer. These layers often have unstable wind conditions due to the daily heating and cooling of the atmosphere which creates turbulent thermals. In addition, wind turbines often operate in the wake of upstream turbines such as in wind farms; where turbulence generated by the rotor can be compounded if the turbines are not sited properly. Although turbulent flow conditions are known to affect performance, i.e. power output and lifespan of the turbine, the flow mechanisms by which atmospheric turbulence and other external conditions (such as blade debris contamination) adversely impact wind turbines are not known in enough detail to address these issues. The main objectives of the current investigation are thus two-fold: (i) to understand the interaction of the turbulent integral length scales and surface roughness on the blade and its effect on aerodynamic performance, and (ii) to develop and apply flow control (both passive and active) techniques to alleviate some of the adverse fluid dynamics phenomena caused by the atmosphere (i.e. blade contamination) and restore some of the aerodynamic performance loss. In order to satisfy the objectives of the investigation, a 2-D blade model based on the S809 airfoil for horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) applications was manufactured and tested at the Johns Hopkins University Corrsin Stanley Wind Tunnel facility. Additional levels of free stream turbulence with an intensity of 6.14% and integral length scale of about 0.321 m was introduced into the flow via an active grid. The free stream velocity was 10 m/s resulting in a Reynolds number based on blade chord of Rec ≃ 2.08x105. Debris contamination on the blade was modeled as surface roughness

  4. An experimental investigation of clocking effects on turbine aerodynamics using a modern 3-D one and one-half stage high pressure turbine for code verification and flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, Charles Waldo, IV

    2003-10-01

    This research uses a modern 1 and 1/2 stage high-pressure (HP) turbine operating at the proper design corrected speed, pressure ratio, and gas to metal temperature ratio to generate a detailed data set containing aerodynamic, heat-transfer and aero-performance information. The data was generated using the Ohio State University Gas Turbine Laboratory Turbine Test Facility (TTF), which is a short-duration shock tunnel facility. The research program utilizes an uncooled turbine stage for which all three airfoils are heavily instrumented at multiple spans and on the HPV and LPV endwalls and HPB platform and tips. Heat-flux and pressure data are obtained using the traditional shock-tube and blowdown facility operational modes. Detailed examination show that the aerodynamic (pressure) data obtained in the blowdown mode is the same as obtained in the shock-tube mode when the corrected conditions are matched. Various experimental conditions and configurations were performed, including LPV clocking positions, off-design corrected speed conditions, pressure ratio changes, and Reynolds number changes. The main research for this dissertation is concentrated on the LPV clocking experiments, where the LPV was clocked relative to the HPV at several different passage locations and at different Reynolds numbers. Various methods were used to evaluate the effect of clocking on both the aeroperformance (efficiency) and aerodynamics (pressure loading) on the LPV, including time-resolved measurements, time-averaged measurements and stage performance measurements. A general improvement in overall efficiency of approximately 2% is demonstrated and could be observed using a variety of independent methods. Maximum efficiency is obtained when the time-average pressures are highest on the LPV, and the time-resolved data both in the time domain and frequency domain show the least amount of variation. The gain in aeroperformance is obtained by integrating over the entire airfoil as the three

  5. Aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A new wind turbine blade has been designed for the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) project and for future experiments at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility with a specific focus on scaled wakes. This report shows the aerodynamic design of new blades that can produce a wake that has similitude to utility scale blades despite the difference in size and location in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dimensionless quantities circulation, induction, thrust coefficient, and tip-speed-ratio were kept equal between rotor scales in region 2 of operation. The new NRT design matched the aerodynamic quantities of the most common wind turbine in the United States, the GE 1.5sle turbine with 37c model blades. The NRT blade design is presented along with its performance subject to the winds at SWiFT. The design requirements determined by the SWiFT experimental test campaign are shown to be met.

  6. Aerodynamics of Rotor Blades for Quadrotors

    CERN Document Server

    Bangura, Moses; Naldi, Roberto; Mahony, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present the theory on aerodynamics of quadrotors using the well established momentum and blade element theories. From a robotics perspective, the theoretical development of the models for thrust and horizontal forces and torque (therefore power) are carried out in the body fixed frame of the quadrotor. Using momentum theory, we propose and model the existence of a horizontal force along with its associated power. Given the limitations associated with momentum theory and the inadequacy of the theory to account for the different powers represented in a proposed bond graph lead to the use of blade element theory. Using this theory, models are then developed for the different quadrotor rotor geometries and aerodynamic properties including the optimum hovering rotor used on the majority of quadrotors. Though this rotor is proven to be the most optimum rotor, we show that geometric variations are necessary for manufacturing of the blades. The geometric variations are also dictated by a desired th...

  7. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  8. Particle Methods in Bluff Body Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Johannes Tophøj

    Fluid-structure interaction is studied numerically in academics and the industry. Shear computational power alone is insufficient to accurately resolve the complex dynamics of high Reynolds number fluid flow. Therefore the development of more efficient and applicable computational algorithms...... is important. This dissertation focuses on the use of vortex particle methods and computational efficiency. The work is divided into three parts. A novel method for the simulation of the aerodynamic admittance in bluff body aerodynamics is presented. The method involves a model for describing oncoming...... turbulence in two-dimensional discrete vortex method simulations by seeding the upstream flow with vortex particles. The turbulence is generated prior to the simulations and is based on analytic spectral densities of the atmospheric turbulence and a coherence function defining the spatial correlation...

  9. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  10. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  11. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  12. Prediction of aerodynamic performance for MEXICO rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Zedong; Yang, Hua; Xu, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of the MEXICO (Model EXperiments In Controlled cOnditions) rotor at five tunnel wind speeds is predicted by making use of BEM and CFD methods, respectively, using commercial MATLAB and CFD software. Due to the pressure differences on both sides of the blade, the tip...... the reliability of the MEXICO data. Second, the SST turbulence model can better capture the flow separation on the blade and has high aerodynamic performance prediction accuracy for a horizontal axis wind turbine in axial inflow conditions. Finally, the comparisons of the axial and tangential forces as well...... as the contrast of the angle of attack indicate that the prediction accuracy of BEM method is high when the blade is not in the stall condition. However, the airfoil characteristic becomes unstable in the stall condition, and the maximum relative error of tangential force calculated by BEM is -0.471. As a result...

  13. Aerodynamic Design of a Tailless Aeroplan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Friedl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an aerodynamic analysis of a one-seat ultralight (UL tailless aeroplane named L2k, with a very complicated layout. In the first part, an autostable airfoil with a low moment coefficient was chosen as a base for this problem. This airfoil was refined and modified to satisfy the design requirements. The computed aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils for different Reynolds numbers (Re were compared with available experimental data. XFOIL code was used to perform the computations. In the second part, a computation of wing characteristics was carried out. All calculated cases were chosen as points on the manoeuvring and gust envelope. The vortex lattice method was used with consideration of fuselage and winglets for very complicated wing geometry. The PMW computer program developed at IAE was used to perform the computations. The computed results were subsequently used for structural and strength analysis and design.

  14. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  15. Aerodynamic interaction between forewing and hindwing of a hovering dragonfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng; Deng, Xin-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The phase change between the forewing and hindwing is a distinct feature that sets dragonfly apart from other insects. In this paper, we investigated the aerodynamic effects of varying forewing-hindwing phase difference with a 60° inclined stroke plane during hovering flight. Force measurements on a pair of mechanical wing models showed that in-phase flight enhanced the forewing lift by 17% and the hindwing lift was reduced at most phase differences. The total lift of both wings was also reduced at most phase differences and only increased at a phase range around in-phase. The results may explain the commonly observed behavior of the dragonfly where 0° is employed in acceleration. We further investigated the wing-wing interaction mechanism using the digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) system, and found that the forewing generated a downwash flow which is responsible for the lift reduction on the hindwing. On the other hand, an upwash flow resulted from the leading edge vortex of the hindwing helps to enhance lift on the forewing. The results suggest that the dragonflies alter the phase differences to control timing of the occurrence of flow interactions to achieve certain aerodynamic effects.

  16. Test section configuration for aerodynamic testing in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the test section configuration required to minimize or alleviate interference effects on model flow produced by the presence of test section walls in the aerodynamic testing of two dimensional transonic airfoils in a shock tube. Tests at a nominal Mach number of 0.85 and a chord Reynolds number of 2,000,000 were carried out by means of schlieren photography and pressure measurements for several symmetric airfoil profiles using shock tube test sections with unmodified straight walls, contoured walls, and slotted walls with adjacent chambers. Results were compared with corresponding results from conventional wind tunnel tests of the airfoils. Results for the straight wall tests show major airfoil flow distortions. Results from contoured wall tests and those performed using a slotted wall test section developed in this study exhibit essential agreement with wind tunnel results. The collective results show that test sections for aerodynamic testing can be designed for shock tubes that will alleviate wall interference effects.

  17. Aerodynamic properties of six organo-mineral fertiliser particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Biocca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural fertilisers are generally applied by means of centrifugal disk spreaders. The machinery, the working conditions and the physical characteristics of fertilizers (including the aerodynamic characteristics of particles may affect the behaviour of particles after the discarding from the spreader. We investigated the aerodynamic properties of organo-mineral fertilisers (a class of slow release fertilisers that are less investigated since they are relatively new in the market using a vertical wind tunnel similar to an elutriator. In the same time, the morphological characteristics of individual fertilizer particles were measured by means of an image analysis procedure. In the study we compare six different fertilisers and we discuss the suitability of the employed methods. The results provide the terminal velocity – Vt – (the velocity value that overcome the gravity force of the particles of the particles, ranging from 8.60 to 9.55 m s-1, and the relationships between Vt and some physical properties (mass, shape, dimensions of the fertilizers. Moreover, the results of field distribution trials show the behaviour of the tested fertilizers during practical use. Such data can contribute to enhance the quality of application of these products in field.

  18. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  19. Aerosol printing of colloidal nanocrystals by aerodynamic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lejun

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, have shown promise as the active material in electronic and optoelectronic applications, because of their high quantum yield, narrow spectral emission band, size-tunable bandgap, chemical stability, and easy processibility. Meanwhile, it is still challenging to print patterns of nanocrystal films with desired linewidth and thickness, which is a critical step in fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices. In this thesis, a direct-write method of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has been developed. Like other direct-write techniques, this aerosol based method simplifies printing process and reduces the manufacturing cost, as it avoids mask screening, lithography, and pre-patterning of the substrate. Moreover, the aerosol printing with aerodynamic lenses needs neither microscale nozzles nor sheath gases, and is able to incorporate into the vacuum systems currently used in microelectronic fabrication. This thesis research presents systematic efforts to develop an aerosol-based method to directly write patterns of semiconductor nanocrystals from colloidal dispersions by aerodynamic focusing. First, the synthesized colloidal nanocrystals in hexane were nebulized into compact and spherical agglomerates suspending in the carrier gas. The details about the impact dynamics of individual aerosolized nanocrystal agglomerates were investigated. As building blocks of printed nanocrystal films, the agglomerate exhibited cohesive and granular behaviors during impact deformation on the substrate. The strength of cohesion between nanocrystals in the agglomerates could be adjusted by tuning the number concentration of colloidal nanocrystal dispersion. Second, ultrathin films of nanocrystals were obtained by printing monodisperse nanocrystal agglomerates. As the result of the granular property of nanocrystal agglomerates, it was found that the thickness of deposited agglomerates strongly depended on the size of agglomerates. A

  20. Investigation of Aerodynamic Interference of Double Deck Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division. Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC); Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division. Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC); Lottes, S. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division. Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC)

    2016-05-01

    Construction of a twin bridge can be a cost effective and minimally disruptive way to increase capacity when an existing bridge is not near the end of its service life. With ever growing vehicular traffic, when demand approaches the capacity of many existing roads and bridges. Remodeling a structure with an insufficient number of lanes can be a good solution in case of smaller and less busy bridges. Closing down or reducing traffic on crossings of greater importance for the construction period, however, can result in major delays and revenue loss for commerce and transportation as well as increasing the traffic load on alternate route bridges. Multiple-deck bridges may be the answer to this issue. A parallel deck can be built next to the existing one, without reducing the flow. Additionally, a new bridge can be designed as a twin or multi-deck structure. Several such structures have been built throughout the United States, among them: - The New NY Bridge Project - the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing, - SR-182 Columbia River Bridge, - The Thaddeus Kosciusko Bridge (I-87), - The Allegheny River Bridge, Pennsylvania, which carries I76, - Fred Hartman Bridge, TX, see Figure 1.2. With a growing number of double deck bridges, additional, more detailed, studies on the interaction of such bridge pairs in windy conditions appears appropriate. Aerodynamic interference effects should be examined to assure the aerodynamic stability of both bridges. There are many studies on aerodynamic response of single deck bridges, but the literature on double-deck structures is not extensive. The experimental results from wind tunnels are still limited in number, as a parametric study is required, they can be very time consuming. Literature review shows that some investigation of the effects of gap-width and angle of wind incidence has been done. Most of the CFD computational studies that have been done were limited to 2D simulations. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate twin decks

  1. Aerodynamics and combustion of axial swirlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongqiang

    A multipoint lean direct injection (LDI) concept was introduced recently in non-premixed combustion to obtain both low NOx emissions and good combustion stability. In this concept, a key feature is the injection of finely atomized fuel into the high-swirling airflow at the combustor dome that provides a homogenous, lean fuel-air mixture. In order to achieve the fine atomization and mixing of the fuel and air quickly and uniformly, a good swirler design should be studied. The focus of this dissertation is to investigate the aerodynamics and combustion of the swirling flow field in a multipoint Lean Direct Injector combustor. A helical axial-vaned swirler with a short internal convergent-divergent venturi was used. Swirlers with various vane angles and fuel nozzle insertion lengths have been designed. Three non-dimensional parameter effects on non-reacting, swirling flow field were studied: swirler number, confinement ratio and Reynolds number. Spray and combustion characteristics on the single swirler were studied to understand the mechanism of fuel-air mixing in this special configuration. Multi-swirler interactions were studied by measuring the confined flow field of a multipoint swirler array with different configurations. Two different swirler arrangements were investigated experimentally, which include a co-swirling array and a counter-swirling array. In order to increase the range of stability of multipoint LDI combustors, an improved design were also conducted. The results show that the degree of swirl and the level of confinement have a clear impact on the mean and turbulent flow fields. The swirling flow fields may also change significantly with the addition of a variety of simulated fuel nozzle insertion lengths. The swirler with short insertion has the stronger swirling flow as compared with the long insertion swirler. Reynolds numbers, with range of current study, will not alter mean and turbulent properties of generated flows. The reaction of the spray

  2. Autonomous Aerodynamic Control of Micro Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-19

    technique based on the aerodynamic derivatives and gains set by the user. The user-set gains remain the same, but gains calculated from the...vehicle (MAV) research. Among these are: advanced modeling and simulation models for MAVs, aero-structural interaction, advanced guidance techniques ...flight. A. Wing-Fuselage Joint and Spring Mechanism Piano hinges are used to connect each wing to the fuselage and limit the wing motion to deflect

  3. Aerodynamic sound of flow in corrugated tubes

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Aerodynamic sound emitted by flow through a finite length duct with corrugated inner surface is experimentally investigated. As the mechanism of sound generating oscillation, so far popular 'cavity-tone' mechanism was definitely denied. The principal reason is: With corrugation of helical geometry, no characteristic sound came on, while a pair of a nozzle edge and a leading edge both of which are helical, with constant distance, made essentially as loud sound as a pair of normal edges. Other ...

  4. Vortices and Vortical Structures in Internal Aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RudolfDvorak

    1997-01-01

    The paper aims at summarizing the author's recent phenomenological study of the origin,development and identification of vortical structures in internal aerodynamics.A connection between evolution of these structures and flow separation in closed curved channels is also discussed.It has been shown that in real fluids the individual vortex cores very sonn lose their identity and merge into a new dissipative structure,the properties of which still have to be defined.

  5. Compressor performance aerodynamics for the user

    CERN Document Server

    Gresh, Theodore

    2001-01-01

    Compressor Performance is a reference book and CD-ROM for compressor design engineers and compressor maintenance engineers, as well as engineering students. The book covers the full spectrum of information needed for an individual to select, operate, test and maintain axial or centrifugal compressors. It includes basic aerodynamic theory to provide the user with the ""how's"" and ""why's"" of compressor design. Maintenance engineers will especially appreciate the troubleshooting guidelines offered. Includes many example problems and reference data such as gas propert

  6. Aerodynamic Benchmarking of the Deepwind Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedona, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge;

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... NACA airfoil family. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license...

  7. Conformable M3 Microsystems for Aerodynamic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    we have fabricated sensors, actuators, and electronics all on the same chip. Control: • A CMOS control circuit has been designed and sent to MOSIS ...macro aerodynamic devices. (3) After the chip from MOSIS is fabricated, it will be tested to confirm that it works as designed. (4) The process and...identify the separation point from the outputs of shear stress sensors and drive the corresponding actuators. The layout has been sent to MOSIS for

  8. Aerodynamic Modeling and Parameter Estimation from QAR Data of an Airplane Approaching a High-altitude Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing; WU Kaiyuan; ZHANG Tianjiao; KONG Yi'nan; QIAN Weiqi

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic modeling and parameter estimation from quick accesses recorder (QAR) data is an important technical way to analyze the effects of highland weather conditions upon aerodynamic characteristics of airplane.It is also an essential content of flight accident analysis.The related techniques are developed in the present paper,including the geometric method for angle of attack and sideslip angle estimation,the extended Kalman filter associated with modified Bryson-Frazier smoother (EKF-MBF) method for aerodynamic coefficient identification,the radial basis function (RBF) neural network method for aerodynamic modeling,and the Delta method for stability/control derivative estimation.As an application example,the QAR data of a civil airplane approaching a high-altitude airport are processed and the aerodynamic coefficient and derivative estimates are obtained.The estimation results are reasonable,which shows that the developed techniques are feasible.The causes for the distribution of aerodynamic derivative estimates are analyzed.Accordingly,several measures to improve estimation accuracy are put forward.

  9. Aerodynamics of a rigid curved kite wing

    CERN Document Server

    Maneia, Gianmauro; Tordella, Daniela; Iovieno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary numerical study on the aerodynamics of a kite wing for high altitude wind power generators is proposed. Tethered kites are a key element of an innovative wind energy technology, which aims to capture energy from the wind at higher altitudes than conventional wind towers. We present the results obtained from three-dimensional finite volume numerical simulations of the steady air flow past a three-dimensional curved rectangular kite wing (aspect ratio equal to 3.2, Reynolds number equal to 3x10^6). Two angles of incidence -- a standard incidence for the flight of a tethered airfoil (6{\\deg}) and an incidence close to the stall (18{\\deg}) -- were considered. The simulations were performed by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes flow model using the industrial STAR-CCM+ code. The overall aerodynamic characteristics of the kite wing were determined and compared to the aerodynamic characteristics of the flat rectangular non twisted wing with an identical aspect ratio and section (Clark Y profil...

  10. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight.

  11. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  12. A Computational Model for Rotor-Fuselage Interactional Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Barnwell, Richard W.; Gorton, Susan Althoff

    2000-01-01

    A novel unsteady rotor-fuselage interactional aerodynamics model has been developed. This model loosely couples a Generalized Dynamic Wake Theory (GDWT) to a thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution procedure. This coupling is achieved using an unsteady pressure jump boundary condition in the Navier-Stokes model. The new unsteady pressure jump boundary condition models each rotor blade as a moving pressure jump which travels around the rotor azimuth and is applied between two adjacent planes in a cylindrical, non-rotating grid. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted time-averaged and time-accurate rotor inflow ratios. Additional comparisons are made between measured and predicted unsteady surface pressures on the top centerline and sides of the fuselage.

  13. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces using pointwise velocity data

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, F; Blackburn, H M

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to estimate unsteady aerodynamic force coefficients from pointwise velocity measurements is presented. The methodology is based on a resolvent-based reduced-order model which requires the mean flow to obtain physical flow structures and pointwise measurement to calibrate their amplitudes. A computationally-affordable time-stepping methodology to obtain resolvent modes in non-trivial flow domains is introduced and compared to previous existing matrix-free and matrix-forming strategies. The technique is applied to the unsteady flow around an inclined square cylinder at low Reynolds number. The potential of the methodology is demonstrated through good agreement between the fluctuating pressure distribution on the cylinder and the temporal evolution of the unsteady lift and drag coefficients predicted by the model and those computed by direct numerical simulation.

  14. Analysis and Improvement of Aerodynamic Performance of Straight Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Baloutaki, Mojtaba

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) with straight blades are attractive for their relatively simple structure and aerodynamic performance. Their commercialization, however, still encounters many challenges. A series of studies were conducted in the current research to improve the VAWTs design and enhance their aerodynamic performance. First, an efficient design methodology built on an existing analytical approach is presented to formulate the design parameters influencing a straight bladed-VAWT (SB-VAWT) aerodynamic performance and determine the optimal range of these parameters for prototype construction. This work was followed by a series of studies to collectively investigate the role of external turbulence on the SB-VAWTs operation. The external free-stream turbulence is known as one of the most important factors influencing VAWTs since this type of turbines is mainly considered for urban applications where the wind turbulence is of great significance. Initially, two sets of wind tunnel testing were conducted to study the variation of aerodynamic performance of a SB-VAWT's blade under turbulent flows, in two major stationary configurations, namely two- and three-dimensional flows. Turbulent flows generated in the wind tunnel were quasi-isotropic having uniform mean flow profiles, free of any wind shear effects. Aerodynamic force measurements demonstrated that the free-stream turbulence improves the blade aerodynamic performance in stall and post-stall regions by delaying the stall and increasing the lift-to-drag ratio. After these studies, a SB-VAWT model was tested in the wind tunnel under the same type of turbulent flows. The turbine power output was substantially increased in the presence of the grid turbulence at the same wind speeds, while the increase in turbine power coefficient due to the effect of grid turbulence was small at the same tip speed ratios. The final section presents an experimental study on the aerodynamic interaction of VAWTs in arrays

  15. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics and design guidelines of push-pull ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R F; Lin, S Y; Jan, S-Y; Hsieh, R H; Chen, Y-K; Chen, C-W; Yeh, W-Y; Chang, C-P; Shih, T-S; Chen, C-C

    2005-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics such as the flow patterns, velocity field, streamline evolutions, characteristic flow modes and characteristic flow regimes of the push-pull ventilation system are cross-examined by using the laser-light sheet smoked-flow visualization method and laser Doppler velocimetry. Four characteristic flow modes, which are denoted as dispersion, transition, encapsulation and strong suction, are identified in the domain of the push-jet and pull-flow velocities at various open-surface tank widths and rising gas velocities. It is argued phenomenologically, from the aerodynamic point of view, that operating the system in the strong suction regime would be a better strategy than operating it in other characteristic regimes for the consideration of capture efficiency. Design guidelines are developed and summarized based on the results obtained from this study. The regression formulas for calculating the critical values of the push-jet and the pull-flow velocities are provided for easy access. The sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas validation technique is performed to measure the capture efficiency. The results of tracer gas validations are consistent with those obtained from the aerodynamic visualization and measurements. The operation points obtained by employing the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists design criteria are compared with the results obtained in this study for both the aerodynamics and the capture efficiency. Methods for improving the capture efficiency and energy consumptions are suggested.

  17. Simulation of rotor aerodynamics : use of the actuator surface method to model the MEXICO wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, S.P.; Watters, C.S.; Masson, C. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the model rotor experiments under controlled conditions (MEXICO) project. The experiments are being conducted in the largest wind tunnel in Europe in order to determine optimal yaw and pitch angles for wind turbines as well as to test the performance of blade aerodynamic profiles and rotor instrumentation. Data obtained during the experiments are used to determine velocity component points in order to develop a greater understanding of wind turbine aerodynamics and improve calculation methods. Blade element momentum (BEM) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and vortex wake codes are used in the program, which includes an actuator surface method embedded in a customized CFD finite element method. To date, the project has validated various models with experimental data, and mapped the induced velocities upwind and downwind from rotors. Further research is being conducted to compare experimental results with other results in the literature related to blade loading, root bending moments, and detailed flow characteristics. Charts of experimental results were included. tabs., figs.

  18. Large eddy simulation for aerodynamics: status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaut, Pierre; Deck, Sébastien

    2009-07-28

    The present paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of large eddy simulation (LES) and sequels for engineering applications related to aerodynamics. Most recent landmark achievements are presented. Two categories of problem may be distinguished whether the location of separation is triggered by the geometry or not. In the first case, LES can be considered as a mature technique and recent hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-LES methods do not allow for a significant increase in terms of geometrical complexity and/or Reynolds number with respect to classical LES. When attached boundary layers have a significant impact on the global flow dynamics, the use of hybrid RANS-LES remains the principal strategy to reduce computational cost compared to LES. Another striking observation is that the level of validation is most of the time restricted to time-averaged global quantities, a detailed analysis of the flow unsteadiness being missing. Therefore, a clear need for detailed validation in the near future is identified. To this end, new issues, such as uncertainty and error quantification and modelling, will be of major importance. First results dealing with uncertainty modelling in unsteady turbulent flow simulation are presented.

  19. Landing Gear Aerodynamic Noise Prediction Using Building-Cube Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Landing gear noise prediction method is developed using Building-Cube Method (BCM. The BCM is a multiblock-structured Cartesian mesh flow solver, which aims to enable practical large-scale computation. The computational domain is composed of assemblage of various sizes of building blocks where small blocks are used to capture flow features in detail. Because of Cartesian-based mesh, easy and fast mesh generation for complicated geometries is achieved. The airframe noise is predicted through the coupling of incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver and the aeroacoustic analogy-based Curle’s equation. In this paper, Curle’s equation in noncompact form is introduced to predict the acoustic sound from an object in flow. This approach is applied to JAXA Landing gear Evaluation Geometry model to investigate the influence of the detail components to flows and aerodynamic noises. The position of torque link and the wheel cap geometry are changed to discuss the influence. The present method showed good agreement with the preceding experimental result and proved that difference of the complicated components to far field noise was estimated. The result also shows that the torque link position highly affects the flow acceleration at the axle region between two wheels, which causes the change in SPL at observation point.

  20. Method for simulation of the nonlinear aerodynamics of airship configurations; Verfahren zur Simulation der nichtlinearen Aerodynamik von Luftschiffkonfigurationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobi, A.

    2007-07-01

    Air flow around airship configurations is highly complex and is governed by 3D aerodynamic effects. Detailed knowledge of this nonlinear aerodynamics is important especially in airship design. The author describes the relevant physical effects governing flow and shows how they are taken account of in the method of calculation he presents. A panel boundary layer method is described in detail which calculates frictionless external flow in a 3D panel method coupled with a 3D integral method for laminar or turbulent boundary layers. The method calculates the tensor of the virtual mass of any given airship takes account of desplacement by the boundary layer, and simulates the effects of propellers. The modelling of free vortex layers in the context of potential theory is described in detail, and the results are discussed. A new panel with two-dimensional vortex distribution is derived. (orig.)

  1. AERODYNAMIC BEHAVIOR AIRCRAFT CAUSED BY RESIDUAL STRAIN WINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy Ishchenko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The influence of residual strain on the airframe aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft wasconsidered. The possibility of estimation of changes in deformation of airframe using data of leveling wasshown. The method of estimating the change of aerodynamic characteristics caused by the influence ofresidual strain airframe was proposed. Technique can be used in the operation and overhaul of aircraft withlarge operating time.Keywords: aerodynamic characteristics, residual strain construction asymmetric moments, thedistribution of circulation, the scheme of leveling, trigonometric series.

  2. AERODYNAMIC BEHAVIOR AIRCRAFT CAUSED BY RESIDUAL STRAIN WINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Ishchenko, Sergiy; Tofil, Arkadiush

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The influence of residual strain on the airframe aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft wasconsidered. The possibility of estimation of changes in deformation of airframe using data of leveling wasshown. The method of estimating the change of aerodynamic characteristics caused by the influence ofresidual strain airframe was proposed. Technique can be used in the operation and overhaul of aircraft withlarge operating time.Keywords: aerodynamic characteristics, residual strain constr...

  3. THE AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE PROFILES FOR FLYING WINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using an un-piloted aerial vector is determined by the aerodynamic characteristics and performances. The design for a tailless unmanned aerial vehicles starts from defining the aerial vector mission and implies o series of geometrical and aerodynamic aspects for stability. This article proposes to remark the aerodynamic characteristics of three profiles used at flying wing airship through 2D software analysis.

  4. THE AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE PROFILES FOR FLYING WINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of using an un-piloted aerial vector is determined by the aerodynamic characteristics and performances. The design for a tailless unmanned aerial vehicles starts from defining the aerial vector mission and implies o series of geometrical and aerodynamic aspects for stability. This article proposes to remark the aerodynamic characteristics of three profiles used at flying wing airship through 2D software analysis.

  5. The aerodynamic and structural study of flapping wing vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the aerodynamic and structural study carried out on flapping wings and flapping vehicles. Theoretical and experimental investigation of aerodynamic forces acting on flapping wings in simple harmonic oscillations is undertaken in order to help conduct and optimize the aerodynamic and structural design of flapping wing vehicles. The research is focused on the large scale ornithopter design of similar size and configuration to a hang glider. By means of Theodorsen’s th...

  6. Detailed comparisons of airborne formaldehyde measurements with box models during the 2006 INTEX-B campaign: potential evidence for unmeasured and multi-generation volatile organic carbon oxidation processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fried

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Detailed comparisons of airborne CH2O measurements acquired by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with steady state box model calculations were carried out using data from the 2006 INTEX-B campaign in order to improve our understanding of hydrocarbon oxidation processing. Select previous comparisons in other campaigns have highlighted some locations in the boundary layer where steady state box models have tended to underpredict CH2O, suggesting that standard steady state modeling assumptions might be unsuitable under these conditions, and pointing to a possible role for unmeasured hydrocarbons and/or additional primary emission sources of CH2O. Employing an improved instrument, more detailed measurement-model comparisons with better temporal overlap, up to date measurement and model precision estimates, up to date rate constants, and additional modeling tools based on both Lagrangian and Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM runs, we have explained much of the disagreement between observed and predicted CH2O as resulting from non-steady-state atmospheric conditions in the vicinity of large pollution sources, and have quantified the disagreement as a function of plume lifetime (processing time. We show that in the near-field (within ~4 to 6 h of the source, steady-state models can either over-or-underestimate observations, depending on the predominant non-steady-state influence. In addition, we show that even far field processes (10–40 h can be influenced by non-steady-state conditions which can be responsible for CH2O model underestimations by as much as a factor of 2. At the longer processing times in the 10 to 40 h range during Mexico City outflow events, MCM model calculations, using assumptions about emissions of high-order NMHCs, further indicate the potential importance of CH2O produced from unmeasured and multi-generation hydrocarbon oxidation processing, particularly

  7. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  8. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm J. Andrews

    2006-04-14

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.’s and three (3) MSc’s, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

  9. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data, first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Finally we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally we give an argument for our believe that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  10. Aerodynamic stability of cable-stayed-suspension hybrid bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-jun; SUN Bing-nan

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional nonlinear aerodynamic stability analysis was applied to study the aerodynamic stability of a cable-stayed-suspension (CSS) hybrid bridge with main span of 1400 meters, and the effects of some design parameters (such as the cable sag, length of suspension portion, cable plane arrangement, subsidiary piers in side spans, the deck form, etc.) on the aerodynamic stability of the bridge are analytically investigated. The key design parameters, which significantly influence the aerodynamic stability of CSS hybrid bridges, are pointed out, and based on the wind stability the favorable structural system of CSS hybrid bridges is discussed.

  11. Aerodynamic instability of a cylinder with thin ice accretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    prototyping. Next, a series of static wind tunnel tests were undertaken to determine the aerodynamic force coefficients of the rapidly prototyped hanger sectional model. Finally the aerodynamic force coefficients (drag, lift and moment), found from the static wind tunnel tests, were used to determine...... the potential for aerodynamic instability of the hanger through application of the quasi-steady theory developed by Gjelstrup et al. [9-10]. The application of the theoretical model yield regions of expected aerodynamic instability in which the observed vibrations of the Great Belt East Bridge hangers lie....

  12. Aerodynamic Modeling with Heterogeneous Data Assimilation and Uncertainty Quantification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. proposes to develop an aerodynamic modeling tool that assimilates data from different sources and facilitates uncertainty quantification. The...

  13. Estimating the aerodynamic roughness of debris covered glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincey, Duncan; Smith, Mark; Rounce, David; Ross, Andrew; King, Owen; Watson, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z0), the height above the ground surface at which the extrapolated horizontal wind velocity profile drops to zero, is one of the most poorly parameterised elements of the glacier surface energy balance equation. Microtopographic methods for estimating z0 are becoming increasingly well used, but are rarely validated against independent measures and are yet to be comprehensively analysed for scale or data resolution dependency. Here, we present the results of a field investigation conducted on the debris covered Khumbu Glacier during the post-monsoon season of 2015. We focus on two sites. The first is characterised by gravels and cobbles supported by a fine sandy matrix. The second comprises cobbles and boulders separated by voids. Vertical profiles of wind speed measured over both sites enable us to derive measurements of aerodynamic roughness that reflect their observed surface characteristics (0.0184 m vs 0.0243 m). z0 at the second site also varied through time following snowfall (0.0055 m) and during its subsequent melt (0.0129 m), showing the importance of fine resolution topography for near-surface airflow. We conducted Structure from Motion Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) surveys across each patch and calculated z0 using three microtopographic methods. The fully three-dimensional cloud-based approach is shown to be most stable across different scales and these z0 values are most correct in relative order when compared to the wind tower data. Popular profile-based methods perform less well providing highly variable values across different scales and when using data of differing resolution.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-08-26

    This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports.

  15. Validation of the actuator line/Navier Stokes technique using mexico measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    This paper concerns the contribution of DTU MEK in the international research collaboration project (MexNext) within the framework of IEA Annex 29 to validate aerodynamic models or CFD codes using the existing measurements made in the previous EU funded projectMEXICO (Model Experiments in Control......This paper concerns the contribution of DTU MEK in the international research collaboration project (MexNext) within the framework of IEA Annex 29 to validate aerodynamic models or CFD codes using the existing measurements made in the previous EU funded projectMEXICO (Model Experiments...... in Controlled Conditions). The Actuator Line/Navier Stokes (AL/NS) technique developed at DTU is validated against the detailed MEXICO measurements. The AL/NS computations without the DNW wind tunnel with speeds of 10m/s, 15m/s and 24m/s. Comparisons of blade loading between computations and measurements show...

  16. AN INVESTIGATION ON THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF 2-D AIRFIOL IN GROUND COLLISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK KARTIGESH A/L KALAI CHELVEN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Near ground operation of airplanes represents a critical and an important aerodynamic practical problem due to the wing-ground collision. The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing are subjected to dramatic changes due to the flow field interference with the ground. In the present paper, the wing-ground collision was investigated experimentally and numerically. The investigation involved a series of wind tunnel measurements of a 2-D wing model having NACA4412 airfoil section. An experimental set up has been designed and constructed to simulate the collision phenomena in a low speed wind tunnel. The investigations were carried out at different Reynolds numbers ranging from 105 to 4×105, various model heights to chord ratios, H/C ranging from 0.1 to 1, and different angles of attack ranging from -4o to 20o. Numerical simulation of the wing-ground collision has been carried out using FLUENT software. The results of the numerical simulation have been validated by comparison with previous and recent experimental data and it was within acceptable agreement. The results have shown that the aerodynamic characteristics are considerably influenced when the wing is close to the ground, mainly at angles of attacks 4o to 8o. The take off and landing speeds are found to be very influencing parameters on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing in collision status, mainly the lift.

  17. Aerodynamic Interactions Between Wing and Body of a Model Insect in Forward Flight and Maneuvers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liang; Mao Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic interactions between the body and the wings of a model insect in forward flight and maneuvers are studied using the method of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations over moving overset grids.Three cases are considered,including a complete insect,wing pair only and body only.By comparing the results of these cases,the interaction effect between the body and the wing pair can be identified.The changes in the force and moment coefficients of the wing pair due to the presence of the body are less than 4.5% of the mean vertical force coefficient of the model insect; the changes in the aerodynamic force coefficients of the body due to the presence of the wings are less than 5.0% of the mean vertical force coefficient of the model insect.The results of this paper indicate that in studying the aerodynamics and flight dynamics of a flapping insect in forward flight or maneuver,separately computing (or measuring) the aerodynamic forces and moments on the wing pair and on the body could be a good approximation.

  18. Estimation of unsteady aerodynamics in the wake of a freely flying European starling

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Taylor, Zachary J; Bezner-Kerr, Wayne; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Kopp, Gregory A; Gurka, Roi

    2013-01-01

    Wing flapping is one of the most widespread propulsion methods found in nature; however, the current understanding of the aerodynamics in bird wakes is incomplete. The role of the unsteady motion in the flow and its contribution to the aerodynamics is still an open question. In the current study, the wake of a freely flying European starling has been investigated using long-duration high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the near wake. Kinematic analysis of the wings and body of the bird has been performed using additional high-speed cameras that recorded the bird movement simultaneously with the PIV measurements. The wake evolution of four complete wingbeats has been characterized through reconstruction of the time resolved data, and the aerodynamics in the wake have been analyzed in terms of the streamwise forces acting on the bird. The profile drag from classical aerodynamics was found to be positive during most of the wingbeat cycle, yet kinematic images show that the bird does not decelerate. It ...

  19. Transitory Control of the Aerodynamic Loads on an Airfoil in Dynamic Pitch and Plunge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuehan; Crittenden, Thomas; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Transitory control and regulation of trapped vorticity concentrations are exploited in wind tunnel experiments for control of the aerodynamic loads on an airfoil moving in time-periodic 2-DOF (pitch and plunge) beyond the dynamic stall margin. Actuation is effected using a spanwise array of integrated miniature chemical (combustion based) high-impulse actuators that are triggered intermittently relative to the airfoil's motion. Each actuation pulse has sufficient control authority to alter the global aerodynamic performance throughout the motion cycle on a characteristic time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's convective time scale. The effects of the actuation on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil are assessed using time-dependent measurements of the lift force and pitching moment coupled with time-resolved particle image velocimetry that is acquired phased-locked to the motion of the airfoil. It is shown that the aerodynamic loads can be significantly altered using actuation programs based on multiple actuation pulses during the time-periodic pitch/plunge cycle. Superposition of such actuation programs leads to enhancement of cycle lift and pitch stability, and reduced cycle hysteresis and peak pitching moment. Supported by GT-VLRCOE.

  20. Numerical Investigation of Aerodynamic Performance and Loads of a Novel Dual Rotor Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Moghadassian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to numerically investigate the effects of the atmospheric boundary layer on the aerodynamic performance and loads of a novel dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT. Large eddy simulations are carried out with the turbines operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL and in a uniform inflow. Two stability conditions corresponding to neutral and slightly stable atmospheres are investigated. The turbines are modeled using the actuator line method where the rotor blades are modeled as body forces. Comparisons are drawn between the DRWT and a comparable conventional single-rotor wind turbine (SRWT to assess changes in aerodynamic efficiency and loads, as well as wake mixing and momentum and kinetic energy entrainment into the turbine wake layer. The results show that the DRWT improves isolated turbine aerodynamic performance by about 5%–6%. The DRWT also enhances turbulent axial momentum entrainment by about 3.3 %. The highest entrainment is observed in the neutral stability case when the turbulence in the ABL is moderately high. Aerodynamic loads for the DRWT, measured as out-of-plane blade root bending moment, are marginally reduced. Spectral analyses of ABL cases show peaks in unsteady loads at the rotor passing frequency and its harmonics for both rotors of the DRWT.

  1. Flutter Derivatives Identification and Aerodynamic Performance of an Optimized Multibox Bridge Deck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhida Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The bridge deck sections used for long-span suspension bridges have evolved through the years, from the compact box deck girders geometrical configurations to twin-box and three-box bridge decks sections. The latest generation of split and multiple-box bridge decks proved to have better aerodynamic behavior; thus further optimization methods are sought for such geometrical configurations. A new type of multibox bridge deck, consisting of four aerodynamically shaped deck boxes, two side decks for the traffic lanes and two middle decks for the railway traffic, connected between them by stabilizing beams, was tested in the wind tunnel for identifying the flutter derivatives and to verify the aerodynamic performance of the proposed multibox deck. Aerodynamic static force coefficients were measured for the multibox bridge deck model, scaled 1 : 80, for Reynolds numbers up to 5.1 × 105, under angles of attack between −8° and 8°. Iterative Least Squares (ILS method was employed for identifying the flutter derivatives of the multibox bridge deck model, based on the results obtained from the free vibration tests and based on the frequency analysis the critical flutter wind speed for the corresponding prototype of the multibox bridge was estimated at 188 m/s.

  2. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T Muijres

    Full Text Available Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate

  3. Comparing aerodynamic efficiency in birds and bats suggests better flight performance in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  4. Aerodynamic performance of wind turbine under different yaw angles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Yali; Zuo, Hongmei; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    . The distributions of pressure coefficients along the airfoil chord in different blade sections calculated by CFD method are in good agreement with the experimental measurements, and the error on the suction surface of airfoil is mainly caused by stall separation occurring on the pressure surface of airfoil...... reduced. When the yaw angle is within 30°, the relative error of axial load coefficients is in the range of ±5% and the relative error of tangential load coefficients is in the range of ±15%. CFD method is higher than BEM (blade element momentum) method in forecasting accuracy of dynamic load calculation......×10-6 m to ensure the first dimensionless size near the wall Y+error of axial load on the airfoil in the 60% section of blades, which respectively are 6 572 451 and 2 961 385. The aerodynamic performance of models under rated condition...

  5. Influence of a humidor on the aerodynamics of baseballs

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Edmund

    2007-01-01

    We investigate whether storing baseballs in a controlled humidity environment significantly affects their aerodynamic properties. To do this, we measure the change in diameter and mass of baseballs as a function of relative humidity (RH). We then model trajectories for pitched and batted baseballs to assess the difference between those stored at 30% RH versus 50% RH. The results show that a drier baseball may be expected to curve slightly more than a humidified one, and that the drier ball will also likely travel slightly less far when batted. We discuss consequences of these results for baseball played at Coors Field in Denver, where baseballs have been stored in a humidor at 50% RH since 2002.

  6. Experimental Aerodynamic Facilities of the Aerodynamics Research and Concepts Assistance Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    liquid droplets and other aerodynamic bodies which are sensitive to support interference and motion cross coupling effects. Rapid and accurate...AESD Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 HQ AFSC/SDZ ATTN: CPT D. Rledlger Andrews AFB, MD 20334 HQ, AFSC/SDNE Andrews AFB, MD 20334 HQ, AFSC/ SGB

  7. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation, and how frequently (probability aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  8. Aerodynamically forced vibration analysis of turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchuri, V.; Pamidi, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of theoretical considerations for the determination of turbomachine response under aerodynamic excitation, as in the cases of advanced turboprop rotors with highly swept blades and axial flow compressors. Dynamic response is characterized in terms of the normal modal coordinates of tuned rotating cyclic structures for both rigid and flexible hubs/disks. Implementation of the scheme is in NASTRAN; coriolis and centripetal accelerations are included, together with differential stiffness effects. Analytically predicted vibratory stresses for the blades of two different advanced turboprops are compared to those determined by wind tunnel tests conducted by NASA-Lewis.

  9. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  10. Fluidization technologies: Aerodynamic principles and process engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Rahul; Puthli, Shivanand

    2009-11-01

    The concept of fluidization has been adapted to different unit processes of pharmaceutical product development. Till date a lot of improvements have been made in the engineering design to achieve superior process performance. This review is focused on the fundamental principles of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics associated with the fluidization technologies. Fluid-bed coating, fluidized bed granulation, rotor processing, hot melt granulation, electrostatic coating, supercritical fluid based fluidized bed technology are highlighted. Developments in the design of processing equipments have been explicitly elucidated. This article also discusses processing problems from the operator's perspective along with latest developments in the application of these principles.

  11. Aerodynamics of High-Speed Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.

    This review highlights the differences between the aerodynamics of high-speed trains and other types of transportation vehicles. The emphasis is on modern, high-speed trains, including magnetic levitation (Maglev) trains. Some of the key differences are derived from the fact that trains operate near the ground or a track, have much greater length-to-diameter ratios than other vehicles, pass close to each other and to trackside structures, are more subject to crosswinds, and operate in tunnels with entry and exit events. The coverage includes experimental techniques and results and analytical and numerical methods, concentrating on the most recent information available.

  12. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  13. Aerodynamics profile not in stationary flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Загорулько

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  Consider the question about influence of unsteady flight on the size of drag and lift coefficients of theaerodynamic profile. Distinctive features of this investigation are obtaining data about aerodynamic drag chancing in process unsteady on high angle at attack and oscillation profile in subsonic and transonic flight. Given analysis of oscillation profile show, that dynamic loops accompany change of lift and dray force. The researches show that it is necessary to clarity the mathematic model of the airplane flight dynamics by introducing numbers, with take into account unsteady effects.

  14. Aerodynamic Optimization of a Winglet Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahiaoui T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an experimental study is presented for a flow around an isolated wing equipped by a winglet and profiled with Naca 0012. Several cases of winglets were tested according to the angle ß: 0°, 55°, 65°and 75°. For all these cases at a velocity of 20, 30 and 40 meters per second, wind tunnel tests are performed and compared for different angles of incidence. It is observed that the aerodynamic performance of the winglet with β= 55° differ favorably for positive angle of incidence compared for other cases.

  15. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  16. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  17. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  18. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Technologies Testing of Heavy-Duty Vocational Vehicles and a Dry Van Trailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thornton, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on two accepted methods for quantifying the benefit of aerodynamic improvement technologies on vocational vehicles: the coastdown technique, and on-road constant speed fuel economy measurements. Both techniques have their advantages. Coastdown tests are conducted over a wide range in speed and allow the rolling resistance and aerodynamic components of road load force to be separated. This in turn allows for the change in road load and fuel economy to be estimated at any speed, as well as over transient cycles. The on-road fuel economy measurements only supply one lumped result, applicable at the specific test speed, but are a direct measurement of fuel usage and are therefore used in this study as a check on the observed coastdown results. Resulting coefficients were then used to populate a vehicle model and simulate expected annual fuel savings over real-world vocational drive cycles.

  19. Influence of anisotropic piezoelectric actuators on wing aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Changing the shape of an airfoil to enhance overall aircraft performance has always been a goal of aircraft designers. Using smart material to reshape the wing can improve aerodynamic performance. The influence of anisotropic effects of piezoelectric actuators on the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified HALE wing model was investigated. Test verification was conducted.

  20. Influence of anisotropic piezoelectric actuators on wing aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN De; LI Min; LI Wei; WANG MingChun

    2008-01-01

    Changing the shape of an airfoil to enhance overall aircraft performance has always been s goal of aircraft designers.Using smart material to reshape the wing can improve aerodynamic performance.The influence of anisotropic effects of piezo-electric actuators on the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified HALE wing model was investigated.Test verification was conducted.

  1. State of the art in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Voutsinas, S

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive review of wind turbine aeroelasticity is given. The aerodynamic part starts with the simple aerodynamic Blade Element Momentum Method and ends with giving a review of the work done applying CFD on wind turbine rotors. In between is explained some methods of intermediate complexity...

  2. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  3. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Instability of Iced Bridge Cable Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Lund, Mia Schou Møller

    2013-01-01

    of bridge cables under wind action. This paper describes the experimental simulation of ice accretion on a real bridge cable sheet HDPE tube segment (diameter 160mm) and its effect on the aerodynamic load. Furthermore, aerodynamic instability will be estimated with quasi-steady theory using the determined...

  4. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics in flight dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.; Schiff, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    Basic concepts involved in the mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic response of an aircraft to arbitrary maneuvers are reviewed. The original formulation of an aerodynamic response in terms of nonlinear functionals is shown to be compatible with a derivation based on the use of nonlinear functional expansions. Extensions of the analysis through its natural connection with ideas from bifurcation theory are indicated.

  5. A new method to calibrate aerodynamic roughness over the Tibetan Plateau using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic roughness height (Zom is a key parameter required in land surface hydrological model, since errors in heat flux estimations are largely dependent on accurate optimization of this parameter. Despite its significance, it remains an uncertain parameter that is not easily determined. This is mostly because of non-linear relationship in Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS and unknown vertical characteristic of vegetation. Previous studies determined aerodynamic roughness using traditional wind profile method, remotely sensed vegetation index, minimization of cost function over MOS relationship or linear regression. However, these are complicated procedures that presume high accuracy for several other related parameters embedded in MOS equations. In order to simplify a procedure and reduce the number of parameters in need, this study suggests a new approach to extract aerodynamic roughness parameter via Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF that affords non-linearity and that requires only single or two heat flux measurement. So far, to our knowledge, no previous study has applied EnKF to aerodynamic roughness estimation, while a majority of data assimilation study has paid attention to land surface state variables such as soil moisture or land surface temperature. This approach was applied to grassland in semi-arid Tibetan area and maize on moderately wet condition in Italy. It was demonstrated that aerodynamic roughness parameter can inversely be tracked from data assimilated heat flux analysis. The aerodynamic roughness height estimated in this approach was consistent with eddy covariance result and literature value. Consequently, this newly estimated input adjusted the sensible heat overestimated and latent heat flux underestimated by the original Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS model, suggesting better heat flux estimation especially during the summer Monsoon period. The advantage of this approach over other methodologies is

  6. Influence of ribs on train aerodynamic performances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Xiu-juan; GAO Guang-jun

    2015-01-01

    The influence of ribs on the train aerodynamic performance was computed using detached eddy simulation (DES), and the transient iteration was solved by the dual-time step lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) method. The results show that the ribs installed on the roof have a great effect on the train aerodynamic performance. Compared with trains without ribs, the lift force coefficient of the train with convex ribs changes from negative to positive, while the side force coefficient increases by 110% and 88%, respectively. Due to the combined effect of the lift force and side force, the overturning moment of the train with convex ribs and cutting ribs increases by 140% and 106%, respectively. There is larger negative pressure on the roof of the train without ribs than that with ribs. The ribs on the train would disturb the flow structure and contribute to the air separation, so the separation starts from the roof, while there is no air separation on the roof of the train without ribs. The ribs can also slow down the flow speed above the roof and make the air easily sucked back to the train surface. The vortices at the leeward side of the train without ribs are small and messy compared with those of the train with convex or cutting ribs.

  7. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-YuKing

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time,the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly (within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large(radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop, its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  8. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Yu King

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time, the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop,its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  9. WECS Incompressible Complex Configuration Aerodynamics (WICCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuss, R.; Morino, L.

    1976-05-01

    A finite-element method for determining the aerodynamic loading on rotors is presented. The report describes the development of the formulation for the steady state and numerical results for horizontal axis windmills. It is based on a general theory for uncompressible potential aerodynamics for complex configurations in a rotating frame of reference. If a rotor is rotating at constant angular velocity and is directed along a uniform wind distribution, the problem may be solved in the steady state for a frame of reference rotating with the rotor. A computer program (WICCA) has been designed to incorporate the method, and results compare favorably with an existing lifting surface formation. The program has been modified to include the hub for analysis. Further modifications are planned to study the effect of the coning angle, chord length distribution, blade pitch angle distribution, and airfoil section. The method may also be applied to unsteady flow problems such as non-uniform wind distributions (windmills in shear winds). The appendices contain graphs, the verification of expressions for the indefinite doublet and source integrals, proof of far wake, and hub geometry.

  10. Aerodynamic Design of a Locomotive Fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Chad; Maynes, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Rising fuel cost has motivated increased fuel efficiency of freight trains. At cruising speed, the largest contributing factor to the fuel consumption is the aerodynamic drag. As a result of air stagnation at the front of the train and substantial flow separation behind, the leading locomotive and trailing railcar experience greater drag than intermediate cars. This work introduces the design of streamlined nose fairings to be attached to freight locomotives as a means of reducing the leading locomotive drag. The aerodynamic performance of each fairing design is modeled using a commercial CFD software package. The K-epsilon turbulence model is used, and fluid properties are equivalent to atmospheric air at standard conditions. A selection of isolated screening studies are performed, and a multidimensional regression is used to predict optimal-performing fairing designs. Between screening studies, careful examination of the flow field is performed to inspire subsequent fairing designs. Results are presented for 250 different nose fairings. The best performing fairing geometry predicts a nominal drag reduction of 17% on the lead locomotive in a train set. This drag reduction is expected to result in nearly 1% fuel savings for the entire train.

  11. Aeroassist flight experiment aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    The problem is to determine the transitional flow aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, including the base flow characteristics, of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE). The justification for the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) Application stems from MSFC's system integration responsibility for the AFE. To insure that the AFE objectives are met, MSFC must understand the limitations and uncertainties of the design data. Perhaps the only method capable of handling the complex physics of the rarefied high energy AFE trajectory is Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The 3-D code used in this analysis is applicable only to the AFE geometry. It uses the Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) collision model and five specie chemistry model available from Langley Research Center. The code is benchmarked against the AFE flight data and used as an Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design tool. The code is being used to understand the AFE flow field and verify or modify existing design data. Continued application to lower altitudes is testing the capability of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) to handle 3-D DSMC and its practicality as an ASTV/AFE design tool.

  12. Modeling the Aerodynamics and Performances of a Historic Airplane: the Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González-Betes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling the aerodynamics and performances of a historic airplane is very similar to the conceptual and preliminary design phases of a new plane, with the advantage of knowing the configuration and that the airplane was airworthy; thus it is unnecessary to outline and assess many different alternatives. However, the drag polar, the real performances, stability features, etc, are still unknown. For various reasons (in particular because of two World Wars, or the Civil War in the Spanish case most details of many historical airplanes have been lost.In the present research work, the situation is as follows. In June 1933 the "Cuatro Vientos", a Spanish-built Bréguet XIX Super TR, flew non-stop from Seville to Cuba; a distance of 7500 km (about 4100 nautical miles in around 40 hours. A few days later, in a far less complicated stage between Havana and Mexico, the airplane was lost with its occupants to a storm in the Yucatan peninsula.The modeling considered in this paper starts by addressing the aerodynamic modifications introduced in the airplane for the extremely long flight. Then, with the help of old and present day aerodynamic data and methods the drag polar is estimated. The available engine data is completed and extrapolated to obtain information on power and fuel consumption. Finally, all this data is integrated to provide a reliable and technically sound reproduction of the Seville-Cuba flight.

  13. Computation of Aerodynamic Noise Radiated from Ducted Tail Rotor Using Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed aerodynamic performance of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD technique. The general governing equations of turbulent flow around ducted tail rotor are given and directly solved by using finite volume discretization and Runge-Kutta time integration. The calculations of the lift characteristics of the ducted tail rotor can be obtained. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combining computational aeroacoustic with boundary element method (BEM has been proposed. The computational steps include the following: firstly, the unsteady flow around rotor is calculated using the CFD method to get the noise source information; secondly, the radiate sound pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy Curle equation in the frequency domain; lastly, the scattering effect of the duct wall on the propagation of the sound wave is presented using an acoustic thin-body BEM. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels are compared with the known technique for validation. The sound pressure directivity and scattering effect are shown to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the method.

  14. Phonetic Detail in American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Freeze

    1987-01-01

    @@ In the course of teaching general phonetics and phonological analysis in the psat few years,l have found some phonetic detail which some native speakers as well as non-native speakers were unaware of. This subtle detail will be the focus of this presentation. Som e of this detail many of you will already be aware of because of your experience in learning, teaching, and thinking about English. If anything is new to you, I hope you might enjoy hearing about it even if it turns out not to be useful in your work.

  15. Decomposing the aerodynamic forces of low-Reynolds flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriche, Manuel; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Flores, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of flow around flapping NACA0012 airfoils at relatively small Reynolds numbers, Re = 1000 . The simulations are carried out with TUCAN, an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible flow with an immersed boundary method to model the presence of the airfoil. The motion of the airfoil is composed of a vertical translation, heaving, and a rotation about the quarter of the chord, pitching. Both motions are prescribed by sinusoidal laws, with a reduced frequency of k = 1 . 41 , a pitching amplitude of 30deg and a heaving amplitude of one chord. Both, the mean pitch angle and the phase shift between pitching and heaving motions are varied, to build a database with 18 configurations. Four of these cases are analysed in detail using the force decomposition algorithm of Chang (1992) and Martín Alcántara et al. (2015). This method decomposes the total aerodynamic force into added-mass (translation and rotation of the airfoil), a volumetric contribution from the vorticity (circulatory effects) and a surface contribution proportional to viscosity. In particular we will focus on the second, analysing the contribution of the leading and trailing edge vortices that typically appear in these flows. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P. The authors thankfully acknowledge the computer resources provided by the Red Española de Supercomputacion.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE AND EXIT FLOW FIELD OF LOW PRESSURE AXIAL FLOW FAN WITH CIRCUMFERENTIAL SKEWED BLADES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the low pressure axial flow fan with circumferential skewed rotor blade, including the radial blade, the forward-skewed blade and the backward-skewed blade, was studied with experimental methods. The aerodynamic performance of the rotors was measured. At the design condition at outlet of the rotors, detailed flow measurements were performed with a five-hole probe and a Hot-Wire Anemometer (HWA). The results show that compared to the radial rotor, the forward-skewed rotor demonstrates a wider Stable Operating Range (SOR), is able to reduce the total pressure loss in the hub region and make main loading of blade accumulating in the mid-span region. There is a wider wake in the upper mid-span region of the forward-skewed rotor. Compared to the radial rotor, in the backward-skewed rotor there is higher total pressure loss near the hub and shroud regions and lower loss in the mid-span region. In addition, the velocity deficit in the wake is lower at mid-span of the backward-skewed rotor than the forward-skewed rotor.

  17. Photogrammetric Tracking of Aerodynamic Surfaces and Aerospace Models at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark R.; Robson, Stuart; Jones, Thomas W.; Goad, William K.; Lunsford, Charles B.

    2016-06-01

    Aerospace engineers require measurements of the shape of aerodynamic surfaces and the six degree of freedom (6DoF) position and orientation of aerospace models to analyse structural dynamics and aerodynamic forces. The measurement technique must be non-contact, accurate, reliable, have a high sample rate and preferably be non-intrusive. Close range photogrammetry based on multiple, synchronised, commercial-off-the-shelf digital cameras can supply surface shape and 6DoF data at 5-15Hz with customisable accuracies. This paper describes data acquisition systems designed and implemented at NASA Langley Research Center to capture surface shapes and 6DoF data. System calibration and data processing techniques are discussed. Examples of experiments and data outputs are described.

  18. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment - Aerodynamics, Aerothermodynamics, and Thermal Protection System Integration Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed during from March 2010 October 2011. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed environment using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. This report will focus on describing the work done in the area of extending the aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics module using S/HABP, CBAERO, PREMIN and LANMIN. It will also detail the work done integrating EXITS as the TPS sizing tool.

  19. Spectral methods and their implementation to solution of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    Fundamental concepts underlying spectral collocation methods, especially pertaining to their use in the solution of partial differential equations, are outlined. Theoretical accuracy results are reviewed and compared with results from test problems. A number of practical aspects of the construction and use of spectral methods are detailed, along with several solution schemes which have found utility in applications of spectral methods to practical problems. Results from a few of the successful applications of spectral methods to problems of aerodynamic and fluid mechanic interest are then outlined, followed by a discussion of the problem areas in spectral methods and the current research under way to overcome these difficulties.

  20. Hypersonic and Supersonic Static Aerodynamics of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Vannorman, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of continuum static aerodynamics of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle (EV). The method is derived from earlier work for Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Path Finder (MPF) and the appropriate additions are made in the areas where physics are different from what the prior entry systems would encounter. These additions include the considerations for the high angle of attack of MSL EV, ablation of the heatshield during entry, turbulent boundary layer, and other aspects relevant to the flight performance of MSL. Details of the work, the supporting data and conclusions of the investigation are presented.

  1. The effect of leading-edge sweep angle asymmetry on lateral aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN JingXia; WANG JinJun

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of force measurement experiment in a low speed wind tunnel,the effect of asymmetrical leading-edge sweep angle on aerodynamic load was investigated with the commonswift's wing model.The wing model was divided into three segments,i.e.,arm wing,hand wingin and hand wingout,and the roll moment produced by the variation of asymmetrical change of wing segment's leading-edge sweep angle was analyzed.

  2. Aerodynamic and Flight Dynamic Characteristics of 5.56-mm Ammunition: M855

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Ammunition: M855 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sidra I. Silton and Bradley E. Howell* 5d. PROJECT...integration technique (6). The 6-DOF routine incorporates the maximum likelihood method ( MLM ) to match the theoretical trajectory to the...experimentally measured trajectory. The MLM is an iterative procedure that adjusts the aerodynamic coefficients to maximize a likelihood function. Using this

  3. The effect of leading-edge sweep angle asymmetry on lateral aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of force measurement experiment in a low speed wind tunnel, the effect of asymmetrical leading-edge sweep angle on aerodynamic load was investigated with the commonswift’s wing model. The wing model was divided into three segments, i.e., arm wing, hand wingin and hand wingout, and the roll moment produced by the variation of asymmetrical change of wing segment’s leading-edge sweep angle was analyzed.

  4. Aerodynamic testing in cryogenic nitrogen gas - A precursor to testing in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Testing techniques for transonic cryogenic tunnels using nitrogen as the test fluid are presented. The measurement of static aerodynamic coefficients used to determine component efficiency is discussed, focusing on tests of two-dimensional airfoils at transonic Mach numbers. Also, three-dimensional tests of complete configurations and sidewall mounted wings are examined. Consideration is given to time-dependent phenomena, fluid mechanics, nonintrusive laser techniques, the detection of transition and separation, and testing for flutter, buffet, and oscillating airfoil characteristics.

  5. A generalized solution of elasto-aerodynamic lubrication for aerodynamic compliant foil bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Lie; QI; Shemiao; GENG; Haipeng

    2005-01-01

    Although aerodynamic compliant foil bearings are successfully applied in a number of turbo-machineries, theoretical researches on the modeling, performance prediction of compliant foil bearings and the dynamic analysis of the related rotor system seem still far behind the experimental investigation because of structural complexity of the foil bearings. A generalized solution of the elasto-aerodynamic lubrication is presented in this paper by introducing both static and dynamic deformations of foils and solving gas-lubricated Reynolds equations with deformation equations simultaneously. The solution can be used for the calculation of dynamic stiffness and damping, as well as the prediction of static performances of foil bearings. Systematical theories and methods are also presented for the purpose of the prediction of dynamic behavior of a rotor system equipped with foil bearings.

  6. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  7. The Effect of Bypass Nozzle Exit Area on Fan Aerodynamic Performance and Noise in a Model Turbofan Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Podboy, Gary, G.; Woodward, Richard P.; Jeracki, Robert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on identifying and understanding the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine, as well as determining their contribution to the overall aircraft noise signature. Therefore, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test program was conducted called the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test as part of the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology program. The test was performed in the anechoic NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel using a 1/5 scale model turbofan simulator which represented a current generation, medium pressure ratio, high bypass turbofan aircraft engine. The investigation focused on simulating in model scale only the bypass section of the turbofan engine. The test objectives were to: identify the noise sources within the model and determine their noise level; investigate several component design technologies by determining their impact on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan stage; and conduct detailed flow diagnostics within the fan flow field to characterize the physics of the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan model. This report discusses results obtained for one aspect of the Source Diagnostic Test that investigated the effect of the bypass or fan nozzle exit area on the bypass stage aerodynamic performance, specifically the fan and outlet guide vanes or stators, as well as the farfield acoustic noise level. The aerodynamic performance, farfield acoustics, and Laser Doppler Velocimeter flow diagnostic results are presented for the fan and four different fixed-area bypass nozzle configurations. The nozzles simulated fixed engine operating lines and encompassed the fan stage operating envelope from near stall to cruise. One nozzle was selected as a baseline reference, representing the nozzle area which would achieve the design point operating conditions and fan stage performance. The total area change from

  8. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of a 1484 ft/sec Tip Speed Quiet High-Speed Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of a 1484 ft/sec tip speed quiet high-speed fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, low-noise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone experimental testing in the 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating points simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, which includes a core duct and a bypass duct that merge upstream of the fan system nozzle. As a result, only fan rotational speed and the system bypass ratio, set by means of a translating nozzle plug, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. Computed blade row flow fields at all fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive or critical boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems, with the exception of the hub boundary layer at the core duct entrance. At that location a significant flow separation is present. The region of local flow

  9. Assessment of dysphonia due to benign vocal fold lesions by acoustic and aerodynamic indices: a multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarella, Giovanna; Baracca, Giovanna; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Forti, Stella

    2011-04-01

    The goal was to identify acoustic and aerodynamic indices that allow the discrimination of a benign organic dysphonic voice from a normal voice. Fifty-three patients affected by dysphonia caused by vocal folds benign lesions, and a control group were subjected to maximum phonation time (MPT) measurements, GRB perceptual evaluations and acoustic/aerodynamic tests. All analyzed variables except the airflow variation coefficient were significantly different between the two groups. The unique significant factors in the discrimination between healthy and dysphonic subjects were the aerodynamic indices of MPT and Glottal efficiency index, and the acoustic index Shimmer. These results show that a combination of three parameters can discriminate a voice deviance and highlight the importance of a multidimensional assessment for objective voice evaluation.

  10. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  11. Aerodynamic Modelling and Optimization of Axial Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    A numerically efficient mathematical model for the aerodynamics oflow speed axial fans of the arbitrary vortex flow type has been developed.The model is based on a blade-element principle, whereby therotor is divided into a number of annular streamtubes.For each of these streamtubes relations...... for velocity, pressure andradial position are derived from the conservationlaws for mass, tangential momentum and energy.The resulting system of equations is non-linear and, dueto mass conservation and pressure equilibrium far downstream of the rotor,strongly coupled.The equations are solved using the Newton...... distributionsof pitch angle and chord length have been chosen as independent variablesin the optimizations.Besides restricting the geometry of the rotor,constraints have been added to ensure a required pressure rise as well asnon-stalled flow conditions.Optimizations have been performed tomaximize the mean value...

  12. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong

    To analyse the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors, the main tool in use today is the 1D-Blade Element Momentum (BEM) technique combined with 2D airfoil data. Because of its simplicity, the BEM technique is employed by industry when designing new wind turbine blades. However, in order...... variables (velocity-pressure formulation) are employed as the basic governing equations. However, since fluid mechanical problems essentially are governed by vortex dynamics, it is sometimes advantageous to use the concept of vorticity (defined as the curl of velocity). In vorticity form the Navier...... or actuator/Navier-Stokes computations. A simple and efficient technique for determining the angle of attack for flow past a wind turbine rotor was developed in [11], and in [12] tunnel wall corrections for wind tunnels with closed or open test sections were developed. The second part of the thesis deals...

  13. Influence of Icing on Bridge Cable Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Frej Henningsen, Jesper; Olsen, Idar

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the relevance of ice accretion for wind-induced vibration of structural bridge cables has been recognised and became a subject of research in bridge engineering. Full-scale monitoring and observation indicate that light precipitation at moderate low temperatures between zero and -...... forces of different bridge cables types. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel facility capable amongst others to simulate incloud icing conditions........ The determination of these force coefficients require a proper simulation of the ice layer occurring under the specific climatic conditions, favouring real ice accretion over simplified artificial reproduction. The work presented in this paper was performed to study the influence of ice accretion on the aerodynamic...

  14. Multiprocessing on supercomputers for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1991-01-01

    Little use is made of multiple processors available on current supercomputers (computers with a theoretical peak performance capability equal to 100 MFLOPS or more) to improve turnaround time in computational aerodynamics. The productivity of a computer user is directly related to this turnaround time. In a time-sharing environment, such improvement in this speed is achieved when multiple processors are used efficiently to execute an algorithm. The concept of multiple instructions and multiple data (MIMD) is applied through multitasking via a strategy that requires relatively minor modifications to an existing code for a single processor. This approach maps the available memory to multiple processors, exploiting the C-Fortran-Unix interface. The existing code is mapped without the need for developing a new algorithm. The procedure for building a code utilizing this approach is automated with the Unix stream editor.

  15. WECS incompressible Lifting Surface Aerodynamics (WILSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suciu, E.; Morino, L.

    1976-05-01

    A method is described for computing the distribution for a zero-thickness horizontal axis windmill, as well as for obtaining the power coefficient. The problem is formulated in terms of velocity potential, and the study deals with a nonlinear finite-element lifting-surface analysis of horizontal-axis windmills in a steady incompressible, inviscid, irrotational flow, with a prescribed helicoidal wake. A zero-order-finite-element analysis is used with a straight-vortex line wake. The correct wake geometry is obtained and the pressure coefficient calculated using both linearized and nonlinear forms of the Bernoulli Theorem. The numerical results compare well with those obtained with Windmill Incompressible Complex Configuration Aerodynamics (WICCA), a computer program for solving the same problem which uses a completely different integral equation. A number of suggestions are offered to improve the model presented.

  16. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong

    or actuator/Navier-Stokes computations. A simple and efficient technique for determining the angle of attack for flow past a wind turbine rotor was developed in [11], and in [12] tunnel wall corrections for wind tunnels with closed or open test sections were developed. The second part of the thesis deals...... with Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA). With the spread of wind turbines near urban areas, there is an increasing need for accurate predictions of aerodynamically generated noise. Indeed, noise has become one of the most important issues for further development of wind power, and the ability of controlling......=U/c), it is difficult to resolve them together at the same time. Hardin and Pope proposed a non-linear two-step (viscous incompressible flow and inviscid acoustic perturbation) splitting procedure for computational aero-acoustics that is suitable for both generation and propagation. The advantage of the splitting...

  17. The aerodynamics and hydrodynamics of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennos, A R

    1999-12-01

    Because they grow away from their substratum to compete for light, plants have to withstand hydrodynamic or aerodynamic drag. Both water and land plants reconfigure in response to this drag, and this is presumed to reduce the risk of mechanical failure. However, there is little unequivocal evidence of drag reduction in large trees as a result of reconfiguration. Land plants must also transport water internally to their tissues, and many have developed xylem tracheids and vessels that help speed up this process. Recent evidence that tree height is limited by water supply suggests that water transport efficiency must be a crucial element in tree design. However, the resistance of many parts of the xylem is still unknown. More focused work is urgently required to shed light on the evolution and ecology of plants in relation to the flow of fluids.

  18. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  19. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  20. A Cost-Effective Tracking Algorithm for Hypersonic Glide Vehicle Maneuver Based on Modified Aerodynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to defend the hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV, a cost-effective single-model tracking algorithm using Cubature Kalman filter (CKF is proposed in this paper based on modified aerodynamic model (MAM as process equation and radar measurement model as measurement equation. In the existing aerodynamic model, the two control variables attack angle and bank angle cannot be measured by the existing radar equipment and their control laws cannot be known by defenders. To establish the process equation, the MAM for HGV tracking is proposed by using additive white noise to model the rates of change of the two control variables. For the ease of comparison several multiple model algorithms based on CKF are presented, including interacting multiple model (IMM algorithm, adaptive grid interacting multiple model (AGIMM algorithm and hybrid grid multiple model (HGMM algorithm. The performances of these algorithms are compared and analyzed according to the simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the proposed tracking algorithm based on modified aerodynamic model has the best tracking performance with the best accuracy and least computational cost among all tracking algorithms in this paper. The proposed algorithm is cost-effective for HGV tracking.