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Sample records for desulfovibrio vulgaris miyazaki

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of adenylylsulfate reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Goenka Agrawal, Aruna; Kaur, Amrit Pal; Goddard, Richard; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The crystallization of adenylylsulfate reductase isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium D. vulgaris Miyazaki F is described. The crystals diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution. Sulfur in its various oxidation states is used for energy conservation in many microorganisms. Adenylylsulfate reductase is a key enzyme in the sulfur-reduction pathway of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The adenylylsulfate reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F has been purified and crystallized at 277 K using the vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. A data set was collected to 1.7 Å resolution from a single crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P3 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125.93, c = 164.24 Å. The crystal contained two molecules per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 4.02 Å 3 Da −1 ; the solvent content was estimated to be 69.4%

  2. Spectroelectrochemical study of the [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F in solution and immobilized on biocompatible gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millo, Diego; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Utesch, Tillmann; Wisitruangsakul, Nattawadee; Mroginski, Maria A; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hildebrandt, Peter; Zebger, Ingo

    2009-11-19

    The catalytic cycle of the anaerobic [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) both in solution and immobilized on an Au electrode was studied by IR spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. IR spectroelectrochemistry in solution at different pH values allows the identification of the various redox-states of the active site and the determination of the midpoint potentials, as well as their acid-base equilibria. The spectroscopic characterization was based on the unique marker bands of the CN and CO stretching modes of the Ni-Fe center and served as reference for the surface-enhanced IR absorption (SEIRA) study of the immobilized enzyme. Using structural models of hydrogenases from DvMF and Desulfovibrio gigas , dipole moment calculations were carried out to guide the immobilization strategy. In view of the high dipole moment of about 1100 D pointing through the negatively charged area surrounding the distal [FeS] cluster, the Au electrode was coated by a self-assembled monolayer of amino-terminated mercaptanes which, due to the positively charged head groups, permit a durable electrostatic binding of the protein. SEIRA spectroscopy revealed a structurally and functionally intact active site as demonstrated by the reversible activation and inactivation under hydrogen and argon, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry on the immobilized enzyme demonstrate a reversible anaerobic inactivation upon changing the applied potential. The "switch" potential (E(switch)) associated with the reductive reactivation was determined to be -33 mV (vs normal hydrogen electrode). However, the catalytic current decreased on the time scale of hours during continuous cycling. SEIRA experiments demonstrate that the loss of catalytic activity is not due to protein desorption but is rather related to a slow degradation of the active site, possibly initiated by the attack of reactive species electrochemically generated from residual traces of oxygen in solution.

  3. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  4. Distribution of Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio vulgaris in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and biofilms from an open simulated cooling water system, were hybridised with a rhodamine-labeled probe SPN3 (Shewanella putrefaciens) and fluorescein-labeled probe SRB385 (Desulfovibrio vulgaris) and investigated using scanning confocal laser microscopy. The facultative anaerobe S. putrefaciens and the strict ...

  5. Identification of Small RNAs in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Andrew; Joachimiak, Marcin; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Bender, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of facilitating the removal of toxic metals such as uranium from contaminated sites via reduction. As such, it is essential to understand the intricate regulatory cascades involved in how D. vulgaris and its relatives respond to stressors in such sites. One approach is the identification and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs); molecules ranging in size from 20-200 nucleotides that predominantly affect gene regulation by binding to complementary mRNA in an anti-sense fashion and therefore provide an immediate regulatory response. To identify sRNAs in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not possess an annotated hfq gene, RNA was pooled from stationary and exponential phases, nitrate exposure, and biofilm conditions. The subsequent RNA was size fractionated, modified, and converted to cDNA for high throughput transcriptomic deep sequencing. A computational approach to identify sRNAs via the alignment of seven separate Desulfovibrio genomes was also performed. From the deep sequencing analysis, 2,296 reads between 20 and 250 nt were identified with expression above genome background. Analysis of those reads limited the number of candidates to ∼87 intergenic, while ∼140 appeared to be antisense to annotated open reading frames (ORFs). Further BLAST analysis of the intergenic candidates and other Desulfovibrio genomes indicated that eight candidates were likely portions of ORFs not previously annotated in the D. vulgaris genome. Comparison of the intergenic and antisense data sets to the bioinformatical predicted candidates, resulted in ∼54 common candidates. Current approaches using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR are being used toverify expression of the candidates and to further develop the role these sRNAs play in D. vulgaris regulation.

  6. Salt Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: An integratedgenomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Baidoo, Edward E.; Borglin, Sharon C.; Chen, Wenqiong; Hazen, Terry C.; He, Qiang; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Huang, Katherine; Huang, Rick; Hoyner,Dominique C.; Katz, Natalie; Keller, Martin; Oeller, Paul; Redding,Alyssa; Sun, Jun; Wall, Judy; Wei, Jing; Yang, Zamin; Yen, Huei-Che; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling Jay D.

    2005-12-08

    The ability of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to reduce, and therefore contain, toxic and radioactive metal waste has made all factors that affect the physiology of this organism of great interest. Increased salinity is an important and frequent fluctuation faced by D. vulgaris in its natural habitat. In liquid culture, exposure to excess salt resulted in striking elongation of D. vulgaris cells. Using data from transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolite assays, phospholipid fatty acid profiling, and electron microscopy, we used a systems approach to explore the effects of excess NaCl on D. vulgaris. In this study we demonstrated that import of osmoprotectants, such as glycine betaine and ectoine, is the primary mechanism used by D. vulgaris to counter hyperionic stress. Several efflux systems were also highly up-regulated, as was the ATP synthesis pathway. Increases in the levels of both RNA and DNA helicases suggested that salt stress affected the stability of nucleic acid base pairing. An overall increase in the level of branched fatty acids indicated that there were changes in cell wall fluidity. The immediate response to salt stress included up-regulation of chemotaxis genes, although flagellar biosynthesis was down-regulated. Other down-regulated systems included lactate uptake permeases and ABC transport systems. The results of an extensive NaCl stress analysis were compared with microarray data from a KCl stress analysis, and unlike many other bacteria, D. vulgaris responded similarly to the two stresses. Integration of data from multiple methods allowed us to develop a conceptual model for the salt stress response in D. vulgaris that can be compared to those in other microorganisms.

  7. Mapping the Two-component Regulatory Networks in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric; Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    D. vulgaris Hildenborough has 72 response regulators. The Desulfovibrio are sulfate reducing bacteria that are important in the sulfur and carbon cycles in anoxic habitats. Its large number of two componenent systems are probably critical to its ability to sense and respond to its environment. Our goal is to map these RRs to the genes they regulate using a DNA-affinity-purification-chip (DAP-chip) protocol. First target determined usuing EMSA. A positive target was determined for as many RRs as possible using EMSA. Targets were selected based on gene proximity, regulon predictions and/or predicted sigma54 dependent promoters. qPCR was used to ensure that the target was enriched from sheared genomic DNA before proceeding to the DAP-chip.

  8. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  9. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  10. The nucleotide sequence of the Desulfovibrio gigas desulforedoxin gene indicates that the Desulfovibrio vulgaris rbo gene originated from a gene fusion event.

    OpenAIRE

    Brumlik, M J; Leroy, G; Bruschi, M; Voordouw, G

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the rbo gene from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in Escherichia coli minicells and Western blotting (immunoblotting) of Desulfovibrio cell extracts with antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide indicated the presence of a 14-kDa polypeptide product, as expected from the gene sequence. Cloning and sequencing of the gene (dsr) for desulforedoxin, a 4-kDa redox protein from Desulfovibrio gigas, showed that it is formed by expression of an autonomous gene of 111 bp, not b...

  11. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  12. Purification and characterization of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) hydrogenase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordouw, G.; Hagen, W.R.; Kruse-Wolters, M.; Berkel-Arts, van A.; Veeger, C.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) is a heterologous dimer of molecular mass 46 + 13.5 kDa. Its two structural genes have been cloned on a 4664-base-pair fragment of known sequence in the vector pUC9. Expression of hydrogenase polypeptides in Escherichia coli transformed with

  13. The primary pathway for lactate oxidation in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia ePieulle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to respire sulfate linked to lactate oxidation is a key metabolic signature of the Desulfovibrio genus. Lactate oxidation by these incomplete oxidizers generates reductants through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR, with the latter catalyzing pyruvate conversion into acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is the source of substrate-level phosphorylation though the production of ATP. Here, we show that these crucial steps are performed by enzymes encoded by a nonacistronic transcriptional unit named now as operon luo (for lactate utilization operon. Using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we assigned a physiological role to the operon genes DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33. The growth of mutant 26-28 was highly disrupted on D-lactate, whereas the growth of mutant 32-33 was slower on L-lactate, which could be related to a decrease in the activity of D-lactate or L-lactate oxidase in the corresponding mutants. The DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33 genes thus encode functional D-LDH and L-LDH enzymes, respectively. Scanning of the genome for lactate utilization revealed several lactate permease and dehydrogenase homologs. However, transcriptional compensation was not observed in any of the mutants except for lactate permease. Although there is a high degree of redundancy for lactate oxidase, it is not functionally efficient in LDH mutants. This result could be related to the identification of several operon enzymes, including LDHs, in the PFOR activity bands, suggesting the occurrence of a lactate-oxidizing supermolecular structure that can optimize the performance of lactate utilization in Desulfovibrio species.

  14. Use of immunomagnetic separation for the detection of Desulfovibrio vulgaris from environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Joyner, D.C.; Kusel, K.; Singer, M.E.; Sitte, J.; Torok, T.

    2011-04-15

    Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) has proved highly efficient for recovering microorganisms from heterogeneous samples. Current investigation targeted the separation of viable cells of the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Streptavidin-coupled paramagnetic beads and biotin labeled antibodies raised against surface antigens of this microorganism were used to capture D. vulgaris cells in both bioreactor grown laboratory samples and from extremely low-biomass environmental soil and subsurface drilling samples. Initial studies on detection, recovery efficiency and viability for IMS were performed with laboratory grown D. vulgaris cells using various cell densities. Efficiency of cell isolation and recovery (i.e., release of the microbial cells from the beads following separation) was followed by microscopic imaging and acridine orange direct counts (AODC). Excellent recovery efficiency encouraged the use of IMS to capture Desulfovibrio spp. cells from low-biomass environmental samples. The environmental samples were obtained from a radionuclide-contaminated site in Germany and the chromium (VI)-contaminated Hanford site, an ongoing bioremediation project of the U.S. Department of Energy. Field deployable IMS technology may greatly facilitate environmental sampling and bioremediation process monitoring and enable transcriptomics and proteomics/metabolomics-based studies directly on cells collected from the field.

  15. Microcalorimetric studies of the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria: energetics of Desulfovibrio vulgaris growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Traore, A S; Hatchikian, C E; Belaich, J P; Le Gall, J

    1981-01-01

    The metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown on medium containing lactate or pyruvate plus a high concentration of sulfate (36 mM) was studied. Molecular growth yields were 6.7 +/- 1.3 and 10.1 +/- 1.7 g/mol for lactate and pyruvate, respectively. Under conditions in which the energy source was the sole growth-limiting factor, we observed the formation of 0.5 mol of hydrogen per mol of lactate and 0.1 mol of hydrogen per mol of pyruvate. The determination of metabolic end prod...

  16. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  17. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  18. Structure of a CRISPR-associated protein Cas2 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samai, Poulami; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    A 1.35 Å resolution crystal structure of Cas2 from the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris (DvuCas2) is reported. CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) provide bacteria and archaea with RNA-guided acquired immunity to invasive DNAs. CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins carry out the immune effector functions. Cas2 is a universal component of the CRISPR system. Here, a 1.35 Å resolution crystal structure of Cas2 from the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris (DvuCas2) is reported. DvuCas2 is a homodimer, with each protomer consisting of an N-terminal βαββαβ ferredoxin fold (amino acids 1–78) to which is appended a C-terminal segment (amino acids 79–102) that includes a short 3 10 -helix and a fifth β-strand. The β5 strands align with the β4 strands of the opposite protomers, resulting in two five-stranded antiparallel β-sheets that form a sandwich at the dimer interface. The DvuCas2 dimer is stabilized by a distinctive network of hydrophilic cross-protomer side-chain interactions

  19. Identification and Characterization of the Major Porin of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lucy; Wooton, Etsuko; Stahl, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due in large part to their ability to facilitate the diffusion of a diverse range of solutes across the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, the porins represent one of the most prominent and important bacterial membrane protein superfamilies. Notably, for the Gram-negative bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model organism for studies of sulfate-reducing bacteria, no genes for porins have been identified or proposed in its annotated genome. Results from initial biochemical studies suggested that the product of the DVU0799 gene, which is one of the most abundant proteins of the D. vulgaris Hildenborough OM and purified as a homotrimeric complex, was a strong porin candidate. To investigate this possibility, this protein was further characterized biochemically and biophysically. Structural analyses via electron microscopy of negatively stained protein identified trimeric particles with stain-filled depressions and structural modeling suggested a β-barrel structure for the monomer, motifs common among the known porins. Functional studies were performed in which crude OM preparations or purified DVU0799 was reconstituted into proteoliposomes and the proteoliposomes were examined for permeability against a series of test solutes. The results obtained establish DVU0799 to be a pore-forming protein with permeability properties similar to those observed for classical bacterial porins, such as those of Escherichia coli. Taken together, these findings identify this highly abundant OM protein to be the major porin of D. vulgaris Hildenborough. Classification of DVU0799 in this model organism expands the database of functionally characterized porins and may also extend the range over which sequence analysis strategies can be used to identify porins in other bacterial genomes. IMPORTANCE Porins are membrane proteins that form transmembrane pores for the passive transport of small molecules across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria

  20. Analysis of a Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) Mutant ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Kelly S.; Yen, Huei-Che Bill; Hemme, Christopher L.; Yang, Zamin K.; He, Zhili; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Huang, Katherine H.; Alm, Eric J.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2007-09-21

    Previous experiments examining the transcriptional profileof the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris demonstrated up-regulation of theFur regulon in response to various environmental stressors. To test theinvolvement of Fur in the growth response and transcriptional regulationof D. vulgaris, a targeted mutagenesis procedure was used for deletingthe fur gene. Growth of the resulting ?fur mutant (JW707) was notaffected by iron availability, but the mutant did exhibit increasedsensitivity to nitrite and osmotic stresses compared to the wild type.Transcriptional profiling of JW707 indicated that iron-bound Fur acts asa traditional repressor for ferrous iron uptake genes (feoAB) and othergenes containing a predicted Fur binding site within their promoter.Despite the apparent lack of siderophore biosynthesis genes within the D.vulgaris genome, a large 12-gene operon encoding orthologs to TonB andTolQR also appeared to be repressed by iron-bound Fur. While other genespredicted to be involved in iron homeostasis were unaffected by thepresence or absence of Fur, alternative expression patterns that could beinterpreted as repression or activation by iron-free Fur were observed.Both the physiological and transcriptional data implicate a globalregulatory role for Fur in the sulfate-reducing bacterium D.vulgaris.

  1. Microcalorimetric studies of the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria: energetics of Desulfovibrio vulgaris growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, A S; Hatchikian, C E; Belaich, J P; Le Gall, J

    1981-01-01

    The metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown on medium containing lactate or pyruvate plus a high concentration of sulfate (36 mM) was studied. Molecular growth yields were 6.7 +/- 1.3 and 10.1 +/- 1.7 g/mol for lactate and pyruvate, respectively. Under conditions in which the energy source was the sole growth-limiting factor, we observed the formation of 0.5 mol of hydrogen per mol of lactate and 0.1 mol of hydrogen per mol of pyruvate. The determination of metabolic end products revealed that D. vulgaris produced, in addition to normal end products (acetic acid, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide) and molecular hydrogen, 2 and 5% of ethanol per mol of lactate and pyruvate, respectively. Power-time curves of growth of D. vulgaris on lactate and pyruvate were obtained, by the microcalorimetric Tian-Calvet apparatus. The enthalpies (delta Hmet) associated with the oxidation of these substrates and calculated from growth thermograms were -36.36 +/- 5 and -70.22 +/- 3 kJ/mol of lactate and pyruvate, respectively. These experimental values were in agreement with the homologous values assessed from the theoretical equations of D. vulgaris metabolism of both lactate and pyruvate. The hydrogen production by this sulfate reducer constitutes an efficient regulatory system of electrons, from energy source through the pathway of sulfate reduction. This hydrogen value may thus facilitate interactions between this strain and other environmental microflora, especially metagenic bacteria.

  2. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  3. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  4. Effect of growth conditions on microbial activity and iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chen, E-mail: chen.zhou.2@asu.edu [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University (United States); Vannela, Raveender [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University (United States); Hayes, Kim F. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan (United States); Rittmann, Bruce E. [Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Extended incubation time to 16 days allowed significant FeS crystallization. • A weakly acidic pH greatly enhanced particle growth of mackinawite. • Microbial metabolism of different donors systematically altered the ambient pH. • Greater sulfide accumulation stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite. - Abstract: Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can produce iron sulfide (FeS) solids with mineralogical characteristics that may be beneficial for a variety of biogeochemical applications, such as long-term immobilization of uranium. In this study, the growth and metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, one of the best-studied SRB species, were comprehensively monitored in batch studies, and the biogenic FeS solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Controlling the pH by varying the initial pH, the iron-to-sulfate ratio, or the electron donor – affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH (from initial conditions or a decrease caused by less sulfate reduction, FeS precipitation, or using pyruvate as the electron donor) produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe{sub 1+x}S). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and particularly stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe{sub 3}S{sub 4}) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3 mM. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe{sup 2+} led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}·8(H{sub 2}O)]. Thus, microbially relevant conditions (initial pH, choice of electron donor, and excess or deficiency of sulfide) are tools to generate biogenic FeS solids of different characteristics.

  5. Effect of growth conditions on microbial activity and iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Hayes, Kim F.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Extended incubation time to 16 days allowed significant FeS crystallization. • A weakly acidic pH greatly enhanced particle growth of mackinawite. • Microbial metabolism of different donors systematically altered the ambient pH. • Greater sulfide accumulation stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite. - Abstract: Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can produce iron sulfide (FeS) solids with mineralogical characteristics that may be beneficial for a variety of biogeochemical applications, such as long-term immobilization of uranium. In this study, the growth and metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, one of the best-studied SRB species, were comprehensively monitored in batch studies, and the biogenic FeS solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Controlling the pH by varying the initial pH, the iron-to-sulfate ratio, or the electron donor – affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH (from initial conditions or a decrease caused by less sulfate reduction, FeS precipitation, or using pyruvate as the electron donor) produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe 1+x S). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and particularly stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe 3 S 4 ) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3 mM. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe 2+ led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 ·8(H 2 O)]. Thus, microbially relevant conditions (initial pH, choice of electron donor, and excess or deficiency of sulfide) are tools to generate biogenic FeS solids of different characteristics

  6. Unintended Laboratory-Driven Evolution Reveals Genetic Requirements for Biofilm Formation by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara B. De León

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB are of particular interest as members of this group are culprits in corrosion of industrial metal and concrete pipelines as well as being key players in subsurface metal cycling. Yet the mechanism of biofilm formation by these bacteria has not been determined. Here we show that two supposedly identical wild-type cultures of the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough maintained in different laboratories have diverged in biofilm formation. From genome resequencing and subsequent mutant analyses, we discovered that a single nucleotide change within DVU1017, the ABC transporter of a type I secretion system (T1SS, was sufficient to eliminate biofilm formation in D. vulgaris Hildenborough. Two T1SS cargo proteins were identified as likely biofilm structural proteins, and the presence of at least one (with either being sufficient was shown to be required for biofilm formation. Antibodies specific to these biofilm structural proteins confirmed that DVU1017, and thus the T1SS, is essential for localization of these adhesion proteins on the cell surface. We propose that DVU1017 is a member of the lapB category of microbial surface proteins because of its phenotypic similarity to the adhesin export system described for biofilm formation in the environmental pseudomonads. These findings have led to the identification of two functions required for biofilm formation in D. vulgaris Hildenborough and focus attention on the importance of monitoring laboratory-driven evolution, as phenotypes as fundamental as biofilm formation can be altered.

  7. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  8. Characterization of a heme c nitrite reductase from a non-ammonifying microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, I A; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V; Teixeira, M

    2000-08-31

    A cytochrome c nitrite reductase (NiR) was purified for the first time from a microorganism not capable of growing on nitrate, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. It was isolated from the membranes as a large heterooligomeric complex of 760 kDa, containing two cytochrome c subunits of 56 and 18 kDa. This complex has nitrite and sulfite reductase activities of 685 micromol NH(4)(+)/min/mg and 1.0 micromol H(2)/min/mg. The enzyme was studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The overall redox behavior was determined through a visible redox titration. The data were analyzed with a set of four redox transitions, with an E(0)' of +160 mV (12% of total absorption), -5 mV (38% of total absorption), -110 mV (38% of total absorption) and -210 mV (12% of total absorption) at pH 7.6. The EPR spectra of oxidized and partially reduced NiR show a complex pattern, indicative of multiple heme-heme magnetic interactions. It was found that D. vulgaris Hildenborough is not capable of using nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. These results indicate that in this organism the NiR is not involved in the dissimilative reduction of nitrite, as is the case with the other similar enzymes isolated so far. The possible role of this enzyme in the detoxification of nitrite and/or in the reduction of sulfite is discussed.

  9. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  10. Distinctive Oxidative Stress Responses to Hydrogen Peroxide in Sulfate Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aifen; He, Zhili; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hemme, Christopher L.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Bender, Kelly S.; Keasling, Jay D.; Stahl, David A.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) was investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. Microarray data demonstrated that gene expression was extensively affected by H2O2 with the response peaking at 120 min after H2O2 treatment. Genes affected include those involved with energy production, sulfate reduction, ribosomal structure and translation, H2O2 scavenging, posttranslational modification and DNA repair as evidenced by gene coexpression networks generated via a random matrix-theory based approach. Data from this study support the hypothesis that both PerR and Fur play important roles in H2O2-induced oxidative stress response. First, both PerR and Fur regulon genes were significantly up-regulated. Second, predicted PerR regulon genes ahpC and rbr2 were derepressedin Delta PerR and Delta Fur mutants and induction of neither gene was observed in both Delta PerR and Delta Fur when challenged with peroxide, suggesting possible overlap of these regulons. Third, both Delta PerR and Delta Fur appeared to be more tolerant of H2O2 as measured by optical density. Forth, proteomics data suggested de-repression of Fur during the oxidative stress response. In terms of the intracellular enzymatic H2O2 scavenging, gene expression data suggested that Rdl and Rbr2 may play major roles in the detoxification of H2O2. In addition, induction of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin appeared to be independent of PerR and Fur. Considering all data together, D. vulgaris employed a distinctive stress resistance mechanism to defend against increased cellular H2O2, and the temporal gene expression changes were consistent with the slowdown of cell growth at the onset of oxidative stress.

  11. Generalized schemes for high throughput manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Butland, G.; Elias, D.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Fok, V.; Juba, T.; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C.-M.; Keller, K.; Reveco, S.; Zane, G.; Semkiw, E.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, M.; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E.; Jorgens, D.; Price, M.; Witkowska, E.; Beller, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Biggin, M.; Auer, M.; Wall, J.; Keasling, J.

    2011-07-15

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high- throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA “parts” to facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of over 700 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  12. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venceslau, Sofia S. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dahl, Christiane [Institut für Mikrobiologie and Biotechnologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 168, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Saraiva, Lígia M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Pereira, Inês A.C., E-mail: ipereira@itqb.unl.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  13. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2008-10-27

    Hypothetical and conserved hypothetical genes account for>30percent of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved hypothetical (9.5percent) along with 887 hypothetical genes (24.4percent). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 hypothetical and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC-MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. 1212 of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes. Except for the latter, monocistronic gene annotation was expanded using the above criteria along with matching Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Polycistronic genes were annotated in the same manner with inferences from their proximity to more confidently annotated genes. Two targeted deletion mutants were used as test cases to determine the relevance of the inferred functional annotations.

  14. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  15. Genetic Adaptation to Salt Stress in Experimental Evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina; He, Zhili; Joachimiak, Marcin; Zane, Grant; Dehal, Paramvir; Arkin, Adam; Stahl, David; Wall, Judy; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Baidoo, Edward; Benke, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    High salinity is one of the most common environmental stressors. In order to understand how environmental organisms adapt to salty environment, an experiment evolution with sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough was conducted. Control lines and salt-stressed lines (6 lines each) grown in minimal medium LS4D or LS4D + 100 mM NaCl were transferred for 1200 generations. The salt tolerance was tested with LS4D supplemented with 250 mM NaCl. Statistical analysis of the growth data suggested that all lines adapted to their evolutionary environment. In addition, the control lines performed better than the ancestor with faster growth rate, higher biomass yield and shorter lag phase under salty environment they did not evolve in. However, the salt-adapted lines performed better than the control lines on measures of growth rate and yield under salty environment, suggesting that the salt?evolved lines acquired mutations specific to having extra salt in LS4D. Growth data and gene transcription data suggested that populations tended to improve till 1000 generations and active mutations tended to be fixed at the stage of 1000 generations. Point mutations and insertion/deletions were identified in isolated colonies from salt-adapted and control lines via whole genome sequencing. Glu, Gln and Ala appears to be the major osmoprotectant in evolved salt-stressed line. Ongoing studies are now characterizing the contribution of specific mutations identified in the salt-evolved D. vulgaris.

  16. Study of Nitrate Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Using iTRAQ Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.

    2006-10-12

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH),a sulphate-reducing bacterium, to nitrate stress was examined usingquantitative proteomic analysis. DvH was stressed with 105 m M sodiumnitrate(NaNO3), a level that caused a 50 percent inhibition in growth.The protein profile of stressed cells was compared with that of cellsgrown in the absence of nitrate using the iTRAQ peptide labellingstrategy and tandem liquid chromatography separation coupled with massspectrometry (quadrupoletime-of-flight) detection. A total of 737 uniqueproteins were identified by two or more peptides, representing 22 percentof the total DvH proteome and spanning every functional category. Theresults indicate that this was a mild stress, as proteins involved incentral metabolism and the sulphate reduction pathway were unperturbed.Proteins involved in the nitrate reduction pathway increased. Increasesseen in transport systems for proline, glycine^ betaineandglutamateindicate that the NaNO3 exposure led to both salt stress and nitratestress.Up-regulation observed in oxidative stress response proteins (Rbr,RbO, etc.) and a large number of ABC transport systems as well as in iron^ sulphur -cluster-containing proteins, however, appear to be specific tonitrate exposure. Finally, a number of hypothetical proteins were amongthe most significant changers, indicating that there may be unknownmechanisms initiated upon nitrate stress in DvH.

  17. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough transition into stationary phase growth during electrondonor depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, M.E.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Huang, K.H.; Alm, E.J.; Wan, X.-F.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Fields, M.W.

    2006-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase during electron donor depletion. In addition to temporal transcriptomics, total protein, carbohydrate, lactate, acetate, and sulfate levels were measured. The microarray data were examined for statistically significant expression changes, hierarchical cluster analysis, and promoter element prediction and were validated by quantitative PCR. As the cells transitioned from the exponential phase to the stationary phase, a majority of the down-expressed genes were involved in translation and transcription, and this trend continued at the remaining times. There were general increases in relative expression for intracellular trafficking and secretion, ion transport, and coenzyme metabolism as the cells entered the stationary phase. As expected, the DNA replication machinery was down-expressed, and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair increased during the stationary phase. Genes involved in amino acid acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and cell envelope biogenesis did not exhibit uniform transcriptional responses. Interestingly, most phage-related genes were up-expressed at the onset of the stationary phase. This result suggested that nutrient depletion may affect community dynamics and DNA transfer mechanisms of sulfate-reducing bacteria via the phage cycle. The putative feoAB system (in addition to other presumptive iron metabolism genes) was significantly up-expressed, and this suggested the possible importance of Fe{sup 2+} acquisition under metal-reducing conditions. The expression of a large subset of carbohydrate-related genes was altered, and the total cellular carbohydrate levels declined during the growth phase transition. Interestingly, the D. vulgaris genome does not contain a putative rpoS gene, a common attribute

  18. Biochemical Function, Molecular Structure and Evolution of an Atypical Thioredoxin Reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Valette

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin reductase (TR regulates the intracellular redox environment by reducing thioredoxin (Trx. In anaerobes, recent findings indicate that the Trx redox network is implicated in the global redox regulation of metabolism but also actively participates in protecting cells against O2. In the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH, there is an intriguing redundancy of the Trx system which includes a classical system using NADPH as electron source, a non-canonical system using NADH and an isolated TR (DvTRi. The functionality of DvTRi was questioned due to its lack of reactivity with DvTrxs. Structural analysis shows that DvTRi is a NAD(PH-independent TR but its reducer needs still to be identified. Moreover, DvTRi reduced by an artificial electron source is able to reduce in turn DvTrx1 and complexation experiments demonstrate a direct interaction between DvTRi and DvTrx1. The deletion mutant tri exhibits a higher sensitivity to disulfide stress and the gene tri is upregulated by O2 exposure. Having DvTRi in addition to DvTR1 as electron source for reducing DvTrx1 must be an asset to combat oxidative stress. Large-scale phylogenomics analyses show that TRi homologs are confined within the anaerobes. All TRi proteins displayed a conserved TQ/NGK motif instead of the HRRD motif, which is selective for the binding of the 2′-phosphate group of NADPH. The evolutionary history of TRs indicates that tr1 is the common gene ancestor in prokaryotes, affected by both gene duplications and horizontal gene events, therefore leading to the appearance of TRi through subfunctionalization over the evolutionary time.

  19. Electron microscopic characterization of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris: biofilms and clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, M.; Remis, J.; Jorgens, D.; Zemla, M.; Singer, M.; Schmitt, J.; Gorby, Y.; Hazen, T.; Wall, J.; Elias, D.; Torok, T.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous studies have helped characterize the stress response of the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). Yet all of these techniques represent bulk analyses of cells grown mostly under liquid culture conditions in large reactors. Such results represent an average over a large variety of individual cellular responses, hence assuming a homogeneous distribution of physiological traits. Moreover, only recently are those techniques applied to the environmentally more relevant condition of microbial communities (biofilms). What is missing is a detailed ultrastructural analysis of such biofilms in order to determine biofilm organization and its extracellular metal deposition distribution. Using sophisticated sample cryo-preparation approaches such as high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution or microwave- assisted processing, followed serial section TEM imaging, we have found a large heterogeneity with respect to metal precipitation with some cells being surrounded by metal precipitates whereas neighboring cells, being genetically identical and seeing virtually the exact same microenvironment, completely lack extracellular metal deposits. Interestingly, apart from metal deposits near cell surfaces, we also found string- and sheet- like metal deposits in between neighboring cells that in mature biofilms can extend for hundreds of micrometers. In mature DvH biofilms such deposits were predominantly associated with areas of intact cells in biofilms, with areas devoid of such metal deposits displayed predominantly cell debris, suggesting a role of such deposits for cell survival, which may be of high significance to biofilms at DOE sites. Upon tomographic imaging we found that extracellular metal deposits were often associated with thin filaments and vesicle-like features. To complement our serial section 2D analysis of resin-embedded samples and the resulting limitation of sampling 3D biofilm as thin sections of arbitrary orientation, we

  20. Unintended Laboratory-Driven Evolution Reveals Genetic Requirements for Biofilm Formation byDesulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León, Kara B; Zane, Grant M; Trotter, Valentine V; Krantz, Gregory P; Arkin, Adam P; Butland, Gareth P; Walian, Peter J; Fields, Matthew W; Wall, Judy D

    2017-10-17

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are of particular interest as members of this group are culprits in corrosion of industrial metal and concrete pipelines as well as being key players in subsurface metal cycling. Yet the mechanism of biofilm formation by these bacteria has not been determined. Here we show that two supposedly identical wild-type cultures of the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough maintained in different laboratories have diverged in biofilm formation. From genome resequencing and subsequent mutant analyses, we discovered that a single nucleotide change within DVU1017, the ABC transporter of a type I secretion system (T1SS), was sufficient to eliminate biofilm formation in D. vulgaris Hildenborough. Two T1SS cargo proteins were identified as likely biofilm structural proteins, and the presence of at least one (with either being sufficient) was shown to be required for biofilm formation. Antibodies specific to these biofilm structural proteins confirmed that DVU1017, and thus the T1SS, is essential for localization of these adhesion proteins on the cell surface. We propose that DVU1017 is a member of the lapB category of microbial surface proteins because of its phenotypic similarity to the adhesin export system described for biofilm formation in the environmental pseudomonads. These findings have led to the identification of two functions required for biofilm formation in D. vulgaris Hildenborough and focus attention on the importance of monitoring laboratory-driven evolution, as phenotypes as fundamental as biofilm formation can be altered. IMPORTANCE The growth of bacteria attached to a surface (i.e., biofilm), specifically biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria, has a profound impact on the economy of developed nations due to steel and concrete corrosion in industrial pipelines and processing facilities. Furthermore, the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil wells causes oil souring from sulfide production, resulting in

  1. Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation andvisualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique; Jacobsen, Janet; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hazen, Terry C.

    2008-10-04

    Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the physiology of an uncharacterized wild-type organism or the physiology/phenotype of a newly created mutant of that organism. Given recent advances in genetic characterization and targeted mutations to elucidate genetic networks and metabolic pathways, high-throughput methods for determining phenotypic differences are essential. Here we outline challenges presented in studying the physiology and phenotype of a sulfate reducing anaerobic delta proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Modifications of the commercially available OmniLog(TM) system (Hayward, CA) for experimental setup, and configuration, as well as considerations in PM data analysis are presented. Also highlighted here is data viewing software that enables users to view and compare multiple PM data sets. The PM method promises to be a valuable strategy in our systems biology approach to D. vulgaris studies and is readily applicable to other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria.

  2. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  3. Can direct extracellular electron transfer occur in the absence of outer membrane cytochromes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Zane, Mr. Grant M. [University of Missouri, Columbia; Auer, Dr. Manfred [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Fields, Dr. Matthew Wayne [Montana State University; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A. [J. Craig Venter Institute

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer has been investigated over several decades via forms of soluble electron transfer proteins that are exported for extracellular reoxidation. More recently, several organisms have been shown to reduce extracellular metals via the direct transfer of electron through appendages; also known as nanowires. They have been reported most predominantly in Shewanella and Geobacter. While the relevancy and composition of these structures in each genus has been debated, both possess outer membrane cytochrome complexes that could theoretically come into direct contact with solid phase oxidized metals. Members of the genus Desulfovibrio apparently have no such cytochromes although similar appendages are present, are electrically conductive, and are different from flagella. Upon U(VI)-reduction, the structures in Desulfovibrio become coated with U(IV). Deletion of flagellar genes did not alter soluble or amorphous Fe(III) or U(VI) reduction, or appendage appearance. Removal of the chromosomal pilA gene hampered amorphous Fe(III)-reduction by ca. 25%, but cells lacking the native plasmid, pDV1, reduced soluble Fe(III) and U(VI) at ca. 50% of the wild type rate while amorphous Fe(III)-reduction slowed to ca. 20% of the wild type rate. Appendages were present in all deletions as well as pDV1, except pilA. Gene complementation restored all activities and morphologies to wild type levels. This suggests that pilA encodes the structural component, whereas genes within pDV1 may provide the reactive members. How such appendages function without outer membrane cytochromes is under investigation.

  4. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Yujie; Feil, Helene; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Shah, Manesh B.; Johnson, David R.; Lee, Patrick K. H.; West, Kimberlee A.; Zinder, Stephen H.; Andersen, Gary L.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2011-09-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0 0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1 0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8 0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0 0.5107 cells per lmol Cl released, compared with 6.8 0.9107 cells per lmol Cl released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3 1.8107 cells per lmol Cl released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a wholegenome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  5. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Yujie [University of California, Berkeley; Feil, Helene [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Johnson, David R. [University of California, Berkeley; Lee, Patrick K. H. [University of California, Berkeley; West, Kimberlee A [University of California, Berkeley; Zinder, Stephen H. [Cornell University; Andersen, Gary L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0 0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1 0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8 0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0 0.5107 cells per lmol Cl released, compared with 6.8 0.9107 cells per lmol Cl released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3 1.8107 cells per lmol Cl released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a wholegenome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  6. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: Global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Y.; Feil, H.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Shah, M.B.; Johnson, D.R.; Lee, P.K.H; West, K.A.; Zinder, S.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2011-03-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0±0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1±0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8±0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0±0.5 x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released, compared with 6.8±0.9x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3±1.8x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a whole-genome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  7. Comparison of transcriptional heterogeneity of eight genes between batch Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm and planktonic culture at a single-cell level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua eQi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB biofilm formed on metal surfaces can change the physicochemical properties of metals and cause metal corrosion. To enhance understanding of differential gene expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris under planktonic and biofilm growth modes, a single-cell based RT-qPCR approach was applied to determine gene expression levels of 8 selected target genes in four sets of the 31 individual cells isolated from each growth condition (i.e., biofilm formed on a stainless steel (SS) and planktonic cultures, exponential and stationary phases. The results showed obvious gene-expression heterogeneity for the target genes among D. vulgaris single cells of both biofilm and planktonic cultures. In addition, an increased gene-expression heterogeneity in the D. vulgaris biofilm when compared with the planktonic culture was also observed for seven out of eight selected genes, which may be contributing to the increased complexity in terms of structures and morphology in the biofilm. Moreover, the results showed up-regulation of DVU0281 gene encoding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein, and down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., DVU0434 and DVU0588, stress responses (i.e., DVU2410 and response regulator (i.e., DVU3062 in the D. vulgaris biofilm cells. Finally, the gene (DVU2571 involved in iron transportation was found down-regulated, and two genes (DVU1340 and DVU1397 involved in ferric uptake repressor and iron storage were up-regulated in D. vulgaris biofilm, suggesting their possible roles in maintaining normal metabolism of the D. vulgaris biofilm under environments of high concentration of iron. This study showed that the single-cell based analysis could be a useful approach in deciphering metabolism of microbial biofilms.

  8. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  9. Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Mutants Lacking Periplasmic Hydrogenases or the Type I Tetraheme Cytochrome c3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Bosak, T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds relies on microbial sulfate reduction. Sulfur isotope fractionation by these microbes has been widely used to trace the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and carbon, but intracellular mechanisms behind the wide range of fractionations observed in nature and cultures are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of electron transport chain components on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by culturing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3). The mutants were grown both in batch and continuous cultures. All tested mutants grew on lactate or pyruvate as the sole carbon and energy sources, generating sulfide. Mutants lacking cytoplasmic and periplasmic hydrogenases exhibited similar growth physiologies and sulfur isotope fractionations to their parent strains. On the other hand, a mutant lacking Tp1-c3 (ΔcycA) fractionated the 34S/32S ratio more than the wild type, evolving H2 in the headspace and exhibiting a lower specific respiration rate. In the presence of high concentrations of pyruvate, the growth of ΔcycA relied largely on fermentation rather than sulfate reduction, even when sulfate was abundant, producing the largest sulfur isotope effect observed in this study. Differences between sulfur isotope fractionation by ΔcycA and the wild type highlight the effect of electron transfer chains on the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation. Because Tp1-c3 is known to exclusively shuttle electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases to transmembrane complexes, electron transfers in the absence of Tp1-c3 should bypass the periplasmic hydrogen cycling, and the loss of reducing equivalents in the form of H2 can impair the flow of electrons from organic acids to sulfur, increasing isotope fractionation. Larger fractionation by ΔcycA can inform interpretations of sulfur isotope data at an environmental scale as well

  10. Subcellular localization of proteins in the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris via SNAP-tag labeling and photoconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorur, A.; Leung, C. M.; Jorgens, D.; Tauscher, A.; Remis, J. P.; Ball, D. A.; Chhabra, S.; Fok, V.; Geller, J. T.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Juba, T.; Elias, D.; Wall, J.; Biggin, M.; Downing, K. H.; Auer, M.

    2010-06-01

    Systems Biology studies the temporal and spatial 3D distribution of macromolecular complexes with the aim that such knowledge will allow more accurate modeling of biological function and will allow mathematical prediction of cellular behavior. However, in order to accomplish accurate modeling precise knowledge of spatial 3D organization and distribution inside cells is necessary. And while a number of macromolecular complexes may be identified by its 3D structure and molecular characteristics alone, the overwhelming number of proteins will need to be localized using a reporter tag. GFP and its derivatives (XFPs) have been traditionally employed for subcelllar localization using photoconversion approaches, but this approach cannot be taken for obligate anaerobic bacteria, where the intolerance towards oxygen prevents XFP approaches. As part of the GTL-funded PCAP project (now ENIGMA) genetic tools have been developed for the anaerobe sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris that allow the high-throughput generation of tagged-protein mutant strains, with a focus on the commercially available SNAP-tag cell system (New England Biolabs, Ipswich, MA), which is based on a modified O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) tag, that has a dead-end reaction with a modified O6-benzylguanine (BG) derivative and has been shown to function under anaerobic conditions. After initial challenges with respect to variability, robustness and specificity of the labeling signal we have optimized the labeling. Over the last year, as a result of the optimized labeling protocol, we now obtain robust labeling of 20 out of 31 SNAP strains. Labeling for 13 strains were confirmed at least five times. We have also successfully performed photoconversion on 5 of these 13 strains, with distinct labeling patterns for different strains. For example, DsrC robustly localizes to the periplasmic portion of the inner membrane, where as a DNA-binding protein localizes to the center of the cell, where the

  11. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  12. Development of a Markerless Genetic Exchange System in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Its Use in Generating a Strain with Increased Transformation Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Bender, Kelly S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2009-07-21

    In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); whereas, a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this inframe deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system, that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

  13. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan, Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracer experiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation and independent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer results from both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCA cycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from this study suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited to biosynthesis. The data also indicate that >80 percent of the lactate was converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary route of energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCA cycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leads to production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicates a ferredoxin-dependent oxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does not support flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductive mode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used to locate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate and confirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formation suggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme is the isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citrate synthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relation between genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris, and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomer analysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy

  14. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  15. Structural redox control in a 7Fe ferredoxin isolated from Desulfovibrio alaskensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazina, Raquel; de Sousa, Patrícia M Paes; Brondino, Carlos D; Carepo, Marta S P; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2011-08-01

    The redox behaviour of a ferredoxin (Fd) from Desulfovibrio alaskensis was characterized by electrochemistry. The protein was isolated and purified, and showed to be a tetramer containing one [3Fe-4S] and one [4Fe-4S] centre. This ferredoxin has high homology with FdI from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki and Hildenborough and FdIII from Desulfovibrio africanus. From differential pulse voltammetry the following signals were identified: [3Fe-4S](+1/0) (E(0')=-158±5mV); [4Fe-4S](+2/+1) (E(0')=-474±5mV) and [3Fe-4S](0/-2) (E(0')=-660±5mV). The effect of pH on these signals showed that the reduced [3Fe-4S](0) cluster has a pK'(red)(')=5.1±0.1, the [4Fe-4S](+2/+1) centre is pH independent, and the [3Fe-4S](0/-2) reduction is accompanied by the binding of two protons. The ability of the [3Fe-4S](0) cluster to be converted into a new [4Fe-4S] cluster was proven. The redox potential of the original [4Fe-4S] centre showed to be dependent on the formation of the new [4Fe-4S] centre, which results in a positive shift (ca. 70mV) of the redox potential of the original centre. Being most [Fe-S] proteins involved in electron transport processes, the electrochemical characterization of their clusters is essential to understand their biological function. Complementary EPR studies were performed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in three Desulfovibrio species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, D.R.; Veenhuis, M.; Fauque, G.; Peck Jr., H.D.; LeGall, J.; Lampreia, J.; Moura, J.J.G.; Hansen, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in Desulfovibrio gigas, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and D. thermophilus was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against the purified enzymes from each strain. Cells fixed with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde were

  18. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, Judy D.

    2011-01-01

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  19. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judy D. Wall

    2011-06-09

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  20. Molecular studies on iron-sulfur proteins in Desulfovibrio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkermans, J.

    1993-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) . The organism described in this thesis, is an anaerobic gram-negative sulfate reducing bacterium (SRB). Its natural environments are the anaerobic sediments in lower levels of lakes and pools. This

  1. CINEMA OF MIYAZAKI AND AUTEUR THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali KARATAY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many different ideas have been put forward under the headings of ideas, theories, technology, technique and etc. in the environment where cinema as a concept is discussed. The discipline which is closely and explicitly connected to the artistic activities is no doubt cinema. Therefore, cinema has always maintained its position on the agenda. Methods being dependent on Auther Theory and produced as a reaction and alternative to the present cinema concept within the process have created their own languages by coping with certain bureaucratic requirements and managed to eliminate the understanding of producer's cinema. This step which Studio Ghibli and also Miyazaki have taken against the prevailing animation sector and concept of the period on the way to find their own style by preserving their sel-identity and this attitude developed and introduced by them are equivalent owing to the likeness between them. Miyazaki Cinema both decorating all elements used in its films with extremely fine details and being extremely specialized in detail possesses a value which can be judged by holistic approach even though it stands in a different position in terms of the relevant period. It is quite remarkable to be able to create such quality works both by aiming to appeal to general audience and without diverting from fictitious perspective. Particularly, the issue of being didactic, which is the reason for fear for many others, is of no concern for Miyazaki and he has transferred his discourse in his films to another dimension, that is, subject of future by delivering important milestones to the young people whom he has given value and advice without having any concern in being didactic.

  2. Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Kavala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thyroid disorders may affect all of the organ systems of the body and they are also highly associated with a wide variety of skin disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV and to determine the association between thyroid disorders and clinical involvement and systemic corticosteroid treatment in patients with PV. Methods. The study consisted of eighty patients with PV and eighty healthy individuals. Thyroid functions (fT3, fT4, and TSH and thyroid autoimmunity (anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg antibodies were investigated in both groups. Primary thyroid disease (PTD was diagnosed with one or more of the following diagnostic criteria: (i positive antithyroid antibodies, (ii primary thyroid function abnormalities. Results. Significant changes in the serum thyroid profile were found in 16% (13/80 of the PV group and 5% (4/80 of the control group. Positive titers of antithyroid antibodies (anti-TPO and anti-Tg were observed in 7 patients (9% with PV and one in the control group (1,2%. Hashimoto thyroiditis was diagnosed in 9% of PV patients and it was found to be more prevalent in the mucosal form of PV. PTD was found in 13 of (%16 PV patients which was significantly high compared to controls. PTD was not found to be associated with systemic corticosteroid use. Free T3 levels were significantly lower in PV group compared to the control group and free T4 levels were significantly higher in PV group compared to the controls. Conclusions. PV may exist together with autoimmune thyroid diseases especially Hashimoto thyroiditis and primer thyroid diseases. Laboratory work-up for thyroid function tests and thyroid autoantibodies should be performed to determine underlying thyroid diseases in patients with PV.

  3. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eKorte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702, as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605 that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance.

  4. Methods for Engineering Sulfate Reducing Bacteria of the Genus Desulfovibrio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, Swapnil R; Keller, Kimberly L.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-03-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria are physiologically important given their nearly ubiquitous presence and have important applications in the areas of bioremediation and bioenergy. This chapter provides details on the steps used for homologous-recombination mediated chromosomal manipulation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a well-studied sulfate reducer. More specifically, we focus on the implementation of a 'parts' based approach for suicide vector assembly, important aspects of anaerobic culturing, choices for antibiotic selection, electroporation-based DNA transformation, as well as tools for screening and verifying genetically modified constructs. These methods, which in principle may be extended to other sulfate-reducing bacteria, are applicable for functional genomics investigations, as well as metabolic engineering manipulations.

  5. Genetic transfer in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, B.J.; Wall, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    An apparently defective bacteriophage capable of mediating transduction has been identified in culture filtrates of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (American Type Culture Collection 27774). Phage-mediated intraspecies transfer of antibiotic resistance markers occurs with a frequency of 10 -4 to 10 -6 per recipient cell. The vector contains linear fragments of double-strained DNA of about 13.5 kilobase pairs, which appear to be random pieces of bacterial DNA. As yet, neither induction nor plaque formation has been observed. To the authors' knowledge, a system of genetic exchange has not been described before for a member of the sulfate-reducing bacteria

  6. Variation among Desulfovibrio species in electron transfer systems used for syntrophic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H(+)/CO(2) reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H(+) reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle.

  7. Functional genomic study of the environmentally important Desulfovibrio /Methanococcus syntrophic co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.

    2008-12-01

    The use of microbe-oriented bioremediation for ameliorating extensive environmental pollution has fostered fundamental and applied studies of environmentally relevant microorganisms such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter metallireducens.. Concurrently, there has been an increasing appreciation that the physiology of these organisms in pure culture is not necessarily representative of its activities in the environment. To enable a better understanding of microbial physiology under more environmentally relevant conditions, the syntrophic growth between the sulfate reducing bacterium, D. vulgaris and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis serves as an ideal system for laboratory studies. Cell wide analyses using transcript, proteomics and metabolite analysis have been widely used to understand cellular activity at a molecular level. Using D. vulgaris and M. maripaludis arrays, and the iTRAQ proteomics method, we studied the physiology of the D. vulgaris / M. maripaludis syntrophic co- cultures. The results from this study allowed us to identify differences in cellular response in mono-culture vs. co-culture growth for both D. vulgaris and M. maripaludis.

  8. A Case of Liver Abscess with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saho Koyano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desulfovibrio spp. are gram-negative, sulfate-reducing, and anaerobic bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Because Desulfovibrio spp. are infrequent causative agents of infectious diseases and are difficult to isolate and to identify from clinical specimens, the appropriate antibiotic therapy to infection with Desulfovibrio spp. has not been determined. We report the first case of liver abscess with bacteremia due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to show the clinical presentation and treatment. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam and oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid.

  9. Ichthyosis vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common ichthyosis ... Ichthyosis vulgaris is one of the most common of the inherited skin disorders. It may begin in ... Ichthyosis vulgaris can be bothersome, but it rarely affects your overall health. The condition usually disappears during ...

  10. Pemphigus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000882.htm Pemphigus vulgaris To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disorder of the ...

  11. Educational needs concerning disaster preparedness and response: a comparison of undergraduate nursing students from Istanbul, Turkey, and Miyazaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekın, Seher Deniz; Larson, Eric Edwin; Altun Uğraş, Gülay; Yüksel, Serpil

    2014-04-01

    To compare 4 year undergraduate nursing students' educational needs concerning disaster preparedness and response in Istanbul and Miyazaki. This was a 13 question descriptive/comparative survey. Females, aged 18-22 years, and in their second year of their nursing programs, rarely participate in disaster preparedness and response courses at their universities (75.2%) or outside (89.8%). Educational needs of Miyazaki's students who had already participated in these courses (85%) were higher than in Istanbul's (67.2%). Of those whose educational needs had not been met, 55.9% were considering taking another lecture/course in one of the following years (Istanbul, 47.4%; Miyazaki, 71.4%). The majority of students from Istanbul reported some knowledge about disaster preparedness and response from courses at their universities while Miyazaki's students showed less. Effective teaching methods/resources were mock drills. Nursing interventions in disaster situations in "response competencies" were preferred issues to be included in course content (Istanbul, 90.4%; Miyazaki, 93.1%). Most student nurses had no expectations on skills that could be gained from a disaster preparedness and response course/culture of disaster lecture (Istanbul, 48.7%; Miyazaki, 34.5%). Nursing students in both cities seem more likely to participate in disaster preparedness and response courses/lectures. The present study also addresses the need to incorporate mass casualty care and disaster management skills into undergraduate curricula. Core contents for nursing curricula in both cities need to be continued. Outcome competencies must be identified and validated through further research. © 2013 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  12. Anime Landscapes as a Tool for Analyzing the Human–Environment Relationship: Hayao Miyazaki Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Mumcu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Common dualistic thinking in environmental design education adopts humans and the environment as separate entities, with the environment as raw material stock. This approach affects the intellectual development of landscape architects and limits their ability to create meaningful landscapes. Therefore, it is necessary to explore and highlight new ideas about the more integrated human–environment relationship. Through the films of Hayao Miyazaki, many audiences around the world have encountered a different worldview. By contrast with Western thinking, which adopts human superiority to nature, the worldview that Miyazaki reflects in his films depicts human as an inseparable part of nature. Being inspired by different communities and their relationship to nature in Miyazaki’s films, we propose using anime as a means of analyzing the human–environment relationship. We classified landscapes based on power relations between humans and nature. We explored how communities shape their physical environment based on how they socially construct nature and the resulting landscapes. Thus, through apocalyptic landscapes, the bitter results of exploiting nature were depicted. Wilderness landscapes reflect the bias humanity has about nature as wild and hostile. Responsible landscapes were introduced asway of understanding the unbreakable bond between humans and the environment. Through these animated landscape types, the ways landscape architecture should approach nature in professional practices was discussed, and the importance of creating responsible landscapes was emphasized.

  13. Analytical data of holocene sediments in the Miyazaki Plain, Southern Kyushu, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Masafumi; Niwa, Masakazu; Takatori, Ryoichi; Kamataki, Takanobu; Kurosawa, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Since the devastated tsunami induced by the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011, a lot of geologists have started to focus on the study of subduction-zone giant earthquakes using tsunami deposits. After the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, a lot of geologists studying tsunami deposits suggest the importance of the study concerning the tsunamis in the eastern coastal side of Kyushu. On the other hand, the Miyazaki Plain, facing the Hyuga-nada, had been attacked repeatedly by historical tsunami events induced by the giant earthquakes whose hypocenters were located in the Hyuga-nada or Nankai Trough. However, scientific studies concerning the tsunami events are still poor in this area. We are studying paleo-tsunami deposits in the Miyazaki Plain to develop investigation methods of tsunami deposits and elucidate the process of uplift and erosion for several thousand years in regional area. This data set shows the result of this study. A DVD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  14. Growth Enhancement of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis NCIMB 13468 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained revealed a ten times growth induction in 50-100% extracts after 1 day of growth when compared with untreated D. vulgaris and D. indonensiensis. After 2 days of growth, there was 100 times growth induction in 70 - 100 % extracts, 100 times growth induction in 5-100 % extract after 3 days and 10, 000 ...

  15. Desulfovibrio bacterial species are increased in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Debate persists regarding the role of Desulfovibrio subspecies in ulcerative colitis. Combined microscopic and molecular techniques enable this issue to be investigated by allowing precise enumeration of specific bacterial species within the colonic mucous gel. The aim of this study was to combine laser capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine Desulfovibrio copy number in crypt-associated mucous gel in health and in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Colonic mucosal biopsies were harvested from healthy controls (n = 19) and patients with acute (n = 10) or chronic (n = 10) ulcerative colitis. Crypt-associated mucous gel was obtained by laser capture microdissection throughout the colon. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA and Desulfovibrio copy number\\/mm were obtained by polymerase chain reaction at each locus. Bacterial copy numbers were interrogated for correlation with location and disease activity. Data were evaluated using a combination of ordinary linear methods and linear mixed-effects models to cater for multiple interactions. RESULTS: Desulfovibrio positivity was significantly increased in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis at multiple levels within the colon, and after normalization with total bacterial signal, the relative Desulfovibrio load was increased in acute colitis compared with controls. Desulfovibrio counts did not significantly correlate with age, disease duration, or disease activity but interlevel correlations were found in adjacent colonic segments in the healthy control and chronic ulcerative colitis groups. CONCLUSION: The presence of Desulfovibrio subspecies is increased in ulcerative colitis and the data presented suggest that these bacteria represent an increased percentage of the colonic microbiome in acute ulcerative colitis.

  16. Nursing educators' perceptions about disaster preparedness and response in Istanbul and Miyazaki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztekin, Seher Deniz; Larson, Eric Edwin; Altun Uğraş, Gülay; Yüksel, Serpil; Savaşer, Sevim

    2015-04-01

    As healthcare professionals, nursing educators need to be prepared to manage and deliver care in what are often dangerous conditions. This research aims to determine and compare nursing educators' perceptions of disaster preparedness and response (DP&R) in Istanbul and Miyazaki. An 18 question descriptive questionnaire was used. One hundred and forty-four nursing educators representing two state university nursing schools in Istanbul, Turkey, and one state and two private universities in Miyazaki, Japan were enrolled. Educators had an average age of 40 years and had been educators for 1-15 years. Just over half of the participants had basic knowledge regarding DP&R with most of them considering taking special courses in the future. The majority considered "caregiver" as a role they could undertake in a disaster situation. The existence of major concerns and conflicts in disaster responses were low. The top ranked item was in the area of conflict between family and job responsibilities. Age and academic levels showed significant differences in basic knowledge on DP&R. Regardless of knowledge in this subject area, no statistical significance on personal preparedness or being a volunteer to disaster events was found. Nursing educators were not thinking about what kinds of disasters occur in the areas where they currently teach and were underprepared to deal with disaster situations. To improve the perceptions of the nursing educators on DP&R, mass casualty care and disaster management skills need to be incorporated into formal education and training on disaster preparedness and workplace preparedness. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  17. Pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Tamgadge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune mucocutaneous disease that initially manifests in the form of intraoral lesions, which spread to other mucous membranes and the skin. The etiology of pemphigus vulgaris is still unknown, although the disease has attracted considerable interest. The pemphigus group of disease is characterized by the production of autoantibodies against intercellular substances and is thus classified as autoimmune diseases. Most patients are initially misdiagnosed and improperly treated for months or even years. Dental professionals must be sufficiently familiar with the clinical manifestations of pemphigus vulgaris to ensure early diagnosis and treatment, since this in turn determines the prognosis and course of the disease. This article presents a case report with unknown etiology along with an overview of the disease.

  18. The influence of desulfovibrio desulfuricans on neptunium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soderholm, L.; Williams, C.; Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Markos, M.

    1999-01-01

    The role of biotic Np(V) reduction is studied in light of its potential role in the environmental immobilization of this hazardous radionuclide. The speciation of Np in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans cultures is compared with Np speciation in the spent medium and in the uninoculated medium. Precipitates formed in all three samples. Optical spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were used to determine that Np(V) is almost quantitatively reduced in all three samples and that the precipitate is an amorphous Np(IV) species. These results demonstrate that the reduction of Np is independent of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The underlying chemistry associated with these results is discussed

  19. Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions about disaster preparedness and response in Istanbul, Turkey, and Miyazaki, Japan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztekin, Seher Deniz; Larson, Eric Edwin; Yüksel, Serpil; Altun Uğraş, Gülay

    2015-04-01

    Although the awareness of disasters has increased among nurses, the concept of disaster preparedness and response has not been sufficiently explored with undergraduate nursing students. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the perceptions of students regarding disaster preparedness and response that live in different earthquake-prone cities; Istanbul, Turkey and Miyazaki, Japan. A cross-sectional study employing seven questions was conducted in a final group of 1053 nursing students from Istanbul, Turkey, and Miyazaki, Japan. Most study respondents were female, aged 18-22 years, with a high proportion of second year students in both cities. Istanbul's students had more knowledge about disaster preparedness and response in relation to age and year of university, showing statistically significant differences. Istanbul's highest rated responses to disaster characteristics were on structural elements and injuries/deaths, while Miyazaki's was "unpredictable/sudden/disorganized". Respondents in Istanbul identified earthquakes as the disaster most likely to occur, while respondents in Miyazaki identified typhoon/hurricane. Study participants responded that they could provide caregiver roles during a disaster event rather than triage or managerial roles as disaster responders. Disaster characteristics were not described by one third of the students. Of the two-thirds that were described, most were of events that were highly predictable because of their frequencies in the given areas. Universities need to target and then focus on high-risk factors in their areas and have disaster plans for students who can provide triage and managerial nursing roles as disaster responders. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Post-traumatic stress disorder in participants of foot-and-mouth disease epidemic control in Miyazaki, Japan, in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Juri; Kurosawa, Aiko; Watanabe, Takuto; Kadowaki, Hazumu; Watari, Michiko; Makita, Kohei

    2015-08-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) occurred in Miyazaki, Japan, in 2010, and 290,000 animals were culled. This paper describes the mental distress of the volunteers who had been dispatched to Miyazaki for disease control two years after the epidemic. It also assesses risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A participatory appraisal and self-administered questionnaire survey were conducted in 2012 for those who were dispatched to Miyazaki in 2010. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) was used as an indicator of PTSD, and univariate and multivariable analyses were performed. Of the 875 respondents, 1.3% had higher IES-R scores than the cut-off point (25), which is suggestive of PTSD. Mental stresses during and soon after FMD control and after two years were described. Four risk factors associated with high IES-R scores were found: transporting culled animals (Pstress during FMD control (Pstress at the time of the survey (Pstress two years later. Public services should provide an opportunity for them to consult with mental health specialists. These findings should be used to better prepare workers who deal with infectious diseases of animals, especially when they must be culled. The establishment of a collaborative framework between veterinary and mental health services is recommended.

  1. HYBRIDIZATION BETWEEN MEDIA EDUCATION AND VISUAL ARTS EDUCATION. MIYAZAKI'S CINEMA AS A REVULSIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricard Huerta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we suggest an approximation between media education and visual arts education. Teachers of Primary School interpret the media as a visual artefacts. But this visual artifacts can be analyzed from the education in visual arts. We can offer a suitable formation in the moment on training teachers (Clarembeaux, 2010; Huerta, 2005, but is also necessary move a notion of visual arts. Now, in Spain, visual arts education is far from the media images. We would incorporate the media education in the Primary School curriculum from the visual arts education (Hernández, 2000; Huerta, 2009. We focuses this research in a case of student’s group. They are university training teachers, and we verify their knowledge about cinema and media as a visual culture texts, promoting a major presence of media in visual arts, extending the field of action, and promoting the use of the cinema as useful tool in the Primary School classes. We encourage teachers and students towards the critical and personal readings in media, reforcing knowledge and analysis more than entertainment (Ambrós & Breu, 2007; Fedorov, 2010. For analyze this situation we have chosen the movie Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea, a film by Hayao Miyazaki.

  2. Flow and geochemical modeling of drainage from Tomitaka mine, Miyazaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kohei; Tomiyama, Shingo; Metugi, Hideya; Ii, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Akira

    2015-10-01

    The chemistry and flow of water in the abandoned Tomitaka mine of Miyazaki, western Japan were investigated. This mine is located in a non-ferrous metal deposit and acid mine drainage issues from it. The study was undertaken to estimate the quantities of mine drainage that needs to be treated in order to avoid acidification of local rivers, taking into account seasonal variations in rainfall. Numerical models aimed to reproduce observed water levels and fluxes and chemical variations of groundwater and mine drainage. Rock-water interactions that may explain the observed variations in water chemistry are proposed. The results show that: (1) rain water infiltrates into the deeper bedrock through a highly permeable zone formed largely by stopes that are partially filled with spoil from excavations (ore minerals and host rocks); (2) the water becomes acidic (pH from 3 to 4) as dissolved oxygen oxidizes pyrite; (3) along the flow path through the rocks, the redox potential of the water becomes reducing, such that pyrite becomes stable and pH of the mine drainage becomes neutral; and (4) upon leaving the mine, the drainage becomes acidic again due to oxidation of pyrite in the rocks. The present numerical model with considering of the geochemical characteristics can simulate the main variations in groundwater flow and water levels in and around the Tomitaka mine, and apply to the future treatment of the mine drainage. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Risk of Cerebral Infarction in Japanese Hemodialysis Patients: Miyazaki Dialysis Cohort Study (MID study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunori Toida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Predictors including the preventive effects of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs on cerebral infarction (CI events have not yet been clarified in dialysis patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the risk of CI and preventive effects of these drugs in Japanese hemodialysis patients. Methods: Patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis (n=1,551, median age (interquartile range, 69.0 (59.0-78.0 years; 41.5% female were enrolled in the Miyazaki Dialysis Cohort Study and prospectively followed-up for 3 years. Kaplan-Meier and Cox's regression analyses were used to clarify the risk of CI. Results: Eighty-four patients developed CI at an incidence of 21.5/1000 patients per year. The presence of a previous history of CI, atrial fibrillation (AF, and diabetes mellitus in addition to age were also identified as predictive factors for new CI, whereas no relationship was observed between antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant usage and CI. Furthermore, no significant difference was noted in the frequency of CI events between patients with AF who received warfarin and those who did not. Conclusions: The incidence of CI was higher in dialysis patients with a previous history of CI and AF; however, the preventive effects of antiplatelet/anticoagulant drugs on the development of CI were not evident.

  4. Ichthyosis vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-01-01

    -deficient skin, and epidemiological studies have found higher levels of hand eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, nickel sensitization and serum vitamin D levels. When relevant, individuals should be informed about an increased risk of developing dermatitis when repeatedly or continuously exposed to nickel...... or irritants. Moreover, with our current knowledge, individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris should be protected against neonatal exposure to cats to prevent atopic dermatitis and should abstain from smoking to prevent asthma. Finally, they should be advised against excessive exposure to factors that decrease skin...

  5. School scoliosis screening by Moiré topography - Overview for 33 years in Miyazaki Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takuya; Chosa, Etsuo; Tajima, Naoya

    2018-04-05

    Since 1981, we have performed school scoliosis screening (SSS) using Moiré topography in Miyazaki, Japan and attained a certain result in detecting scoliosis. However, this screening system was discontinued due to cessation of repair and production of Moiré topographic equipment. The purpose of this study was to make clear both the results and the problems of SSS by Moiré topography on the basis of our past 33 years' experiences. The subjects were 689,293 students (5th grade boys in 200,329, 5th grade girls in 191,919, 8th grade boys in 151,351, and 8th grade girls in 145,694) who were screened by Moiré topography between 1981 and 2013. The number of students received SSS, the positive rate of Moiré topography, the discovery rate of scoliosis greater than 20°, the reference rate to the second screening, and the positive predictive value of Moiré topography to detect scoliosis greater than 20° were investigated. The number of students received SSS achieved a peak in 1992. The positive rate of Moiré topography and the discovery rate of scoliosis were highest in 8th grade girls. The reference rates to the second screening were 49.8% in 5th grade students and 41.4% in 8th grade students. The positive predictive values were 2.1% in 5th grade students and 7.6% in 8th grade students. SSS by Moiré topography seemed to be effective in detecting scoliosis although both the positive predictive value and the reference rate to the second screening were low. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. High Throughput Identification, Purification and Structural Characterization of Water Soluble Protein Complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong,, Ming; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Liu, Hui-Hai; Malik, J.; Geller, Jil; Yang, Li; Choi, M.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Arbelaez, Pablo; Sterling, H. J.; Typke, Dieter; Shatsky, Max; Brenner, Steve; Fisher, Susan; Williams, Evan; Szakal, Evelin; Allen, S.; Hall, S. C.; Hazen, Terry; Witkowska, H. E.; Jin, Jiming; Glaeser, Robert; Biggin, Mark

    2010-05-17

    Our scheme for the tagless purification of water soluble complexes. 10 g of protein from a crude bacterial extract is first fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and then by a series of chromatographic steps: anion exchange (IEX), hydrophobic interaction (HIC), and finally size exclusion (Gel Filtration). Fractions from the last chromatography step are trypsin digested and peptides labeled with iTRAQ reagents to allow multiplexing and quantitation during mass spectrometric analysis. Elution profiles of identified proteins are then subjected to clustering analysis.

  7. Large-Scale, Continuous-Flow Production of Stressed Biomass (Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Jil T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Fortney, Julian L.; Lam, Bonita R.; Hazen, Terry C.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2010-05-01

    The Protein Complex Analysis Project (PCAP, http://pcap.lbl.gov/), focuses on high-throughput analysis of microbial protein complexes in the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism, DesulfovibriovulgarisHildenborough(DvH).Interest in DvHas a model organism for bioremediation of contaminated groundwater sites arises from its ability to reduce heavy metals. D. vulgarishas been isolated from contaminated groundwater of sites in the DOE complex. To understand the effect of environmental changes on the organism, midlog-phase cultures are exposed to nitrate and salt stresses (at the minimum inhibitory concentration, which reduces growth rates by 50percent), and compared to controls of cultures at midlogand stationary phases. Large volumes of culture of consistent quality (up to 100 liters) are needed because of the relatively low cell density of DvHcultures (one order of magnitude lower than E. coli, for example) and PCAP's challenge to characterize low-abundance membrane proteins. Cultures are grown in continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTRs) to produce consistent cell densities. Stressor is added to the outflow from the CFSTR, and the mixture is pumped through a plug flow reactor (PFR), to provide a stress exposure time of 2 hours. Effluent is chilled and held in large carboys until it is centrifuged. A variety of analyses -- including metabolites, total proteins, cell density and phospholipidfatty-acids -- track culture consistency within a production run, and differences due to stress exposure and growth phase for the different conditions used. With our system we are able to produce the requisite 100 L of culture for a given condition within a week.

  8. Acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Ganceviciene, Ruta; Dessinioti, Clio; Feldman, Steven R; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-09-17

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease - rather than a natural part of the life cycle as colloquially viewed - of the pilosebaceous unit (comprising the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland) and is among the most common dermatological conditions worldwide. Some of the key mechanisms involved in the development of acne include disturbed sebaceous gland activity associated with hyperseborrhoea (that is, increased sebum production) and alterations in sebum fatty acid composition, dysregulation of the hormone microenvironment, interaction with neuropeptides, follicular hyperkeratinization, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Grading of acne involves lesion counting and photographic methods. However, there is a lack of consensus on the exact grading criteria, which hampers the conduction and comparison of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating treatments. Prevention of acne relies on the successful management of modifiable risk factors, such as underlying systemic diseases and lifestyle factors. Several treatments are available, but guidelines suffer from a lack of data to make evidence-based recommendations. In addition, the complex combination treatment regimens required to target different aspects of acne pathophysiology lead to poor adherence, which undermines treatment success. Acne commonly causes scarring and reduces the quality of life of patients. New treatment options with a shift towards targeting the early processes involved in acne development instead of suppressing the effects of end products will enhance our ability to improve the outcomes for patients with acne.

  9. [Historical studies on the origins of pharmaceutical sciences in Hyuga (Miyazaki). (Part 10)--students from Hyuga (Miyazaki) who studied under Sanyou Rai in Osaka and Toyou Yamawaki in Kyoto during the late Edo period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Usami, Noriyuki; Jun, Cheng Bing; Kishi, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part 10 of a historical article on young students from Hyuga who went to Osaka or Kyoto to study in the Edo period. The article investigates the influence of these students on medical and pharmaceutical sciences in the Hyuga, which is now Miyazaki-Prefecture. The knowledge in this area is limited, thus, we aimed to examine and summarize the historical events. It was found that seven students, Bunchu Niizuma, Shikan Kai, Kaneo Niizuma, Ritsukei Shiraishi, Bunkichi Maki, Genzou Katayose and Buntetsu Kai, studied under Sanyou Rai in Osaka, and two students, Zusho Hayakawa and Chikanaga Nyuta-Motonaka, studied under Toyou Yamawaki in Kyoto. Both Kaneo Niizuma and Zusho Hayakawa participated in the foundation of the medical school called "Meidou-kan" at Nobeoka in 1857 before the Meiji Restoration in 1868.

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thase [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MQAARVEGYLATCLAGRGIPPRLQSAMEYSLLAGGKRLRPVL...DMDYTGRDDIDLAALRTMHAMKTGALIRCSCVAGALLGGAPASAVEQVAGYGAAIGAAFQIVDDILDETGDEAQLGKPVGSDVEQGKVTYPSLLGIERSRALAQEQADIAVTCLADFEGEDADFLRALAQYIVDRVS

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available me MiaB [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MHDRTFHIETFGCQMNVNDSDWLARALMERGFSPAPFGEA...SVFVNIMQGCDNFCAYCIVPYTRGRQKSRATGTILDECRALLDRGAREITLLGQNVNSFGQDSHGDGTTFAQLLHKVAALP

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein/permease protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MSGIDEEHMGGYQGADAGDASGQD...IAMGVPNADDRMIMRAADVAGVTEFARNHPAGFGLQVGERGMALSGGQRQAVALARALLHDPDVLILDEPTSNMDTGSEFAFKQRLRALLGDKTLVLITHRMSVIDLVDRLVVVDGGRIVADGPRDAVIKALRSTGVQAAPAARFRKNGTVGAAGGAA

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tase, alpha subunit [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MQQAPRSIVIGGEAGQGLVTIGDMLVRT...LIRSGYGVLVAQHYMSRVRGGHNTYNIRVGAGDVLAPTDDVHVLVALDQRTVTEQGPRLGDGLLILDERLDPGSLNALRVPFAALAGRPLYENIAALGVLAALLGLER

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein/permease protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MGEPSTTQRASLPLLRRIGRYFLP...LFNLSVSDNITYGTPNVGAGRIEAAAHAAFAHEFVQQLAQGYDTVLGERGVKLSGGQKQRLTIARALLKDAPLLILDEATS

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MRIREALLDVLKGLLKTTPREEPLADTSVTEEGRSRTQRPGTMRQP...PALDIGTSGMACSMPVGDLAEEAQTVAPDALVDDIRKRFEDGQQHNGLAVVDANTHPMGLVMDYHLNRQLSAQYGVALYSRRAVTCVMDPAPTILDE

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MQHDDTIAAIATPLGQGGIGIIRISGPASLEVLRALFRPSSSRFGGFR...STPEGCRSVHVAAASGDGVESLVTAIRAAVLAATGAGEPEAGELAPNMRQAAALDKAATILDELAGDIRAHVPYDLCGVRLDGACAALMDVTGQSTPEAILDAIFASFCIGK

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available family protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MKAPLVSIIIPVWNLWELTCACLDSIRAHTPGN...ESRTPGRKEHDAANATLLNRRCSGCFGPDLHRHALRDGFAIALTPWLDTYLTLPPGREAALTREHITDFDPGRCWETLQGEPLWHGGYEMLCSILDEAGRHAESAGVR

  18. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available transporter, ATP binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MSLLSLRNLTKTFGG...EEKRAIERAVRELEFVGLADQHDNLAKNLSYGNQRLLEIARALATDPRFIILDEPAGGMNDQETAALIGTIRAIRDRGISVLLIEHDMSLVMKVCEKLVVLEYGALIAEGTPSVIKRDPRVIEAYLGADSDI

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pha subunits [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MFVRSVIAFATPNPTGLTMFLNEHQSKRLFEEAGI...GGTAEEELAAWVRETAFPKPVVSFVAGRTAPPGRRLGHAGAILDEADGGIAGKVRALCDAGIAVCPDLGSLPAAVRQALG

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available otein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MFIGVLGVVASTAVFVGLILSWRMQAELEDFGHENLASFMDT...ADGKPAIGTYIPAESPVYQAIEKGQEYVGVANVVGQPFLTHYRPIRDARGQFTIALFAGVPLLQPSFTEMFAGAKVGGAGYTFILDE

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tS [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MTNPSPKLTPMFEQYLRIKEDYPDALLFYRMGDFYELFFDDAETT...NMAGKSTVLRQTAIICLLAQMGAFVPAREASIGIADRIFSRVGASDNLAQGQSTFMVEMMETARILRQASKRSLVILDEIGRGTSTFDGMALAWAVVEELTRRAGGGI

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MAHPFLHRLTLRLDAQRAAGLDRTVMTPETRTTRHVILDGQRLCNF...GDLARLDRRLTAWRHETTAETASAAPLTEGAPLSSPPATCPTASPPPHGDASPVILTESLFSMDGTVTSMDALATLRSRHGAFVILDE

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available putative [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MSRTIIPFGPQHPVLPEPLHLKLVVEDETVVEAIPALG...YVHRGLETLASIRDYNQMVYVVERVCGICSCIHAMCYCQSLECMMNVEVPRRAKVLRTIWSELHRIHSHLLWLGLFADGFGFESLFMQFWKVRERVMDINEATAGNRVVISTNIVGGVRRDLSPEHQKWILDE

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MTHTNDDTKSTTIATVDTDDKPDTVVDDGDTLAAVQPADTPE...LDIAKLPRDVRKEADKQLRRLAAMHPDSSEATVTRTYLEWLSELPWRKLSRDRLDIRKAKVILDEDHFGLDKVKDRILEYLSVRKLNPDSKGPILCFAGPPGVGKTSL

  5. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of an aldehyde oxidoreductase isolated from Desulfovibrio aminophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapper, Anders; Rivas, Maria G; Brondino, Carlos D; Ollivier, Bernard; Fauque, Guy; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2006-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) activity has been found in a number of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The enzyme that is responsible for the conversion of aldehydes to carboxylic acids is a mononuclear molybdenum enzyme belonging to the xanthine oxidase family. We report here the purification and characterization of AOR isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio (D.) aminophilus DSM 12254, an aminolytic strain performing thiosulfate dismutation. The enzyme is a homodimer (ca. 200 kDa), containing a molybdenum centre and two [2Fe-2S] clusters per monomer. UV/Visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of D. aminophilus AOR recorded in as-prepared and reduced states are similar to those obtained in AORs from Desulfovibrio gigas, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Despite AOR from D. aminophilus is closely related to other AORs, it presents lower activity towards aldehydes and no activity towards N-heterocyclic compounds, which suggests another possible role for this enzyme in vivo. A comparison of the molecular and EPR properties of AORs from different Desulfovibrio species is also included.

  6. Intracellular Hg(0) Oxidation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Schaefer, Jeffra K; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Yee, Nathan

    2016-10-03

    The disposal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) wastes in mining and manufacturing areas has caused serious soil and groundwater contamination issues. Under anoxic conditions, certain anaerobic bacteria can oxidize dissolved elemental mercury and convert the oxidized Hg to neurotoxic methylmercury. In this study, we conducted experiments with the Hg-methylating bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 to elucidate the role of cellular thiols in anaerobic Hg(0) oxidation. The concentrations of cell-surface and intracellular thiols were measured, and specific fractions of D. desulfuricans ND132 were examined for Hg(0) oxidation activity and analyzed with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that intracellular thiol concentrations are approximately six times higher than those of the cell wall. Cells reacted with a thiol-blocking reagent were severely impaired in Hg(0) oxidation activity. Spheroplasts lacking cell walls rapidly oxidized Hg(0) to Hg(II), while cell wall fragments exhibited low reactivity toward Hg(0). EXAFS analysis of spheroplast samples revealed that multiple different forms of Hg-thiols are produced by the Hg(0) oxidation reaction and that the local coordination environment of the oxidized Hg changes with reaction time. The results of this study indicate that Hg(0) oxidation in D. desulfuricans ND132 is an intracellular process that occurs by reaction with thiol-containing molecules.

  7. Multicentric lupus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60 year old female patient presented with disseminated tuberculosis. She had multicentric lupus vulgaris and her joints, bones, lymph nodes and lungs were also affected. Haematogenous dissemination was because of her poor health.

  8. Lupus vulgaris of external nose

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B. Usha

    2008-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  9. Hayao Miyazaki, la lámpara maravillosa. Un estudio de su cine y de sus referencias humanistas a la luz de las conexiones culturales entre Japón y Occidente

    OpenAIRE

    Fortes Guerrero, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    «Hayao Miyazaki, la lámpara maravillosa. Un estudio de su cine y de sus referencias humanistas a la luz de las conexiones culturales entre Japón y Occidente». Bajo este título, ofrecemos una completa y profunda investigación centrada en la obra integral del realizador nipón Hayao Miyazaki (1941), aunque con especial incidencia en sus once largometrajes, su única serie televisiva como director absoluto y algunos cortometrajes y mangas. Dicha investigación, en la que desgranamos los temas recto...

  10. The role of polyglucose in oxygen-dependent respiration by a new strain of Desulfovibrio salexigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNiel, EWJ; Gomes, TMP; Willems, A; Collins, MD; Prins, RA; Gottschal, JC

    1996-01-01

    Desulfovibrio salexigens strain Mastl was isolated from the oxic/anoxic interface of a marine sediment. Growth under sulfate-reducing conditions was accompanied by polyglucose accumulation in the cell with every substrate tested. Highest polyglucose storage was found with glucose (0.8-1.0 g

  11. Psoriasiform lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Dhanlaklshmi, M

    2008-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Cutaneous Tuberculosis constitutes a minor proportion of extra-pulmonary manifestations of Tuberculosis. Lupus Vulgaris (LV) is one of the clinical variants of Cutaneous Tuberculosis. A case of a large plaque type psoriasiform lesion of lupus vulgaris on the thigh, of 15 years' duration, in an 18-year-old girl is reported. This case highlights the ignorance level among the patients and consequent failure to avail proper anti-tuberculous treatment despite campaign in print and audio visual media.

  12. Relationship between Hemoglobin Levels Corrected by Interdialytic Weight Gain and Mortality in Japanese Hemodialysis Patients: Miyazaki Dialysis Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Takashi; Sato, Yuji; Komatsu, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Background Although hemoglobin (Hb) levels are affected by a change in the body fluid status, the relationship between Hb levels and mortality while taking interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) at blood sampling into account has not yet been examined in hemodialysis patients. Study design Cohort study. Setting, Participants Data from the Miyazaki Dialysis cohort study, including 1375 prevalent hemodialysis patients (median age (interquartile range), 69 (60–77) years, 42.3% female). Predictor Patients were divided into 5 categories according to baseline Hb levels and two groups based on the median value of IDWG rates at blood sampling at pre-HD on the first dialysis session of the week. Outcomes All-cause and cardiovascular mortalities during a 3-year follow-up. Measurements Hazard ratios were estimated using a Cox model for the relationship between Hb categories and mortality, and adjusted for potential confounders such as age, sex, dialysis duration, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosage, Kt/V, comorbid conditions, anti-hypertensive drug use, serum albumin, serum C-reactive protein, serum ferritin, and serum intact parathyroid hormone. Patients with Hb levels of 9–9.9 g/dL were set as our reference category. Results A total of 246 patients (18%) died of all-cause mortality, including 112 cardiovascular deaths. Lower Hb levels (<9.0g/dL) were associated with all-cause mortality (adjusted HRs 2.043 [95% CI, 1.347–3.009]), while Hb levels were not associated with cardiovascular mortality. When patients were divided into two groups using the median value of IDWG rates (high IDWG, ≥5.4% and low IDWG, <5.4%), the correlation between lower Hb levels and all-cause mortality disappeared in high IDWG patients, but was maintained in low IDWG patients (adjusted HRs 3.058 [95% CI,1.575–5.934]). On the other hand, higher Hb levels (≥12g/dL) were associated with cardiovascular mortality in high IDWG patients (adjusted HRs 2.724 [95% CI, 1.010–7.349]), but not in low

  13. Lupus vulgaris on keloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena S

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old man presented with multicentric lupus vulgaris on keloids over chest, axilla, neck and back for last 6 months. He had pulmonary tuberculosis. All the laboratory investigations were in favour of clinical diagnosis. The patient responded to antituberculosis therapy.

  14. Acne vulgaris: endocriene aspecten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, O. M.; Thio, B. H.; Romijn, J. A.; Smit, J. W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Androgens play an important part in the development of acne vulgaris. Androgen levels in patients with acne are higher than those in controls and people with the androgen insensitivity syndrome do not develop acne. Local factors other than androgen plasma levels, also play a part in the development

  15. Sonography of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, Ximena; Claveria, Pedro; Valenzuela, Fernando; Molina, Maria Teresa; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the sonographic morphology of the clinical and subclinical pathology of facial acne vulgaris. We studied patients with facial acne vulgaris diagnosed by certified dermatologists, and using a standardized protocol for sonographic examinations, we sequentially described the sonographic pathomorphologic characteristics. Lesions of particular interest to the referring clinician were also analyzed separately. Additionally, acne involvement was staged clinically and sonographically (SOS-Acne) using morphologic definitions of the relevant lesions and predefined scoring systems for gradation of the severity of acne lesions. A total of 245 acne lesions in 20 consecutive patients were studied. Sonographic abnormalities consisted of pseudocysts, folliculitis, fistulas, and calcinosis. Most conditions were subclinical and mostly due to lesion extensions deep into the dermis and hypodermis (52% of pseudocysts and 68% of fistulas). The statistical concordance between acne severity scores assigned by two separate clinicians was strong (κ = 0.8020), but the corresponding sonographic scores generally showed more severe and clinically occult involvement. Facial acne vulgaris often involves deeper tissues, beyond the reach of the spatially restricted clinical examination; these subclinical conditions can be detected and defined with sonography. Additionally, acne vulgaris is amenable to sonographic scoring.

  16. Oral Pemphigus Vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2015-10-04

    Oct 4, 2015 ... Mt Sinai J Med 2001;. 68(4-5):268–78. 17. Toth GG, Jonkman MF. Therapy of pemphigus. Clin Dermatol 2001;19(6):761–7. 18. Lever WF, Schaumburg-Lever G. Treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Results obtained in 84 patients between 1961 and 1982. Arch. Dermatol 1984;120(1):44–7.

  17. Investigating the role of CheA-3 in Dusulfovibrio Vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jayashee; Keller, Kimberley; Krierim, Bernhard; Auer, Manfred; Keasling, Jay; Wall, Judy; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-22

    Multiple sets of chemotaxis genes including three cheA homologs were identified in the genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Each CheA is a histidine kinase (HK) and part of a two component signal transduction system. Knock out mutants in the three cheA genes were created using single cross-over homologous recombination insertion. We studied the phenotypes of the cheA mutants in detail and discovered that ?cheA-3 has a non swarming/swimming phenotype both in the soft agar plates and Palleroni chamber assays. CheA-3 shows similarity to the Shewanella oneidensis CheA-3 and the Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 that are responsible for chemotaxis in the respective organisms. We did not find any morphological or structural differences between the three Delta cheA mutants and the wild type cells in electron microscopy. Our results from these studies are presented.

  18. Lupus vulgaris: difficulties in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Julia; Caccetta, Tony Philip; Tait, Clare

    2013-05-01

    Lupus vulgaris is one of the most common forms of cutaneous tuberculosis. It presents a diagnostic challenge due to its paucibacillary nature. This is a report of a case of a delayed diagnosis of lupus vulgaris, presenting as perianal and peristomal plaques, followed by a review of the diagnostic tools for lupus vulgaris and their limitations. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  19. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome C3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D

    2013-04-11

    The central objective of our proposed research was twofold: 1) to investigate the structure-function relationship of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (now Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20) cytochrome c3 with uranium and 2) to elucidate the mechanism for uranium reduction in vitro and in vivo. Physiological analysis of a mutant of D. desulfuricans with a mutation of the gene encoding the type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 had demonstrated that uranium reduction was negatively impacted while sulfate reduction was not if lactate were the electron donor. This was thought to be due to the presence of a branched pathway of electron flow from lactate leading to sulfate reduction. Our experimental plan was to elucidate the structural and mechanistic details of uranium reduction involving cytochrome c3.

  20. Pemphigus vulgaris in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberg, Kelsey W; Gero, Melanie J; Ragsdale, Bruce D

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) during pregnancy. The patient presented with widespread blistering dermatitis and associated burning and pruritus. At 6 weeks' gestation the patient was admitted to the hospital to expedite her diagnosis and initiate treatment. A skin biopsy revealed suprabasal acantholysis, and direct immunofluorescence demonstrated diffuse intercellular IgG in the epidermis and basal intercellular C3, which confirmed the diagnosis of PV. Treatment with corticosteroids was instituted after discussions with the patient about possible adverse effects to the fetus. Pemphigus vulgaris is rare in pregnancy and active PV presents potential threats of fetal spread and transient lesion production, which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in the fetus. Our patient had active PV and required treatment throughout her pregnancy. The pregnancy progressed to premature delivery of the neonate without skin lesions or apparent complications.

  1. PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS IN WOMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Ayu Rima Mahadewi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pemfigus vulgaris merupakan penyakit autoimun yang memberikan manifestasi bulayang bersifat kronik. Lokalisasi dari bula tersebut yaitu pada mukokutaneus. Dilaporkankasus seorang wanita berumur 28 tahun dengan keluhan utama gelembung berair padakulit seluruh tubuh dan mengeluarkan cairan serta menyebabkan gatal tanpa rasa nyeri.Efloresensi berupa makula hiperpigmentasi yang multipel berbentuk geografika denganukuran 3x4 cm sampai 10x15 cm dan erosi soliter berbentuk bulat dengan ukurandiameter 2 cm yang ditutupi krusta coklat kehitaman. Hasil biopsi kulit menggambarkanmorfologi pemfigus. Terapi farmakologis yang diberikan yaitu dexamethasone 1,5 mg-1mg- 0 mg, hydrocortisone 2,5%, chloramphenicol 2%, dan loratadine 1x10mg. Hasilpengobatan belum dapat dievalusi dan prognosis dari pasien dubious. pemfigus vulgaris, autoimun, bula

  2. Lung and lupus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Mukta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs . This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  3. Lung and lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukta, V; Jayachandran, K

    2011-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs. This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  4. Hydrogen evolution and consumption in AOT–isooctane reverse micelles by Desulfovibrio gigas hydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, José J. G.; Andrade, Susana L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The enzyme hydrogenase isolated from the sulphate reducing anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas was encapsulated in reverse micelles of AOT–water–isooctane. The enzyme ability to consume molecular hydrogen was studied as a function of the micelle size (given by Wo = [H2O]/[organic solvent]). A peak of catalytic activity was obtained for Wo = 18, a micelle size theoretically fitting the heterodimeric hydrogenase molecule. At this Wo value, the recorded catalytic activity was slightly ...

  5. Particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor tests with quartz sand particles using a 100-kWth beam-down solar concentrating system at Miyazaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Cho, Hyun Seok; Matsubara, Koji; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Senuma, Kazuya; Itoh, Sumie; Yokota, Shin-nosuke

    2017-06-01

    A window-type, solar fluidized bed receiver with quartz sand particles was tested by a 100-kWth novel beam-down solar concentrating system at Miyazaki, Japan. A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) was placed above the quartz window of the receiver to increase the concentration of the solar fluxes from the beam-down solar concentrating system. The solar tests were performed in the middle of December, 2015. The central bed temperature of the receiver was reached around 960-1100° C. It was found that only 20 Ndm3/min of air flow rate was enough to create the uniform fluidization of the particles at the given temperature range. It was predicted that if the central bed temperature could have been higher than 1100°C if solar receiver test had conducted in other seasons than winter. The next solar campaign of the receiver test will be carried out in October, 2016.

  6. La filosofía del viento: un análisis del lenguaje en el cine de Hayao Miyazaki. Primera parte

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Zuluaga, Juan David; Universidad de Manizales Programa de Comunicación Social y Periodismo

    2015-01-01

    En esta primera parte del artículo sobre Hayao Miyazaki, reconocido mundialmente gracias a su trabajo más célebre, El viaje de Chihiro (2001), se analizarán algunos de los temas más frecuentes dentro de la extensa filmografía del autor. Su fascinación por los aviones; el poder que otorga a las mujeres; el tratamiento que da a los antagonistas, y la introspección frecuente del cineasta dentro de sus obras, son elementos que le han llevado a consagrarse como uno de los directores de cine japoné...

  7. A new type of metal-binding site in cobalt- and zinc-containing adenylate kinases isolated from sulfate-reducers Desulfovibrio gigas and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavel, Olga Yu; Bursakov, Sergey A; Di Rocco, Giulia; Trincão, José; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N; Calvete, Juan J; Shnyrov, Valery L; Brondino, Carlos D; Pereira, Alice S; Lampreia, Jorge; Tavares, Pedro; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) mediates the reversible transfer of phosphate groups between the adenylate nucleotides and contributes to the maintenance of their constant cellular level, necessary for energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. The AK were purified from crude extracts of two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio (D.) gigas NCIB 9332 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, and biochemically and spectroscopically characterised in the native and fully cobalt- or zinc-substituted forms. These are the first reported adenylate kinases that bind either zinc or cobalt and are related to the subgroup of metal-containing AK found, in most cases, in Gram-positive bacteria. The electronic absorption spectrum is consistent with tetrahedral coordinated cobalt, predominantly via sulfur ligands, and is supported by EPR. The involvement of three cysteines in cobalt or zinc coordination was confirmed by chemical methods. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that cobalt or zinc are bound by three cysteine residues and one histidine in the metal-binding site of the "LID" domain. The sequence 129Cys-X5-His-X15-Cys-X2-Cys of the AK from D. gigas is involved in metal coordination and represents a new type of binding motif that differs from other known zinc-binding sites of AK. Cobalt and zinc play a structural role in stabilizing the LID domain.

  8. Characterization of Desulfovibrio salinus sp. nov., a slightly halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a saline lake in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier; Thioye, Abdoulaye; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Joseph, Manon; Fauque, Guy; Labat, Marc

    2018-03-01

    A novel slightly halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain P1BSR T , was isolated from water of a saline lake in Tunisia. Strain P1BSR T had motile (single polar flagellum), Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming cells, occurring singly or in pairs. Strain P1BSR T grew at temperatures between 15 and 45 °C (optimum 40 °C), and in a pH range between 6 and 8.5 (optimum pH 6.7). The strain required NaCl for growth (1 % w/v), and tolerated high NaCl concentration (up to 12 % w/v) with an optimum of 3 % (w/v). Sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite served as terminal electron acceptors, but not elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate and nitrite. Strain P1BSR T utilized lactate, pyruvate, formate, d-fructose and glycerol as carbon and energy sources. The main cellular fatty acid was C16 : 0 (50.8 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 47.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain P1BSR T was affiliated to the genus Desulfovibrio, with the type strains Desulfovibrio salexigens (96.51 %), Desulfovibrio zosterae (95.68 %), Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis (94.81 %) and Desulfovibrio ferrireducens (94.73 %) as its closest phylogenetic relatives. On the basis of genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, it is proposed to assign strain P1BSR T to a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio salinus sp. nov. The type strain is P1BSR T (=DSM 101510 T =JCM 31065 T ).

  9. Detailed Assessment of the Kinetics of Hg-Cell Association, Hg Methylation, and Methylmercury Degradation in Several Desulfovibrio Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew M.; Bullock, Allyson L.; Maizel, Andrew C.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of inorganic Hg [Hg(II)i] association, methylation, and methylmercury (MeHg) demethylation were examined for a group of Desulfovibrio species with and without MeHg production capability. We employed a detailed method for assessing MeHg production in cultures, including careful control of medium chemistry, cell density, and growth phase, plus mass balance of Hg(II)i and MeHg during the assays. We tested the hypothesis that differences in Hg(II)i sorption and/or uptake rates drive observed differences in methylation rates among Desulfovibrio species. Hg(II)i associated rapidly and with high affinity to both methylating and nonmethylating species. MeHg production by Hg-methylating strains was rapid, plateauing after ∼3 h. All MeHg produced was rapidly exported. We also tested the idea that all Desulfovibrio species are capable of Hg(II)i methylation but that rapid demethylation masks its production, but we found this was not the case. Therefore, the underlying reason why MeHg production capability is not universal in the Desulfovibrio is not differences in Hg affinity for cells nor differences in the ability of strains to degrade MeHg. However, Hg methylation rates varied substantially between Hg-methylating Desulfovibrio species even in these controlled experiments and after normalization to cell density. Thus, biological differences may drive cross-species differences in Hg methylation rates. As part of this study, we identified four new Hg methylators (Desulfovibrio aespoeensis, D. alkalitolerans, D. psychrotolerans, and D. sulfodismutans) and four nonmethylating species (Desulfovibrio alcoholivorans, D. tunisiensis, D. carbinoliphilus, and D. piger) in our ongoing effort to generate a library of strains for Hg methylation genomics. PMID:22885751

  10. Thymus vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. (Lamiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer-Gallego, Pedro Pablo; Navarro Peris, Albert Josep; Laguna Lumbreras, Emilio; Mateo Sanz, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    RESUMEN: Se describe una nueva subespecie de Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae); Th. vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov., caracterizada por presentar un hábito postrado, tallos estoloníferos, decumbentes y radicantes, hojas muy estrechas y una floración otoñal. ABSTRACT: Thymus vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. (Lamiaceae). A new subspecies of Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae); Th. vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. is described. This new subspecies is characterized by its prost...

  11. Strongylus vulgaris and colic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Krarup; Jacobsen, Stine; Olsen, Susanne Nautrup

    not address its role as risk factor for colic in horse populations. This study was designed as a retrospective case-control study among equine patients referred to the University of Copenhagen Large Animal Hospital during 2009-2011. Every referred colic case was matched with a patient of the same type (pony......, warmblooded, coldblooded), age, gender, and admitted in the same month and year, but for problems unrelated to the gastrointestinal tract. Serum samples were analyzed for antibodies to migrating S. vulgaris larvae using a recently developed ELISA. Three case definitions were used; colic sensu latum (n=274...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003212 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS96105.1| AB...C ... transporter, ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris ... subsp. vulgaris str. Hilden... ... LQGEDLRKRFGQREVVRGVSVSVQQGEIVGLLGPNGAGKTTTFYMLTGIIK--PTAGIVR 58 ... Query: 124 LDAKMDILDMDEEMAERYLNEGFSGGEKKRNEILQLLMIEPKLAILDE

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003210 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS96105.1| AB...C ... transporter, ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris ... subsp. vulgaris str. Hilden... ... LQGEDLRKRFGQREVVRGVSVSVQQGEIVGLLGPNGAGKTTTFYMLTGIIK--PTAGIVR 58 ... Query: 124 LDAKMDILDMDEEMAERYLNEGFSGGEKKRNEILQLLMIEPKLAILDE

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_002973 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS96105.1| AB...C ... transporter, ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris ... subsp. vulgaris str. Hilden... ... LQGEDLRKRFGQREVVRGVSVSVQQGEIVGLLGPNGAGKTTTFYMLTGIIK--PTAGIVR 58 ... Query: 124 LDAKMDILDMDEEMAERYLNEGFSGGEKKRNEILQLLMIEPKLAILDE

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available idine decarboxylase [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS94902.1| ... ... ... carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase [Desulfovibrio ... vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenbo...rough] ... Length = 362 ... Query: 17 ... SPCFVIDEDRLVANAAILDEVQRRTGARVLLALKGFAA...WSTFPLLSRAQGGVLHGTCASS 76 ... SPCFVIDEDRLVANAAILDEVQRRTGARVLLALKGFAAWSTFPLLSRAQGGVLHGTCASS Sbjct: 1 ... SPCFVIDEDRLVANAAILDE

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available porter [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] gb|AAS96283.1| magnesium trans...porter ... [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] ... Length = ...127 ... Query: 141 TAGGVMNTEIVILDEQLTADQAILQIRREIEDKENPYYAYVVDIDDRLIGVLSLRDLLLS 200... ... TAGGVMNTEIVILDEQLTADQAILQIRREIEDKENPYYAYVVDIDDRLIGVLSLRDLLLS Sbjct: 1 ... TAGGVMNTEIVILDEQLTADQAIL

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tase [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] gb|AAS94860.1| thioredoxin reduc...tase ... [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] ... Length = 29...7 ... Query: 4 ... AFDLIILGGGVAGMTSAIYAARANLRVLILDENACGGLVNWTKVVENMPSYTSIGGMELA 63 ... ... ... AFDLIILGGGVAGMTSAIYAARANLRVLILDENACGGLVNWTKVVENMPSYTSIGGMELA Sbjct: 1 ... AFDLIILGGGVAGMTSAIYAARANLRVLILDE

  18. Desulfovibrio frigidus sp. nov. and Desulfovibrio ferrireducens sp. nov., psychrotolerant bacteria isolated from Arctic fjord sediments (Svalbard) with the ability to reduce Fe(III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, Verona; Knoblauch, Christian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2006-01-01

    fermentation products such as hydrogen, formate and lactate with sulfate as the electron acceptor. Sulfate could be replaced by sulfite, thiosulfate or elemental sulfur. Poorly crystalline and soluble Fe(III) compounds were reduced in sulfate-free medium, but no growth occurred under these conditions....... In the absence of electron acceptors, fermentative growth was possible. The pH optimum for the strains was around 7.1. The DNA G+C contents were 43.3 and 42.0 mol% for strains 18T and 61T, respectively. Strains 18T, 61T and 77 were most closely related to Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis (95.0-95.7 % 16S rRNA gene...

  19. Paragonimus y Paragonimiasis en el norte peruano. Proceso del desarrollo de Paragonimus peruvianus Miyazaki¡ Ibañez y Miranda¡ 1969 en Felis cati L. gato doméstico infectado experimentalmente.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor Ibáñez H.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se ha estudiado el proceso del desarrollo de Parogonimus peruvianus Miyazaki, Ibóñez y Miranda, 1969 en el gato doméstico, Felis cati L. infectado experimentalmente mediante la administración oral de metacercarias del parasito extraídas de ejemplares de Pseudothelphusa chilensis Milne Edwards, 1843 procedentes de áreas endémicas.

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available transporter, ATP-binding protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MVRLEGIGKSFGPVR...LDIDPAARVCDLSMGERQRVEILKLLYRDSRVLILDEPTAVLTPGETEQLFEALHRMAENGKAIVFISHKMQEVLALADEI

  1. Broad-temperature range spectroscopy of the two-centre modular redox metalloprotein Desulfovibrio desulfuricans desulfoferrodoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Harnung, S.E.; Trabjerg, I.

    2003-01-01

    /VIS, MCD, CD, and EPR spectroscopy. The UV/VIS spectra of grey DFx at room temperature is characterised by broad charge transfer (CT) transitions associated with oxidised centre 1 (495 and 368 nm) and II (335 and 635 nm). The transitions are resolved at 78 K, substantiated by VT-MCD and -CD. The data offer......The electronic-vibrational couplings of the two-centre non-heme iron protein Desulfovibrio desulfuricans desulfoferrodoxin (DFx) in three oxidation states, i.e. fully oxidised (grey), half-oxidised (pink), and fully reduced (colourless), have been investigated by variable temperature (VT) UV...

  2. Nail manifestations in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahali Juliana Burihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail involvement in pemphigus vulgaris is rare. We describe 5 patients with pemphigus vulgaris presenting nail involvement. In this disease, nail manifestations present, by order of frequency, as chronic paronychia, onychomadesis, onycholysis, Beau's lines and trachyonychia. All our 5 cases presented with paronychia, and 1 of them also had Beau's lines. Treatment with prednisone and/or cyclophosphamide controlled mucocutaneous and nail manifestations in all cases.

  3. Electron-dense granules in Desulfovibrio gigas do not consist of inorganic triphosphate but of a glucose pentakis(diphosphate)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, CMH; Santos, H; Zhang, CH; Kruizinga, WH; Hansen, TA

    1996-01-01

    Under certain growth conditions the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas forms electron-dense granules in the cells which had been claimed to consist of a magnesium triphosphate). We observed granules after cultivation in media with a low Fe2+ or NH4+ concentration and reinvestigated the

  4. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Desulfovibrio sp. DV isolated from the sediments of a Pb-Zn mine tailings dam in the Chita region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiia Kovaliova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the draft genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Desulfovibrio sp. DV isolated from the sediments of a Pb-Zn mine tailings dam in the Chita region, Russia. The draft genome has a size of 4.9 Mb and encodes multiple K+-transporters and proton-consuming decarboxylases. The phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated ribosomal proteins revealed that strain DV clusters together with the acid-tolerant Desulfovibrio sp. TomC and Desulfovibrio magneticus. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession number MLBG00000000.

  5. Phaseolus vulgaris - recalcitrant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2014-11-15

    Since the ability to genetically engineer plants was established, researchers have modified a great number of plant species to satisfy agricultural, horticultural, industrial, medicinal or veterinary requirements. Almost thirty years after the first approaches to the genetic modification of pulse crops, it is possible to transform many grain legumes. However, one of the most important species for human nutrition, Phaseolus vulgaris, still lacks some practical tools for genomic research, such as routine genetic transformation. Its recalcitrance towards in vitro regeneration and rooting significantly hampers the possibilities of improvement of the common bean that suffers from many biotic and abiotic constraints. Thus, an efficient and reproducible system for regeneration of a whole plant is desired. Although noticeable progress has been made, the rate of recovery of transgenic lines is still low. Here, the current status of tissue culture and recent progress in transformation methodology are presented. Some major challenges and obstacles are discussed and some examples of their solutions are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Signalling pathways in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Ishii, Norito; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Acantholysis in pemphigus vulgaris is induced by binding of autoantibodies to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). The roles of signalling pathways on development of acantholysis have recently been extensively studied. In the study by Sayar et al., recently published in Exp Dermatol, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling was activated in both in vivo and in vitro pemphigus vulgaris experimental models. However, while EGFR inhibitors suppressed activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) linearly, they suppressed activity of c-Myc and acantholysis in a non-linear, V-shaped relationship. These findings indicated complicated interactions among EGFR, p38MAPK and c-Myc in pemphigus vulgaris pathology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Inhibition of a sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio marinisediminis GSR3, by biosynthesized copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasvand Zarasvand, Kiana; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    To control the severe problem of microbiologically influenced corrosion, industries require highly potent antibacterial agent which can inhibit the growth of bacteria on man-made surfaces. This need drove the research towards the synthesis of nanoscale antimicrobial compounds. We, therefore, screened several bacteria for the biosynthesis of copper/copper compound nanoparticles which could inhibit the growth of Desulfovibrio marinisediminis, a sulfate reducing bacterium. Supernatant of thirty bacteria isolated from the biofilm formed on ship hull was mixed with 1 mM CuCl 2 solution at room temperature. Eight bacterial strains, whose mixtures exhibited colour change, were selected for antimicrobial test. One nanoparticle which has been biosynthesized by Shewanella indica inhibited the growth of D. marinisediminis. Characterization of this particle by UV-visible spectrophotometer, XRD, TEM, DLS and FTIR showed that the particle is polydisperse CuO nanoparticle with average size of 400 nm.

  8. Pharmacognostic Evaluation of Bambusa vulgaris Var. vulgaris Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated the pharmacognostic characters and toxicity of the aqueous ethanolic extract of Bambusa vulgaris leaf in male wistar rats. The microscopy of the leaf revealed diagnostic characters such as anomocytic stomata, sinuous epidermal cells, numerous prisms of calcium oxalate crystals and covering ...

  9. Management of Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholera, Mimansa; Chainani-Wu, Nita

    2016-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic, autoimmune, vesiculobullous disease. As a result of the relative rarity of PV, published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are limited, which makes it difficult to evaluate the efficacy of different treatment regimens in this disease. This also precludes conduct of a meta-analysis. English-language publications describing treatment outcomes of patients with PV were identified by searches of electronic databases through May 2015, and additionally by review of the bibliography of these publications. A total of 89 papers, which included 21 case reports, 47 case series, 8 RCTs, and 13 observational studies, were identified. The findings from these publications, including information on disease course and prognosis, medications used, treatment responses, and side effects, are summarized in the tables and text of this review. Prior to availability of corticosteroid therapy, PV had a high fatality rate. Early publications from the 1970s reported high-dose, prolonged corticosteroid use and significant associated side effects. Later reports described use of corticosteroids along with steroid-sparing adjuvants, which allows a reduction in the total dose of corticosteroids and a reduction in observed mortality and morbidity. For the majority of patients in these reports, a long-term course on medications lasting about 5-10 years was observed; however, subgroups of patients requiring shorter courses or needing longer-term therapy have also been described. Early diagnosis of PV and early initiation of treatment were prognostic factors. In recent publications, commonly used initial regimens include corticosteroids in combination with mycophenolate or azathioprine; whereas, for patients with inadequate response to these regimens, adjuvants such as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) or rituximab are used. The review findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, early initiation of treatment, and use of steroid-sparing adjuvants to

  10. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days -1 while the half-velocity constant (K s ) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k d ) was calculated as 0.072 days -1 . After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO 2 ) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat

  11. Bambusa vulgaris and Raffia bambusa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... Preliminary studies in some parts of Ghana by the authors showed a consistent ... 2 Resources and Methods Used. 2.1 Materials. The roots of B. vulgaris and R. bambusa (Fig. 1) were harvested from wetlands in south-western. Ghana. In the first ... Bamboo Obtained by Courtesy of. Openclipart.org).

  12. Lupus Vulgaris Following Bcg Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Pandhi

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of lupus vulgaris developing at the site of BCG vaccination are reported. All the patients had lesions starting before the age of 15 years. Clinically and histologically the lesions ′were indistinguishable from spontaneous lupus vulgarism Treatment with streptomycin and isonicotinic acid hydrazide for 1 year produced complete resolution of lesions.

  13. Porokeratosis Masquerading As Lupus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sudip

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Porokeratosis is a specific disorder of kerstinization characterized histologically by cornoid lamella. Lesions of porokeratosis present varied features, often mimicking other dermatological disorders. Herein, we report a case of porokeratosis of Mibelli presenting with verrucous lesions simulating lupus vulgaris.

  14. Disseminated lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Taru; Ramchander; Shrihar, Rashmi; Gupta, Tanvi Pal; Aggarwal, Shilpi

    2011-01-01

    follicular plugging and multiple epithelioid cell granulomas, rimmed by lymphocytes in the deeper portion of the dermis, mainly peri-appendageal. Stain for acid-fast bacteria was negative. Cultures from the skin lesions were negative. The patient was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris with multiple lesions of varying morphology at different sites with pulmonary tuberculosis and healed lymph node involvement.

  15. Extensive keloid formation after pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Eric Y; Workwick, Scott

    2015-11-18

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an immunobullous disease characterized by intraepidermal blister formation. These blisters eventually rupture, leaving erosions that are slow to heal, often leaving hyperpigmented patches, but no scars. We describe a case of a 67- year-old man with pemphigus vulgaris who suffered severe keloidal scarring after the pemphigus lesions became infected. His keloids were treated with intralesional corticosteroids with some improvement. Pemphigus vulgaris, a process confined to the epidermis, may lead to scarring in predisposed individuals, particularly if infection occurs.

  16. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B.-G.; Dong, M.; Liu, H.; Camp, L.; Geller, J.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Choi, M.; Witkowska, H. E.; Ball, D. A.; Typke, D.; Downing, K. H.; Shatsky, M.; Brenner, S. E.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Biggin, M. D.; Glaeser, R. M.

    2009-08-15

    An unbiased survey has been made of the stable, most abundant multi-protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) that are larger than Mr {approx} 400 k. The quaternary structures for 8 of the 16 complexes purified during this work were determined by single-particle reconstruction of negatively stained specimens, a success rate {approx}10 times greater than that of previous 'proteomic' screens. In addition, the subunit compositions and stoichiometries of the remaining complexes were determined by biochemical methods. Our data show that the structures of only two of these large complexes, out of the 13 in this set that have recognizable functions, can be modeled with confidence based on the structures of known homologs. These results indicate that there is significantly greater variability in the way that homologous prokaryotic macromolecular complexes are assembled than has generally been appreciated. As a consequence, we suggest that relying solely on previously determined quaternary structures for homologous proteins may not be sufficient to properly understand their role in another cell of interest.

  17. Malignant change in lupus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Girdhar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases developed squamous cell carcinoma over the lupus vulgaris lesions. The first patient was a, 14 year male with a gradually developing painless, hypertrophic lesion just below the left knee for 6 years. Four years later a cauliflower growth developed over it. He was on antitubercular therapy for 3 months without any improvement. The second patient was 42 year male with a painless, growing lesion behind the right knee for 25 years. About 9 months back a rapidly progressive painful ulcerated mass developed over it which used to bleed easily o n slight trauma. Histopathological findings in both the cases were compatible with lupus vulgaris and squamous cell carcinoma. None of the cases had recurrence following excision and subsequent antitubercular therapy.

  18. Lupus vulgaris associated with Scrofuloderma

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    Isha Preet Tuli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris is a rare manifestation of tuberculosis. It is even rarer for it to complicate scrofuloderma. We report a case of a 27-year-old man who had undergone a successful treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with scrofuloderma with lesions of lupus on the overlying skin. The Mantoux test was positive and initial chest X-ray did not show any active features of tuberculosis. Discharge from the lesion stained positive for acid fast bacilli. Multiple fine needle aspirations were inconclusive. However the histopathology of biopsied lesion revealed tuberculoid granuloma with Langhans giant cells. TThe patient improved with antitubercular therapy. We are presenting this case as a rare coexistence of scrofuloderma with lupus vulgaris.

  19. Oral Pemphigus Vulgaris: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpita, Rai; Monica, Arora; Venkatesh, Naikmasur; Atul, Sattur; Varun, Malhotra

    2015-10-01

    Pemphigus is a potentially life threatening autoimmune disease that causes blisters and erosions of the skin and the mucous membrane. The epithelial lesions are a result of auto-antibodies that react with desmosomal glycoproteins that are present on the cell surface of the keratinocyte. The autoimmune reaction against these glycoproteins causes a loss of cell to cell adhesion, resulting in the formation of intraepithelial bullae. Eighty to ninety percent of patients with pemphigus vulgaris develop oral lesions and in 60% of cases oral lesions are the first sign. Timely recognition and therapy of oral lesion is critical as it may prevent skin involvement. If treatment is instituted during this time, the disease is easier to control and the chance for an early remission of the disorder is enhanced. This case report describes the case of a patient who complained of ulcers of the mouth and difficulty in swallowing since 20 days, who was diagnosed as having Pemphigus vulgaris. Due to early diagnosis, lower doses of medication for a shorter period of time could control the disease. Dental professionals must be sufficiently familiar with the clinical manifestations of pemphigus vulgaris to ensure early diagnosis and treatment which in turn determines the prognosis and course of the disease.

  20. EPR and redox properties of periplasmic nitrate reductase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Pablo J; Rivas, María G; Brondino, Carlos D; Bursakov, Sergey A; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2006-07-01

    Nitrate reductases are enzymes that catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. We report here electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies in the periplasmic nitrate reductase isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774. This protein, belonging to the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes, comprises a single 80-kDa subunit and contains a Mo bis(molybdopterin guanosine dinucleotide) cofactor and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. EPR-monitored redox titrations, carried out with and without nitrate in the potential range from 200 to -500 mV, and EPR studies of the enzyme, in both catalytic and inhibited conditions, reveal distinct types of Mo(V) EPR-active species, which indicates that the Mo site presents high coordination flexibility. These studies show that nitrate modulates the redox properties of the Mo active site, but not those of the [4Fe-4S] center. The possible structures and the role in catalysis of the distinct Mo(V) species detected by EPR are discussed.

  1. Transcriptomics reveal several gene expression patterns in the piezophile Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis in response to hydrostatic pressure.

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    Amira Amrani

    Full Text Available RNA-seq was used to study the response of Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal chimney on the East-Pacific Rise at a depth of 2,600 m, to various hydrostatic pressure growth conditions. The transcriptomic datasets obtained after growth at 26, 10 and 0.1 MPa identified only 65 differentially expressed genes that were distributed among four main categories: aromatic amino acid and glutamate metabolisms, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and unknown function. The gene expression patterns suggest that D. hydrothermalis uses at least three different adaptation mechanisms, according to a hydrostatic pressure threshold (HPt that was estimated to be above 10 MPa. Both glutamate and energy metabolism were found to play crucial roles in these mechanisms. Quantitation of the glutamate levels in cells revealed its accumulation at high hydrostatic pressure, suggesting its role as a piezolyte. ATP measurements showed that the energy metabolism of this bacterium is optimized for deep-sea life conditions. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms linked to hydrostatic pressure adaptation in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  2. Study of the cathodic depolarization theory with hydrogen permeation and the bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M. F. de; Duque, Z.; Rinco, O. T. de; Perez, O.; Araujo, I.

    2003-01-01

    A Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ssp. desulfuricans (SRB) was used to study the permeation of hydrogen, using a Devanatan and Stachurski cell and a palladium sheet. The aim was to evaluate cathodic depolarization as a Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria action mechanisms in Microbiologically Induced Corrosion. The permeation tests were run with and without cathodic polarization, using a sterile deaerated culture medium inoculated with 10% SRB concentrated at 10''8 cell/ml. the results indicate bacterial growth in the order of 10''9-10''10 cel/ml after 18 h both in the polarized and non-polarized, tests, indicating that SRB developed regardless of the surface polarized as a source of H''0, generating H 2 S as a product of the anaerobic respiration. It was also determined that, without cathodic polarization, the conditions are not enough to reduce the H* generated by the H 2 S dissociation (pd is not susceptible to corrosion at this condition). On the other hand, cathodic polarization increased the permeation current, which was associated with the maximum enzymatic activity phase of the bacteria. (Author) 8 refs

  3. Impact of Desulfovibrio alaskensis biofilms on corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikieł, Agata J; Datsenko, Iaryna; Vera, Mario; Sand, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Sulfate reducing prokaryotes are associated with the steel deterioration. They build heterogeneous biofilms, capable of accelerating corrosion processes. In this study metabolic activity and the biofilm development of Desulfovibrio alaskensis were correlated to electrochemical response of carbon steel surface. In the exponential growth phase sulfide concentration reached its maximum of about 10mM. This phenomenon was responsible for the parallel increase in the corrosion potential (Ecorr) up to -720mV (vs. SCE). Subsequently, during the intensive biofilm formation and development another Ecorr peak (-710mV vs. SCE) occurred. Decrease in Ecorr was registered during the biofilm maturation and kept stable, being 20mV lower than in the control. While carbon steel was protected from the microbial attachment and exposed to metabolic products, only one potential maximum (-730mV vs. SCE) was recorded. Here Ecorr variations coincided with sulfide concentration changes and kept at 120mV lower vs. the control. Weight loss examinations revealed corrosion rates, which did not exceed 0.05mm/y. Confocal microscopy suggested the importance of extracellular proteins in the biofilm formation. Above 150 proteins were detected in the EPS matrix. Surface effects of biofilm and metabolic products were visualised, revealing the role of attached microorganisms in the localised corrosion. © 2013.

  4. The role of Rnf in ion gradient formation in Desulfovibrio alaskensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyao Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rnf is a membrane protein complex that has been shown to be important in energy conservation. Here, Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 and Rnf mutants of G20 were grown with different electron donor and acceptor combinations to determine the importance of Rnf in energy conservation and the type of ion gradient generated. The addition of the protonophore TCS strongly inhibited lactate-sulfate dependent growth whereas the sodium ionophore ETH2120 had no effect, indicating a role for the proton gradient during growth. Mutants in rnfA and rnfD were more sensitive to the protonophore at 5 µM than the parental strain, suggesting the importance of Rnf in the generation of a proton gradient. The electrical potential (ΔΨ, ΔpH and proton motive force were lower in the rnfA mutant than in the parental strain of D.alaskensis G20. These results provide evidence that the Rnf complex in D. alaskensis functions as a primary proton pump whose activity is important for growth.

  5. Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moberly, James G [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

  6. System-Wide Adaptations of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 to Phosphate-Limited Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Bosak

    Full Text Available The prevalence of lipids devoid of phosphorus suggests that the availability of phosphorus limits microbial growth and activity in many anoxic, stratified environments. To better understand the response of anaerobic bacteria to phosphate limitation and starvation, this study combines microscopic and lipid analyses with the measurements of fitness of pooled barcoded transposon mutants of the model sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Phosphate-limited G20 has lower growth rates and replaces more than 90% of its membrane phospholipids by a mixture of monoglycosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG, glycuronic acid diacylglycerol (GADG and ornithine lipids, lacks polyphosphate granules, and synthesizes other cellular inclusions. Analyses of pooled and individual mutants reveal the importance of the high-affinity phosphate transport system (the Pst system, PhoR, and glycolipid and ornithine lipid synthases during phosphate limitation. The phosphate-dependent synthesis of MGDG in G20 and the widespread occurrence of the MGDG/GADG synthase among sulfate reducing ∂-Proteobacteria implicate these microbes in the production of abundant MGDG in anaerobic environments where the concentrations of phosphate are lower than 10 μM. Numerous predicted changes in the composition of the cell envelope and systems involved in transport, maintenance of cytoplasmic redox potential, central metabolism and regulatory pathways also suggest an impact of phosphate limitation on the susceptibility of sulfate reducing bacteria to other anthropogenic or environmental stresses.

  7. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13 is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1 is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  8. Bacterial Growth Phase Influences Methylmercury Production by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yin, Xiangping Lisa [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate-fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg:SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg-NOM to growing cultures 24h before sampling (late addition) resulted in {approx}2x greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid- and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to {approx}3x more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production.

  9. Bacterial Growth Phase Influences Methylmercury Production by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yin, Xiangping Lisa [ORNL; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg: SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg NOM to growing cultures 24 h before sampling (late addition) resulted in ~2 greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid-and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to ~3 more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production.

  10. Bismuth(III) deferiprone effectively inhibits growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Larry L; Lyle, Daniel A; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Granat, Alex S; Khurshid, Ali N; Kherbik, Nada; Hider, Robert; Lin, Henry C

    2016-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis in humans and there is an interest in inhibiting the growth of these sulfide-producing bacteria. This research explores the use of several chelators of bismuth to determine the most effective chelator to inhibit the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. For our studies, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was grown with nitrate as the electron acceptor and chelated bismuth compounds were added to test for inhibition of growth. Varying levels of inhibition were attributed to bismuth chelated with subsalicylate or citrate but the most effective inhibition of growth by D. desulfuricans was with bismuth chelated by deferiprone, 3-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridone. Growth of D. desulfuricans was inhibited by 10 μM bismuth as deferiprone:bismuth with either nitrate or sulfate respiration. Our studies indicate deferiprone:bismuth has bacteriostatic activity on D. desulfuricans because the inhibition can be reversed following exposure to 1 mM bismuth for 1 h at 32 °C. We suggest that deferiprone is an appropriate chelator for bismuth to control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria because deferiprone is relatively nontoxic to animals, including humans, and has been used for many years to bind Fe(III) in the treatment of β-thalassemia.

  11. Autoimmunity to desmocollin 3 in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Nagler, Arielle R; Farber, Sara A; Choi, Eun Jung; Jackson, Lauren H; Leiferman, Kristin M; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Amagai, Masayuki; Zone, John J; Payne, Aimee S

    2010-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to the desmosomal adhesion protein, desmoglein 3. Genetic deficiency of desmoglein 3 in mice mimics autoimmunity to desmoglein 3 in pemphigus vulgaris, with mucosal-dominant blistering in the suprabasal layer of the epidermis. Mice with an epidermal-specific deletion of desmocollin 3, the other major desmosomal cadherin isoform expressed in the basal epidermis, develop suprabasal blisters in skin that are histologically identical to those observed in pemphigus vulgaris, suggesting that desmocollin 3 might be a target of autoantibodies in some pemphigus vulgaris patients. We now demonstrate that desmocollin 3 is an autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris, illustrated in a patient with mucosal-dominant blistering. Six of 38 pemphigus vulgaris and one of 85 normal serum samples immunoprecipitate desmocollin 3 (P = 0.003). Incubation of patient IgG with human keratinocytes causes loss of intercellular adhesion, and adsorption with recombinant desmocollin 3 specifically prevents this pathogenic effect. Additionally, anti-desmocollin 3 sera cause loss of keratinocyte cell surface desmocollin 3, but not desmoglein 3 by immunofluorescence, indicating distinct cellular pathogenic effects in anti-desmocollin and anti-desmoglein pemphigus, despite their identical clinical presentations. These data demonstrate that desmocollin 3 is a pathogenic autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris and suggest that pemphigus vulgaris is a histological reaction pattern that may result from autoimmunity to desmoglein 3, desmocollin 3, or both desmosomal cadherins.

  12. Pemphigus Vulgaris with Solitary Toxic Thyroid Nodule

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    Mostafa Alfishawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disease, affecting the skin and mucous membranes. It is reported to be associated with other autoimmune diseases including autoimmune thyroid diseases. However we report herein a case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with autonomous toxic nodule. Case Presentation. A 51-year-old woman was evaluated for blisters and erosions that develop on her trunk, face, and extremities, with a five-year history of progressively enlarging neck mass, and a past medical history of pemphigus vulgaris seven years ago. The condition was associated with palpitation, dyspnea, and heat intolerance. Thyroid function tests and thyroid scan were compatible with the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis due to autonomous toxic nodule. Exacerbation of pemphigus vulgaris was proved by skin biopsy from the patient which revealed histologic picture of pemphigus vulgaris. Conclusion. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are reported to associate pemphigus vulgaris. To our knowledge, this case is the first in the English literature to report association between pemphigus vulgaris and autonomous toxic nodule and highlights the possibility of occurrence of pemphigus vulgaris with a nonautoimmune thyroid disease raising the question: is it just a coincidence or is there an explanation for the occurrence of both conditions together?

  13. Sporotrichoid lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Anshul; Tiwari, Siddhi; Mathur, Deepak K; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common presentation of cutaneous tuberculosis in India and can present as papular, nodular, plaque, ulcerative, vegetating, and tumid forms. Unusual variants include the frambesiform, gangrenous, ulcerovegetating, lichen simplex chronicus, myxomatous, and sporotrichoid types. We describe a rare sporotrichoid presentation of lupus vulgaris on the leg of a 28-year-old female of 12 years duration.

  14. Lupus vulgaris with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Mojakgomo Hendrick; Doman, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant problem in developing countries. Cutaneous forms of tuberculosis account for approximately 10% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of true infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or because of tuberculids. Tuberculids are immunological reactions to haematogenously spread antigenic components of M. tuberculosis. True cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of inoculation or haematogenous spread of M. tuberculosis to the skin. Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of true cutaneous tuberculosis. Other forms of true cutaneous tuberculosis are tuberculous chancre, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, scrofuloderma, periorificial tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis of the skin. Lupus vulgaris is usually chronic and progressive. It occurs in patients with moderate to high immunity against M. tuberculosis as evidenced by strongly positive tuberculin test. Long-standing cases of lupus vulgaris may be complicated by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We describe a patient who had undiagnosed lupus vulgaris for 35 years until she developed SCC on the lesion of lupus vulgaris.

  15. Filamentous fungi associated to Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland plantations

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    Mayra Acosta-Suárez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland is a species of a great economic importance and in the conservation of soils. Nevertheless, little information exists on the microbial communities associated to its plantations, and their impact on the soil. For that reason it is necessary to identify the cultivable filamentous fungi to understand their roll and contribution to the development of this forest species and their impact in the environment. Considering these criteria the current work had as objectives to quantify, to characterize, to identify and to conserve filamentous fungi in soils cultivated with Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrader ex. Wendland. Samples from three soils with plantations of Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland, yagruma (Cecropia peltata L. and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grandis L. as well as soil without any crop, used as control, were collected for the microbiological analysis. Decimal dilutions of soil were done in Rose Agar Bengal culture medium for strain isolation. The cultural and morphologic characteristics were described. The amount of filamentous fungi oscillated between 103 and 105ufc/g in Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland, similar to the previous registered in plants of yagruma, eucalyptus and in the soil without any crop. A total of 13 generous were identified: Aspergillus, Botryotrichum, Cephalosporium., Cladosporium, Cunningamella, Fusarium, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Pythium, Pyrenochaeta, Rhizoctonia, Trichocladium and Trichoderma. It was demonstrated that the communities of fungi in plantations of B. vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland are diverse. Key word: bamboo, filamentous fungi, rhizosphere

  16. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  17. Lupus vulgaris of the auricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Eftekhari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays despite decrease in the tuberculosis (TB incidence around the world with standard anti tubercular treatment, atypical forms of TB is increasing due to extensive use of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune diseases and increasing prevalence of HIV infection, so early diagnosis of pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB in these patients is very important. Cutaneous TB could be a great imitator and confused with other granulomatous lesions. It has different morphological patterns. Lupus vulgaris (LV is the most common type of cutaneous TB which usually involves head and neck. We present herein a case of LV in auricular region without apparent systemic involvement.

  18. Molybdenum Induces the expression of a protein containing a new heterometallic Mo-Fe cluster in desulfoVibrio alaskensis

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas, Maria G.; Carepo, Marta S. P.; Mota, Cristiano S.; Moura, José J. G.; Moura, Isabel; Korbas, Malgorzata; Lopes, Ana T.; Brondino, Carlos D.; Pereira, Alice S.

    2009-01-01

    Biochemistry. 2009 Feb 10;48(5):873-82. doi: 10.1021/bi801773t. The characterization of a novel Mo-Fe protein (MorP) associated with a system that responds to Mo in Desulfovibrio alaskensis is reported. Biochemical characterization shows that MorP is a periplasmic homomultimer of high molecular weight (260 +/- 13 kDa) consisting of 16-18 monomers of 15321.1 +/- 0.5 Da. The UV/visible absorption spectrum of the as-isolated protein shows absorption peaks around 280, 320, and 570 nm with exti...

  19. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and fourier transform-ion cyclotronresonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-07-11

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  20. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan, Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic or oxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes, in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine to form serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate and glycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine its use of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, we grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C] lactate as the sole carbon source with either trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor. Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage (>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate or pyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other key metabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serine pathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversible serine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significant activity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observed to be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratede hydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of a complete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reduction condition

  1. Hydrogenase activity of mineral-associated and suspended populations of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, C L; Magnuson, T S; Boyd, E S; Leavitt, W D; Reed, D W; Geesey, G G

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate electron transfer to metals and may contribute to the formation and speciation of ferrous sulfides formed at the cell-mineral interface. In the present study, we compared the whole cell hydrogenase activity of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Essex 6 growing as biofilms on hematite (hematite-associated) or as suspended populations using different metabolic pathways. Hematite-associated cells exhibited significantly greater hydrogenase activity than suspended populations during sulfate respiration but not during pyruvate fermentation. The enhanced activity of the hematite-associated, sulfate-grown cells appears to be dependent on iron availability rather than a general response to surface attachment since the activity of glass-associated cells did not differ from that of suspended populations. Hydrogenase activity of pyruvate-fermenting cells was stimulated by addition of iron as soluble Fe(II)Cl2 and, in the absence of added iron, both sulfate-reducing and pyruvate-fermenting cells displayed similar rates of hydrogenase activity. These data suggest that iron exerts a stronger influence on whole cell hydrogenase activity than either metabolic pathway or mode of growth. The location of hydrogenase to the cell envelope and the enhanced activity at the hematite surface in sulfate-reducing cells may influence the redox conditions that control the species of iron sulfides on the mineral surface.

  2. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J.; Semkiw, Elizabeth S.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-02-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  3. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp-Giles, Barbara J [University of Missouri, Columbia; Keller, Kimberly L [University of Missouri, Columbia; Porat, Iris [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Semkiw, Elizabeth M. [University of Missouri; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri

    2014-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  4. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney KM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristen M Whitney1, Chérie M Ditre21Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Skin Enhancement Center and Cosmetic Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USADate of preparation: 30th November 2010Conflicts of interest: None declaredClinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne?Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients.Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of childbearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral.Keywords: acne vulgaris, benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, antibiotics, light and laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, photopneumatic therapy, chemical peels

  5. Extensive keloidal healing of pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Neena

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullae of pemphigus vulgaris heal without scarring. We here report a patient of pemphigus vulgaris whose lesions healed with a one-month history of extensive flaccid bullae and uninfected erosions on the trunk and extremities along with superficial erosions in the oral mucosa. The clinical suspicion of pemphigus vulgaris was confirmed by histopathological and immunohistological examination. Pulse therapy with monthly parenteral dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide pulse was instituted. The cutaneous lesions on healing formed extensive keloidal scars despite high dose of monthly corticosteroid therapy.

  6. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported.

  7. TEM investigation of U6+ and Re7+ reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, HUIFANG; BARTON, LARRY L.; CHOUDHURY, KEKA; ZHANG, PENGCHU; WANG, YIFENG

    2000-01-01

    Uranium and its fission product Tc in aerobic environment will be in the forms of UO 2 2+ and TcO 4 - . Reduced forms of tetravalent U and Tc are sparingly soluble. As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl acetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolic active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. The reduction of Re 7+ by cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans is fast in media containing H 2 an electron donor, and slow in media containing lactic acid. It is proposed that the cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl and Re 7+ is (a chemical analogue for Tc 7+ ) through transferring an electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to the oxyions of UO 2 2+ and TcO 4 -

  8. Molybdenum induces the expression of a protein containing a new heterometallic Mo-Fe cluster in Desulfovibrio alaskensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Maria G; Carepo, Marta S P; Mota, Cristiano S; Korbas, Malgorzata; Durand, Marie-Claire; Lopes, Ana T; Brondino, Carlos D; Pereira, Alice S; George, Graham N; Dolla, Alain; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2009-02-10

    The characterization of a novel Mo-Fe protein (MorP) associated with a system that responds to Mo in Desulfovibrio alaskensis is reported. Biochemical characterization shows that MorP is a periplasmic homomultimer of high molecular weight (260 +/- 13 kDa) consisting of 16-18 monomers of 15321.1 +/- 0.5 Da. The UV/visible absorption spectrum of the as-isolated protein shows absorption peaks around 280, 320, and 570 nm with extinction coefficients of 18700, 12800, and 5000 M(-1) cm(-1), respectively. Metal content, EXAFS data and DFT calculations support the presence of a Mo-2S-[2Fe-2S]-2S-Mo cluster never reported before. Analysis of the available genomes from Desulfovibrio species shows that the MorP encoding gene is located downstream of a sensor and a regulator gene. This type of gene arrangement, called two component system, is used by the cell to regulate diverse physiological processes in response to changes in environmental conditions. Increase of both gene expression and protein production was observed when cells were cultured in the presence of 45 microM molybdenum. Involvement of this system in Mo tolerance of sulfate reducing bacteria is proposed.

  9. Lupus vulgaris with tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad PVS

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available 26 years old male presented with two large plaques of lupus vulgaris and a lesion of tuberculosis verrucosa cutis on the right thigh and foot, respectively. Both the lesions were confirmed by histopathological examinations.

  10. EFFECTS OF TUNGSTATE ON THE GROWTH OF DESULFOVIBRIO-GIGAS NCIMB-9332 AND OTHER SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA WITH ETHANOL AS A SUBSTRATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENSGENS, CMH; NIENHUISKUIPER, ME; HANSEN, TA

    Growth of Desulfovibrio gigas NCIMB 9332 in mineral, vitamin-supplemented media with ethanol as substrate was strongly stimulated by the addition of tungstate (optimal level approximately 10(-7) M). At suboptimal tungstate concentrations, up to 1.0 mM acetaldehyde was detected in the culture

  11. Desultovibrio frigidus sp nov and Desulfovibrio ferfireducens sp nov., psychrotolerant bacteria isolated from Arctic fiord sediments (Svalbard) with the ability to reduce Fe(III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2006-01-01

    (.)0-95(.)7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Strains 18(T) and 77, exhibiting 99(.)9% sequence similarity, represent a novel species for which the name Desulfovibrio frigidus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 18(T) (=DSM 17176(T)=jCM 12924(T)). Strain 61(T) was closely related to strains 18(T...

  12. [Childhood pemphigus vulgaris, a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, Ana G; Mantero, Natalia M; Rueda, María L; Navacchia, Daniel; Cao, Gabriel; De Lillo, Leonardo; Grees, Susana A

    2016-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic disease that is characterized by flaccid blisters and erosions, caused by immunoglobulin G autoantibodies against epidermal components. It is highly unusual in the pediatric population; it represents the 1.4 - 2.9% of the total cases. We present a case of pemphigus vulgaris in a 12 year old girl, which has implied a challenge both in its diagnosis and in its treatment. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  13. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  14. Serum angiotensin converting enzyme in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza M Robati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering skin disease with unknown etiology. Drugs such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors may contribute in the pathogenesis of pemphigus. Objective: We plan this essay to evaluate the serum ACE level in pemphigus vulgaris patients in comparison with healthy controls to recognize its possible role in disease pathogenesis or activity. Methods: This study was planned and performed in the dermatology clinics of Shahid Beheshti University of MedicalSciences′ Hospitals between July 2010 and June 2011. Patients with new onset of pemphigus vulgaris were enrolled in our study. Control subjects were frequency-matched to cases by sex and age. Serum ACE was determined by the spectrophotometric method. Results: Thirty-four patients with pemphigus vulgaris and 35 healthy individuals were recruited in the study. No statistical significant difference was detected in the mean level of serum ACE of the two groups (t-test, P = 0.11. The mean ACE level was significantly lower in male patients compared with male controls (P = 0.04. Moreover, a significant higher serum ACE level of patients with cutaneous involvement was observed compared to patients with mucosal involvement (P = 0.02. Conclusions: Despite lack of any significant difference of serum ACE level between pemphigus and control group, the serum ACE level was considerably lower in male pemphigus vulgaris patients compared with male controls. Therefore, ACE might have some association with pemphigus vulgaris especially in male patients; however, further studies are required to confirm this association.

  15. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Kristen M; Ditre, Chérie M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s) for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne? Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of child-bearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral. PMID:21691566

  16. Soil bacteria associated to Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrad. ex Wendl plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileidy Cruz-Martín

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris is a species that protects the soil and has many other applications. Identifying the microorganisms in their plantations, including bacteria that play a key role are required to demonstrate their impacts on the environment. This work was aimed to quantify, characterize and identify soil bacteria associated to plantations of Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris. Soil samples were taken from a plantation of B. vulgaris var. vulgaris with 4 years of culture, Cecropia peltata L. and uncultivated soil as control. To quantify the number of cultivable bacteria present, the plate count method was used in selective culture media for bacteria that fix nitrogen and solubilise phosphorus. Colonies with different cultural characteristics were isolated and a morphological, physiological and cultural characterization was done. As a result, we verified the presence of bacterial communities in similar orders to those found in other species and uncultivated soil. In addition, growth of bacterial colonies was observed in selective culture medium for fixing nitrogen and solubilising phosphorus. Seven strains were identified as Bacillus. The results achieved are a starting point to work on microbial ecology in B. vulgaris var. vulgaris. Keywords: bamboo, microorganism quantification, rhizosphere.

  17. Lupus vulgaris of nose — a case report

    OpenAIRE

    M, Sadarudheen Ahmed; Vinayakumar, A. R.; Mathai, John; Nair, P. Prathapan

    1999-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris which is a mucocutaneous form of Tuberculosis is not an uncommon condi-tion. But the disease resulting in excessive destruction is rare today. We report a case of lupus vulgaris which almost completely destroyed the nose.

  18. Lupus vulgaris: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniacka, Anna; Schwartz, Robert A; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Borun, Marta; Arkuszewska, Cecylia

    2005-04-01

    Although there has been a steady decline in the incidence of tuberculosis in recent years, it persists in some regions, and where AIDS is especially prevalent, the number of new cases has been increasing. Thus, cutaneous tuberculosis has re-emerged in areas with a high incidence of HIV infection and multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris has been and remains the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis. Cutaneous manifestations of disseminated tuberculosis are unusual, being seen in less than 0.5% of cases. Scrofuloderma, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and lupus vulgaris comprise most cutaneous tuberculosis cases. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is derived from an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis and is employed beneficially as a relatively safe vaccination in Poland and other countries in which the prevalence of tuberculosis is high. However, BCG vaccination may produce complications, including disseminated BCG and lupus vulgaris, the latter seen in one of our two patients in whom lupus vulgaris at the inoculation site followed a second vaccination with BCG 12 years after the initial one. A similar phenomenon has been described after immunotherapy with BCG vaccination. Re-infection (secondary) inoculation cutaneous tuberculosis may also occur as a result of BCG vaccination, producing either lupus vulgaris or tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, probably depending upon the patient's degree of cell-mediated immunity. However, most lupus vulgaris cases are not associated with vaccination with BCG, as occurred in our first patient. For those who do develop lupus vulgaris, it can be persistent for a long period, in some cases for many decades. In the second patient we describe a lengthy duration and cutaneous reactivation at distant sites after more than 40 years.

  19. Palladium and gold removal and recovery from precious metal solutions and electronic scrap leachates by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Neil J; Baxter-Plant, Victoria S; Henderson, John; Potter, M; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2006-09-01

    Biomass of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to recover Au(III) as Au(0) from test solutions and from waste electronic scrap leachate. Au(0) was precipitated extracellularly by a different mechanism from the biodeposition of Pd(0). The presence of Cu(2+) ( approximately 2000 mg/l) in the leachate inhibited the hydrogenase-mediated removal of Pd(II) but pre-palladisation of the cells in the absence of added Cu(2+) facilitated removal of Pd(II) from the leachate and more than 95% of the Pd(II) was removed autocatalytically from a test solution supplemented with Cu(II) and Pd(II). Metal recovery was demonstrated in a gas-lift electrobioreactor with electrochemically generated hydrogen, followed by precipitation of recovered metal under gravity. A 3-stage bioseparation process for the recovery of Au(III), Pd(II) and Cu(II) is proposed.

  20. Prophage-like gene transfer agents-novel mechanisms of gene exchange for Methanococcus, Desulfovibrio, Brachyspira, and Rhodobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Thad B

    2007-04-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are novel mechanisms for bacterial gene transfer. They resemble small, tailed bacteriophages in ultrastructure and act like generalized transducing prophages. In contrast to functional prophages, GTAs package random fragments of bacterial genomes and incomplete copies of their own genomes. The packaged DNA content is characteristic of the GTA and ranges in size from 4.4 to 13.6kb. GTAs have been reported in species of Brachyspira, Methanococcus, Desulfovibrio, and Rhodobacter. The best studied GTAs are VSH-1 of the anaerobic, pathogenic spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and RcGTA of the nonsulfur, purple, photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. VSH-1 and RcGTA have likely contributed to the ecology and evolution of these bacteria. The existence of GTAs in phylogenetically diverse bacteria suggests GTAs may be more common in nature than is now appreciated.

  1. Competition for L-lactate betweenDesulfovibrio, Veillonella, andAcetobacterium species isolated from anaerobic intertidal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanbroek, H J; Geerligs, H J; Peijnenburg, A A; Siesling, J

    1983-12-01

    Almost equal numbers ofDesulfovibrio, Veillonella, andAcetobacterium species were found in agar shake dilutions of anaerobic intertidal brackish sediments applying L-lactate as the only energy source and sulfate as electron acceptor. Pure cultures of these bacteria were studied in more detail in batch cultures as well as in L-lactate-limited chemostats. The maximal specific growth rates on L-lactate were determined in washout experiments and amounted to 0.16, 0.30, and 0.06 h(-1) forDesulfovibrio baculatus H.L21,Veillonella alcalescens NS.L49, andAcetobacterium NS.L40, respectively. Competition for L-lactate was studied in energy-limited chemostats at a dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1).D. baculatus H.L21 turned out to be the best competitor at low L-lactate concentrations provided that sufficient sulfate and iron were present.V. alcalescens NS.L49 was favored by the absence of sulfate and iron. Coexistence ofD. baculatus H.L21 andV. alcalescens NS.L49 was observed in a L-lactate-limited chemostat with additional sulfate and citrate. Syntrophic growth ofV. alcalescens NS.L49 andAcetobacterium NS.L40 occurred in a L-lactate-limited chemostat in the absence of sulfate. No coexistence betweenD. baculatus H.L21 andAcetobacterium NS.L40 was observed in a L-lactate-limited chemostat without sulfate. Addition of calcium-saturated illite to an energy-limited mixed culture ofV. alcalescens NS.L49 andAcetobacterium NS.L40 induced iron limitation and subsequent washout of theAcetobacterium species. Finally, the ecological niches of the 3 species in relation to the consumption of lactate were discussed.

  2. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-19

    Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included

  3. Twins with neonatal pemphigus vulgaris born to a mother with pemphigus vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsukaichi, Mina; Takakuwa, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Serikawa, Takehiro; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kojima, Kinuko; Sakakibara, Seiichi; Usuda, Tohei; Matsunaga, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Dichorionic diamniotic twins were born at 37 weeks of gestation by cesarean section to a 34-year-old primigravid Japanese woman because the first twin was in breech presentation. The mother had been diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris prior to her pregnancy. In addition to a high antidesmoglein 3 autoantibody titer, flaccid bullae and erosions on both of the twins' lips and in their oral cavities at 13 days of age led to the diagnosis of neonatal pemphigus vulgaris. This case highlights the need for awareness that pemphigus vulgaris may not occur immediately after birth. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A case of giant lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Mohammad; Amin, Syed Suhail; Saeed, Noora; Mohtashim, Mohd; Priya, Annu; Alam, Mahtab

    2018-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris, the commonest form of tuberculosis of the skin, presents with a plaque that enlarges slowly with advancing edges while showing atrophy at other areas. It may be acquired by the blood stream, via lymph, by contiguous spread or from external inoculation. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris with a large erythematous-scaly plaque of 44 × 26 cm over the back and a similar 7 × 5 cm plaque over the right thigh. The plaque over the back was gradually progressive for the previous ten years and showed scarring and atrophy at places. Histopathology of the area showed caseating granulomas with Langhans giant cells, epitheloid cells and lymphocytes. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made. This case is being presented owing to the large size of the lesion.

  5. [Pemphigus chronicus vulgaris--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoljar, Sanja; Cavka, Mira; Tvorić, Anamarija

    2012-10-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare, chronic, autoimmune blistering skin disease of adulthood. In 50 percent of patients, mucous membrane erosions of the oral cavity are the presenting sign. Typically, patients develop flaccid blisters and erosions on the normal appearing skin and mucous membranes. Mucous membranes in other areas may also be involved. The disease is caused by IgG autoantibodies to the desmosomes inducing the loss of cell adhesion between keratinocytes, and subsequent intraepidermal blister formation. Antigens are desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) transmembrane glycoproteins. Desmoglein 3 is expressed in the lower portion of the epidermis. Alone, it is sufficient to keep mucosal surfaces intact. Desmoglein 1 is expressed more intensely in the superficial layers. Pemphigus vulgaris can be divided into two subgroups, the mucosal type and mucocutaneous type. The characteristic histologic finding is intraepidermal blister. Acantholytic keratinocytes as well as clusters of epidermal cells are seen in the blister cavity. Direct immunofluorescence examination (DIF) of perilesional skin shows a deposit of IgG, rarely IgA, and complement components (C3, C1q,C4) between the epidermal cells. The titers of circulating antibodies measured with indirect immunofluorescence examination (IIF) often correlate with the disease course. There are sporadic cases of pemphigus vulgaris associated with the use of drugs, in particular D-penicillamine and captopril. Pemphigus vulgaris has rarely evolved into pemphigus foliaceus, and vice versa. Very uncommon, pemphigus vulgaris or pemphigus foliaceus has been associated with bullous pemphigoid in the same patient. We present an unusual case of pemphigus vulgaris in an adult female patient.

  6. Desulfovibrio oceani subsp. oceani sp. nov., subsp. nov and Desulfovibrio oceani subsp. galateae subsp. nov., novel sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from the oxygen minimum zone off the coast of Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup

    2010-01-01

    at 20°C at pH 7.0-8.0 and at 2.5-3.5% NaCl (w/v). The strains grew by utilizing hydrogen/acetate, C3-4 fatty acids, amino acids and glycerol as electron acceptors for sulfate reduction. Fumarate, lactate and pyruvate supported fermentative growth. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and taurin supported......%) for strain I.9.1T. The G+C contents of their genomic DNA were 45-46 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and dsrAB gene sequences showed that both strains belong to the genus Desulfovibrio. Desulfovibrio acrylicus DSM 10141T and Desulfovibrio marinisediminis JCM 14577T represented their closest validly.......1T represent a novel species for which the name Desulfovibrio oceani sp. nov. is proposed with the two subspecies D. oceani subsp. oceani (type strain, I.8.1T = DSM 21390T = JCM 15970T) and D. oceani subsp. galateae (type strain, I.9.1T = DSM 21391T = JCM 15971T)....

  7. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  8. Chlorotic mottle of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayasinghe, W.U.

    1982-01-01

    For the past years there have been outbreaks of a disease of bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia called bean chlorotic mottle. The etiology of bean chlorotic mottle was not known, but the disease was generally believed to be incited by the same whitefly-transmitted virus

  9. Fulminante, rituximab-resistente, mucocutane pemphigus vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gostyński, A.; Ammatuna, E.; Huls, G.; Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Jonkman, M. F.; Horváth, B.

    2017-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disease mediated by auto-antibodies against desmoglein 1 and 3. First line treatment for pemphigus consists of systemic corticosteroids and anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) to eliminate B-cells. Since 2005, more than 100 patients with pemphigus have been treated with

  10. A new sesquiterpene from Artemisia vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragasa, Consolacion Y; de Jesus, Jenny P; Apuada, Mary Jane; Rideout, John A

    2008-10-01

    The dichloromethane extract of the air-dried leaves of Artemisia vulgaris afforded a new sesquiterpene 1, caryophyllene oxide, phytyl fatty acid esters, squalene, stigmasterol and sitosterol. The structure of 1 was elucidated by extensive one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  11. Major dicaffeoylquinic acids from Artemisia vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnat, A; Heitz, A; Fraisse, D; Carnat, A P; Lamaison, J L

    2000-09-01

    The two major caffeoylquinic acids, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, were new-isolated from the flowering tops of Artemisia vulgaris (yield 2.0% and 0.3% on dry weight, respectively) and characterized by spectroscopic analysis.

  12. Lupus Vulgaris At A Rare Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaduri Gautam

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of lupus vulgaris at a rare site-eyelid is reported here. Delayed diagnosis of the condition affecting the left eyelid in a female patient aged 78 years, led to scarring and fixity of eyelids with resultant exposure keratitis and dimness of vision. Antitubercular therapy improved skin condition but dimness f vision persisted.

  13. Fixed Cutaneous Sporotrichosis Masquerading As Lupus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar B C

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is reported to be rare in India. Fixed cutaneous variety is the most pleomorphic type of sporotrichosis and it may mimick several other dermatoses resulting in difficulty in making a correct diagnosis. Here we are reporting a case of fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis which resembled lupus vulgaris both clinically and histopathologically.

  14. Rhino-oro-ophthalmo-cutaneous Lupus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Mishra

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual modes of presentation of lupus vulgaris are being reported.. In one case the lesion started in the nasal mucosa and spread to the nose, upper lip, gums, palate and naso-lacrimal ducts. In the second case the primary nasal lesion led to perforation of the cartilaginous nasal septum.

  15. Lupus Vulgaris Mimicking Hansen′s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Puneet

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40 year old female presented with erythematous infiltrating plaque on the face involving both the ears with destruction of nasal cartilage and satellite lesions on the right shoulder. Clinical diagnosis of Hansen’s disease was later proved to be a case of Lupus vulgaris.

  16. Psoriasiform Lupus Vulgaris : An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi Sanjay K

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55 year old woman presented with gradually progressive erythematous scaly plaques, simulating psoriasis, on extremities and face last 20 years. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of lupus vulgaris which is known for its notorious presentations. The case is being reported for its unusual presentation which can cause diagnostic and therapeutic problems.

  17. Guidelines for the Management of Acne Vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Acne vulgaris is the most common skin ailment in humans. It is a chronic disease with potentially severe impact on the quality of life of young people. Most cases are of mild severity ... general medical practitioners. Several guideline documents for management thereof exist and there is an overwhelmingly large,.

  18. streptococcus pneumoniae , klebsiella pneumoniae proteus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. This investigation was conducted to determine the in-vitro effect of aqueous, ethanol and methanol crude extracts of Euphorbia hirta at concentrations ranging from 10mg/ml – 100mg/ml against three pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris) using cup plate ...

  19. Chemotaxonomy of iridoids in Linaria vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiso, Marcella; Tassone, Grazia; Nicoletti, Marcello; Serafini, Mauro; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2007-11-01

    The phytochemical analysis of the extracts of Linaria vulgaris, has allowed to underline an iridoidic pattern similar to that of the other Linaria plants, with the presence of antirrinoside, antirride, 6-beta-idrossiantirride, 10-beta-glucosilaucubina and a new iridoidic compound, whose structure was demonstrated to be that of 4-carboxy-boonein.

  20. Pemphigus vulgaris and laser therapy: crucial role of dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlić, Verica; Aleksić, Vesna Vujić; Zubović, Nina; Veselinović, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a relatively rare, chronic, autoimmune vesiculobullous disorder characterized by formation of intraepithelial vesiculae and/or bullae in the skin and mucous membrane. Systemic steroids are considered to be the standard first-line therapy for pemphigus vulgaris. However, for patients unresponsive to standard therapy, the new treatment modalities are being sought. Low-level laser therapy has been accepted as an alternative or adjunctive treatment modality for many conditions in medicine and dentistry. Therefore, this study was aimed at presenting the effects of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris and to emphasize the crucial role of dentists in early recognition and diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. The articles published until May 2013 were obtained from the Medline/PubMed online database, using following search terms and key words: "laser therapy" and "pemphigus vulgaris", "low-level laser irradiation" and "pemphigus vulgaris", "lasers" and "pemphigus vulgaris" and "pemphigus vulgaris". Low-level laser therapy could result in immediate and significant analgesia and improved wound healing within the observation period and follow-up. Furthermore, a decrease in patients' discomfort as well as the absence of recurrence of the pemphigus vulgaris lesions has been claimed. Even though available literature suggests that low-level laser therapy can be efficiently used in treatment of oral pemphigus vulgaris, either independently or as a part of combined therapy approach, these results should be interpreted with caution since there are no solid evidence-based proofs to provide the guidelines for the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris with low-level laser therapy. Therefore, further long-term randomized controlled clinical studies are necessary in order to give any solid recommendations on the use of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris.

  1. Effects of molybdate and tungstate on expression levels and biochemical characteristics of formate dehydrogenases produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cristiano S; Valette, Odile; González, Pablo J; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel; Dolla, Alain; Rivas, Maria G

    2011-06-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are enzymes that catalyze the formate oxidation to carbon dioxide and that contain either Mo or W in a mononuclear form in the active site. In the present work, the influence of Mo and W salts on the production of FDH by Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 was studied. Two different FDHs, one containing W (W-FDH) and a second incorporating either Mo or W (Mo/W-FDH), were purified. Both enzymes were isolated from cells grown in a medium supplemented with 1 μM molybdate, whereas only the W-FDH was purified from cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10 μM tungstate. We demonstrated that the genes encoding the Mo/W-FDH are strongly downregulated by W and slightly upregulated by Mo. Metal effects on the expression level of the genes encoding the W-FDH were less significant. Furthermore, the expression levels of the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdate and tungstate transport are downregulated under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. The molecular and biochemical properties of these enzymes and the selective incorporation of either Mo or W are discussed.

  2. Contrasting Effects of Dissolved Organic Matter on Mercury Methylation by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linduo; Chen, Hongmei; Lu, Xia; Lin, Hui; Christensen, Geoff A; Pierce, Eric M; Gu, Baohua

    2017-09-19

    Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects mercury (Hg) redox reactions and anaerobic microbial methylation in the environment. Several studies have shown that DOM can enhance Hg methylation, especially under sulfidic conditions, whereas others show that DOM inhibits Hg methylation due to strong Hg-DOM complexation. In this study, we investigated and compared the effects of DOM on Hg methylation by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and a sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 under nonsulfidic conditions. The methylation experiment was performed with washed cells either in the absence or presence of DOM or glutathione, both of which form strong complexes with Hg via thiol-functional groups. DOM was found to greatly inhibit Hg methylation by G. Sulfurreducens PCA but enhance Hg methylation by D. desulfuricans ND132 cells with increasing DOM concentration. These strain-dependent opposing effects of DOM were also observed with glutathione, suggesting that thiols in DOM likely played an essential role in affecting microbial Hg uptake and methylation. Additionally, DOM and glutathione greatly decreased Hg sorption by G. sulfurreducens PCA but showed little effect on D. desulfuricans ND132 cells, demonstrating that ND132 has a higher affinity to sorb or take up Hg than the PCA strain. These observations indicate that DOM effects on Hg methylation are bacterial strain specific, depend on the DOM:Hg ratio or site-specific conditions, and may thus offer new insights into the role of DOM in methylmercury production in the environment.

  3. [Research progress on molecular ecology of Sciurus vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Tian, Xin-min; Chen, Huan; Guo, Hui-yan; Jin, Jian-li; Zhang, Xiao-jun

    2015-03-01

    Today, the main threats for Sciurus vulgaris are illegal hunting, deforestation, and subsequent population fragmentation, combined with interspecific competition from S. carolinensis in some regions of Europe, which has led to a sharp reduction in the number of population. S. vulgaris has been listed as Near Threatened IUCN Red List and included in key protected wild animals in Jilin Province, China. The molecular ecology of S. vulgaris is developing rapidly with the rapid development of molecular biology methods. In particular, the research of mtDNA fragments and the application squirrel study microsatellite loci has further promoted the molecular ecology of S. vulgaris. In this study, the molecular phylogeny, the genetic diversity and the molecular phylogeography involving the molecular ecology of S. vulgaris were reviewed. Four areas for the future development in molecular ecology of S. vulgaris were proposed: 1) to further explore the molecular phylogeny relationship between S. vulgaris and S. lis; 2) the comparative analysis of the genetic diversity of S. vulgaris for continuous populations, isolated populations and metapopulation; 3) the analysis of molecular phylogeography of S. vulgaris based on other markers of nuclear; 4) to explore whether there existed the quaternary glacial refuge in Asia.

  4. Mycophenolate mofetil as adjuvant in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Nilendu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a life threatening autoimmune blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes. Advent of systemic steroids has greatly reduced the mortality rate. However, steroids and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy are nowadays frequent contributory agents of morbidity and mortality of PV. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has been reported to be an effective adjuvant to systemic steroids. It helps in increasing the immunosuppressive effect and minimizing the toxicities by steroid sparing effect. However, its efficacy in refractory cases of PV is not well documented. The lowest possible dose with satisfactory therapeutic efficacy and least side effects is known. We used MMF 1 g/day and systemic steroids in 3 Indian patients with pemphigus vulgaris who were resistant to systemic steroid monotherapy or combination treatment with azathioprine. In our experience, MMF offers an effective adjuvant with minimal side-effects in the treatment of resistant PV.

  5. Management of pemphigus vulgaris: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Efthymiou, Ourania; Stefanaki, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    The main objective in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris is to control the disease, prevent relapses, and avoid adverse events associated with the prolonged use of steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Systemic corticosteroids remain the gold standard treatment for pemphigus vulgaris. Azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil are the first line of steroid-sparing treatment. Rituximab is extremely effective in recalcitrant pemphigus, when other treatments fail to control the disease. The European Dermatology Forum recommends tapering prednisolone by 25% every 2 weeks after the consolidation phase, and a 5 mg reduction every 4 weeks when the dose is reduced to <20 mg. If the patient relapses, options include increasing steroids back to the previous dose, adding an immunosuppressant if using steroid monotherapy, or replacing a first-line immunosuppressant by another if already on combination therapy. PMID:26543381

  6. Pemphigus vulgaris: a rare cause of dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Ali; Greenfield, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. The case reported presented unusually with dyspepsia that was not responsive to protein pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. This progressed to severe dysphagia and odynophagia. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed extensive ulceration of the esophagus, and direct immunofluorescence of an esophageal biopsy showed bright intercellular staining with C3 and IgG, confirming the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. Immunological remission was achieved after a number of courses of pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. The patient has remained in remission for 5 years, but has required regular dilation of esophageal strictures for symptom relief. During this period, a chronic lymphocytosis was incidentally noted on routine blood tests, and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia was diagnosed. It is essential to investigate PPI-resistant symptoms, dysphagia and odynophagia, as they may indicate a serious underlying cause. PMID:26494724

  7. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchidanand, S; Sharavana, S; Mallikarjun, M; Nataraja, H V

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan's type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  8. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sacchidanand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan′s type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  9. [Diet in pathogenesis of acne vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdarska, Katarzyna; Osucha, Karolina; Savitskyi, Stepan; Malejczyk, Jacek; Galus, Ryszard

    2017-10-23

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common dermatologic condition especially among adolescents. Acne is related to excess sebum production by sebaceous glands, inflammation both within and adjacent to the comedones, hyperproliferation of Propionibacterium acnes. Some of investigations show association between acne and diet. Milk increases the level of IGF-1 leading to the synthesis of androgen-mediated increases sebum production. Chocolate predispose to hyperglycemia and insulinemia which aggravate of acne vulgaris. High levels of omega-6 fatty acids have been associated with increase of acne in contrast to omega-3 fatty acids, which decrease inflammation. Food have huge impact on development and severity of acne and may exert beneficial effect in the treatment of this disorder.

  10. Chloroplast Microsatellite Diversity in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiderio, F.; Bitocchi, E.; Bellucci, E.; Rau, D.; Rodriguez, M.; Attene, G.; Papa, R.; Nanni, L.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary studies that are aimed at defining the processes behind the present level and organization of crop genetic diversity represent the fundamental bases for biodiversity conservation and use. A Mesoamerican origin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris was recently suggested through analysis of nucleotide polymorphism at the nuclear level. Here, we have used chloroplast microsatellites to investigate the origin of the common bean, on the basis of the specific characteristics of these markers (no recombination, haploid genome, uniparental inheritance), to validate these recent findings. Indeed, comparisons of the results obtained through analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA should allow the resolution of some of the contrasting information available on the evolutionary processes. The main outcomes of the present study are: (i) confirmation at the chloroplast level of the results obtained through nuclear data, further supporting the Mesoamerican origin of P. vulgaris, with central Mexico representing the cradle of its diversity; (ii) identification of a putative ancestral plastidial genome, which is characteristic of a group of accessions distributed from central Mexico to Peru, but which have not been highlighted beforehand through analyses at the nuclear level. Finally, the present study suggests that when a single species is analyzed, there is the need to take into account the complexity of the relationships between P. vulgaris and its closely related and partially intercrossable species P. coccineus and P. dumosus. Thus, the present study stresses the importance for the investigation of the speciation processes of these taxa through comparisons of both plastidial and nuclear variability. This knowledge will be fundamental not only from an evolutionary point of view, but also to put P. coccineus and P. dumosus germplasm to better use as a source of useful diversity for P. vulgaris breeding. PMID:23346091

  11. The Psychosocial Impact of Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Neirita; Archana, M

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaire. Females (56%), 15-20 year olds (61%), facial lesions (60%), and Grade II acne (70%) were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6-10) interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05) found were as follows: Physical symptoms with grade of acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment.

  12. The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neirita Hazarika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI questionnaire. Results: Females (56%, 15–20 year olds (61%, facial lesions (60%, and Grade II acne (70% were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10 interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05 found were as follows: Physical symptoms with grade of acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment.

  13. The Psychosocial Impact of Acne Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Neirita; Archana, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Females (56%), 15–20 year olds (61%), facial lesions (60%), and Grade II acne (70%) were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10) interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:27688440

  14. Pemfigus Vulgaris Manifestasi di Mulut dan Penatalaksanaannya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metawati Tarmidi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pemfigus is an autoimmune disease involving the skin and mucosa and characterized by intraepidermal bullae formation. The four variations of pemphigus are pemphigus vulgaris, vegetans, foliaceus, and erythematosus. Although several clinical variants are recognized, pemphigus vulgaris is the most common form and the type most likely to exhibit oral manifestations. There are from 0,1 to 0,5 cases reported each year per 100,000 population with the highest incidence occurring in the fourth and seventh decades of life. Only rare cases have been reported in children and the elderly. Before the advent of systemic corticosteroid therapy, pemphigus vulgaris was fatal within few months to two years. A characteristic feature is the nikolsky sign which is the ability to elicit the formation of bullae by the application of firm lateral pressure on normal-appearing skin. The oral lesions often have a slow, insidious onset with symptoms present for many months before a diagnosis is made or skin lesions develop. Lesions may be found anywhere but are most common on the palate, buccal mucosa, and gingiva. Although the oral lesions are vesicobullous in nature, intact blisters are rarely seen. Diagnosis is established by biopsy and immunofluorescent studies. Titers on indirect immunofluorescence often correlate to the severity of the disease. The aim of this study is to promote and support early dental diagnosis when the prognosis is good.

  15. [Pemphigus vulgaris: an unusual clinical presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhiba, H; Hamada, S; Guerouaz, N; Saidi, A; Senouci, K; Hassam, B

    2013-02-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a bullous auto-immune disease affecting the skin and mucosa. It is characterised by acantholysis that results in the formation of intraepithelial bullous lesions. Herein we report a case distinguished by its unusual clinical presentation. A 45-year-old man, a chronic smoker, consulted for hyperkeratotic lesions of the toes on the right foot present for 5 months. Examination revealed a violet colour of the toes associated with localised yellowish keratoderma on the sole of the foot and impaired toe nails, as well as impairment on the nails of the first, third and fourth fingers on the right hand. In addition, two hyperkeratotic plaques with crusts were noted on the patient's forehead. Histological examination of a biopsy sample taken from the nail bed of the fourth toe on the right foot showed suprabasal acantholysis with a characteristic tombstone appearance. Direct immunofluorescence confirmed the diagnosis of pemphigus. Oral corticosteroid therapy was initiated consisting of prednisone 1.5mg/kg per day. Improvement of the nail lesions and subsidence of the lesions on the patient's forehead occurred after three months of treatment. During the course of pemphigus, the nail findings most commonly reported in the literature are paronychia, onychomadesis and onycholysis. However, these signs are generally seen in patients with known pemphigus vulgaris and only rarely indicate bullous disease. The case we report illustrates a special situation in which pemphigus vulgaris was revealed by unusual skin and nail lesions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] gb|AAS96558.1| Snf2 family pr...otein ... [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] ... Length =...YLNFLREYGFGGILADEMGLGKTVQTLSFVQHMVESGKIG 60 ... Query: 703 ... ELQNHTFNCIILDEAQNIKNPNTITARSVRRIKADMRLCLSGTPIENNLFE...LWSLFEFLM 762 ... ELQNHTFNCIILDEAQNIKNPNTITARSVRRIKADMRLCLSGTPIENNLFELWSL...FEFLM Sbjct: 121 ... ELQNHTFNCIILDEAQNIKNPNTITARSVRRIKADMRLCLSGTPIENNLFELWSLFEFLM 180 ... Query: 823 ... LAEEQAELYTAL

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available me family protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS97536.1| AMP-...binding ... enzyme family protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborou...gh] ... Length = 533 ... Query: 7 ... REMTLGRILDETAAKFPDNDAVVYVDRDYRQTYREFVSVVD...DLARGLMALGVKRGDKVAL 66 ... REMTLGRILDETAAKFPDNDAVVYVDRDYRQTYREFVSVVDDLARGLMALGVKRGDKVAL Sbjct: 1 ... REMTLGRILDE

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GTPase TrmE [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS95559.1| tRNA ... ... ... modification GTPase TrmE [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. ... vulgaris str. Hildenborough] ... ...SRDLVAQADLVL 300 ... Query: 365 ESLVTAIRAAVXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXNMRQAAALDKAATILDELAGDIRAHVPYDLCGV 424 ... ESL...VTAIRAAV ... NMRQAAALDKAATILDELAGDIRAHVPYDLCGV Sbjct: 361 ESLVTAIRAAVLAATGAGEPEAGELAPNMRQAAALDKAATILDELAGDIRAHVPYDLCGV 420 ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nthase, beta/alpha subunits [Desulfovibrio vulgaris ... subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] gb|AAS966...10.1| ... succinyl-CoA synthase, beta/alpha subunits ... [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hilde...GIGQSLCAGVGGDPYI 180 ... Query: 664 RLGHAGAILDEADGGIAGKVRALCDAGIAVCPDLGSLPAAVRQALG 709 ... RLGHAGAILDEAD...GGIAGKVRALCDAGIAVCPDLGSLPAAVRQALG Sbjct: 241 RLGHAGAILDEADGGIAGKVRALCDAGIAVCPDLGSLPAAVRQALG 286

  20. Antioxidant effect of Citrullus vulgaris (watermelon) extract against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Antioxidant effect of Citrullus Vulgaris (Watermelon) extract was evaluated against lipid oxidation in freshly caught fishes during cooking. GC-MS analysis of Hexane and total phenolic extract of Citrullus Vulgaris flesh reveals that the extracts contain 55 compounds which includes 5- hydroxymethyl furfural, ...

  1. allelopathic effects of eucalyptus tereticornis on phaseolus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The water extracts of leaves (green, brown and decayed stages) and bark of Eucalyptus tereticornis were tested for seed germination and primary root and shoot development of. Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings. There was no significant difference in the germination percentage of Phaseolus vulgaris due to the treatments of ...

  2. Multiple lesions of lupus vulgaris with unusual morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Rao D

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of multiple lesions of lupus vulgaris in a 40 year old man. The patient came with asymptomatic plaques of varying sizes all over the body. Histopathology revealed features of lupus vulgaris. Radiological examination of chest revealed pulmonary tuberculosis. Mantoux test was negative.

  3. EPR characterization of the molybdenum(V) forms of formate dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 upon formate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, María G; González, Pablo J; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2007-11-01

    The EPR characterization of the molybdenum(V) forms obtained on formate reduction of both as-prepared and inhibited formate dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of formate to CO(2), is reported. The Mo(V) EPR signal of the as-prepared formate-reduced enzyme is rhombic (g(max)=2.012, g(mid)=1.996, g(min)=1.985) and shows hyperfine coupling with two nuclear species with I=1/2. One of them gives an anisotropic splitting and is not solvent exchangeable (A(max)=11.7, A(mid)=A(min)=non-detectable, A-values in cm(-1)x10(-4)). The second species is exchangeable with solvent and produces a splitting at the three principal g-values (A(max)=7.7, A(mid)=10.0, A(min)=9.3). The hyperfine couplings of the non-solvent and solvent exchangeable nuclei are assigned to the hydrogen atoms of the beta-methylene carbon of a selenocysteine and to a Mo ligand whose nature, sulfydryl or hydroxyl, is still in debate. The Mo(V) species obtained in the presence of inhibitors (azide or cyanide) yields a nearly axial EPR signal showing only one detectable splitting given by nuclear species with I=1/2 (g(max)=2.092, g(mid)=2.000, g(min)=1.989, A(max)=non-detectable, A(mid)=A(min)=7.0), which is originated from the alpha-proton donated by the formate to a proximal ligand of the molybdenum. The possible structures of both paramagnetic molybdenum species (observed upon formate reduction in presence and absence of inhibitors) are discussed in comparison with the available structural information of this enzyme and the structural and EPR properties of the closely related formate dehydrogenase-H from Escherichia coli.

  4. Impact of different environmental conditions on the aggregation of biogenic U(IV) nanoparticles synthesized by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Şengör, S. Sevinç; Singh, Gursharan; Dohnalkova, Alice; Spycher, Nicolas; Ginn, Timothy R.; Peyton, Brent M.; Sani, Rajesh K.

    2016-09-13

    This study investigates the impact of specific environmental conditions on the formation of colloidal U(IV) nanoparticles by the sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB, Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20). The reduction of soluble U(VI) to less soluble U(IV) was quantitatively investigated under growth and non-growth conditions in bicarbonate or 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid (PIPES) buffered environments. The results showed that under non-growth conditions, the majority of the reduced U nanoparticles aggregated and precipitated out of solution. High resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that only a very small fraction of cells had reduced U precipitates in the periplasmic spaces in the presence of PIPES buffer, whereas in the presence of bicarbonate buffer, reduced U was also observed in the cytoplasm with greater aggregation of biogenic U(IV) particles at higher initial U(VI) concentrations. The same experiments were repeated under growth conditions using two different electron donors (lactate and pyruvate) and three electron acceptors (sulfate, fumarate, and thiosulfate). In contrast to the results of the non-growth experiments, even after 0.2 m filtration, the majority of biogenic U(IV) remained in the aqueous phase resulting in potentially mobile biogenic U(IV) nanoparticles. Size fractionation results showed that U(IV) aggregates were between 18 and 200 nm in diameter, and thus could be very mobile. The findings of this study are helpful to assess the size and potential mobility of reduced U nanoparticles under different environmental conditions, and would provide insights on their potential impact affecting U(VI) bioremediation efforts at subsurface contaminated sites.

  5. Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) on DHP copper by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Bacillus megaterium strains in media simulating heater waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumelzu, E.; Cabezas, C.; Schoebitz, R.; Ugarte, R.; Rodriguez, E.D.; Rios, J.

    2003-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of microbial populations in water heating systems of steam generators make it necessary to study the magnitude of the metabolic activity of bacteria and biofilm development that may lead to degradation of metal components through microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Electrolytes simulating the conditions found in heater water networks were used to induce biofilm formation on DHP copper coupons by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSMZ and Bacillus megaterium C10, a commercial strain and an isolate from these waters, respectively. In order to enhance their action, industrial waters enriched with the minimum nutrient content such as sodium lactate and sodium sulphite for the DSMZ strain and glucose, proteose peptone and starch for the C10 strain were employed. Biofilm formation was studied under controlled temperature, time, shaking, pH and concentrations of the media used in this study. Then, the samples were electrochemically tested in an artificial solution of sea water as control medium, based on the hypothesis that the action of an aggressive biofilm/electrolyte medium generates damaged and non-damaged areas on the metal surface, and assuming that the sea water trial can detect the latter. Hence, a higher anodic current was associated with a lower degradation of the metal surface by the action of one of the media under study. All these trials were performed along with bacterial count, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Furthermore, it was possible to identify under which conditions MIC on DHP copper occurred and complex mechanisms from retention of cations to diffusion processes at the biofilm/tested media interface level were proposed. Surface corrosion by MIC took place on DHP copper; therefore, greater control on the treatment of industrial waters is highly desirable. (author)

  6. Energy-Based Devices in Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Marc Z; Bloom, Bradley S; Goldberg, David J

    2016-05-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic dermatologic complaint with a multifactorial cause. Traditionally, antibiotics and retinoids have been used to manage the condition; patient compliance has been an ongoing issue. A variety of energy-based devices have been reported to be effective in the treatment of acne vulgaris. To review and summarize the current literature specific to treatment of acne vulgaris with energy-based devices. A review of the current literature of energy-based devices used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Although limited randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acne have been performed, significant clinical improvement of acne vulgaris, especially of inflammatory lesions, has been demonstrated with a variety of energy-based devices. Newer approaches may lead to even better results.

  7. Clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea: A comparison study with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Maosong; Xie, Hongfu; Cheng, Lin; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea by comparing with acne vulgaris. Four hundred and sixty-three papulopustular rosacea patients and four hundred and twelve acne vulgaris patients were selected for the study in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from March 2015 to May 2016. They were analyzed for major facial lesions, self-conscious symptoms and epidermal barrier function. Erythema, burning, dryness and itching presented in papulopustular rosacea patients were significantly higher than that in acne vulgaris patients ( P acne vulgaris patients ( P acne vulgaris patients ( P acne vulgaris patients in comparison with that of healthy subjects ( P >0.05, P acne vulgaris patients and healthy subjects ( P acne vulgaris patients than that of healthy subjects ( P acne vulgaris. The epidermal barrier function was damaged in papulopustular rosacea patients while not impaired in that of acne vulgaris patients.

  8. Clinico- Pathological Study Of Ichthyosis Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandy Utpal

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinico- pathological study of 28 cases of ichthyosis vulgaris appeared with in the age of 5 years. The presence of the disease since birth was also found. While most (24 patients showed a diminution of severity in summer with an aggravation during winter, 4 patients followed the opposite seasonal pattern. Only in 4 patients, fine scales in the scalp were detected. One patient showed an affection of flexures. There was also a low occurrence of palmo- planter hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, fissuring of hands and feet and atopy.

  9. Nootropic effect of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the extracts of the aboveground parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench on the behavior and memory of mice after hypoxic injury and their physical performance in the open-field test were studied using the models of hypoxia in a sealed volume, conditioned passive avoidance response (CPAR), and forced swimming with a load. The extracts improved animal resistance to hypoxia, normalized orientation and exploration activities, promoted CPAR retention after hypoxic injury, and increased physical performance. Aqueous extract of meadowsweet had the most pronounced effect that corresponded to the effect of the reference drug piracetam. These effects were probably caused by modulation of hippocampal activity.

  10. Annular Lupus Vulgaris Mimicking Tinea Cruris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young Soo; Shin, Won Woong; Kim, Yong Ju; Song, Hae Jun

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It is often clinically and histopathologically confused with various cutaneous disorders. A 36-year-old man attended our clinic with slowly progressive, asymptomatic, annular skin lesions on both the thighs and buttocks for 10 years. He consulted with many physicians and was improperly treated with an oral antifungal agent for several months under the diagnosis of tinea cruris, but no resolution of his condition was observed. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on the histopathologic examination and the polymerase chain reaction assay. Anti-tuberculosis therapy was administered and the lesions started to regress. PMID:20548922

  11. Lupus vulgaris in a young girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Bakshi, S K

    2013-01-01

    With the estimated global burden of TB being 8.8 million incident cases and 1.1 million deaths from TB in HIV-negative cases and additional 0.35 million deaths in HIV-associated cases,1 the total number of cutaneous TB cases ( lupus vulgaris in a young girl with rapid progression of a large plaque with hypertrophic features in the periphery. The case is unusual due to its rapid progression, unusual site and extensive giant form which have never been reported previously.

  12. Disseminated lupus vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Burce; Zindanci, Ilkin; Turkoglu, Zafer; Kavala, Mukaddes; Ulucay, Vasfiye; Demir, Filiz Topaloglu

    2014-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a secondary form of cutaneous tuberculosis which persists for years if not treated. The head and neck are the most commonly affected sites. While less frequently arms and legs, and rarely the trunk and the scalp are involved. Herein, we describe a 73-year-old man with a 5-year history of slowly growing, atrophic, some eroded and ulcerated, red-brown plaques on his forehead, nose, cheeks, ear lobes, trunk and extremites. All of his disseminated lesions healed after antituberculosis therapy.

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imerase/dehydratase family protein [Desulfovibrio ... vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] ... ...s subsp. vulgaris ... str. Hildenborough] ... Length = 282 ... Query: ...1 ... MKITLFGGAGFLGSHVCDKLSEAGHDVTVVDLRPSPYLRPDQTMITGNILDEELVARAVE 60 ... MKITLFGGAGFLGSHVCDKLSEAGHDVTVVDLRPSPYLRPDQTMITGNILDE...ELVARAVE Sbjct: 1 ... MKITLFGGAGFLGSHVCDKLSEAGHDVTVVDLRPSPYLRPDQTMITGNILDEELVARAVE 60 ...

  14. [Microstructural changes in hardened beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujica, Maria Virginia; Granito, Marisela; Soto, Naudy

    2015-06-01

    (Phaseolus vulgaris). The hardening of Phaseolus vulgaris beans stored at high temperature and high relative humidity is one of the main constraints for consumption. The objective of this research was to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy, structural changes in cotyledons and testa of the hardened beans. The freshly harvested grains were stored for twelve months under two conditions: 5 ° C-34% RH and 37 ° C-75% RH, in order to promote hardening. The stored raw and cooked grains were lyophilized and fractured. The sections of testa and cotyledons were observed in an electron microscope JSM-6390. After twelve months, grains stored at 37 ° C-75% RH increased their hardness by 503%, whereas there were no significant changes in grains stored at 5 ° C-34% RH. At the microstructural level, the cotyledons of the raw grains show clear differences in appearance of the cell wall, into the intercellular space size and texture matrix protein. There were also differences in compaction of palisade and sub-epidermal layer in the testa of raw grains. After cooking, cotyledon cells of the soft grains were well separated while these ofhard grains were seldom separated. In conclusion, the found differences in hard and soft grains showed a significant participation of both structures, cotyledons and testa, in the grains hardening.

  15. Lupus vulgaris: unusual presentation on face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilani, A; Vora, R V

    2014-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a variant of cutaneous tuberculosis. As the disease has potential to mutilate when left untreated, leaving deforming scars and disfigurement, an early diagnosis is of paramount importance. Though the common type is plaque type, rarely mutilating and vegetative forms also are found. A 28 year old female, labourer presented with progressive annular plaque over right side of cheek extending upto right lower lid and ala of nose. There were two satellite plaques near the right side of giant lesion. On diascopy apple jelly nodule was seen. There was no regional lymhadenopathy. Histopathological examination showed many granulomas in upper dermis extending to deep dermis comprising of epitheloid cells with langhans' type of giant cells, lymphocytic infiltration & focal necrosis suggestive of lupus vulgaris. The consequences of failing to make an early diagnosis can be disastrous for the patients, as the progression of the disease can lead to necrosis, destruction of bones and cartilage leading to permanent deformity. Thus it is vital for clinicians to have a high index of suspicion of such atypical forms and take biopsy samples for histological and bacteriological studies.

  16. Vascular cognitive impairment in Pemphigus vulgaris: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ibiapina Siqueira- Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pemphigus vulgaris is a systemic auto-immune medical condition that mainly manifests with changes in skin and vasculopathy. This is a case report of a 69-year-old male with confirmed histopathologic diagnosis of Pemphigus vulgaris presenting ulterior Cognitive Impairment, mostly in executive function. The patient was treated using steroids, immunomodulatory therapy, fluoxetine and galantamine. Neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance (MRI were performed. This is the first report of correlational cognitive impairment with Pemphigus vulgaris in the literature. Physicians should be aware of vascular causes for cognitive impairment in patients presenting auto-immune conditions.

  17. Changes in hemostasis in foals naturally infected with Strongylus vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Krarup Nielsen, Martin; Jacobsen, Stine

    2017-01-01

    Strongylus vulgaris has been found endemic in equine populations subject to parasite control by targeted selective anthelmintic therapy. This study investigated hemostasis in foals naturally infected with S. vulgaris and monitored this response over the course of progressing infection stages...... enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay values in all foals using a linear mixed effects model with repeated measures and to total numbers of S. vulgaris larvae in nine foals at necropsy with Pearson linear correlation. In the first week of life, all evaluated indices of hemostasis were significantly different...

  18. Primula latifolia Lapeyr. and Primula vulgaris Hudson flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Paola S; Flamini, Guido; Fico, Gelsomina

    2014-01-01

    Three flavonoids were isolated from the leaf MeOH extracts of Primula latifolia Lapeyr. and Primula vulgaris Hudson collected from Italian Alps: rutin (1) and kaempferol 3-neohesperidoside (2) from P. latifolia, and kaempferol 3-β-O-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 2) gentiobioside (3) from P. vulgaris. The structures were assigned on the basis of their (1)H and (13)C NMR data, including those derived from 2D NMR, as well as on HPLC-MS results. This article is the first to report on P. vulgaris tissue flavonoids after Harborne's study in 1968 and the first work ever on these compounds from P. latifolia.

  19. Effects of Kidney Bean, Phaseolus vulgaris Meal on the Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Oreochromis niloticus (mean weight 1.36 + 0.05 g) fed diets containing varying levels of the kidney bean, Phaseolus vulgaris were investigated under laboratory conditions. The kidney bean was incorporated at separate levels of 60, 40, ...

  20. Accentuation of ichthyosis vulgaris due to associated leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A. P.; Shah, S. S.; Doshi, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    A case of ichthyosis vulgaris associated with tuberculoid leprosy is reported. Ichthyotic scales were markedly accentuated within the anaesthetic patches of leprosy. The probable mechanism of the accentuation of ichthyosis by leprosy is discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4760727

  1. Laryngeal involvement in pemphigus vulgaris: a proposed classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, A; Miziara, I D; Costa, K C; Santi, C G; Maruta, C W; Aoki, V

    2012-10-01

    (1) To investigate the incidence of laryngeal involvement in a large series of patients with pemphigus vulgaris, using endoscopic examination, (2) to describe the lesions, and (3) to establish a classification of laryngeal involvement in pemphigus vulgaris based on the location of the lesions. Prospective study. A total of 40 sequentially treated pemphigus vulgaris patients, diagnosed using clinical, histological and immunofluorescence criteria, were evaluated for laryngeal manifestations using endoscopic examination. The results were used to establish a graded classification of laryngeal involvement according to the location of the lesions. Active laryngeal lesions (ulcers or blisters) were found in 16 patients (40 per cent). Of these, 37.5 per cent were classified as grade I, 20 per cent as grade II, 20 per cent as grade III and 17.5 per cent as grade IV. Laryngeal involvement is common in pemphigus vulgaris and must be considered at the point of diagnosis. Grade I lesions are the most frequent.

  2. Antifertility activity of Artemisia vulgaris leaves on female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Afsar; Kanhere, Rupesh S; Cuddapah, Rajaram; Nelson, Kumar S; Vara, Prasanth Reddy; Sibyala, Saisaran

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the antifertility activity of Artemisia vulgaris leaves on female Wistar rats. The plant extract was tested for its effect on implant formation at two dose levels, 300 and 600 mg·kg⁻¹, respectively. The effective methanolic plant extract was further studied for estrogenic potency on ovariectomised immature female Wistar rats. The data presented in this study demonstrate the antifertility potential of Artemisia vulgaris methanolic leaf extract, which shows a strong and significant decrease in implant formation (100%), and a strong estrogenic effect resulting in a significant increase in uterine weight in immature ovariectomised rats. These observations suggest that the methanolic extract of Artemisia vulgaris leaves has strong anti-implantation activity and estrogenic activity. The methanolic plant extract of A. vulgaris has antifertility activity. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bambusa vulgaris : determination of mechanical strength as bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    composite material. The manufactured bio-composite was made from combinations of two materials, which are bamboo scientifically named as Bambusa Vulgaris and a polymer named HDPE. The main objective of this paper is to expose the ...

  4. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  5. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ACNE VULGARIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melathil Sadanandan Sadeep

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent chronic inflammatory disease of pilosebaceous unit affecting teenagers and young adults. Prognosis of acne is generally good, especially in mild acne. But, this disease reduces the self-esteem, their sense of identity and can severely compromise quality of life. All clinicians caring for children and adolescents should be familiar with this problem. Early diagnosis, proper treatment and timely counselling reduce the overall impact of disease to individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study conducted in the Department of Dermatology at Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, in 200 patients who presented to the outpatient clinic with a clinical diagnosis of acne vulgaris who have not yet received any medical treatment for the disease and consented to participate in the study. RESULTS Male-to-female ratio of 1.43:1. 61.5% patients were in the 2nd decade. 4% were more than 30 years old. Duration of the disease at the time of presentation ranged from 3 weeks to 30 years. 42.5% complained of mild itching and 18.5% had burning sensation. 48.5% attribute exacerbation of disease after food intake. 72.5% acne patients had seborrhoea. Hirsutism and Acanthosis nigricans were present in 7.31% and 4.87% female patients, respectively. 50% with hirsutism and 25% with Acanthosis nigricans had polycystic ovarian disease and severe grades of acne. 25.6% females complained of premenstrual exacerbation of the disease. 26% of the patients showed exacerbation in summer. Smokers had severe grades of acne vulgaris compared to nonsmokers. Comedones were present in all and they were the predominant lesions in majority. Inflammatory papules were the 2nd most common lesions. Severe grades of acne were more common in patients with age ≥20 years. Severity of the disease increases with long duration of the disease. Relatively high incidence of post-acne scarring and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation was

  6. Hepatoprotective activity of Thymus vulgaris extract against Toxoplasma gondii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa Mostafa El-Sayed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extract against Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii infection in experimentally infected mice. Methods: Sixty mice were divided into six groups (Group I–Group VI. Group I was normal control (non-infected, non-treated; Group II was non-infected and treated with T. vulgaris extract (500 mg/kg; Group III was T. gondii infected-non-immunosuppressed control; Group IV consisted of infected immunosuppressed mice; Group V was infected and treated with T. vulgaris extract; Group VI consisted of infected immunosuppressed mice treated with T. vulgaris extract. Hepatoprotective effect of T. vulgaris extract was evaluated by histopathological examination of tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, determination of liver function parameters (alanine aminotransaminase, aspartate aminotransaminase and alkaline phosphates, total bilirubin, total protein concentrations and assessment of hepatocytes genotoxicity by comet assay.Antigenotoxic effect of T. vulgaris was assessed by several comet assay parameters that were provided by the image analysis software, including % tailed cells, % of DNA in the tail, tail length, and tail moment. Results: Treatment with T. vulgaris in both Groups V and VI improved T. gondii induced pathological lesions in the infected liver that regressed to near the normal picture especially in Group V. Also, it restored the altered values of liver function parameters near to the normal levels significantly (P < 0.05 compared with Groups III and IV respectively. Regarding comet assay parameters, all of them were significantly increased (P < 0.05 after T. gondii infection (Group III and reached the greatest values in infected immunosuppressed group (Group IV compared to the normal controls (Group I. With treatment by T. vulgaris in Groups V and VI, there was a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in all values compared to Groups III and V respectively. The

  7. Ichthyosis Vulgaris Coexisted with Acrokeratosis Verruciformis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Serarslan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyosis vulgaris is an autosomal dominant inherited, keratinization disorder and characterized by diffuse scaling. Acrokeratosis verruciformis is also an autosomal dominant, rare keratinization disorder and characterized by warty, brownish to skin colored papules on the dorsa of the hands and feet. We present a case of ichthyosis vulgaris coexisted with acrokeratosis verruciformis in a 24-year-old woman. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 134-6

  8. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kassas, Hala Yassin; Mohamed, Laila Abdelfattah

    2014-01-01

    The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE) was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD). This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE) and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production...

  9. Hepatoprotective activity of aqueous-methanol extract of Artemisia vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Anwarul Hassan; Yaeesh, Sheikh; Jamal, Qamar; Ghayur, M Nabeel

    2005-02-01

    The effect of a crude extract of the aerial parts of Artemisia vulgaris (Av.Cr) was investigated against D-galactosamine (D-GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced hepatitis in mice. Co-administration of D-GalN (700 mg[sol ]kg) and LPS (1 microg[sol ]kg) significantly (p Artemisia vulgaris for various liver disorders. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Lupus vulgaris of external nose--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, J S; Naveen, K N; Prasad, K C; Santhosh, S G; Hegde, J S

    2013-02-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common morphological variant of cutaneous tuberculosis accounting for approximately 59% of cases of cutaneous tuberculosis in India. We present a case of lupus vulgaris of external nose diagnosed early and treated with CAT-3 RNTCP regimen for six months without any nasal deformity except for a small scar over the dorsum of the nose. Patient followed up for one year after completion of the prescribed regimen, there being no recurrence of the lesion.

  11. Novel techniques for enhancement and segmentation of acne vulgaris lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A S; Humayun, J; Kamel, N; Yap, F B-B

    2014-08-01

    More than 99% acne patients suffer from acne vulgaris. While diagnosing the severity of acne vulgaris lesions, dermatologists have observed inter-rater and intra-rater variability in diagnosis results. This is because during assessment, identifying lesion types and their counting is a tedious job for dermatologists. To make the assessment job objective and easier for dermatologists, an automated system based on image processing methods is proposed in this study. There are two main objectives: (i) to develop an algorithm for the enhancement of various acne vulgaris lesions; and (ii) to develop a method for the segmentation of enhanced acne vulgaris lesions. For the first objective, an algorithm is developed based on the theory of high dynamic range (HDR) images. The proposed algorithm uses local rank transform to generate the HDR images from a single acne image followed by the log transformation. Then, segmentation is performed by clustering the pixels based on Mahalanobis distance of each pixel from spectral models of acne vulgaris lesions. Two metrics are used to evaluate the enhancement of acne vulgaris lesions, i.e., contrast improvement factor (CIF) and image contrast normalization (ICN). The proposed algorithm is compared with two other methods. The proposed enhancement algorithm shows better result than both the other methods based on CIF and ICN. In addition, sensitivity and specificity are calculated for the segmentation results. The proposed segmentation method shows higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods. This article specifically discusses the contrast enhancement and segmentation for automated diagnosis system of acne vulgaris lesions. The results are promising that can be used for further classification of acne vulgaris lesions for final grading of the lesions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Pemphigus Vulgaris and Infections: A Retrospective Study on 155 Patients

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    Nafiseh Esmaili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune process and immunosuppressive therapy of pemphigus vulgaris would predispose the patients to infections. Aim. We aimed to study the prevalence of infection and pathogenic agents in pemphigus vulgaris patients admitted to dermatology service. Material and methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 155 pemphigus vulgaris patients (68 males, 87 females admitted to dermatology service between 2009 and 2011. In this study, the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was confirmed by light microscopic and direct immunofluorescence findings. Data were collected through a questionnaire. Results. Of 155 pemphigus vulgaris patients, 33 had infection at admission and 9 acquired nosocomial infection. In addition, 37 cases of oral candidiasis and 15 cases of localized herpes simplex were recorded. Totally, 94 cases of infection were recorded. The occurrence of infection was significantly related to the severity of disease, number of hospital admissions, and presence of diabetes mellitus. The most common pathogenic germs isolated from cultures were Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Conclusion. Severity of pemphigus vulgaris and diabetes were directly related with tendency to infections. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were the most common pathogenic agents. Due to limitations of retrospective study, a prospective study is recommended.

  13. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Prabodh; Murray, Brittney L.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Setzer, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1) linalool; (2) borneol; (3) geraniol; (4) sabinene hydrate; (5) thymol; (6) carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%); the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%); the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%); and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%). A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris. PMID:28231164

  14. Changes in serum desnutrin levels in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Betul; Ucak, Haydar; Cicek, Demet; Aydin, Suleyman; Erden, Ilker; Dertlioglu, Selma Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Androgens and insulin may contribute to increased sebum production in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. We investigated the association between serum desnutrin levels and acne vulgaris in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. 25 patients presenting with acne vulgaris and 25 control subjects participated in this study. Fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, LDL, VLDL, HDL, total cholesterol, insulin, C-peptide and thyroid function tests were measured. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance. Desnutrin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) according to the manufacturer's protocol. Patients with acne vulgaris had a mean serum desnutrin level of (8.83 ± 1.13 μIU/mL), which was statistically significantly lower in the control group (10:58 ± 3.43 μIU/mL). In patients with acne vulgaris the serum glucose levels, insulin levels and HOMA-IR values (87.92 ± 7:46 mg/dL, 11.33 ± 5.93 μIU/mL, 2.49 ± 1.40, respectively) were significantly higher than the control group (77.36 ± 9.83 mg/dL, 5.82 ± 2.68 μIU/mL, 1.11 ± 0.51, respectively) (p = 0.01, pacne vulgaris, as a result of increased levels of serum glucose and insulin, the function of desnutrin was suppressed, perhaps contributing to insulin resistance.

  15. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabodh Satyal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1 linalool; (2 borneol; (3 geraniol; (4 sabinene hydrate; (5 thymol; (6 carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%; the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%; the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%; and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%. A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris.

  16. Ichthyosis vulgaris and pycnodysostosis: An unusual occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Y. Kshirsagar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pycnodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder whose generesponsible for this phenotype (CTSK, mapped to human chromosome1q21, code for the enzyme cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteineprotease; with an estimated incidence of 1.7 per 1 million births. This clinical entity includes micromelic dwarfism, increased radiological bone density, dysplasia of the skull, acro-osteolysis, straightening of the mandibular angle and in some cases, dysplasia of the acromial end of the clavicle. Oral and maxillo-facial manifestations of this disease are very clear. Herein we reported a case of pycnodysostosis, showing short stature with widening of the sutures, unfused anterior and posterior fontanelles, crowding of teeth with dental caries and typical radiological features associated with ichthyosis vulgaris and palmoplantar keratoderma.

  17. Pemphigus vulgaris-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yi-Xiu; Chu, Jin-Gang; Xiao, Ting; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBDs)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) is extremely rare. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an intraepidermal autoimmune blistering disease caused by circulating autoantibodies against desmoglein. To date, PV-associated ILD has rarely been reported in English literature. We report a rare association of PV and ILD. A 53-year-old Chinese female with PV for 8 months developed ILD after a relapse of PV for 2 months due to discontinuation of oral prednisone by herself. She was successfully treated by systemic methylprednisolone. Taken previously reported bullous pemphigoid-associated ILD and linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis-associated ILD together, in general, AIBDs-associated ILD occurs when AIBDs relapse or are not controlled, responds well to systemic corticosteroids, and has a relatively better prognosis when compared with rheumatoid arthritis- or dermatomyositis-associated ILD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pregnancy-Associated "Cutaneous Type" Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The development of pemphigus, including pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus, during pregnancy is rare. PV manifests with mucosal and/or cutaneous erosions with flaccid bullae that are histologically characterized by suprabasilar acantholysis. In contrast, pemphigus foliaceus manifests with cutaneous-only involvement and superficial epidermal acantholysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for autoantibodies against desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 aids in the diagnosis and differentiation between pemphigus subtypes. High-dose systemic corticosteroids are first-line agents in management of PV, yet their potential long-term use raises complex management issues associated with pregnancy and fetal risk. Here we report a rare case of cutaneous-limited PV in association with pregnancy.

  19. Setting the target for pemphigus vulgaris therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the rising incidence of autoimmunity, therapeutic options for patients with autoimmune disease still rely on decades-old immunosuppressive strategies that risk severe and potentially fatal complications. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diseases are greatly needed in order to minimize treatment-related toxicity. Such strategies would ideally target only the autoreactive immune components to preserve beneficial immunity. Here, we review how several decades of basic, translational, and clinical research on the immunology of pemphigus vulgaris (PV), an autoantibody-mediated skin disease, have enabled the development of targeted immunotherapeutic strategies. We discuss research to elucidate the pathophysiology of PV and how the knowledge afforded by these studies has led to the preclinical and clinical testing of targeted approaches to neutralize autoantibodies, to induce antigen-specific tolerance, and to specifically eliminate autoreactive B cells in PV. PMID:28289723

  20. Plastid transformation in sugar beet: Beta vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast biotechnology has assumed great importance in the past 20 years and, thanks to the numerous advantages as compared to conventional transgenic technologies, has been applied in an increasing number of plant species but still very much limited. Hence, it is of utmost importance to extend the range of species in which plastid transformation can be applied. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an important industrial crop of the temperate zone in which chloroplast DNA is not transmitted trough pollen. Transformation of the sugar beet genome is performed in several research laboratories; conversely sugar beet plastome genetic transformation is far away from being considered a routine technique. We describe here a method to obtain transplastomic sugar beet plants trough biolistic transformation. The availability of sugar beet transplastomic plants should avoid the risk of gene flow between these cultivated genetic modified sugar beet plants and the wild-type plants or relative wild species.

  1. Urease from seeds of 'Citrullus vulgaris'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargreaves, A.B.; Souza Marcondes, N. de; Elias, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the urea analogs acetanide and hidroxi-urea on the enzyme kinetic of urease obtained from seeds of 'Citrullus vulgaris' fruits has been studied. The action of the sulphydryl reagents and the enzyme and the effect of x-rays and the protective action of the cysteamine are also studied. Acetamide has no effect on urease kinetic. Hydroxi-urea acts as a competitive inhibitor of urease. Spectrophotometric experiments suggest that the studied urease decomposes hidroxi-urea with liberation of hydroxilamine. The sulphydril reagent, p-hydroxi-mercuribenzoate inhibts the enzyme. Cysteine and dithiotreitol reactivate the enzyme activity in no more than 50% even when excess of the substances is used. Urease is very sensitive to x-rays. Cysteamine acts as a protective agent of the enzyme. Dithiotreitol reinforces this protective action [pt

  2. Twenty-nine cases of lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, K; Boudaya, S; Chaabane, H; Amouri, M; Masmoudi, A; Mseddi, M; Turki, H

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (TB) is a rare presentation of extrapulmonary TB. Lupus vulgaris (LV) is a common presentation of cutaneous TB. We aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical, paraclinical, therapeutic, and outcome features of LV in the region of Sfax, Tunisia. We conducted a retrospective and descriptive study of LV case patients observed at the dermatology department of the Hédi Chaker Hospital (Sfax) over a 34-year period. A total of 88 cutaneous TB case patients were identified during the study period, including 29 patients presenting with LV. All patients had clinical features of the most common presentation of LV. The results of skin biopsies indicated tuberculoid granulomas without caseous necrosis. Patients received TB treatment. LV progressed to squamous cell carcinoma in one patient. In Tunisia, endemic country for TB, LV should be considered in patients presenting with an old skin lesion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of olfaction in Octopus vulgaris reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory system in any animal is the primary sensory system that responds to chemical stimuli emanating from a distant source. In aquatic animals "Odours" are molecules in solution that guide them to locate food, partners, nesting sites, and dangers to avoid. Fish, crustaceans and aquatic molluscs possess sensory systems that have anatomical similarities to the olfactory systems of land-based animals. Molluscs are a large group of aquatic and terrestrial animals that rely heavily on chemical communication with a generally dispersed sense of touch and chemical sensitivity. Cephalopods, the smallest class among extant marine molluscs, are predators with high visual capability and well developed vestibular, auditory, and tactile systems. Nevertheless they possess a well developed olfactory organ, but to date almost nothing is known about the mechanisms, functions and modulation of this chemosensory structure in octopods. Cephalopod brains are the largest of all invertebrate brains and across molluscs show the highest degree of centralization. The reproductive behaviour of Octopus vulgaris is under the control of a complex set of signal molecules such as neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and sex steroids that guide the behaviour from the level of individuals in evaluating mates, to stimulating or deterring copulation, to sperm-egg chemical signalling that promotes fertilization. These signals are intercepted by the olfactory organs and integrated in the olfactory lobes in the central nervous system. In this context we propose a model in which the olfactory organ and the olfactory lobe of O. vulgaris could represent the on-off switch between food intake and reproduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phototherapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Nevien A; Attia, Abeer T; Badawi, Ashraf M

    2008-07-01

    Achieving an effective management of acne vulgaris with minimal complications remains a difficult challenge for physicians. Moreover, the rise in antibiotic-resistant strains reduce the future usefulness of current mainstay therapies, and accordingly, the need for alternative therapies is mandatory. Phototherapy has been shown to be an effective treatment for acne, and there has been a renewed interest in photodynamic therapy as a treatment modality for this condition. To evaluate the effectiveness of pulsed dye laser (PDL), intense pulsed light (IPL) and light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy for the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Forty-five patients with moderate to severe acne were randomly divided into 3 equal groups. Group 1 was treated with a PDL, group 2 was treated with IPL, and group 3 was treated with a blue-red combination LED. Treatment was continued until a > or = 90% clearance of patient lesions was achieved. Clinical assessments were conducted before starting treatment, at 1 month as a midpoint evaluation, and after the final treatment session. Patients treated with the PDL reached a > or = 90% clearance of their inflammatory lesions after a mean of 4.1 +/- 1.39 sessions, while patients treated with IPL required a mean of 6 +/- 2.05 sessions. Patients treated with the LED required a mean of 10 +/- 3.34 sessions. At the mid-point evaluation, the percent reduction in acne lesions treated with the PDL was 90% or more, in cases of IPL and the LED, the percent reductions were 41.7% and 35.3%, respectively. Laser and light phototherapy sessions were well tolerated with minimal adverse events experienced as being mild and usually self-limiting. The encouraging results of the present study contributes evidence of phototherapy as useful therapeutic option for treatment of moderate to severe acne, and validates further studies to evaluate treatments with a larger number of patients and for a longer period of follow-up.

  5. Coexistence of Metabolic Syndrome and Psoriasis Vulgaris

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    Reyhan Çelik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is one of the chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Crohn's disease, in which the inflammation is responsible for the pathogenesis. Recently, some studies reported the importance of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and an association of chronic inflammatory systemic diseases with atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine coexistence of psoriasis vulgaris with various severity and metabolic syndrome.Material and Method: One hundred psoriasis vulgaris patients and one hundred sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI was used for evaluating the disease severity in psoriasis patients. A PASI score below 7 was accepted as mild, between 7-12 as moderate, and above 12 as severe. We evaluated metabolic syndrome in both patient and control groups by using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III metabolic syndrome criteria. SPSS 10.0 for Windows was used in analyzing data. For comparison, the student’s-t test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test were used. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Metabolic syndrome, hypertension, elevated fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, high waist circumference and lower high-density lipoprotein levels were more common in patients with psoriasis than in controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference in these parameters between these two groups (p>0.05. We found that the mean value of triglyceride levels was statistically higher in the psoriasis group (p0.05.Conclusion: No significant difference was observed between patients with mild, moderate, severe psoriasis and controls for the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. However, the mean value of triglyceride levels in psoriasis patients was higher and the mean value

  6. The Difference in Interleukin-19 Serum on Degrees of Acne Vulgaris Severity

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    Moerbono Mochtar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acne vulgaris is a multifactorial disease. Recent study showed that inflammation does have a central role in the formation of both inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions in acne vulgaris. There are various findings of proinflammatory cytokines related to acne vulgaris, but no previous study correlate interleukin- (IL- 19 to acne vulgaris. This pilot study aims to look at difference in IL-19 serum concentration on degrees of severity of acne vulgaris. Methods. This is an analytical observational cross-sectional study. Sample subjects were patients with acne vulgaris who met the inclusion criteria. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA study was applied to measure IL-19 serum. Result. Analysis test found statistically significant difference between IL-19 serum concentration of group of patients with mild acne vulgaris and that of group of patients with severe acne vulgaris. Moreover, analysis revealed significant difference between IL-19 serum concentration of group of patients with moderate acne vulgaris and that of group of patients with severe acne vulgaris. Conclusions. There are differences in serum levels of IL-19 on the severity of acne vulgaris. The significant difference might show that inflammation has a core role in severity of acne vulgaris, and IL-19 might potentially be related to acne vulgaris.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATPS) from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavel, Olga Yu.; Kladova, Anna V.; Bursakov, Sergey A.; Dias, João M.; Texeira, Susana; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Moura, José J. G.; Moura, Isabel; Romão, Maria J.; Trincão, José, E-mail: trincao@dq.fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Centro de Química Fina e Biotecnologia, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2008-07-01

    Native zinc-containing ATP sulfurylase from D. desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Native zinc/cobalt-containing ATP sulfurylase (ATPS; EC 2.7.7.4; MgATP:sulfate adenylyltransferase) from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The orthorhombic crystals diffracted to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and the X-ray data collected should allow the determination of the structure of the zinc-bound form of this ATPS. Although previous biochemical studies of this protein indicated the presence of a homotrimer in solution, a dimer was found in the asymmetric unit. Elucidation of this structure will permit a better understanding of the role of the metal in the activity and stability of this family of enzymes.

  8. Impact of the hydrogen partial pressure on lactate degradation in a coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. G11 and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus DH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, H; Feldman, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the impact of the hydrogen partial pressure on lactate degradation was investigated in a coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. G11 and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus DH1. To impose a change of the hydrogen partial pressure, formate was added to the reactor. Hydrogen results from the bioconversion of formate besides lactate in the liquid phase. In the presence of a hydrogen-consuming methanogen, this approach allows for a better estimation of low dissolved hydrogen concentrations than under conditions where hydrogen is supplied externally from the gas phase, resulting in a more accurate determination of kinetic parameters. A change of the hydrogen partial pressure from 1,200 to 250 ppm resulted in a threefold increase of the biomass-specific lactate consumption rate. The 50 % inhibition constant of hydrogen on lactate degradation was determined as 0.692 ± 0.064 μM dissolved hydrogen (831 ± 77 ppm hydrogen in the gas phase). Moreover, for the first time, the maximum biomass-specific lactate consumption rate of Desulfovibrio sp. G11 (0.083 ± 0.006 mol-Lac/mol-XG11/h) and the affinity constant for hydrogen uptake of Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus DH1 (0.601 ± 0.022 μM dissolved hydrogen) were determined. Contrary to the widely established view that the biomass-specific growth rate of a methanogenic coculture is determined by the hydrogen-utilizing partner; here, it was found that the hydrogen-producing bacterium determined the biomass-specific growth rate of the coculture grown on lactate and formate.

  9. Genetics, chemistry and ecology of a qualitative glucosinolate polymorphism in Barbarea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leur, H.

    2008-01-01

    Like many other plants, chemical defence compounds are involved in the defense of Barbarea vulgaris against natural enemies. Barbarea vulgaris produces glucosinolates, which are present in most crucifers such as cabbage, mustard, and the scientific model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucosinolates

  10. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Importance Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds) remains lacking. Objective To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds) and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design Database summary study. Setting Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons) associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous opportunities for enhanced patient care. To that end, we highlight some of the effective and promising treatments currently available and address important factors, such as sex, nationality, genetics, pathophysiology, and diet, as they relate to acne vulgaris in late adolescence. PMID:26955297

  11. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biomass-Kinetic Model for Chlorella vulgaris in a Biofuel Production Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BIOMASS-KINETIC MODEL FOR CHLORELLA VULGARIS IN A BIOFUEL PRODUCTION SCHEME THESIS William M. Rowley, Major...States Government. AFIT/GES/ENV/10-M04 NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BIOMASS-KINETIC MODEL FOR CHLORELLA VULGARIS IN A BIOFUEL...MODEL FOR CHLORELLA VULGARIS IN A BIOFUEL PRODUCTION SCHEME William M. Rowley, BS Major, USMC Approved

  12. Gender-based variability in disease presentation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Sahar Y; Gill, Liza; Shah, Jay; Sinha, Animesh A

    2014-10-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune blistering disorder of the skin. As with many autoimmune diseases, a female predominance in pemphigus vulgaris is well established. The genetic and physiological basis for this gender bias is not well understood. Moreover, it is unclear whether the affect of gender extends beyond disease susceptibility to influence disease presentation. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 72 male and 125 female pemphigus vulgaris patients across a set of defined demographic (HLA type, ethnicity) and clinical (age at disease onset, anti-desmoglein antibody levels, site of lesions, and history of autoimmune disease) factors. We find that male patients are more likely to present with disease onset before age 40 than females. Additionally, we find that males have increased cutaneous involvement and display greater co-expression of anti-Dsg1 and anti-Dsg3 antibodies, while females tend to have mucosal predominance and stronger personal and family histories of autoimmunity. We do not find any differences in the distribution of HLA type or ethnicity between male and female pemphigus vulgaris patients. Our findings establish that gender does influence disease presentation in pemphigus vulgaris, supporting a role for genetic and hormonal factors in immune dysregulation and perpetuation of the autoimmune phenotype.

  13. [Genetic diversity of Sabina vulgaris populations at different succession stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu; Wang, Lin-He; Zhang, Guosheng; Enhe, Bayaer; Liang, Xiaorong

    2006-11-01

    By means of random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, a molecular ecological study was made with Sabina vulgaris populations at 4 succession stages in Maowusu sandy grassland, aimed to reveal the relationships between molecular variation and succession stages. A total of 17 random primers were selected for amplification, and 190 repetitive loci were produced, of which, 173 were polymorphic. The data were analyzed by POPGENE 3. 2 Version 1. 31. The results showed that the genetic diversity of S. vulgaris populations was high, and changed with succession stages. The percentage of polymorphic loci in each S. vulgaris population ranged from 64.21% to 74.63%, with the highest in early succession stage Artemisia ordosica + S. vulgaris on semi-fixed sand dunes, and the lowest in sub-climax stage S. vulgaris on fixed dunes. The genetic differentiation among the populations was small (G(st) = 0.1761), and 82.39% of it was within the populations. Cluster analysis demonstrated that the populations at similar succession stage clustered together, suggesting that the genetic differentiation was closely related to succession stage. The genetic diversity indicated by Nei index ranged in 0. 2163 -0. 2564, and the gene flow (N(m) *) was 2.7972, indicating that more gene exchange occurred within the populations, which prevented the genetic differentiation among the populations at different succession stages.

  14. [Lupus vulgaris manifestation as a destructive nose and facial tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, D; Reisser, C

    2009-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most frequent manifestation of cutaneous tuberculosis, but in Europe it is limited to isolated cases. Mainly immunocompetent individuals are affected by this result of an endogenous reinfection on a lymphogenous-less frequently hematogenous-pathway. Lupus vulgaris has been observed to develop in more than 50% of all patients who already suffer from other manifestations of tuberculosis. The development of a squamous cell carcinoma in the lupus vulgaris is a rare complication; therefore, lupus vulgaris is deemed a facultative precancerosis.A 68-year-old female Serbo-Croatian patient presented with an extensive ulcerative nose and facial tumor. Her anamnesis included a squamous cell carcinoma of the nose that had been excised alio loco 3 years before. Further examinations revealed enlarged cervical lymphoma on both sides, and pulmonary metastases were also suspected. The tumor biopsy revealed a necrotic, granulomatous inflammation. No acid-fast rods were seen on Ziehl-Neelsen stain. The tuberculous origin of this ulcerative skin tumor-the lupus vulgaris-as an endogenous reinfection of pulmonary tuberculosis manifestation was confirmed by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in polymerase chain reaction and the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies in the bacterial culture (skin biopsy and bronchial secretion). The skin tumor as well as the pulmonary manifestation were successfully treated with combined tuberculostatic therapy and showed a dramatic response within 3 months.

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han; Cao, Hua; Cai, Yan-Fei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Qu, Su-Ping; Huang, Xing-Qi

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined in this study. The cpDNA was 149,637 bp in length, containing a pair of 24,439 bp inverted repeat regions (IR), which were separated by small and large single copy regions (SSC and LSC) of 17,701 and 83,057 bp, respectively. 53.4% of the sugar beet cpDNA consisted of gene coding regions (protein coding and RNA genes). The gene content and relative positions of 113 individual genes (79 protein encoding genes, 30 tRNA genes, 4 rRNA genes) were almost identical to those of tobacco cpDNA. The overall AT contents of the sugar beet cpDNA were 63.6% and in the LSC, SSC and IR regions were 65.9%, 70.8% and 57.8%, respectively. Fifteen genes contained one intron, while three genes had two introns.

  16. Phytoaccumulation of uranium by Phaseolus Vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment surrounding facilities where uranium has been mined and processed has occurred in many countries. If phytomanagement of uranium contaminated areas is envisaged, the impact of the contamination on the vegetation has to be investigated. Uranium is a radiotoxic and chemotoxic heavy metal. Mechanisms of toxicity have been predominantly studied on man and on some animal species. For plants, little information on uranium toxicity at the cellular level is available. In plants facing environmental stress, for example contamination by heavy metals, an increase in the formation of highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) is often observed. ROS are naturally produced in the plant cells and consequently, cells have developed several anti-oxidative defense mechanisms in order to control the redox state of the cell, an essential parameter for normal physiological and biochemical functioning. The defense system comprise antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutases, peroxidases, catalases, glutathione reductase) and antioxidants (e.g. glutathione, ascorbate,I). The presence of heavy metals, in particular uranium, results in an enhancement of the antioxidative defense mechanism. The objective of the study was to analyze the biological effects (biometry, stress enzyme and antioxidant content, DNA integrity) induced by bioaccumulation of uranium in the bean Phaseolus vulgaris, to evaluate whether the various investigated biomarkers are related and to define possible dose-effect relationships

  17. Pemphigus vulgaris induced by electrical injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Stephen R; McDermott, Mark R; Castillo, Carlos J; Sauder, Daniel N

    2006-03-01

    Pemphigus refers to a group of autoimmune blistering diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. Pemphigus may be induced following exposure to various exogenous agents, including thermal burns, drugs, infectious agents, and neoplasms, as well as UV, ionizing, and x-ray irradiation. We report a case of a 28-year-old man with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) induced by a severe electrical injury. Approximately one month after the electrical injury, he began to develop recurrent painful oral ulcers; one year later, he began to develop cutaneous bullae. Results of a histopathologic examination and immunofluorescence studies were diagnostic of PV The primary mechanisms of high-voltage electrical injury involve electroporation, electroconformational protein denaturation, and both joule and dielectric heating. Cutaneous electrical injury ultimately results in the destruction of cells with release of their cellular constituents. Through these mechanisms, desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) may be released and become available to the immune system, which potentially leads to an autoantibody response and the subsequent development of PV.

  18. Atypical Histiocytosis in Red Squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S H; Stevenson, K; Del-Pozo, J; Moss, S; Meredith, A

    2017-05-01

    Four red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) were subjected to necropsy examination over a 3-year period as part of a broader surveillance study. The squirrels presented with cutaneous, subcutaneous and/or internal swellings and nodules that consisted microscopically of sheets of atypical round cells and multinucleated giant cells. There was moderate anisokaryosis with rare mitoses. Nuclei ranged from oval to indented or C-shaped and some were bizarre, twisted or multilobulated. Many giant cells also had a bizarre morphology, with anisokaryosis within individual cells. Giant cell nuclei were often multilobulated, ring-shaped or segmented. Affected internal organs varied depending on the squirrel, but included lymph node, kidney, intestinal tract and lungs. Representative lesions from each of the four squirrels were negative for acid-fast organisms. Formalin-fixed tissues from all four squirrels and ethanol-fixed tissue from one animal were negative for Mycobacterium by polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemically, the majority of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells in all four squirrels strongly expressed vimentin and class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex. Otherwise, the atypical mononuclear and multinucleated cells were negative for CD3, Pax-5, Mac387, CD18 and E-cadherin. Based on the combination of cellular morphology, arrangement and immunophenotype, a novel form of atypical histiocytosis is considered most likely in these squirrels, although the exact origin and triggering factors remain uncertain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordain, Loren; Lindeberg, Staffan; Hurtado, Magdalena; Hill, Kim; Eaton, S Boyd; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2002-12-01

    In westernized societies, acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79% to 95% of the adolescent population. In men and women older than 25 years, 40% to 54% have some degree of facial acne, and clinical facial acne persists into middle age in 12% of women and 3% of men. Epidemiological evidence suggests that acne incidence rates are considerably lower in nonwesternized societies. Herein we report the prevalence of acne in 2 nonwesternized populations: the Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and the Aché hunter-gatherers of Paraguay. Additionally, we analyze how elements in nonwesternized environments may influence the development of acne. Of 1200 Kitavan subjects examined (including 300 aged 15-25 years), no case of acne (grade 1 with multiple comedones or grades 2-4) was observed. Of 115 Aché subjects examined (including 15 aged 15-25 years) over 843 days, no case of active acne (grades 1-4) was observed. The astonishing difference in acne incidence rates between nonwesternized and fully modernized societies cannot be solely attributed to genetic differences among populations but likely results from differing environmental factors. Identification of these factors may be useful in the treatment of acne in Western populations.

  20. Autoreactive T cells in the immune pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber, Kyle T; Staropoli, Patrick; Shiman, Michael I; Elgart, George W; Hertl, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a life-threatening autoimmune blistering disease caused by anti-desmoglein IgG autoantibodies that finally lead to acantholysis presenting clinically as progressive blistering. Whilst the production of pathogenic antibodies is key to the development of pemphigus vulgaris, many immunological steps are required prior to autoantibody induction. We review advances in the understanding of these immunologic processes with a focus on human leucocyte antigen polymorphisms and antigen recognition, epitope spreading, central and peripheral tolerance, T helper differentiation, induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and T-cell regulation of B cells. Targeting autoaggressive T cells as regulators and stimulators of B-cell antibody production should allow for more specific therapeutic immune interventions, avoiding the global immunosuppression seen with many commonly used immunosuppressants in pemphigus vulgaris. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nasal, pharyngeal, and laryngeal pemphigus vulgaris successfully treated with rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a potentially fatal autoimmune blistering disease that can involve the nasopharyngeal and laryngeal tissues. The disease can be recalcitrant to conventional oral treatments, and treatment alternatives are limited. This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy of rituximab as a rescue agent in 5 patients with recalcitrant pemphigus vulgaris involving nasopharyngeal and laryngeal mucosa. All 5 patients were unresponsive to systemic steroids and at least one conventional oral immunosuppressive agent. The patients received rituximab infusions as a rescue agent because of recalcitrant disease. All 5 patients had a complete clinical response to rituximab and could discontinue systemic steroids and reduce the dosage of their initial immunosuppressive agent. No major adverse reactions were observed or reported with rituximab. Rituximab can be used as an effective rescue agent in the treatment of severe pemphigus vulgaris with nasopharyngeal and laryngeal involvement.

  2. Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: a clinicohistopathological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, F Sule; Afsar, Ilhan; Diniz, Gulden; Asilsoy, Suna; Sorguc, Yelda

    2008-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis which usually occurs in patients previously sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. He had well demarcated, irregularly bordered, pink, infiltrated plaques on his left cheek showing apple-jelly appearance on diascopy. The histopathological examination showed tuberculoid granulomas with Langhans type giant cells. The Mantoux reactivity was in normal limits, and no acid-fast bacilli was found in the lesion, either by direct stained smears or by culture. The lesions showed marked improvement on anti-tuberculosis treatment. We want to emphasize that histopathological examination has diagnostic value in lupus vulgaris in correlation with clinical appearance, when direct analysis or culture is negative.

  3. Bilateral "turkey ear" as a cutaneous manifestation of lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingjie; Wang, Hongmiao; Zheng, Hua; Li, Xiao

    2018-03-14

    Lupus vulgaris is a common form of cutaneous tuberculosis in China, mostly involving the head and neck region. Turkey ear is a clinically descriptive term, used for a massively enlarged earlobe with bluish-red or violaceous indurated plaques and nodules, which can be a sign of lupus vulgaris. A 47-year-old female presented with edema and reddish ulcerated lesions on both ears which was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris by conventional laboratory investigations and the patient showed good response to antituberculous therapy. Occurrence of turkey ears in lupus pernio (sarcoidosis) should also be mentioned here as this presentation was originally described in this condition. Two case reports of turkey ear have been reported with cutaneous tuberculosis (not bilateral). However, occurrence of bilateral turkey ears in cutaneous tuberculosis has not been described so far in the literature.

  4. Lupus vulgaris occurring in a locus minoris resistentiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Richard; Beatch, Anita; Lee, Mao-Cheng; Cheung-Lee, Melody; Wasel, Norman

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lupus vulgaris, a form of cutaneous tuberculosis, is not always clear, especially in patients who do not have coexistent extracutaneous tuberculosis and in patients with single lesions. To report a case of lupus vulgaris in a locus minoris resistentiae (a site of reduced resistance) and to use a unique set of clinical circumstances and laboratory tests to reconstruct the pathogenesis of the lesion and the response to treatment. Lupus vulgaris can occur in a locus minoris resistentiae; local trauma and possibly other factors, such as increased temperature, topical corticosteroids, and the virulence of the infecting strain, may facilitate the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present at a locus minoris resistentiae as a result of a silent bacillemia.

  5. Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: a clinicohistopathological diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sule Afsar

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis which usually occurs in patients previously sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. He had well demarcated, irregularly bordered, pink, infiltrated plaques on his left cheek showing apple-jelly appearance on diascopy. The histopathological examination showed tuberculoid granulomas with Langhans type giant cells. The Mantoux reactivity was in normal limits, and no acid-fast bacilli was found in the lesion, either by direct stained smears or by culture. The lesions showed marked improvement on anti-tuberculosis treatment. We want to emphasize that histopathological examination has diagnostic value in lupus vulgaris in correlation with clinical appearance, when direct analysis or culture is negative.

  6. An Atlas of annotations of Hydra vulgaris transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Daniela; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2016-09-22

    RNA sequencing takes advantage of the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies for analyzing RNA transcript counts with an excellent accuracy. Trying to interpret this huge amount of data in biological information is still a key issue, reason for which the creation of web-resources useful for their analysis is highly desiderable. Starting from a previous work, Transcriptator, we present the Atlas of Hydra's vulgaris, an extensible web tool in which its complete transcriptome is annotated. In order to provide to the users an advantageous resource that include the whole functional annotated transcriptome of Hydra vulgaris water polyp, we implemented the Atlas web-tool contains 31.988 accesible and downloadable transcripts of this non-reference model organism. Atlas, as a freely available resource, can be considered a valuable tool to rapidly retrieve functional annotation for transcripts differentially expressed in Hydra vulgaris exposed to the distinct experimental treatments. WEB RESOURCE URL: http://www-labgtp.na.icar.cnr.it/Atlas .

  7. Physiological responses of phaseolus vulgaris to different lead concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, N.; Bukhari, N.; Jawaid, F.

    2010-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the phyto toxicity of lead on some physio-biochemical parameters that is chlorophyll, protein, carbohydrate, nucleic acid and phenolic content of Phaseolus vulgaris. Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings were treated with 25, 50 and 100 ppm concentration of lead acetate and a control (without any treatment) and sown in pots. Increasing lead acetate levels lead to several disruptions of Phaseolus vulgaris plants, which are reflected by reductions of protein, chlorophyll, carbohydrate DNA and RNA content. However phenolic content of plants were increasing with increasing levels of heavy metal lead. The effect of lead toxicity was more pronounced at 100 ppm as compared to 25 and 50 ppm lead concentration. (author)

  8. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma developing in lupus vulgaris exfoliativus persistent for 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawirska, Agnieszka; Adamski, Zygmunt; Stawicka, Ewa; Schwartz, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    A 65-year-old man is described with a 40-year history of lupus vulgaris exfoliativus, a form of cutaneous tuberculosis that resembles psoriasis. He had been misdiagnosed as having psoriasis vulgaris for many years. A cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma developed within a plaque of lupus vulgaris exfoliativus. A skin biopsy provided the correct diagnoses. The patient was successfully treated with medication for tuberculosis and had his skin cancer cured by surgical excision. With an increasing worldwide incidence of tuberculosis, one needs to be aware of its cutaneous forms and variants, as well as its complications, in particular skin cancer. Lupus vulgaris exfoliativus may resemble psoriasis vulgaris.

  9. Pemphigus vulgaris: an evidence-based treatment update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cathy Y; Murrell, Dedee F

    2015-02-01

    While a variety of intervention options have been described for pemphigus vulgaris, the optimal treatment strategy has not been established. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the literature on the efficacy and safety of interventions for the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Five electronic databases were searched, including The Cochrane Skin Group's Specialized Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, MEDLINE and Latin American and Caribbean Health science Information database (LILACS). Five trial registers as well as reference lists of included RCTs were also searched. Any published randomised controlled trial (RCT) on intervention for pemphigus vulgaris was included, provided the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was confirmed with appropriate clinical features, histopathology and immunofluorescence studies. Studies which included forms of pemphigus other than pemphigus vulgaris were excluded. Altogether 18 RCTs were identified including 16 distinct interventions. Included studies were assessed for patient selection, methods of randomisation, blinding, follow-up and selective reporting. Current evidence is incomplete and inconclusive. The interventions which appear promising, but will require further evaluation include adjuvant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), azathioprine, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), sulfasalazine and pentoxifylline, infliximab, epidermal growth factor and pimecrolimus. Interventions with inconclusive evidence include high (120-180 mg) versus low (45-60 mg) prednisone dosage, pulsed dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (DCP), cyclosporine, dapsone, etanercept, acyclovir and tacrolimus. Our review is limited by the small number of high-quality RCTs and variety of outcome measures, precluding the performing of a meta-analysis. The optimal treatment strategy for pemphigus vulgaris remains unclear. Higher quality RCTs are required in the future to re

  10. Culture of the microalga chlorella vulgaris on different proportions of sugar mill effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.N.M.A.I.; Islam, M.R.; Habib, M.A.B.; Hossain, M.S.; Miah, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    Chlarella vulgaris was cultured in four different dilutions of sugar mill effluent media (SMEM). Bold's basal medium (BBM) was used as the control under laboratory conditions. Maximum cell growth and chlorophyll-a content were obtained on 10th day of the culture in 50% diluted SMEM, followed by those grown in BBM, and 75, 25 and 100% SMEM at stationary phase. The specific growth rate (mu g/day) of cells and chlorophyll-a of C. vulgaris grown in 50% SMEM varied significantly (p < 0.0 I) from those of C. vulgaris cultured in BBM, followed by other SMEM concentrations. Total biomass of C. vulgaris. cultured in 50% SMEM, was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.0 I) than that of C. vulgaris cultured in BBM, and 25, 75 and 100% SMEM concentrations. Similar trend was also observed in the case of optical density. Cell number and chlorophyll-a of C. vulgaris were highly (p < 0.01) and directly correlated with chlorophyll-a (r2 = 0.991) of C. vulgaris and optical density (r2 = 0.989) for the culture media containing C. vulgaris, respectively. Crude proteins and crude lipids of C. vulgaris. grown in 50% SMEM, were significantly (p < 0.01) higher than those of C. vulgaris cultured in other SMEM concentrations. Due to good growth performance exhibited in the 50% SMEM dilution, the sugar mill effluent may be used for efficient cultivation of C. vulgaris and possibly other micro algae. (author)

  11. The dual nature of interleukin-10 in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Payne, Aimee S

    2015-06-01

    The immunomodulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays beneficial but also potentially detrimental roles in inflammation, infection, and autoimmunity. Recent studies suggest a regulatory role for IL-10-expressing B cells in the autoimmune blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris. Here we review the studies on IL-10 in pemphigus vulgaris and discuss the potential pathophysiological significance of these findings in comparison to prior studies of IL-10 in other human conditions. A better understanding of the complex roles of IL-10 in immune regulation may improve our understanding of pemphigus pathogenesis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pemphigus vulgaris in a pregnant woman and her neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sameera Begum Kader; BM, Yashodhara; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Kanagasabai, Sachchithanatham

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old pregnant woman in her second trimester of pregnancy presented with blisters on the face, abdomen and the leg. Based on the clinical presentation and skin biopsy (histopathology and direct immunofluorescence) the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was established. The child born to this patient also had similar skin lesions. The lesions in the mother and the child improved after treatment. The authors report a rare case of pemphigus vulgaris in a pregnant lady and neonatal pemphigus in her child, both of whom were treated successfully. PMID:22744241

  13. Radiation-induced pemphigus vulgaris of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigna-Taglianti, R.; Russi, E.G.; Denaro, N.; Numico, G.; Brizio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare autoimmune muco-cutaneous bullous disease. Patients with a history of pemphigus vulgaris - who need radiotherapy - may show a long lasting bullous cutaneous manifestation, typical of pemphigus, within radiation fields. The literature describes fewer than 20 radio-induced cases. While systematic corticosteroid therapy has proven to be useful, topical treatment used in association with corticosteroid therapy is rarely described. To our knowledge the use of modern dressing products has never been described. We report our experience in a case in which modern dressing products were usefully associated to systemic therapy. (authors)

  14. Seeking approval: Present and future therapies for pemphigus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Payne, Aimee S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Despite the potentially fatal prognosis, there are currently no FDA-approved treatments specifically for pemphigus. In 2006, the FDA designated orphan drug status to mycophenolate mofetil for the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris indicating both federal and commercial interest in developing therapies for this devastating disease. This review focuses on pemphigus therapies that are currently in preclinical or clinical trials, as well as potential novel therapies based on recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:18465660

  15. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  16. Efecto del aib y el tdz en el enraizamiento in vitro de plantas de bambusa vulgaris var vulgaris schrad. ex wendl

    OpenAIRE

    García Ramírez, Yudith; Freire-Seijo, Marisol; Pérez Mederos, Blanca Rosa; Hurtado Rivalta, Ortelio

    2012-01-01

    Título en ingles: Effect of IBA and TDZ on in vitro rooting of plants Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrad. ex Wendl. Resumen: Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schard. ex Wendl. sobresale dentro del género por sus propiedades físico-mecánicas y por el tamaño de sus culmos. Desarrollar la propagación vía organogénesis sería una alternativa para propagar esta especie. Sin embargo, los bajos porcentajes de enraizamiento y de superviviencia ex vitro han sido elementos que han afectado la propagac...

  17. Management of pemphigus vulgaris during acute phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We present our experience with 21 patients of pemphigus vulgaris seen over a period of 10 years managed in service hospitals during acute phase of the disease. Age groups of patients ranged from 25-45 years. Eighteen (85.7% were young adults, 30-40 years of age. Fifteen (71.4% were men and 6(28.6% were women. All the cases were hospitalized in ICU, till the acute phase of the disease subsided. Complete hematological profile, urinalysis, serum biochemistry and repeated bacterial cultures from the skin were carried out in all patients at the time of admission and thereafter weekly. The treatment comprised of potassium permanganate lotion bath (1:10000 and 1 framycetin gauze dressing of the denuded areas, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. All suspected infections and septicemia were treated with appropriate antibiotics. The corticosteroids were usually administered as a single dose of prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day. Cyclophosphamide was given at an initial dose of 50mg/day and the dose was escalated to 100mg/day. Once the bulk of the lesions were healed, the dose of corticosteroids was gradually lowered by approximately 50% every two weeks and cyclophosphamide was continued till patients were symptomfree. Out of 21 patients receiving corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide and other supportive therapy, 20(95% had undergone clinical resolution of the disease. During follow up study 15(71.4% patients remained symptom-free and undergone clinical remission. Five patients (23.8% had relapse, out of which 4(19% remained symptom free, after subsequent treatment. There was one death (4.7% in our study.

  18. SEZARY SYNDROME MIMICKING GENERALIZED PSORIASIS VULGARIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Rianova Lynoora

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sezary syndrome is the leukemic variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. This disease is characterized by some reddish patches or plaques all over the skin which extends to the whole body into erythroderma, lymphadenopathy. It is also indicated by the presence of atypical lymphocytes called Sezary cells. This case report is aimed to know clinical manifestation, examination and management of Sezary syndrome which clinically resembles generalized psoriasis. A 60 years old man came with scaly reddish brown plaques almost all over his body. It was accompanied by lymphadenopathy on the supraclavicular lymph node right and left as well as intense itchy. Other clinical features were alopecia, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, onychodysthropy, facies leonine without anesthesia on the lesion and enlargement of peripheral nerve. From a laboratory test, an increase in the number of leukocytes and, Sezary cells were found in peripheral blood smear examination; while the histopathology showed focal athrophy and acanthosis of the epidermis and dense infiltration of lymphocytes in the dermo-epidermal junction and superficial dermis. Patient received 3 x 5 mg (1 cycle of methotrexate (MTX with 0,1% cream mometasone furoate and 3x1 tablet of CTM for adjunctive therapy. Methotrexate was discontinued because there was a disturbance in liver function and deterioration of patient’s condition. After 25 days of treatment, the patient got sepsis and then passed away. Early onset of Sezary syndrome in this case is difficult to know because the clinical manifestation is similar with psoriasis vulgaris. Supporting examination such as laboratory test, blood smears and histopathology examination could help the diagnosis. The presence of lymphadenopathy, and atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and the extensive skin involvement reflect the poor prognosis. The most common cause of death was sepsis.

  19. Differential expression patterns of non-symbiotic hemoglobins in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Pin, Pierre A; Kraft, Thomas; Dohm, Juliane C; Minoche, André E; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Bülow, Leif

    2014-04-01

    Biennial sugar beet (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is a Caryophyllidae that has adapted its growth cycle to the seasonal temperature and daylength variation of temperate regions. This is the first time a holistic study of the expression pattern of non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) is being carried out in a member of this group and under two essential environmental conditions for flowering, namely vernalization and length of photoperiod. BvHb genes were identified by sequence homology searches against the latest draft of the sugar beet genome. Three nsHb genes (BvHb1.1, BvHb1.2 and BvHb2) and one truncated Hb gene (BvHb3) were found in the genome of sugar beet. Gene expression profiling of the nsHb genes was carried out by quantitative PCR in different organs and developmental stages, as well as during vernalization and under different photoperiods. BvHb1.1 and BvHb2 showed differential expression during vernalization as well as during long and short days. The high expression of BvHb2 indicates that it has an active role in the cell, maybe even taking over some BvHb1.2 functions, except during germination where BvHb1.2 together with BvHb1.1-both Class 1 nsHbs-are highly expressed. The unprecedented finding of a leader peptide at the N-terminus of BvHb1.1, for the first time in an nsHb from higher plants, together with its observed expression indicate that it may have a very specific role due to its suggested location in chloroplasts. Our findings open up new possibilities for research, breeding and engineering since Hbs could be more involved in plant development than previously was anticipated.

  20. Effects of Thymus vulgaris and Mentha pulegium on colour, nutrients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and Mentha pulegium (mentha) powders on meat colour, nutrient composition and malondialdehyde (MDA) where broiler chickens were under heat stress. Two hundred one-day-old male chicks were used in a completely randomized design with ...

  1. Genetic diversity study of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. (family Leguminosae), is a leguminous crop widely distributed in all parts of the world. In Ethiopia, common bean is cultivated as a source of protein for local consumption and for export. Mostly, it grows in the warm and lowland areas of the country. The aim of this research was to investigate the genetic ...

  2. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity in French bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAPD molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity in the fourteen varieties of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) of three eco-geographical regions of Bangladesh. Out of the 20 primers only, 6 yielded polymorphic banding patterns. In total, 40 different DNA bands were reproducibly obtained, out of which ...

  4. Performance of Phaseolus vulgaris L. in a soil contaminated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytoremediation is an alternative low cost approach for in situ treatment of polluted soils. This study evaluated growth and biochemical composition of Phaseolus vulgaris as influenced by spent engine oil contaminated soil. The experiment was conducted in a pot during the 2005 cropping season. The soil received (0% ...

  5. Registration of Gabisa Common Bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Variety

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gabisa is a common name for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) variety with pedigree name of VAX-2. It is a bush food bean variety selected out of common bean lines introduced to Ethiopia through CIAT program and released in 2007 by the Bako Agricultural Research Center for production in western Ethiopia and ...

  6. POD DEVELOPMENT INCREASES THE OZONE SENSITIVITY OF PHASEOLUS VULGARIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine if the O3 sensitivity of Phaseolus vulgaris L. changed with plant development. Plants exposed to charcoal-filtered air or elevated O3 throughout the study were compared to those exposed only during the vegetative or reproductive s...

  7. Assessment of genetic diversity in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... RAPD molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity in the fourteen varieties of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) of three eco-geographical regions of Bangladesh. Out of the 20 primers only,. 6 yielded polymorphic banding patterns. In total, 40 different DNA bands were reproducibly ...

  8. Biocontrol Of Viral Necrotic Disease Of Phaseolus Vulgaris By ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study revealed that the preinoculation of soil with rhizosphere microorganisms significantly reduced number of local lesions produced by TNV, in P. vulgaris plants either grown in amended or unamended soil. Phaseolus plants grown in fish meal amended soil supplied with RMs singly or in mixtures, and then their ...

  9. Pathological Fracture due to pemphigus vulgaris: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare but serious autoimmune mucocutaneous bullous disease.The two cardinal pathological processes at work are a split within the epidermis and loss of adhesion of epidermal cells (Acantholysis). It is due to deposition of pathogenic IgG on the Keratinocyte cell surface. The mainstay of treatment is ...

  10. Pemphigus vulgaris activity score and assessment of convergent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Rahbar, Ziba; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Mortazavizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Akhyani, Maryam; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Balighi, Kamran

    2013-05-07

    Pemphigus is a rare autoimmune blistering disease with different phenotypes. The evaluation of therapeutic interventions requires a reliable, valid and feasible to use measurement. However, there is no gold standard to measure the disease activity in clinical trials. In this study we aimed to introduce the pemphigus vulgaris activity score (PVAS) measurement and to assess the convergent validity with the experts' opinion of disease activity. In PVAS scoring, the distribution of pemphigus vulgaris antigen expression in different anatomical regions is taking in to account with special consideration of the healing process. PVAS is a 0-18 scale, based on the extent of mucocutaneous involvement, type of lesion and the presence of Nikolsky's sign. The sum of the scores of total number of lesions, number of different anatomic regions involvement and Nikolsky's sign is weighted by the type of lesion. In the present study, PVAS was assessed in 50 patients diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by one dermatologist. Independently, five blinded experts scored all the patients through physician's global assessment (PGA). The convergent validity with experts' opinion was assessed. The Spearman coefficient of correlation showed the acceptable value of 0.751 (95%CI: 0.534- 0.876). PVAS is a valid, objective and simple-to-use scoring measurement. It showed a good correlation with PGA of pemphigus disease activity in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

  11. Pemphigus vulgaris in childhood: clinical features, treatment, and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    There are 31 reports in the literature of the clinical and immunopathologic features of pemphigus vulgaris in children. Bullous lesions often occur initially in the oral cavity, later spreading to the skin. The diagnosis can be established by means of histologic and immunopathologic criteria. Most

  12. Pemphigus Vulgaris Activity Score and Assessment of Convergent Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyda Chams-Davatchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus is a rare autoimmune blistering disease with different phenotypes. The evaluation of therapeutic interventions requires a reliable, valid and feasible to use measurement. However, there is no gold standard to measure the disease activity in clinical trials. In this study we aimed to introduce the pemphigus vulgaris activity score (PVAS measurement and to assess the convergent validity with the experts’ opinion of disease activity. In PVAS scoring, the distribution of pemphigus vulgaris antigen expression in different anatomical regions is taking in to account with special consideration of the healing process. PVAS is a 0-18 scale, based on the extent of mucocutaneous involvement, type of lesion and the presence of Nikolsky’s sign. The sum of the scores of total number of lesions, number of different anatomic regions involvement and Nikolsky’s sign is weighted by the type of lesion. In the present study, PVAS was assessed in 50 patients diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by one dermatologist. Independently, five blinded experts scored all the patients through physician’s global assessment (PGA. The convergent validity with experts’ opinion was assessed. The Spearman coefficient of correlation showed the acceptable value of 0.751 (95%CI: 0.534- 0.876. PVAS is a valid, objective and simple-to-use scoring measurement. It showed a good correlation with PGA of pemphigus disease activity in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris

  13. Response of Field Beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Unacidulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The agronomic effectiveness of minjingu rock phosphate (MRP) was compared with that of highly soluble phosphate triple superphosphate (TSP), in pot studies with field bean (P. vulgaris L. ) in a greenhouse at the field station of Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Kenya. MRP finely ground with 30 Grade % P and ...

  14. Phosphorus use efficiency in common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tripartite symbiosis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) recombinant inbred line (RIL) 147 with rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was assessed in sand culture by comparing the effects of three AMF species on the mycorrhizal root colonization, rhizobial nodulation, plant growth and phosphorus use ...

  15. [Molecular genetic investigation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butorina, A K; Kornienko, A V

    2011-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are reviewed as a basis for the development of genomics of this species. The methods used to study structural and functional genomics are considered. The results and their application to increase the efficiency of sugar beet breeding are discussed.

  16. Reproductive biology of common octopus Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive biology of common octopus Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797), on the Kenyan South coast. ... Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science ... Although common octopus catches are increasing globally, lack of information on the species reproductive biology has been a major concern in its management ...

  17. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Yassin El-Kassas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD. This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production and for the removal of colour and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD by this microalga. The cultivation of C. vulgaris, presented maximum cellular concentrations Cmax and maximum specific growth rates μmax in the wastewater concentration of 5.0% and 17.5%, respectively. The highest colour and COD removals occurred with 17.5% of textile waste effluent. The results of C. vulgaris culture in the textile waste effluent demonstrated the possibility of using this microalga for the colour and COD removal and for biomass production. There was a significant negative relationship between textile waste effluent concentration and Cmax at 0.05 level of significance. However, sodium bicarbonate concentration did not significantly influence the responses of Cmax and the removal of colour and COD.

  18. Effect of Euphorbia hirta and Thymus vulgaris powders on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ban placed on the long term use of commercial antibiotics at subtherapeutic levels for diseases control and growth promotion in livestock production necessitated a worldwide search for available, cost effective and efficacious alternatives. Accordingly, the effects of Euphorbia hirta (EH) and Thymus vulgaris (TV) ...

  19. The biomass and ecology of chokka squid Loligo vulgaris reynaudii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-22

    Jan 22, 1991 ... Trekgewoontes, stapelgrootte en die ekologie van die tjokka Loligo vulgaris reynaudii aan die Weskus van. Suid-Afrika is bestudeer en verwantskappe met ander gebiede vergelyk aan die hand van ontleding van verspreidings-, biomassa-, grootteverspreidings- en biologiese data wat twee maal jaarliks ...

  20. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in photobioreactor by using compost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in photobioreactor by using compost as a nutrient source for biomass production. X. B. Tan, Y. Uemura, J. W. Lim, M. K. Lam. Abstract. Microalgae are well known for its high photosynthetic activity and ability to accumulate large amount of lipids within their cells. Compost fertilizers are derived ...

  1. Drug resistant Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris are pathogens often associated with drug resistance traits. They are of public health importance with zoonotic status. They have been globally associated with humans and poultry infections. Multidrug resistant strains of these organisms are routinely isolated from organs samples from ...

  2. Fermented Condiments from Melon ( Citrullus vulgaris ) and African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermented Citrullus vulgaris and Parkia biglobosa have been reported to contribute to minerals, calorie and protein intake when consumed. Although these traditionally fermented condiments have not attained full commercial status in Nigeria due to the subsistence level of farming and artisanal production; they have been ...

  3. Dapsone 7.5% Gel: A Review in Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salama, Zaina T; Deeks, Emma D

    2017-02-01

    Dapsone 7.5% gel (Aczone ® ) is indicated for the once-daily topical treatment of acne vulgaris in patients aged ≥12 years. Dapsone is a sulfone antibacterial with anti-inflammatory actions, which are thought to be largely responsible for its efficacy in treating acne vulgaris. In two phase III trials of 12 weeks' duration in patients aged ≥12 years with moderate acne vulgaris, once-daily dapsone 7.5% gel reduced acne severity (as per the Global Acne Assessment Score) and lesion counts versus vehicle. The benefits of dapsone 7.5% gel over vehicle were seen as early as week 2 for inflammatory lesion counts, and from week 4 or 8 for other outcomes. Dapsone 7.5% gel was well tolerated, with a low incidence of treatment-related adverse events, with the majority of adverse events being administration-site related and mild or moderate in severity. Thus, dapsone 7.5% gel is an effective and well tolerated option for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris in patients aged ≥12 years, with the convenience of once-daily application.

  4. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochloris oculata in effluents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Luis Alfredo Ortega Clemente

    2015-01-27

    Jan 27, 2015 ... 3Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I. P. N., Department of Biotechnology & Bioengineering, ... microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochloris oculata), ii) two types of culture media [wastewater of tilapia farming (WTF) and ... generation and environmental protection are derived from.

  5. Nodulation and nitrogen fixation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mamadou Gueye

    Nodulation and nitrogen fixation of field grown common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as influenced by fungicide seed treatment. Ndeye Fatou Diaw GUENE, Adama DIOUF and Mamadou GUEYE*. MIRCEN/ Laboratoire commun de microbiologie IRD-ISRA-UCAD, BP 1386, DAKAR, Senegal. Accepted 23 June 2003.

  6. Novel protocol for lutein extraction from microalga Chlorella vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Este, Martina; De Francisci, Davide; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a pigment generally extracted from marigold flowers. However, lutein is also found in considerable amounts in microalgae. In this study a novel method was developed to improve the extraction efficiency of lutein from microalga C. vulgaris. Differently from conventional methods, ethanol...

  7. Terapi Topikal Clindamycin Dibandingkan Dengan Niacinamide + Zinc Pada Acne Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Nugroho, Rima Adjani; Widayati, Retno Indar

    2013-01-01

    Latar Belakang: Pengobatan antibiotik topical untuk menangani akne vulgaris sudah sering digunakan, salah satunya adalah Clindamycin 1 %. Namun demikian, penggunaan antibiotic ini secara luas diperkirakan memunculkan strain P. Acnes yang resistan terhadap clindamycin. Kombinasi niacinamide dan zinc berfungsi sebagai anti inflamasi, menurunkan produksi sebum, dan mencegah timbulnya bekas luka jerawat. Niacinamide + zinc dapat mengatasi jerawat tanpa menimbulkan resistansi bakteri P. Acnes.Tuju...

  8. Anaphylaxis to pine nut: cross-reactivity to Artemisia vulgaris?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Alves, R; Pregal, A; Pereira-Santos, M C; Branco-Ferreira, M; Lundberg, M; Oman, H; Pereira-Barbosa, M

    2008-01-01

    The use of pine nuts, the seeds of Pinus pinea, is on the increasing in the modern Mediterranean diet. Little more than 20 cases of allergy to this tree nut have been published, and cross-reactivity with pine pollen, peanut and almond has already been reported. We describe the case of a young boy with several episodes of anaphylaxis after pine nut ingestion. Specific IgE to pine nut and Artemisia vulgaris was demonstrated by skin prick tests and in vitro determination of specific IgE, although no IgE to pine pollen or other nuts was detected. Immunoblotting of Artemisia vulgaris and pine nut revealed two matching diffuse bands, just below 14 kDa and 30 kDa. The ImmunoCAP inhibition assays showed complete inhibition of pine nut specific IgE after serum incubation with Artemisia vulgaris extract. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of documented cross-reactivity between pine nut and Artemisia vulgaris.

  9. An update on the management of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonette Keri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Jonette Keri1,2, Michael Shiman11Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Service, Miami VA Hospital, FL, USAAbstract: Acne vulgaris is a common skin disorder that can affect individuals from childhood to adulthood, most often occurring in the teenage years. Acne can have a significant physical, emotional, and social impact on an individual. Many different treatment options are available for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Commonly used topical treatments include benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, sulfur and sodium sulfacetamide, azelaic acid, and retinoids. Systemic treatment is frequently used and includes the use of systemic antibiotics, oral contraceptives, antiandrogens, and retinoids. Other treatment modalities exist such as the use of superficial chemical peels as well as using laser and light devices for the treatment of acne. With the multitude of treatment options and the rapidly expanding newer technologies available to clinicians, it is important to review and be aware of the current literature and studies regarding the treatment of acne vulgaris.Keywords: acne vulgaris, treatment, benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, retinoids, lasers

  10. Fatty acids composition of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris can be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Varying culture methods of Chlorella vulgaris (CV) has been associated with different nutrient composition. The aim of this study was to investigate the fatty acid contents and other nutrients of CV subjected to various culturing conditions. We found that CV cultured under 24 h light and 10% CO2 showed the best growth rates ...

  11. Value of direct immunofluorescence in predicting remission in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balighi, Kamran; Taheri, Arash; Mansoori, Parisa; Chams, Cheida

    2006-11-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies to desmogleins. Multiple relapses and remission may occur during the course of the disease. The goal of this study was to determine whether direct immunofluorescence study has any value in detecting immunological remission of pemphigus vulgaris. Fifty-seven patients with pemphigus vulgaris who were in clinical remission for at least 3 months, while taking prednisolone 5-7.5 mg/day, were recruited retrospectively for the study. Direct immunofluorescence study had been performed in all patients after a period of at least 3 months in clinical remission. Treatment had been discontinued in all patients with negative results of direct immunofluorescence. Of 57 patients who were in clinical remission, 24 patients (42%) had negative and 33 patients (58%) had positive results of direct immunofluorescence. Eleven patients (46%) with negative results of direct immunofluorescence relapsed within the first year of the follow-up period. Nine patients with negative direct immunofluorescence had a history of more than 6 months of clinical remission before direct immunofluorescence study. Among them, two patients (22%) relapsed. None of four patients with history of more than 12 months of clinical remission before a negative direct immunofluorescence study relapsed. Negative direct immunofluorescence is an indicator of immunological remission in patients with pemphigus vulgaris after 6-12 months in clinical remission.

  12. Effect of Prunella vulgaris L extract on hyperplasia of mammary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p < 0.01) in rats treated with highdose PVE. Conclusion: These results suggest that PVE exerts anti-HMG effect in rats induced by estrogen and progestogen. Keywords: Prunella vulgaris L; Anti-inflammatory; Anti-hyperplasia of mammary gland ...

  13. A comparison between Daphnia pulex and Hydra vulgaris as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mortalities as well as morphological changes (H. vulgaris) were analysed using Microsoft Excel. The LC50-values were statistically determined using the EPA Probit Analysis Model and the Spearman-Karber analysis methods. Prior to being used, analysis of the physico-chemical properties, nutrients and metals of both ...

  14. Response of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yield losses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) may occur due to boron (B) deficiency when the susceptible cultivars are grown in calcareous boron deficient soils. The study was therefore aimed at investigating the effects of three B doses: control (0.0 kg ha-1), soil application (3.0 kg ha-1) and foliar fertilization (0.3 kg ...

  15. Using bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) as a field drainage material in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris), one of the most widespread member of its genus, was used as field drainage material in Akure, Nigeria. Pre-determined sizes of bamboo with uniform lengths and diameters were installed as sub-drains in agricultural field for drainage purposes, especially in developing countries like Nigeria.

  16. Composite Phaseolus vulgaris plants with transgenic roots as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large seeded grain legumes such as the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) are very important crops with seeds that are major protein source for people in developing countries, but their yields and improvement lag behind the economically more important cereals. For research purposes ...

  17. Evaluation of Azithromycin in Treatment of Acne Vulgaris Compared to

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Acne vulgaris is the most common dermatological disorder in adolescence. Treatment is essential to prevent physical and psychological scarring. Although many treatments for acne are available, effective management has become increasingly challenging with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of ...

  18. Topical antibiotic monotherapy prescribing practices in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, William D; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency of dosing topical antibiotics as monotherapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris, and physician specialty prescribing these medications. This study is a retrospective review of all visits with a sole diagnosis of acne vulgaris (ICD-9-CM code 706.1) found on the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) in 1993-2010. We recorded the number of visits surveyed where acne vulgaris was the sole diagnosis, number of visits where topical antibiotics were the only treatment prescribed, and the specialty of physician in each encounter. Topical erythromycin or clindamycin were the sole medication prescribed in 0.81% of the visits recorded, with 60% of these prescriptions arising from dermatologists and 40% from non-dermatologists. The trend of prescribing topical antibiotic monotherapy is declining (p acnes to topical antibiotic regimens has led to the need to re-evaluate the use of topical antibiotics in the treatment of acne vulgaris. While the rate of topical antibiotic monotherapy is declining, their use should be reserved for situations where the direct need for antibiotics arises. If a clinician feels that antibiotics are a necessary component to acne therapy, they should be used as part of a combination regimen.

  19. The oral adverse effects of isotretinoin treatment in acne vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Isotretinoin is the most effective therapy to treat severe acne vulgaris and its systemic adverse effects have been well documented, but little is known on dental side effects over the course of treatment. Objectives: This prospective case-control study aimed to evaluate the oral adverse effects of isotretinoin in ...

  20. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn DD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Darren D Lynn,1 Tamara Umari,1 Cory A Dunnick,2,3 Robert P Dellavalle2–4 1Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, 3Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, 4Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Importance: Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds remains lacking. Objective: To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design: Database summary study. Setting: Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants: Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures: Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance: Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous

  1. Effects of Molybdate and Tungstate on Expression Levels and Biochemical Characteristics of Formate Dehydrogenases Produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cristiano S.; Valette, Odile; González, Pablo J.; Brondino, Carlos D.; Moura, José J. G.; Moura, Isabel; Dolla, Alain; Rivas, Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are enzymes that catalyze the formate oxidation to carbon dioxide and that contain either Mo or W in a mononuclear form in the active site. In the present work, the influence of Mo and W salts on the production of FDH by Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 was studied. Two different FDHs, one containing W (W-FDH) and a second incorporating either Mo or W (Mo/W-FDH), were purified. Both enzymes were isolated from cells grown in a medium supplemented with 1 μM molybdate, whereas only the W-FDH was purified from cells cultured in medium supplemented with 10 μM tungstate. We demonstrated that the genes encoding the Mo/W-FDH are strongly downregulated by W and slightly upregulated by Mo. Metal effects on the expression level of the genes encoding the W-FDH were less significant. Furthermore, the expression levels of the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdate and tungstate transport are downregulated under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. The molecular and biochemical properties of these enzymes and the selective incorporation of either Mo or W are discussed. PMID:21478344

  2. AFM study of microbial colonization and its deleterious effect on 304 stainless steel by Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in simulated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, S.J.; Pehkonen, S.O.

    2009-01-01

    The biofilm colonization dynamics of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 27774) on 304 stainless steels (304 SS) was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in simulated seawater-based media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results showed that the biofilm formed on the coupon surface by the two strains of bacteria increased in the coverage, heterogeneity and thickness with exposure time, thus resulting in the deterioration of the steel substratum underneath the biofilm in the form of pitting corrosion. The depth of pits induced by D. desulfuricans was larger than that by Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, which was mainly attributed to the enhanced corrosion of 304 SS coupons by the biogenic sulfide ions, as revealed by the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Tafel polarization curves. AFM was also used to determine cell attachment/detachment processes of the Pseudomonas and D. desulfuricans bacteria on the coupon surface by quantifying the tip-cell interaction forces. The interactive forces between the tip and the bacterial cell surface were considerably smaller than those between the tip and the cell-cell interface due to the accumulation of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) for both strains. Furthermore, the adhesion forces over the Pseudomonas cells were verified to be more attractive than those of D. desulfuricans due to the former being a slime-producer.

  3. Cobalt-, zinc- and iron-bound forms of adenylate kinase (AK) from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas: purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kladova, A. V.; Gavel, O. Yu.; Mukhopaadhyay, A.; Boer, D. R.; Teixeira, S.; Shnyrov, V. L.; Moura, I.; Moura, J. J. G.; Romão, M. J.; Trincão, J.; Bursakov, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) from D. gigas was purified and crystallized in three different metal-bound forms: Zn 2+ –AK, Co 2+ –AK and Fe 2+ –AK. Adenylate kinase (AK; ATP:AMP phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.4.3) is involved in the reversible transfer of the terminal phosphate group from ATP to AMP. AKs contribute to the maintenance of a constant level of cellular adenine nucleotides, which is necessary for the energetic metabolism of the cell. Three metal ions, cobalt, zinc and iron(II), have been reported to be present in AKs from some Gram-negative bacteria. Native zinc-containing AK from Desulfovibrio gigas was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to beyond 1.8 Å resolution. Furthermore, cobalt- and iron-containing crystal forms of recombinant AK were also obtained and diffracted to 2.0 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Zn 2+ –AK and Fe 2+ –AK crystallized in space group I222 with similar unit-cell parameters, whereas Co 2+ –AK crystallized in space group C2; a monomer was present in the asymmetric unit for both the Zn 2+ –AK and Fe 2+ –AK forms and a dimer was present for the Co 2+ –AK form. The structures of the three metal-bound forms of AK will provide new insights into the role and selectivity of the metal in these enzymes

  4. Biocorrosion of carbon steel alloys by an hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio capillatus isolated from a Mexican oil field separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, E. [IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Developement, Universites de Provence et de la Mediterranee, ESIL Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, Cedex 09 (France); Bethencourt, M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain)]. E-mail: manuel.bethencourt@uca.es; Botana, F.J. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Cano, M.J. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Sanchez-Amaya, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Corzo, A. [Departamento de Biologia, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Garcia de Lomas, J. [Departamento de Biologia, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Fardeau, M.L. [IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Developement, Universites de Provence et de la Mediterranee, ESIL Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, Cedex 09 (France); Ollivier, B. [IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Developement, Universites de Provence et de la Mediterranee, ESIL Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, F-13288 Marseille, Cedex 09 (France)

    2006-09-15

    The hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio capillatus (DSM14982{sup T}) was isolated from an oil field separator with serious corrosion problems; this is the study of its role in the corrosion of carbon steels under anaerobic conditions. Immersion tests with two steel alloys, St-35.8 (typical carbon steel employed in European naval industry), and API-5XL52 (weathering alloy steel employed in Mexican oil industries) were performed. Total exposure was 45 days and different concentrations of thiosulfate as electron acceptor for bacterial growth were employed. The samples immersed in media with SRB undergo fast activation and numerous active sites form on the surface. Microscopic observations were made by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Weight loss and electrochemical testing included open circuit potential (E {sub corr}), polarization resistance (R {sub p}), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise (EN) were measured with and without bacteria in the culture medium in order to determine corrosion rates and mechanisms. All electrochemical techniques have shown that after the end of the exponential phase the corrosion activity notably increased due to the high concentration of bacterial metabolites. Finally, the corrosion behavior of API-5XL52 was worse than St-35.8.

  5. Vitamin D levels in acne vulgaris patients treated with oral isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hamd, Mohammed Abu; El Taieb, Moustafa A; Ibrahim, Hassan M; Aly, Sanaa S

    2018-02-20

    Acne vulgaris is a common inflammatory skin disease. Vitamin D deficiency plays a role in many inflammatory skin diseases. It may play a role in pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. This study aimed to assess serum levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D in patients with acne vulgaris before and after treatment with isotretinoin and its relation with acne vulgaris severity. Ninety patients with acne vulgaris and 60 age-sex matched healthy subject as controls have been recruited in this study. Patients were treated with 0.75 mg/kg/d isotretinoin for 3 months. Serum level of 25 hydroxy vitamin D has been measured at baseline and after treatment. Serum levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D were significantly higher in patients with acne vulgaris than healthy controls (P = .001). There was a significant inverse relation between level of 25 hydroxy vitamin D and severity of acne vulgaris before treatment (P = .001). Serum levels of 25 hydroxy vitamin D were significantly increased after isotretinoin treatment in patients with acne vulgaris (P = .001). This study concluded that vitamin D may play a potential role in pathogenesis of acne vulgaris or acne vulgaris may have a negative effect on vitamin D synthesis. Further studies are needed to confirm these potential relations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Characterization of antioxidant activity of extract from Artemisia vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temraz, Abeer; El-Tantawy, Walid H

    2008-10-01

    Recent investigations have shown that the antioxidant properties of plants could be correlated with oxidative stress defense and different human diseases. In this respect flavonoids and other polyphenolic compounds have gained the greatest attention. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of aqueous extract of Artemisia vulgaris. The plant extract was tested for DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl, 2-picryl hydrazyl) radical scavenging, nitric oxide radical scavenging, reducing power assays, total phenol, flavonoid and flavonol content. Determination of serum ascorbic acid level, blood glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity in rats treated with 100 mg/Kg of Artemisia vulgaris extract. The extract exhibited scavenging potential with IC50 value of 11.4 micro g/ ml for DPPH, the value were found to close to those of standard rutin (10 micro g/ ml).On the other hand Artemisia vulgaris extract exhibited nitric oxide scavenging activity with IC50 value 125 mg/ ml. The reducing power of the extract depends on the amount of extract. The content of phenolic compounds (mg/g) in aqueous extract was found 19 +/- 0.16 mg/g plant extract and expressed in gallic acid equivalents (GAE). The flavonoidal and flavonol contents were found to be 7.96 +/- 0.76 and 3.4 +/- 0.0 respectively mg/g plant extract in rutin equivalent. The treatment of rats with aqueous extract of Artemisia vulgaris resulted in a significant increase in blood glutathione level, superoxide dismutase activity and serum ascorbic acid level as compared to their corresponding controls. The results obtained in the present study indicate that aqueous extract of Artemisia vulgaris is a potential source of natural antioxidants.

  7. Pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody profiling by proteomic technique.

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    Mina Kalantari-Dehaghi

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a mucocutaneous blistering disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies against the stratified squamous epithelium. Current understanding of PV pathophysiology does not explain the mechanism of acantholysis in patients lacking desmoglein antibodies, which justifies a search for novel targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. We tested 264 pemphigus and 138 normal control sera on the multiplexed protein array platform containing 701 human genes encompassing many known keratinocyte cell-surface molecules and members of protein families targeted by organ-non-specific PV antibodies. The top 10 antigens recognized by the majority of test patients' sera were proteins encoded by the DSC1, DSC3, ATP2C1, PKP3, CHRM3, COL21A1, ANXA8L1, CD88 and CHRNE genes. The most common combinations of target antigens included at least one of the adhesion molecules DSC1, DSC3 or PKP3 and/or the acetylcholine receptor CHRM3 or CHRNE with or without the MHC class II antigen DRA. To identify the PV antibodies most specific to the disease process, we sorted the data based on the ratio of patient to control frequencies of antigen recognition. The frequency of antigen recognition by patients that exceeded that of control by 10 and more times were the molecules encoded by the CD33, GP1BA, CHRND, SLC36A4, CD1B, CD32, CDH8, CDH9, PMP22 and HLA-E genes as well as mitochondrial proteins encoded by the NDUFS1, CYB5B, SOD2, PDHA1 and FH genes. The highest specificity to PV showed combinations of autoantibodies to the calcium pump encoded by ATP2C1 with C5a receptor plus DSC1 or DSC3 or HLA-DRA. The results identified new targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. Novel autoantibody signatures may help explain individual variations in disease severity and treatment response, and serve as sensitive and specific biomarkers for new diagnostic assays in PV patients.

  8. Pemphigus Vulgaris Autoantibody Profiling by Proteomic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Anhalt, Grant J.; Camilleri, Michael J.; Chernyavsky, Alex I.; Chun, Sookhee; Felgner, Philip L.; Jasinskas, Algis; Leiferman, Kristin M.; Liang, Li; Marchenko, Steve; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Zone, John J.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a mucocutaneous blistering disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies against the stratified squamous epithelium. Current understanding of PV pathophysiology does not explain the mechanism of acantholysis in patients lacking desmoglein antibodies, which justifies a search for novel targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. We tested 264 pemphigus and 138 normal control sera on the multiplexed protein array platform containing 701 human genes encompassing many known keratinocyte cell-surface molecules and members of protein families targeted by organ-non-specific PV antibodies. The top 10 antigens recognized by the majority of test patients’ sera were proteins encoded by the DSC1, DSC3, ATP2C1, PKP3, CHRM3, COL21A1, ANXA8L1, CD88 and CHRNE genes. The most common combinations of target antigens included at least one of the adhesion molecules DSC1, DSC3 or PKP3 and/or the acetylcholine receptor CHRM3 or CHRNE with or without the MHC class II antigen DRA. To identify the PV antibodies most specific to the disease process, we sorted the data based on the ratio of patient to control frequencies of antigen recognition. The frequency of antigen recognition by patients that exceeded that of control by 10 and more times were the molecules encoded by the CD33, GP1BA, CHRND, SLC36A4, CD1B, CD32, CDH8, CDH9, PMP22 and HLA-E genes as well as mitochondrial proteins encoded by the NDUFS1, CYB5B, SOD2, PDHA1 and FH genes. The highest specificity to PV showed combinations of autoantibodies to the calcium pump encoded by ATP2C1 with C5a receptor plus DSC1 or DSC3 or HLA-DRA. The results identified new targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. Novel autoantibody signatures may help explain individual variations in disease severity and treatment response, and serve as sensitive and specific biomarkers for new diagnostic assays in PV patients. PMID:23505434

  9. Validation of the commitment index of skin and mucous membranes in pemphigus vulgaris for the clinical evaluation of patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Sávio Reder de; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna; Nascimento, Leninha Valério do

    2011-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a severe bullous disease, produced by the autoimmune destruction of desmosomes, resulting in the formation of intraepidermal blisters, affecting skin and mucous membranes, with a mortality of 5 to 10%. Side effects of therapy contributed to increased morbidity, accounting for considerable part of the immediate causes of death due to PV today. There is no reproducible score for clinical evaluation of patients with Pemphigus vulgaris, making the therapeutic decision subjective, and its results, uncertain. Create and evaluate the reproducibility of a scoring system for clinical evaluation of patients with pemphigus vulgaris. The Commitment Index of Skin and Mucous in Pemphigus Vulgaris was created, scoring easily observed findings on clinical examination. During 3 years, 7 patients with active PV were submitted to pairings of Commitment Index of Skin and Mucous in Pemphigus Vulgaris conduced by independent examiners for determinate its reproducibility. The Commitment Index of Skin and Mucous in Pemphigus Vulgaris proved that it is reproducible in all the statistical methods used to assess agreement between the independent examiners. In adition, it permited us to separate the patients into classes of severity. The Commitment Index of Skin and Mucous in Pemphigus Vulgaris can classify the severity of Pemphigus Vulgaris, contributing to medical research, and to the standardization of the therapy in the near future.

  10. Skin prick test results to artesunate in children sensitized to Artemisia vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, F; Pantano, S; Rossi, M E; Montagnani, C; Chiappini, E; Novembre, E; Galli, L; de Martino, M

    2015-09-01

    Artemisia vulgaris L and Artemisia annua L (Chinese: qinghao) are similar plants of the Asterbaceae family. Artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivate of artemisin which is the active principle extract of the plant qinghao, has antimalarial properties. Some cases of severe allergic reactions to artesunate have been described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between positive skin tests to Artemisia vulgaris L allergen and a preparation of injectable artesunate. A total of 531 children were skin prick tested with inhalants (including Artemisia vulgaris L), foods, and artesunate. Among the 59 patients positive to Artemisia vulgaris L only one child was also positive to artesunate. No child was positive to artesunate in those negative to Artemisia vulgaris L. We conclude that Artemisia vulgaris L sensitization is not associated with sensitization to artesunate; consequently, skin test to artesunate should not be carried out before using the drug considering the rare allergic reactions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Identifikasi Kromatografi Lapis Tipis Sudamala (Artemisia vulgaris L.

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    Ira Arundina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Karsinoma sel skuamosa rongga mulut merupakan jenis kanker yang paling sering ditemukan di rongga mulut. Faktor risiko utama terjadi keganasan di rongga mulut meliputi riwayat serta kebiasaan mengkonsumsi tembakau dan atau alkohol. Tanaman sudamala (Artemisia vulgaris L. sering digunakan di masyarakat sebagai anti tumor pada organ pencernaan termasuk di rongga mulut, namun belum ada penelitian tentang bahan aktif yang berperan sebagai anti kanker di rongga mulut. Banyak didapatkan spesies dari genus Artemisia, sedangkan yang banyak tumbuh di Indonesia adalah spesies Artemisia vulgaris L. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menjelaskan identifikasi menggunakan Kromatografi Lapis Tipis (KLT dari sudamala. Penelitian meliputi ekstraksi sudamala, identifikasi ekstrak sudamala, fraksinasi sudamala menggunakan Kromatografi Kolom Vakum dan identifikasi dari fraksi sudamala menggunakan Kromatografi Lapis Tipis (KLT. Ekstrak heksan sudamala yang dilakukan fraksinasi menggunakan n-heksan: etil asetat menghasilkan 11 fraksi. Fraksi n-heksan: etil asetat (3:7,v/v dari sudamala yang teridentifikasi menggunakan Kromatografi Lapis Tipis (KLT mengandung terpenoid. Identification of Sudamala ( Artemisia vulgaris L. Thin Layer Chromatography. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the type of cancer which is most frequently found in oral cavity. The primary risk factor of malignancy in oral cavity includes the habit of consuming tobacco and or alcohol. The plant sudamala (Artemisia vulgaris L. is often used in the community as anti-tumor in digestive organ, including in oral cavity. However, there have been no studies on active ingredients playing the role as anti-cancer in oral cavity. The species are mostly from the genus Artemisia, while those generally growing in Indonesia are the species Artemisia vulgaris L. The objective of this study is to explain the identification by TLC of sudamala. The study was sudamala extraction, identification of sudamala extract

  12. Perbedaan Self-Image Remaja Laki-Laki dan Perempuan Penderita Acne Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Fauziah Nami

    2016-01-01

    The research aims to find out the differences self-images on adolescent boy’s Acne Vulgaris patient and on adolescent girl’s. Self-image is the mental picture of an individual about his physical appearance Jersild (1963). Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammation of the follicle polisebasea characterized by comedones, papules, pustules, and cysts in predilection areas, such as the face, shoulders, chest, and back. The population of the research is senior students in Medan who have Acne Vulgaris...

  13. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of aqueous extract of phaseolus vulgaris pods in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuaigel, Mohammad Faisal; Seif, Mosaad A; Albuali, Hamad Waleed; Alharbi, Omar; Alhawash, Amer

    2017-10-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the reduction potential of aqueous extract of casing of pods of phaseolus vulgaris in blood glucose and lipids levels among hyperglycemic streptozotocin (STZ)-induced rats. Oral administration of 150mg/kg of aqueous oral administration of aqueous pod extract of phaseolus vulgaris to diabetic rats for 40days resulted in a significant decrease in blood glucose (pphaseolus vulgaris and glibenclamide reduced the blood levels of glucose and lipids. In addition, aqueous extract of phaseolus vulgaris pods was more effective than glibenclamide in reducing blood glucose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris in a captopril-taking woman with angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Dmochowski, Marian; Pietkiewicz, Pawel; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 39-year-old woman with an apparent captopril-induced, contact mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris and angioedema, who took captopril during a bout of arterial hypertension. This exposure suggests that captopril and pathophysiology of angioedema stimulated the development of pemphigus vulgaris, which was diagnosed using the novel, indirect immunofluorescence BIOCHIP mosaic, with the modification to detect serum IgG4 autoantibodies. We discuss the patient, who experienced a chain of events leading to the active stage of pemphigus vulgaris, and review concepts of pemphigus vulgaris inducible by drugs and pathological immunity.

  15. Phaseolus vulgaris RbohB functions in lateral root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) catalyze the reduction of oxygen to generate superoxide anion, a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS produced by RBOHs play essential roles in diverse processes, such as root hair development, stomata closure and signaling mechanisms in response to abiotic stimuli and during plant-pathogen interactions. Recently, we found that PvRbohB silencing in transgenic Phaseolus vulgaris roots had a negative impact on lateral root density. In this work, we show that the downregulation of PvRbohB affects both the growth and ROS levels in recently emerged lateral roots. In addition, we found that the PvRbohB promoter was activated during lateral root primordium initiation in the pericycle, and remained active throughout lateral root development. This study identifies RBOHs as potentially important players in lateral root development in P. vulgaris.

  16. Pemphigus Vulgaris: How to Perform an Oral Biopsy Properly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes da Silva, Aneliza de Fatima; Bernabé, Daniel Galera; Miyahara, Glauco Issamu; Biasoli, Eder Ricardo; Callestini, Renata; Tjioe, Kellen Cristine

    2016-11-01

    Oral biopsy of vesiculobullous diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris often raises questions due to some particularities involving this procedure. The adequate selection of the area to be biopsied defines if the final diagnosis will be reached, being the Achiles heel of the proper management of the patient. Here, the authors report a case of a woman who sought for treatment of generalized oral blisters and ulcers that caused severe pain. She had undergone a previous biopsy by other professionals that was inconclusive. The authors' team diagnosed the patient with pemphigus vulgaris and treated her properly. The authors provide a brief discussion about the adequate oral site to be chosen when dealing with vesiculobullous diseases once it still remains a source of doubts for the dental surgeons.

  17. [Effects of seed priming on vigor of Prunella vulgaris seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Xiu; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Ru

    2008-03-01

    To select an effective way to enhance vigor of Prunella vulgaris seeds. Three population seeds were treated at the 20 degrees C and dark enviroment. Priming with 20% - 30% PEG and 200 - 400 mg x L(-1) GA3 could enhance seeds germination and vigor. Germination percentage of three population seeds treated with 0. 6% - 3.0% NaCl reduced, but they started to germinate in advance. Treated with 0.6% - 2.4% KNO3-KH2PO4, germination rate and vigor of seeds in Zijinshan and Pan' an both increased and the one in Bozhou decreased. Vigor of P. vulgaris seed treated with PEG and GA3 under proper concentration increases, while treated with KNO3-KH2PO, and NaCl low vigor seeds germination rate reduces.

  18. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

  19. Case of lupus vulgaris diagnosed 50 years after onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttawichai, Pattanawadee; Igarashi, Tsukasa; Kawana, Seiji

    2009-02-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but is a symptom that can lead to diagnosis of tuberculosis. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris in a 79-year-old woman who had a 50-year history of a slowly growing plaque on her right cheek. She visited many hospitals without resolution and the plaque gradually enlarged. Recently, she was misdiagnosed with eczema and prescribed topical steroids that had no effect, and she subsequently visited our outpatient clinic. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on histopathology, culture and polymerase chain reaction, and isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol were administered as antituberculosis treatment. Although the incidence of cutaneous tuberculosis has decreased significantly in developed countries, knowledge and awareness of the disease are still of importance for proper diagnosis and treatment.

  20. [Effects of different forest management alternatives on Sciurus vulgaris habitat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Long-Ru; He, Hong-Shi; Zong, Cheng; Zhou, Yu-Fei; Bu, Ren-Cang

    2008-05-01

    A spatially explicit landscape model LANDIS was applied to simulate the forest landscape changes under four management alternatives (no cutting, clear cutting, selective cutting I and II) in Youhao Forestry Bureau located in Small Xing' an Mountain from 2000 to 2200. The outcomes from LANDIS were combined with a landscape-level habitat suitability index (HSI) model in a GIS environment to assess Sciurus vulgaris habitat quality. The results showed that the increase of suitable habitat area and the decrease of marginally suitable area were the fastest under no cutting scenario, and the slowest under clear cutting scenario. Suitable habitat area increased faster while marginally suitable area decreased more slowly under selective cutting I scenario than under selective cutting II. Overall, the optimal management alternative of S. vulgaris habitat was in the sequence of no cutting, selective cutting I, selective cutting II, and clear cutting.

  1. Verruca vulgaris of the buccal mucosa: A case report

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    Aastha Mattoo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral verruca vulgaris is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Verruca vulgaris most frequently occurs on the fingers, toes, soles, and dorsal surfaces of hands and is mostly asymptomatic. Varieties of verrucous and papillary lesions affect the skin as well as oral mucosa which may be either benign or reactive. Common wart is one of the most commonly observed skin growths and a lesion of childhood. Intraoral warts can occur at any age with equal incidence in both genders but are most commonly seen in the third to fifth decade. It is found commonly on the palate followed by lip, tongue, buccal mucosa, and rarely seen on gingiva. Surgical excision with adequate margins is the treatment of choice.

  2. Biotransformation and Bioconcentration of Steroid Estrogens by Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, K. M.; Scrimshaw, M. D.; Lester, J. N.

    2002-01-01

    The biotransformation and bioconcentration of natural and synthetic steroid estrogens by Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by using batch-shaking experiments with incubation for 48 h in the light or dark. Estradiol and estrone were interconvertible in both light and dark conditions; however, this biotransformation showed a preference for estrone. In the light, 50% estradiol was further metabolized to an unknown product. Apart from biotransformation, estrone, as well as hydroxyestrone, estriol, and ethinylestradiol, was relatively stable in the algal culture, whereas estradiol valerate was hydrolyzed to estradiol and then to estrone within 3 h of incubation. All of the tested estrogens exhibited a degree of partitioning to C. vulgaris; however, the concentrations of estriol, hydroxyestrone, ethinylestradiol, and estradiol valerate were always below the quantification limits. For estradiol and estrone, the partitioning of these estrogens in the algal extracts to the filtrates was biotransformation. PMID:11823229

  3. Thyroid neoplasms after radiation therapy for adolescent acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloyan, E.; Lawrence, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    There is a potential hazard of thyroid cancer after exposure to external irradiation for the treatment of adolescent acne vulgaris. We noted a 60% incidence of thyroid carcinoma among 20 patients with such a history, who were operated on for thyroid nodules during a five-year period. Eighty-three percent of the patients with carcinoma had either a follicular or a mixed papillary-follicular carcinoma; 17% had a papillary carcinoma; 33% had regional node metastases; none had evidence of distant metastases. The interval between radiation exposure and thyroidectomy ranged from nine to 41 years. This association of thyroid neoplasms and a prior history of radiation for acne vulgaris may be coincidental and therefore remains to be proved by retrospective surveys of large numbers of treated patients with appropriate controls

  4. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear. PMID:27279815

  5. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Aldehyde Oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas Reveal a Dithiolene-Based Chemistry for Enzyme Activation and Inhibition by H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J.; González, Pablo J.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes of the xanthine oxidase (XO) family catalyze the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The molybdenum active site shows a distorted square-pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site) and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. The XO family member aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR) is an exception as presents in its catalytically competent form an equatorial oxo ligand instead of the sulfido ligand. Despite this structural difference, inactive samples of DgAOR can be activated upon incubation with dithionite plus sulfide, a procedure similar to that used for activation of desulfo-XO. The fact that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis indicates that the process leading to the activation of inactive DgAOR samples is different to that of desulfo-XO. We now report a combined kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study to unveil the enzyme modification responsible for the inactivation and the chemistry that occurs at the Mo site when DgAOR is activated. In contrast to XO, which is activated by resulfuration of the Mo site, DgAOR activation/inactivation is governed by the oxidation state of the dithiolene moiety of the pyranopterin cofactor, which demonstrates the non-innocent behavior of the pyranopterin in enzyme activity. We also showed that DgAOR incubation with dithionite plus sulfide in the presence of dioxygen produces hydrogen peroxide not associated with the enzyme activation. The peroxide molecule coordinates to molybdenum in a η2 fashion inhibiting the enzyme activity. PMID:24391748

  6. Kinetic and structural studies of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas reveal a dithiolene-based chemistry for enzyme activation and inhibition by H(2O(2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Marangon

    Full Text Available Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes of the xanthine oxidase (XO family catalyze the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The molybdenum active site shows a distorted square-pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. The XO family member aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR is an exception as presents in its catalytically competent form an equatorial oxo ligand instead of the sulfido ligand. Despite this structural difference, inactive samples of DgAOR can be activated upon incubation with dithionite plus sulfide, a procedure similar to that used for activation of desulfo-XO. The fact that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis indicates that the process leading to the activation of inactive DgAOR samples is different to that of desulfo-XO. We now report a combined kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study to unveil the enzyme modification responsible for the inactivation and the chemistry that occurs at the Mo site when DgAOR is activated. In contrast to XO, which is activated by resulfuration of the Mo site, DgAOR activation/inactivation is governed by the oxidation state of the dithiolene moiety of the pyranopterin cofactor, which demonstrates the non-innocent behavior of the pyranopterin in enzyme activity. We also showed that DgAOR incubation with dithionite plus sulfide in the presence of dioxygen produces hydrogen peroxide not associated with the enzyme activation. The peroxide molecule coordinates to molybdenum in a η(2 fashion inhibiting the enzyme activity.

  7. Kinetic and structural studies of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas reveal a dithiolene-based chemistry for enzyme activation and inhibition by H(2)O(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Jacopo; Correia, Hugo D; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, José J G; Romão, Maria J; González, Pablo J; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes of the xanthine oxidase (XO) family catalyze the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The molybdenum active site shows a distorted square-pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site) and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. The XO family member aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR) is an exception as presents in its catalytically competent form an equatorial oxo ligand instead of the sulfido ligand. Despite this structural difference, inactive samples of DgAOR can be activated upon incubation with dithionite plus sulfide, a procedure similar to that used for activation of desulfo-XO. The fact that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis indicates that the process leading to the activation of inactive DgAOR samples is different to that of desulfo-XO. We now report a combined kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study to unveil the enzyme modification responsible for the inactivation and the chemistry that occurs at the Mo site when DgAOR is activated. In contrast to XO, which is activated by resulfuration of the Mo site, DgAOR activation/inactivation is governed by the oxidation state of the dithiolene moiety of the pyranopterin cofactor, which demonstrates the non-innocent behavior of the pyranopterin in enzyme activity. We also showed that DgAOR incubation with dithionite plus sulfide in the presence of dioxygen produces hydrogen peroxide not associated with the enzyme activation. The peroxide molecule coordinates to molybdenum in a η(2) fashion inhibiting the enzyme activity.

  8. Aromatic aldehydes at the active site of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas: reactivity and molecular details of the enzyme-substrate and enzyme-product interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Hugo D; Marangon, Jacopo; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, Jose J G; Romão, Maria J; González, Pablo J; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas aldehyde oxidoreductase (DgAOR) is a mononuclear molybdenum-containing enzyme from the xanthine oxidase (XO) family, a group of enzymes capable of catalyzing the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The kinetic studies reported in this work showed that DgAOR catalyzes the oxidative hydroxylation of aromatic aldehydes, but not heterocyclic compounds. NMR spectroscopy studies using (13)C-labeled benzaldehyde confirmed that DgAOR catalyzes the conversion of aldehydes to the respective carboxylic acids. Steady-state kinetics in solution showed that high concentrations of the aromatic aldehydes produce substrate inhibition and in the case of 3-phenyl propionaldehyde a suicide substrate behavior. Hydroxyl-substituted aromatic aldehydes present none of these behaviors but the kinetic parameters are largely affected by the position of the OH group. High-resolution crystallographic structures obtained from single crystals of active-DgAOR soaked with benzaldehyde showed that the side chains of Phe425 and Tyr535 are important for the stabilization of the substrate in the active site. On the other hand, the X-ray data of DgAOR soaked with trans-cinnamaldehyde showed a cinnamic acid molecule in the substrate channel. The X-ray data of DgAOR soaked with 3-phenyl propionaldehyde showed clearly how high substrate concentrations inactivate the enzyme by binding covalently at the surface of the enzyme and blocking the substrate channel. The different reactivity of DgAOR versus aldehyde oxidase and XO towards aromatic aldehydes and N-heterocyclic compounds is explained on the basis of the present kinetic and structural data.

  9. Dicamba causes genomic instability in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Murat; Taşpınar, Mahmut Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Yaǧci, Semra; Aǧar, Güleray

    2017-04-01

    The herbicide 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (dicamba) is principally used widely agriculture today. The widely use of dicamba in agriculture may represent a potential toxic risks to some crops. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of dicamba by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings. The results showed that persistent DNA damage and decreased genomic template stability (GTS) induced by dicamba (0,2, 0,4 and 0,6 ppm).

  10. Intralesional Rituximab in the Treatment of Refractory Oral Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Keshavamurthy; Kanwar, Amrinder J; Mittal, Ankit; Dogra, Sunil; Minz, Ranjana W; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Oral lesions of pemphigus vulgaris are usually recalcitrant and respond slowly to treatments. Corticosteroid injection is considered to be the most effective local treatment in oral pemphigus vulgaris. However, intralesional corticosteroids are not effective in all remnant lesions. In 3 such patients with pemphigus vulgaris, we evaluated the utility of 2 injections (on days 1 and 15) of intralesional rituximab, 5 mg/cm², in terms of accelerated healing, limitation of the use of systemic immunosuppressants, and reduction of their adverse effects. Three patients (1 man and 2 women) received 2 doses of intralesional rituximab in March and April 2013. All 3 patients responded to the treatment. In patients 1 and 2, the objective severity score was reduced to 0 at the final visit from a baseline score of 4 and 5, respectively (range, 0-11). The subject severity score in these patients was reduced to 1.0 and 0 from a baseline score of 22.0 and 22.5, respectively. After clinical remission was achieved, patient 3 developed a relapse of mucosal lesions. At the final visit, all of the patients were satisfied with the treatment, with a mean satisfaction score of 8 (maximum score, 10). We found a marked decline in the CD19 cell count from a pretreatment mean count of 287 cells/µL to 6 cells/µL on day 15 after a single intralesional rituximab injection. Adverse events were limited to local pain in 1 patient. Intralesional rituximab administration lacks the adverse effects of intravenous administration. This method reduces the amount of drug administered and therefore is less expensive. Encouraging results from our study should prompt further evaluation of this novel route of rituximab administration in patients with refractory oral pemphigus vulgaris.

  11. Dyes adsorption on magnetically modified Chlorella vulgaris cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafaříková, Miroslava; Pona, B. M. R.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Weyda, František; Šafařík, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2008), s. 486-492 ISSN 1018-4619 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 108; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/094 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Chlorella vulgaris * magnetically modified cells * dyes Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2008

  12. Nail changes in female pemphigus vulgaris patients on immunosuppressive therapy ?

    OpenAIRE

    El-Komy, M.M.; Abdel Halim, D.M.; Samir, N.; Hegazy, R.A.; Gawdat, H.I.; Shoeb, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy may develop nail alterations resulting from infection, skin disorder, or drug regimen. Objective: This study aims to describe nail changes in PV female patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy and to report the frequency of associated fungal and bacterial growth in the patients’ nails. Methods: Twenty-five female PV patients who had at least one acquired finger or toenail abnormality and had been admini...

  13. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochloris oculata in effluents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microalgae were inoculated in photobioreactors in 6 L of medium (WTF or BBM) at an initial concentration of 1.0 × 106 cells ml-1 at 20 ± 2°C. The highest average cell density as well as the highest productivity of biomass observed in the treatments was C. vulgaris treatment in BBM and multi-LED lighting (8.83 × 107 cells ...

  14. Standardization of phaseolus vulgaris valves by macro- and microscopic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Ігорівна Крюкова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last years on the Ukrainian pharmaceutical market a tendency to increase the range of the national herbal remedies is observed. Native flora herbs, having a sufficient resource base, deserve special attention and are characterized by a number of economic benefits for manufacturers. The implementation of herbal remedies in medical practice is accompanied by the necessity to improve the quality control of herbal material and to develop normative documents. Macro- and microscopy analysis becomes important at standardization of herbal material especially cut and powdered.Aim. The aim of our work was to carry out macro- and microscopy research of Phaseolus vulgaris and to determine its diagnostic morphologic and anatomic features.Methods. The conventional research methods in pharmacognosy have been used; photomicrography has been taken by using microscope MC-10 and Samsung PL 50 camera.Results. As a result of research, the microscopic diagnostic characteristics for Phaseolus vulgaris valves have been proposed, e.g.: the valves are elongated, straight, navicular or grooved, twisted to some extent; the external surface is smooth or slightly undulating, mat, pale yellow or yellow; the internal surface is shiny, white or yellowish-white. Sometimes carpophore (stalk may occur. The microscopic diagnostic features have been determined and offered, e.g.: cells of outer epidermis are pentagonal and hexagonal, with plicated cuticle; stomata are surrounded by 3–4 subsidiary narrow cells, additionally surrounded by 5–6 narrow cells; cover trichomes and glandular trichomes are elongated, pointed and unbranched; xylem vessels and tracheids; non-bundled structure stalk fragments with pericyclic sclerenchyma and secretory cells in the phloem.Conclusion. Research on determination of the macro- and microscopic characteristics of Phaseolus vulgaris valves has been carried out. The diagnostic morphological and anatomic elements in herbal material have

  15. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Darren D Lynn,1 Tamara Umari,1 Cory A Dunnick,2,3 Robert P Dellavalle2–4 1Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, 3Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, 4Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Importance: Acne vulgaris is ...

  16. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tramacere

    Full Text Available The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa. In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  17. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  18. Lupus vulgaris of the popliteal fossa: a delayed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Ilknur Kivanc; Kayaoglu, Semra; Ekmekci, Tugba Rezan; Kutlu, Safiye; Arpag, Esra Saygin

    2007-07-13

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis. It commonly presents on the head and neck regions. The diagnosis may be difficult when LV occurs at unexpected regions or in unusual clinical forms. Sometimes special stains for the organism and mycobacterial cultures may be negative. Nevertheless, it is usually possible to reach the correct diagnosis of LV using clinical and histopathological findings. But at times, a therapeutic trial with antitubercular agents may be required.

  19. Biotransformation and Bioconcentration of Steroid Estrogens by Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, K. M.; Scrimshaw, M. D.; Lester, J. N.

    2002-01-01

    The biotransformation and bioconcentration of natural and synthetic steroid estrogens by Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by using batch-shaking experiments with incubation for 48 h in the light or dark. Estradiol and estrone were interconvertible in both light and dark conditions; however, this biotransformation showed a preference for estrone. In the light, 50% estradiol was further metabolized to an unknown product. Apart from biotransformation, estrone, as well as hydroxyestrone, estr...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002937 gi|46578950 >1h0hB 1 196 39 230 4e-37 ... ref|YP_009758.1| hmc operon prote...in 2 [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] gb|AAS95017.1| hmc operon protei...n 2 ... [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. ... Hildenborough] sp|P33389|HMC2_DESVH Protein DVU0535 (HMC

  1. Detection of apoptosis in pemphigus vulgaris by TUNEL technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Vega-Memíje, Maria Elisa; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Aguilar-Urbano, Marco António

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus is part of a group of blistering diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. Based on its autoimmune origin, autoantibodies develop in pemphigus that are directed toward cell surface components of keratinocytes. However, some data cannot be explained, such as the lack of a relationship between autoantibody levels and the severity of clinical manifestations, treatment resistance, the presence of inflammatory infiltrates and the potential occurrence of apoptosis as determinants of vesicle formation. To examine the presence of apoptosis in pemphigus vulgaris by TUNEL technique. In this cross-sectional study, we selected 15 paraffin-embedded tissues from subjects who were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The samples were subjected to TUNEL assay and examined under an Olympus BX61 fluorescence microscope. Positivity was categorized dichotomously, and the statistical analysis was performed using the X2 test. Positivity was observed in basal layer cells in 14 (93.3%) cases. In 13 (86.7%) of the positive cases, we noted espinosum and granular layers that formed the blister roof, and in 12 cases (80%), positive acantholytic cells were observed. TUNEL positivity was observed in pemphigus vulgaris, implicating apoptosis in the pathophysiology of this condition, which can help guide the development of apoptotic blockers as therapeutics.

  2. HLA- DR Alleles in Pakistani Patients of Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sara Waqar; Iftikhar, Nadia; Ahmed, Tahir Aziz; Bashir, Mukarram

    2015-04-01

    To determine frequency of HLA-DR alleles in Pakistani patients of pemphigus vulgaris in comparison with local healthy controls. Cross-sectional, comparative study. Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from January 2011 to January 2014. Twenty eight patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris referred from Department of Dermatology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi were included. Patients were compared with a group of 150 unrelated local healthy subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected in Tri-potassium EDTA. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01--DRB1*16) using SSP (sequence specific primers). HLA type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among patient group and control group was calculated by direct counting and significance of their association was determined by Fisher's exact test/ Chi square test. A total of 12 male and 16 female patients, with age ranging from 21 to 34 (mean 23.4 years) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*04 was observed (50% versus 20.7% in controls, p pemphigus vulgaris in Pakistani population.

  3. HLA- DR Alleles in Pakistani Patients of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S. W.; Ahmad, T. A.; Bashir, M.; Iftikhar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequency of HLA-DR alleles in Pakistani patients of pemphigus vulgaris in comparison with local healthy controls. Study Design: Cross-sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from January 2011 to January 2014. Methodology: Twenty eight patients with biopsy proven diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris referred from Department of Dermatology, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi were included. Patients were compared with a group of 150 unrelated local healthy subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood collected in Tri-potassium EDTA. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01 - DRB1*16) using SSP (sequence specific primers). HLA type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among patient group and control group was calculated by direct counting and significance of their association was determined by Fisher's exact test/ Chi square test. Results: A total of 12 male and 16 female patients, with age ranging from 21 to 34 (mean 23.4 years) were genotype for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*04 was observed (50% versus 20.7% in controls, p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is a strong association of HLA-DRB1*04 with pemphigus vulgaris in Pakistani population. (author)

  4. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  5. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and associated bacteria in photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Intihar, Veera M; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test three flat plate photobioreactor configurations for growth of Chlorella vulgaris under non-axenic conditions and to characterize and quantify associated bacterial communities. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water-based media to introduce background bacterial population. Growth of algae was monitored over time with three independent methods. Additionally, the quantity and quality of eukaryotes and bacteria were analysed using culture-independent molecular tools based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Static mixers used in the flat plate photobioreactors did not generally enhance the growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum specific growth rate were 1.0 g l(-1) and 2.0 day(-1) respectively. Bacterial growth as determined by QPCR was associated with the growth of C. vulgaris. Based on PCR-DGGE, bacteria in the cultures mainly originated from the tap water. Bacterial community profiles were diverse but reproducible in all flat plate cultures. Most prominent bacteria in the C. vulgaris cultures belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and especially to the genus Sphingomonas. Analysis of the diversity of non-photosynthetic microorganisms in algal mass cultures can provide useful information on the public health aspects and unravel community interactions. © 2011 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Enhancement of hydrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris by hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Charnho; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yoo, Hah Young; Lee, Ju Hun; Lee, Soo Kweon; Kim, Seung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is considered as one of the potential sources of biomass for bio-based products because it consists of large amounts of carbohydrates. In this study, hydrothermal acid hydrolysis with five different acids (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, peracetic acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid) was carried out to produce fermentable sugars (glucose, galactose). The hydrothermal acid hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid showed the highest sugar production. C. vulgaris was hydrolyzed with various concentrations of hydrochloric acid [0.5-10 % (w/w)] and microalgal biomass [20-140 g/L (w/v)] at 121 °C for 20 min. Among the concentrations examined, 2 % hydrochloric acid with 100 g/L biomass yielded the highest conversion of carbohydrates (92.5 %) into reducing sugars. The hydrolysate thus produced from C. vulgaris was fermented using the yeast Brettanomyces custersii H1-603 and obtained bioethanol yield of 0.37 g/g of algal sugars.

  7. Metastasized squamous cell carcinoma developed on lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pătraşcu, V; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Tănase, Loredana Elena; Mogoantă, S S

    2008-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the most frequent cutaneous tuberculosis, representing more than 55% of the tuberculoses with this location. Malignization can occur after a long latency (10-30 years), in 1-2% of the cases, and it is mainly in squamous cell carcinoma. The histological exam is highly important in the observation of neoplasic transformations. The authors present a 59-years-old female patient, from the rural environment, working as a farmer, with lupus vulgaris developing since her first childhood years. It started at the age of 2 years, at the right ear lobule, after the empiric perforation for earrings. The evolution was progressive, eccentric, interesting the pinna and the right cheek in the meanwhile. At the first examination, in 2002, a diffuse mass of red-yellowish infiltration was found at the level of the right ear and the right cheek. In the following two years, an ulcero-vegetating tumor developed at the level of the right ear lobule, accompanied by the presence of a right retromandibular adenopathy, of about 1 cm, which was proved by the histopathologic exam to be a squamous cell carcinoma developed from a lupus vulgaris. After scraping out the right retromandibular ganglion, detected by palpation, a histological exam showed ganglion metastasis.

  8. Recycling of food waste as nutrients in Chlorella vulgaris cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kin Yan; Pleissner, Daniel; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated in food waste hydrolysate. The highest exponential growth rate in terms of biomass of 0.8day(-1) was obtained in a hydrolysate consisting of 17.9gL(-1) glucose, 0.1gL(-1) free amino nitrogen, 0.3gL(-1) phosphate and 4.8mgL(-1) nitrate, while the growth rate was reduced in higher concentrated hydrolysates. C. vulgaris utilized the nutrients recovered from food waste for the formation of biomass and 0.9g biomass was produced per gram glucose consumed. The microalgal biomass produced in nutrient sufficient batch cultures consisted of around 400mgg(-1) carbohydrates, 200mgg(-1) proteins and 200mgg(-1) lipids. The conversion of nutrients derived from food waste and the balanced biomass composition make C. vulgaris a promising strain for the recycling of food waste in food, feed and fuel productions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular phylogeography of European Sciurus vulgaris: refuge within refugia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Andrea; Amori, Giovanni; Aloise, Gaetano; Lisi, Irene; Tosi, Guido; Wauters, Lucas A; Randi, Ettore

    2009-06-01

    The red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) is a well-known forest animal distributed all over Europe. Still, we are far from having a firm knowledge of the species' phylogeography. This study investigates the genetic differentiation of S. vulgaris across the species' Eurasian range, using sequence data from the mitochondrial DNA gene (D-loop, 252 base pairs, cytochrome b, 359 base pairs), and eight variable autosomal microsatellite loci genotyped for 236 individuals. The results reveal the presence of two main mitochondrial phylogroups. The first clade comprises the individuals from the region of Calabria in southern Italy, belonging to the subspecies S. v. meridionalis, while the second clade contains the remainder of the studied individuals. Bayesian analysis of microsatellite genotypes resulted in three main clusterings corresponding to the three S. vulgaris subspecies: infuscatus, meridionalis and fuscoater. Geographical distribution of mtDNA haplotypes and mismatch analysis suggest a common refugium for the red squirrel across most of its present range from which expansion happened rather rapidly. The genotype mixing of italicus with northern populations could be a residual of postglacial expansion. The lack of mixing between the Calabrian lineage and the rest of European red squirrel haplotypes can be seen as evidence for distinct histories throughout the Pleistocene. Calabrian mtDNA probably diverged in an ice age contraction and remained isolated from the neighbouring squirrel populations until very recent times.

  10. Novel pharmacological approaches for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente Duarte de Sousa, Isabel Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease worldwide; yet, current treatment options, although effective, are associated with unwanted side effects, chronicity, relapses and recurrences. The adequate control of the four pathogenic mechanisms, involved in the appearance of acne lesions, is paramount to treatment success. The authors discuss and evaluate the pathogenic pathways related to the mechanisms of action of novel molecules, which are currently under investigation for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The manuscript is based on comprehensive searches made through PubMed, GoogleScholar and ClinicalTrial.gov, using different combination of key words, which include acne vulgaris, pathogenesis, treatment, sebogenesis and Propionibacterium acnes. In the near future, more effective treatments with fewer side effects are expected. The use of topical antiandrogens, acetylcholine inhibitors and PPAR modulators seem to be promising options for controlling sebum production. Retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agents and IL-1α inhibitors have the potential to become legitimate alternative options to retinoid therapy in the management of infundibular dyskeratosis. Indeed, the authors believe that there will likely be a decline in the use of antibiotics for controlling P. acnes colonization and targeting the inflammation cascade.

  11. Profile of acne vulgaris-A hospital-based study from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adityan Balaji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is believed to be the most common disease of the skin. There is no Indian study on the profile of acne vulgaris, markers of severe forms of acne vulgaris and a possible correlation between acne vulgaris and markers of androgenicity in females. Aim: To study the profile of acne vulgaris, its seasonal variation, relationship with smoking and possible correlation between acne vulgaris and markers of androgenicity in females. Methods: The study was conducted between August 2006 and June 2008. All patients with acne vulgaris who consented to participate in the study were included. The parameters evaluated included age, gender, age of onset, duration of lesions, site of lesions, grade, relation with menstrual cycle, markers of androgenicity, number of acne lesions such as comedones, papules pustules and nodules, number and site of post-acne scarring, post-acne hyperpigmentation, seasonal variation and history of smoking. Results: A total of 309 patients with acne vulgaris were included in the study. The frequency of acne vulgaris in our study was 1.068%. Mean age of the study group was 19.78 years. Male to female ratio was 1.25:1. The most common age group involved was 16 to 20 years (59.8%. Mean age of onset was 15.97 years. Face was involved in all the patients, followed by back (28.2%, chest (20.1%, neck (9.4% and arms (10%. In the older age groups, women were more likely to report having acne vulgaris than men ( P = 0.01. The closed comedones outnumbered open comedones by a factor of 4.9:1. A total of 186 patients (60.2% had grade 1 acne vulgaris, 85 (27.5% had grade 2 acne, 8 (2.6% had grade 3 acne and 30 (9.7% had grade 4 acne vulgaris. There was a higher incidence of scarring (39.5% and post-acne hyperpigmentation (24.6% in our study. In female patients, 57.7% had premenstrual flare and 12.4% had cutaneous markers of androgenicity. There was no association between severity of acne vulgaris and other markers of

  12. Effect of uranium uptake on oxidative stress reactions for Phaseolus vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    CUYPERS, Ann; Vandenhove, H.; van Hees, M.; Wannijn, J.

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the biological effects induced by bioaccumulation of uranium by Phaseolus vulgaris. Following a 1 week exposure, plant development and the capacity of enzymes involved in the anti-oxidative defense mechanism of the plant were analyzed. uranium; oxidative stress; Phaseolus vulgaris; uptake; hydroponics

  13. Cardiac surgery in a patient with pemphigus vulgaris: anesthetic and surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mitsuko; Rhee, Amanda J; Rakasi, Raghuveer R; Yildirim, Asu; Silvay, George; Reddy, Ramachandra C

    2014-03-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disorder that causes blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. We present a patient with pemphigus vulgaris who required combined coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve repair. The challenges that we faced and modifications to the technique required in this situation are described and reviewed.

  14. The response of Acne vulgaris to antibiotics both oral and topical | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that involves pilosebaceous units. Many systemic treatments used for acne vulgaris such as antibiotics, hormonal therapy, isotretinoin and occasionally, corticosteroids. Oral azithromycin has been advocated by some in the treatment of acne, but its efficacy ...

  15. Biology and host specificity of Rhinusa pilosa, a recommended biological control agent of Linaria vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre Gassmann; Rosemarie De Clerck-Floate; Sharlene Sing; Ivo Tosevski; Milana Mitrovic; Olivier Krstic

    2014-01-01

    Linaria vulgaris Mill. (Plantaginaceae), common or yellow toadflax, is a Eurasian short-lived perennial forb invasive throughout temperate North America. Rhinusa pilosa (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) is a univoltine shoot-galling weevil found exclusively on L. vulgaris in Europe. Under no-choice test conditions, 13 non-native Linaria species exposed toR....

  16. Effect of gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorella vulgaris had the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3) which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or to convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of this study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally expressed in mammalian cells and ...

  17. Nasal, oral, and pharyngolaryngeal manifestations of pemphigus vulgaris: Endoscopic ororhinolaryngologic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering disorder that involves the skin and mucous membranes. Few reports have described nasal and oropharyngolaryngeal lesions in pemphigus vulgaris using an endoscopic ororhinolaryngologic examination. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 11 patients with pemphigus vulgaris between 2001 and 2013 with respect to their symptoms, lesion sites, lesion features, and treatments received. All patients had undergone an endoscopic ororhinolaryngologic examination. Their mucosa-related symptoms were sore throat, oral pain, odynophagia, gingival bleeding, hoarseness, and epistaxis. The most frequent sites were the oral cavity (gingiva and buccal mucosa), larynx (epiglottis and vocal fold), oropharynx (soft palate), and nasal cavity (nasal septum). Lesions were typically characterized by erosion, erosion with a whitish exudate, and erythematous patches. Thus, our study findings reveal that pemphigus vulgaris involves both the nasal and oropharyngolaryngeal regions. Patients with pemphigus vulgaris should undergo an endoscopic ororhinolaryngologic examination to determine the range of their lesions.

  18. Co-pyrolysis characteristics of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and coal through TGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunxiang; Ma, Xiaoqian; He, Yao

    2012-08-01

    To find out an alternative of coal saving, a kind of microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) which is widespread in fresh water was introduced into coal pyrolysis process. In this work, the pyrolysis experiments of C. vulgaris and coal blend (CCB) were carried out by TGA, and those of C. vulgaris and coal were also taken respectively as control groups. It was found that: the TG and DTG profiles of CCB were similar to C. vulgaris, but different from coal under various blending ratios; DTG profiles of CCB were different at several heating rates; interaction was observed between the solid phases of CCB; kinetic triplets were determined by the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), and master-plots method, respectively. The results provide a reference for further study on co-pyrolysis of microalgae and coal to a certain extent. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l. ) walp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos)

    1982-05-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation.

  20. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l.) walp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M.

    1982-01-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation. (Author) [pt

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Topical Niacinamide for Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: To investigate the efficacy and safety of topical 4% naicinamide gel cream in the treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris and to assess the quality of life of acne patients.Material and Method: Twenty-nine female patients aged 16-38 (mean: 23.57±5.42 years with mild to moderate acne vulgaris who presented in dermatology outpatient clinic were enrolled in the study. All patients applied 4% niacinamide gel cream (Vivatinell-acnecinamide gel cream® on their faces twice daily for eight weeks. The number of lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory was counted at 0, 2, 4 and 8 weeks. The side effects (erythema, desquamation, burning and dryness were recorded. The Skindex-29, a quality-of-life measure for patients with skin disease, was administered to the subjects at the beginning and the end of treatment.Results: The decrease in the mean number of inflammatory lesions was statistically significant at the end of the treatment (pre-treatment vs. post-treatment: 12.24 vs. 6.14; p =0.000. However, there was no statistically significant decrease in the number of non-inflammatory lesions at the end of the eight weeks. The niacinamide gel cream was generally well tolerated. There was statistically significant improvement in the Skindex-29 scale scores (p =0.000 at the end of the treatment.Conclusion: Topical 4% niacinamide gel cream may be an alternative treatment for inflammatory lesions of mild to moderate acne vulgaris.

  2. Phytochemical analysis and hemodynamic actions of Artemisia vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigno, X T; de Guzman, F; Flora, A M

    2000-01-01

    Artemisia vulgaris L. is widely used in the Philippines for its anti-inflammatory properties. The plant was cultivated and mature leaves were collected and washed. The dried leaves were extracted with both distilled water and chloroform. NMR data were obtained using a Varian Unity 500 MHz spectrophotometer. High and low-resolution mass spectra were obtained on a Finnigan MAT 96 high resolution gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer with a MAT ICIS operating system. The leaves yielded 2 sesquiterpene lactones and a novel aromatic compound. Two partition fractions from the aqueous extracts and four partition fractions from the chloroform extracts were tested on male Sprague-Dawley rats using both the in situ mesenteric circulation and the isolated perfused mesentery. In the isolated perfused rat mesentery, administration of 10% w/v solutions of water extract fractions FGN 63-1 and FGN 63-2 of A. vulgaris were highly effective in reversing the hypertensive action induced by norepinephrine, but they did not change the regional mesenteric pressures when given at baseline. In the intact rat, injection of 10 mg/ml of FGN 63-1 and chloroform extract FGN 64-2 did not significantly alter baseline blood pressures, but were able to reverse the increase in mean systolic and diastolic pressures induced by norepinephrine. The same fractions did not exert any significant effect on heart rate in either the normotensive or hypertensive states. The present data suggest that aqueous and chloroform extracts from leaves of A. vulgaris have anti-hypertensive actions but have no significant effects on cardiovascular hemodynamics under basal conditions.

  3. Irradiated larval vaccination of ponies against Strongylus vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klei, T.R.; Torbert, B.J.; Chapman, M.R.; Ochoa, R.

    1982-01-01

    Nonimmune pony foals 9 to 12 mo of age were vaccinated with third-stage Strongylus vulgaris larvae (L3) irradiated with 70, 100, or 130 Kr of gamma radiation. Ponies receiving per os inoculations of L3 irradiated with 70 or 100 Kr were protected from the clinical disease and lesions associated with challenge infections of 4,300 L3, when compared to nonvaccinated controls. Similarly, the numbers of worms from the challenging population recovered from successfully vaccinated animals were significantly lower than from nonvaccinated controls. The degree of resistance that develops in individuals can be semiquantitated based on clinical and pathological responses

  4. Primer registro de Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) en la Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Maité MASCIOCCHI; Jacqueline R. BEGGS; James M. CARPENTER; Juan C. CORLEY

    2010-01-01

    Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus) es un véspido social nativo de la región Holártica. En este trabajo reportamos la primera detección de esta especie en Argentina. Obreras de esta avispa fueron capturadas cerca de la ciudad de San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina) en Febrero de 2010, mientras se tomaban muestras de otra avispa invasora, Vespula germanica (Fabricius) o chaqueta amarilla, de morfología externa y hábitos similares a la anteriormente mencionada. Además, detallamos algunos caracteres de i...

  5. First record of Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Masciocchi, Maité; Beggs, Jacqueline R.; Carpenter, James M.; Corley, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus) es un véspido social nativo de la región Holártica. En este trabajo reportamos la primera detección de esta especie en Argentina. Obreras de esta avispa fueron capturadas cerca de la ciudad de San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina) en Febrero de 2010, mientras se tomaban muestras de otra avispa invasora, Vespula germanica (Fabricius) o chaqueta amarilla, de morfología externa y hábitos similares a la anteriormente mencionada. Además, detallamos algunos caracteres de i...

  6. Primer registro de Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae en la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maité MASCIOCCHI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus es un véspido social nativo de la región Holártica. En este trabajo reportamos la primera detección de esta especie en Argentina. Obreras de esta avispa fueron capturadas cerca de la ciudad de San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina en Febrero de 2010, mientras se tomaban muestras de otra avispa invasora, Vespula germanica (Fabricius o chaqueta amarilla, de morfología externa y hábitos similares a la anteriormente mencionada. Además, detallamos algunos caracteres de identificación y características biológicas.

  7. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp ...

  8. ACRODERMATITIS CONTINUA SUPPURATIVA HALLOPEAU IN COMBINATION WITH LOCALIZED PSORIASIS VULGARIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sokolovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available А clinical case of a rare form of pustular psoriasis, known as “acrodermatitis continua suppurativa Hallopeau” is described. The involvement of the distal phalanges of the fingers and toes in combination with localized psoriasis vulgaris is observed. Specific features of this case are the presence of two different forms of the disease and comorbidities, that limits treatment options. The article provides current data on the clinical features and management of acrodermamtitis continua suppurativa Hallopeau. An acceptable personalized treatment with systemic retinoids and topical substances containing betamethasone dipropionate and calcipotriol has been proposed.

  9. Characterization of a coryneform isolate from fasciated mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battikhi, M N G

    2002-04-01

    The morphological and physiological features of coryneform isolated from fasciated mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) display many morphological similarities with the plant pathogenic corynebacteria, but differ from Corynebacterium fascians in exhibiting motility albeit in only a small proportion of each cell population, and by its ability to hydrolyze asculin, its failure to produce urease and differences in pigmentation. The isolate appears to be related to Corynebacterium fascians in its ability to cause fasciation but physiologically and biochemically it resembles Cornyebacterium poinsettiae and C. flaccumfaciens, both of which were transferred to the genus Curtobacterium.

  10. Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oils from Thymus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A.B. Vieira de Melo

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris leaves was studied using experimental data recently obtained in the Florys S.p.A. laboratory. Mass transfer coefficients in the supercritical and solid phases from extraction curves at 40°C and 20 MPa were evaluated using a mathematical model based on the local adsorption equilibrium of essential oil on lipid in leaves. The adsorption equilibrium constant was fitted to these experimental data, and internal and external mass transfer resistances were calculated, allowing identification of the mechanism controlling the extraction process.

  11. ACNE VULGARIS. EVALUATION OF A MEDICATED CLEANSING PAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROTH, H L

    1964-03-01

    Using the technique of simultaneous, symmetrical paired comparisons, a medicated cleansing pad that can be easily used at work or at school as an adjunctive in the treatment of acne vulgaris was evaluated.The experimental pads were significantly beneficial in reducing skin oiliness and in clinical improvement of the acne. Response to standard acne therapy was faster when the pads were used adjunctively, although the significant results seen initially tended to even out as therapy continued. Use of the medicated pads produced no untoward side effects and were well accepted by patients.

  12. Spina ventosa with lupus vulgaris and lymphadenopathy: Multifocal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Sood, Shikha; Gupta, Mudita

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculous dactylitis is a rare yet well-recognized disease of small bones of the hands and feet. It occurs in young children below five years of age. Tubercular dactylitis with lupus vulgaris and lymphadenopathy was suspected clinically and radiologically in an 8-year-old girl who had multiple soft tissue swelling of hands and feet with ulceration, encrustations, and an atrophic scar with lytic expansile lesions of the small bones of the hands and feet. Tubercular lymph node involvement was confirmed histopathologically.

  13. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris over nose, leading to cosmetic deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya A Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris (LV, is a chronic and progressive form of secondary cutaneous tuberculosis. In India, it is commonly seen over buttocks, thighs, and legs whereas involvement of nose is quite rare. Ulcerative variant particularly over nose causes destruction of cartilage, leading to irreversible deformities and contracture. High-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prevention of cosmetic deformity. A case of LV over nose in a young male with ulceration is reported who responded well to anti-tubercular therapy, but left with scarring of nose, which could have been prevented if adequate awareness regarding extra-pulmonary cases would have been practiced.

  14. Atypical forms of lupus vulgaris - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha, Mohanan; Parveen, Basheer Ahamed; Anandan, Venkatesan; Priyavathani, Malathy R; Tharini, Karuvelan G

    2009-02-01

    Atypical presentations of cutaneous tuberculosis are not so uncommon and are frequently overlooked in clinical practice, leading to late diagnosis and increased morbidity. We report three cases of lupus vulgaris with atypical presentations. The cases mimicked other chronic skin lesions like actinomycosis, mycetoma, and so on. Strong clinical suspicion, histopathology, and response to antituberculous treatment led to the diagnosis and all three had excellent response to treatment. Today, when tuberculosis threatens to burst into pandemics again, early diagnosis and treatment are more important than ever for control and prevention of morbidity.

  15. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris over nose, leading to cosmetic deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pragya A; Mehta, Malay J; Patel, Bhumi B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV), is a chronic and progressive form of secondary cutaneous tuberculosis. In India, it is commonly seen over buttocks, thighs, and legs whereas involvement of nose is quite rare. Ulcerative variant particularly over nose causes destruction of cartilage, leading to irreversible deformities and contracture. High-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prevention of cosmetic deformity. A case of LV over nose in a young male with ulceration is reported who responded well to anti-tubercular therapy, but left with scarring of nose, which could have been prevented if adequate awareness regarding extra-pulmonary cases would have been practiced.

  16. Spina ventosa with lupus vulgaris and lymphadenopathy: Multifocal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous dactylitis is a rare yet well-recognized disease of small bones of the hands and feet. It occurs in young children below five years of age. Tubercular dactylitis with lupus vulgaris and lymphadenopathy was suspected clinically and radiologically in an 8-year-old girl who had multiple soft tissue swelling of hands and feet with ulceration, encrustations, and an atrophic scar with lytic expansile lesions of the small bones of the hands and feet. Tubercular lymph node involvement was confirmed histopathologically.

  17. The Paleobiolinguistics of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecil H. Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Paleobiolinguistics is used to determine when and where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. developed significance for prehistoric groups of Native America. Dates and locations of proto-languages for which common bean terms reconstruct generally accord with crop-origin and dispersal information from plant genetics and archaeobotany. Paleobiolinguistic and other lines of evidence indicate that human interest in the common bean became significant primarily with the widespread development of a village‐farming way of life in the New World rather than earlier when squash and maize and a few other crops became important.

  18. Enhancement of Chlorella vulgaris growth and bioremediation ability of aquarium wastewater using diazotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sayeda Mohammed; Nasr, Hoda Shafeek; Abbas, Wafaa Tawfik

    2012-08-15

    Treatment of aquarium wastewater represents an important process to clean and recycle wastewater to be safely returned to the environment, used for cultivation or to minimize the multiple renewal of water. Chlorella vulgaris was an important freshwater microalgae which used in wastewater treatment, and increasing its potential of treatment can be achieved with existence of N2-fixing bacteria. Co-culturing of Chlorella vulgaris with the diazotrophs, Azospirillum brasilense or Azotobacter chroococcum in three different media; aquarium wastewater (AWW), sterile enriched natural aquarium wastewater (GPM) and synthetic wastewater media (SWW) were studied. Biomass yield of the microalgae was estimated by determination of chlorophylls (a and b), total carotenoid and the dry weight of C. vulgaris. Also determination of ammonia, nitrite, phosphate and nitrate in the culture were done. The presence of diazotrophs significantly increased the biomass of C. vulgaris by increasing its microalgae pigments (chlorophylls a and b, and total carotenoids). The highest pigments percentage was reported due to addition of A. brasilense to C. vulgaris (18.3-133.5%) compared to A. chroococcum (23.9-56.9%). As well as increased dry weight from 12 to 50%. There was also improved removal of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia and phosphate; where, the highest removal percentage was reported due to addition of A. chroococcum to C. vulgaris (0.0-52%) compared to A. brasilense (0.6-16.4%). A. brasilense and A. chroococcum can support C. vulgaris biomass production and bioremediation activity in the aquarium to minimize the periodical water renewal.

  19. Inhibitory effects of Iranian Thymus vulgaris extracts on in vitro growth of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, Maryam; Haghighi, Ali; Komeylizadeh, Hossein; Tabaei, Seyyed-Javadi Seyyed; Abadi, Alireza

    2008-09-01

    One of the most common drugs used against a wide variety of anaerobic protozoan parasites is metronidazole. However, this drug is mutagenic for bacteria and is a potent carcinogen for rodents. Thymus vulgaris is used for cough suppression and relief of dyspepsia. Also it has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The aim of this study was to investigate antiamebic effect of Thymus vulgaris against Entamoeba histolytica in comparison with metronidazole. One hundred gram air-dried T. vulgaris plant was obtained and macerated at 25 degrees C for 14 days using n-hexane and a mixture of ethanol and water. For essential oil isolation T. vulgaris was subjected to hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type apparatus for 3 hr. E. histolytica, HM-1: IMSS strain was used in all experiments. It was found that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic, hexanic extracts, and the essential oil after 24 hr was 4 mg/mL, 4 mg/mL, and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. After 48 hr the MIC for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic and hexanic extracts was 3 and 3 mg/mL, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Iranian T. vulgaris is effective against the trophozoites of E. histolytica.

  20. Quality of life, self-esteem and psychosocial factors in adolescents with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Gustavo Nunes; Santos, Laís Araújo dos; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological diseases, among which acne vulgaris, have psychological impact on the affected generating feelings of guilt, shame and social isolation. To compare quality of life, self-esteem and other psychosocial variables amongst adolescents with and without acne vulgaris, and between levels of severity. Cross-sectional observational study in a sample of 355 high school students from the city of João Pessoa. Data collection was performed with questionnaires and clinical-dermatological evaluation. The primary variables were the incidence of AV; quality of life, set by the Children's Dermatology Quality of Life Index and Dermatology Quality of Life Index; and self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. For calculation of statistical tests, we used the SPSS 20.0 software, considering p=0.05. The sample, with an average age of 16, showed 89.3% prevalence of acne vulgaris. The most prevalent psychosocial issue was "afraid that acne will never cease", present in 58% of affected youth. The median score of Quality of Life in Children's Dermatology Index was different amongst students with and without acne vulgaris (p=0.003), as well as the Quality of Life in Dermatology (p=0.038) scores, so that students with acne vulgaris have worse QoL. There was a correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and worse quality of life. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with the occurrence or severity of acne vulgaris. acne vulgaris assumes significance in view of its high prevalence and the effect on quality of life of adolescents, more severe at the more pronounced stages of disease (pacne vulgaris should be valued in the management of patients with this condition.

  1. TNFα gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Kornélia; Tax, Gábor; Teodorescu-Brinzeu, Dragos; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in acne pathogenesis, and pro-inflammatory cytokines are key factors in these events. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a central molecule coded by a gene that shows high level of genetic polymorphisms especially in its promoter region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNFα gene have been shown to be associated with an increased risk to develop chronic inflammatory diseases. In order to find out if known TNFα regulatory SNPs (-1031T>C, -857C>T, -863C>A, -308G>A, -238G>A) have a role in the development of the inflammatory reactions in acne vulgaris, we analyzed our genomic collection in a retrospective case-control study using the PCR-RFLP method, and we compared the resulting genotype and allele frequencies. There were no significant differences in the observed genotype or allele frequencies between the control and acne group in case of the -1031, -863, -238 SNPs; however, the TNFα -857 minor T allele was found to act as a protective factor in our study population in acne, and a higher occurrence of the minor -308 A allele in female acne patients was also noted. Genetic variants of the TNFα gene may affect the risk of acne vulgaris. Our results can help to elucidate the molecular events leading to acne development.

  2. Effect of the hydrocarbon phenanthrene on Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellaceae) growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero Paternina, Angelica; Cruz Casallas, Pablo E; Velasco Santamaria, Yohana M

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene on the growth of chlorella vulgaris alga were evaluated under laboratory conditions. The algae were exposed during 72 h to different concentrations of phenanthrene (0, 1, 10, 100, 1000 and 10000 μg/l). The alga density was daily determined by a neubauer chamber. The average growth average, total biomass and inhibition percentage of the biomass were also determined. In addition, the content of chlorophyll a was determined at the beginning and the end of the experiment. the assays were carried out in glass bottles of 0,4 l using the complex NPK (remital m 17-6-18) at 1 g/l as an organic fertilizing. The results showed that phenanthrene inhibited progressively the alga growth being the lowest cellular growth observed in the medium with the highest phenanthrene concentration, reaching an inhibition percentage of 59 %. In the other treatments, the daily growth rate was relatively constant. The chlorophyll a concentration evaluated by spectrophotometry was not affected by the phenanthrene concentration. in conclusion, the growth of the alga c. vulgaris was affected negatively by the exposure to nominal concentrations of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene higher than 1 μg/l.

  3. [A case of systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with psoriasis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidara, Kumi; Soejima, Makoto; Shiseki, Mariko; Ohta, Syuji; Nishinarita, Makoto

    2003-12-01

    A 49-years-old female admitted to our hospital because of skin eruptions on the extremities in 1985. She had suffered from polyarthralgia, skin eruptions since 1983. Physical examinations revealed discoid lesion, central nervous system involvement, and polyarthritis. Laboratory tests revealed leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Antinuclear antibody, ant-DNA antibody, LE test were positive. From these findings, she was diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). She developed lupus peritonitis in 1990 and 1994, which was successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy. Since then, the activity of SLE was in good control under administration of prednisolone 10 mg/day. Chilblain lupus was seen from 1993, Raynaud's phenomenon from 1996, and she further developed subcutaneous induration on her chest, back and upper extremities in 1999. Skin biopsy findings were compatible with lupus panniculitis. In 2002, erythematous patches with scales were observed on her right hand and left knee, and these skin lesions were histologically diagnosed as psoriasis vulgaris. An autoimmune response similar to SLE is speculated in psoriasis. We describe a rare case of SLE with various skin lesions including psoriasis vulgaris.

  4. Nutritional and functional potential of Beta vulgaris cicla and rubra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninfali, Paolino; Angelino, Donato

    2013-09-01

    Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris cicla, BVc) and beetroot (Beta vulgaris rubra, BVr) are vegetables of the Chenopodiaceae family, widely consumed in traditional western cooking. These vegetables represent a highly renewable and cheap source of nutrients. They can be cultivated in soils with scarce organic material and little light and water. BVc and BVr have a long history of use in folk medicine. Modern pharmacology shows that BVc extracts possess antihypertensive and hypoglycaemic activity as well as excellent antioxidant activity. BVc contains apigenin flavonoids, namely vitexin, vitexin-2-O-rhamnoside and vitexin-2-O-xyloside, which show antiproliferative activity on cancer cell lines. BVr contains secondary metabolites, called betalains, which are used as natural dyes in food industry and show anticancer activity. In this light, BVc and BVr can be considered functional foods. Moreover, the promising results of their phytochemicals in health protection suggest the opportunity to take advantage of the large availability of this crop for purification of chemopreventive molecules to be used in functional foods and nutraceutical products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of acne vulgaris with fractional radiofrequency microneedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Kang Hoon; Sim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Kee Suck; Jang, Min Soo

    2014-07-01

    Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a novel radiofrequency technique that uses insulated microneedles to deliver energy to the deep dermis at the point of penetration without destruction of the epidermis. It has been used for the treatment of various dermatological conditions including wrinkles, atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars. There have been few studies evaluating the efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne, and none measuring objective parameters like the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions or sebum excretion levels. The safety and efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne vulgaris was investigated. In a prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedling. The procedure was carried out three times at 1-month intervals. Acne lesion count, subjective satisfaction score, sebum excretion level and adverse effects were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the first treatment as well as 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the last treatment. Number of acne lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory) decreased. Sebum excretion and subjective satisfaction were more favorable at every time point compared with the baseline values (P acne vulgaris. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. Two endornaviruses show differential infection patterns between gene pools of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankhum, Surasak; Valverde, Rodrigo A; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A; Osorno, Juan M; Sabanadzovic, Sead

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2, in breeding lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) collected from the two centers of common bean domestication: Mesoamerica and the Andes. The two endornaviruses were detected in many genotypes of Mesoamerican origin but rarely in genotypes of Andean origin. The results suggest that these two endornaviruses were introduced into the Mesoamerican modern genotypes during common bean domestication and provide more evidence for the existence of two divergent gene pools of common bean.

  7. Detection of filaggrin gene mutation (2282del4) in Pakistani ichthyosis vulgaris families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, N.; Samdani, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    he aim of this study was to detect an 811 bp filaggrin (FLG) gene fragment known to carry a mutation 2282del4 which causes ichthyosis vulgaris. Seven clinically examined ichthyosis vulgaris families were included in this study. An 811 bp FLG gene fragment was targeted in the genomic DNA of all the members of the seven families by PCR amplification using known primers RPT1P7 and RPT2P1. Successful amplification of an 811 bp FLG gene fragment in all the families suggested the possible role of the 2282del4 mutation in causing ichthyosis vulgaris in Pakistani population. (author)

  8. Potential Of Microalgae Chlorella vulgaris As Bioremediation Agents of Heavy Metal Pb (Lead) On Culture Media

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Sulistya Dewi Endah; Nuravivah Riza

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study to determine the ability of Chlorella vulgaris in absorbing Pb (lead) and the effect of the variation of Pb metal concentration on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.This study using an experimental study with complete random design with 4 treatments, namely control (without the addition of metal), Pb1 (addition of metal 1 mg / l), Pb3 (3 mg / l) and Pb5 (5 mg / l), respectively 3 replications. Exposure Pb ion in Chlorella vulgaris for 7 days. Analysis of the metal con...

  9. A pediatric case of disseminated mutilating lupus vulgaris: A disgrace for society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris (LV is a chronic and progressive form of cutaneous tuberculosis. The lesions may sometimes be associated with extensive destruction of tissue resulting in marked disfigurement and morbidity. A high index of suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis and treatment and thereby prevention of cosmetic deformity. Lupus vulgaris presenting as disseminated mutilating lesions in a child is uncommon, especially in today's era. Herein, we report an unusual case of lupus vulgaris with coexistence of multiple ulcerative mutilating lesions over face and classical plaque over distant site (right thigh in a 9 year old girl.

  10. [Ineffective change of antimalaria prophylaxis to Artemisia vulgaris in a group travelling to West Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2005-10-24

    Sixteen travellers to West Africa used four kinds of antimalaria chemoprophylaxis. Suspected malaria in three persons and vaginal candidiasis in one caused all seven doxycycline users to change their medication. One of these was persuaded to use Artemisia vulgaris extract. In the course of the three-month journey, there were seven suspected cases of malaria, only two of which could be confirmed by antibody and antigen detection or expert microscopy; both were in travellers who had used A. vulgaris. A. vulgaris had no effect on parasite growth in vitro. The use of natural products for malaria prophylaxis should be discouraged.

  11. Rhizofiltration using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) to remediate uranium contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minhee, E-mail: heelee@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyondong, Namgu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Minjune [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyondong, Namgu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    The uranium removal efficiencies of rhizofiltration in the remediation of groundwater were investigated in lab-scale experiments. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) were cultivated and an artificially uranium contaminated solution and three genuine groundwater samples were used in the experiments. More than 80% of the initial uranium in solution and genuine groundwater, respectively, was removed within 24 h by using sunflower and the residual uranium concentration of the treated water was lower than 30 {mu}g/L (USEPA drinking water limit). For bean, the uranium removal efficiency of the rhizofiltration was roughly 60-80%. The maximum uranium removal via rhizofiltration for the two plant cultivars occurred at pH 3-5 of solution and their uranium removal efficiencies exceeded 90%. The lab-scale continuous rhizofiltration clean-up system delivered over 99% uranium removal efficiency, and the results of SEM and EDS analyses indicated that most uranium accumulated in the roots of plants. The present results suggested that the uranium removal capacity of two plants evaluated in the clean-up system was about 25 mg/kg of wet plant mass. Notably, the removal capacity of the root parts only was more than 500 mg/kg.

  12. Shelf-life extension of minimally processed and gamma irradiated red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.), Cv. early wonder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandes, Nilber Kenup; Vital, Helio de Carvalho [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear (DDQBN)]. E-mail: nilberkenup@ctex.eb.br; vital@ctex.eb.br; Coneglian, Regina Celi Cavestre [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst.de Agronomia. Dept. de Fitotecnia]. E-mail: rccconeg@ufrrj.br; Godoy, Ronoel Luiz de Oliveira [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronoel@ctaa.embrapa.br

    2007-07-01

    This work investigated the effects of gamma irradiation on the shelf-life extension and safety of minimally processed red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.) by performing microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses. Red beets were harvested 73 days after transplanting and their tuberous parts were minimally processed and separated in two groups: control (non-irradiated) and irradiated (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy). Tests for Salmonella sp., total and fecal coliforms, total count of aerobic mesophilic and lactic-acid bacteria were performed during the 21-day storage at 8 deg C. They indicated that the samples irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy remained in good conditions throughout storage while the unirradiated samples did not last 7 days. Chemical analyses indicated that the concentrations of vitamins B1 and B2 were not affected by irradiation. In contrast the amounts of fructose and glucose increased during storage while the one for sucrose decreased. In addition four series of sensory evaluations including appearance and aroma indicated that the samples irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy remained good for consumption for 20 days. Therefore it was concluded that the use of the doses of 1.0 and 1.5 kGy produced the best effects on the conservation of the samples without harming the sensory characteristics and nutritional constituents tested. (author)

  13. Shelf-life extension of minimally processed and gamma irradiated red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.), Cv. early wonder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandes, Nilber Kenup; Vital, Helio de Carvalho; Coneglian, Regina Celi Cavestre

    2007-01-01

    This work investigated the effects of gamma irradiation on the shelf-life extension and safety of minimally processed red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.) by performing microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses. Red beets were harvested 73 days after transplanting and their tuberous parts were minimally processed and separated in two groups: control (non-irradiated) and irradiated (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy). Tests for Salmonella sp., total and fecal coliforms, total count of aerobic mesophilic and lactic-acid bacteria were performed during the 21-day storage at 8 deg C. They indicated that the samples irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy remained in good conditions throughout storage while the unirradiated samples did not last 7 days. Chemical analyses indicated that the concentrations of vitamins B1 and B2 were not affected by irradiation. In contrast the amounts of fructose and glucose increased during storage while the one for sucrose decreased. In addition four series of sensory evaluations including appearance and aroma indicated that the samples irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy remained good for consumption for 20 days. Therefore it was concluded that the use of the doses of 1.0 and 1.5 kGy produced the best effects on the conservation of the samples without harming the sensory characteristics and nutritional constituents tested. (author)

  14. Primer registro de Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae en la Argentina First record of Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maité Masciocchi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus es un véspido social nativo de la región Holártica. En este trabajo reportamos la primera detección de esta especie en Argentina. Obreras de esta avispa fueron capturadas cerca de la ciudad de San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina en Febrero de 2010, mientras se tomaban muestras de otra avispa invasora, Vespula germanica (Fabricius o chaqueta amarilla, de morfología externa y hábitos similares a la anteriormente mencionada. Además, detallamos algunos caracteres de identificación y características biológicas.Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus is a social vespid native to the Holarctic region. The first detection of this species in Argentina is here reported. Workers were captured close to San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina during February 2010, while sampling for another successful invader, the German wasp or Yellowjacket, Vespula germanica (Fabricius. Both these wasp species are very similar morphologically and share a number of common habits. Also, some identification features and biological characters are here explained.

  15. Rhizofiltration using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) to remediate uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minhee; Yang, Minjune

    2010-01-01

    The uranium removal efficiencies of rhizofiltration in the remediation of groundwater were investigated in lab-scale experiments. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) were cultivated and an artificially uranium contaminated solution and three genuine groundwater samples were used in the experiments. More than 80% of the initial uranium in solution and genuine groundwater, respectively, was removed within 24 h by using sunflower and the residual uranium concentration of the treated water was lower than 30 μg/L (USEPA drinking water limit). For bean, the uranium removal efficiency of the rhizofiltration was roughly 60-80%. The maximum uranium removal via rhizofiltration for the two plant cultivars occurred at pH 3-5 of solution and their uranium removal efficiencies exceeded 90%. The lab-scale continuous rhizofiltration clean-up system delivered over 99% uranium removal efficiency, and the results of SEM and EDS analyses indicated that most uranium accumulated in the roots of plants. The present results suggested that the uranium removal capacity of two plants evaluated in the clean-up system was about 25 mg/kg of wet plant mass. Notably, the removal capacity of the root parts only was more than 500 mg/kg.

  16. Genetic resources of Thymus vulgaris L. and T. vulgaris x T. Marschallianus Willd. in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duskova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two varieties of Thymus vulgaris L. (´Krajový´ and ´Winter´ and three its hybrids with T. Marschallianus Will. (variety ´Mixta´ and two accessions of variety ´Lemona´ were evaluated according the Draft Descriptor List Thymus vulgaris L. and analysed for the essential oil content and composition in years 2014 and 2015. All evaluated accessions were found morphologically and/or chemically different. Varieties ´Krajový´, ´Winter´ and ´Mixta´ were assessed as a thymol type with the thymol (39.1 – 69.6 %, o-cymene (6.3 – 24.9 % and γ-terpinene (2.75 – 13.8 % as main oil components. The two accessions of ´Lemona´ variety were found significantly different each other: one of them (income No. 3239 was assessed as a terpineol type with the terpineol acetate (75.7 % and α-terpineol (16.9 % as main oil components and the other one (income No. 2757 as a geraniol type with the geranyl acetate (±42.4 % and geraniol (±20.8 % as main oil components. Only the accession with income No. 3239 was proved as a ´Lemona´ variety due its citral (±9.3 % content, though even this content is too small compare to original ´Lemona´ where about 20 % of citral was declared.

  17. Catalase and lipid peroxidation values in serum of Tunisian patients with pemphigus vulgaris and foliaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Olfa; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Gargouri, Bochra; Ben Ayed, Mourad; Masmoudi, Abderrahmen; Turki, Hamida; Masmoudi, Hatem; Lassoued, Saloua

    2012-12-01

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune disorder resulting from the interaction between autoantibodies and desmoglein. Oxidative stress seems to be responsible for the onset/aggravation of many human diseases. Actually, it is considered as one of the several factors for the etiopathogenesis of pemphigus. The present study aims to evaluate the oxidative state in the sera of pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus patients by assessing lipid peroxidation, proteins oxidation, and antioxidant enzyme activity. This study included 36 pemphigus vulgaris and 42 pemphigus foliaceus patients as well as a group of controls consisting of 78 healthy volunteers. Malondialdehyde levels (p pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus patients, except for the catalase which shows an increase in the pemphigus vulgaris group. We have also found significant correlations between serum oxidative stress marker levels and serum anti-desmoglein antibody levels in the two pemphigus groups. These findings underline the implication of oxidative stress in the physiopathology of pemphigus by the increase in the autoantibodies' reactivity.

  18. Randomized controlled trial of adjuvant oral dexamethasone pulse therapy in pemphigus vulgaris - PEMPULS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentink, LF; Mackenzie, MW; Toth, GG; Laseur, M; Lambert, FPG; Veeger, NJGM; Cianchini, G; Pavlovic, MD; Jonkman, MF

    Objective: To determine the therapeutic effect of adjuvant dexamethasone pulse therapy when given in addition to conventional treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Design: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Setting: International European, multicenter outpatient and inpatient study. Patients: Of the

  19. Bioelectrogenesis with microbial fuel cells (MFCs using the microalga Chlorella vulgaris and bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Huarachi-Olivera

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that MFCs with C. vulgaris and bacterial community have a simultaneous efficiency in the production of bioelectricity and bioremediation processes, becoming an important source of bioenergy in the future.

  20. Local adaptation in the monocarpic perennial Carlina vulgaris at different spatial scales across Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becker, U.; Colling, G.; Dostál, Petr; Jakobsson, A.; Matthies, D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 150, - (2006), s. 506-518 ISSN 0029-8549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Carlina vulgaris * local adaptation * plant fitness Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.333, year: 2006

  1. Development of 12 chloroplast microsatellite markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae) and amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Li, Yi; Guo, Rui; Wu, Hua; Hu, Zhihui; Chen, Chanyou

    2014-03-01

    Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. • Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. • The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris.

  2. Development of 12 chloroplast microsatellite markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae) and amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Li, Yi; Guo, Rui; Wu, Hua; Hu, Zhihui; Chen, Chanyou

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. • Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. • Conclusions: The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris. PMID:25202608

  3. Synergistic antibacterial activity between Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum essential oils and methanol extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayati, Firas A

    2008-03-28

    Essential oils (EOs) and methanol extracts obtained from aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum seeds were evaluated for their single and combined antibacterial activities against nine Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The essential oils and methanol extracts revealed promising antibacterial activities against most pathogens using broth microdilution method. Maximum activity of Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum essential oils and methanol extracts (MIC 15.6 and 62.5mug/ml) were observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Proteus vulgaris. Combinations of essential oils and methanol extracts showed an additive action against most tested pathogens especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  4. Adapalene gel 0.1% for topical treatment of acne vulgaris in African patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacyk, W K; Mpofu, P

    2001-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common dermatologic disease in African patients, as well as in Caucasians. Our report evaluates the safety and efficacy of adapalene gel 0.1% in African patients with acne vulgaris. We used a 12-week, 2-center, open-label, noncomparative study of adapalene gel 0.1% in 65 African patients with acne vulgaris to assess the drug's effect on hyperpigmented lesions in people with dark skin. The study demonstrated that the progressive and significant improvements in lesion counts and global acne grades produced by adapalene in African patients were paralleled by significant improvements in the degree of hyperpigmentation of acne lesions. During treatment with adapalene, less than 5% of patients reported moderate or severe skin irritation at any time during the study, and the incidence of skin oiliness decreased markedly. We conclude that adapalene gel 0.1% was well tolerated and highly effective in African patients with acne vulgaris and was found to reduce hyperpigmentation.

  5. Development of 12 Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae and Amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. Conclusions: The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris.

  6. Aromatic glucosinolate biosynthesis pathway in Barbarea vulgaris and its response to Plutella xylostella infestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tongjin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Haohui

    2016-01-01

    , showed only 77.50% identity in coding DNA sequences and 65.48% identity in deduced amino acid sequences. The homology to GS-OH in Arabidopsis, DBM induction of the transcript and a series of qPCR and glucosinolate analyses of G-type, P-type and F1 plants indicated that these genes control the production...... vulgaris) was unknown. In B. vulgaris, aromatic glucosinolates derived from homo-phenylalanine are the dominant glucosinolates, but their biosynthesis pathway was unclear. In this study, we used G-type (pest-resistant) and P-type (pest-susceptible) B. vulgaris to compare glucosinolate levels...... and the expression profiles of their biosynthesis genes before and after infestation by DBM larvae. Two different stereoisomers of hydroxylated aromatic glucosinolates are dominant in G- and P-type B. vulgaris, respectively, and are induced by DBM. The transcripts of genes in the glucosinolate biosynthesis pathway...

  7. Silver-containing Hydrofiber Dressing is an Effective Adjunct in the Treatment of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Shan Wu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris is a life-threatening autoimmune bullous dermatosis and its management represents a major challenge to medical teams. The primary treatments for pemphigus vulgaris are oral steroids and immunosuppressants, but topical approaches also play a role in disease management. Here, we report a patient with pemphigus vulgaris involving 62% of the total body surface area, with initial poor clinical response to systemic steroids and topical silver sulfadiazine therapy. However, a marked improvement in wound healing and decreased patient discomfort were observed after application of silver-containing hydrofiber dressings (Aquacel-Ag®. Therefore, silver-containing hydrofiber dressings may offer an effective adjunct in the treatment of patients with pemphigus vulgaris with extensive skin involvement. Our encouraging experience with these dressing patches may be extended to manage other large exudation wounds.

  8. Lupus Vulgaris Erythematoides: report of a patient initially misdiagnosed as dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Lopez, Francisco; Fueyo-Casado, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Lara, Leire

    2013-05-15

    A small percentage of patients with tuberculosis present with cutaneous findings, which may be difficult to diagnose. We present a patient diagnosed with a rare, non-scarring form of cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB), classically termed as lupus vulgaris erythematoides.

  9. [Dynamic change of active component content in different parts of Prunella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxia; Yin, Jinbao; Guo, Qiaosheng; Xiao, Yunhua

    2011-03-01

    Through determination of the dynamic change of the active component in different parts of Prunella vulgaris at different growth stages, to find the optimal harvest time. Total flavonoids content was determined by using the spectrophotometric method, and the content of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid was determined by HPLC. The contents of ash and extract were determined according to the methods in Chinese Pharmacopeia (2005 edition). There existed the active components in all parts of P. vulgaris, but the active component contents in different parts of P. vulgaris of at different growth stages, changed very obviously. In Yangtze-Huaihai region, the optimal harvest time of Prunella spike best harvest is at the end of June, and Prunellastem at the end of May. All parts of P. vulgaris have medicinal value.

  10. Cranial Mesenteric Arterial Obstruction Due To Strongylus vulgaris Larvae in a Donkey (Equus asinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borji, Hassan; Moosavi, Zahra; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    Arteritis due to Strongylus vulgaris is a well-known cause of colic in horses and donkeys. The current report describes a fatal incidence of arterial obstruction in cranial mesenteric artery caused by S. vulgaris infection in an adult donkey in which anthelmintic treatment was not regularly administered. Necropsy findings of the abdominal cavity revealed a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to larvae of S. vulgaris, causing severe colic. To the authors' knowledge, a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to verminous arteritis has rarely been described in horses and donkeys. Based on recent reports of fatal arterial obstruction due to S. vulgaris infection in donkeys, it may be evident to consider acute colic caused by this pathogenic parasite a re-emerging disease in donkeys and horses.

  11. Cranial Mesenteric Arterial Obstruction Due To Strongylus vulgaris Larvae in a Donkey (Equus asinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Borji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arteritis due to Strongylus vulgaris is a well-known cause of colic in horses and donkeys. The current report describes a fatal incidence of arterial obstruction in cranial mesenteric artery caused by S. vulgaris infection in an adult donkey in which anthelmintic treatment was not regularly administered. Necropsy findings of the abdominal cavity revealed a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to larvae of S. vulgaris, causing severe colic. To the authors' knowledge, a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to verminous arteritis has rarely been described in horses and donkeys. Based on recent reports of fatal arterial obstruction due to S. vulgaris infection in donkeys, it may be evident to consider acute colic caused by this pathogenic parasite a re-emerging disease in donkeys and horses.

  12. Cheilitis in acne vulgaris patients with no previous use of systemic retinoid products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balighi, Kamran; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Lajevardi, Vahideh; Talebi, Shahin; Azizpour, Arghavan

    2017-08-01

    Isotretinoin is commonly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris. While one of the more common side-effects is cheilitis, we have observed an increased incidence of cheilitis prior to the commencement of systemic isotretinoin. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of cheilitis among acne vulgaris patients. A non-interventional cross-sectional study of patients with acne vulgaris. Patients with previous use of systemic retinoids were excluded. The patients were examined for signs and symptoms of cheilitis. Of a total of 400 patients, 134 (34%) had evidence of cheilitis at initial presentation. Two-thirds (63%) were female (P acne excorie, compared with only 8% of patients with no signs of cheilitis. Our findings suggest that cheilitis is quite common among acne vulgaris patients even before treatment with isotretinoin. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  13. Composition and antimicrobial studies of essential oil of Thymus vulgaris from Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanović-Vratnica, B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of the hydrodistilled essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme from Montenegro was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and its antimicrobial activity was evaluated against 10 microorganisms, including reference and clinically isolated strains. T. vulgaris essential oil yield was 0.42% (v/w, based on the dry leaves weight whereas the analysis showed that major components, amongst 22 identified in the oil, were geraniol (25.66%, geranyl-acetate (20.34%, linalool (10.89% and caryophyllene oxide (9.89%. The results of the antimicrobial activity tests revealed that the essential oil of T .vulgaris from Montenegro has rather strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These results confirm the potential use of T. vulgaris essential oil in food products the as well as for therapeutic applications.

  14. Potential Of Microalgae Chlorella vulgaris As Bioremediation Agents of Heavy Metal Pb (Lead) On Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Endah Rita Sulistya; Nuravivah, Riza

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study to determine the ability of Chlorella vulgaris in absorbing Pb (lead) and the effect of the variation of Pb metal concentration on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.This study using an experimental study with complete random design with 4 treatments, namely control (without the addition of metal), Pb1 (addition of metal 1 mg / l), Pb3 (3 mg / l) and Pb5 (5 mg / l), respectively 3 replications. Exposure Pb ion in Chlorella vulgaris for 7 days. Analysis of the metal content of Pb concentration performed on culture media after exposure it at 3 hours after dispersion Chlorella vulgaris and on day 7 of culture using the AAS method. Do also counting the growth of cells each day. The results of the analysis of the average metal content of Pb in the culture medium at the end of the study was the control (0.1980), Pb1 (0.1453), Pb3 (0.4144) and Pb5 (0.5305). While the average growth of Chlorella vulgaris at the end of the study were control (630.1116 x 104), Pb1 (829.0012 x 104), Pb3 (1069.9446 x 104) and Pb 5 (808.94450 x 104). The results of the analysis of the content of Pb in the F test shown that the difference in concentration of water Pb given real influence on the ability of Chlorella vulgaris in absorbing Pb and growth. The conclusion of this study was Chlorella vulgaris has the ability to absorb metals in the waters, and the provision of various concentrations of Pb can affect the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

  15. Therapeutic plasma exchange-A new dawn in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disorder that involves intraepithelial blistering and sores of skin and mucous membrane. It generally correlates with the levels of circulating autoantibodies; their removal seems a reasonable therapeutic approach. Therapeutic plasma exchange is hypothesized to remove pathogenic autoantibodies and has been used in refractory or severe cases. It may be considered for rapid control of severe or recalcitrant pemphigus vulgaris and should be combined with use of concomitant immuno-suppressive.

  16. Potential Of Microalgae Chlorella vulgaris As Bioremediation Agents of Heavy Metal Pb (Lead On Culture Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Sulistya Dewi Endah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study to determine the ability of Chlorella vulgaris in absorbing Pb (lead and the effect of the variation of Pb metal concentration on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.This study using an experimental study with complete random design with 4 treatments, namely control (without the addition of metal, Pb1 (addition of metal 1 mg / l, Pb3 (3 mg / l and Pb5 (5 mg / l, respectively 3 replications. Exposure Pb ion in Chlorella vulgaris for 7 days. Analysis of the metal content of Pb concentration performed on culture media after exposure it at 3 hours after dispersion Chlorella vulgaris and on day 7 of culture using the AAS method. Do also counting the growth of cells each day. The results of the analysis of the average metal content of Pb in the culture medium at the end of the study was the control (0.1980, Pb1 (0.1453, Pb3 (0.4144 and Pb5 (0.5305. While the average growth of Chlorella vulgaris at the end of the study were control (630.1116 x 104, Pb1 (829.0012 x 104, Pb3 (1069.9446 x 104 and Pb 5 (808.94450 x 104. The results of the analysis of the content of Pb in the F test shown that the difference in concentration of water Pb given real influence on the ability of Chlorella vulgaris in absorbing Pb and growth. The conclusion of this study was Chlorella vulgaris has the ability to absorb metals in the waters, and the provision of various concentrations of Pb can affect the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

  17. Serological diagnosis of Strongylus vulgaris infection: use of a recombinant protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla Vestergaard; Howe, Daniel K.; Olsen, Susanne Nautrup

    Strongyle parasites are ubiquitous in grazing horses, with cyathostomins being the most prevalent, but the large strongyles having larger clinical impact. Strongylus vulgaris is considered most pathogenic nematode, with migrating larvae causing verminous endarteritis and potentially ischaemic...... infarction of intestinal segments. Developing anthelmintic resistance in equine parasites has put emphasis on less intensive treatment regimens to maintain efficacy of current anthelmintics. This has been associated with apparent re-emergence of S. vulgaris. Currently there are no methods for diagnosing...

  18. Clinical cross-reactivity between Artemisia vulgaris and Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Morín, F; Sánchez Machín, I; García Robaina, J C; Fernández-Caldas, E; Sánchez Triviño, M

    2001-01-01

    Artemisia vulgaris is a common weed and an important source of allergens on the subtropical island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. It pollinates mainly from July to September, although, due to some local climatic conditions, it may flower throughout the year. Cross-reactivity with hazelnut, kiwi, birch, several Compositae (Ambrosia, Chrysanthemum, Matricaria, Solidago) and grass allergens has been suggested. Few studies have addressed the issue of in vivo cross-reactivity between A. vulgaris and Matricaria chamomilla. The objective of this study was to perform conjunctival and bronchial challenges with A. vulgaris and M. chamomilla and oral challenge with chamomile in 24 patients with asthma and/or rhinitis sensitized primarily to A. vulgaris. Skin prick tests with M. chamomilla were positive in 21 patients. Eighteen patients had a positive conjunctival provocation test with a A. vulgaris pollen extract and 13 patients had a positive conjunctival provocation test with a M. chamomilla pollen extract. Bronchial provocation tests with A. vulgaris were positive in 15 patients and with M. chamomilla pollen in another 16 individuals. Oral provocation tests, conducted with a commercial chamomile infusion were positive in 13 patients. Nine of these individuals were skin test positive to food allergens and 17 to others pollens of the Compositae family. This study confirms a high degree of in vivo cross-reactivity between A. vulgaris and M. chamomilla. Sensitization to A. vulgaris seems to be a primary risk factor for experiencing symptoms after the ingestion of chamomile infusions. Based on the results of bronchial provocation tests, M. chamomilla pollen could be a relevant inhalant allergen.

  19. Terapi Topikal Azelaic Acid Dibandingkan Dengan Niacinamide+zinc Pada Akne Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Soeyono, Aini; Widayati, Retno Indar

    2013-01-01

    Latar Belakang: Akne vulgaris adalah penyakit kulit yang disebabkan oleh hiperkeratinisasi yang abnormal dan produksi sebum yang berlebihan . Azelaic acid adalah salah satu terapi akne vulgaris yang memiliki efek antimicrobial dan anti-inflamatory. Kombinasi niacinamide+zinc berfungsi sebagai anti inflamasi, menurunkan produksi sebum, dan mencegah timbulnya bekas luka jerawat. Selain itu niacinamide sangat well-tolerated terhadap kulit wajah. Tujuan: Menganalisis perbedaan efektivitas pen...

  20. Lupus vulgaris in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and persistent IgG deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, N; Duman, M; Sonel, B; Peksari, Y; Erdem, C; Tokgöz, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed a persistent, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia with IgG deficiency. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was probably a complication of high dose corticosteroid treatment. The serum IgG level remained subnormal despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Lupus vulgaris, which developed on the nasal cartilage in this patient with SLE, is not an expected finding. This patient is probably the first reported case of SLE associated with lupus vulgaris.

  1. Phenological Variations in the Surface Flavonoids of Artemisia vulgaris L. and Artemisia absinthium L.

    OpenAIRE

    NIKOLOVA, Milena; VELICKOVIC, Dragan

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative variations in the surface flavonoids in relation to phenological development of Artemisia vulgaris L. and Artemisia absinthium L. were examined. Plant material was harvested at different phenological stages (vegetative, before budding, floral budding, flowering, and fruiting) of the life cycle of the species. In A. vulgaris and A. absinthium acetone exudates, 6 and 4 flavonoid aglycones were identified, respectively, by TLC analysis. Quercetin 3,7,3'-trim...

  2. Phytochemical analysis and antimicrobial activity of Chorella vulgaris isolated from Unkal Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Shakeel Ahmed Adhoni; Shivasharana Chandrabanda Thimmappa; Basappa Basawanneppa Kaliwal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of bioactive molecules and to check their antimicrobial activity from green algae Chlorella vulgaris (AS-3) (C. vulgaris) isolated from Unkal Lake in Dharwad District, Karnataka, India. Methods: Based on the polarity, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, ethanol, hexane, methanol, petroleum ether and distilled water were the solvents used for the preparation of algal extracts using Soxhlet apparatus, which were further subjected to phytochemi...

  3. Photoprotective properties of Prunella vulgaris and rosmarinic acid on human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psotova, Jitka; Svobodova, Alena; Kolarova, Hana; Walterova, Daniela

    2006-09-01

    UVA radiation provokes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce oxidative stress in the exposed cells leading to extensive cellular damage and cell death either by apoptosis or necrosis. One approach to protecting human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation is by using herbal compounds as photoprotectants. This study evaluated the protective effects of Prunella vulgaris L. (Labiatae) and its main phenolic acid component, rosmarinic acid (RA), against UVA-induced changes in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). Human keratinocytes exposed to UVA (10-30 J/cm(2)) were treated with an extract of P. vulgaris (1-75 mg/l) or RA (0.9-18 mg/l) for 4h. P. vulgaris and RA exhibited ability to reduce the UVA-caused decrease in a cell viability monitored by neutral red retention and by LDH release into medium. The P. vulgaris extract and RA significantly suppressed UVA-induced ROS production, which manifests as a decrease in intracellular lipid peroxidation, elevation of ATP and reduced glutathione. Post-treatment with P. vulgaris extract and RA also significantly reduced DNA damage. In addition, UVA-induced activation of caspase-3 was inhibited by treatment with P. vulgaris and RA. The P. vulgaris extract and RA demonstrated a concentration-dependent photoprotection (maximum at 25-50 mg/l and 9 mg/l, respectively). These results suggest that P. vulgaris and RA, used in skin care cosmetics, may offer protection against UVA-induced oxidative stress and may be beneficial as a supplement in photoprotective dermatological preparations.

  4. A clinico-histopathological study of lupus vulgaris: A 3 year experience at a tertiary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Varadraj Vasant; Naveen, Kikkeri Narayanshetty; Athanikar, S B; Dinesh, U S; Divyashree, A; Gupta, Gaurang

    2014-10-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis in adults. Lupus vulgaris is caused by hematogenous, lymphatic, or contiguous spread from elsewhere in the body. histologically it is charecterised by typical tubercles with or without caseation, surrounded by epitheloid histiocytes and multinucleate giant cells in the superficial epidermis with prominent peripheral lymphocytes. All cases of clinically and histopathologicaly diagnosed lupus vulgaris over the previous five years were included in the study. Fourteen cases of lupus vulgaris cases reported during the study period with eaqual incidence among males and females. Plaque type of lupus vulgaris was the most common type. Histopathologically tubercular granulomas were seen in all cases as compared to other studies. Different patterns of lupus vulgaris are reported.

  5. A clinico-histopathological study of lupus vulgaris: A 3 year experience at a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis in adults. Lupus vulgaris is caused by hematogenous, lymphatic, or contiguous spread from elsewhere in the body. histologically it is charecterised by typical tubercles with or without caseation, surrounded by epitheloid histiocytes and multinucleate giant cells in the superfi cial epidermis with prominent peripheral lymphocytes. Materials and Method: All cases of clinically and histopathologicaly diagnosed lupus vulgaris over the previous five years were included in the study. Results: Fourteen cases of lupus vulgaris cases reported during the study period with eaqual incidence among males and females. Discussion: Plaque type of lupus vulgaris was the most common type. Histopathologically tubercular granulomas were seen in all cases as compared to other studies. Conclusion: Different patterns of lupus vulgaris are reported

  6. Computational identification of miRNAs and their targets in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Xie, H; Kong, M L; Sun, Q P; Li, R Z; Pan, J B

    2014-01-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Although thousands of miRNAs have been identified in plants, limited information is available about miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris, despite it being an important food legume worldwide. The high conservation of plant miRNAs enables the identification of new miRNAs in P. vulgaris by homology analysis. Here, 1804 known and unique plant miRNAs from 37 plant species were blast-searched against expressed sequence tag and genomic survey sequence databases to identify novel miRNAs in P. vulgaris. All candidate sequences were screened by a series of miRNA filtering criteria. Finally, we identified 27 conserved miRNAs, belonging to 24 miRNA families. When compared against known miRNAs in P. vulgaris, we found that 24 of the 27 miRNAs were newly discovered. Further, we identified 92 potential target genes with known functions for these novel miRNAs. Most of these target genes were predicted to be involved in plant development, signal transduction, metabolic pathways, disease resistance, and environmental stress response. The identification of the novel miRNAs in P. vulgaris is anticipated to provide baseline information for further research about the biological functions and evolution of miRNAs in P. vulgaris.

  7. Study of artemisinin and sugar accumulation in Artemisia vulgaris and Artemisia dracunculus "hairy" root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobot, Kateryna O; Matvieieva, Nadiia A; Ostapchuk, Andriy M; Kharkhota, Maxim A; Duplij, Volodymyr P

    2017-09-14

    We studied the effect of genetic transformation on biologically active compound (artemisinin and its co-products (ART) as well as sugars) accumulation in Artemisia vulgaris and Artemisia dracunculus "hairy" root cultures. Glucose, fructose, sucrose, and mannitol were accumulated in A. vulgaris and A. dracunculus "hairy" root lines. Genetic transformation has led in some cases to the sugar content increasing or appearing of nonrelevant for the control plant carbohydrates. Sucrose content was 1.6 times higher in A. vulgaris "hairy" root lines. Fructose content was found to be 3.4 times higher in A. dracunculus "hairy" root cultures than in the control roots. The accumulation of mannitol was a special feature of the leaves of A. vulgaris and A. dracunculus control roots. A. vulgaris "hairy" root lines differed also in ART accumulation level. The increase of ART content up to 1.02 mg/g DW in comparison with the nontransformed roots (up to 0.687 mg/g DW) was observed. Thus, Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated genetic transformation can be used for obtaining of A. vulgaris and A. dracunculus "hairy" root culture produced ART and sugars in a higher amount than mother plants.

  8. Study of the effect of extract of Thymus vulgaris on anxiety in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki, Alireza; Hoseini, Faeghe; Shahidi, Siamak; Baharlouei, Negar

    2016-07-01

    There is some evidence in traditional medicine for the effectiveness of Thymus vulgaris ( bǎi lǐ xiāng) in the treatment of anxiety in humans. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of extract of T. vulgaris on rat behavior in the EPM. In the present study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into four groups: saline group and T. vulgaris groups (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg infusion for 7 days by feeding). During the test period, the total distance covered by animals, the number of open- and closed-arm entries, and the time spent in open and closed arms of the EPM were recorded. T. vulgaris increased open-arm exploration and open-arm entry in the EPM, whereas extract of this plant has no effects on the total distance covered by animals and the number of closed-arm entries. The results of the present experiment indicate that T. vulgaris may have an anxiolytic profile in rat behavior in the EPM test, which is not influenced by the locomotor activity. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms by which T. vulgaris extract exerts an anxiolytic effect in rats.

  9. Chlorella vulgaris vs cyanobacterial biomasses: Comparison in terms of biomass productivity and biogas yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, Lara; Mahdy, Ahmed; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cyanobacteria and C. vulgaris were compared in terms of growth and methane production. • Biomasses were subjected to anaerobic digestion without applying any disruption method. • Cyanobacteria showed an increased methane yield in comparison with C. vulgaris. - Abstract: The aim of the present study was to compare cyanobacteria strains (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, Anabaena planctonica, Borzia trilocularis and Synechocystis sp.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) in terms of growth rate, biochemical profile and methane production. Cyanobacteria growth rate ranged 0.5–0.6 day −1 for A. planctonica, A. ovalisporum and Synecochystis sp. and 0.4 day −1 for B. tricularis. Opposite, C. vulgaris maximum growth rate was double (1.2 day −1 ) than that of cyanobacteria. Regarding the methane yield, microalgae C. vulgaris averaged 120 mL CH 4 g COD in −1 due to the presence of a strong cell wall. On the other hand, anaerobic digestion of cyanobacteria supported higher methane yields. B. trilocularis and A. planctonica presented 1.42-fold higher methane yield than microalgae while this value was raised to approximately 1.85-fold for A. ovalisporum and Synechochystis sp. In the biogas production context, this study showed that the low growth rates of cyanobacteria can be overcome by their increased anaerobic digestibility when compared to their microalgae counterpartners, such is the case of C. vulgaris

  10. Ghrelin in the pilosebaceous unit: alteration of ghrelin in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Demet; Demir, Betul; Erder, Ilker; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Ucer, Ozlem; Aydin, Suleyman; Ucak, Haydar; Dertlioglu, Selma; Kalayci, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin in the pilosebaceous tissues of human skin and ghrelin levels in patients with acne vulgaris have not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to screen ghrelin immunoreactivity by immunohistochemistry in human pilosebaceous tissues of human skin and also to determine the quantities of ghrelin in the serum of the patients with acne vulgaris. 30 patients presenting with acne vulgaris and 30 control subjects participated in this study. Ghrelin levels were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Human hair follicles and sebaceous glands were immunohistochemically examined. Immunohistochemistry results showed that there is a strong ghrelin immunoreactivity in the hair follicles and sebaceous glands in sections of human skin. The mean serum ghrelin levels (27.58 ・} 15.44 pg/mL) in patients with acne vulgaris was significantly lower than those of controls (35.62・}20.46 pg/mL). Ghrelin produced in hair follicles and sebaceous glands of the skin might participate in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris and also acne vulgaris in humans might be associated with decreased serum ghrelin.

  11. Leaf conductance response of phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.

    The effect of ozone flux density on leaf conductance to ozone in Phaseolus vulgaris was examined. The change in conductance was measured within the first two hours of fumigation for mature, fruiting 6-week-old plants of an ozone sensitive cultivar (Seafarer); for young, 14-day-old plants of the same cultivar; and for an ozone resistant cultivar (Gold Crop). Young Seafarer plants showed no change in conductance to ozone over a wide range of ozone flux densities. Gold Crop showed a decrease in conductance of -3.1 % /(mgO 3 m -2 h -1) whereas mature Seafarer plants exhibited a stronger decrease of -7.7% /(mgO 3 m -2 h -1). Diffusion porometer measurements taken on fruiting Seafarer plants in the field illustrated that a decrease in leaf diffusive conductance to water is related to visual ozone injury.

  12. Pemphigus vulgaris – a report of three cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharote, Harshkant P; Nair, Preeti P; Kasetty, Sowmya; Thomas, Shaji; Kulkarni, Abhay

    2012-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a potentially life-threatening illness that manifests in the mouth and on skin. In a majority of patients it affects the oral mucosa and is sometimes difficult to diagnose when only mucosal involvement is present. In an attempt to highlight the proper treatment plan of this potentially fatal disorder, the authors document a report of three cases. These patients were prescribed conventional steroids which brought about partial relief but early recurrence with discontinuation of the drug. Subsequent management of these patients with azathioprine along with corticosteroids improved the outcome of the disease with longer remission periods. In this case series, the steroid sparing effect of azathioprine was achieved successfully and hence needs to be considered as a primary drug in management of PV. PMID:22605597

  13. [Transition from pemphigus vulgaris to pemphigus foliaceus: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy-Sitbon, C; Reguiaï, Z; Durlach, A; Goeldel, A-L; Grange, F; Bernard, P

    2013-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are the two main subtypes of auto-immune pemphigus, each having different clinical, histological and immunopathological features. We report the case of a patient initially with typical PV who relapsed within 2years, presenting clinically, histologically and immunologically typical PF. A 47-year old man presented in March 2008 with clinically, histologically and serologically typical PV and treated with systemic corticosteroids alone (prednisone: 1mg/kg per day) then combined with a cycle of rituximab, which resulted in complete remission. After discontinuation of therapy (duration: 26months), he relapsed 6 months later with PF presenting clinical, histological and serological characteristics typical of this condition. This is a rare case of complete transition from PV to PF in clinical, histological and serological terms, and the first case occurring after initial treatment with rituximab. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Future therapies for pemphigus vulgaris: Rituximab and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Amy; Madan, Raman K; Levitt, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    The conventional treatment for patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) centers on global immunosuppression, such as the use of steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs, to decrease titers of antidesmoglein autoantibodies responsible for the acantholytic blisters. Global immunosuppressants, however, cause serious side effects. The emergence of anti-CD20 biologic medications, such as rituximab, as an adjunct to conventional therapy has shifted the focus to targeted destruction of autoimmune B cells. Next-generation biologic medications with improved modes of delivery, pharmacology, and side effect profiles are constantly being developed, adding to the diversity of options for PV treatment. We review promising monoclonal antibodies, including veltuzumab, obinutuzumab (GA-101), ofatumumab, ocaratuzumab (AME-133v), PRO131921, and belimumab. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PRODUCTIVITY OF MICROALGAE CHLORELLA VULGARIS IN LABORATORY CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Patyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Algae biomass is increasingly regarded as a potential resource that could be used to produce biofuels, electricity and heat. Algae contain a lot of nutrients, so they can be used as food for humans and livestock. Because of their valuable composition (many nutrients they are used as supplements of balanced diet, in turn taking into account their biosorption abbility they are used to detoxification of human body. Algae cultivation does not demand large areas of land to expose cells to sunlight, so their production rate is higher than vascular plants. Moreover algae cultivation lets to achieve high biomass concentration. Important cultivation factors are: illumination (light intensity is an important factor because it drives photosynthesis, CO2 supply, culture medium and mixing. The experimental research was conducted using Chlorella vulgaris BA 002 strain. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of biomass growth in laboratory condition.

  16. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds.

  17. Four cases of recalcitrant pemphigus vulgaris salvaged with rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyak Ganjre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the long-term use of immunosuppressives – supplemented with more aggressive treatments such as immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulins, or plasmapheresis in recalcitrant cases has dramatically improved the prognosis of pemphigus vulgaris, opportunistic infections secondary to immunosuppression continue to cause significant mortality. We report four cases– three old ones, who had accumulated significant morbidities over their disease duration ranging from 5 to 10 years, and the fourth, a teenage female intolerant to corticosteroids and idiosyncratic to methotrexate– who achieved complete remission on administration of rituximab by the lymphoma protocol. One of the old cases who had recalcitrant mucositis experienced its complete subsidence without any adjuvant whatsoever. All continue to remain asymptomatic for 11–20 months. None had infusion reactions or any delayed side effects.

  18. Cannibalistic behavior of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Urcera, Jorge; Garci, Manuel E; Roura, Alvaro; González, Angel F; Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Guerra, Angel

    2014-11-01

    The first description of cannibalism in wild adult Octopus vulgaris is presented from 3 observations made in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain), which were filmed by scuba divers. These records document common traits in cannibalistic behavior: (a) it was intercohort cannibalism; (b) attacks were made by both males and females; (c) in 2 of the records, the prey were transported to the den, which was covered with stones of different sizes; (d) the predator started to eat the tip of the arms of its prey; (e) predation on conspecifics occurred even if there were other abundant prey available (i.e., mussels); and (f) the prey/predator weight ratio in the 3 cases ranged from 20% to 25% body weight. The relationships between this behavior and sex, defense of territory, energy balance, food shortage, competition and predation, as well as how the attacker kills its victim are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hydra vulgaris (Hydroida: Hydridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hong-Chun; Fang, Hong-Yan; Li, Shi-Wei; Liu, Jun-Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, An-Tai

    2014-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Hydra vulgaris (Hydroida: Hydridae) is composed of two linear DNA molecules. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule 1 is 8010 bp long and contains six protein-coding genes, large subunit rRNA, methionine and tryptophan tRNAs, two pseudogenes consisting respectively of a partial copy of COI, and terminal sequences at two ends of the linear mtDNA, while the mtDNA molecule 2 is 7576 bp long and contains seven protein-coding genes, small subunit rRNA, methionine tRNA, a pseudogene consisting of a partial copy of COI and terminal sequences at two ends of the linear mtDNA. COI gene begins with GTG as start codon, whereas other 12 protein-coding genes start with a typical ATG initiation codon. In addition, all protein-coding genes are terminated with TAA as stop codon.

  20. Lupus Vulgaris Causing Nasal Destruction: Rare Presentation in Current Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Rokon Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old lady reported with slowly progressive reddish lesions over the nose, followed by atrophy and ulceration for about 6 years. Clinical examination revealed atrophied, ulcerated, erythematous lesions over central face, forehead and neck destroying whole nose. Mantoux test resulted 16×18 mm on 48 hours observation. Histopathological examination of the lesion showed noncaseating grunuloma along with Langhans giant cells in the upper dermis surrounded by lymphocytes. The conclusive diagnosis was lupus vulgaris based on above findings. Six months therapy with INH 300 mg plus rifampicin 600 mg supplemented by initial 2 months ethambutol 1000 mg plus pyrazinamide 1500 mg daily resulted clean-looking perforation with healthy margin