WorldWideScience

Sample records for designing safer chemicals

  1. The Need for, and the Role of the Toxicological Chemist in the Design of Safer Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Stephen C

    2018-02-01

    During the past several decades, there has been an ever increasing emphasis for designers of new commercial (nonpharmaceutical) chemicals to include considerations of the potential impacts a planned chemical may have on human health and the environment as part of the design of the chemical, and to design chemicals such that they possess the desired use efficacy while minimizing threats to human health and the environment. Achievement of this goal would be facilitated by the availability of individuals specifically and formally trained to design such chemicals. Medicinal chemists are specifically trained to design and develop safe and clinically efficacious pharmaceutical substances. No such formally trained science hybrid exists for the design of safer commercial (nonpharmaceutical) chemicals. This article describes the need for and role of the "toxicological chemist," an individual who is formally trained in synthetic organic chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, toxicology, environmental science, and in the relationships between structure and commercial use efficacy, structure and toxicity, structure and environmental fate and effects, and global hazard, and trained to integrate this knowledge to design safer commercially efficacious chemicals. Using examples, this article illustrates the role of the toxicological chemist in designing commercially efficacious, safer chemical candidates. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2017. This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Safer by design strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobaleda-Siles, M.; Guillamon, A. P.; Delpivo, C.; Vázquez-Campos, S.; Puntes, V. F.

    2017-06-01

    Throughout the EU funded FP7 project GUIDENano, we are trying to control and monitor the evolution of nano-enable products during their lifecycle. Small alterations of the nanoparticle (NP) state may have critical consequences on the NP behaviour and performance. For this reason it is important to highlight the importance of an extensive and proper characterization to define the NP physico-chemical characteristics under several environmental conditions. Furthermore, this characterization is necessary to ensure that obtained results are reproducible and allow understanding the behaviour of the NP on biological systems. In this paper different strategies reported in the literature regarding the safety-by-design concept are summarized. Several strategies from the synthetic point of view that help us to modulate the main factors which determine the safety of nanomaterials are proposed.

  3. Chemical Safety Alert: Safer Technology and Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    This alert is intended to introduce safer technology concepts and general approaches, explains the concepts and principles, and gives brief examples of the integration of safer technologies into facility risk management activities.

  4. Computational design of safer nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burello, E.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are expected to find applications in numerous consumer products, posing the challenge to guarantee their safety and environmental sustainability before they can be transferred from research labs to end-consumer products. One emerging solution, called safe design, relies on the

  5. Designing safer living environments support for local government

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, K

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the built environment, the opportunities it presents for crime and the role city planners and urban designers have to play in the design of safer cities and towns. City planners and urban designers can play a role...

  6. SaferNanoDesign Summer School | 13-18 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    A bioHC Summer School - 13-18 June 2016 - European Scientific Institute, Archamps, Haute-Savoie.   How can industrial innovation in nanotechnologies be reconciled with the legitimate concerns of citizens regarding environmental protection and public health? Tomorrow’s researchers and engineers will require skills in risk evaluation using computational methods of modelling and simulation relevant to nanomaterials. An intensive one-week specialist school, SaferNanoDesign will examine the analytical tools and methodologies required to rise to the challenge of the ecodesign of nanomaterial-enabled technology. The School combines an intensive programme of lecture presentations, followed up by practical sessions (experiments, computer simulation and modelling) and interdisciplinary group work. Courses will be given by international experts from France, Scotland, the US, the Netherlands and Switzerland and representatives from industry and regulatory bodies. For more information: www....

  7. SWOT analysis for safer carriage of bulk liquid chemicals in tankers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ozcan; Er, Ismail Deha

    2008-06-15

    The application of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis to formulation of strategy concerned with the safe carriage of bulk liquid chemicals in maritime tankers was examined in this study. A qualitative investigation using SWOT analysis has been implemented successfully for ships that are designed to carry liquid chemicals in bulk. The originality of this study lies in the use of SWOT analysis as a management tool to formulate strategic action plans for ship management companies, ship masters and officers for the carriage of dangerous goods in bulk. With this transportation-based SWOT analysis, efforts were made to explore the ways and means of converting possible threats into opportunities, and changing weaknesses into strengths; and strategic plans of action were developed for safer tanker operation.

  8. An open framework for automated chemical hazard assessment based on GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehage, Kristopher; Chenhansa, Panan; Schoenung, Julie M

    2017-01-01

    GreenScreen® for Safer Chemicals is a framework for comparative chemical hazard assessment. It is the first transparent, open and publicly accessible framework of its kind, allowing manufacturers and governmental agencies to make informed decisions about the chemicals and substances used in consumer products and buildings. In the GreenScreen® benchmarking process, chemical hazards are assessed and classified based on 18 hazard endpoints from up to 30 different sources. The result is a simple numerical benchmark score and accompanying assessment report that allows users to flag chemicals of concern and identify safer alternatives. Although the screening process is straightforward, aggregating and sorting hazard data is tedious, time-consuming, and prone to human error. In light of these challenges, the present work demonstrates the usage of automation to cull chemical hazard data from publicly available internet resources, assign metadata, and perform a GreenScreen® hazard assessment using the GreenScreen® "List Translator." The automated technique, written as a module in the Python programming language, generates GreenScreen® List Translation data for over 3000 chemicals in approximately 30 s. Discussion of the potential benefits and limitations of automated techniques is provided. By embedding the library into a web-based graphical user interface, the extensibility of the library is demonstrated. The accompanying source code is made available to the hazard assessment community. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:167-176. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, Charles; Heidel, Donna; Sayes, Christie; Hodson, Laura; Schulte, Paul; Eastlake, Adrienne; Brenner, Sara

    2015-01-01

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles, which includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial

  10. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Charles; Heidel, Donna; Sayes, Christie; Hodson, Laura; Schulte, Paul; Eastlake, Adrienne; Brenner, Sara

    2015-09-01

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles, which includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial.

  11. Crime and public transport: designing a safer journey

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, Tinus

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available evasion), employees (assaults on ticket collectors) and passengers (pickpocketing, assault) (Smith and Clarke, 2000). Numerous studies have been conducted internationally highlighting various crime problems related to public transport. This has become... trading, food sales, 24- hour convenience shops, emergency pharmacies, satellite police stations and even entertainment such as cinemas and restaurants. However, liquor outlets should be avoided. Designated areas for hawkers should be provided to reduce...

  12. Designing out Crime - Voices from the Fields: Editorial for Special Edition of Safer Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Monchuk, Leanne; Clancey, Garner

    2013-01-01

    ‘Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED)’, ‘designing out crime’, ‘safer by design’, ‘secured by design’ or any of the other ‘flavours’ of manipulating the built environment to prevent crime, invariably engender an inter-disciplinary approach. This work is frequently the domain of architects, urban planners, police, security professionals, local authority planners and community safety professionals (amongst others). Despite the real work being undertaken by these actors, the div...

  13. Design of chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Il; Kim, Seung Jae; Yang, Jae Ho; Ryu, Hwa Won

    1993-01-01

    This book describes design of chemical plant, which includes chemical engineer and plan for chemical plant, development of chemical process, cost engineering pattern, design and process development, general plant construction plan, project engineering, foundation for economy on assets and depreciation, estimation for cost on capital investment and manufacturing cost, design with computers optimal design and method like fluid mechanics design chemical device and estimation for cost, such as dispatch of material and device writing on design report and appendixes.

  14. Using a service design model to develop the "Passport to Safer Birth" in Nigeria and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Mariana; Wendland, Melanie; Rodriguez, Damaris; Bohren, Meghan A; Oladapo, Olufemi T; Ojelade, Olubunmi A; Olalere, Adebimpe A; Luwangula, Ronald; Mugerwa, Kidza; Fawole, Bukola

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate how a human-centered service design approach can generate practical tools for good-quality childbirth care in low-resource settings. As part of the WHO "Better Outcomes in Labour Difficulty" (BOLD) project, a service design approach was used in eight Ugandan and Nigerian health facilities and communities to develop the "Passport to Safer Birth." There are three phases: Research for Design, Concept Design, and Detail Design. These generated design principles, design archetype personas, and Passport prototypes. Data collection methods included desk research, interviews, group discussions, and journey mapping to identify touchpoints where the woman interacts with the health system. A total of 90 interviews, 12 observation hours, and 15 group discussions were undertaken. The resulting design principles were: a shared and deeper understanding of pregnancy and childbirth among family and community; family readiness for decision-making and action; and the woman's sense of being in control and being cared for. Four archetype personas of women emerged: Vulnerable; Passive; Empowered; Accepter. Subsequent development of the Passport to Safer Birth tools addressed three domains: Care Mediator; Expectation Manager; and Pregnancy Assistant. The service design approach can create innovative, human-centered service solutions to improve maternity care experiences and outcomes in low-resource settings. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  15. Toxic release consequence analysis tool (TORCAT) for inherently safer design plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariff, Azmi Mohd; Zaini, Dzulkarnain

    2010-01-01

    Many major accidents due to toxic release in the past have caused many fatalities such as the tragedy of MIC release in Bhopal, India (1984). One of the approaches is to use inherently safer design technique that utilizes inherent safety principle to eliminate or minimize accidents rather than to control the hazard. This technique is best implemented in preliminary design stage where the consequence of toxic release can be evaluated and necessary design improvements can be implemented to eliminate or minimize the accidents to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) without resorting to costly protective system. However, currently there is no commercial tool available that has such capability. This paper reports on the preliminary findings on the development of a prototype tool for consequence analysis and design improvement via inherent safety principle by utilizing an integrated process design simulator with toxic release consequence analysis model. The consequence analysis based on the worst-case scenarios during process flowsheeting stage were conducted as case studies. The preliminary finding shows that toxic release consequences analysis tool (TORCAT) has capability to eliminate or minimize the potential toxic release accidents by adopting the inherent safety principle early in preliminary design stage.

  16. Chemical Product Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights for a class of chemical products, the design process, their design with respect to the important issues, the need for appropriate tools and finally, lists some of the challenges and opportunities for the process systems engineering (PSE)/computer-aided process engineering...... (CAPE) community. The chemical products considered belong to the following types: chemical/biochemical/agrochemical products, coatings and solvents, food (nutraceuticals), HIM (household, industrial and institutional), personal care, pharmaceuticals and drugs. The challenges and opportunities...... are highlighted in terms of the needs for multi-level modeling with emphasis on property models that are suitable for computer-aided applications, flexible solution strategies that are able to solve a large range of chemical product design problems and finally, a systems chemical product design framework...

  17. Advancing alternatives analysis: The role of predictive toxicology in selecting safer chemical products and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Timothy; Zaunbrecher, Virginia; Beryt, Elizabeth; Judson, Richard; Tice, Raymond; Allard, Patrick; Blake, Ann; Cote, Ila; Godwin, Hilary; Heine, Lauren; Kerzic, Patrick; Kostal, Jakub; Marchant, Gary; McPartland, Jennifer; Moran, Kelly; Nel, Andre; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Rossi, Mark; Thayer, Kristina; Tickner, Joel; Whittaker, Margaret; Zarker, Ken

    2017-09-01

    Alternatives analysis (AA) is a method used in regulation and product design to identify, assess, and evaluate the safety and viability of potential substitutes for hazardous chemicals. It requires toxicological data for the existing chemical and potential alternatives. Predictive toxicology uses in silico and in vitro approaches, computational models, and other tools to expedite toxicological data generation in a more cost-effective manner than traditional approaches. The present article briefly reviews the challenges associated with using predictive toxicology in regulatory AA, then presents 4 recommendations for its advancement. It recommends using case studies to advance the integration of predictive toxicology into AA, adopting a stepwise process to employing predictive toxicology in AA beginning with prioritization of chemicals of concern, leveraging existing resources to advance the integration of predictive toxicology into the practice of AA, and supporting transdisciplinary efforts. The further incorporation of predictive toxicology into AA would advance the ability of companies and regulators to select alternatives to harmful ingredients, and potentially increase the use of predictive toxicology in regulation more broadly. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:915-925. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  18. On Demand Internal Short Circuit Device Enables Verification of Safer, Higher Performing Battery Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew

    2017-05-15

    The Internal Short Circuit (ISC) device enables critical battery safety verification. With the aluminum interstitial heat sink between the cells, normal trigger cells cannot be driven into thermal runaway without excessive temperature bias of adjacent cells. With an implantable, on-demand ISC device, thermal runaway tests show that the conductive heat sinks protected adjacent cells from propagation. High heat dissipation and structural support of Al heat sinks show high promise for safer, higher performing batteries.

  19. NREL Multiphysics Modeling Tools and ISC Device for Designing Safer Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.; Yang, Chuanbo

    2016-03-24

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed a portfolio of multiphysics modeling tools to aid battery designers better understand the response of lithium ion batteries to abusive conditions. We will discuss this portfolio, which includes coupled electrical, thermal, chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical modeling. These models can simulate the response of a cell to overheating, overcharge, mechanical deformation, nail penetration, and internal short circuit. Cell-to-cell thermal propagation modeling will be discussed.

  20. Surface interactions with compartmentalized cellular phosphates explain rare earth oxide nanoparticle hazard and provide opportunities for safer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dunphy, Darren R; Cai, Xiaoming; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Haiyuan; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, Andre; Xia, Tian

    2014-02-25

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use.

  1. FMEA and consideration of real work situations for safer design of production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Aurélien; Mawo De Bikond, Johann; Etienne, Alain; Quillerou-Grivot, Edwige

    2016-12-01

    Production equipment designers must ensure the health and safety of future users; in this regard, they augment requirements for standardizing and controlling operator work. This contrasts with the ergonomic view of the activity, which recommends leaving operators leeway (margins for manoeuvre) in performing their task, while safeguarding their health. Following a brief analysis of design practices in the car industry, we detail how the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) approach is implemented in this sector. We then suggest an adaptation that enables designers to consider real work situations. This new protocol, namely, work situation FMEA, allows experience feedback to be used to defend the health standpoint during designer project reviews, which usually only address quality and performance issues. We subsequently illustrate the advantage of this approach using two examples of work situations at car parts manufacturers: the first from the literature and the second from an in-company industrial project.

  2. Designing a Safer Interactive Healthcare System - The Impact of Authentic User Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Went, Kathryn L.; Gregor, Peter; Ricketts, Ian W.

    Information technology has been widely promoted in the healthcare sector to improve current practice and patient safety. However, end users are seldom involved extensively in the design and development of healthcare systems, with lip service often paid to the idea of true user involvement. In this case study the impact of sustained authentic user participation was explored using an interdisciplinary team, consisting of experts both in interaction and healthcare design and consultant anaesthetists, nurses, and pharmacists, to create an electronic prescribing and administration system. This paper details the interface that was created and provides examples of the way in which the design evolved in response to the sustained authentic user participation methods. The working prototype both reduced the opportunity for user error and was preferred by its users to the existing manual system.

  3. Colegios mas seguros a traves del diseno del medioambiente (Safer Schools through Environmental Design). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tod

    This digest in Spanish describes the key elements of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is based on the recognition that the physical environment influences human behavior. It is different from conventional security measures, which many times are based on prohibitions, in that it focuses on desired behaviors and attempts…

  4. A participatory systems approach to design for safer integrated medicine management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Gyuchan Thomas; Canham, Aneurin; Altuna-Palacios, Ander; Ward, James R; Bhamra, Ran; Rogers, Stephen; Dutt, Amalin; Shah, Priyal

    2018-01-01

    It is recognised that whole systems approaches are required in the design and development of complex health care services. Application of a systems approach benefits from the involvement of key stakeholders. However, participation in the context of community based health care is particularly challenging due to busy and geographically distributed stakeholders. This study used action research to investigate what processes and methods were needed to successfully employ a participatory systems approach. Three participatory workshops planned and facilitated by method experts were held with 30 representative stakeholders. Various methods were used with them and evaluated through an audit of workshop outputs and a qualitative questionnaire. Findings on the method application and participation are presented and methodological challenges are discussed with reference to further research. Practitioner Summary: This study provides practical insights on how to apply a participatory systems approach to complex health care service design. Various template-based methods for systems thinking and risk-based thinking were efficiently and effectively applied with stakeholders.

  5. Safer@home-Simulation and training: the study protocol of a qualitative action research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Siri; Guise, Veslemøy; Anderson, Janet; Storm, Marianne; Lunde Husebø, Anne Marie; Testad, Ingelin; Søyland, Elsa; Moltu, Kirsti L

    2014-07-29

    While it is predicted that telecare and other information and communication technology (ICT)-assisted services will have an increasingly important role in future healthcare services, their implementation in practice is complex. For implementation of telecare to be successful and ensure quality of care, sufficient training for staff (healthcare professionals) and service users (patients) is fundamental. Telecare training has been found to have positive effects on attitudes to, sustained use of, and outcomes associated with telecare. However, the potential contribution of training in the adoption, quality and safety of telecare services is an under-investigated research field. The overall aim of this study is to develop and evaluate simulation-based telecare training programmes to aid the use of videophone technology in elderly home care. Research-based training programmes will be designed for healthcare professionals, service users and next of kin, and the study will explore the impact of training on adoption, quality and safety of new telecare services. The study has a qualitative action research design. The research will be undertaken in close collaboration with a multidisciplinary team consisting of researchers and managers and clinical representatives from healthcare services in two Norwegian municipalities, alongside experts in clinical education and simulation, as well as service user (patient) representatives. The qualitative methods used involve focus group interviews, semistructured interviews, observation and document analysis. To ensure trustworthiness in the data analysis, we will apply member checks and analyst triangulation; in addition to providing contextual and sample description to allow for evaluation of transferability of our results to other contexts and groups. The study is approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. The study is based on voluntary participation and informed written consent. Informants can withdraw at any point in

  6. BIRD/WILDLIFE STRIKE CONTROL FOR SAFER AIR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-06-05

    Jun 5, 2012 ... These include staff training and retraining, developing good data bank based on .... wildlife is very important in bird control. Successful habitat ... Designated staff patrols the airside areas using chemical repellants, propane cannons, distress call. Birds/Wildlife Strikes Control for Safer Air .................Usman et ...

  7. Designing safer composite helmets to reduce rotational accelerations during oblique impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Yasmine; Cajka, Martin; Depreitere, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos; Ivens, Jan

    2018-03-01

    Oblique impact is the most common accident situation that occupants in traffic accidents or athletes in professional sports experience. During oblique impact, the human head is subjected to a combination of linear and rotational accelerations. Rotational movement is known to be responsible for traumatic brain injuries. In this article, composite foam with a column/matrix composite configuration is proposed for head protection applications to replace single-layer uniform foam, to better attenuate rotational movement of the head during oblique impacts. The ability of composite foam in the mitigation of rotational head movement is studied by performing finite element (FE) simulations of oblique impact on flat and helmet shape specimens. The performance of composite foam with respect to parameters such as compliance of the matrix foam and the number, size and cross-sectional shape of the foam columns is explored in detail, and subsequently an optimized structure is proposed. The simulation results show that using composite foam instead of single-layer foam, the rotational acceleration and velocity of the headform can be significantly reduced. The parametric study indicates that using a more compliant matrix foam and by increasing the number of columns in the composite foam configuration, the rotation can be further mitigated. This was confirmed by experimental results. The simulation results were also analyzed based on global head injury criteria such as head injury criterion, rotational injury criterion, brain injury criterion and generalized acceleration model for brain injury threshold which further confirmed the superior performance of composite foam versus single-layer homogeneous expanded polystyrene foam. The findings of simulations give invaluable information for design of protective helmets or, for instance, headliners for the automotive industry.

  8. Towards Safer Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Baun, Anders

    2014-01-01

    As nanomaterials become more widespread in everything from industrial processes to consumer products, concerns about human and environmental safety are being taken increasingly more seriously. In our research we are working with minimizing the impact and risks of engineered nanomaterials by looking...... into how the design of nanomaterials can be optimized to minimize their toxicity while still preserving their beneficial or wanted properties. Current efforts in this field are focusing on identifying design rules or parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a risk reduction, either by reducing the hazard...... or the exposure and optimally both. Examples include the 5 SAFER principles (Morose, 2010) or screenings of early warning signs (Hansen et al., 2013). Taking the full life cycle of nanomaterials into account, the principles of Green chemistry and Green engineering could also prove useful to reduce...

  9. How to sell safer sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overs, C

    1991-09-01

    Social and economic factors determine the extent of the sex industry in societies. Despite AIDS, the sex industry will continue to thrive. Accordingly, health promotion strategies aimed at sex workers and their clients should not stem from the belief that the industry should cease to exist. This paper offers advice in developing and implementing programs to promote safer sex among sex workers. The social context is 1 element to consider in planning successful campaigns. Interventions must be combined with well-planned prevention campaigns aimed at entire populations. The opinions and participation of those involved in the industry should also be sought, while worker discussion and action upon other community issues should not be discouraged. Care should be given to target the numerous and diverse sex worker audiences in addition to other persons related to and involved in the industry. Programs should address the main obstacles to practicing safer sex, and attention should be given to ensure the provision of an adequate and regular supply of cheap or free condoms through varied distribution channels. In the area of service provision, sex workers need easy access to social support and health care services from which they are often excluded. Activities conducted around the world include the marketing of safer sex, distributing printed information on HIV and AIDS to clients, training sex workers to pass designated constructive ideas to others involved in the sex industry, referring sex workers to sex businesses supportive of safer sex practices, and developing street theater and cabaret shows in bars.

  10. SaferProducts API

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Consumer Product Safety Commission — On March 11, 2011, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission launched SaferProducts.gov. This site hosts the agency's new Publicly Available Consumer Product...

  11. Chemical design of nanocrystal solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2013-01-01

    This account highlights our recent and present activities dedicated to chemical synthesis and applications of inorganic nanostructures. In particular, we discuss the potential of metal amides as precursors in the synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanocrystals. We show the importance of surface chemical functionalization for the emergence of collective electronic properties in nanocrystal solids. We also demonstrate a new kind of long-range ordered, crystalline matter comprising colloidal nanocrystals and atomically defined inorganic clusters. Finally, we point the reader's attention to the high potential benefits of size- and shape-tunability of nanocrystals for achieving higher performance of rechargeable Li-ion battery electrodes.

  12. Testing of tunnel support : dynamic load testing of rockbolt elements to provide data for safer support design.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ortlepp, WD

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available This research report discusses the development of a realistic and controllable method of testing support tendons dynamically, which has been achieved in this research project, offers a new and fresh opportunity for improving the design methodology...

  13. A Course in Chemical Reactor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1983-01-01

    Presents course outline, topics covered, and final project (doubling as a take home final exam) for a one-semester, interdisciplinary course on the design and behavior of chemical reactors. Interplay of chemical and physical rate processes is stressed in the course. (JM)

  14. SaferProducts.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov. Tell CPSC. Then others will know. Get Started Just for Business Reports submitted on SaferProducts.gov are sent to ... they are posted online. Sign up with the Business Portal to get reports quickly. Get Started Do You Have Questions? Are you uncertain about ...

  15. Safer Head Start Playgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Gayle; Hendricks, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    Argues that there are three areas to evaluate when creating safer playgrounds for children: environment, supervision, and education. Discusses the importance of safe and properly installed equipment, resilient surfacing, removal of hazards, proper maintenance, appropriate adult-to-child ratio, and enforcement of proper playground safety and injury…

  16. Design of Safer Flame Retardant Textiles through Inclusion Complex Formation with Cyclodextrins: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nanshan

    Triphenyl phosphate (TPP) is widely used as a phosphorus flame retardant. It is also one component of a commercial flame retardant mixture known as Firemaster 550. TPP is likely to be released into the environment due to its high volatility and has been detected at a concentration as high as 47,000 ng/m3 in air. Recent studies have also indicated that FRs like TPP could contribute to obesity and osteoporosis in humans. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are enzymatic degradation products of starch and consist of several (alpha-1,4)-linked alpha-Dglucopyranose units. CDs own a hydrophilic outside and a hydrophobic inner cavity, which enables the formation of non-covalently bonded cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (CD-ICs) with a vast array of molecules. We hypothesize that the formation of inclusion complexes between TPP and cyclodextrins will reduce its exposure yet also retain flame retarding properties of TPP, since the formation of FR-CD-ICs is expected to eliminate unnecessary loss of FRs, especially volatile FR compounds like TPP, and release them only during a fire when they are actually needed. After creating the TPP-beta-CD-IC, we applied it to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films by a hot press technique. Flame tests indicated TPP-beta-CD-IC exhibited flame resistant performance matching that of neat TPP, even though much less TPP was contained in its beta-CD-IC. Incorporation of FRs and other chemical additives into textile substrates in the form of their crystalline CD-ICs is a promising way to reduce the exposure of hazardous chemicals to humans and to our environment while not impacting their efficacy. Two other parent CDs (alpha-CD and gamma-CD) were applied and their abilities to form ICs with guest TPP were studied. Results from a series of characterization methods, including FTIR, DSC, TGA, XRD and NMR indicated the successful synthesis of TPP-gamma-CD-IC via two routes. However, alpha-CD appears unable to form an IC with TPP, which is likely attributable to a

  17. Supporting chemical process design under uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wechsung

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in chemical process design is to make design decisions based on partly incomplete or imperfect design input data. Still, process engineers are expected to design safe, dependable and cost-efficient processes under these conditions. The complexity of typical process models limits intuitive engineering estimates to judge the impact of uncertain parameters on the proposed design. In this work, an approach to quantify the effect of uncertainty on a process design in order to enhance comparisons among different designs is presented. To facilitate automation, a novel relaxation-based heuristic to differentiate between numerical and physical infeasibility when simulations do not converge is introduced. It is shown how this methodology yields more details about limitations of a studied process design.

  18. Are some "safer alternatives" hazardous as PBTs? The case study of new flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Cassani, Stefano; Sangion, Alessandro

    2016-04-05

    Some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), as PBDEs, are persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic (PBT) and are restricted/prohibited under various legislations. They are replaced by "safer" flame retardants (FRs), such as new BFRs or organophosphorous compounds. However, informations on the PBT behaviour of these substitutes are often lacking. The PBT assessment is required by the REACH regulation and the PBT chemicals should be subjected to authorization. Several new FRs, proposed and already used as safer alternatives to PBDEs, are here screened by the cumulative PBT Index model, implemented in QSARINS (QSAR-Insubria), new software for the development/validation of QSAR models. The results, obtained directly from the chemical structure for the three studied characteristics altogether, were compared with those from the US-EPA PBT Profiler: the two different approaches are in good agreement, supporting the utility of a consensus approach in these screenings. A priority list of the most harmful FRs, predicted in agreement by the two modelling tools, has been proposed, highlighting that some supposed "safer alternatives" are detected as intrinsically hazardous for their PBT properties. This study also shows that the PBT Index could be a valid tool to evaluate appropriate and safer substitutes, a priori from the chemical design, in a benign by design approach, avoiding unnecessary synthesis and tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  20. Chemical-Based Formulation Design: Virtual Experimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa; Gani, Rafiqul

    This paper presents a software, the virtual Product-Process Design laboratory (virtual PPD-lab) and the virtual experimental scenarios for design/verification of consumer oriented liquid formulated products where the software can be used. For example, the software can be employed for the design......, the additives and/or their mixtures (formulations). Therefore, the experimental resources can focus on a few candidate product formulations to find the best product. The virtual PPD-lab allows various options for experimentations related to design and/or verification of the product. For example, the selection...... design, model adaptation). All of the above helps to perform virtual experiments by blending chemicals together and observing their predicted behaviour. The paper will highlight the application of the virtual PPD-lab in the design and/or verification of different consumer products (paint formulation...

  1. Land use planning in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information in the computer tool Safer-TNP. Safer-TNP is a design tool that guides network planners in designing safe transportation networks (or improving safety of existing transportation networks). It provid...

  2. A grand model for chemical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fung, Ka Y.; Ng, Ka M.; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    , ingredients and structure. Market and competitive analysis, government policies and regulations have to be explicitly considered in product design. All these considerations are accounted for in the Grand Product Design Model, which consists of a process model, a property model, a quality model, a cost model......Chemical engineering has been expanding its focus from primarily business-to-business products (B2B) to business-to-consumer (B2C) products. The production of B2B products generally emphasizes on process design and optimization, whereas the production of B2C products focuses on product quality...... product composition changes with market conditions. Another is a hand lotion that illustrates how product quality affects the profit.(C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. Intelligent Controller Design for a Chemical Process

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Glan Devadhas G; Dr.Pushpakumar S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical process control is a challenging problem due to the strong on*line non*linearity and extreme sensitivity to disturbances of the process. Ziegler – Nichols tuned PI and PID controllers are found to provide poor performances for higher*order and non–linear systems. This paper presents an application of one*step*ahead fuzzy as well as ANFIS (adaptive*network*based fuzzy inference system) tuning scheme for an Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor CSTR process. The controller is designed based ...

  4. Property Modelling for Applications in Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    Physical-chemical properties of pure chemicals and their mixtures play an important role in the design of chemicals based products and the processes that manufacture them. Although, the use of experimental data in design and analysis of chemicals based products and their processes is desirable...... such as database, property model library, model parameter regression, and, property-model based product-process design will be presented. The database contains pure component and mixture data for a wide range of organic chemicals. The property models are based on the combined group contribution and atom...... modeling tools in design and analysis of chemical product-process design, including biochemical processes will be highlighted....

  5. Chemical process and plant design bibliography 1959-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This book is concerned specifically with chemical process in formation and plant equipment design data. It is a source for chemical engineers, students and academics involved in process and design evaluation. Over 500 chemical categories are included, from Acetaldehyde to zirconium Dioxide, with cross-referencing within the book to appropriate associated chemicals

  6. Material properties and processing in chemical product design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchioni, F; Broekhuis, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews developments in the first decade since the introduction of chemical product design and engineering as a new disciplinary element within the chemical engineering sciences. This opinion focuses on the differences between processes needed for the manufacture of specified chemicals

  7. Shopping for a safer car

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This brochure provides some helpful tips on what to look for when shopping for a safer car. Automakers are increasingly advertising the safety features of their cars. The problem is sorting out their claims and zeroing in on the safety features that ...

  8. SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feminism and Masculinity in an African Capitalist Context: · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Mwenda G. Ntarangwi, 19-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/safere.v3i1.23948 ...

  9. Safer sex in tourist resorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, N; Inman, M

    1992-01-01

    A survey in Torbay, England, indicated substantial sexual interaction of an unsafe kind between young residents and tourists. A pilot programme is described which sought to promote safer sexual behaviour: the attention of both tourists and local people who frequented nightclubs was engaged by peer groups who conveyed educational messages.

  10. Chemicals-Based Formulation Design: Virtual Experimentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic procedure for virtual experimentations related to the design of liquid formulated products. All the experiments that need to be performed when designing a liquid formulated product (lotion), such as ingredients selection and testing, solubility tests, property...... measurements, can now be performed through the virtual Product-Process Design laboratory [[1], [2] and [3

  11. Computational chemical product design problems under property uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Cignitti, Stefano; Abildskov, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Three different strategies of how to combine computational chemical product design with Monte Carlo based methods for uncertainty analysis of chemical properties are outlined. One method consists of a computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) solution and a post-processing property uncertainty...

  12. Integrating MBSE into Ongoing Projects: Requirements Validation and Test Planning for the ISS SAFER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Herbert A.; Williams, Antony; Pierce, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Simplified Aid for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Rescue (SAFER) is the spacewalking astronaut's final safety measure against separating from the ISS and being unable to return safely. Since the late 1990s, the SAFER has been a standard element of the spacewalking astronaut's equipment. The ISS SAFER project was chartered to develop a new block of SAFER units using a highly similar design to the legacy SAFER (known as the USA SAFER). An on-orbit test module was also included in the project to enable periodic maintenance/propulsion system checkout on the ISS SAFER. On the ISS SAFER project, model-based systems engineering (MBSE) was not the initial systems engineering (SE) approach, given the volume of heritage systems engineering and integration (SE&I) products. The initial emphasis was ensuring traceability to ISS program standards as well as to legacy USA SAFER requirements. The requirements management capabilities of the Cradle systems engineering tool were to be utilized to that end. During development, however, MBSE approaches were applied selectively to address specific challenges in requirements validation and test and verification (T&V) planning, which provided measurable efficiencies to the project. From an MBSE perspective, ISS SAFER development presented a challenge and an opportunity. Addressing the challenge first, the project was tasked to use the original USA SAFER operational and design requirements baseline, with a number of additional ISS program requirements to address evolving certification expectations for systems operating on the ISS. Additionally, a need to redesign the ISS SAFER avionics architecture resulted in a set of changes to the design requirements baseline. Finally, the project added an entirely new functionality for on-orbit maintenance. After initial requirements integration, the system requirements count was approaching 1000, which represented a growth of 4x over the original USA SAFER system

  13. SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Chemical optimization algorithm for fuzzy controller design

    CERN Document Server

    Astudillo, Leslie; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    In this book, a novel optimization method inspired by a paradigm from nature is introduced. The chemical reactions are used as a paradigm to propose an optimization method that simulates these natural processes. The proposed algorithm is described in detail and then a set of typical complex benchmark functions is used to evaluate the performance of the algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed optimization algorithm can outperform other methods in a set of benchmark functions. This chemical reaction optimization paradigm is also applied to solve the tracking problem for the dynamic model of a unicycle mobile robot by integrating a kinematic and a torque controller based on fuzzy logic theory. Computer simulations are presented confirming that this optimization paradigm is able to outperform other optimization techniques applied to this particular robot application

  15. Safer v. Estate of Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-11

    The Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division, recognized "a physician's duty to warn those known to be at risk of avoidable harm from a genetically transmissible condition." During the 1950s, Dr. George Pack treated Donna Shafer's father for a cancerous blockage of the colon and multiple polyposis. In 1990, Safer was diagnosed with the same condition, which she claims is inherited, and, if not diagnosed and treated, invariably will lead to metastic colorectal cancer. Safer alleged that Dr. Pack knew the hereditary nature of the disease, yet failed to warn the immediate family, thus breaching his professional duty to warn. The court did not follow the analysis of the trial court, that a physician has no legal duty to warn the child of a patient of the genetic risk of disease because no physician and patient relationship exists between the doctor and the child.

  16. Inorganic chemical precipitate formation payload design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Craig

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special payload to investigate the formation of inorganic precipitates (G-405) utilizes six transparent chemical reaction chambers to actively mix a dry powder with a liquid solution. At predetermined intervals the progress of the precipitate formation is photographed and stored as data. The precipitate particles will also be subject to post-flight analysis. The various tasks performed during the 14 hour duration of the experiment are initiated and monitored by a custom-built digital controller. The payload is currently scheduled as a backup payload for STS-29 with a possible launch date of January, 1989.

  17. Virtual design of chemical penetration enhancers for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golla, Sharath; Neely, Brian J; Whitebay, Eric; Madihally, Sundar; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2012-04-01

    Traditional drug design is a laborious and expensive process that often challenges the pharmaceutical industries. As a result, researchers have turned to computational methods for computer-assisted molecular design. Recently, genetic and evolutionary algorithms have emerged as efficient methods in solving combinatorial problems associated with computer-aided molecular design. Further, combining genetic algorithms with quantitative structure-property relationship analyses has proved effective in drug design. In this work, we have integrated a new genetic algorithm and nonlinear quantitative structure-property relationship models to develop a reliable virtual screening algorithm for the generation of potential chemical penetration enhancers. The genetic algorithms-quantitative structure-property relationship algorithm has been implemented successfully to identify potential chemical penetration enhancers for transdermal drug delivery of insulin. Validation of the newly identified chemical penetration enhancer molecular structures was conducted through carefully designed experiments, which elucidated the cytotoxicity and permeability of the chemical penetration enhancers. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Computer-aided design of small molecules for chemical genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    De novo design provides an in silico toolkit for the design of novel molecular structures to a set of specified structural constraints, and is thus ideally suited for creating molecules for chemical genomics. The design process involves manipulation of the input, modification of structural constraints, and further processing of the de novo-generated molecules using various modular toolkits. The development of a theoretical framework for each of these stages will provide novel practical solutions to the problem of creating compounds with maximal chemical diversity. This chapter describes the fundamental problems encountered in the application of novel chemical design technologies to chemical genomics by means of a formal representation. Formal representations help to outline and clarify ideas and hypotheses that can then be explored using mathematical algorithms. It is only by developing this rigorous foundation, that in silico design can progress in a rational way.

  19. Designing microcapsule arrays that propagate chemical signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Balazs, Anna C.

    2010-08-01

    Using analysis and simulation, we show how ordered arrays of microcapsules in solution can be harnessed to propagate chemical signals in directed and controllable ways, allowing the signals to be transmitted over macroscopic distances. The system encompasses two types of capsules that are localized on an adhesive surface. The “signaling” capsules release inducer molecules, which trigger “targets” to release nanoparticles. The released nanoparticles can bind to the underlying surface and thus, create adhesion gradients, which then propel the signaling capsules to shuttle between neighboring targets. This arrangement acts like a relay, so that triggering target capsules at a particular location in the array also triggers target capsules in adjacent locations. For an array containing two target columns, our simulations and analysis show that steady input signal leads to a sustained periodic output. For an array containing multiple target columns, we show that by introducing a prescribed ratio of nanoparticle release rates between successive target columns, a chemical signal can be propagated along the array without dissipation. We also demonstrate that similar signal transmission cannot be performed via diffusion alone.

  20. Designing Intelligent Secure Android Application for Effective Chemical Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukran, Mohd Afizi Mohd; Naim Abdullah, Muhammad; Nazri Ismail, Mohd; Maskat, Kamaruzaman; Isa, Mohd Rizal Mohd; Shahfee Ishak, Muhammad; Adib Khairuddin, Muhamad

    2017-08-01

    Mobile services support various situations in everyday life and with the increasing sophistication of phone functions, the daily life is much more easier and better especially in term of managing tools and apparatus. Since chemical inventory management system has been experiencing a new revolution from antiquated to an automated inventory management system, some additional features should be added in current chemical inventory system. Parallel with the modern technologies, chemical inventory application using smart phone has been developed. Several studies about current related chemical inventory management using smart phone application has been done in this paper in order to obtain an overview on recent studies in smartphone application for chemical inventory system which are needed in schools, universities or other education institutions. This paper also discuss about designing the proposed secure mobile chemical inventory system. The study of this paper can provide forceful review analysis support for the chemical inventory management system related research.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Albright & Wilson Americas, discovered that tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate, THPS, is an effective, safer biocide for use in industrial water systems.

  2. Design, synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of a dinuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4. Design, synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of a dinuclear zinc(II) complex with a novel 'end-off' compartmental ligand. Anil D Naik Vidyanand K Revankar. Inorganic Volume 113 Issue 4 August 2001 pp 285-290 ...

  3. New Vistas in Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Babi, Deenesh Kavi; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    , its corresponding process, and its integration are highlighted. Although significant advances have been made in the development of systematic model-based techniques for process design (also for optimization, operation, and control), much work is needed to reach the same level for product design....... Timeline diagrams illustrating key contributions in product design, process design, and integrated product-process design are presented. The search for novel, innovative, and sustainable solutions must be matched by consideration of issues related to the multidisciplinary nature of problems, the lack......Design of chemicals-based products is broadly classified into those that are process centered and those that are product centered. In this article, the designs of both classes of products are reviewed from a process systems point of view; developments related to the design of the chemical product...

  4. Roadside infrastructure for safer European roads: D08 European best practice for roadside design: guidelines for maintenance and operations of roadside infrastructure. Project RISER, European Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, J.; Lanner, G.; Wink, W.; Halleman, B.; Naing, C.L.; Thomson, R.; Fagerlind, H.; Dupre, G.; Bisson, O.; Carcia, J.M.; Lopez, F.; Papi, J.; Martinez, A.V.; Amengual, A.; Valtonen, J.; Kelkka, M.; Goose, U.; Klootwijk, C.W.; Hoogvelt, B.; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Ridder, S. de; Hoschopf, H.; Hill, J.

    2006-01-01

    Maintenance and operations of road safety equipment and infrastructure ensure that all safety related elements of the road system are operating as they were designed, tested, and approved. Maintenance of road equipment should not only be considered as the repair of broken or damaged equipment, but

  5. Models and Modelling Tools for Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    -process design. Illustrative examples highlighting the need for efficient model-based systems will be presented, where the need for predictive models for innovative chemical product-process design will be highlighted. The examples will cover aspects of chemical product-process design where the idea of the grand......The design, development and reliability of a chemical product and the process to manufacture it, need to be consistent with the end-use characteristics of the desired product. One of the common ways to match the desired product-process characteristics is through trial and error based experiments......, which can be expensive and time consuming. An alternative approach is the use of a systematic model-based framework according to an established work-flow in product-process design, replacing some of the time consuming and/or repetitive experimental steps. The advantages of the use of a model...

  6. Safer electronic health records safety assurance factors for EHR resilience

    CERN Document Server

    Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    This important volume provide a one-stop resource on the SAFER Guides along with the guides themselves and information on their use, development, and evaluation. The Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience (SAFER) guides, developed by the editors of this book, identify recommended practices to optimize the safety and safe use of electronic health records (EHRs). These guides are designed to help organizations self-assess the safety and effectiveness of their EHR implementations, identify specific areas of vulnerability, and change their cultures and practices to mitigate risks.This book pr

  7. Process Design and Evaluation for Chemicals Based on Renewable Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Wenjing

    One of the key steps in process design is choosing between alternative technologies, especially for processes producing bulk and commodity chemicals. Recently, driven by the increasing oil prices and diminishing reserves, the production of bulk and commodity chemicals from renewable feedstocks has...... gained considerable interest. Renewable feedstocks usually cannot be converted into fuels and chemicals with existing process facilities due to the molecular functionality and variety of the most common renewable feedstock (biomass). Therefore new types of catalytic methods as well as new types...... of processes for converting renewable feedstocks to bulk and commodity chemicals are required. In the future, it seems increasingly likely that a combination of biocatalysts (in the form of enzymes) as well as chemical catalysts will be needed in the production of bulk chemicals from renewable feedstocks...

  8. Chemical Product Design: A new challenge of applied thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2004-01-01

    Chemical products involving specialty chemicals and microstructured materials are often multicomponent systems. A number of five to 20 molecules is not unusual, comprising a range of different chemical compounds e.g. polymers, surfactants, solid particles and water. Milk is an example......, and then to outline some specific examples from our research activities in the area of thermodynamics for chemical products. The examples cover rather diverse areas such as interrelation between thermodynamic and engineering properties in detergents (surfactants), paint thermodynamics and the development of models...... try to describe and understand chemical products with traditional thermodynamic models, typically applicable to problems of petrochemical industries. The purpose of this article is two-fold: first to present some current and future challenges in thermodynamic modelling towards chemical product design...

  9. Statistically designed experiments to screen chemical mixtures for possible interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, J.P.; Tajima, O.; Feron, V.J.; Schoen, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    For the accurate analysis of possible interactive effects of chemicals in a defined mixture, statistical designs are necessary to develop clear and manageable experiments. For instance, factorial designs have been successfully used to detect two-factor interactions. Particularly useful for this

  10. GMES Sentinel-3: A Safer Satellite for a Safer Space World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, S.; Derenne, P.; Palmade, J. L.; Paoli, F.; Baillion, Y.; Berruti, B.

    2013-09-01

    The Sentinel-3 Mission is part of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative whose overall objective is to support Europe's goals regarding sustainable development and global governance of the environment by providing timely and quality data, information, services and knowledge. In that way, Sentinel-3 will help humanity by contributing to the improvement of the life quality.The Sentinel-3 mission will be more particularly devoted to the provision of Ocean observation data in routine, long term (20 years of operations) and continuous fashion with a consistent quality and a very high level of availability. In addition, the mission will be designed to generate Land optical observation products, ice topography and land hydrology products.THALES ALENIA Space has successfully performed during past years the definition phase of this mission and the system together with ESA to come to an optimized system answering to the users' needs. The results of this development phase and the way forward for a successful implementation of the mission safety compliant to applicable standards will be presented in this paper. In particular, the technical baseline and evolutions will be presented in order to demonstrate the safety improvements versus the previous generation of similar spacecrafts in term of design and operations. A specific focus will be given on quality and safety topics raised and managed during satellite development.The intention of this paper is to present: * The benefits of GMES initiative and specifically of the Sentinel-3 mission for the global humanity to contribute "for a Safer World". * The improvements of Sentinel-3 satellite design & operations in term of Space Safety with regard to previous similar satellites in demonstrating complianceto IADCGuidelines"foraSaferSpace" * The specific Safety and Quality management process implemented daily and the safety concerns raised during Satellite development "for a Safer Satellite" * The

  11. Method for innovative synthesis-design of chemical process flowsheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    is available, rigorous simulation is performed to validate the synthesis-design. Note that since the flowsheet is synthesized and the operations in the flowsheet designed to match a set of design targets, there are no iterations involved as the final flowsheet is among the best, if not the best. In this paper...... of chemical processes, where, chemical process flowsheets could be synthesized in the same way as atoms or groups of atoms are synthesized to form molecules in computer aided molecular design (CAMD) techniques [4]. That, from a library of building blocks (functional process-groups) and a set of rules to join...... and selected for further analysis. In the next stage, the design parameters for the operations of the flowsheet are established through reverse engineering approaches based on driving forces available for each operation. In the final stage, when all the necessary information for a rigorous process simulation...

  12. A Systematic Methodology for Design of Emulsion Based Chemical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    a hierarchical approach starting with the identification of the needs to be satisfied by the emulsified product and then building up the formulation by adding one-by-one the different classes of chemicals. A structured database together with dedicated property prediction models and evaluation criteria......A systematic methodology for emulsion based chemical product design is presented. The methodology employs a model-based product synthesis/design stage and a modelexperiment based further refinement and/or validation stage. In this paper only the first stage is presented. The methodology employs...

  13. A FRAMEWORK TO DESIGN AND OPTIMIZE CHEMICAL FLOODING PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  14. New Vistas in Chemical Product and Process Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Babi, Deenesh K; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-06-07

    Design of chemicals-based products is broadly classified into those that are process centered and those that are product centered. In this article, the designs of both classes of products are reviewed from a process systems point of view; developments related to the design of the chemical product, its corresponding process, and its integration are highlighted. Although significant advances have been made in the development of systematic model-based techniques for process design (also for optimization, operation, and control), much work is needed to reach the same level for product design. Timeline diagrams illustrating key contributions in product design, process design, and integrated product-process design are presented. The search for novel, innovative, and sustainable solutions must be matched by consideration of issues related to the multidisciplinary nature of problems, the lack of data needed for model development, solution strategies that incorporate multiscale options, and reliability versus predictive power. The need for an integrated model-experiment-based design approach is discussed together with benefits of employing a systematic computer-aided framework with built-in design templates.

  15. Integrating chemical engineering fundamentals in the capstone process design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Solms, Nicolas; Woodley, John; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2010-01-01

    All B.Eng. courses offered at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) must now follow CDIO standards. The final “capstone” course in the B.Eng. education is Process Design, which for many years has been typical of chemical engineering curricula worldwide. The course at DTU typically has about 30...... of the CDIO standards – especially standard 3 – Integrated Curriculum - means that the course projects must draw on competences provided in other subjects which the students are taking in parallel with Process Design – specifically Process Control and Reaction Engineering. In each semester of the B...... Reaction Engineering. In order to incorporate reactor design into process design in a meaningful way, the teachers of the respective courses need to collaborate (Standard 9 – Enhancement of Faculty CDIO skills). The students also see that different components of the chemical engineering curriculum relate...

  16. Safer sex and the polyamorous lesbian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, M

    1999-01-01

    SUMMARY In recent years, concern about transmission of AIDS and other STDs has prompted people of all sexual orientations to use various safer sex techniques. This article explains why monogamy is not necessarily any safer than polyamory. Research on the low risk of woman-to-woman transmission of HIV and other STDs is described.

  17. Property Model-Based Chemcal Substitution and Chemical Formulation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jhamb, Spardha Virendra; Liang, Xiaodong; Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao

    with environmentally benign chemicals. Additionally, the decisions taken during chemical product design also have an impact on the process and product performance and are influenced by company strategy, availability of market and government policies [2]. Hence, undoubtedly there is a need to develop a systematic...... it is desired to come up with alternative substitutes for the undesirable chemicals, the trial an error based approach will have a very large search space. This could be avoided by having predictive models coupled with the desired target properties, making the identification of these substitutes easier...... and safety) properties, and then to generate, evaluate and identify candidates that can replace them. The presentation will discuss the general methodology for chemical substitution, which caters to different problem definitions depending on the reason for substitution. The associated property modeling tools...

  18. Portfolio Assessment on Chemical Reactor Analysis and Process Design Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alha, Katariina

    2004-01-01

    Assessment determines what students regard as important: if a teacher wants to change students' learning, he/she should change the methods of assessment. This article describes the use of portfolio assessment on five courses dealing with chemical reactor and process design during the years 1999-2001. Although the use of portfolio was a new…

  19. Design, synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of a dinuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Design, synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of a dinuclear zinc(II) complex with a novel 'end-off' compartmental ligand. ANIL D NAIK and VIDYANAND K REVANKAR*. Department of Chemistry, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003, India e-mail: vkrevankar@rediffmail.com. MS received 17 March 2001; revised 9 ...

  20. Sustainable Chemical Processes and Products. New Design Methodology and Design Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, G.

    2004-01-01

    The current chemical industry is not sustainable, which leads to the fact that innovation of chemical processes and products is too often hazardous for society in general and the environment in particular. It really is a challenge to implement sustainability considerations in the design activities

  1. Chemical reaction network designs for asynchronous logic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, Luca; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Whitby, Max

    2018-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks (CRNs) are a versatile language for describing the dynamical behaviour of chemical kinetics, capable of modelling a variety of digital and analogue processes. While CRN designs for synchronous sequential logic circuits have been proposed and their implementation in DNA demonstrated, a physical realisation of these devices is difficult because of their reliance on a clock. Asynchronous sequential logic, on the other hand, does not require a clock, and instead relies on handshaking protocols to ensure the temporal ordering of different phases of the computation. This paper provides novel CRN designs for the construction of asynchronous logic, arithmetic and control flow elements based on a bi-molecular reaction motif with catalytic reactions and uniform reaction rates. We model and validate the designs for the deterministic and stochastic semantics using Microsoft's GEC tool and the probabilistic model checker PRISM, demonstrating their ability to emulate the function of asynchronous components under low molecular count.

  2. Methods and tools for sustainable chemical process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loureiro da Costa Lira Gargalo, Carina; Chairakwongsa, Siwanat; Quaglia, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    chemical processes is presented. The framework allows the use of appropriate computer-aided methods and tools in a hierarchical manner according to a developed work flow for a multilevel criteria analysis that helps generate competing and more sustainable process design options. The application......As the pressure on chemical and biochemical processes to achieve a more sustainable performance increases, the need to define a systematic and holistic way to accomplish this is becoming more urgent. In this chapter, a multilevel computer-aided framework for systematic design of more sustainable...... of the framework as well as the related computer-aided methods and tools are highlighted through a case study involving the production of bioethanol from various renewable raw materials....

  3. Design Science Methodology Applied to a Chemical Surveillance Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhuanyi; Han, Kyungsik; Charles-Smith, Lauren E.; Henry, Michael J.

    2017-05-11

    Public health surveillance systems gain significant benefits from integrating existing early incident detection systems,supported by closed data sources, with open source data.However, identifying potential alerting incidents relies on finding accurate, reliable sources and presenting the high volume of data in a way that increases analysts work efficiency; a challenge for any system that leverages open source data. In this paper, we present the design concept and the applied design science research methodology of ChemVeillance, a chemical analyst surveillance system.Our work portrays a system design and approach that translates theoretical methodology into practice creating a powerful surveillance system built for specific use cases.Researchers, designers, developers, and related professionals in the health surveillance community can build upon the principles and methodology described here to enhance and broaden current surveillance systems leading to improved situational awareness based on a robust integrated early warning system.

  4. A real-life example of choosing an inherently safer process option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study, Karen

    2007-01-01

    While choosing an inherently safer alternative may seem straightforward, sometimes what seems to be the most obvious alternative may not provide the best risk reduction. The process designer must maintain a broad perspective to be able to recognize all potential hazards when evaluating design options. All aspects of operation such as start-up, shut-down, utility failure, as well as normal operation should be considered. Choosing the inherently safer option is best accomplished early in the option selection phase of a project; however, recycle back to the option selection phase may be needed if an option is not thoroughly evaluated early in the process. In this paper, a project to supply ammonia to a catalytic reactor will be reviewed. During the course of the project, an 'inherently safer' alternative was selected and later discarded due to issues uncovered during the detail design phase. The final option chosen will be compared to (1) the original design and (2) the initial 'inherently safer' alternative. The final option was inherently safer than both the original design and the initial 'inherently safer' alternative even though the design team initially believed that it would not be

  5. Kawusemuhle | Matshe | SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. POETRY Women's Respite | Masitera | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Interview with: Priscilla Misihairabwi | Misihairabwi | SAFERE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Feminism, Anthropology and Androcentrism | Ntarangwi | SAFERE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Small modular reactors: Simpler, safer, cheaper?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujić, Jasmina; Bergmann, Ryan M.; Škoda, Radek; Miletić, Marija

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a very significant long-term role for meeting the world’s increasing energy demands, while simultaneously addressing challenges associated with global climate and environmental impact. Many nations of the world, particularly the Asia/Pacific Rim countries, are actively engaged in a major expansion of their nuclear energy complex. The degree to which nuclear energy can address long-term energy needs, either globally or regionally, will be dictated by the pace and adequacy of technical and policy solutions for waste, safety, security, and non-proliferation issues, as well as the capital cost of construction. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) could successfully address several of these issues. SMRs offer simpler, standardized, and safer modular design by being factory built, requiring smaller initial capital investment, and having shorter construction times. The SMRs could be small enough to be transportable, could be used in isolated locations without advanced infrastructure and without power grid, or could be clustered in a single site to provide a multi-module, large capacity power plant. This paper summarizes some of the basic features of SMRs for early deployment, several advanced SMR concepts, and points out the benefits and challenges in regulatory, economical, safety and security issues. -- Highlights: ► We held a summer forum on SMR technologies at UC Berkeley in July 2010. ► Advantages and disadvantages, technical and economic, of each design were discussed. ► Further literature searches were also done and this paper summarizes prominent designs. ► We conclude SMRs have no large problems preventing their introduction into the nuclear market.

  10. Integration of process design and controller design for chemical processes using model-based methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abd.Hamid, Mohd-Kamaruddin; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel systematic model-based methodology for performing integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) for chemical processes is presented. The methodology uses a decomposition method to solve the IPDC typically formulated as a mathematical programming (optimization with ...... that satisfy design, control and cost criteria. The advantage of the proposed methodology is that it is systematic, makes use of thermodynamic-process knowledge and provides valuable insights to the solution of IPDC problems in chemical engineering practice.......In this paper, a novel systematic model-based methodology for performing integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) for chemical processes is presented. The methodology uses a decomposition method to solve the IPDC typically formulated as a mathematical programming (optimization...... with constraints) problem. Accordingly the optimization problem is decomposed into four sub-problems: (i) pre-analysis, (ii) design analysis, (iii) controller design analysis, and (iv) final selection and verification, which are relatively easier to solve. The methodology makes use of thermodynamic-process...

  11. Designing new nuclear chemical processing plants for safeguards accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    New nuclear chemical processing plants will be required to develop material accountability control limits from measurement error propagation analysis rather than historical inventory difference data as performed in the past. In order for measurement error propagation methods to be viable alternatives, process designers must ensure that two nondimensional accountability parameters are maintained below 0.1. These parameters are ratios between the material holdup increase and the variance in inventory difference measurement uncertainty. Measurement uncertainty data for use in error propagation analysis is generally available in the open literature or readily derived from instrument calibration data. However, nuclear material holdup data has not been adequately developed for use in the material accountability design process. Long duration development testing on isolated unit operations is required to generate this necessary information

  12. MECON's activities in chemical plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, S.R.; Wazir, S.N.

    1976-12-01

    Mecon's activities in chemical plant design are surveyed, including the company's, i.e., Metallurgical and Engineering Consultants (India) Ltd., countercurrent extraction process with caustic soda solution for recovering phenols (up to 90%) as sodium phenolate from by-product oil fractions produced at coke plants and coal gasification plants, which was first installed at the Durgapur Steel Plant for treating light oil and drained naphthalene-oil fractions; a design for producer-gas generators with approximately 4 to 4.5 million kcal/h thermal output, which can be operated on sized coal or sized coke and which can be used to make raw, hot or clean, cold producer gas, e.g., as a petroleum oil substitute; a countercurrent wash-oil scrubbing process and detailed design for the recovery, refining, and rectification of benzene, toluene, and xylene from petroleum- or coal-based streams; and the engineering and design of a new 13,700 ton/y oil-furnace carbon black plant at Kerala. Flow diagrams, diagrams, and tables.

  13. Model-Based Integrated Process Design and Controller Design of Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abd Hamid, Mohd Kamaruddin Bin

    in terms of optimal condition of operation from design and control viewpoints. The targets for the design-control solution are defined at the maximum point of the attainable region and driving force diagrams. Defining the targets at the maximum point of the attainable region and driving force diagram......This thesis describes the development and application of a new systematic modelbased methodology for performing integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) of chemical processes. The new methodology is simple to apply, easy to visualize and efficient to solve. Here, the IPDC problem...... and verification. Using thermodynamic and process insights, a bounded search space is first identified. This feasible solution space is further reduced to satisfy the process design and controller design constraints in sub-problems 2 and 3, respectively, until in the final sub-problem all feasible candidates...

  14. Improved and safer nuclear power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J J

    1989-04-21

    Recent progress in advanced nuclear power development in the United States is revealing high potential for nuclear reactor systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the present generation. Passive, or intrinsic, characteristics are applied not only to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction but also to ensure continued cooling of the fuel and its containment systems even if a major breakdown of the normal cooling and control functions were to occur. The chance of a severe accident is thereby substantially reduced. The plant designs that are emerging are simpler and more rugged, have a longer life span, and place less burden on equipment and operating personnel. Modular design concepts and design standardization are also used to reduce construction time and engineering costs, giving promise that the cost of generating power from these systems will be competitive with alternative methods.

  15. Graphene Based Ultra-Capacitors for Safer, More Efficient Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Mackey, Paul J.; Zide, Carson J.

    2016-01-01

    Current power storage methods must be continuously improved in order to keep up with the increasingly competitive electronics industry. This technological advancement is also essential for the continuation of deep space exploration. Today's energy storage industry relies heavily on the use of dangerous and corrosive chemicals such as lithium and phosphoric acid. These chemicals can prove hazardous to the user if the device is ruptured. Similarly they can damage the environment if they are disposed of improperly. A safer, more efficient alternative is needed across a wide range of NASA missions. One solution would a solid-state carbon based energy storage device. Carbon is a safer, less environmentally hazardous alternative to current energy storage materials. Using the amorphous carbon nanostructure, graphene, this idea of a safer portable energy is possible. Graphene was electrochemically produced in the lab and several coin cell devices were built this summer to create a working prototype of a solid-state graphene battery.

  16. The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory for Structured Chemical Product Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti; Kalakul, Sawitree

    2014-01-01

    the design and analysis of a wide range of homogeneous formulated products: tailor-made blends, single phase liquid formulations and emulsion-based products. The decision making process is supported by dedicated property models and structured databases, specifically developed for each design problem scenario......The objective of this paper is to present new methods for design of chemicals based formulated products and their implementation in the software, the Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory. The new products are tailor-made blended liquid products and emulsion-based products. The new software...... employs a template approach, where each template follows the same common steps in the workflow for design of formulated products, but has the option to employ different product specific property models, data and calculation routines, when necessary. With the new additions, the software is able to support...

  17. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belavic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s, mixer(s, reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and channels, and thick-film technology was used to make electrical heaters, temperature sensors and pressure sensors. The final 3D ceramic structure consists of 45 LTCC tapes. The dimensions of the structure are 75 × 41 × 9 mm3 and the weight is about 73 g.

  18. Faster, deeper and safer drilling with tailor-made ``designer tools`` - a new approach in borehole technology; Schneller, weiter und sicherer Bohren mit massgeschneiderten ``Designer Garnituren`` - Ein neuer Ansatz in der Bohrtechnologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, M. [Technical Services Baker Hughes INTEQ, Celle (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In the past few years, progress has been made in all deep drilling components, but a systemic approach tends to be neglected. Combinations of optimized components alone will not ensure maximum heading rates, long life and economic efficiency. Since about two years ago, research is being made into ``designer tool combinations``. The contribution describes a typical example along with the software used to select the components. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den vergangenen Jahren sind deutliche Fortschritte bei der Entwicklung aller fuer Tiefbohrungen erforderlicher Komponenten erzielt worden. Vermisst wird aber ein Ansatz zum Systemdenken, da leider haeufig das Zusammenspiel dieser Komponenten im praktischen Einsatz nicht beruecksichtigt wird. Die Kombination optimierter Einzelkomponenten allein fuehrt weder zu maximalem Bohrfortschritt noch zu hoechster Lebensdauer oder einem wirtschaftlichen Optimum. Beste Ergebnisse sind vielmehr von Bohrgarnituren zu erwarten, die nach mechanischen und hydraulischen Gesetzmaessigkeiten fuer eine maximale Leistung des Gesamtsystems zusammengestellt werden. Diese relativ einfache Erkenntnis wird erst seit kurzem systematisch in die Praxis umgesetzt. In den letzten zwei Jahren wurden mehrere umfassende Programme zur Optimierung von Bohrgarnituren durchgefuehrt. Die Ergebnisse, die mit diesen `Designer-Bohrgarnituren` erzielt wurden, demonstrieren in eindrucksvoller Weise das Verbesserungspotential. Nachfolgend werden die typischen Komponenten einer `Designer-Garnitur` beschrieben und ein Einblick in die Software gegeben, die zur Optimierung eingesetzt wird. Die erreichten Verbesserungen gegenueber den zuvor benutzten konventionellen Garnituren werden mit Fallbeispielen belegt. (orig.)

  19. Nailuj | Watson | SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  20. Chemical Design and Example of Transparent Bipolar Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Takeshi; Iimura, Soshi; Kim, Junghwan; Toda, Yoshitake; Ueda, Shigenori; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-11-29

    Transparent bipolar semiconductors (TBSCs) are in demand for transparent electronics to serve as the basis for next generation optoelectronic devices. However, the poor carrier controllability in wide-bandgap materials makes the realization of a bipolar nature difficult. Only two materials, CuInO 2 and SnO, have been reported as TBSCs. To satisfy demand for the coexistence of transparency and bipolarity, we propose a design concept with three strategies; choice of early transition metals (eTM) such as Y 3+ and Zr 4+ for improving controllability of carrier doping, design of chemical bonds to obtain an appropriate band structure for bipolar doping, and use of a forbidden band-edge transition to retain transparency. This approach is verified through a practical examination of a candidate material, tetragonal ZrOS, which is chosen by following the criteria. ZrOS exhibits an excellent controllability of the electrical conductivity (10 -7 -10 -2 S cm -1 ), p- or n-type nature with ∼10 -2 S cm -1 by Y or F doping, respectively, and optically wide gap (below 10 -4 cm -1 up to ∼2.5 eV). This concept provides a new kind of TBSC based on eTM ionic compounds.

  1. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 1: Fundamentals and design methodology

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2014-04-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising option for several applications including carbon capture (CC), fuel reforming, H 2 generation, etc. Previous studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing CLC in a novel rotary design with micro-channel structures. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet, and depleted air and product streams at exit. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of micro-channels with oxygen carriers (OC) coated on the inner surface of the channel walls. In the CC application, the OC oxidizes the fuel while the channel is in the fuel zone to generate undiluted CO2, and is regenerated while the channel is in the air zone. In this two-part series, the effect of the reactor design parameters is evaluated and its performance with different OCs is compared. In Part 1, the design objectives and criteria are specified and the key parameters controlling the reactor performance are identified. The fundamental effects of the OC characteristics, the design parameters, and the operating conditions are studied. The design procedures are presented on the basis of the relative importance of each parameter, enabling a systematic methodology of selecting the design parameters and the operating conditions with different OCs. Part 2 presents the application of the methodology to the designs with the three commonly used OCs, i.e., nickel, copper, and iron, and compares the simulated performances of the designs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Safer Vehicles for People and the Planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Thomas P; Wenzel, Thomas P; Ross, Marc

    2008-03-01

    inherently dangerous to those riding in them is flawed. For starters, all else is never equal; other aspects of vehicle design appear to control what really happens in a crash, as reflected in the safety record of different kinds of vehicles. What's more, the use of high-strength steel, light-weight metals such as aluminum and magnesium, and fiber-reinforced plastics now offers automotive engineers the means to fashion vehicles that are simultaneously safer and less massive than their predecessors, and such designs would, of course, enjoy the better fuel economy that shedding pounds brings.

  3. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Kumar, Lokesh; Jain, Ashish; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Lal, Nand; Kumar, Lalit; Rawat, Tara; Dwivedi, Anil K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC), a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation), were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (Pspermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro), and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2) at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols) on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of thiol-active PPC is apparently much more specific, potent and safe. PPC presents a proof-of-concept for prophylactic contraception via manipulation of thiols in vagina for selective targeting of sperm and Trichomonas, and qualifies as a promising lead for the development of dually

  4. Designing continuous safety improvement within chemical industrial areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, G.L.L.; Ale, B. J.M.; Dullaert, W.; Soudan, K.

    This article provides support in organizing and implementing novel concepts for enhancing safety on a cluster level of chemical plants. The paper elaborates the requirements for integrating Safety Management Systems of chemical plants situated within a so-called chemical cluster. Recommendations of

  5. A Safer Formulation Concept for Flame-Generated Engineered Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Samuel; Cohen, Joel M; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Demokritou, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The likely success or failure of the nanotechnology industry depends on the environmental health and safety of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). While efforts toward engineering safer ENMs are sparse, such efforts are considered crucial to the sustainability of the nanotech industry. A promising approach in this regard is to coat potentially toxic nanomaterials with a biologically inert layer of amorphous SiO 2 . Core-shell particles exhibit the surface properties of their amorphous SiO 2 shell while maintaining specific functional properties of their core material. A major challenge in the development of functional core-shell particles is the design of scalable high-yield processes that can meet large-scale industrial demand. Here, we present a safer formulation concept for flame-generated ENMs based on a one-step, in flight SiO 2 encapsulation process, which was recently introduced by the authors as a means for a scalable manufacturing of SiO 2 coated ENMs. Firstly, the versatility of the SiO 2 -coating process is demonstrated by applying it to four ENMs (CeO 2, ZnO, Fe 2 O 3 , Ag) marked by their prevalence in consumer products as well as their range in toxicity. The ENM-dependent coating fundamentals are assessed and process parameters are optimized for each ENM investigated. The effects of the SiO 2 -coating on core material structure, composition and morphology, as well as the coating efficiency on each nanostructured material, are evaluated using state-of-the-art analytical methods (XRD, N 2 adsorption, TEM, XPS, isopropanol chemisorption). Finally, the biological interactions of SiO 2 -coated vs. uncoated ENMs are evaluated using cellular bioassays, providing valuable evidence for reduced toxicity for the SiO 2 -coated ENMs. Results indicate that the proposed 'safer by design' concept bears great promise for scaled-up application in industry in order to reduce the toxicological profile of ENMs for certain applications.

  6. Lessons learned from the design of chemical space networks and opportunities for new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Martin; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Maggiora, Gerald M; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The concept of chemical space is of fundamental relevance in chemical informatics and computer-aided drug discovery. In a series of articles published in the Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design, principles of chemical space design were evaluated, molecular networks proposed as an alternative to conventional coordinate-based chemical reference spaces, and different types of chemical space networks (CSNs) constructed and analyzed. Central to the generation of CSNs was the way in which molecular similarity relationships were assessed and a primary focal point was the network-based representation of biologically relevant chemical space. The design and comparison of CSNs based upon alternative similarity measures can be viewed as an evolutionary path with interesting lessons learned along the way. CSN design has matured to the point that such chemical space representations can be used in practice. In this contribution, highlights from the sequence of CSN design efforts are discussed in context, providing a perspective for future practical applications.

  7. Lessons learned from the design of chemical space networks and opportunities for new applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Martin; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Maggiora, Gerald M.; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The concept of chemical space is of fundamental relevance in chemical informatics and computer-aided drug discovery. In a series of articles published in the Journal of Computer- Aided Molecular Design, principles of chemical space design were evaluated, molecular networks proposed as an alternative to conventional coordinate-based chemical reference spaces, and different types of chemical space networks (CSNs) constructed and analyzed. Central to the generation of CSNs was the way in which molecular similarity relationships were assessed and a primary focal point was the network-based representation of biologically relevant chemical space. The design and comparison of CSNs based upon alternative similarity measures can be viewed as an evolutionary path with interesting lessons learned along the way. CSN design has matured to the point that such chemical space representations can be used in practice. In this contribution, highlights from the sequence of CSN design efforts are discussed in context, providing a perspective for future practical applications.

  8. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sharma

    Full Text Available Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC, a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation, were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (P<0.001 thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. However, the molecule completely lost all its biological activities once its thiol group was blocked by alkylation. PPC was subsequently formulated into a mucoadhesive vaginal film using GRaS excipients and evaluated for spermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro, and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2 at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of

  9. A Comprehensive Framework for Surfactant Selection and Design for Emulsion Based Chemical Product Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Gani, Rafiqul

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of emulsified products is of increasing interest in the consumer oriented chemical indus-try. Several cosmetic, house-hold and pharmaceutical products are in the emulsified form when soldand/or they are expected to form an emulsion when used. Therefore, there is a need for the dev......The manufacture of emulsified products is of increasing interest in the consumer oriented chemical indus-try. Several cosmetic, house-hold and pharmaceutical products are in the emulsified form when soldand/or they are expected to form an emulsion when used. Therefore, there is a need...... ingredientsis consequently necessary to tackle this problem with computer-aided methods and tools. A compre-hensive framework for the selection and design of surfactants, the main responsible for the formationand the stability of emulsions, is presented here together with the modeling of the cloud point, a key......-property of nonionic surfactants, with a group-contribution model. The mathematical formulation of astandard product design problem is presented, together with the list of both the pure component prop-erties (related to nonionic surfactants) and the mixture properties (relevant to the overall products asan emulsion...

  10. Gaming for Safer Sex: Young German and Turkish People Report No Specific Culture-Related Preferences Toward Educational Games Promoting Safer Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüll, Phil; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wiers, Reinout W; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive sex education programs specifically designed for adolescents and young adults that take into account gender norms and cultural background have shown promise as a means of countering the high sexually transmitted infection rate in young people. Recently, digital gaming interventions delivered on computers or mobile devices have emerged as another way to promote safer sex behavior in a young population. Tailoring these computer-based interventions to their target population has been recognized to increase positive behavior outcomes. In this qualitative study, we investigated whether young female and male adults from two different cultural backgrounds (all living in Germany) would have different preferences and needs in relation to an educational game promoting safer sex. We conducted four semistructured focus group interviews comprising open-ended questions with male and female participants who had either a German or a Turkish background. In total, 20 individuals, aged between 18 and 22 years, from two socially diverse and ethnically mixed vocational schools in Germany participated. Independent of cultural background and gender, participants preferred a real-world design with a first-person visual perspective over a fantasy-like third-person perspective. Furthermore, they preferred highly customizable avatars. All participants mentioned the importance of including an alcohol-intoxicated avatar and most participants wanted there to be additional information available about various safer sex approaches and about the use of different barrier protection methods. Males and females reported similar preferences for the design of an educational game promoting safer sex, with the only difference being exactly how the topic of having sexual intercourse should be addressed in the game. Males preferred a direct approach, whereas females had a preference for treating this subject more sympathetically. Educational games offer anonymity and can provide young people

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Chemical Specialties, developed an alkaline copper quaternary wood preservative to replace chromated copper arsenate preservative phased out due to risk to children.

  12. The quest for novel chemical matter and the contribution of computer-aided de novo design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirard, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    Identifying novel chemical matter is the focus of many drug discovery efforts. Through these efforts, computer-based de novo design of drug-like molecules, which aim to build an entire molecule 'from scratch', has emerged as a valuable approach to identify novel chemical matter. In this paper, the author discusses the recent research efforts that aim to build, in silico, more chemically accessible molecules, sample more efficiently the chemical space and rank the proposed molecules. The author reviews de novo design algorithms developed between 2008 and 2010 and the issue of validation, and highlights some recent successful applications of de novo design to drug discovery projects. Although research has addressed the lack of synthetic accessibility of the molecules proposed by the first generation of de novo design tools, the lack of accurate scoring function remains a major limitation of structure-based de novo design. However, de novo design is a valuable approach to generate either chemical starting points or ideas.

  13. Considerations for designing chemical screening strategies in plant biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eSerrano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, biologists regularly used classical genetic approaches to characterize and dissect plant processes. However, this strategy is often impaired by redundancy, lethality or pleiotropy of gene functions, which prevent the isolation of viable mutants. The chemical genetic approach has been recognized as an alternative experimental strategy, which has the potential to circumvent these problems. It relies on the capacity of small molecules to modify biological processes by specific binding to protein target(s, thereby conditionally modifying protein function(s, which phenotypically resemble mutation(s of the encoding gene(s. A successful chemical screening campaign comprises three equally important elements: (1 a reliable, robust, and quantitative bioassay, which allows to distinguish between potent and less potent compounds, (2 a rigorous validation process for candidate compounds to establish their selectivity, and (3 an experimental strategy for elucidating a compound’s mode of action and molecular target. In this review we will discuss details of this general strategy and additional aspects that deserve consideration in order to take full advantage of the power provided by the chemical approach to plant biology. In addition, we will highlight some success stories of recent chemical screenings in plant systems, which may serve as teaching examples for the implementation of future chemical biology projects.

  14. Considerations for designing chemical screening strategies in plant biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Mario; Kombrink, Erich; Meesters, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biologists regularly used classical genetic approaches to characterize and dissect plant processes. However, this strategy is often impaired by redundancy, lethality or pleiotropy of gene functions, which prevent the isolation of viable mutants. The chemical genetic approach has been recognized as an alternative experimental strategy, which has the potential to circumvent these problems. It relies on the capacity of small molecules to modify biological processes by specific binding to protein target(s), thereby conditionally modifying protein function(s), which phenotypically resemble mutation(s) of the encoding gene(s). A successful chemical screening campaign comprises three equally important elements: (1) a reliable, robust, and quantitative bioassay, which allows to distinguish between potent and less potent compounds, (2) a rigorous validation process for candidate compounds to establish their selectivity, and (3) an experimental strategy for elucidating a compound's mode of action and molecular target. In this review we will discuss details of this general strategy and additional aspects that deserve consideration in order to take full advantage of the power provided by the chemical approach to plant biology. In addition, we will highlight some success stories of recent chemical screenings in plant systems, which may serve as teaching examples for the implementation of future chemical biology projects.

  15. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Reactor Analysis: A Web-Based Reactor Design Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbey, Nese; Clay, Molly; Russell, T.W. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    An approach to explain chemical engineering through a Web-based interactive game design was developed and used with college freshman and junior/senior high school students. The goal of this approach was to demonstrate how to model a lab-scale experiment, and use the results to design and operate a chemical reactor. The game incorporates both…

  16. A systems engineering approach to manage the complexity in sustainable chemical product-process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    This paper provides a perspective on model-data based solution approaches for chemical product-process design, which consists of finding the identity of the candidate chemical product, designing the process that can sustainably manufacture it and verifying the performance of the product during ap...

  17. Teaching chemical product design to engineering students: course contents and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Kiil, Søren

    Chemical product design is not taught in the same way as traditional engineering courses like unit operations or transport phenomena. This paper gives an overview of the challenges that we, as teachers, have faced when teaching chemical product design to engineering students. Specific course...... contents and relevant teaching methods are discussed....

  18. Teaching chemical product design to engineering students: course contents and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Kiil, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Chemical product design is not taught in the same way as traditional engineering courses like unit operations or transport phenomena. This paper gives an overview of the challenges that we, as teachers, have faced when teaching chemical product design to engineering students. Specific course contents and relevant teaching methods are discussed.

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose): From chemical synthesis to drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2016-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an important biopolymer, which is involved in various life processes such as DNA repair and replication, modulation of chromatin structure, transcription, cell differentiation, and in pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, ischemia and inflammations. PAR is the most electronegative biopolymer and this property is essential for its binding with a wide range of proteins. Understanding of PAR functions in cell on molecular level requires chemical synthesis of regular PAR oligomers. Recently developed methodologies for chemical synthesis of PAR oligomers, will facilitate the study of various cellular processes, involving PAR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The Safer Choices Project: Methodological Issues in School-Based Health Promotion Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basen-Engquist, Karen; Parcel, Guy S.; Harrist, Ronald; Kirby, Douglas; Coyle, Karin; Banspach, Stephen; Rugg, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    Uses Safer Choices--a school-based program for preventing HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy--to examine methodological issues in large-scale school-based health promotion research, discussing randomization of small numbers of units; reasons for using a cohort or cross-sectional design; and analysis of data by appropriate…

  1. Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System Design Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargelski, C. J.; Berrett, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the system architecture of the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the course of the document observations are made concerning the objectives, constraints and limitations, technical approaches, and the technical deliverables

  2. Virtual Design of Chemical Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Golla, Sharath; Neely, Brian J.; Whitebay, Eric; Madihally, Sundar; Robinson, Robert L.; Gasem, Khaled A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional drug design is a laborious and expensive process that often challenges the pharmaceutical industries. As a result, researchers have turned to computational methods for computer-assisted molecular design. Recently, genetic and evolutionary algorithms have emerged as efficient methods in solving combinatorial problems associated with computer-aided molecular design. Further, combining genetic algorithms (GAs) with quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) analyses has prov...

  3. Molecular simulation studies on chemical reactivity of methylcyclopentadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Yingchun; Rogers, William J; Mannan, M Sam

    2009-06-15

    Molecular simulations are important to predict thermodynamic values for reactive chemicals especially when sufficient experimental data are not available. Methylcyclopentadiene (MCP) is an example of a highly reactive and hazardous compound in the chemical process industry. In this work, chemical reactivity of 2-methylcyclopentadiene, including isomerization, dimerization, and oxidation reactions, is investigated in detail by theoretical computational chemistry methods and empirical thermodynamic-energy correlation. On the basis of molecular simulations, an average value of -15.2 kcal/mol for overall heat of dimerization and -45.6 kcal/mol for overall heat of oxidation were obtained in gaseous phase at 298 K and 1 atm. These molecular simulation studies can provide guidance for the design of safer chemical processes, safer handling of MCP, and also provide useful information for an investigation of the T2 Laboratories explosion on December 19, 2007, in Florida.

  4. Designing chemical soil characterization programs for mixed waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, K.A. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project is a remedial action effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Weldon Spring Site, a former uranium processing facility, is located in east-central Missouri on a portion of a former ordnance works facility which produced trinitrotoluene during World War II. As a result of both uranium and ordnance production, the soils have become both radiologically and chemically contaminated. As a part of site characterization efforts in support of the environmental documentation process, a chemical soil characterization program was developed. This program consisted of biased and unbiased sampling program which maximized areal coverage, provided a statistically sound data base and maintained cost effectiveness. This paper discusses how the general rationale and processes used at the Weldon Spring Site can be applied to other mixed and hazardous waste sites

  5. SAFE(R): A Matlab/Octave Toolbox (and R Package) for Global Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianosi, Francesca; Sarrazin, Fanny; Gollini, Isabella; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is increasingly used in the development and assessment of hydrological models, as well as for dominant control analysis and for scenario discovery to support water resource management under deep uncertainty. Here we present a toolbox for the application of GSA, called SAFE (Sensitivity Analysis For Everybody) that implements several established GSA methods, including method of Morris, Regional Sensitivity Analysis, variance-based sensitivity Analysis (Sobol') and FAST. It also includes new approaches and visualization tools to complement these established methods. The Toolbox is released in two versions, one running under Matlab/Octave (called SAFE) and one running in R (called SAFER). Thanks to its modular structure, SAFE(R) can be easily integrated with other toolbox and packages, and with models running in a different computing environment. Another interesting feature of SAFE(R) is that all the implemented methods include specific functions for assessing the robustness and convergence of the sensitivity estimates. Furthermore, SAFE(R) includes numerous visualisation tools for the effective investigation and communication of GSA results. The toolbox is designed to make GSA accessible to non-specialist users, and to provide a fully commented code for more experienced users to complement their own tools. The documentation includes a set of workflow scripts with practical guidelines on how to apply GSA and how to use the toolbox. SAFE(R) is open source and freely available from the following website: http://bristol.ac.uk/cabot/resources/safe-toolbox/ Ultimately, SAFE(R) aims at improving the diffusion and quality of GSA practice in the hydrological modelling community.

  6. Fast, Autonomous Chemical Interplanetary Mission Design via Hybrid Optimal Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interplanetary mission design is historically a complex and expensive process requiring many human-hours of work. This proposal outlines a novel technique for...

  7. Low-toxic and safe nanomaterials by surface-chemical design, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    YanEqual Contribution, Liang; Zhao, Feng; Li, Shoujian; Hu, Zhongbo; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-02-01

    The toxicity grade for a bulk material can be approximately determined by three factors (chemical composition, dose, and exposure route). However, for a nanomaterial it depends on more than ten factors. Interestingly, some nano-factors (like huge surface adsorbability, small size, etc.) that endow nanomaterials with new biomedical functions are also potential causes leading to toxicity or damage to the living organism. Is it possible to create safe nanomaterials if such a number of complicated factors need to be regulated? We herein try to find answers to this important question. We first discuss chemical processes that are applicable for nanosurface modifications, in order to improve biocompatibility, regulate ADME, and reduce the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and graphenes). Then the biological/toxicological effects of surface-modified and unmodified carbon nanomaterials are comparatively discussed from two aspects: the lowered toxic responses or the enhanced biomedical functions. We summarize the eight biggest challenges in creating low-toxicity and safer nanomaterials and some significant topics of future research needs: to find out safer nanofactors; to establish controllable surface modifications and simpler chemistries for low-toxic nanomaterials; to explore the nanotoxicity mechanisms; to justify the validity of current toxicological theories in nanotoxicology; to create standardized nanomaterials for toxicity tests; to build theoretical models for cellular and molecular interactions of nanoparticles; and to establish systematical knowledge frameworks for nanotoxicology.

  8. Enhanced Teaching and Student Learning through a Simulator-Based Course in Chemical Unit Operations Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes…

  9. Molecular design, synthesis and evaluation of chemical biology tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, Jorin

    2017-01-01

    Chapter 1 provides a perspective of synthetic organic chemistry as a discipline involved in the design, synthesis and evaluation of complex molecules. The reader is introduced with a brief history of synthetic organic chemistry, all the while dealing with different aspects of

  10. Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design. From Fundamentals to Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-12-01

    Vision2020 agreed to join NNI and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EERE) in sponsoring the "Nanomaterials and the Chemical Industry Roadmap Workshop" on September 30-October 2, 2002. This roadmap, Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design: From Fundamentals to Function, is based on the scientific priorities expressed by workshop participants from the chemical industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  11. Community voices and initiatives for building safer spaces in Latin ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    These institutions are joining efforts to shine new light on the complex process of building safer spaces in cities affected by violence and insecurity. It will also include a ... It will analyze the impacts of public policies to build safer spaces, and how they are being influenced by existing community interventions. It will strengthen ...

  12. system hardening architecture for safer access to critical business

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    cation, operating system, user, and the physical layers. This architecture is proposed on the premise that the premise that organisations implementing system hardening security approaches experience safer access to rganisations implementing system hardening security approaches experience safer access to data, as well.

  13. WAR DSS: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The second generation of the Waste Reduction (WAR) Algorithm is constructed as a decision support system (DSS) in the design of chemical manufacturing facilities. The WAR DSS is a software tool that can help reduce the potential environmental impacts (PEIs) of industrial chemical...

  14. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  15. Integrated Process Design, Control and Analysis of Intensified Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    distillation column. Next, these design methods are extended using element concept to also include ternary as well as multicomponent reactive distillation processes. The element concept is used to translate a ternary system of compounds (A + B ↔ C) to a binary system of elements (WA and WB). When only two...... elements are needed to represent the reacting system of more than two compounds, a binary element system is identified. In the case of multi-element reactive distillation processes (where more than two elements are encountered) the equivalent element concept is used to translate a multicomponent (multi......-element) system of compounds (A + B ↔ C + D) to a binary system of key elements (elements WHK and WLK). For an energy-efficient design, non-reactive driving force (for binary non-reactive distillation), reactive driving force (for binary element systems) and binary-equivalent driving force (for multicomponent...

  16. Procafd: Computer Aided Tool for Synthesis-Design & Analysis of Chemical Process Flowsheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar Tula, Anjan; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    unit operations (reactor, distillation, flash, crystallization, etc.), bonds representing streams and/or recycles, rules for chemical feasibility also representing process flowsheet feasibility and sum of group contributions representing the performance of the flowsheet. In the next stage, the design...

  17. Simplifying Chemical Reactor Design by using Molar Quantities Instead of Fractional Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee F.; Falconer, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Explains the advantages of using molar quantities in chemical reactor design. Advocates the use of differential versions of reactor mass balances rather than the integrated forms. Provides specific examples and cases to illustrate the principles. (ML)

  18. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  19. Implementation Plan for Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials by Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop an implementation plan to realize the vision and goals identified in the Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design: From Fundamentals to Function.

  20. Computational Issues in Analysis and Design of Chemical-Laser Flow-Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eppard, W

    2002-01-01

    In support of the Air Force's airborne laser (ABL) development program. state-of-the-art CFD analysis and design methods have been extended to include the physical models important in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) systems...

  1. Sustainability assessment and decision making in chemical process design

    OpenAIRE

    Othman, Mohamad Rizza bin

    2011-01-01

    Die Nachhaltigkeit stellt eine große Herausforderung für Ingenieure und Manager in der Industrie dar. Gerade auf dem Gebiet der Prozessentwicklung oder dem Prozess-System Engineering (PSE), ist die Nachhaltigkeit des Prozessdesigns vor allem in den frühen Phasen der Prozessentwicklung von enormer Bedeutung. Bei der Nachhaltigkeit im Prozess-Design geht es um das Finden der besten Lösung, die neben der techno-ökonomischen Leistungsfähigkeit, gerade die ökologischen und sozialen Auswirkungen be...

  2. Reducing aquatic hazards of industrial chemicals: probabilistic assessment of sustainable molecular design guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Kristin A; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina M; Kostal, Jakub; Anastas, Paul; Zimmerman, Julie B; Brooks, Bryan W

    2014-08-01

    Basic toxicological information is lacking for the majority of industrial chemicals. In addition to increasing empirical toxicity data through additional testing, prospective computational approaches to drug development aim to serve as a rational basis for the design of chemicals with reduced toxicity. Recent work has resulted in the derivation of a "rule of 2," wherein chemicals with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log P) less than 2 and a difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital (ΔE) greater than 9 (log P9 eV) are predicted to be 4 to 5 times less likely to elicit acute or chronic toxicity to model aquatic organisms. The present study examines potential reduction of aquatic toxicity hazards from industrial chemicals if these 2 molecular design guidelines were employed. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches were used to model the likelihood of encountering industrial chemicals exceeding toxicological categories of concern both with and without the rule of 2. Modeling predicted that utilization of these molecular design guidelines for log P and ΔE would appreciably decrease the number of chemicals that would be designated to be of "high" and "very high" concern for acute and chronic toxicity to standard model aquatic organisms and end points as defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. For example, 14.5% of chemicals were categorized as having high and very high acute toxicity to the fathead minnow model, whereas only 3.3% of chemicals conforming to the design guidelines were predicted to be in these categories. Considerations of specific chemical classes (e.g., aldehydes), chemical attributes (e.g., ionization), and adverse outcome pathways in representative species (e.g., receptor-mediated responses) could be used to derive future property guidelines for broader classes of contaminants. © 2014 SETAC.

  3. Sexuality and safer sex: the issues for lesbians and bisexual women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, P E; Hall, J M

    2001-01-01

    Nursing interventions to help women reduce their risk of contracting HIV must be designed from an in-depth understanding of the complex sociocultural patterns of sexuality in particular communities and among specific subgroups. In this data collection phase of a community-based HIV prevention project, the objective was to understand HIV risk-taking and HIV risk-reduction activities of lesbians and bisexual women. Qualitative field study. Data were collected in women's bars and dance clubs and at selected lesbian/bisexual community events in San Francisco. Interviews were conducted with 1,189 racially diverse, socially and sexually active lesbians and bisexual women. Inductive content analysis produced two themes: realities of sexual behavior and sexual expressions and their meanings. Realities of sexual behavior included an assumption that women who have sex with other women cannot get HIV, a lack of familiarity with HIV prevention strategies, inconsistent practice of safer sex with men and/or women, and the negative effect of alcohol or drug use on safer sex efforts. Sexual expressions and their meaning included trust in monogamy, a sense that safer sex practices detracted from intimacy and eroticism, the difficulty of negotiating sexual behaviors with men or women, and dealing with partner resistance to safer sex practices. Specific recommendations for practice are the need for nurses to understand the range and diversity of women's sexual behaviors, to develop skills in conducting inclusive sexual histories, and to develop a comprehensive approach to sexual health.

  4. Versatile Chemical Derivatizations to Design Glycol Chitosan-Based Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycol chitosan (GC and its derivatives have been extensively investigated as safe and effective drug delivery carriers because of their unique physiochemical and biological properties. The reactive functional groups such as the amine and hydroxyl groups on the GC backbone allow for easy chemical modification with various chemical compounds (e.g., hydrophobic molecules, crosslinkers, and acid-sensitive and labile molecules, and the versatility in chemical modifications enables production of a wide range of GC-based drug carriers. This review summarizes the versatile chemical modification methods that can be used to design GC-based drug carriers and describes their recent applications in disease therapy.

  5. Molecular modeling for the design of novel performance chemicals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Beena

    2012-01-01

    Molecular modeling (MM) tools offer significant benefits in the design of industrial chemical plants and material processing operations. While the role of MM in biological fields is well established, in most cases MM works as an accessory in novel products/materials development rather than a tool for direct innovation. As a result, MM engineers and practitioners are often seized with the question: ""How do I leverage these tools to develop novel materials or chemicals in my industry?"" Molecular Modeling for the Design of Novel Performance Chemicals and Materials answers this important questio

  6. Systematic Computer-Aided Framework for Sustainable Chemical Product Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cignitti, Stefano; Zhang, Lei; Kalakul, Sawitree

    for CAPD, including the accuracy of the property estimation, molecular structure generation, inclusion of sustainability, process and application targets and needs in the problem formulation. CAPD has been widely utilized for the synthesis of several types of products, such as solvents, polymers, fuels...... and environmental impact. In step (3), the CAPD formulation is converted into a mixed-integer nonlinear program (MINLP) by set-up of constraints, objective and boundaries defined in step (2). In step (4), the MINLP is solved through a decomposed approach [3]. The decomposed approach breaks down the MINLP problem...... and formulated products [2]. However, for product design problems where the process needs and sustainability possess demanding constraints, the complexity of the problem is increased as the relation between product property, sustainability and process criteria is difficult to mathematically define. In this work...

  7. Design of multi-phase dynamic chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chenrui; Tan, Junjun; Hsieh, Ming-Chien; Pan, Ting; Goodwin, Jay T.; Mehta, Anil K.; Grover, Martha A.; Lynn, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Template-directed polymerization reactions enable the accurate storage and processing of nature's biopolymer information. This mutualistic relationship of nucleic acids and proteins, a network known as life's central dogma, is now marvellously complex, and the progressive steps necessary for creating the initial sequence and chain-length-specific polymer templates are lost to time. Here we design and construct dynamic polymerization networks that exploit metastable prion cross-β phases. Mixed-phase environments have been used for constructing synthetic polymers, but these dynamic phases emerge naturally from the growing peptide oligomers and create environments suitable both to nucleate assembly and select for ordered templates. The resulting templates direct the amplification of a phase containing only chain-length-specific peptide-like oligomers. Such multi-phase biopolymer dynamics reveal pathways for the emergence, self-selection and amplification of chain-length- and possibly sequence-specific biopolymers.

  8. Integrated Computer-aided Framework for Sustainable Chemical Product Design and Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalakul, Sawitree; Cignitti, Stefano; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes an integrated model-based framework for chemical product design and evaluation based on which the software, VPPD-Lab (The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory) has been developed. The framework allows the following options: (1) design a product using design templates, such...... of the templates for three case studies: (i) the design of a refrigeration cycle, (ii) a mixture/blend design problem involving lubricant design and (iii) a tailor-made product design of jet-fuels (blended chemical products).......This work proposes an integrated model-based framework for chemical product design and evaluation based on which the software, VPPD-Lab (The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory) has been developed. The framework allows the following options: (1) design a product using design templates......, such as, single molecule products, formulated products, blended products, emulsified products and devices; (2) analyze the product by performing virtual experiments (product property and performance calculations); (3) create and add new product property and product performance models; (4) create new...

  9. A framework for safer driving in Mauritius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bassoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the National Transport Authority (NTA, there were 493,081 registered vehicles in Mauritius in April 2016, which represents a 1.4% annual increase compared to 2015. Despite the sensitization campaigns and the series of measures setup by the Minister of Public Infrastructure and Land Transport, the number of road accidents continues to rise. The three main elements that contribute to accidents are: road infrastructure, vehicle and driver. The driver has the highest contribution in collisions. If the driver is given the right information (e.g. driving behaviour, accident-prone areas and vehicle status at the right time, he/she can make better driving decisions and react promptly to critical situations. This paper proposes a framework for safer driving in Mauritius that uses an on-board car diagnostic module (OBDII to collect data such as vehicle average speed, engine revolution and acceleration. This module relays the data to a cloud environment where an adaptive algorithm analyses the data and predicts driver behaviour in real-time. Based on driving behaviour, mobile alerts can be sent to the driver in the form of messages, voice commands or beeps. A survey was also carried out to evaluate the acceptance rate of such a framework by people of different age groups in Mauritius.

  10. Female gratification, sexual power and safer sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Ina; Silberschmidt, Margrethe

    2014-01-01

    The gender-based response to HIV in sub-Saharan Africa has tended to reinforce normative stereotypes of women as subordinated, passive and powerless victims, in particular in sexual relations. However, based on qualitative data from Rwanda, this paper argues that such conceptualisations fail to r...... both to practice safer sex and to access decision-making power and material resources. This suggests that inherent in sexual relations is a potential for the empowerment of women and the transformation of gender relations.......The gender-based response to HIV in sub-Saharan Africa has tended to reinforce normative stereotypes of women as subordinated, passive and powerless victims, in particular in sexual relations. However, based on qualitative data from Rwanda, this paper argues that such conceptualisations fail...... to recognise that while women do comply with prevalent social norms, they also challenge these norms and sex becomes a domain in which they can exert power. Female sexuality and sexual gratification - acknowledged and valued by women as well as men - play a pivotal role in the Rwandese mode of sexual...

  11. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kamal G; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters.

  12. As if they feel no pain | Ndonde | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. Gender and Supply Response | Fall | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. The Marginalisation of women in the Kgotla | Letsididi | SAFERE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. Mothers of the Revolution | Staunton | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. War, Women and Children | Ndonde | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Boxed and Labelled | Matshe | SAFERE: Southern African Feminist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. You cannot ignore me | Manzvanzvike | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, AND APPLICATION OF THE TRIMETHOPRIM-BASED CHEMICAL TAG FOR LIVE CELL IMAGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chaoran; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade chemical tags have been developed to complement the use of fluorescent proteins in live cell imaging. Chemical tags retain the specificity of protein labeling achieved with fluorescent proteins through genetic encoding, but provide smaller, more robust tags and modular use of organic fluorophores with high photon-output and tailored functionalities. The trimethoprim-based chemical tag (TMP-tag) was initially developed based on the high affinity interaction between E.coli dihydrofolatereductase and the antibiotic trimethoprim and subsequently rendered covalent and fluorogenic via proximity-induced protein labeling reactions. To date, the TMP-tag is one of the few chemical tags that enable intracellular protein labeling and high-resolution live cell imaging. Here we describe the general design, chemical synthesis, and application of TMP-tag for live cell imaging. Alternative protocols for synthesizing and using the covalent and the fluorogenic TMP-tags are also included. PMID:23839994

  20. Essentials of water systems design in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza; Boyd, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Essentials of Water Systems Design in the Oil, Gas and Chemical Processing Industries provides valuable insight for decision makers by outlining key technical considerations and requirements of four critical systems in industrial processing plants—water treatment systems, raw water and plant water systems, cooling water distribution and return systems, and fire water distribution and storage facilities. The authors identify the key technical issues and minimum requirements related to the process design and selection of various water supply systems used in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries. This book is an ideal, multidisciplinary work for mechanical engineers, environmental scientists, and oil and gas process engineers.

  1. Implications and control of fuel-cladding chemical interaction for LMFBR fuel pin design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roake, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI) is typically incorporated into the design of an LMFBR fuel pin as a wastage allowance. Several interrelated factors are considered during the evolution of an LMFBR fuel pin design. Those which are indirectly affected by FCCI include: allowable pin power, fuel restructuring, fission gas migration and release from the fuel, fuel cracking, fuel swelling, in-reactor cladding creep, cladding swelling, and the cladding mechanical strain. Chemical activity of oxygen is the most readily controlled factor in FCCI. Two methods are being investigated: control of total oxygen inventory by limiting fuel O/M, and control of oxygen activity with buffer metals

  2. Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication and Adolescent Safer Sex Behavior: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widman, Laura; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Noar, Seth M; Nesi, Jacqueline; Garrett, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    Parent-adolescent sexual communication has received considerable attention as a factor that can positively affect safer sex behavior among youth; however, the evidence linking such communication to youth contraceptive and condom use has not been empirically synthesized. To examine the effect of parent-adolescent sexual communication on safer sex behavior among youth and explore potential moderators of this association. A systematic search of studies published from database inception through June 30, 2014, using the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Communication & Mass Media Complete databases and relevant review articles yielded 5098 studies, of which 52 studies with 25,314 adolescents met the study eligibility criteria. Analysis was conducted from July 1, 2014, to July 27, 2015. Studies were included if they sampled adolescents (mean sample age ≤18 years), included an adolescent report of sexual communication with one or both parents, measured safer sex behavior, and were published in English. Correlation coefficients (r) and 95% CIs were computed from studies and meta-analyzed using random-effects models. Safer sex behavior, including use of contraceptives or condoms. Fifty-two articles, including 71 independent effects representing more than 3 decades of research on 25,314 adolescents (weighted mean age, 15.2 years) were synthesized. Across studies, there was a significant weighted mean effect (r = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.08-0.13) linking parent-adolescent sexual communication with safer sex behavior, which was statistically heterogeneous (Q = 203.50, P communication with girls (r = 0.12) than boys (r = 0.04) and among youth who discussed sex with their mothers (r = 0.14) compared with their fathers (r = 0.03). Effects did not differ for contraceptive vs condom use or among longitudinal vs cross-sectional studies, indicating that parent sexual communication had a similar effect across study designs and outcomes. Several methodological issues were

  3. IMCO: Making the seas safer and cleaner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Since 1959, when the IMCO Assembly met for the first time, the Organization has had two main objectives: the introduction of measures designed to improve safety at sea and to prevent pollution of the sea from ships. But during its twenty-year history IMCO has also adopted a number of Conventions and other measures which are aimed specifically at tankers and the problem of pollution. The 1954 Oil Pollution Convention (for which IMCO became depositary in 1959) was the first major attempt by the maritime nations to curb the impact of oil pollution, but since then the problem has become even more serious today The amount of oil carried by sea has risen by 700 per cent in 20 years - to around 1,700 million tons. The world tanker fleet has increased from 37 million deadweight tons in 1954 to around 340 million deadweight tons today, and the size of the tankers themselves has also grown amazingly. The second Convention deals with liability of the ship or cargo owner for damage suffered as a result of an oil pollution casualty. The Convention is intended to ensure that adequate compensation is available to victims and places the liability for the damage on the shipowner. As a result, another Conference was convened by IMCO in 1971 which resulted in the adoption of a Convention establishing the International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage The Convention came into force in 1978 and the Fund has now been established with its headquarters in London These three Conventions all deal with what one might call the legal aspects of oil pollution. But the continuing boom in the transportation of oil showed that more work needed to be done on the technical side as well: the scale of oil pollution was so great in some areas that there was serious concern for the marine environment, not only as a result of accidents but through normal tanker operations, notably the cleaning of cargo tanks. In 1973 a major conference was called to discuss the whole problem of marine

  4. Safer operating conditions and optimal scaling-up process for cyclohexanone peroxide reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Na; Qian, Xin-Ming; Liu, Zhen-Yi; Shu, Chi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal hazard of cyclohexanone peroxide reaction was measured by experimental techniques. • Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm was adopted to evaluate kinetic parameters. • Safer operating conditions at laboratory scale were acquired by BDs and TDs. • The verified safer operating conditions were used to obtain the optimal scale-up parameters applied in industrial plants. - Abstract: The cyclohexanone peroxide reaction process, one of the eighteen hazardous chemical processes identified in China, is performed in indirectly cooled semibatch reactors. The peroxide reaction is added to a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid, which form heterogeneous liquid–liquid systems. A simple and general procedure for building boundary and temperature diagrams of peroxide process is given here to account for the overall kinetic expressions. Such a procedure has been validated by comparison with experimental data. Thermally safer operating parameters were obtained at laboratory scale, and the scaled-up procedure was performed to give the minimum dosing time in an industrial plant, which is in favor of maximizing industrial reactor productivity. The results are of great significance for governing the peroxide reaction process apart from the thermal runaway region. It also greatly aids in determining optimization on operating parameters in industrial plants.

  5. The WIPP transportation system -- ''Safer than any other''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, T.R.; Spooner, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an integrated transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely dispersed generator sites to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The system consists of a Type B container, a specially designed trailer, a lightweight tractor, the DOE TRANSCOM satellite-based vehicle tracking system, and uniquely qualified and highly trained drivers. The DOE has demonstrated that this system is ready to transport the TRU waste to the WIPP site efficiently and safely. Since the system was put in place in November 1988, it has been repeatedly upgraded and enhanced to incorporate additional safety measures. In June of 1989, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) reviewed the transportation system and concluded that ''the system proposed for transportation of TRU waste to WIPP is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the United States today and will reduce risk to very low levels'' (emphasis added). The NAS conclusion was made before the DOE implemented the Enhanced Driver Training Course for carrier drivers. The challenge facing the DOE was to examine the transportation system objectively and determine what additional improvements could be made to further enhance safety

  6. The Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) : are we safer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, Nancy E.

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) is designed to make world safer by reducing the role of U.S. nuclear weapons and reducing the salience of nuclear weapons. U.S. also seeks to maintain a credible nuclear deterrent and reinforce regional security architectures with missile defenses and other conventional military capabilities. But recent studies suggest that nuclear proliferation is a direct response to the perceived threat of U.S. conventional capabilities not U.S. nuclear stockpile. If this is true, then the intent of the NPR to reduce the role and numbers of nuclear weapons and strengthen conventional military capabilities may actually make the world less safe. First stated objective of NPR is to reduce the role and numbers of U.S. nuclear weapons, reduce the salience of nuclear weapons and move step by step toward eliminating them. Second stated objective is a reaffirmation of U.S. commitment to maintaining a strong deterrent which forms the basis of U.S. assurances to allies and partners. The pathway - made explicit throughout the NPR - for reducing the role and numbers of nuclear weapons while maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent and reinforcing regional security architectures is to give conventional forces and capabilities and missile defenses (e.g. non-nuclear elements) a greater share of the deterrence burden.

  7. Designing SQCRA as a Software to Semi-quantitative Chemical Risk Assessment in Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : The aim of chemical risk assessment is to identify and evaluate risks originated from chemicals usages. This study aims to design a practical tool for facilitating chemical risk assessment. Methods: The proposed software was derived from chemical risk assessment method which was recommended by Ministry of Human Resources of Malaysia. All of the processes in question are designed in operating system software. Based on some revisions, this software was developed using Visual Basic (VB titled as SQCRA. The developed software was used for chemical risk assessment in Narges Vegetale Oil Company in Shiraz (center of Iran. Result: The output of software showed that the level of risk derived from sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, aluminum sulphate, nickel catalyst, acetic acid used as a raw material were 2.4, 2.84, 2.3, 3.5 and 2.66, respectively. Moreover, risk rank and proposed control methods for each of these materials were determined. Conclusions : The developed software calculates the health risk level based on the degree of hazard and exposure in shorttime and without using risk matrix and chemical formula. After determining the risk rank, the software proposes the control procedures to reduce occupational exposure.

  8. Design of an Emulsion-based Personal Detergent through a Model-based Chemical Product Design Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Hill, Michael; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    An extended systematic methodology for the design of emulsion-based Chemical products is presented. The methodology consists of a model-based framework involving seven sequential hierarchical steps: starting with the identification of the needs to be satisfied by the product and then adding one-b...... to obtain one or more candidate formulations. A conceptual casestudy representing a personal detergent is presented to highlight the methodology....

  9. Tailor-made Design of Chemical Blends using Decomposition-based Computer-aided Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza; Manan, Zainuddin Abd.; Gernaey, Krist

    Computer aided technique is an efficient approach to solve chemical product design problems such as design of blended liquid products (chemical blending). In chemical blending, one tries to find the best candidate, which satisfies the product targets defined in terms of desired product attributes...... (properties). In this way, first the systematic computer-aided technique establishes the search space, and then narrows it down in subsequent steps until a small number of feasible and promising candidates remain and then experimental work may be conducted to verify if any or all the candidates satisfy...... is decomposed into two stages. The first stage investigates the mixture stability where all unstable mixtures are eliminated and the stable blend candidates are retained for further testing. In the second stage, the blend candidates have to satisfy a set of target properties that are ranked according...

  10. Model Reduction in Chemical Engineering : Case studies applied to process analysis, design and operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorneanu, B.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, models have become widely used for supporting a broad range of chemical engineering activities, such as product and process design and development, process monitoring and control, real time optimization of plant operation or supply chain management. Although tremendous

  11. Designing multifunctional chemical sensors using Ni and Cu doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a “bottom up” approach to the computational design of a multifunctional chemical sensor. General techniques are employed for describing the adsorption coverage and resistance properties of the sensor based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function...

  12. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  13. Lost opportunities to reduce periconception HIV transmission: safer conception counseling by South African providers addresses perinatal but not sexual HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn T; Milford, Cecilia; Kaida, Angela; Ehrlich, Matthew J; Ng, Courtney; Greener, Ross; Mosery, F N; Harrison, Abigail; Psaros, Christina; Safren, Steven A; Bajunirwe, Francis; Wilson, Ira B; Bangsberg, David R; Smit, Jennifer A

    2014-12-01

    Safer conception strategies create opportunities for HIV-serodiscordant couples to realize fertility goals and minimize periconception HIV transmission. Patient-provider communication about fertility goals is the first step in safer conception counseling. We explored provider practices of assessing fertility intentions among HIV-infected men and women, attitudes toward people living with HIV (PLWH) having children, and knowledge and provision of safer conception advice. We conducted in-depth interviews (9 counselors, 15 nurses, 5 doctors) and focus group discussions (6 counselors, 7 professional nurses) in eThekwini District, South Africa. Data were translated, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis with NVivo10 software. Among 42 participants, median age was 41 (range, 28-60) years, 93% (39) were women, and median years worked in the clinic was 7 (range, 1-27). Some providers assessed women's, not men's, plans for having children at antiretroviral therapy initiation, to avoid fetal exposure to efavirenz. When conducted, reproductive counseling included CD4 cell count and HIV viral load assessment, advising mutual HIV status disclosure, and referral to another provider. Barriers to safer conception counseling included provider assumptions of HIV seroconcordance, low knowledge of safer conception strategies, personal feelings toward PLWH having children, and challenges to tailoring safer sex messages. Providers need information about HIV serodiscordance and safer conception strategies to move beyond discussing only perinatal transmission and maternal health for PLWH who choose to conceive. Safer conception counseling may be more feasible if the message is distilled to delaying conception attempts until the infected partner is on antiretroviral therapy. Designated and motivated nurse providers may be required to provide comprehensive safer conception counseling.

  14. Property Model-based Tailor-made Design of Chemical-based Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalakul, Sawitree

    on experiment are reduced leading to faster and cheaper to market the products. The tools also help to manage the solution of product design problems, which usually require efficient handling of model-data-knowledge from different sources and at different time and size scales. The main contribution...... types of products. The goal has been to develop a chemical product simulator, similar inconcept to a process simulator, which make the product design and development easier and faster, and provide the way for unified and consistent product documentation. In the same way a typical process simulator works...... tasks. In order to achieve the features mentioned above, several issues need to be addressed:the translation of consumer needs into target properties; property models and available data for each type of chemical products; design methods and algorithms; available computer-aided tools; the systematic...

  15. Identifying psychosocial variables that predict safer-sex intentions in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil eBrüll

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Young people are especially vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections. The triad of deliberate and effective safer-sex behavior encompasses condom use, combined with additional information about a partner’s sexual health, and the kind of sex acts usually performed. To identify psychosocial predictors of young people’s intentions to have safer sex, as related to this triad we conducted an online study with 211 sexually active participants aged between 18 and 24 years. Predictors (i.e. perceived behavioural control, subjective norms and intention taken from Fishbein and Ajzen’s Reasoned Action Approach (RAA, were combined with more distal variables (e.g. behavioral inhibition, sensation seeking, parental monitoring, and knowledge about sexually transmitted infections. Beyond the highly predictive power of RAA variables, additional variance was explained by the number of instances of unprotected sexual intercourse during the last twelve months and reasons for using barrier protection during first sexual intercourse. In particular, past condom nonuse behavior moderated perceived behavioral control related to intended condom use. Further, various distal variables showed significant univariate associations with intentions related to the three behaviors of interest. It may, therefore, be helpful to include measures of past behavior as well as certain additional distal variables in future safer-sex programs designed to promote health sustaining sexual behavior.

  16. Implementation of a safer conception service for HIV-affected couples in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Bassett, Jean; Sanne, Ian; Phofa, Rebecca; Yende, Nompumelelo; Van Rie, Annelies

    2014-07-01

    To describe the development and implementation of a safer conception service in a resource-limited setting. Qualitative work to inform the design of a safer conception service was conducted with clients and providers at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre, a primary health center in Johannesburg, South Africa. Services began in July 2013 for HIV-affected participants planning conception within 6 months and included counseling about timed unprotected intercourse and home-based self-insemination, early initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV-infected individuals, pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-uninfected partners and circumcision for men. Participants were enrolled into an implementation science study evaluating method uptake, acceptability, and pregnancy and HIV transmission outcomes. Findings to-date from 51 qualitative participants and 128 clinical cohort participants (82 women and 46 men, representing 82 partnerships) are presented. All men were accompanied by female partners, whereas 56% of women attended with their male partner. Fifteen of the 46 couples (33%) were in confirmed serodiscordant relationships; however, of the 36 additional women attending alone, 56% were unaware of their partners' HIV status or believed them to be HIV-uninfected. The majority of the HIV-infected women (86%) and men (71%) were on cART at enrollment; however, only 47% on cART were virally suppressed. Timed unprotected intercourse, self-insemination and cART were common choices for participants; few elected pre-exposure prophylaxis. Lessons learned from early implementation demonstrate feasibility of safer conception services; however, reaching discordant couples, cART-naïve infected partners, and men remain challenges. Creating demand for safer conception services among those at highest risk for HIV transmission is necessary.

  17. Viral Transmissions: Safer Sex Videos, Disability, and Queer Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karisa Butler-Wall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bringing disability studies into conversation with queer histories of AIDS activism, this article examines the relationship between disability and queer politics in safer sex videos created by AIDS activists in the 1980s. As a form of what the author terms "guerrilla biopolitics," safer sex videos insisted on the viability of queer life and sexual expression at a historical moment of intense homophobia and sex negativity. At the same time, the vision of sexual health and identity they offered risked reproducing racialized and classed ideologies of ableism. Seeking to "crip" our understandings of safer sex discourses and practices, this study explores how risk reduction techniques have been historically linked to imperatives of compulsory able-bodiedness, precluding alternative expressions of queer/crip life.

  18. Design of sustainable chemical processes: Systematic retrofit analysis, generation and evaluation alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Ana; Gani, Rafiqul; Matos, Henrique

    2008-01-01

    eliminating the need to identify trade-off-based solutions. These indicators are also able to reduce (where feasible) a set of safety indicators. An indicator sensitivity analysis algorithm has been added to the methodology to define design targets and to generate sustainable process alternatives. A computer......The objective of this paper is to present a generic and systematic methodology for identifying the feasible retrofit design alternatives of any chemical process. The methodology determines a set of mass and energy indicators from steady-state process data, establishes the operational and design...... targets, and through a sensitivity-based analysis, identifies the design alternatives that can match a set of design targets. The significance of this indicator-based method is that it is able to identify alternatives, where one or more performance criteria (factors) move in the same direction thereby...

  19. The role of self-esteem in safer sexual practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, F L

    1997-01-01

    Self-esteem appears in the literature as a variable that influences the practice of risky sexual behaviors. It is often assumed that higher levels of self-esteem are associated with safer sexual behaviors, especially those that prevent the spread of HIV. The research literature was reviewed to examine the relationship between self-esteem and the practice of safer sexual behaviors. Research indicates that higher levels of self-esteem are found in adolescents who practice risky sexual behaviors and have more sexual partners. Research and clinical implications are discussed.

  20. Computer-Aided Chemical Product Design Framework: Design of High Performance and Environmentally Friendly Refrigerants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cignitti, Stefano; Zhang, Lei; Gani, Rafiqul

    Refrigerants are widely used in household and industrial applications, such as processes for energy transfer from low grade heat sources. Refrigerants are utilized in heat pump cycles for moving heat from one source to another with the task to heat or to refrigerate. Environmental issues have been...... a driving force for the industry to continuously seek novel refrigerants as current refrigerants risk phasing out due to environmental regulations. This trend has been seen since the Kyoto Protocol in 1997 and recently from the EU regulations from 2014, which will restrict the use of some known refrigerants...... today (Mota-Babiloni et al., 2015). However, design of new refrigerants poses a great challenge and finding an optimum solution for a given application often faces trade-off issues between cycle performance and environmental criteria. In addition, following issues are still to be addressed. What target...

  1. Integrated supply chain design for commodity chemicals production via woody biomass fast pyrolysis and upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Hu, Guiping; Brown, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the optimal supply chain design for commodity chemicals (BTX, etc.) production via woody biomass fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing pathway. The locations and capacities of distributed preprocessing hubs and integrated biorefinery facilities are optimized with a mixed integer linear programming model. In this integrated supply chain system, decisions on the biomass chipping methods (roadside chipping vs. facility chipping) are also explored. The economic objective of the supply chain model is to maximize the profit for a 20-year chemicals production system. In addition to the economic objective, the model also incorporates an environmental objective of minimizing life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, analyzing the trade-off between the economic and environmental considerations. The capital cost, operating cost, and revenues for the biorefinery facilities are based on techno-economic analysis, and the proposed approach is illustrated through a case study of Minnesota, with Minneapolis-St. Paul serving as the chemicals distribution hub. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) as asymmetric weapons: the design basis threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, L.

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric warfare concepts relate well to the use of improvised chemical weapons against urban targets. Sources of information on toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and lists of high threat chemicals are available that point to likely choices for an attack. Accident investigations can be used as a template for attacks, and to judge the possible effectiveness of an attack using TICs. The results of a chlorine rail car accident in South Carolina, USA and the Russian military assault on a Moscow theater provide many illustrative points for similar incidents that mighty be carried out deliberately. Computer modeling of outdoor releases shows how an attack might take into consideration issues of stand-off distance and dilution. Finally, the preceding may be used to estimate with some accuracy the design basis threat posed by the used of TICs as weapons.(author)

  3. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  4. Design of chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes in Serpong nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimin, Z.; Walman, E.; Santoso, P.; Purnomo, S.; Sugito; Suwardiyono; Wintono

    1996-01-01

    The chemical treatment unit for radioactive liquid wastes arising from nuclear fuel fabrication, radioisotopes production and radiometallurgy facility has been designed. The design of chemical processing unit is based on the characteristics of liquid wastes containing fluors from uranium fluoride conversion process to ammonium uranyl carbonate on the fuel fabrication. The chemical treatment has the following process steps: coagulation-precipitation of fluoride ion by calcium hydroxide coagulant, separation of supernatant solution from sludge, coagulation of remaining fluoride on the supernatant solution by alum, separation of supernatant from sludge, and than precipitation of fluors on the supernatant by polymer resin WWS 116. The processing unit is composed of 3 storage tanks for raw liquid wastes (capacity 1 m 3 per tank), 5 storage tanks for chemicals (capacity 0.5 m 3 per tank), 2 mixing reactors (capacity 0.5 m 3 per reactor), 1 storage tank for supernatant solution (capacity 1 m 3 ), and 1 storage tank for sludge (capacity 1 m 3 )

  5. Mapping Chemical Selection Pathways for Designing Multicomponent Alloys: an informatics framework for materials design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Broderick, Scott R.; Zhang, Ruifeng; Mishra, Amrita; Sinnott, Susan B.; Saxena, Surendra K.; Lebeau, James M.; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    A data driven methodology is developed for tracking the collective influence of the multiple attributes of alloying elements on both thermodynamic and mechanical properties of metal alloys. Cobalt-based superalloys are used as a template to demonstrate the approach. By mapping the high dimensional nature of the systematics of elemental data embedded in the periodic table into the form of a network graph, one can guide targeted first principles calculations that identify the influence of specific elements on phase stability, crystal structure and elastic properties. This provides a fundamentally new means to rapidly identify new stable alloy chemistries with enhanced high temperature properties. The resulting visualization scheme exhibits the grouping and proximity of elements based on their impact on the properties of intermetallic alloys. Unlike the periodic table however, the distance between neighboring elements uncovers relationships in a complex high dimensional information space that would not have been easily seen otherwise. The predictions of the methodology are found to be consistent with reported experimental and theoretical studies. The informatics based methodology presented in this study can be generalized to a framework for data analysis and knowledge discovery that can be applied to many material systems and recreated for different design objectives.

  6. Mapping Chemical Selection Pathways for Designing Multicomponent Alloys: an informatics framework for materials design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Broderick, Scott R; Zhang, Ruifeng; Mishra, Amrita; Sinnott, Susan B; Saxena, Surendra K; LeBeau, James M; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-12-18

    A data driven methodology is developed for tracking the collective influence of the multiple attributes of alloying elements on both thermodynamic and mechanical properties of metal alloys. Cobalt-based superalloys are used as a template to demonstrate the approach. By mapping the high dimensional nature of the systematics of elemental data embedded in the periodic table into the form of a network graph, one can guide targeted first principles calculations that identify the influence of specific elements on phase stability, crystal structure and elastic properties. This provides a fundamentally new means to rapidly identify new stable alloy chemistries with enhanced high temperature properties. The resulting visualization scheme exhibits the grouping and proximity of elements based on their impact on the properties of intermetallic alloys. Unlike the periodic table however, the distance between neighboring elements uncovers relationships in a complex high dimensional information space that would not have been easily seen otherwise. The predictions of the methodology are found to be consistent with reported experimental and theoretical studies. The informatics based methodology presented in this study can be generalized to a framework for data analysis and knowledge discovery that can be applied to many material systems and recreated for different design objectives.

  7. Design of tailor-made chemical blend using a decomposition-based computer-aided approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza; Gernaey, Krist; Manan, Z.A.

    2011-01-01

    methodology for blended liquid products that identifies a set of feasible chemical blends. The blend design problem is formulated as a Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) model where the objective is to find the optimal blended gasoline or diesel product subject to types of chemicals...... must be stable liquid mixture). In the second stage, the blend candidates have to satisfy a set of target properties that are ranked according to a specified priority. Finally, a short list of candidates, ordered in terms of specified performance criteria, is produced for final testing and selection....... The application of this systematic and computer-aided approach is illustrated through a case study involving the design of blends of gasoline with oxygenated compounds resulting from degradation and fermentation of biomass for use in internal combustion engines. Emphasis is given here on the concepts used...

  8. Computer-Aided Modelling of Short-Path Evaporation for Chemical Product Purification, Analysis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Alfonso Mauricio; Gani, Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    An important stage in the design process for many chemical products is its manufacture where, for a class of chemical products that may be thermally unstable (such as, drugs, insecticides, flavours /fragrances, and so on), the purification step plays a major role. Short-path evaporation is a safe...... method, suitable for separation and purification of thermally unstable materials whose design and analysis can be efficiently performed through reliable model-based techniques. This paper presents a generalized model for short-path evaporation and highlights its development, implementation and solution...... glycerol, mono-, di- and triglycerides, and (b) the recovery of a pharmaceutical product from a six-component mixture. Validation of the short-path evaporation model is highlighted through the comparison of experimental data from an industrial pilot plant with the simulated results from the model. Also...

  9. Making Medical Devices Safer at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poor usability is among the top 10 health technology hazards of 2012. Examples include users having difficulty ... handle the device in an emergency. Designing Visual Learning Guides, using mostly pictures. The first two guides ... and Players . Language Assistance Available: Español | 繁體ä¸æ–‡ | ...

  10. Doing Textiles Experiments in Game-Based Virtual Reality: A Design of the Stereoscopic Chemical Laboratory (SCL) for Textiles Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong; Kan, Chi Wai; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of stereoscopic virtual technology in textile and fashion studies in particular to the area of chemical experiment. The development of a designed virtual platform, called Stereoscopic Chemical Laboratory (SCL), is introduced. Design/methodology/approach: To implement the suggested…

  11. Client uptake of safer conception strategies: implementation outcomes from the Sakh'umndeni Safer Conception Clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Bassett, Jean; Holmes, Charles B; Yende, Nompumelelo; Phofa, Rebecca; Sanne, Ian; Van Rie, Annelies

    2017-03-08

    Implementation of safer conception services for HIV-affected couples within primary healthcare clinics in resource-limited settings remains limited. We review service utilization and safer conception strategy uptake during the first three years of Sakh'umndeni , which is a safer conception clinic in South Africa. Sakh'umndeni is located at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre, a high-volume primary healthcare clinic in northern Johannesburg. Men and women desiring to conceive in less than or equal to six months and in relationships in which one or both partners are living with HIV are eligible for safer conception services. Clients receive a baseline health assessment and counselling around periconception HIV risk reduction strategies and choose which strategies they plan to use. Clients are followed-up monthly. We describe client service utilization and uptake and continuation of safer conception methods. Factors associated with male partner attendance are assessed using robust Poisson regression. Overall 440 individuals utilized the service including 157 couples in which both partners attended (55%) and 126 unaccompanied female partners. Over half of the couples (55%) represented were in serodiscordant/unknown status relationships. Higher economic status and HIV-negative status of the women increased male partner involvement, while HIV-negative status of the men decreased male involvement. Regarding safer conception strategies, uptake of antiretroviral therapy initiation (90%), vaginal self-insemination among partnerships with HIV-negative men (75%) and timed condomless intercourse strategies (48%) were variable, but generally high. Overall uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) was 23% and was lower among HIV-negative men than women (7% vs. 44%, p  conception strategy. Continuation of selected strategies over attempted conception attempts was >60%. Safer conception strategies are generally used by clients per recommendations. High uptake of strategies

  12. A novel double loop control model design for chemical unstable processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Er-Ding; Hu, Ming-Hui; Tu, Shan-Tung; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Shao, Hui-He

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript, based on Smith predictor control scheme for unstable process in industry, an improved double loop control model is proposed for chemical unstable processes. Inner loop is to stabilize integrating the unstable process and transform the original process to first-order plus pure dead-time dynamic stable process. Outer loop is to enhance the performance of set point response. Disturbance controller is designed to enhance the performance of disturbance response. The improved control system is simple with exact physical meaning. The characteristic equation is easy to realize stabilization. Three controllers are separately design in the improved scheme. It is easy to design each controller and good control performance for the respective closed-loop transfer function separately. The robust stability of the proposed control scheme is analyzed. Finally, case studies illustrate that the improved method can give better system performance than existing design methods. © 2013 ISA Published by ISA All rights reserved.

  13. An alternative safer and cost effective surface sterilization method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regardless of its serious health effect, mercury chloride is frequently utilized for surface sterilization to mitigate microbial contamination in sugarcane tissue culture. The current study aimed at finding an alternative safer and cost effective sterilization method to substitute mercury chloride. In the study, sugarcane shoot tip ...

  14. AIDS in Zimbabwe: | Sibanda | SAFERE: Southern African Feminist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  15. Military men and sexual practices: Discourses of 'othering' in safer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Military men and sexual practices: Discourses of 'othering' in safer sex in the light of HIV/AIDS. ... Military men are particularly vulnerable to HIV because of their working conditions; for example, working far from home and being among communities where they have greater economic and political power, as well as in relation ...

  16. Using a Narrative to Spark Safer Sex Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, Lennie; Hoeks, John; Jansen, Carel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: College students are a group at risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). While they are generally well informed about STIs, they do not consistently use condoms. An important element in preventing STIs is safer sex communication, especially with a sexual partner. This may be difficult, however, because of a lack of…

  17. The Vulnerability of Women to Aids | IIunga | SAFERE: Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  18. Mass-Produced, Buffer | Masitera | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  19. BOOK REVIEWS Rwanda - Not so innocent: | Mate | SAFERE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  20. Using a narrative to spark safer sex communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donné, Lennie; Hoeks, Jacobus; Jansen, C. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: College students are a group at risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). While they are generally well informed about STIs, they do not consistently use condoms. An important element in preventing STIs is safer sex communication, especially with a sexual partner. This

  1. Consumers want safer meat - but not at all costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkbak, Morten Raun; Christensen, Tove; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    different packages of minced pork that differed with respect to Salmonella risks, risk reduction method, and price. The sample consisted of 844 Danish consumers, who answered a questionnaire over the internet. Our results indicate that consumers demand safer meat, but not at all costs - there is a limit...

  2. An alternative safer and cost effective surface sterilization method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-10-30

    Oct 30, 2013 ... Regardless of its serious health effect, mercury chloride is frequently utilized for surface sterilization to mitigate microbial contamination in sugarcane tissue culture. The current study aimed at finding an alternative safer and cost effective sterilization method to substitute mercury chloride. In the study,.

  3. Remembered Rapture: the writer at work | Abraham | SAFERE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  4. SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review - Vol 3, No 1 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feminism and Masculinity in an African Capitalist Context: · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Mwenda G. Ntarangwi, 19-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/safere.v3i1.23948 ...

  5. The urban dilemma: how to make cities safer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    Oct 1, 2015 ... ... and inequalities, and identify which programs work – and which don't – to prevent and reduce violence in cities. Read the blog post. Learn more from the baseline study, Researching the Urban Dilemma. Find out more about how IDRC supports research to make cities safer through our partnership – Safe ...

  6. Modeling and designing a new gas injection diffusion system for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C. C.; Hsiau, S. S.; Chuang, T. C.

    2018-01-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is a critical process and is widely used for the epitaxial growth of light-emitting diode (LED) wafers. The key component, a gas injection system, delivers the gas into the reactor by using a nozzle or showerhead. In this paper, the numerical simulation method was applied to investigate the thermal fluid field and to design a new gas injection system for MOCVD. In this study, we developed a new gas injection system with inlet barriers. The inlet barriers can separate the various reactive gases, reduce the prereaction, and prevent adducted particles from forming and blocking the inlet gas system. The barrier geometry, including the barrier length, the barrier inclination angle, and the V/III precursor ratio was systematically studied to determine the optimal design conditions. Higher growth rate and improved uniformity were demonstrated using the new optimal gas inlet barrier design.

  7. An integrated computer aided system for integrated design of chemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Hytoft, Glen; Jaksland, Cecilia

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, an Integrated Computer Aided System (ICAS), which is particularly suitable for solving problems related to integrated design of chemical processes; is presented. ICAS features include a model generator (generation of problem specific models including model simplification and model...... and communicates with all other computational tools available in ICAS. A large range of thermodynamic models for estimation of the necessary thermo-physical properties, a large range of computational algorithms for determination of various types of phase diagrams, algorithms for process synthesis, design, control...... reduction), a simulator (use of problem specific simulation strategies for steady state and dynamic simulation), toolboxes (thermodynamic toolbox, synthesis toolbox, control toolbox, design toolbox and analysis toolbox), and an interface for problem defintion. Each toolbox solves aspecific set of problems...

  8. Importance of deposit information in the design and execution of steam generator chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, O.; Remark, J.

    1997-01-01

    During the planning stages of the chemical cleaning of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) units 2 and 3 steam generators, it was determined that an understanding of the steam generator deposit loading and composition was essential to the design and success of the project. It was also determined that qualification testing, preferably with actual deposits from the SONGS steam generators, was also essential. SONGS units 2 and 3 have Combustion Engineering (CE)-designed pressurized water reactors. Each unit has two CE model 3410 steam generators. Each steam generator has 9350 alloy 600 tubes with 1.9-cm (3/4 in.) outside diameter. Unit 2 began commercial operation in 1983, and unit 3, in 1984. The purpose of this technical paper is to explain the effort and methodology for deposit composition, characterization, and quantification. In addition, the deposit qualification testing and design of the cleaning are discussed

  9. Systematic methods for synthesis and design of sustainable chemical and biochemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    , biomass, coal, natural gas, rock, etc., that are usually extracted), to a bigger set of basic chemical products (such as, ethylene, benzene sulfuric acid, ammonia, etc., that are produced in large quantities), to an even bigger set of intermediates (such as, methanol, urea, succinic acid, ethylene glycol...... from the renewable resources, the sustainability of the product and therefore the process can be improved. Also, the number of alternatives that exist provide opportunities and challenges to find the best synthesis routes, for example, for process intensification or a multi-product processing complex...... like a biorefinery. The process synthesis design problem can be formulated as one where first a synthesis-design target (a process with desired qualities) is defined and then design alternatives (process flowsheets for different raw material-product connection) that match the target are identified...

  10. An Intelligent System for Modelling, Design and Analysis of Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    ICAS, Integrated Computer Aided System, is a software that consists of a number of intelligent tools, which are very suitable, among others, for computer aided modelling, sustainable design of chemical and biochemical processes, and design-analysis of product-process monitoring systems. Each...... of these tools are characterized by a framework that follows an established work-flow and data-flow, developed to guide the user through the many steps of the problem solution process. At each, the specific tool knows which data, model and/or algorithm to use. The tool also provides analysis of the calculated...... results so that the user can make intelligent decisions to proceed to the next step. The tools contain in-house databases, especially designed to work in an integrated manner with tool specific ontology for efficient knowledge management. Examples highlighting the use of the tools willl be given, where...

  11. Development of pure component property models for chemical product-process design and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao

    statistical information about the quality of parameter estimation, such as the parameter covariance, the standard errors in predicted properties, and the confidence intervals. For parameter estimation, large data sets of experimentally measured property values of a wide range of pure components taken from......Property prediction models based on the group-contribution+ (GC+) approach have been developed to provide reliable predictions of pure component properties together with uncertainties of predicted property values which is much needed information in performing chemical product and process design...... and analysis of sustainable chemical processes. For developing property models, a systematic methodology for property modeling and uncertainty analysis is employed. The methodology includes a parameter estimation step to determine parameters of the property model and an uncertainty analysis step to establish...

  12. Steering patients to safer hospitals? The effect of a tiered hospital network on hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-10-01

    To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety "leaps." The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Changes in hospital admissions' patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Patients affiliated with the engineers' union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists' union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear.

  13. Design Tool for Estimating Chemical Hydrogen Storage System Characteristics for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Sprik, Sam; Tamburello, David; Thornton, Matthew

    2018-05-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a vehicle framework model to simulate fuel cell-based light-duty vehicle operation for various hydrogen storage systems. This transient model simulates the performance of the storage system, fuel cell, and vehicle for comparison to DOE’s Technical Targets using four drive cycles/profiles. Chemical hydrogen storage models have been developed for the Framework model for both exothermic and endothermic materials. Despite the utility of such models, they require that material researchers input system design specifications that cannot be easily estimated. To address this challenge, a design tool has been developed that allows researchers to directly enter kinetic and thermodynamic chemical hydrogen storage material properties into a simple sizing module that then estimates the systems parameters required to run the storage system model. Additionally, this design tool can be used as a standalone executable file to estimate the storage system mass and volume outside of the framework model and compare it to the DOE Technical Targets. These models will be explained and exercised with existing hydrogen storage materials.

  14. Mega-supramolecules for safer, cleaner fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfield, Julie

    Guided by the statistical mechanics of ring-chain equilibrium, we designed and synthesized polymers that self-assemble into ``mega-supramolecules'' (>=5,000 kg/mol) at low concentration (total polymer concentration--if, and only if , the backbones are long (>400 kg/mol) and end-association strength is optimal (16-18kT). Hydrocarbon liquid fuels are the world's dominant power source (34% of global energy consumption). Transportation relies heavily on such liquids, presenting the risk of explosive post-impact fires. The collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 inspired us to revisit polymers for mist control to mitigate post-impact fuel explosions. Rheological and both light and neutron scattering measurements of long end-functional polymers having polycyclooctadiene backbones and acid or amine end groups verify formation of mega-supramolecules. Post-impact flame propagations experiments show that mega-supramolecules control misting. Turbulent flow measurements show that mega-supramolecules reduce drag like ultra-long covalent polymers. With individual building blocks short enough to avoid hydrodynamic chain scission (400

  15. Design and analysis of questionnaires for survey skills in chemical engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Lucas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false CA X-NONE X-NONE The new reorganization of university education has involved relevant changes in teaching and learning methodologies in order to help students to learn more effectively and to develop important skills and competences demanded by the professional world. In this sense the new configuration of the degree in Chemical Engineering required the identification of the main general and transferable skills, the implementation of the new teaching and learning strategies necessary to achieve them and, in addition, an evaluation procedure for determining the importance and the degree of development of a student´s skills and competences. In this exercise, two obligatory chemical reactor engineering subjects of the still in effect Chemical Engineering degree were chosen as examples of competence-based learning disciplines. For each one, a significant group of transferable and specific skills were selected to be developed. The identification and selection of skills was made according to the recommendations of the European Federation of Chemical Engineering (EFCE together with the established requirements in the ministerial order for the new Chemical Engineering Degree (Ministerial order CIN/351/2009. In order to check the effectiveness of teaching strategies in helping students to acquire these abilities, specific questionnaires were designed. These tests allowed for the utility of the competences in question to be evaluated in terms of the students´ professional work as future chemical engineering graduates and also facilitated the perception of skill development acquired through the methodology implemented in these subjects. The results of the skill evaluation questionnaires revealed the importance that both university collectives (students and professors give to the development of transferable skills. These skills included the ability to communicate effectively (including in English, to work in

  16. 75 FR 71123 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Safer Detergent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Safer Detergent... ICR, entitled: ``Safer Detergent Stewardship Initiative (SDSI) Program'' and identified by EPA ICR No... surfactants. Title: Safer Detergent Stewardship Initiative (SDSI) Program. ICR numbers: EPA ICR No. 2261.02...

  17. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  18. A Combined Heuristic and Indicator-based Methodology for Design of Sustainable Chemical Process Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Iskandar; Carvalho, Ana; Srinivasan, Rajagopalan

    2011-01-01

    , and high-lights trade-offs between environmental and economic objectives. This is complemented by SustainPro which evaluates the alternatives and screens them in-depth through indicators for profit and energy, water, and raw material usage. This results in accurate identification of the root causes......The current emphasis on sustainable production has prompted chemical plants to minimize raw material and energy usage without compromising on economics. While computer tools are available to assistin sustainability assessment, their applications are constrained to a specific domain of the design...

  19. Formulation design of oral pediatric Acetazolamide suspension: dose uniformity and physico-chemical stability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoveña, Ana; Suárez-González, Javier; Martín-Rodríguez, Cristina; Fariña, José B

    2017-03-01

    The formulation of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as oral solution or suspension in pediatrics is a habitual practice, due to the non-existence of many commercialized medicines in pediatric doses. It is also the simplest way to prepare and administer them to this vulnerable population. The design of a formulation that assures the dose and the system stability depends on the physico-chemical properties of the API. In this study, we formulate a class IV API, Acetazolamide (AZM) as suspension for oral administration to pediatric population. The suspension must comply attributes of quality, safety and efficacy for this route of administration. We use simple compounding procedures, as well as fewer pure excipients, as recommended for children. Mass and uniformity content assays and physical and chemical stability studies were performed. To quantify the API an UPLC method was used. We verified the physico-chemical stability of the suspensions and that they passed the mass test of the European Pharmacopeia (EP), but not the dose uniformity test. This reveals that AZM must be formulated as liquid forms with a more complex system of excipients (not usually indicated in pediatrics), or otherwise solid forms capable of assuring uniformity of mass and dose for every dosage unit.

  20. Design of Chemical Literacy Assessment by Using Model of Educational Reconstruction (MER) on Solubility Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusmaita, E.; Nasra, Edi

    2018-04-01

    This research aims to produce instrument for measuring chemical literacy assessment in basic chemistry courses with solubility topic. The construction of this measuring instrument is adapted to the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) problem’s characteristics and the Syllaby of Basic Chemistry in KKNI-IndonesianNational Qualification Framework. The PISA is a cross-country study conducted periodically to monitor the outcomes of learners' achievement in each participating country. So far, studies conducted by PISA include reading literacy, mathematic literacy and scientific literacy. Refered to the scientific competence of the PISA study on science literacy, an assessment designed to measure the chemical literacy of the chemistry department’s students in UNP. The research model used is MER (Model of Educational Reconstruction). The validity and reliability values of discourse questions is measured using the software ANATES. Based on the acquisition of these values is obtained a valid and reliable chemical literacy questions.There are seven question items limited response on the topic of solubility with valid category, the acquisition value of test reliability is 0,86, and has a difficulty index and distinguishing good

  1. In Silico Prediction of Chemical Toxicity for Drug Design Using Machine Learning Methods and Structural Alerts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During drug development, safety is always the most important issue, including a variety of toxicities and adverse drug effects, which should be evaluated in preclinical and clinical trial phases. This review article at first simply introduced the computational methods used in prediction of chemical toxicity for drug design, including machine learning methods and structural alerts. Machine learning methods have been widely applied in qualitative classification and quantitative regression studies, while structural alerts can be regarded as a complementary tool for lead optimization. The emphasis of this article was put on the recent progress of predictive models built for various toxicities. Available databases and web servers were also provided. Though the methods and models are very helpful for drug design, there are still some challenges and limitations to be improved for drug safety assessment in the future.

  2. In Silico Prediction of Chemical Toxicity for Drug Design Using Machine Learning Methods and Structural Alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongbin; Sun, Lixia; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun

    2018-01-01

    During drug development, safety is always the most important issue, including a variety of toxicities and adverse drug effects, which should be evaluated in preclinical and clinical trial phases. This review article at first simply introduced the computational methods used in prediction of chemical toxicity for drug design, including machine learning methods and structural alerts. Machine learning methods have been widely applied in qualitative classification and quantitative regression studies, while structural alerts can be regarded as a complementary tool for lead optimization. The emphasis of this article was put on the recent progress of predictive models built for various toxicities. Available databases and web servers were also provided. Though the methods and models are very helpful for drug design, there are still some challenges and limitations to be improved for drug safety assessment in the future.

  3. Whole Wafer Design and Fabrication for the Alignment of Nanostructures for Chemical Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    A major objective in aerospace sensor development is to produce sensors that are small in size, easy to batch fabricate and low in cost, and have low power consumption The fabrication of chemical sensors involving nanostructured materials can provide these properties as well as the potential for the development of sensor systems with unique properties and improved performance. However, the fabrication and processing of nanostructures for sensor applications currently is limited in the ability to control their location on the sensor. Currently, our group at NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated the controlled placement of nanostructures in sensors using a sawtooth patterned electrode design. With this design the nanostructures are aligned between opposing sawtooth electrodes by applying an alternating current.

  4. Incorporation of environmental impact criteria in the design and operation of chemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Bauer

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental impact assessment is becoming indispensable for the design and operation of chemical plants. Structured and consistent methods for this purpose have experienced a rapid development. The more rigorous and sophisticated these methods become, the greater is the demand for convenient tools. On the other hand, despite the incredible advances in process simulators, some aspects have still not been sufficiently covered. To date, applications of these programs to quantify environmental impacts have been restricted to straightforward examples of steady-state processes. In this work, a life-cycle assessment implementation with the aim of process design will be described, with a brief discussion of a dynamic simulation for analysis of transient state operations, such as process start-up. A case study shows the importance of this analysis in making possible operation at a high performance level with reduced risks to the environment.

  5. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. ‘It is not expected for married couples’: a qualitative study on challenges to safer sex communication among polygamous and monogamous partners in southeastern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtenga, Sally Mmanyi; Geubbels, Eveline; Tanner, Marcel; Merten, Sonja; Pfeiffer, Constanze

    2016-01-01

    Background Behavioral change approaches for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention in Tanzania encourage married partners to observe safe sex practices (condom use, avoidance of, or safe sex with multiple partners). To implement this advice, partners need to communicate with each other about safer sex, which is often challenging. Although social-structural factors are crucial in understanding sexual behavior, only a few studies focus on understanding safer sex dialogue in a broader social context. Design Drawing on the WHO-Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (WHO-CSDH) framework, this study explored key social-structural constructs for studying health in the context of improving safer sex dialogue between polygamous and monogamous partners. Twenty-four in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus group discussions (FGDs) with 38 men and women aged 18–60 years were conducted in Ifakara town located in Kilombero district, Tanzania. The study was nested within the community health surveillance project MZIMA (Kiswahili: ‘being healthy’). Partners’ experiences of safer sex dialogue in polygamous and monogamous relations were investigated and the challenges to safer sex dialogue explored. Results The study revealed that open safer sex dialogue in marriage is limited and challenged by social norms about marriage (a view that safer sex dialogue imply that partners are ‘not really’ married); marital status (a belief that safer sex dialogue is not practical in polygamous marriages, the elder wife should be exempted from the dialogue since she is at lower risk of engaging in extramarital affairs); relationship quality (marital conflicts, extramarital affairs, trust, and sexual dissatisfaction); and gender power relations (the notion that females’ initiative to discuss condom use and HIV couple counseling and testing may lead to conflict or divorce). Conclusions Implementing safer sex practices requires interventions beyond promotion messages. HIV

  7. ‘It is not expected for married couples’: a qualitative study on challenges to safer sex communication among polygamous and monogamous partners in southeastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Mmanyi Mtenga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral change approaches for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevention in Tanzania encourage married partners to observe safe sex practices (condom use, avoidance of, or safe sex with multiple partners. To implement this advice, partners need to communicate with each other about safer sex, which is often challenging. Although social-structural factors are crucial in understanding sexual behavior, only a few studies focus on understanding safer sex dialogue in a broader social context. Design: Drawing on the WHO-Commission on the Social Determinants of Health (WHO-CSDH framework, this study explored key social-structural constructs for studying health in the context of improving safer sex dialogue between polygamous and monogamous partners. Twenty-four in-depth interviews (IDIs and six focus group discussions (FGDs with 38 men and women aged 18–60 years were conducted in Ifakara town located in Kilombero district, Tanzania. The study was nested within the community health surveillance project MZIMA (Kiswahili: ‘being healthy’. Partners’ experiences of safer sex dialogue in polygamous and monogamous relations were investigated and the challenges to safer sex dialogue explored. Results: The study revealed that open safer sex dialogue in marriage is limited and challenged by social norms about marriage (a view that safer sex dialogue imply that partners are ‘not really’ married; marital status (a belief that safer sex dialogue is not practical in polygamous marriages, the elder wife should be exempted from the dialogue since she is at lower risk of engaging in extramarital affairs; relationship quality (marital conflicts, extramarital affairs, trust, and sexual dissatisfaction; and gender power relations (the notion that females’ initiative to discuss condom use and HIV couple counseling and testing may lead to conflict or divorce. Conclusions: Implementing safer sex practices requires interventions beyond promotion

  8. Enhanced teaching and student learning through a simulator-based course in chemical unit operations design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-07-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes through simulators. A case study presenting the teaching method was evaluated using student surveys and faculty assessments, which were designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively demonstrate that this method is an extremely efficient way of teaching a simulator-based course. In addition to that, this teaching method can easily be generalised and used in other courses. A student's final mark is determined by a combination of in-class assessments conducted based on cooperative and peer learning, progress tests and a final exam. Results revealed that peer learning can improve the overall quality of student learning and enhance student understanding.

  9. SAFER Inspection of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Zebulon C.; Rajula, Sudhakar

    2005-01-01

    In the aftermath of the space shuttle Columbia accident, it quickly became clear that new methods would need to be developed that would provide the capability to inspect and repair the shuttle's thermal protection system (TPS). A boom extension to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) with a laser topography sensor package was identified as the primary means for measuring the damage depth in acreage tile as well as scanning Reinforced Carbon- Carbon (RCC) surfaces. However, concern over the system's fault tolerance made it prudent to investigate alternate means of acquiring close range photographs and contour depth measurements in the event of a failure. One method that was identified early was to use the Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsion system to allow EVA access to damaged areas of concern. Several issues were identified as potential hazards to SAFER use for this operation. First, the ability of an astronaut to maintain controlled flight depends upon efficient technique and hardware reliability. If either of these is insufficient during flight operations, a safety tether must be used to rescue the crewmember. This operation can jeopardize the integrity of the Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) or delicate TPS materials. Controls were developed to prevent the likelihood of requiring a tether rescue, and procedures were written to maximize the chances for success if it cannot be avoided. Crewmember ability to manage tether cable tension during nominal flight also had to be evaluated to ensure it would not negatively affect propellant consumption. Second, although propellant consumption, flight control, orbital dynamics, and flight complexity can all be accurately evaluated in Virtual Reality (VR) Laboratory at Johnson Space Center, there are some shortcomings. As a crewmember's hand is extended to simulate measurement of tile damage, it will pass through the vehicle without resistance. In reality, this force will push the crewmember away from the

  10. Piroxicam-β-cyclodextrin: a GI safer piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpignato, C

    2013-01-01

    Although NSAIDs are very effective drugs, their use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse reactions in the liver, kidney, cardiovascular (CV) system, skin and gut. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects are the most common and constitute a wide clinical spectrum ranging from dyspepsia, heartburn and abdominal discomfort to more serious events such as peptic ulcer with life-threatening complications of bleeding and perforation. The appreciation that CV risk is also increased further complicates the choices of physicians prescribing anti-inflammatory therapy. Despite prevention strategies should be implemented in patients at risk, gastroprotection is often underused and adherence to treatment is generally poor. A more appealing approach would be therefore to develop drugs that are devoid of or have reduced GI toxicity. Gastro- duodenal mucosa possesses many defensive mechanisms and NSAIDs have a deleterious effect on most of them. This results in a mucosa less able to cope with even a reduced acid load. NSAIDs cause gastro-duodenal damage, by two main mechanisms: a physiochemical disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier and systemic inhibition of gastric mucosal protection, through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, PG endoperoxide G/H synthase) activity of the GI mucosa. However, against a background of COX inhibition by anti-inflammatory doses of NSAIDs, their physicochemical properties, in particular their acidity, underlie the topical effect leading to short-term damage. It has been shown that esterification of acidic NSAIDs suppresses their gastrotoxicity without adversely affecting anti-inflammatory activity. Another way to develop NSAIDs with better GI tolerability is to complex these molecules with cyclodextrins (CDs), giving rise to so-called "inclusion complexes" that can have physical, chemical and biological properties very different from either those of the drug or the cyclodextrin. Complexation of NSAIDs with β-cyclodextrin potentially leads to a

  11. Quantitative design of emergency monitoring network for river chemical spills based on discrete entropy theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bin; Jiang, Jiping; Sivakumar, Bellie; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Peng

    2018-05-01

    Field monitoring strategy is critical for disaster preparedness and watershed emergency environmental management. However, development of such is also highly challenging. Despite the efforts and progress thus far, no definitive guidelines or solutions are available worldwide for quantitatively designing a monitoring network in response to river chemical spill incidents, except general rules based on administrative divisions or arbitrary interpolation on routine monitoring sections. To address this gap, a novel framework for spatial-temporal network design was proposed in this study. The framework combines contaminant transport modelling with discrete entropy theory and spectral analysis. The water quality model was applied to forecast the spatio-temporal distribution of contaminant after spills and then corresponding information transfer indexes (ITIs) and Fourier approximation periodic functions were estimated as critical measures for setting sampling locations and times. The results indicate that the framework can produce scientific preparedness plans of emergency monitoring based on scenario analysis of spill risks as well as rapid design as soon as the incident happened but not prepared. The framework was applied to a hypothetical spill case based on tracer experiment and a real nitrobenzene spill incident case to demonstrate its suitability and effectiveness. The newly-designed temporal-spatial monitoring network captured major pollution information at relatively low costs. It showed obvious benefits for follow-up early-warning and treatment as well as for aftermath recovery and assessment. The underlying drivers of ITIs as well as the limitations and uncertainty of the approach were analyzed based on the case studies. Comparison with existing monitoring network design approaches, management implications, and generalized applicability were also discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Within-otolith variability in chemical fingerprints: implications for sampling designs and possible environmental interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Antonio; Bulleri, Fabio; Pennetta, Antonio; De Benedetto, Giuseppe; Clarke, K Robert; Guidetti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Largely used as a natural biological tag in studies of dispersal/connectivity of fish, otolith elemental fingerprinting is usually analyzed by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). LA-ICP-MS produces an elemental fingerprint at a discrete time-point in the life of a fish and can generate data on within-otolith variability of that fingerprint. The presence of within-otolith variability has been previously acknowledged but not incorporated into experimental designs on the presumed, but untested, grounds of both its negligibility compared to among-otolith variability and of spatial autocorrelation among multiple ablations within an otolith. Here, using a hierarchical sampling design of spatial variation at multiple scales in otolith chemical fingerprints for two Mediterranean coastal fishes, we explore: 1) whether multiple ablations within an otolith can be used as independent replicates for significance tests among otoliths, and 2) the implications of incorporating within-otolith variability when assessing spatial variability in otolith chemistry at a hierarchy of spatial scales (different fish, from different sites, at different locations on the Apulian Adriatic coast). We find that multiple ablations along the same daily rings do not necessarily exhibit spatial dependency within the otolith and can be used to estimate residual variability in a hierarchical sampling design. Inclusion of within-otolith measurements reveals that individuals at the same site can show significant variability in elemental uptake. Within-otolith variability examined across the spatial hierarchy identifies differences between the two fish species investigated, and this finding leads to discussion of the potential for within-otolith variability to be used as a marker for fish exposure to stressful conditions. We also demonstrate that a 'cost'-optimal allocation of sampling effort should typically include some level of within-otolith replication in the

  13. Nuclear, biological, and chemical terrorism: understanding the threat and designing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J D

    1999-01-01

    Today nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) terrorism is a serious issue. The threat of terrorist or rogue states acquiring and using NBC weapons has ushered in a new age of terrorism; an age that is far more dangerous than any previous period. It is an age of terrorism with which no one yet knows how to deal. This article reviews recent trends in terrorism, and identifies groups that have both the potential and the motive to use weapons of mass destruction. In addition, it discusses the design and implemention of effective measures to meet this threat, as well as the role of CISM teams in preparation for, and in the aftermath of, an incident involving NBC weapons.

  14. Using Genome Sequence to Enable the Design of Medicines and Chemical Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelbello, Alicia J; Chen, Jonathan L; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Zhang, Peiyuan; Wang, Zi-Fu; Disney, Matthew D

    2018-02-28

    Rapid progress in genome sequencing technology has put us firmly into a postgenomic era. A key challenge in biomedical research is harnessing genome sequence to fulfill the promise of personalized medicine. This Review describes how genome sequencing has enabled the identification of disease-causing biomolecules and how these data have been converted into chemical probes of function, preclinical lead modalities, and ultimately U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. In particular, we focus on the use of oligonucleotide-based modalities to target disease-causing RNAs; small molecules that target DNA, RNA, or protein; the rational repurposing of known therapeutic modalities; and the advantages of pharmacogenetics. Lastly, we discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in the direct utilization of genome sequence to enable design of medicines.

  15. Use of QR and EAN-13 codes by older patients taking multiple medications for a safer use of medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Guilabert, Mercedes; Carrillo, Irene; Fernández, César; Vicente, Ma Asunción; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Gil-Guillen, Vicente F

    2015-06-01

    Older persons following a prolonged complex drug regimen often make mistakes when taking their medication. Currently, the widespread use of tablets and smartphones has encouraged the development of applications to support self-management of medication. The aim of this study was to design, develop and assess an app that transforms medication-associated ean-13 (barcodes) and Quick Response codes (QR) into verbal instructions, to enable safer use of medication by the elderly patients taking multiple medications. Meetings were held in which participated a total of 61 patients. The results showed that patients appreciated the application and found it useful for safer use of medicines. The study results support the use of such technology to increase patient safety taking multiple medications safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Designing Focused Chemical Libraries Enriched in Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors using Machine-Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynès, Christelle; Host, Hélène; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Laconde, Guillaume; Leroux, Florence; Mazars, Anne; Deprez, Benoit; Fahraeus, Robin; Villoutreix, Bruno O.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) may represent one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets. So far, only a minute fraction of the estimated 650,000 PPIs that comprise the human interactome are known with a tiny number of complexes being drugged. Such intricate biological systems cannot be cost-efficiently tackled using conventional high-throughput screening methods. Rather, time has come for designing new strategies that will maximize the chance for hit identification through a rationalization of the PPI inhibitor chemical space and the design of PPI-focused compound libraries (global or target-specific). Here, we train machine-learning-based models, mainly decision trees, using a dataset of known PPI inhibitors and of regular drugs in order to determine a global physico-chemical profile for putative PPI inhibitors. This statistical analysis unravels two important molecular descriptors for PPI inhibitors characterizing specific molecular shapes and the presence of a privileged number of aromatic bonds. The best model has been transposed into a computer program, PPI-HitProfiler, that can output from any drug-like compound collection a focused chemical library enriched in putative PPI inhibitors. Our PPI inhibitor profiler is challenged on the experimental screening results of 11 different PPIs among which the p53/MDM2 interaction screened within our own CDithem platform, that in addition to the validation of our concept led to the identification of 4 novel p53/MDM2 inhibitors. Collectively, our tool shows a robust behavior on the 11 experimental datasets by correctly profiling 70% of the experimentally identified hits while removing 52% of the inactive compounds from the initial compound collections. We strongly believe that this new tool can be used as a global PPI inhibitor profiler prior to screening assays to reduce the size of the compound collections to be experimentally screened while keeping most of the true PPI inhibitors. PPI-HitProfiler is

  17. SAFER CVIEW interface re-certification : description of re-certification process for CVISN stakeholders : version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-23

    In order to improve data quality in the SAFER system, two major software changes have been made in the recent SAFER releases. SAFER version 4.9, released in October 2005, has implemented data rules (SAFER CR 131) to support the requirements for manda...

  18. Electronic cigarettes: a safer alternative or potential poison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Janet E

    2014-10-01

    Electronic cigarettes have been marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes, and their use is expanding exponentially. However, there is a severe lack of scientific data about the ingredients in the liquid used in the device and the health consequences of using electronic cigarettes. As technology has outpaced regulations, the production and sale of electronic cigarettes are, as yet, unregulated and do not fall under the purview of the Food and Drug Administration. This article will review the mechanism of action and what is currently known about the safety of electronic cigarettes. The risk of poisoning for children will also be identified, as well as the implications for home healthcare clinicians.

  19. Design of an ultraprecision computerized numerical control chemical mechanical polishing machine and its implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chupeng; Zhao, Huiying; Zhu, Xueliang; Zhao, Shijie; Jiang, Chunye

    2018-01-01

    The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a key process during the machining route of plane optics. To improve the polishing efficiency and accuracy, a CMP model and machine tool were developed. Based on the Preston equation and the axial run-out error measurement results of the m circles on the tin plate, a CMP model that could simulate the material removal at any point on the workpiece was presented. An analysis of the model indicated that lower axial run-out error led to lower material removal but better polishing efficiency and accuracy. Based on this conclusion, the CMP machine was designed, and the ultraprecision gas hydrostatic guideway and rotary table as well as the Siemens 840Dsl numerical control system were incorporated in the CMP machine. To verify the design principles of machine, a series of detection and machining experiments were conducted. The LK-G5000 laser sensor was employed for detecting the straightness error of the gas hydrostatic guideway and the axial run-out error of the gas hydrostatic rotary table. A 300-mm-diameter optic was chosen for the surface profile machining experiments performed to determine the CMP efficiency and accuracy.

  20. Mechanistic Design of Chemically Diverse Polymers with Applications in Oral Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera-Giraldo, Laura I; Borca, Carlos H; Meng, Xiangtao; Edgar, Kevin J; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-11-14

    Polymers play a key role in stabilizing amorphous drug formulations, a recent strategy employed to improve solubility and bioavailability of drugs delivered orally. However, the molecular mechanism of stabilization is unclear, therefore, the rational design of new crystallization-inhibiting excipients remains a substantial challenge. This article presents a combined experimental and computational approach to elucidate the molecular features that improve the effectiveness of cellulose polymers as solution crystallization inhibitors, a crucial first step toward their rational design. Polymers with chemically diverse substituents including carboxylic acids, esters, ethers, alcohols, amides, amines, and sulfides were synthesized. Measurements of nucleation induction times of the model drug, telaprevir, show that the only effective polymers contained carboxylate groups in combination with an optimal hydrocarbon chain length. Computational results indicate that polymer conformation as well as solvation free energy are important determinants of effectiveness at inhibiting crystallization and show that simulations are a promising predictive tool in the screening of polymers. This study suggests that polymers need to have an adequate hydrophilicity to promote solvation in an aqueous environment, and sufficient hydrophobic regions to drive interactions with the drug. Particularly, the right balance between key substituent groups and lengths of hydrocarbon side chains is needed to create effective materials.

  1. Design of an ultra-precision CNC chemical mechanical polishing machine and its implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chupeng; Zhao, Huiying; Gu, Yawen; Ban, Xinxing; Jiang, Chunye

    2017-10-01

    The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a key process during the machining route of plane optics. To improve the polishing efficiency and accuracy, a new CMP model and machine tool were developed. Based on the Preston equation and the axial run-out error measurement results of the m circles on the tin plate, a CMP model that could simulate the material removal at any point on the workpiece was presented. An analysis of the model indicated that lower axial run-out error led lower material removal but better polishing efficiency and accuracy. Based on this conlusion, the new CMP machine was designed, and the ultra-precision gas hydrostatic guideway and rotary table as well as the Siemens 840Dsl numerical control system were incorporated in the new CMP machine. To verify the design principles of new machine, a series of detection and machining experiments were conducted. The LK-G5000 laser sensor was employed for detecting the straightness error of the gas hydrostatic guideway and the axial run-out error of the gas hydrostatic rotary table. A 300-mm-diameter optic was chosen for the surface profile machining experiments performed to determine the CMP efficiency and accuracy.

  2. Chemical looping reactor system design double loop circulating fluidized bed (DLCFB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischi, Aldo

    2012-05-15

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is continuously gaining more importance among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. It is an unmixed combustion process which takes place in two steps. An effective way to realize CLC is to use two interconnected fluidized beds and a metallic powder circulating among them, acting as oxygen carrier. The metallic powder oxidizes at high temperature in one of the two reactors, the air reactor (AR). It reacts in a highly exothermic reaction with the oxygen of the injected fluidising air. Afterwards the particles are sent to the other reactor where the fuel is injected, the fuel reactor (FR). There, they transport heat and oxygen necessary for the reaction with the injected fuel to take place. At high temperatures, the particle's oxygen reacts with the fuel producing Co2 and steam, and the particles are ready to start the loop again. The overall reaction, the sum of the enthalpy changes of the oxygen carrier oxidation and reduction reactions, is the same as for the conventional combustion. Two are the key features, which make CLC promising both for costs and capture efficiency. First, the high inherent irreversibility of the conventional combustion is avoided because the energy is utilized stepwise. Second, the Co2 is intrinsically separated within the process; so there is in principle no need either of extra carbon capture devices or of expensive air separation units to produce oxygen for oxy-combustion. A lot of effort is taking place worldwide on the development of new chemical looping oxygen carrier particles, reactor systems and processes. The current work is focused on the reactor system: a new design is presented, for the construction of an atmospheric 150kWth prototype working with gaseous fuel and possibly with inexpensive oxygen carriers derived from industrial by-products or natural minerals. It consists of two circulating fluidized beds capable to operate in fast fluidization regime; this will increase the

  3. Association between 'safer sex fatigue' and rectal gonorrhea is mediated by unsafe sex with casual partners among HIV-positive homosexual men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, Ineke G; Wit, John B F de; Kolader, Marion-Eliëtte; Fennema, Johan S A; Coutinho, Roel A; Dukers, Nicole H T M

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate whether and what sexual risk behavior is a mediator of associations between rectal gonorrhea (RG) and highly active antiretroviral therapy-related beliefs, safer sex fatigue, or sexual sensation-seeking among homosexual men. STUDY DESIGN:

  4. Association between 'safer sex fatigue' and rectal gonorrhea is mediated by unsafe sex with casual partners among HIV-positive homosexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, Ineke G.; de Wit, John B. F.; Kolader, Marion; Fennema, Han; Coutinho, Roel A.; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate whether and what sexual risk behavior is a mediator of associations between rectal gonorrhea (RG) and highly active antiretroviral therapy-related beliefs, safer sex fatigue, or sexual sensation-seeking among homosexual men. STUDY DESIGN:

  5. Design of electrolyzer for carbon dioxide conversion to fuels and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jonathan S.

    The stabilization of global atmospheric CO2 levels requires a transition towards a renewable energy based economy as well as methods for handling current CO2 output from fossil fuels. Challenges with renewable energy intermittency have thus far limited the use of these alternative energy sources to only a fraction of the current energy portfolio. To enable more widespread use of renewable energy systems, methods of large scale energy storage must be developed to store excess renewable energy when demand is low and allow for combined use of energy storage and renewable systems when demand is high. To date, no one technique has demonstrated energy storage methods on the gigawatt scale needed for integration with renewable sources; therefore the development of suitable energy storage technologies, such as CO2 electrolysis to fuels is needed. In this work, research efforts have focused on two major thrusts related to electrochemical methods of CO 2 conversion to fuels. The first thrust focuses on the synthesis and design of highly efficient anode and cathode catalysts with emphasis on understanding structure-property relationships. A second thrust focuses on the design of novel electrochemical devices for CO2 conversion and integration of synthesized materials into flow cell systems. On the anode side, the synthesis of highly active catalysts using abundant transition metals is crucial to reducing capital costs and enabling widespread use of electrochemical CO2 conversion devices. Highly active mesoporous Co3O4 and metal-substituted Co3O4 water oxidation catalysts were designed to investigate the role of the spinel structure on water oxidation activity. Further analysis of metal substituted samples reveal the importance of the octahedral sites in the spinel structure, which was later used to design an Mg-Co3O4 sample with improved water oxidation activity. The design of efficient cathode materials which can selectivity reduce CO2 to fuels and chemicals is critical to

  6. Surrogate models and optimal design of experiments for chemical kinetics applications

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-07

    Kinetic models for reactive flow applications comprise hundreds of reactions describing the complex interaction among many chemical species. The detailed knowledge of the reaction parameters is a key component of the design cycle of next-generation combustion devices, which aim at improving conversion efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. Shock tubes are a laboratory scale experimental configuration, which is widely used for the study of reaction rate parameters. Important uncertainties exist in the values of the thousands of parameters included in the most advanced kinetic models. This talk discusses the application of uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to the analysis of shock tube data as well as the design of shock tube experiments. Attention is focused on a spectral framework in which uncertain inputs are parameterized in terms of canonical random variables, and quantities of interest (QoIs) are expressed in terms of a mean-square convergent series of orthogonal polynomials acting on these variables. We outline the implementation of a recent spectral collocation approach for determining the unknown coefficients of the expansion, namely using a sparse, adaptive pseudo-spectral construction that enables us to obtain surrogates for the QoIs accurately and efficiently. We first discuss the utility of the resulting expressions in quantifying the sensitivity of QoIs to uncertain inputs, and in the Bayesian inference key physical parameters from experimental measurements. We then discuss the application of these techniques to the analysis of shock-tube data and the optimal design of shock-tube experiments for two key reactions in combustion kinetics: the chain-brancing reaction H + O2 ←→ OH + O and the reaction of Furans with the hydroxyl radical OH.

  7. Design Evolution and Verification of the A-3 Chemical Steam Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Casey K.

    2009-01-01

    Following is an overview of the Chemical Steam Generator system selected to provide vacuum conditions for a new altitude test facility, the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center (SSC) in Bay St. Louis, MS. A-3 will serve as NASA s primary facility for altitude testing of the J-2X rocket engine, to be used as the primary propulsion device for the upper stages of the Ares launch vehicles. The Chemical Steam Generators (CSGs) will produce vacuum conditions in the test cell through the production and subsequent supersonic ejection of steam into a diffuser downstream of the J-2X engine nozzle exit. The Chemical Steam Generators chosen have a rich heritage of operation at rocket engine altitude test facilities since the days of the Apollo program and are still in use at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in New Mexico. The generators at WSTF have been modified to a degree, but are still very close to the heritage design. The intent for the A-3 implementation is to maintain this heritage design as much as possible, making minimal updates only where necessary to substitute for obsolete parts and to increase reliability. Reliability improvements are especially desired because the proposed system will require 27 generators, which is nine times the largest system installed in the 1960s. Improvements were suggested by the original design firm, Reaction Motors, by NASA SSC and NASA WSTF engineers, and by the A-3 test stand design contractor, Jacobs Technology, Inc. (JTI). This paper describes the range of improvements made to the design to date, starting with the heritage generator and the minor modifications made over time at WSTF, to the modernized configuration which will be used at A-3. The paper will discuss NASA s investment in modifications to SSC s E-2 test facility fire a full-scale Chemical Steam Generator in advance of the larger steam system installation at A-3. Risk mitigation testing will be performed in early 2009 at this test facility to verify that the CSGs

  8. Within-otolith variability in chemical fingerprints: implications for sampling designs and possible environmental interpretation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Franco

    Full Text Available Largely used as a natural biological tag in studies of dispersal/connectivity of fish, otolith elemental fingerprinting is usually analyzed by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. LA-ICP-MS produces an elemental fingerprint at a discrete time-point in the life of a fish and can generate data on within-otolith variability of that fingerprint. The presence of within-otolith variability has been previously acknowledged but not incorporated into experimental designs on the presumed, but untested, grounds of both its negligibility compared to among-otolith variability and of spatial autocorrelation among multiple ablations within an otolith. Here, using a hierarchical sampling design of spatial variation at multiple scales in otolith chemical fingerprints for two Mediterranean coastal fishes, we explore: 1 whether multiple ablations within an otolith can be used as independent replicates for significance tests among otoliths, and 2 the implications of incorporating within-otolith variability when assessing spatial variability in otolith chemistry at a hierarchy of spatial scales (different fish, from different sites, at different locations on the Apulian Adriatic coast. We find that multiple ablations along the same daily rings do not necessarily exhibit spatial dependency within the otolith and can be used to estimate residual variability in a hierarchical sampling design. Inclusion of within-otolith measurements reveals that individuals at the same site can show significant variability in elemental uptake. Within-otolith variability examined across the spatial hierarchy identifies differences between the two fish species investigated, and this finding leads to discussion of the potential for within-otolith variability to be used as a marker for fish exposure to stressful conditions. We also demonstrate that a 'cost'-optimal allocation of sampling effort should typically include some level of within

  9. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration (SAFER): Development, implementation, and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, J.D. [CH2M Hill Richland, WA (United States); Amaya, J.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This report reviews the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) effort during FY 1992, FY 1993, and the first quarter of FY 1994. The report comprises three sections: Introduction, Activities Summary, and Lessons Learned and Related Activities. This section provides context for the report by briefly reviewing the development of SAFER and its operational assumptions. Section 2 describes SAFER workshops and site-specific SAFER implementation support. Additionally, Section 2 provides an update on the status of sites that initially received support from either Observational Approach or SAFER teams and subsequently implemented either of these two related approaches to site restoration streamlining. Section 3 describes lessons learned and upcoming SAFER activities.

  10. Responsible men, blameworthy women: Black heterosexual men's discursive constructions of safer sex and masculinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowleg, Lisa; Heckert, Andrea L; Brown, Tia L; Massie, Jenné S

    2015-04-01

    Although Black heterosexual men (BHM) in the United States rank among those most affected by HIV, research about how safer sex messages shape their safer sex behaviors is rare, highlighting the need for innovative qualitative methodologies such as critical discursive psychology (CDP). This CDP study examined how: (a) BHM construct safer sex and masculinity; (b) BHM positioned themselves in relation to conventional masculinity; and (c) discursive context (individual interview vs. focus group) shaped talk about safer sex and masculinity. Data included individual interviews (n = 30) and 4 focus groups (n = 26) conducted with 56 self-identified Black/African American heterosexual men, ages 18 to 44. Analyses highlighted 5 main constructions: (a) condoms as signifiers of "safe" women; (b) blaming women for STI/responsibility for safer sex; (c) relationship/trust/knowledge; (d) condom mandates; and (e) public health safer sex. Discourses positioned BHM in terms of conventional masculinity when talk denied men's agency for safer sex and/or contraception, or positioned women as deceitful, or apathetic about sexual risk and/or pregnancy. Notably, discourses also spotlighted alternative masculinities relevant to taking responsibility for safer sex or sexual exclusivity. Discursive context, namely the homosocial nature of focus group discussions, shaped how participants conversed about safer sex, and masculinity but not the content of that talk. In denying BHM's responsibility for safer sex, BHM's discourses about safer sex and masculinity often mirror public health messages, underscoring a critical need to sync these discourses to reduce sexual risk, and develop gender-transformative safer sex interventions for BHM. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. A Probablistic Diagram to Guide Chemical Design with Reduced Potency to Incur Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity is a concern with many chemicals currently in commerce, and with new chemicals that are introduced each year. The standard approach to testing chemicals is to run studies in laboratory animals (e.g. rats, mice, dogs), but because of the expense of these studies and conce...

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Nanostructured Materials for Energy Storage Devices and Flexible Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ning

    Nanomaterials have shown increasing applications in the design and fabrication of functional devices such as energy storage devices and sensor devices. A key challenge is the ability to harness the nanostructures in terms of size, shape, composition and structure so that the unique nanoscale functional properties can be exploited. This dissertation describes our findings in design, synthesis, and characterization of nanoparticles towards applications in two important fronts. The first involves the investigation of nanoalloy catalysts and functional nanoparticles for energy storage devices, including Li-air and Li-ion batteries, aiming at increasing the capacity and cycle performance. Part of this effort focuses on design of bifunctional nanocatalysts through alloying noble metal with non-noble transition metal to improve the ORR and OER activity of Li-air batteries. By manipulating the composition and alloying structure of the catalysts, synergetic effect has been demonstrated, which is substantiated by both experimental results and theoretical calculation for the charge/discharge process. The other part of the effort focuses on modification of Si nanoparticles towards high-capacity anode materials. The modification involved dopant elements, carbon coating, and graphene composite formation to manipulate the ability of the nanoparticles in accommodating the volume expansion. The second part focuses on the design, preparation and characterization of metal nanoparticles and nanocomposite materials for the application in flexible sensing devices. The investigation focuses on fabrication of a novel class of nanoparticle-nanofibrous membranes consisting of gold nanoparticles embedded in a multi-layered fibrous membrane as a tunable interfacial scaffold for flexible sweat sensors. Sensing responses to different ionic species in aqueous solutions and relative humidity changes in the environment were demonstrated, showing promising potential as flexible sensing devices for

  13. Recent developments in chimeric NSAIDs as safer anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Sharad Kumar; Sharma, Manu

    2015-03-01

    NSAIDs are among the most widely prescribed medications across the world, but the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity still remains the biggest problem and the challenge for current NSAIDs-based therapeutics. The development of selective COX-2 inhibitors was driven by the assumption that selective inhibition of COX-2 would reduce the GI side effects. However, the initial enthusiasm for selective COX-2 inhibitors has faded away due to the emergence of serious side effects associated with the long-term use of these NSAIDs. In the recent years, a number of novel approaches to develop gastrosparing NSAIDs have been explored with the promising results. This review deals with such approaches and strategies that have been employed in the last two decades and are being used currently in the design and development of safer NSAIDs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The Role of Diet in Shaping the Chemical Signal Design of Lacertid Lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeckens, Simon; García-Roa, Roberto; Martín, José; Van Damme, Raoul

    2017-09-01

    Lizards communicate with others via chemical signals, the composition of which may vary among species. Although the selective pressures and constraints affecting chemical signal diversity at the species level remain poorly understood, the possible role of diet has been largely neglected. The chemical signals of many lizards originate from the femoral glands that exude a mixture of semiochemicals, and may be used in a variety of contexts. We analyzed the lipophilic fraction of the glandular secretions of 45 species of lacertid lizard species by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The proportions of nine major chemical classes (alcohols, aldehydes, fatty acids, furanones, ketones, steroids, terpenoids, tocopherols and waxy esters), the relative contributions of these different classes ('chemical diversity'), and the total number of different lipophilic compounds ('chemical richness') varied greatly among species. We examined whether interspecific differences in these chemical variables could be coupled to interspecific variation in diet using data from the literature. In addition, we compared chemical signal composition among species that almost never, occasionally, or often eat plant material. We found little support for the hypothesis that the chemical profile of a given species' secretion depends on the type of food consumed. Diet breadth did not correlate with chemical diversity or richness. The amount of plants or ants consumed did not affect the relative contribution of any of the nine major chemical classes to the secretion. Chemical diversity did not differ among lizards with different levels of plant consumption; however, chemical richness was low in species with an exclusive arthropod diet, suggesting that incorporating plants in the diet enables lizards to increase the number of compounds allocated to secretions, likely because a (partly) herbivorous diet allows them to include compounds of plant origin that are unavailable in animal prey. Still, overall

  15. Utilizing Iron's Attractive Chemical and Magnetic Properties in Microrocket Design, Extended Motion, and Unique Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshalev, Emil; Chen, Chuanrui; Marolt, Gregor; Martín, Aída; Campos, Isaac; Castillo, Roxanne; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    All-in-one material for microrocket propulsion featuring acid-based bubble generation and magnetic guidance is presented. Electrochemically deposited iron serves as both a propellant, toward highly efficient self-propulsion in acidic environments, and as a magnetic component enabling complete motion control. The new microrockets display longer lifetime and higher propulsion efficiency compared to previously reported active metal zinc-based microrockets due to the chemical properties of iron and the unique structure of the microrockets. These iron-based microrockets also demonstrate unique and attractive cargo towing and autonomous release capabilities. The latter is realized upon loss of the magnetic properties due to acid-driven iron dissolution. More interestingly, these bubble-propelled microrockets assemble via magnetic interactions into a variety of complex configurations and train structures, which enrich the behavior of micromachines. Modeling of the magnetic forces during the microrocket assembly and cargo capture confirms these unique experimentally observed assembly and cargo-towing behaviors. These findings provide a new concept of blending propellant and magnetic components into one, toward simplifying the design and fabrication of artificial micro/nanomachines, realizing new functions and capabilities for a variety of future applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of renin inhibitors guided by simulated annealing of chemical potential simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloudsdale, Ian S; Dickson, John K; Barta, Thomas E; Grella, Brian S; Smith, Emilie D; Kulp, John L; Guarnieri, Frank; Kulp, John L

    2017-08-01

    We have applied simulated annealing of chemical potential (SACP) to a diverse set of ∼150 very small molecules to provide insights into new interactions in the binding pocket of human renin, a historically difficult target for which to find low molecular weight (MW) inhibitors with good bioavailability. In one of its many uses in drug discovery, SACP provides an efficient, thermodynamically principled method of ranking chemotype replacements for scaffold hopping and manipulating physicochemical characteristics for drug development. We introduce the use of Constrained Fragment Analysis (CFA) to construct and analyze ligands composed of linking those fragments with predicted high affinity. This technique addresses the issue of effectively linking fragments together and provides a predictive mechanism to rank order prospective inhibitors for synthesis. The application of these techniques to the identification of novel inhibitors of human renin is described. Synthesis of a limited set of designed compounds provided potent, low MW analogs (IC 50 s20-58%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical and Colloidal Stability of Carboxylated Core-Shell Magnetite Nanoparticles Designed for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Tiszlavicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large efforts to prepare super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs for biomedical applications, the number of FDA or EMA approved formulations is few. It is not known commonly that the approved formulations in many instances have already been withdrawn or discontinued by the producers; at present, hardly any approved formulations are produced and marketed. Literature survey reveals that there is a lack for a commonly accepted physicochemical practice in designing and qualifying formulations before they enter in vitro and in vivo biological testing. Such a standard procedure would exclude inadequate formulations from clinical trials thus improving their outcome. Here we present a straightforward route to assess eligibility of carboxylated MNPs for biomedical tests applied for a series of our core-shell products, i.e., citric acid, gallic acid, poly(acrylic acid and poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid coated MNPs. The discussion is based on physicochemical studies (carboxylate adsorption/desorption, FTIR-ATR, iron dissolution, zeta potential, particle size, coagulation kinetics and magnetization measurements and involves in vitro and in vivo tests. Our procedure can serve as an example to construct adequate physico-chemical selection strategies for preparation of other types of core-shell nanoparticles as well.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chemically designed (Globo)3–DTPA–KLH antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajmohammadi, Mehdi; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Ghorbani, Masoud; Shafiee Ardestani, Mehdi; Teimourian, Shahram; Asgari, Vahid; Ahangari Cohan, Reza; Hajmohammadi, Mostafa; Hajmohammadi, Akram; Behzadi, Ramezan; Rajab Nezhad, Saied; Namvar Asl, Nabiollah

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many experiments have been conducted for the production and evaluation of anticancer glycoconjugated vaccines in developed countries and many achievements have been accomplished with Globo H derivatives. In the current experiment, a new chemically designed triplicate version of (Globo H)3–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)–KLH antigen was synthesized and characterized. Immunization with (Globo H)3-DTPA-KLH, a hexasaccharide that is a member of a family of antigenic carbohydrates that are highly expressed in various types of cancers conjugated with DTPA and KLH protein, induced a high level of antibody titer along with an elevated level of IL-4 in mice. Treatment of tumors with the collected sera from immunized mice decreased the tumor size in nude mice as well. None of the immunized mice illustrated any sign of tumor growth after injection of MCF-7 cells compared to the control animals. These findings, based on the newly presented structure of the Globo H antigen, lend exciting and promising evidence for clinical advancement in the development of a therapeutic vaccine in the future. PMID:25565775

  19. Safer cycling in the urban road environment: study approach and protocols guiding an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Mark; Johnson, Marilyn; Oxley, Jennie; Meuleners, Lynn; Gabbe, Belinda; Rose, Geoffrey

    2015-02-01

    Much of the research into cyclist safety in Australia has focused on behaviour with less focus on the impact of the urban transport environment on cyclist safety. A greater understanding of the urban transport system and the improvements needed to create a safer cycling environment are essential if cyclists are to be safe and increased cycling participation targets are to be achieved. The proposed study will use existing cyclist crash data along with unique cyclist exposure data to develop road infrastructure prototypes that improve cyclists' safety and evaluate the effectiveness of these prototypes in a cycling simulator. This study will be conducted in two Australian cities namely Perth and Melbourne as both cities have policies that strongly advocate cycling. Two methods of data collection will be employed: (1) in-depth crash investigations of injured cyclists; and (2) video footage of cyclist exposure through a naturalistic cycling study of non-injured cyclists. The findings from these two methods will be used to develop new urban road design prototypes which will be tested with a sample of cyclists and motorists in safe environment namely, a cycling simulator and a driving simulator. By designing and evaluating safer environments for cyclists, this study will identify solutions that reduce the risk of road trauma and importantly, support this alternative mode of transport and thereby contribute to a reduction in traffic-related emissions and pollution and enhance sustainable economic and social connectivity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. State‐of‐the‐art and progress in the optimization‐based simultaneous design and control for chemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Chen, Bingzhen; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress in the area of simultaneous design and control for chemical processes has been achieved and various methodologies have been put forward to address this issue over the last several decades. These methods can be classified in two categories (1) controllability indicator......‐based frameworks that are capable of screening alternative designs, and (2) optimization‐based frameworks that integrate the process design and control system design. The major objective is to give an up‐to‐date review of the state‐of‐the‐art and progress in the challenging area of optimization‐based simultaneous...... design and control. First, motivations and significances of simultaneous design and control are illustrated. Second, a general classification of existing methodologies of optimization‐based simultaneous design and control is outlined. Subsequently, the mathematical formulations and relevant theoretical...

  1. Safer lithium ion batteries based on nonflammable electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ziqi; Wu, Bingbin; Xiao, Lifen; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yao; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi; Cao, Yuliang

    2015-04-01

    The safety of lithium ion batteries has long been a critical obstacle for their high-power and large-scale applications because of the flammable nature of their carbon anode and organic carbonate electrolytes. To eliminate the potential safety hazards, lithium ion batteries should be built up with thermal-stable electrodes and nonflammable electrolytes. Here we report safer lithium ion batteries using nonflammable phosphonate electrolyte, thermal-stable LiFePO4 cathode and alloy anodes. Benefiting from the electrochemical compatibility and strong fire-retardancy of the phosphonate electrolyte, the cathode and anode materials in the nonflammable phosphonate electrolyte demonstrate similar charge-discharge performances with those in the conventional carbonate electrolyte, showing a great prospect for large-scale applications in electric vehicles and grid-scale electric energy storage.

  2. Are nuclear ships environmentally safer than conventionally powered ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, C.A.; Molgaard, C.A.; Helmkamp, J.C.; Golbeck, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    An epidemiologic analysis was conducted to determine if risk of hospitalization varied by age, ship type, or occupation between nuclear and conventional powered ship crews in the U.S. Navy. Study cohorts consisted of all male enlisted personnel who served exclusively aboard conventional or nuclear powered aircraft carriers and cruisers during the years 1975-1979; cases were those men hospitalized during this period (N = 48,242). Conventional ship personnel showed significantly elevated rates of injury and disease when compared to nuclear ship personnel. The largest relative risks by age occurred for conventional ship crewmen less than 30 years old. Seaman, logistics (supply), and healthcare personnel serving aboard conventional ships comprised the occupational groups exhibiting the highest hospitalization rate differentials. The results strongly suggest that nuclear ships provide a healthier, safer working and living environment than conventional ships

  3. Towards safer surgery in patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.

    2007-01-01

    Surgery in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has been associated with high morbidity and mortality. In recent years, a marked improvement in the safety of surgery and anesthesia in this high-risk group of patients has been witnessed; owing to the improvements in surgical and anesthetic care, greater awareness of pathophysiology of disease, proper perioperative preparation and attention to factors predisposing to vasoocclusive crises. However, this is not paralleled by similar improvement in countries where the disease is not prevalent. Greater population mobility in recent years makes recognition of surgical manifestations of the disease and awareness of perioperative management of sickle cell patients undergoing surgical interventions of paramount importance. This article aims to summarize steps towards safer surgery in patients with SCD. (author)

  4. K-targeted metabolomic analysis extends chemical subtraction to DESIGNER extracts: selective depletion of extracts of hops (Humulus lupulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Alvarenga, René F; Friesen, J Brent; Nikolić, Dejan; Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G; van Breemen, Richard; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-12-26

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid-liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical subtraction enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the subtracted targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted subtraction of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. Multiple countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by (1)H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting.

  5. Recommendations for safer radiotherapy: what’s the message?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunscombe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy, with close to a million courses delivered per year in North America, is a very safe and effective intervention for a devastating disease. However, although rare, several deeply regrettable incidents have occurred in radiotherapy and have rightly been the subject of considerable public interest. Partly in response to reports of these incidents a variety of authoritative organizations across the globe has harnessed the expertise amongst their members in attempts to identify the measures that will make radiotherapy safer. While the intentions of all these organizations are clearly good it is challenging for the health care providers in the clinic to know where to start with so much advice coming from so many directions. Through a mapping exercise we have identified commonalities between recommendations made in seven authoritative documents and identified those issues most frequently cited. The documents reviewed contain a total of 117 recommendations. Using the 37 recommendations in “Towards Safer Radiotherapy” as the initial base layer, recommendations in the other documents were mapped, adding to the base layer to accommodate all the recommendations from the additional six documents as necessary. This mapping exercise resulted in the distillation of the original 117 recommendations down to 61 unique recommendations. Twelve topics were identified in three or more of the documents as being pertinent to the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy. They are, in order of most to least cited: training, staffing, documentation, incident learning, communication, check lists, quality control and preventive maintenance, dosimetric audit, accreditation, minimizing interruptions, prospective risk assessment, and safety culture. This analysis provides guidance for the selection of those activities most likely to enhance safety and quality in radiotherapy based on the frequency of citation in selected recent authoritative literature.

  6. Recommendations for safer radiotherapy: what’s the message?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eDunscombe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy, with close to a million courses delivered per year in North America, is a very safe and effective intervention for a devastating disease. However, although rare, several deeply regrettable incidents have occurred in radiotherapy and have rightly been the subject of considerable public interest. Partly in response to reports of these incidents a variety of authoritative organizations across the globe has harnessed the expertise amongst their members in attempts to identify the measures that will make radiotherapy safer. While the intentions of all these organizations are clearly good it is challenging for the health care providers in the clinic to know where to start with so much advice coming from so many directions. Through a mapping exercise we have identified commonalities between recommendations made in seven authoritative documents and identified those issues most frequently cited. The documents reviewed contain a total of 117 recommendations. Using the 37 recommendations in Towards Safer Radiotherapy as the initial base layer, recommendations in the other documents were mapped, adding to the base layer to accommodate all the recommendations from the additional six documents as necessary. This mapping exercise resulted in the distillation of the original 117 recommendations down to 61 unique recommendations. Twelve topics were identified in three or more of the documents as being pertinent to the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy. They are, in order of most to least cited: training, staffing, documentation, incident learning, communication, check lists, quality control and preventive maintenance, dosimetric audit, accreditation, minimizing interruptions, prospective risk assessment and safety culture. This analysis provides guidance for the selection of those activities most likely to enhance safety and quality in radiotherapy based on the frequency of citation in selected recent authoritative literature.

  7. Investigations on the optimum design of chemical addition system for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Byong Hoon [Junior College of Inchon, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang Kyu; Choi, Han Rim; Kim, Eun Kee; Ro, Tae Sun [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc. Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Mixing characteristics of the chemical additives in the chemical injection tank of the chemical and volume control system(CVCS) were investigated for the Yonggwang Nuclear units 5 and 6. Numerical calculations were performed with a low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Studies were also conducted for the injection tank with a disk located at 1/4H, 2/4H, and 3/4H from the inlet in order to see the effect in the enhancement of chemical mixing. Results show that the optimum arrangement is to locate a disk close to the inlet. 10 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  8. Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and its application in the design of a new generation of environmentally safe dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, Boris D; Rumyantseva, Svetlana V; Moryganov, Andrey P; Berezin, Mikhail B

    2004-01-01

    Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and physicochemical properties of its derivatives are considered. These compounds can be used in the design of a new generation of chlorophyll- and porphyrin-based dyes environmentally more safe than currently used arene dyes and possessing renewable sources of raw materials. The first results on the use of chlorophyll derivatives for dyeing wool, acetate fibres and cotton are reported.

  9. Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and its application in the design of a new generation of environmentally safe dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, Boris D; Rumyantseva, Svetlana V; Moryganov, Andrey P; Berezin, Mikhail B [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2004-02-28

    Chemical transformations of chlorophyll and physicochemical properties of its derivatives are considered. These compounds can be used in the design of a new generation of chlorophyll- and porphyrin-based dyes environmentally more safe than currently used arene dyes and possessing renewable sources of raw materials. The first results on the use of chlorophyll derivatives for dyeing wool, acetate fibres and cotton are reported.

  10. A novel three-jet microreactor for localized metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of gallium arsenide : Design and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel three-jet microreactor design for localized deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) by low-pressure Metal-Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) for semiconductor devices, microelectronics and solar cells. Our approach is advantageous compared to the standard lithography and

  11. Safer Conception for Couples Affected by HIV: Structural and Cultural Considerations in the Delivery of Safer Conception Care in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindry, Deborah; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Beyeza-Kashesya, Jolly; Woldetsadik, Mahlet A; Finocchario-Kessler, Sarah; Goggin, Kathy; Wagner, Glenn

    2017-08-01

    In countries with high HIV prevalence and high fertility desires, the rights of HIV-affected couples to have children are a pressing issue. Conception among people living with HIV carries risks for both horizontal and vertical HIV transmission. In Uganda ~100,000 HIV-infected women become pregnant annually. Providers face a number of challenges to preventing HIV transmission, reducing unplanned pregnancies, and ensuring safer conception. We report findings from interviews with 27 HIV-affected couples (54 individuals) in Uganda. We explored key cultural and structural factors shaping couples' childbearing decisions. Our data reveal a complex intersection of gender norms, familial expectations, relationship dynamics, and HIV stigma influencing their decisions. Participants provided insights regarding provider bias, stigma, and the gendering of reproductive healthcare. To reduce horizontal transmission HIV and family planning clinics must address men's and women's concerns regarding childbearing with specific attention to cultural and structural challenges.

  12. Access management in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  13. Route management in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  14. The SAFER Latinos Project: Addressing a Community Ecology Underlying Latino Youth Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D.; Collins, Elizabeth; Klevens, Joanne; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Ivonne; del Cid, Alex Taylor; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the intervention model, early implementation experience, and challenges for the "Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos" (SAFER) Latinos project. The SAFER Latinos project is an attempt to build the evidence for a multilevel participatory youth violence prevention model tailored to the specific circumstances of…

  15. Can public campaigns effectively change psychological determinants of safer sex? An evaluation of three Dutch campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, MC; Siero, FW; Buunk, BP

    This study evaluated the 1994, 1995 and 1996 Dutch safer sex campaigns as to their effectiveness in terms of improved attitudes, perceived social norms, self-efficacy and intentions regarding safer sex. The hypotheses were tested that variables become more positive when campaigns are conducted and

  16. Land use planning in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  17. Intersection planning in Safer Transportation Network Planning : safety principles, planning framework, and library information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    This report is one in a series of publications, used in the development of the network planning tool ‘Safer Transportation Network Planning’ (Safer-TNP). The publications were used to guide the development of planning structures, diagnostic tools, planning recommendations, and research information

  18. ïSCOPE: Safer care for older persons (in residential environments: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnard Debbie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current profile of residents living in Canadian nursing homes includes elder persons with complex physical and social needs. High resident acuity can result in increased staff workload and decreased quality of work life. Aims Safer Care for Older Persons [in residential] Environments is a two year (2010 to 2012 proof-of-principle pilot study conducted in seven nursing homes in western Canada. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of engaging front line staff to use quality improvement methods to integrate best practices into resident care. The goals of the study are to improve the quality of work life for staff, in particular healthcare aides, and to improve residents' quality of life. Methods/design The study has parallel research and quality improvement intervention arms. It includes an education and support intervention for direct caregivers to improve the safety and quality of their care delivery. We hypothesize that this intervention will improve not only the care provided to residents but also the quality of work life for healthcare aides. The study employs tools adapted from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Breakthrough Series: Collaborative Model and Canada's Safer Healthcare Now! improvement campaign. Local improvement teams in each nursing home (1 to 2 per facility are led by healthcare aides (non-regulated caregivers and focus on the management of specific areas of resident care. Critical elements of the program include local measurement, virtual and face-to-face learning sessions involving change management, quality improvement methods and clinical expertise, ongoing virtual and in person support, and networking. Discussion There are two sustainability challenges in this study: ongoing staff and leadership engagement, and organizational infrastructure. Addressing these challenges will require strategic planning with input from key stakeholders for sustaining quality improvement

  19. Design of an Emulsion-based Personal Detergent through a Model-based Chemical Product Design Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Hill, Michael; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    -by-one the different classes of chemicals, until a formulation is obtained, the stability of which as en emulsion is finally checked with appropriate models. Structured databases, appropriate pure component as well as mixture property models, rule-based selection criteria and CAMD techniques are employed together...... to obtain one or more candidate formulations. A conceptual casestudy representing a personal detergent is presented to highlight the methodology....

  20. Designing Solutions by a Student Centred Approach: Integration of Chemical Process Simulation with Statistical Tools to Improve Distillation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Joao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Projects thematically focused on simulation and statistical techniques for designing and optimizing chemical processes can be helpful in chemical engineering education in order to meet the needs of engineers. We argue for the relevance of the projects to improve a student centred approach and boost higher order thinking skills. This paper addresses the use of Aspen HYSYS by Portuguese chemical engineering master students to model distillation systems together with statistical experimental design techniques in order to optimize the systems highlighting the value of applying problem specific knowledge, simulation tools and sound statistical techniques. The paper summarizes the work developed by the students in order to model steady-state processes, dynamic processes and optimize the distillation systems emphasizing the benefits of the simulation tools and statistical techniques in helping the students learn how to learn. Students strengthened their domain specific knowledge and became motivated to rethink and improve chemical processes in their future chemical engineering profession. We discuss the main advantages of the methodology from the students’ and teachers perspective

  1. Seriously Mentally Ill Women’s Safer Sex Behaviors and the Theory of Reasoned Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Mary E.; Pinkerton, Steven D.; Somlai, Anton M.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Gibson, Richard H.; Hackl, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Seriously mentally ill women at risk for HIV infection (n = 96) participated in structured interviews assessing sexual and substance use behavior over a 3-month period. The majority of the women (63.5%) did not use condoms. Consistent with the Theory of Reasoned Action, condom use attitudes and perceived social norms about safer sex were associated with safer sex intentions. Supplementing TRA variables with safer sex self-efficacy explained additional variance in safer sex intentions. Greater safer sex intentions were related to both greater condom use and to less frequent unprotected intercourse. In addition, less frequent sex after drug use and a less fatalistic outlook were associated with less frequent unprotected intercourse. Life circumstances specific to this population are particularly important to examine to improve the effectiveness of risk reduction interventions for seriously mentally ill women. PMID:19458268

  2. Design & synthesis of silicone elastomer networks with tunable physico-chemical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Julie Ann-Crowe

    2007-05-01

    We have engineered functional surfaces via the manipulation of silicone elastomers (SEs). The most common silicone, poly(dimethylsiloxane) PDMS, can be both challenging and advantageous in the design of surfaces due to its inherent inertness and flexibility of the siloxane backbone. This unique polymer is approaching a $10 billion dollar market attributed to its formulation in a wide array of applications; from the personal care industry to the electronics industry. While it can be used for many applications, surface design with PDMS usually requires a chemical or physical modification of the polymeric network. In addition, surface characteristics are tailored for specific functions since there is not one surface that fits all end-uses. In studying the intrinsic behavior of engineered SEs, we asked questions regarding surface stability, environmental conformation and adaptability, and tuning physical features. We report on the formation of responsive surfaces with tailorable surface-reconstruction kinetics and switching hysteresis by thiol-ene radical addition of mercaptoalkanols with variable lengths to poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) networks. Exposing the modified surfaces to water led to a rearrangement of the hydrophilic alkanes at the surface. The rearrangement kinetics decreases with increasing number of the methylene spacers (n) in the mercaptoalkanol. The response kinetics is found to be very fast for n = 2 and 6. For instance, upon exposing to water, the water contact angle on 3-mercaptopropanol-based surfaces decreases by ≈35° at the rate of 2°/second. The high flexibility of the siloxane backbone endows these materials with switching longevity; the materials were able to switch their wettability over 10 cycles with minimum hysteresis. Increasing the number of methylene spacers to n = 11 decreases the surface reorganization dramatically. Formation of semi-crystalline regions in such materials (detected via IR) is responsible for initial "sluggish" kinetics

  3. Using Green Chemistry and Engineering Principles to Design, Assess, and Retrofit Chemical Processes for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concepts of green chemistry and engineering (GC&E) have been promoted as an effective qualitative framework for developing more sustainable chemical syntheses, processes, and material management techniques. This has been demonstrated by many theoretical and practical cases. I...

  4. Influence of the Chemical Design on the Coherent Photoisomerization of Biomimetic Molecular Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivucci Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals the effect of chemical substitutions on the photoreaction kinetics of biomimetic photoswitches displaying coherent dynamics. Ground state vibrational coherences are no longer observed when the excited state lifetime exceeds 300fs.

  5. Chemical and Biological Defense: Designated Entity Needed to Identify, Align, and Manage DOD’s Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    PAIO) , the analytical arm of the CBDP Enterprise, assessed the physical infrastructure capabilities that support the CBDP Enterprise’s mission and...of the physical infrastructure of the CBDP Enterprise. Page 3 GAO-15-257 Chemical and Biological Defense use threat data and the results...PAIO study made recommendations to address “ physical ” infrastructure capabilities, whereas the 2008 Chemical and Biological Defense Program (CBDP

  6. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration (SAFER) plan for corrective action unit 412: clean slate I plutonium dispersion (TTR) tonopah test range, Nevada, revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2015-04-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 412. CAU 412 is located on the Tonopah Test Range and consists of a single corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-01CS, Pu Contaminated Soil. There is sufficient information and historical documentation from previous investigations and the 1997 interim corrective action to recommend closure of CAU 412 using the SAFER process. Based on existing data, the presumed corrective action for CAU 412 is clean closure. However, additional data will be obtained during a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information and determine whether the CAU 412 closure objectives have been achieved. This SAFER Plan provides the methodology to gather the necessary information for closing the CAU.The following summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 412:• Collect environmental samples from designated target populations to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information.• If no COCs are present, establish clean closure as the corrective action. • If COCs are present, the extent of contamination will be defined and further corrective actions will be evaluated with the stakeholders (NDEP, USAF).• Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chemically designed (Globo3–DTPA–KLH antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajmohammadi M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mehdi Hajmohammadi,1 Seyed Davar Siadat,2 Masoud Ghorbani,3,4,* Mehdi Shafiee Ardestani,5,* Shahram Teimourian,6 Vahid Asgari,3 Reza Ahangari Cohan,3 Mostafa Hajmohammadi,5 Akram Hajmohammadi,7 Ramezan Behzadi,8 Saied Rajab Nezhad,9 Nabiollah Namvar Asl10 1Department of Research and Biotechnology, 2Department of Microbiology, 3Department of Virology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran Iran; 4Department of Virology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 5Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Medical Genetics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 7Faculty of Pharmacy, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, 8Laboratory Animal Management of North Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, 9Department of Research and Development, Alhavi Pharmaceutical, Tehran, 10Pasteur Institute of Iran, Department of Animal Sciences, Karaj, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In recent years, many experiments have been conducted for the production and evaluation of anticancer glycoconjugated vaccines in developed countries and many achievements have been accomplished with Globo H derivatives. In the current experiment, a new chemically designed triplicate version of (Globo H3–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA–KLH antigen was synthesized and characterized. Immunization with (Globo H3-DTPA-KLH, a hexasaccharide that is a member of a family of antigenic carbohydrates that are highly expressed in various types of cancers conjugated with DTPA and KLH protein, induced a high level of antibody titer along with an elevated level of IL-4 in mice. Treatment of tumors with the collected sera from immunized mice decreased the tumor size in nude mice as well. None of the immunized mice illustrated any sign of tumor growth after injection of MCF-7 cells compared to the control animals. These findings, based on the newly presented

  8. Design Concepts for Co-Production of Power, Fuels & Chemicals Via Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A. D.; Chen, Q.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2012-09-30

    The overall goal of the program is to develop design concepts, incorporating advanced technologies in areas such as oxygen production, feed systems, gas cleanup, component separations and gas turbines, for integrated and economically viable coal and biomass fed gasification facilities equipped with carbon capture and storage for the following scenarios: (i) coproduction of power along with hydrogen, (ii) coproduction of power along with fuels, (iii) coproduction of power along with petrochemicals, and (iv) coproduction of power along with agricultural chemicals. To achieve this goal, specifically the following objectives are met in this proposed project: (i) identify advanced technology options and innovative preliminary design concepts that synergistically integrate plant subsections, (ii) develop steady state system simulations to predict plant efficiency and environmental signature, (iii) develop plant cost estimates by capacity factoring major subsystems or by major equipment items where required, and then capital, operating and maintenance cost estimates, and (iv) perform techno- economic analyses for the above described coproduction facilities. Thermal efficiencies for the electricity only cases with 90% carbon capture are 38.26% and 36.76% (HHV basis) with the bituminous and the lignite feedstocks respectively. For the coproduction cases (where 50% of the energy exported is in the form of electricity), the electrical efficiency, as expected, is highest for the hydrogen coproduction cases while lowest for the higher alcohols (ethanol) coproduction cases. The electrical efficiencies for Fischer-Tropsch coproduction cases are slightly higher than those for the methanol coproduction cases but it should be noted that the methanol (as well as the higher alcohol) coproduction cases produce the finished coproduct while the Fischer-Tropsch coproduction cases produce a coproduct that requires further processing in a refinery. The cross comparison of the thermal

  9. Antiretrovirals and safer conception for HIV-serodiscordant couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn T.; Smit, Jennifer A.; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Cohan, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Many men and women living with HIV and their uninfected partners attempt to conceive children. HIV-prevention science can be applied to reduce sexual transmission risk while respecting couples’ reproductive goals. Here we discuss antiretrovirals as prevention in the context of safer conception for HIV-serodiscordant couples. Recent findings Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the infected partner and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the uninfected partner reduce the risk of heterosexual HIV transmission. Several demonstration projects suggest the feasibility and acceptability of antiretroviral (ARV)s as periconception HIV-prevention for HIV-serodiscordant couples. The application of ARVs to periconception risk reduction may be limited by adherence. Summary For male-infected (M+F−) couples who cannot access sperm processing and female-infected (F+M−) couples unwilling to carry out insemination without intercourse, ART for the infected partner, PrEP for the uninfected partner, combined with treatment for sexually transmitted infections, sex limited to peak fertility, and medical male circumcision (for F+M couples) provide excellent, well tolerated options for reducing the risk of periconception HIV sexual transmission. PMID:23032734

  10. Automatic Chemical Design Using a Data-Driven Continuous Representation of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    We report a method to convert discrete representations of molecules to and from a multidimensional continuous representation. This model allows us to generate new molecules for efficient exploration and optimization through open-ended spaces of chemical compounds. A deep neural network was trained on hundreds of thousands of existing chemical structures to construct three coupled functions: an encoder, a decoder, and a predictor. The encoder converts the discrete representation of a molecule into a real-valued continuous vector, and the decoder converts these continuous vectors back to discrete molecular representations. The predictor estimates chemical properties from the latent continuous vector representation of the molecule. Continuous representations of molecules allow us to automatically generate novel chemical structures by performing simple operations in the latent space, such as decoding random vectors, perturbing known chemical structures, or interpolating between molecules. Continuous representations also allow the use of powerful gradient-based optimization to efficiently guide the search for optimized functional compounds. We demonstrate our method in the domain of drug-like molecules and also in a set of molecules with fewer that nine heavy atoms. PMID:29532027

  11. Automatic Chemical Design Using a Data-Driven Continuous Representation of Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Wei, Jennifer N; Duvenaud, David; Hernández-Lobato, José Miguel; Sánchez-Lengeling, Benjamín; Sheberla, Dennis; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Hirzel, Timothy D; Adams, Ryan P; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2018-02-28

    We report a method to convert discrete representations of molecules to and from a multidimensional continuous representation. This model allows us to generate new molecules for efficient exploration and optimization through open-ended spaces of chemical compounds. A deep neural network was trained on hundreds of thousands of existing chemical structures to construct three coupled functions: an encoder, a decoder, and a predictor. The encoder converts the discrete representation of a molecule into a real-valued continuous vector, and the decoder converts these continuous vectors back to discrete molecular representations. The predictor estimates chemical properties from the latent continuous vector representation of the molecule. Continuous representations of molecules allow us to automatically generate novel chemical structures by performing simple operations in the latent space, such as decoding random vectors, perturbing known chemical structures, or interpolating between molecules. Continuous representations also allow the use of powerful gradient-based optimization to efficiently guide the search for optimized functional compounds. We demonstrate our method in the domain of drug-like molecules and also in a set of molecules with fewer that nine heavy atoms.

  12. Computer Aided Methodology for Simultaneous Synthesis, Design & Analysis of Chemical Products-Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Anterroches, Loïc; Gani, Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    A new combined methodology for computer aided molecular design and process flowsheet design is presented. The methodology is based on the group contribution approach for prediction of molecular properties and design of molecules. Using the same principles, process groups have been developed toget...

  13. Selected bibliography for the extraction of uranium from seawater: chemical process and plant design feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binney, S.E.; Polkinghorne, S.T.; Jante, R.R.; Rodman, M.R.; Chen, A.C.T.; Gordon, L.I.

    1979-02-01

    A selected annotated bibliography of 521 references was prepared as a part of a feasibility study of the extraction of uranium from seawater. For the most part, these references are related to the chemical processes whereby the uranium is removed from the seawater. A companion docment contains a similar bibliography of 471 references related to oceanographic and uranium extraction plant siting considerations, although some of the references are in common. The bibliography was prepared by computer retrieval from Chemical Abstracts, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Data Base, NTIS, and Oceanic Abstracts. References are listed by author, country of author, and selected keywords.

  14. Selected bibliography for the extraction of uranium from seawater: chemical process and plant design feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.; Polkinghorne, S.T.; Jante, R.R.; Rodman, M.R.; Chen, A.C.T.; Gordon, L.I.

    1979-02-01

    A selected annotated bibliography of 521 references was prepared as a part of a feasibility study of the extraction of uranium from seawater. For the most part, these references are related to the chemical processes whereby the uranium is removed from the seawater. A companion docment contains a similar bibliography of 471 references related to oceanographic and uranium extraction plant siting considerations, although some of the references are in common. The bibliography was prepared by computer retrieval from Chemical Abstracts, Nuclear Science Abstracts, Energy Data Base, NTIS, and Oceanic Abstracts. References are listed by author, country of author, and selected keywords

  15. Design of a New Concentration Series for the Orthogonal Sample Design Approach and Estimation of the Number of Reactions in Chemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiajia; Liu, Yuhai; Guo, Ran; Li, Xiaopei; He, Anqi; Gao, Yunlong; Wei, Yongju; Liu, Cuige; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Wu, Jinguang

    2015-11-01

    A new concentration series is proposed for the construction of a two-dimensional (2D) synchronous spectrum for orthogonal sample design analysis to probe intermolecular interaction between solutes dissolved in the same solutions. The obtained 2D synchronous spectrum possesses the following two properties: (1) cross peaks in the 2D synchronous spectra can be used to reflect intermolecular interaction reliably, since interference portions that have nothing to do with intermolecular interaction are completely removed, and (2) the two-dimensional synchronous spectrum produced can effectively avoid accidental collinearity. Hence, the correct number of nonzero eigenvalues can be obtained so that the number of chemical reactions can be estimated. In a real chemical system, noise present in one-dimensional spectra may also produce nonzero eigenvalues. To get the correct number of chemical reactions, we classified nonzero eigenvalues into significant nonzero eigenvalues and insignificant nonzero eigenvalues. Significant nonzero eigenvalues can be identified by inspecting the pattern of the corresponding eigenvector with help of the Durbin-Watson statistic. As a result, the correct number of chemical reactions can be obtained from significant nonzero eigenvalues. This approach provides a solid basis to obtain insight into subtle spectral variations caused by intermolecular interaction.

  16. Design and Analysis of Questionnaires for Survey Skills in Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas Yagüe, Susana; Coca Sanz, Mónica; González Benito, Gerardo; Cartón López, Ángel; Urueña Alonso, Miguel Ángel; García Cubero, Mª Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The new reorganization of university education has involved relevant changes in teaching and learning methodologies in order to help students to learn more effectively and to develop important skills and competences demanded by the professional world. In this sense the new configuration of the degree in Chemical Engineering required the…

  17. Sustainability in the Design, Synthesis and Analysis of Chemical Engineering Processes 1st edition (Preface)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book preface explains the needs found by the book editors for assembling the state of the art of technical and scientific knowledge relevant to chemical engineering, sustainability, and sustainable uses of wastes and materials management, and to do so in an accessible and c...

  18. Assessment of infant exposure to food chemicals: the French Total Diet Study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulin, M; Bemrah, N; Nougadère, A; Volatier, J L; Sirot, V; Leblanc, J C

    2014-01-01

    As part of the previous French Total Diet Studies (TDS) focusing on exposure to food chemicals in the population aged 3 years and older, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES) launched a specific TDS on infants to complete its overall chemical food safety programme for the general population. More than 500 chemical substances were analysed in food products consumed by children under 3 years old, including nutrients, several endocrine disruptors resulting from human activities (polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins and furans, brominated flame retardants, perfluoroalkyl acids, pesticide residues, etc.) or migrating from food contact materials such as bisphenol A or phthalates, but also natural substances such as mycotoxins, phytoestrogens and steroids. To obtain a representative and general view of infant food consumption, food items were selected based on results of a national consumption survey conducted specifically on this population. Moreover, a specific study on food was conducted on 429 households to determine which home-cooking practices are employed to prepare food consumed by infants. Overall, the targeted chemical substances were analysed in more than 450 food samples, representing the purchase and home-cooking practices of over 5500 food products. Foods included common foods such as vegetables, fruit or cakes as well as specific infant foods such as infant formula or jarred baby food. The sampling plan covered over 80% of the total diet. Specificities in infant food consumption and habits were therefore considered to define this first infant TDS. This study, conducted on a large scale and focusing on a particularly sensitive population, will provide accurate information on the dietary exposure of children under 3 years to food chemicals, especially endocrine disruptors, and will be particularly useful for risk assessment analysis under the remit of ANSES' expert committees.

  19. Design and control of chemical compositions for high-performance austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Wenbang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of chemical compositions of austempered ductile iron (ADI on casting quality, heat treatment process parameters and mechanical properties of final products. Through experiment and production practice, the impacts of carbon equivalent on ADI and its mechanical properties have been studied. Proper content ranges for carbon and silicon have been obtained to avoid ADI casting shrinkage and graphite floatation, as well as to achieve the optimal mechanical properties. According to the impact of silicon content on austenite phase transformation, the existing form of carbon in ADI has been analyzed, and also the formula and diagram showing the relationship between austenitizing temperature and carbon content in austenite have been deduced. The chemical composition range for high performance ADI and its control points have been recommended, to serve as a reference for production process.

  20. Maintaining Microclimates during Nanoliter Chemical Dispensations Using Custom-Designed Source Plate Lids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Bryan J; Drozd, Ashley M; Bollard, Mary T; Laspina, Denise; Podobedov, Nikita; Zeniou, Nicholas; Rao, Anjali S; Andi, Babak; Jackimowicz, Rick; Sweet, Robert M; McSweeney, Sean; Soares, Alexei S

    2016-02-01

    A method is described for using custom snap-on lids to protect chemicals in microtiter plates from evaporation and contamination. The lids contain apertures (diameter 1.5, 1.0, or 0.5 mm) through which the chemical building blocks can be transferred. The lid with 0.5 mm apertures was tested using a noncontact acoustic liquid handler; the 1.0 and 1.5 mm lids were tested using two tip-based liquid handlers. All of the lids reduced the rate at which solvents evaporated to room air, and greatly reduced the rate of contamination by water and oxygen from room air. In steady-state measurements, the lids reduced the rate of evaporation of methanol, 1-hexene, and water by 33% to 248%. In cycled experiments, the contamination of aqueous solvent with oxygen was reduced below detectability and the rate at which DMSO engorged atmospheric water was reduced by 81%. Our results demonstrate that the lids preserve the integrity of air-sensitive reagents during the time needed for different types of liquid handlers to perform dispensations. Controlling degradation and evaporation of chemical building blocks exposed to the atmosphere is increasingly useful as the reagent volume is reduced by advances in liquid handling technology, such as acoustic droplet ejection. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. Safety and fitness electronic records (SAFER) system : logical architecture document : working draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-31

    This Logical Architecture Document includes the products developed during the functional analysis of the Safety and Fitness Electronic Records (SAFER) System. This document, along with the companion Operational Concept and Physical Architecture Docum...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Topics Covered Alcohol Antibiotic Resistance Cancer Cardiovascular Diseases Diseases & Conditions Food Safety Healthcare- ... Clips Making Health Care Safer Protect patients from antibiotic resistance Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  3. In/Through the Bodies of women | Mire | SAFERE: Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... hospitals had at least one patient with a CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) infection during the first half ...

  5. Chemical treatment response to variations in non-point pollution water quality: results of a factorial design experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Leiviskä, Tiina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    Chemical treatment of non-point derived pollution often suffers from undesirable oscillations in purification efficiency due to variations in runoff water quality. This study examined the response of the chemical purification process to variations in water quality using a 2(k) factorial design for runoff water rich in humic substances. The four k factors evaluated and the levels applied were: organic matter as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (20-70 mg/L), suspended solids (SS) (10-60 mg/L), initial water pH (4.5-7), and applied coagulant dosage (ferric sulphate) (35-100 mg/L). Indicators of purification efficiency were residual concentration of DOC, SS and total phosphorus (tot-P). Analysis of variance and factor effect calculations showed that the initial DOC concentration in raw water samples and its interactions with the coagulant dosage applied exerted the most significant influence on the chemical purification process, substantially affecting the residual concentration of DOC, SS and tot-P. The variations applied to the factors SS and pH only slightly affected purification efficiency. The results can be used in the design of purification systems with high organic matter load variation, e.g. peat extraction runoff. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic Optimization-Based Integrated Chemical Product–Process Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cignitti, Stefano; Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Woodley, John M.

    2018-01-01

    An integrated optimization-based framework for product and process design is proposed. The framework uses a set of methods and tools to obtain the optimal product–process design solution given a set of economic and environmental sustainability targets. The methods and tools required are property...... of the framework is demonstrated through three case studies: (i) refrigeration cycle unit for R134a replacement, (ii) a mixed working fluid design problem for R134a replacement, and (iii) pure solvent design for water-acetic acid LLE extraction. Through the application of the framework it is demonstrated that all...... solutions satisfy product, process, economic, and environmental targets simultaneously. The solution is obtained through a direct deterministic mathematical optimization strategy. The framework proposed in this work is generic and can be applied to a wide range of problems where an integrated solution...

  7. Analysis and design recommendation on rabbeted capping plate of equipment cell in nuclear chemical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingyu; Yin Xiaozhan

    2013-01-01

    Rabbeted capping plates are widely used in the roof of equipment cells in order to meet the requirements of nuclear radiation protection. The key considerations in the design include vertical load, seismic load and repair load. This article establishes T shaped and Z-shaped plate model via FEM software (ANSYS), analyzes the bearing capacity and displacement distribution in different load cases, and provides recommendations to the design and construction accordingly. (authors)

  8. A systematic synthesis and design methodology to achieve process intensification in (bio) chemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutze, Philip; Woodley, John; Gani, Rafiqul

    be intensified for biggest improvement, process synthesis and design tools are applied which results in the development of a systematic methodology incorporating PI. In order to manage the complexity of PI process options in which a feasible and optimal process solution may exist, the solution procedure......, the application of the computer-aided systematic synthesis and design methodology is highlighted via a case study which is the chemo-enzymatic synthesis of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac))....

  9. Design and optimization of pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI using a multiobjective genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimaru, Eriko S; Randtke, Edward A; Pagel, Mark D; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI experimental parameters and RF saturation pulse shapes were optimized using a multiobjective genetic algorithm. The optimization was carried out for RF saturation duty cycles of 50% and 90%, and results were compared to continuous wave saturation and Gaussian waveform. In both simulation and phantom experiments, continuous wave saturation performed the best, followed by parameters and shapes optimized by the genetic algorithm and then followed by Gaussian waveform. We have successfully demonstrated that the genetic algorithm is able to optimize pulse CEST parameters and that the results are translatable to clinical scanners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rational Design of Mixed-Metal Oxides for Chemical Looping Combustion of Coal via Coupled Computational-Experimental Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Amit; Li, Fanxing; Santiso, Erik

    2017-09-18

    Energy and global climate change are two grand challenges to the modern society. An urgent need exists for development of clean and efficient energy conversion processes. The chemical looping strategy, which utilizes regenerable oxygen carriers (OCs) to indirectly convert carbonaceous fuels via redox reactions, is considered to be one of the more promising approaches for CO2 capture by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). To date, most long-term chemical looping operations were conducted using gaseous fuels, even though direct conversion of coal is more desirable from both economics and CO2 capture viewpoints. The main challenges for direct coal conversion reside in the stringent requirements on oxygen carrier performances. In addition, coal char and volatile compounds are more challenging to convert than gaseous fuels. A promising approach for direct conversion of coal is the so called chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) technique. In the CLOU process, a metal oxide that decomposes at the looping temperature, and releases oxygen to the gas phase is used as the OC. The overarching objective of this project was to discover the fundamental principles for rational design and optimization of oxygen carriers (OC) in coal chemical looping combustion (CLC) processes. It directly addresses Topic Area B of the funding opportunity announcement (FOA) in terms of “predictive description of the phase behavior and mechanical properties” of “mixed metal oxide” based OCs and rational development of new OC materials with superior functionality. This was achieved through studies exploring i) iron-containing mixed-oxide composites as oxygen carriers for CLOU, ii) Ca1-xAxMnO3-δ (A = Sr and Ba) as oxygen carriers for CLOU, iii) CaMn1-xBxO3-δ (B=Al, V, Fe, Co, and Ni) as oxygen carrier for CLOU and iv) vacancy creation energy in Mn-containing perovskites as an indicator chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling.

  11. Safer Wards: reducing violence on older people's mental health wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Kwesi, Solomon; Joyce, Maggie; Dusoye, Jenny; Mohamudbucus, Yasin; Shah, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Through the Safer Wards project we aimed to reduce the number of incidents of physical violence on older people's mental health wards. This was done using quality improvement methods and supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Violence can be an indicator of unmet needs in this patient population, with a negative effect on patient care and staff morale. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust. We established a multi-disciplinary group who led on the project on each ward and used a Pareto diagram to establish the focus of our work. We established a dashboard of measures based on our incident reporting system Datix, including number of incidents of violence, days between incidents, days of staff sickness, days between staff injury, use of restraint, and use of rapid tranquilisation (the last two being balancing measures in the reduction of violence). Each team identified factors driving physical violence on the wards, under headings of unmet patient needs, staff needs and staff awareness, which included lack of activity and a safe and therapeutic environment. Using driver diagrams, we identified change ideas that included hourly rounding (proactive checks on patient well-being), the addition of sensory rooms, flexible leave for patients, and a structured activity programme. We also introduced exercise to music, therapeutic groups led by patients, and focused on discharge planning and pet therapy, each of which starting sequentially over the course of a one year period from late 2013 and subject to a cycle of iterative learning using PDSA methods. The specific aim was a 20% decrease in violent incidents on three wards in City and Hackney, and Newham. Following our interventions, days between violent incidents increased from an average of three to an average of six. Days between staff injury due to physical violence rose from an average of

  12. Toetsing van het gehalte duurzame veiligheid met Safer Transportation Network Planning : integratie van de ‘DV-gehaltemeter’ in het ontwerpprogramma ‘Safer-TNP’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.

    2001-01-01

    Testing the sustainable-safety contents with Safer Transportation Network Planning. In the publication entitled “Developing a sustainable-safety meter (DV-meter) for measuring the sustainable-safety contents” (Van der Kooi & Dijkstra, 2000), the development of and a pilot measurement with a

  13. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternat......The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case...... for alternatives assessment approaches as they can be considered both emerging “chemicals” of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging and critical elements...... in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. This paper...

  14. Coupled sensor/platform control design for low-level chemical detection with position-adaptive micro-UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas; Carr, Ryan; Mitra, Atindra K.; Selmic, Rastko R.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the development of Position-Adaptive Sensors [1] for purposes for detecting embedded chemical substances in challenging environments. This concept is a generalization of patented Position-Adaptive Radar Concepts developed at AFRL for challenging conditions such as urban environments. For purposes of investigating the detection of chemical substances using multiple MAV (Micro-UAV) platforms, we have designed and implemented an experimental testbed with sample structures such as wooden carts that contain controlled leakage points. Under this general concept, some of the members of a MAV swarm can serve as external position-adaptive "transmitters" by blowing air over the cart and some of the members of a MAV swarm can serve as external position-adaptive "receivers" that are equipped with chemical or biological (chem/bio) sensors that function as "electronic noses". The objective can be defined as improving the particle count of chem/bio concentrations that impinge on a MAV-based position-adaptive sensor that surrounds a chemical repository, such as a cart, via the development of intelligent position-adaptive control algorithms. The overall effect is to improve the detection and false-alarm statistics of the overall system. Within the major sections of this paper, we discuss a number of different aspects of developing our initial MAV-Based Sensor Testbed. This testbed includes blowers to simulate position-adaptive excitations and a MAV from Draganfly Innovations Inc. with stable design modifications to accommodate our chem/bio sensor boom design. We include details with respect to several critical phases of the development effort including development of the wireless sensor network and experimental apparatus, development of the stable sensor boom for the MAV, integration of chem/bio sensors and sensor node onto the MAV and boom, development of position-adaptive control algorithms and initial tests at IDCAST (Institute for the Development and

  15. Heavy Sexual Content Versus Safer Sex Content: A Content Analysis of the Entertainment Education Drama Shuga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Nancy Achieng'; Miller, Ann Neville; Ngure, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Extremely popular with Kenyan youth, the entertainment-education drama Shuga was designed with specific goals of promoting condom use, single versus multiple sexual partners, and destigmatization of HIV. Almost as soon as it aired, however, it generated controversy due to its extensive sexual themes and relatively explicit portrayal of sexual issues. To determine how safer sex, antistigma messages, and overall sexual content were integrated into Shuga, we conducted a content analysis. Results indicated that condom use and HIV destigmatization messages were frequently and clearly communicated. Negative consequences for risky sexual behavior were communicated over the course of the entire series. Messages about multiple concurrent partnerships were not evident. In addition, in terms of scenes per hour of programming, Shuga had 10.3 times the amount of sexual content overall, 8.2 times the amount of sexual talk, 17.8 times the amount of sexual behavior, and 9.4 times the amount of sexual intercourse as found in previous analysis of U.S. entertainment programming. Research is needed to determine how these factors may interact to influence adolescent viewers of entertainment education dramas.

  16. Safer obstetric anesthesia through education and mentorship: a model for knowledge translation in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Patricia; Evans, Faye; Nsereko, Etienne; Nyirigira, Gaston; Ruhato, Paulin; Sargeant, Joan; Chipp, Megan; Enright, Angela

    2014-11-01

    High rates of maternal mortality remain a widespread problem in the developing world. Skilled anesthesia providers are required for the safe conduct of Cesarean delivery and resuscitation during obstetrical crises. Few anesthesia providers in low-resource settings have access to continuing education. In Rwanda, anesthesia technicians with only three years of post-secondary training must manage complex maternal emergencies in geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this special article is to describe implementation of the SAFE (Safer Anesthesia From Education) Obstetric Anesthesia course in Rwanda, a three-day refresher course designed to improve obstetrical anesthesia knowledge and skills for practitioners in low-resource areas. In addition, we describe how the course facilitated the knowledge-to-action (KTA) cycle whereby a series of steps are followed to promote the uptake of new knowledge into clinical practice. The KTA cycle requires locally relevant teaching interventions and continuation of knowledge post intervention. In Rwanda, this meant carefully considering educational needs, revising curricula to suit the local context, employing active experiential learning during the SAFE Obstetric Anesthesia course, encouraging supportive relationships with peers and mentors, and using participant action plans for change, post-course logbooks, and follow-up interviews with participants six months after the course. During those interviews, participants reported improvements in clinical practice and greater confidence in coordinating team activities. Anesthesia safety remains challenged by resource limitations and resistance to change by health care providers who did not attend the course. Future teaching interventions will address the need for team training.

  17. A Systematic Computer-Aided Framework for Integrated Design and Control of Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    processes including process intensification is proposed. Note however, because of integration of functions/operations into one system the controllability region of intensified equipment may become smaller (Nikačević et al., 2012). The methodology developed in this work, employs a decomposition......-separator-recycle (RSR) system. Next, it will be shown that the RSR system can be replaced by an intensified unit operation, a reactive distillation column (RDC) which optimal design-control solution is also presented. The operation and control of the RSR and RDC at the optimal designs is compared with other candidate...

  18. Chemical engineering in the electronics industry: progress towards the rational design of organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Clancy, Paulette

    2012-05-01

    We review the current status of heterojunction design for combinations of organic semiconductor materials, given its central role in affecting the device performance for electronic devices and solar cell applications. We provide an emphasis on recent progress towards the rational design of heterojunctions that may lead to higher performance of charge separation and mobility. We also play particular attention to the role played by computational approaches and its potential to help define the best choice of materials for solar cell development in the future. We report the current status of the field with respect to such goals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A systematic synthesis and design methodology to achieve process intensification in (bio) chemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutze, Philip; Roman Martinez, Alicia; Woodley, John

    2012-01-01

    be intensified for the biggest improvement is difficult to identify. In this paper the development of a systematic computer aided model-based synthesis and design methodology incorporating PI is presented. In order to manage the complexities involved, the methodology employs a decomposition-based solution...... the chemo-enzymatic synthesis of N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)....

  20. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances of radioisotope for design, intensification and optimization of processes and operations in chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In chemical industries different processes and operations involve a variety of multiphase contacting schemes for optimal production schedule in terms of ease of handling, time and money. A number of parameters will have to be optimized for this purpose. Further more, during the operation of a process plant, a number of problems such as reduction in process efficiency, deterioration in product quality etc. are encountered due to malfunctioning of one or more components. The successful operation of an industry depends on the early detection of the problems for appropriate remedial action. These are conveniently carried out by the application of radioisotopes either directly or in sealed condition depending upon the problem to be addressed. In this talk both types of radiotracer applications are discussed by taking specific examples

  2. Transverse-flow quasi-cw HF chemical laser: design and preliminary performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, J.M.; Mah, S.Q.; Conturie, Y.

    1974-01-01

    A small transverse-flow HF chemical laser has been constructed using a large volume microwave plasma generator for the production of F atoms. The F atoms react with hydrogen to form the lasing HF molecules. The active medium is about 5 cm long, and the maximum average laser power was found to be 560 mW for all lines. Three laser lines with wavelengths 2.61 μm, 2.64 μm, and 2.73 μm were observed. The time-varying laser transition profile closely resembles the density profile of the excited fluorine atoms in the plasma. Both profiles are greatly affected by changes in flow conditions

  3. Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition – Technological Design Of Functional Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januś M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (PA CVD method allows to deposit of homogeneous, well-adhesive coatings at lower temperature on different substrates. Plasmochemical treatment significantly impacts on physicochemical parameters of modified surfaces. In this study we present the overview of the possibilities of plasma processes for the deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings doped Si and/or N atoms on the Ti Grade2, aluminum-zinc alloy and polyetherketone substrate. Depending on the type of modified substrate had improved the corrosion properties including biocompatibility of titanium surface, increase of surface hardness with deposition of good adhesion and fine-grained coatings (in the case of Al-Zn alloy and improving of the wear resistance (in the case of PEEK substrate.

  4. Safer-drinking strategies used by chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazioli, Véronique S; Hicks, Jennifer; Kaese, Greta; Lenert, James; Collins, Susan E

    2015-07-01

    Chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence experience severe alcohol-related consequences. It is therefore important to identify factors that might be associated with reduced alcohol-related harm, such as the use of safer-drinking strategies. Whereas effectiveness of safer-drinking strategies has been well-documented among young adults, no studies have explored this topic among more severely affected populations, such as chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. The aims of this study were thus to qualitatively and quantitatively document safer-drinking strategies used in this population. Participants (N=31) were currently or formerly chronically homeless individuals with alcohol dependence participating in a pilot study of extended-release naltrexone and harm-reduction counseling. At weeks 0 and 8, research staff provided a list of safer-drinking strategies for participants to endorse. Implementation of endorsed safer-drinking strategies was recorded at the next appointment. At both time points, strategies to buffer the effects of alcohol on the body (e.g., eating prior to and during drinking) were most highly endorsed, followed by changing the manner in which one drinks (e.g., spacing drinks), and reducing alcohol consumption. Quantitative analyses indicated that all participants endorsed safer-drinking strategies, and nearly all strategies were implemented (80-90% at weeks 0 and 8, respectively). These preliminary findings indicate that chronically homeless people with alcohol dependence use strategies to reduce harm associated with their drinking. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to test whether interventions that teach safer-drinking strategies may reduce overall alcohol-related harm in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Innovation in Integrated Chemical Product-Process Design - Development through a Model-based Systems Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa

    in which experiments are planned and a third stage in which experiments are performed to validate the final product formula. The main focus of the project is on the development of the computer-aided stage of the methodology described above. The methodology considers two different scenarios: the design...... appropriate model-based screening techniques are employed. In the verification scenario, a shortlist of candidate ingredients is provided, therefore the problem size is much smaller and rigorous property models can be employed/developed. When using computer-aided tools for product design, several issues need...... to be addressed: new property models may need to be developed and/or the application range of existing property models may need to be extended (that is, new model parameters are needed), new and more efficient methods and tools for the application of the models may need to be developed, together with a flexible...

  6. Graphene nanoribbons as low band gap donor materials for organic photovoltaics: quantum chemical aided design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, Silvio; Narita, Akimitsu; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Hernandez, Yenny; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Beljonne, David

    2012-06-26

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are strips of graphene cut along a specific direction that feature peculiar electronic and optical properties owing to lateral confinement effects. We show here by means of (time-dependent) density functional theory calculations that GNRs with properly designed edge structures fulfill the requirements in terms of electronic level alignment with common acceptors (namely, C(60)), solar light harvesting, and singlet-triplet exchange energy to be used as low band gap semiconductors for organic photovoltaics.

  7. Using highly efficient nonlinear experimental design methods for optimization of Lactococcus lactis fermentation in chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiying; Block, David E

    2009-01-01

    Optimization of fermentation media and processes is a difficult task due to the potential for high dimensionality and nonlinearity. Here we develop and evaluate variations on two novel and highly efficient methods for experimental fermentation optimization. The first approach is based on using a truncated genetic algorithm with a developing neural network model to choose the best experiments to run. The second approach uses information theory, along with Bayesian regularized neural network models, for experiment selection. To evaluate these methods experimentally, we used them to develop a new chemically defined medium for Lactococcus lactis IL1403, along with an optimal temperature and initial pH, to achieve maximum cell growth. The media consisted of 19 defined components or groups of components. The optimization results show that the maximum cell growth from the optimal process of each novel method is generally comparable to or higher than that achieved using a traditional statistical experimental design method, but these optima are reached in about half of the experiments (73-94 vs. 161, depending on the variants of methods). The optimal chemically defined media developed in this work are rich media that can support high cell density growth 3.5-4 times higher than the best reported synthetic medium and 72% higher than a commonly used complex medium (M17) at optimization scale. The best chemically defined medium found using the method was evaluated and compared with other defined or complex media at flask- and fermentor-scales. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  8. Ameliorating soil chemical properties of a hard setting subsoil layer in Coastal Plain USA with different designer biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigua, G C; Novak, J M; Watts, D W

    2016-01-01

    Biochar application is an emerging management option to increase soil fertility. Biochars could improve chemical properties of soils with hard setting subsoil layer. However, biochar effect can be inconsistent because different biochars react differently in soils. We hypothesized that addition of designer biochars will have variable effects on improving the chemical properties of hard setting layers. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of biochars on soil properties in Norfolk's soil with a hard setting subsoil layer grown with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). All designer biochars were added at the rate of 40 Mg ha(-1). Feedstocks used for biochars production were: plant-based (pine chips, 100% PC); animal-based (poultry litter, 100% PL); 50:50 blend (50% PC:50% PL); 80:20 blend (80% PC:20% PL); and hardwood (100% HW). Higher nutrient availability was found after additions of biochars especially additions of 100% PL and 50:50 blend of PC and PL. On the average, applications of 100% PL and 50:50 blend of PC:PL had the greatest amount of soil total nitrogen with means of 1.94±0.3% and 1.44±0.3%, respectively. When compared with the control and other biochars, 50:50 blend of PC:PL additions resulted in increase of 669% for P, 830% for K, 307% for Ca, 687% for Mg and 2315% for Na while application of 100% PL increased the concentration of extractable P, K, Ca, Mg, and Na by 363%, 1349%, 152%, 363%, and 3152%, respectively. Overall, our results showed promising significance since biochars did improve chemical properties of a Norfolk's soil. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Sand Intermittent Filtration Technology for safer Domestic Sewage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'fotal alkalinity of domestic sewage was recorded 423.33 mg/l. Maximum reduction of Total alkalinity i.e. 37.9% was found at 2 feet depth in 3:l ratio while ... 3 by generating unfavorable temperature resulted lowered uptake of oxygen and due to their retention in the bed. Chemical oxygen demand. (COD) of domestic sewage ...

  10. Thermo-hydrological and chemical (THC) modeling to support Field Test Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zyvoloski, George Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Terry Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This report summarizes ongoing efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report includes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt”, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013). Since the last deliverable, there have been code updates to improve the integration of the salt module with the pre-existing code and development of quality assurance (QA) tests of constitutive functions and precipitation/dissolution reactions. Simulations of bench-scale experiments, both historical and currently in the planning stages have been performed. Additional simulations have also been performed on the drift-scale model that incorporate new processes, such as an evaporation function to estimate water vapor removal from the crushed salt backfill and isotopic fractionation of water isotopes. Finally, a draft of a journal paper on the importance of clay dehydration on water availability is included as Appendix I.

  11. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Eiteman

    2007-07-31

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzymes PEP carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The study reports on strain development and process development. In the area of strain development, knockouts in genes which divert carbon from the enzymatic steps involved in CO{sub 2} consumption were completed, and were shown not to affect significantly the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinic acid generation. Furthermore, the pyc gene encoding for pyruvate carboxylase proved to be unstable when integrated onto the chromosome. In the area of process development, an optimal medium, pH and base counterion were obtained, leading to a sequestration rate as great as 800 mg/Lh. Detailed studies of gas phase composition demonstrated that CO{sub 2} composition has a significant affect on CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the presence of 'toxic' compounds in the gas, including NO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} did not have a detrimental effect on sequestration. Some results on prolonging the rate of sequestration indicate that enzyme activities decrease with time, suggesting methods to prolong enzyme activity may benefit the overall process.

  12. Design of a versatile chemical assembly method for patterning colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J H; Adams, S M; Ragan, R

    2009-01-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) domains in phase-separated polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer thin films were chemically modified for controlled placement of solution synthesized Au nanoparticles having a mean diameter of 24 nm. Colloidal Au nanoparticles functionalized with thioctic acid were immobilized on amine functionalized PMMA domains on the PS-b-PMMA template using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride linking chemistry and N-hydroxy sulfosuccinimide stabilizer. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated immobilization of Au nanoparticles commensurate with PMMA domains. Nanoparticles form into clusters of single particles, dimers, and linear chains as directed by the PMMA domain size and shape. Capillary forces influence the spacing between Au nanoparticles on PMMA domains. Inter-particle spacings below 3 nm were achieved and these assemblies of closely spaced nanoparticle clusters are expected to exhibit strong localized electromagnetic fields. Thus, these processes and material systems provide an experimental platform for studying resonantly enhanced excitations of surface plasmons as a function of material and geometric structure as well as utilization in catalytic applications.

  13. Identification of novel target genes for safer and more specific control of root-knot nematodes from a pan-genome mining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne G J Danchin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes are globally the most aggressive and damaging plant-parasitic nematodes. Chemical nematicides have so far constituted the most efficient control measures against these agricultural pests. Because of their toxicity for the environment and danger for human health, these nematicides have now been banned from use. Consequently, new and more specific control means, safe for the environment and human health, are urgently needed to avoid worldwide proliferation of these devastating plant-parasites. Mining the genomes of root-knot nematodes through an evolutionary and comparative genomics approach, we identified and analyzed 15,952 nematode genes conserved in genomes of plant-damaging species but absent from non target genomes of chordates, plants, annelids, insect pollinators and mollusks. Functional annotation of the corresponding proteins revealed a relative abundance of putative transcription factors in this parasite-specific set compared to whole proteomes of root-knot nematodes. This may point to important and specific regulators of genes involved in parasitism. Because these nematodes are known to secrete effector proteins in planta, essential for parasitism, we searched and identified 993 such effector-like proteins absent from non-target species. Aiming at identifying novel targets for the development of future control methods, we biologically tested the effect of inactivation of the corresponding genes through RNA interference. A total of 15 novel effector-like proteins and one putative transcription factor compatible with the design of siRNAs were present as non-redundant genes and had transcriptional support in the model root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Infestation assays with siRNA-treated M. incognita on tomato plants showed significant and reproducible reduction of the infestation for 12 of the 16 tested genes compared to control nematodes. These 12 novel genes, showing efficient reduction of parasitism when

  14. Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control for Multiple-Flyby Interplanetary Mission Design Using Chemical Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob; Vavrina, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The customer (scientist or project manager) most often does not want just one point solution to the mission design problem Instead, an exploration of a multi-objective trade space is required. For a typical main-belt asteroid mission the customer might wish to see the trade-space of: Launch date vs. Flight time vs. Deliverable mass, while varying the destination asteroid, planetary flybys, launch year, etcetera. To address this question we use a multi-objective discrete outer-loop which defines many single objective real-valued inner-loop problems.

  15. Extraction of uranium from seawater: chemical process and plant design feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.H.; Frame, J.M.; Dudey, N.D.; Kiel, G.R.; Mesec, V.; Woodfield, F.W.; Binney, S.E.; Jante, M.R.; Anderson, R.C.; Clark, G.T.

    1979-02-01

    A major assessment was made of the uranium resources in seawater. Several concepts for moving seawater to recover the uranium were investigated, including pumping the seawater and using natural ocean currents or tides directly. The optimal site chosen was on the southeastern Puerto Rico coast, with the south U.S. Atlantic coast as an alternate. The various processes for extracting uranium from seawater were reviewed, with the adsorption process being the most promising at the present time. Of the possible adsorbents, hydrous titanium oxide was found to have the best properties. A uranium extraction plant was conceptually designed. Of the possible methods for contacting the seawater with the adsorbent, a continuous fluidized bed concept was chosen as most practical for a pumped system. A plant recovering 500 tonnes of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ per year requires 5900 cubic meters per second of seawater to be pumped through the adsorbent beds for a 70% overall recovery efficiency. Total cost of the plant was estimated to be about $6.2 billion. A computer model for the process was used for parametric sensitivity studies and economic projections. Several design case variations were developed. Other topics addressed were the impact of co-product recovery, environmental considerations, etc.

  16. Extraction of uranium from seawater: chemical process and plant design feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, M.H.; Frame, J.M.; Dudey, N.D.; Kiel, G.R.; Mesec, V.; Woodfield, F.W.; Binney, S.E.; Jante, M.R.; Anderson, R.C.; Clark, G.T.

    1979-02-01

    A major assessment was made of the uranium resources in seawater. Several concepts for moving seawater to recover the uranium were investigated, including pumping the seawater and using natural ocean currents or tides directly. The optimal site chosen was on the southeastern Puerto Rico coast, with the south U.S. Atlantic coast as an alternate. The various processes for extracting uranium from seawater were reviewed, with the adsorption process being the most promising at the present time. Of the possible adsorbents, hydrous titanium oxide was found to have the best properties. A uranium extraction plant was conceptually designed. Of the possible methods for contacting the seawater with the adsorbent, a continuous fluidized bed concept was chosen as most practical for a pumped system. A plant recovering 500 tonnes of U 3 O 8 per year requires 5900 cubic meters per second of seawater to be pumped through the adsorbent beds for a 70% overall recovery efficiency. Total cost of the plant was estimated to be about $6.2 billion. A computer model for the process was used for parametric sensitivity studies and economic projections. Several design case variations were developed. Other topics addressed were the impact of co-product recovery, environmental considerations, etc

  17. Toward safer food: perspectives on risk and priority setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffmann, Sandra; Taylor, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ix 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. PART I Framing the Design Problem Getting to Risk-Based Food Safety Regulatory Management: Lessons from Federal Environmental Policy...

  18. Beyond HIV-serodiscordance: Partnership communication dynamics that affect engagement in safer conception care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Bridget F.; Bajunirwe, Francis; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Bwana, Mwebesa; Ng, Courtney; Kastner, Jasmine; Kembabazi, Annet; Sanyu, Naomi; Kusasira, Adrine; Haberer, Jessica E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Kaida, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We explored acceptability and feasibility of safer conception methods among HIV-affected couples in Uganda. Methods We recruited HIV-positive men and women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (‘index’) from the Uganda Antiretroviral Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort who reported an HIV-negative or unknown-serostatus partner (‘partner’), HIV-serostatus disclosure to partner, and personal or partner desire for a child within two years. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 individuals from 20 couples, using a narrative approach with tailored images to assess acceptability of five safer conception strategies: ART for the infected partner, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the uninfected partner, condomless sex timed to peak fertility, manual insemination, and male circumcision. Translated and transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results 11/20 index participants were women, median age of 32.5 years, median of 2 living children, and 80% had HIV-RNA for women. Such miscommunication was common, as only 2 of 20 partnerships in our sample were mutually-disclosed with agreement across all four communication themes. Conclusions Enthusiasm for safer conception programming is growing. Our findings highlight the importance of addressing gendered partnership communication regarding HIV disclosure, reproductive goals, acceptable HIV risk, and commitment, alongside technical safer conception advice. Failing to consider partnership dynamics across these domains risks limiting reach, uptake, adherence to, and retention in safer conception programming. PMID:28880892

  19. Community Influences on Married Women's Safer Sex Negotiation Attitudes in Bangladesh: A Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesmin, Syeda S; Cready, Cynthia M

    2016-02-01

    The influence of disadvantaged or deprived community on individuals' health risk-behaviors is increasingly being documented in a growing body of literature. However, little is known about the effects of community characteristics on women's sexual attitudes and behaviors. To examine community effects on married women's safer sex negotiation attitudes, we analyzed cross-sectional data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys on a sample of 15,134 married women in 600 communities. We estimated two multilevel logistic regression models. Model 1, which included only individual-level variables, showed that women's autonomy/empowerment, age, and HIV knowledge had significant associations with their safer sex negotiation attitudes. We did not find any socioeconomic status gradient in safer sex negotiation attitudes at the individual level. Adding community-level variables in Model 2 significantly improved the fit of the model. Strikingly, we found that higher community-level poverty was associated with greater positive safer sex negotiation attitudes. Prevailing gender norms and overall women's empowerment in the community also had significant effects. While research on community influences calls for focusing on disadvantaged communities, our research highlights the importance of not underestimating the challenges that married women in economically privileged communities may face in negotiating safer sex. To have sufficient and equitable impact on married women's sexual and reproductive health, sexual and reproductive health promotion policies and programs need to be directed to women in wealthier communities as well.

  20. Process of chemical recycling of post-consumer PET using a factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Carlos Eduardo de O.; Almeida, Yeda Medeiros B. de; Vinhas, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated important variables in the depolymerization reaction of post-consumer poly (ethylene terephthalate) - PET via alkaline hydrolysis. Through this reaction is obtained terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer, which when purified, is used for the production of PET resin. The study was based on a 2 2 factorial design in which the independent variables were the concentration of NaOH solution and the reaction time, and the dependent variable was the yield of PTA obtained. The experiments that generated the best results, 100 % of yield, were obtained with the higher values of the independent variables. Statistical analysis showed that the concentration of NaOH solution is the variable that most influences in the process. The PTA obtained was analyzed by NMR ¹H technique, confirming the strong resemblance to commercial PTA obtained by petrochemical way. (author)

  1. Chemical food safety: a scientist's perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riviere, J. Edmond (Jim Edmond)

    2002-01-01

    ... AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements This work is a revised and expanded version of my original book on this subject: Why Our Food is Safer Through Science: Fallacies of the Chemical Threat, published in 1997. The lion's share of thanks for both works must go to Dr. Nancy Ann Monteiro (my spouse, soul mate, and fellow toxicologist) for truly helping me w...

  2. An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer by fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Malin, E-mail: liumalin@tsinghua.edu.cn; Chang, Jiaxing; Shao, Youlin; Liu, Bing

    2015-12-15

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle has been successful in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), but an improved design is required for future development. In this paper, the coating layers are reconsidered, and an improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer is proposed. Three methods of preparing the porous SiC layer, called high methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentration method, high Ar concentration method and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) method, are experimentally studied. It is indicated that porous SiC layer can be successfully prepared and the density of SiC layer can be adjusted by tuning the preparation parameters. Microstructure and characterization of the improved TRISO coated particle are given based on scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. It can be found that the improved TRISO coated particle with porous SiC layer can be mass produced successfully. The formation mechanisms of porous SiC layer are also discussed based on the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition principle. - Graphical abstract: An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer to replace the inner porous pyrolytic carbon layer was proposed and prepared by FB-CVD method. This new design is aimed to reduce the total internal pressure of the particles by reducing the formation of CO and to reduce the risks of amoeba effect. - Highlights: • An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer was proposed. • Three methods of preparing porous SiC layer are proposed and experimentally studied. • The density of porous SiC layer can be controlled by adjusting experimental parameters. • Formation mechanisms of porous SiC layer were given based on the FB-CVD principle. • TRISO particles with porous SiC inner layer were mass produced successfully.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 411. Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis), Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick K. [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 411, Double Tracks Plutonium Dispersion (Nellis). CAU 411 is located on the Nevada Test and Training Range and consists of a single corrective action site (CAS), NAFR-23-01, Pu Contaminated Soil. There is sufficient information and historical documentation from previous investigations and the 1996 interim corrective action to recommend closure of CAU 411 using the SAFER process. Based on existing data, the presumed corrective action for CAU 411 is clean closure. However, additional data will be obtained during a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, and to determine whether the CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. This SAFER Plan provides the methodology to gather the necessary information for closing the CAU. The results of the field investigation will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 20, 2014, by representatives of NDEP, the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine whether CAU 411 closure objectives have been achieved. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 411; Collect environmental samples from designated target populations to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information; If COCs are no longer present, establish clean closure as the corrective action; If COCs are present, the extent of contamination will be defined and further corrective actions

  4. Consensus statement: Supporting Safer Conception and Pregnancy For Men And Women Living with and Affected by HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn T; Beyeza-Kashesya, Jolly; Cooke, Ian; Davies, Natasha; Heffron, Renee; Kaida, Angela; Kinuthia, John; Mmeje, Okeoma; Semprini, Augusto E; Weber, Shannon

    2017-05-13

    Safer conception interventions reduce HIV incidence while supporting the reproductive goals of people living with or affected by HIV. We developed a consensus statement to address demand, summarize science, identify information gaps, outline research and policy priorities, and advocate for safer conception services. This statement emerged from a process incorporating consultation from meetings, literature, and key stakeholders. Three co-authors developed an outline which was discussed and modified with co-authors, working group members, and additional clinical, policy, and community experts in safer conception, HIV, and fertility. Co-authors and working group members developed and approved the final manuscript. Consensus across themes of demand, safer conception strategies, and implementation were identified. There is demand for safer conception services. Access is limited by stigma towards PLWH having children and limits to provider knowledge. Efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and acceptability data support a range of safer conception strategies including ART, PrEP, limiting condomless sex to peak fertility, home insemination, male circumcision, STI treatment, couples-based HIV testing, semen processing, and fertility care. Lack of guidelines and training limit implementation. Key outstanding questions within each theme are identified. Consumer demand, scientific data, and global goals to reduce HIV incidence support safer conception service implementation. We recommend that providers offer services to HIV-affected men and women, and program administrators integrate safer conception care into HIV and reproductive health programs. Answers to outstanding questions will refine services but should not hinder steps to empower people to adopt safer conception strategies to meet reproductive goals.

  5. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer - 13158

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Conley, S.F.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Schatz, Aaron L.; Brown, W.L.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    documents, the system saves three-to-four man days each month for the field personnel taking the measurements and the scientists and administrators managing the data and the documentation. After the information has received technical review, FLEDG automatically updates the database for water-level measurements and loads the document management system with the completed sampling report. Due to safety considerations, access to wells is conditional. A spreadsheet with appropriate data not only lists the wells that are cleared for work, but also the safety personnel who must be present before work can start. This spreadsheet is used in planning daily activities. Daily plans are structured to ensure that the wells to be sampled are cleared for work and the appropriate safety personnel have been assigned and are present before the work starts. Historically, the spreadsheets have been prepared manually, and as a result, are potentially subject to human error. However, a companion database application has been developed to work with FLEDG - making the entire sampling process more efficient and safer for personnel. The Well Access List - Electronic, WAL-E, is a database that contains much the same information that was previously manually loaded into the spread sheet. In addition, WAL-E contains a managed work-flow application that shows the access requirements and allows for appropriate reviews of the compiled well. Various CHPRC organizations, including Industrial Hygiene, RADCON, and Well Maintenance and Sample Administration are able to enter and review the wells added or deleted from the WAL-E database. The FLEDG system then accesses this database information to identify appropriate support personnel and provide safety requirements to field personnel. In addition, WAL-E offers the assurance that wells have appropriate locks and are correctly labeled and electrically grounded as required, before well activities begin. This feature is an extremely important aspect of the FLEDG

  6. Safer sexual practices among African American women: intersectional socialisation and sexual assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Danice L; Blackmon, Sha'Kema; Shiflett, Alexandra

    2017-09-18

    Scholars have posited that childhood socialisation experiences may play a key role in influencing behaviours and attitudes that contribute to the acquisition of HIV. This study examined the links between past ethnic-racial and gender socialisation, sexual assertiveness and the safe sexual practices of African American college women utilising a cluster analytic approach. After identifying separate racial-gender and ethnic-gender socialisation profiles, results indicated that ethnic-gender socialisation cluster profiles were directly associated with sexual assertiveness and safer sex behaviour. Greater levels of ethnic socialisation and low traditional gender role socialisation were found to be associated with greater sexual assertiveness and safer sex behaviour. Further analysis showed that sexual assertiveness mediated the links between the identified ethnic-gender socialisation profiles and safer sex behaviour. Implications for policy and programme development are discussed.

  7. Examining the Principles of Influence on Safer Sex Communication During Casual and Committed Sexual Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds-Tylus, Tobias; Rinaldi-Miles, Anna; Quick, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    Teens and young people are at risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections. Understanding how relationship context may moderate the effectiveness of safer sex communication strategies among this demographic is important information for practitioners striving to promote safer sex behaviors. In this study, focus groups (N = 9) with college students were conducted and analyzed to examine the relation between 6 principles of influence (authority, consistency, liking, reciprocity, scarcity, and social proof) and safer sex communication during committed and casual sexual encounters. Results revealed that with the exceptions of social proof and consistency, the principles of influence were endorsed more frequently for casual than committed sexual encounters. For casual sexual encounters, the principles of authority, reciprocity, and scarcity arose as influential principles. For committed sexual encounters, the principles of consistency, liking, and reciprocity arose as influential principles. These results are discussed with an emphasis on the theoretical and practical implications.

  8. Investigation of Chemical-Foam Design as a Novel Approach toward Immiscible Foam Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Nasab, S M; Zitha, P L J

    2017-10-19

    Strong foam can be generated in porous media containing oil, resulting in incremental oil recovery; however, oil recovery factor is restricted. A large fraction of oil recovered by foam flooding forms an oil-in-water emulsion, so that costly methods may need to be used to separate the oil. Moreover, strong foam could create a large pressure gradient, which may cause fractures in the reservoir. This study presents a novel chemical-foam flooding process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) from water-flooded reservoirs. The presented method involved the use of chemically designed foam to mobilize the remaining oil after water flooding and then to displace the mobilized oil to the production well. A blend of two anionic surfactant formulations was formulated for this method: (a) IOS, for achieving ultralow interfacial tension (IFT), and (b) AOS, for generating a strong foam. Experiments were performed using Bentheimer sandstone cores, where X-ray CT images were taken during foam generation to find the stability of the advancing front of foam propagation and to map the gas saturation for both the transient and the steady-state flow regimes. Then the proposed chemical-foam strategy for incremental oil recovery was tested through the coinjection of immiscible nitrogen gas and surfactant solutions with three different formulation properties in terms of IFT reduction and foaming strength capability. The discovered optimal formulation contains a foaming agent surfactant, a low IFT surfactant, and a cosolvent, which has a high foam stability and a considerably low IFT (1.6 × 10 -2 mN/m). Coinjection resulted in higher oil recovery and much less MRF than the same process with only using a foaming agent. The oil displacement experiment revealed that coinjection of gas with a blend of surfactants, containing a cosolvent, can recover a significant amount of oil (33% OIIP) over water flooding with a larger amount of clean oil and less emulsion.

  9. Towards designing polymers for photovoltaic applications: A DFT and experimental study of polyazomethines with various chemical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkiewicz, Jacek; Iwan, Agnieszka; Pilch, Marek; Boharewicz, Bartosz; Wójcik, Kamil; Tazbir, Igor; Kaminska, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Theoretical studies of polyazomethines (PAZs) with various chemical structures designated for photovoltaic applications are presented. PAZ energy levels and optical properties were calculated within density-functional theory (DFT and TDDFT) framework for 28 oligomers (monomer, dimer and trimer) of PAZs. The correlations between chemical structure of PAZ and location of its highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels were examined. It turned out that the presence of triaminophenylene, dimethoxydiphenylene and fluorine group raises the orbital energies. As a consequence, it is a factor which improves the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cell built on the base of the corresponding PAZ and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). On the contrary, quinone, 1,3,5-triazine and perfluorophenylene groups lower orbital energies and have negative influence on the photovoltaic efficiency. Moreover, calculations for methyl, ethyl and butyl analogs of P3HT as well as polythiophenes were performed and compared with the results obtained for PAZs. In addition experimental data are presented, which cover optical, electrochemical and electrical transport properties of the studied PAZs, allowing to determine HOMO and LUMO energies of the polymers and their conductivity. Finally, comparison between calculated and experimental results were made and discussed.

  10. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two-part series, a new rotary reactor concept for gas-fueled CLC is proposed and analyzed. In part 1, the detailed configuration of the rotary reactor is described. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet and exit. Two purging sectors are used to avoid the mixing between the fuel stream and the air stream. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of channels with copper oxide coated on the inner surface of the channels. The support material is boron nitride, which has high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Gas flows through the reactor at elevated pressure, and it is heated to a high temperature by fuel combustion. Typical design parameters for a thermal capacity of 1 MW have been proposed, and a simplified model is developed to predict the performances of the reactor. The potential drawbacks of the rotary reactor are also discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Implementation of an innovative teaching project in a Chemical Process Design course at the University of Cantabria, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Berta; Muñoz, Iciar; Viguri, Javier R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper shows the planning, the teaching activities and the evaluation of the learning and teaching process implemented in the Chemical Process Design course at the University of Cantabria, Spain. Educational methods to address the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students who complete the course are expected to acquire are proposed and discussed. Undergraduate and graduate engineers' perceptions of the methodology used are evaluated by means of a questionnaire. Results of the teaching activities and the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed case study are discussed in relation to the course characteristics. The findings of the empirical evaluation shows that the excessive time students had to dedicate to the case study project and dealing with limited information are the most negative aspects obtained, whereas an increase in the students' self-confidence and the practical application of the methodology are the most positive aspects. Finally, improvements are discussed in order to extend the application of the methodology to other courses offered as part of the chemical engineering degree.

  12. Towards designing polymers for photovoltaic applications: A DFT and experimental study of polyazomethines with various chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkiewicz, Jacek; Iwan, Agnieszka; Pilch, Marek; Boharewicz, Bartosz; Wójcik, Kamil; Tazbir, Igor; Kaminska, Maria

    2017-06-15

    Theoretical studies of polyazomethines (PAZs) with various chemical structures designated for photovoltaic applications are presented. PAZ energy levels and optical properties were calculated within density-functional theory (DFT and TDDFT) framework for 28 oligomers (monomer, dimer and trimer) of PAZs. The correlations between chemical structure of PAZ and location of its highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels were examined. It turned out that the presence of triaminophenylene, dimethoxydiphenylene and fluorine group raises the orbital energies. As a consequence, it is a factor which improves the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cell built on the base of the corresponding PAZ and [6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). On the contrary, quinone, 1,3,5-triazine and perfluorophenylene groups lower orbital energies and have negative influence on the photovoltaic efficiency. Moreover, calculations for methyl, ethyl and butyl analogs of P3HT as well as polythiophenes were performed and compared with the results obtained for PAZs. In addition experimental data are presented, which cover optical, electrochemical and electrical transport properties of the studied PAZs, allowing to determine HOMO and LUMO energies of the polymers and their conductivity. Finally, comparison between calculated and experimental results were made and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Rationale and Design of the Surgical Treatment for IsChemic Heart failure (STICH) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Oh, Jae K.; Bonow, Robert O.; Pohost, Gerald M.; Feldman, Arthur M.; Mark, Daniel B.; Panza, Julio A.; Sopko, George; Rouleau, Jean L.; Jones, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The rationale and design of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial is described. Prior to STICH, <1000 ischemic cardiomyopathy patients had been studied in randomized comparisons of medical therapy (MED) versus coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Trial data reflect how these therapies were delivered over 20 years ago and do not indicate the relative benefits of MED versus CABG in contemporary practice. Methods Randomization of consenting patients with heart failure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction ≤0.35, and coronary artery disease is based on whether patients are judged by attending physicians to be candidates only for CABG or for MED or CABG. Patients eligible for surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR) due to significant anterior wall akinesis or dyskinesis, but ineligible for MED are randomly assigned to CABG with or without SVR. Patients eligible for MED are randomly assigned between MED only and MED with CABG. Patients eligible for all 3 are randomly assigned evenly to MED only, MED and CABG, or MED and CABG and SVR. Major substudies will examine quality of life, cost-effectiveness, changes in LV volumes, impact of myocardial viability, selected biomarkers, and selected polymorphisms on treatment differences Conclusions STICH is an NHLBI-funded multicenter international randomized trial addressing 2 specific primary hypotheses: 1) CABG with intensive MED improves long-term survival compared with MED alone; and 2) in patients with anterior LV dysfunction, SVR to a more normal LV size plus CABG improves survival free of subsequent hospitalization for cardiac cause when compared with CABG alone. PMID:18023680

  14. Chemical design of radiolabeled antibody fragments for low renal radioactivity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arano, Y; Fujioka, Y; Akizawa, H; Ono, M; Uehara, T; Wakisaka, K; Nakayama, M; Sakahara, H; Konishi, J; Saji, H

    1999-01-01

    imaging and therapy using antibody fragments as vehicles. These findings also suggested that the radiochemical design of radiolabeled antibody fragments that liberate radiometabolites of urinary excretion from antibody fragments by the action of brush border enzymes may constitute a new strategy for reducing the renal radioactivity levels of antibody fragments.

  15. The SAFER guides: empowering organizations to improve the safety and effectiveness of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to improve quality and safety of healthcare. However, EHR users have experienced safety concerns from EHR design and usability features that are not optimally adapted for the complex work flow of real-world practice. Few strategies exist to address unintended consequences from implementation of EHRs and other health information technologies. We propose that organizations equipped with EHRs should consider the strategy of "proactive risk assessment" of their EHR-enabled healthcare system to identify and address EHR-related safety concerns. In this paper, we describe the conceptual underpinning of an EHR-related self-assessment strategy to provide institutions a foundation upon which they could build their safety efforts. With support from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), we used a rigorous, iterative process to develop a set of 9 self-assessment tools to optimize the safety and safe use of EHRs. These tools, referred to as the Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience (SAFER) guides, could be used to self-assess safety and effectiveness of EHR implementations, identify specific areas of vulnerability, and create solutions and culture change to mitigate risks. A variety of audiences could conduct these assessments, including frontline clinicians or care teams in different practices, or clinical, quality, or administrative leaders within larger institutions. The guides use a multifaceted systems-based approach to assess risk and empower organizations to work with internal or external stakeholders (eg, EHR developers) on optimizing EHR functionality and using EHRs to drive improvements in the quality and safety of healthcare.

  16. How traffic law enforcement can contribute to safer roads.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adminaite, D. Jost, G. Stipdonk, H. & Ward, H.

    2016-01-01

    Exceeding speed limits, drink or distracted driving and failure to wear a seat belt are still the leading causes of death and serious injury on European roads. Despite legislation designed to prevent all four, many drivers involved in fatal traffic collisions clearly failed to comply with one or

  17. Learning how to make cities safer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... A poverty reduction program in South Africa is showing enormous potential for reducing urban violence, even though it was designed as a social safety net, not a crime prevention strategy. The Community Work Programme (CWP) provides work – and wages – to its mainly female participants, allowing them ...

  18. The Architecture of Chemical Alternatives Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Kenneth; Tickner, Joel; Edwards, Sally; Rossi, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Chemical alternatives assessment is a method rapidly developing for use by businesses, governments, and nongovernment organizations seeking to substitute chemicals of concern in production processes and products. Chemical alternatives assessment is defined as a process for identifying, comparing, and selecting safer alternatives to chemicals of concern (including those in materials, processes, or technologies) on the basis of their hazards, performance, and economic viability. The process is intended to provide guidance for assuring that chemicals of concern are replaced with safer alternatives that are not likely to be later regretted. Conceptually, the assessment methods are developed from a set of three foundational pillars and five common principles. Based on a number of emerging alternatives assessment initiatives, in this commentary, we outline a chemical alternatives assessment blueprint structured around three broad steps: Scope, Assessment, and Selection and Implementation. Specific tasks and tools are identified for each of these three steps. While it is recognized that on-going practice will further refine and develop the method and tools, it is important that the structure of the assessment process remain flexible, adaptive, and focused on the substitution of chemicals of concern with safer alternatives. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Streamlined Approach for (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 566: E-MAD Compound, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566, EMAD Compound, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-99-20, EMAD Compound This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-99-20. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 566 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The data quality objective (DQO) strategy for CAU 566 was developed at a meeting on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 566. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will

  20. Understanding Barriers to Safer Sex Practice in Zimbabwean Marriages: Implications for Future HIV Prevention Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugweni, Esther; Omar, Mayeh; Pearson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Against the backdrop of high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence in stable relationships in Southern Africa, our study presents sociocultural barriers to safer sex practice in Zimbabwean marriages. We conducted 36 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with married men and women in Zimbabwe in 2008. Our aim was to identify…

  1. Are Charter Schools Safer in Deindustrialized Cities with High Rates of Crime? Testing Hypotheses in Detroit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Families in deindustrialized cities with high crime rates report prioritizing school safety when opting for charter schools. Yet, very little research has investigated whether charter schools are safer than traditional public schools. This study compares charter and traditional public schools in Detroit, Michigan, on perceived school safety by…

  2. A Safer and Convenient Synthesis of Sulfathiazole for Undergraduate Organic and Medicinal Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Jeff; Otty, Sandra; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi

    2012-01-01

    A safer method for the synthesis of the sulfonamide drug sulfathiazole, for undergraduate classes, is described. This method improves upon procedures currently followed in several undergraduate teaching laboratories for the synthesis of sulfathiazole. Key features of this procedure include the total exclusion of pyridine, which has potential…

  3. The WHO five keys to safer food: A tool for food safety health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In response to the increasing need to educate food handlers, including consumers about their responsibilities for assuring the safety of food, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a health promotion campaign around five simple rules, "the five keys to safer food" to help ensure food safety during food handling and ...

  4. HIV-Positive Mothers' Communication about Safer Sex and Std Prevention with Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Debra A.; Roberts, Kathleen Johnston; Herbeck, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers play an important role in promoting the sexual health of their adolescent children. Fifty-seven HIV-positive mothers with adolescent children participated in an in-depth, qualitative interview regarding whether they have talked to their children about safer sex and sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, including at what age they…

  5. Motives and barriers to safer sex and regular STI testing among MSM soon after HIV diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, Titia; Zuure, Freke; Stolte, Ineke; Davidovich, Udi

    2017-01-01

    Understanding why some recently with HIV diagnosed men who have sex with men (MSM) choose for safer sex and regular STI testing, whereas others do not, is important for the development of interventions that aim to improve the sexual health of those newly infected. To gain insight into motives and

  6. Achieving Safety: Safer Sex, Communication, and Desire among Young Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Anna; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Pingel, Emily; Johns, Michelle Marie; Santana, Matthew Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Conceptualizations of safer sex practices among young gay men (YGM) are frequently structured around communication between partners and the subsequent utilization or absence of condoms in a sexual encounter. Drawing on a sample of 34 in-depth interviews with YGM, ages 18 to 24, the authors explore the ways in which conceptualizations and…

  7. kNOw Fear: Making rural public spaces safer for women and girls ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-02

    4 days ago ... Big pink stickers point the way to the women's only car in the Delhi subway. “This taxi respects women” decals adorn cabs in the city's snarled traffic. These are outward signs of the potent advocacy pushing governments, like Delhi's, to make public spaces and transportation in India's cities safer for women ...

  8. Seriously Mentally Ill Women's Safer Sex Behaviors and the Theory of Reasoned Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Mary E.; Pinkerton, Steven D.; Somlai, Anton M.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; McAuliffe, Timothy L.; Gibson, Richard H.; Hackl, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Seriously mentally ill women at risk for HIV infection (n = 96) participated in structured interviews assessing sexual and substance-use behavior over a 3-month period. The majority of the women (63.5%) did not use condoms. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action, attitudes toward condom use and perceived social norms about safer sex were…

  9. NanoSafer vs. 1.1 - Nanomaterial risk assessment using first order modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Keld A.; Saber, Anne T.; Kristensen, Henrik V.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there are no nanospecific safety data sheets (SDS) fo r manufactured nanomaterials (MN) and there is only limited data available on nanomaterial exposure levels. We have established an advanced control banding tool, NanoSafer, which enables alternative risk assessm ent and guidance...

  10. Identifying psychosocial variables that predict safer sex intentions in adolescents and young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüll, Phil; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wiers, Reinout W; Kok, Gerjo

    Young people are especially vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The triad of deliberate and effective safer sex behavior encompasses condom use, combined with additional information about a partner's sexual health, and the kind of sex acts usually performed. To identify

  11. Identifying Psychosocial Variables That Predict Safer Sex Intentions in Adolescents and Young Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüll, P.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Wiers, R.W.; Kok, G.

    Young people are especially vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The triad of deliberate and effective safer sex behavior encompasses condom use, combined with additional information about a partner’s sexual health, and the kind of sex acts usually performed. To identify

  12. Married women's negotiation for safer sexual intercourse in Kenya: Does experience of female genital mutilation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiangnan; Sano, Yujiro; Kansanga, Moses; Baada, Jemima; Antabe, Roger

    2017-12-01

    Married women's ability to negotiate for safer sex is important for HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa, including Kenya. Yet, its relationship to female genital mutilation is rarely explored, although female genital mutilation has been described as a social norm and marker of womanhood that can control women's sexuality. Drawing on the social normative influence theory, this study addressed this void in the literature. We analysed data from the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey using logistic regression. Our sample included 8,602 married women. Two indicators of safer sex, namely the ability to refuse sex and the ability to ask for condom use, were explored. We found that women who had undergone genital mutilation were significantly less likely to report that they can refuse sex (OR=0.87; pnegotiate for safer sex through gendered socialization and expectations. Based on these findings, several policy implications are suggested. For instance, culturally sensitive programmes are needed that target both married women who have undergone genital mutilation and their husbands to understand the importance of safer sexual practices within marriage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Short-Term Impact of Safer Choices: A Multicomponent, School-Based HIV, Other STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Karin; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Kirby, Douglas; Parcel, Guy; Banspach, Stephen; Harrist, Ronald; Baumler, Elizabeth; Weil, Marsha

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the first year of "Safer Choices," a two-year, multicomponent HIV, STD, and pregnancy-prevention program for high school students based on social theory. Student self-report surveys indicated that "Safer Choices" succeeded in reducing selected risk behaviors and in enhancing selected protective…

  14. Beyond HIV-serodiscordance: Partnership communication dynamics that affect engagement in safer conception care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn T Matthews

    Full Text Available We explored acceptability and feasibility of safer conception methods among HIV-affected couples in Uganda.We recruited HIV-positive men and women on antiretroviral therapy (ART ('index' from the Uganda Antiretroviral Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort who reported an HIV-negative or unknown-serostatus partner ('partner', HIV-serostatus disclosure to partner, and personal or partner desire for a child within two years. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 individuals from 20 couples, using a narrative approach with tailored images to assess acceptability of five safer conception strategies: ART for the infected partner, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for the uninfected partner, condomless sex timed to peak fertility, manual insemination, and male circumcision. Translated and transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis.11/20 index participants were women, median age of 32.5 years, median of 2 living children, and 80% had HIV-RNA <400 copies/mL. Awareness of HIV prevention strategies beyond condoms and abstinence was limited and precluded opportunity to explore or validly assess acceptability or feasibility of safer conception methods. Four key partnership communication challenges emerged as primary barriers to engagement in safer conception care, including: (1 HIV-serostatus disclosure: Although disclosure was an inclusion criterion, partners commonly reported not knowing the index partner's HIV status. Similarly, the partner's HIV-serostatus, as reported by the index, was frequently inaccurate. (2 Childbearing intention: Many couples had divergent childbearing intentions and made incorrect assumptions about their partner's desires. (3 HIV risk perception: Participants had disparate understandings of HIV transmission and disagreed on the acceptable level of HIV risk to meet reproductive goals. (4 Partnership commitment: Participants revealed significant discord in perceptions of partnership commitment. All four types of partnership

  15. Negotiation for safer sex among married women in Cambodia: the role of women's autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Mengieng; Boateng, Godfred O; Armah, Frederick A; Amoyaw, Jonathan A; Luginaah, Isaac; Kuuire, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Negotiating safer sex among married women has been identified as an important determinant of vulnerability or resilience to new HIV infections. Using the Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey data of 2010, this paper examined negotiation for safer sex among 11,218 married women in the context of Cambodia's highly touted reduction in HIV/AIDS prevalence. The results from a complementary log-log regression model indicate that wealthier and highly educated married women were more likely to report that they can refuse sexual intercourse and ask their husbands to use a condom. Interestingly, while women who were fully involved in decision-making on their own health care were 19% more likely to refuse sex, they were 14% less likely to be able to ask their husbands to use a condom, compared with their counterparts who were not involved in this decision-making. Women who were partially involved in decision-making on family visits were 17% less likely to be able to ask their husbands to use a condom compared with those who were not involved. In this context, involvement in decision-making may have translated into trust and risk compensation. Those who believed in HIV transmission myths were less likely to negotiate safer sex relative to their counterparts who did not hold such myths to be true. Women's ability to negotiate for safer sex is, therefore, a function of their autonomy in terms of their full participation in decision-making in health care, household expenditure and mobility. Policy implications of the capacity of women to negotiate for safer sex are delineated.

  16. Safer Ski Jumps: Design of Landing Surfaces and Clothoidal In-Run Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    1 A. AN ABBREVIATED HISTORY OF SKIING ............................................ 1 B. THE RISE OF FREESTYLE SKIING...JUMPING A. AN ABBREVIATED HISTORY OF SKIING Skiing is one of the oldest sports in human history . The earliest known accounts of skiing occurred...skiing, racing, ski ballet , jibbing, powder skiing, aerials, ski jumping, skiercross, and others. 2 1. Olympic Jumps and Aerials Ski jumping gained

  17. Designing heavy vehicles to be safer and more productive using PBS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kienhöfer, FW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available demonstration vehicles: a pipe-carrying vehicle with a payload increase from 32 000 to 48 000 kg, a mining road train with a payload increase from 105 000 to 122 000 kg and a bi-articulated bus able to carry 137 seated passengers....

  18. Simulation and design of the emission wavelength of multiple quantum well structures fabricated by selective area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioda, Tomonari; Doi, Takeshi; Al Amin, Abdullah; Song Xueliang; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Shimogaki, Yukihiro; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    Selective area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (SA-MOCVD) is effective for the monolithic integration of semiconductor optical devices. Using appropriate patterns of SiO 2 masks on a substrate, we can fabricate multiple quantum wells (MQWs) of In 1-x Ga x As y P 1-y alloys with various emission wavelengths. Therefore, we can fabricate both passive elements and active components for different wavelengths on a substrate by a single growth. To make the best use of this SA-MOCVD process, we need a simulation tool that predicts the performance of the grown layer for a given mask pattern. We constructed a simulation that predicts the emission wavelength of MQW structures grown by SA-MOCVD. The simulation took into account the gas-phase diffusion of the precursors of In and Ga and their incorporation to the growth area. The rate parameters of these processes were extracted from the growth-rate profile in the SA-MOCVD of InP and GaAs. Based on these data, we simulated the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength of (1) In 1-x Ga x As y P 1-y bulk films and (2) MQWs consisting of these quaternary alloys. The simulated results agreed with experimental results, indicating the feasibility of computer-assisted design (CAD) of the mask patterns for SA-MOCVD

  19. To err is human. Building a safer health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Marano

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Human beings, make errors Healthcare Services is a complex industry prone to accidents.The IOM Report [1] points out that some systems are more prone to accidents than others. When a system fails there are often multiple faults. In healthcare,human errors are the greatest contributors to accidents,however when human error is to blame it often depends upon failures within the system.These failures exists in the system before the error occurs, the same as with latent errors which are difficult to identify since they may be hidden in computers or within the various managerial layers.

    Most of the errors can be prevented by designing systems that make it hard for people to do the wrong thing and easy for people to do the right thing. In healthcare, this means designing processes that are able to ensure that patients are safe from accidental injury. As healthcare and the system that delivers it become more complex, the opportunities for errors abound. The IOM report “To Err is Human” proposes an approach for reducing medical errors and improving patient safety.The environment within which this occurs has a critical influence on quality.This influence may contain two dimensions; the first consists of the domain of quality which includes the practice that is consistent with current medical knowledge. The second dimension consists of forces in the external environment that can drive quality improvement in the delivery system. Although the risk of dying as a result of a medical error, far surpasses the risk of dying in an airline accident, public attention has been more focused on improving safety in the airline industry than in healthcare systems. Because of the absence of standardized nomenclature, it is important to define what an error is and what is an adverse event, the IOM Report defines them in the following way: “An error is the failure of a planned action to be completed as intended or the use of a wrong plan to achieve an aim

  20. Prolonging contact lens wear and making contact lens wear safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N

    2006-02-01

    To summarize the present status of safety and efficacy of contact lens wear. Literature review. Ovid Medline searches were performed on records from 1966 through 2005 using keywords: keratitis, contact lens complications, extended-wear contact lenses, and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses. Patients desire comfort, clarity of vision, and prolonged contact lens wear when contact lenses are used to correct refractive error. Practitioners desire patient satisfaction but also require maintenance of the integrity of the eye and no complications that jeopardize vision or health of the eye. Improvements in the oxygen permeability of the contact lens materials, design of the contact lens and its surface, and solutions for the maintenance of the lens have reduced but not eliminated the risks of infection, inflammation, and conjunctival papillary reaction associated with contact lens wear. The lessons of past and recent history suggest that patient education and practitioner participation in the management of contact lens wear continue to be critical factors for patient satisfaction and safety in the extended wear of contact lenses. The availability of highly oxygen permeable contact lenses has increased the tolerance and safety of extended contact lens wear, but patient instruction and education in proper use and care of lenses is required and caution is advised.

  1. Beyond HIV-serodiscordance: Partnership communication dynamics that affect engagement in safer conception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn T; Burns, Bridget F; Bajunirwe, Francis; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Bwana, Mwebesa; Ng, Courtney; Kastner, Jasmine; Kembabazi, Annet; Sanyu, Naomi; Kusasira, Adrine; Haberer, Jessica E; Bangsberg, David R; Kaida, Angela

    2017-01-01

    We explored acceptability and feasibility of safer conception methods among HIV-affected couples in Uganda. We recruited HIV-positive men and women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) ('index') from the Uganda Antiretroviral Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort who reported an HIV-negative or unknown-serostatus partner ('partner'), HIV-serostatus disclosure to partner, and personal or partner desire for a child within two years. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 individuals from 20 couples, using a narrative approach with tailored images to assess acceptability of five safer conception strategies: ART for the infected partner, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the uninfected partner, condomless sex timed to peak fertility, manual insemination, and male circumcision. Translated and transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis. 11/20 index participants were women, median age of 32.5 years, median of 2 living children, and 80% had HIV-RNA conception methods. Four key partnership communication challenges emerged as primary barriers to engagement in safer conception care, including: (1) HIV-serostatus disclosure: Although disclosure was an inclusion criterion, partners commonly reported not knowing the index partner's HIV status. Similarly, the partner's HIV-serostatus, as reported by the index, was frequently inaccurate. (2) Childbearing intention: Many couples had divergent childbearing intentions and made incorrect assumptions about their partner's desires. (3) HIV risk perception: Participants had disparate understandings of HIV transmission and disagreed on the acceptable level of HIV risk to meet reproductive goals. (4) Partnership commitment: Participants revealed significant discord in perceptions of partnership commitment. All four types of partnership miscommunication introduced constraints to autonomous reproductive decision-making, particularly for women. Such miscommunication was common, as only 2 of 20 partnerships in our sample were mutually

  2. Materials at 200 mph: Making NASCAR Faster and Safer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra

    2008-03-01

    You cannot win a NASCAR race without understanding science.ootnotetextDiandra Leslie-Pelecky, The Physics of NASCAR (Dutton, New York City, 2008). Materials play important roles in improving performance, as well as ensuring safety. On the performance side, NASCAR limits the materials race car scientists and engineers can use to limit ownership costs. `Exotic metals' are not allowed, so controlling microstructure and nanostructure are important tools. Compacted Graphite Iron, a cast iron in which magnesium additions produce interlocking microscale graphite reinforcements, makes engine blocks stronger and lighter. NASCAR's new car design employs a composite called Tegris^TM that has 70 percent of the strength of carbon fiber composites at about 10 percent of the cost. The most important role of materials in racing is safety. Drivers wear firesuits made of polymers that carbonize (providing thermal protection) and expand (reducing oxygen access) when heated. Catalytic materials originally developed for space-based CO2 lasers filter air for drivers during races. Although materials help cars go fast, they also help cars slow down safely---important because the kinetic energy of a race car going 180 mph is nine times greater than that of a passenger car going 60 mph. Energy-absorbing foams in the cars and on the tracks control energy dissipation during accidents. To say that most NASCAR fans (and there are estimated to be 75 million of them) are passionate about their sport is an understatement. NASCAR fans understand that science and engineering are integral to keeping their drivers safe and helping their teams win. Their passion for racing gives us a great opportunity to share our passion for science with them. NASCAR^ is a registered trademark of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc. Tegris^TM is a trademark of Milliken & Company.

  3. K-Targeted Metabolomic Analysis Extends Chemical Subtraction to DESIGNER Extracts: Selective Depletion of Extracts of Hops (Humulus lupulus)⊥

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid–liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical subtraction enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the subtracted targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted subtraction of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. Multiple countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by 1H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting. PMID:25437744

  4. Safe-R: a novel score, accounting for oncological safe nerve-sparing at radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Andreas; Coelius, Carolina; Adam, Meike; Tennstedt, Pierre; Kluth, Luis; Steuber, Thomas; Heinzer, Hans; Graefen, Markus; Schlomm, Thorsten; Michl, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe a novel score (safe-R), combining information on surgical margin status (SM) and extend of nerve-sparing (NS) applicable for all patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), and to test the impact of our frozen-section navigated nerve-sparing approach (NeuroSAFE) on safe-R score. We retrospectively analyzed 9,635 RPs performed at our center between 2002 and 2011. Of these, 47 % were conducted with NeuroSAFE. Proportions of NS and SM status were assessed. Subsequently, a score for oncological safe NS (safe-R) was developed; Safe-R was categorized as 3 (for negative SM and bilateral NS), 2 (for negative SM and unilateral NS), 1 (for negative SM without NS), and 0 (for patients with positive SM), respectively. The impact of NeuroSAFE on safe-R was analyzed by chi-square test and confirmed by multinomial logistic regression, adjusting for preoperative risk factors. Applying NeuroSAFE resulted in enhanced safe-R score, indicating lower rates of positive SM and higher rates of NS, across all risk categories (all p R 0 (27.6 vs. 33.6 %) and higher proportions of safe-R 3 (32.4 vs. 17.1 %, p R was confirmed after multinomial logistic adjustment for preoperative risk factors. All results were confirmed in a propensity-matched cohort (matched for preoperative risk factors and year of surgery, data not shown). Safe-R represents a novel tool to assess and report on oncological safe nerve-sparing in RP. NeuroSAFE is associated with enhanced safe-R scores.

  5. Policy issues and risk-benefit trade-offs of 'safer surfacing' for children's playgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David J

    2004-07-01

    The case for the universal application of 'safer surfacing' in playgrounds is assessed in terms of absolute risk, cost-benefit, and qualitative factors, and found to be open to question on each front. In parallel, it is noted that members of the child welfare and play communities are increasingly of the view that playgrounds are losing their appeal for children, which in turn has its own health, safety and developmental consequences. In part, this loss of attractiveness may have linkages with the recent concern over play safety and the imposition of measures such as 'safer surfacing'. It is proposed that the drive for play safety, which has existed for some 20 years, should be succeeded by a more holistic approach which, rather than considering play safety in isolation, acknowledges the importance of all attributes of play including child safety both on and off playgrounds, potential beneficial aspects of childhood risk exposure, adventure, and play value.

  6. Design, Modeling, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators with Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposited Polysilicon as Thermoelement Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Maria Theresa; Tarazona, Antulio; Chong, Harold; Kraft, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, fabrication, and evaluation of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with p-type polysilicon deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) as thermoelement material. A thermal model is developed based on energy balance and heat transfer equations using lumped thermal conductances. Several test structures were fabricated to allow characterization of the boron-doped polysilicon material deposited by HWCVD. The film was found to be electrically active without any post-deposition annealing. Based on the tests performed on the test structures, it is determined that the Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the HWCVD polysilicon are 113 μV/K, 126 W/mK, and 3.58 × 10-5 Ω m, respectively. Results from laser tests performed on the fabricated TEG are in good agreement with the thermal model. The temperature values derived from the thermal model are within 2.8% of the measured temperature values. For a 1-W laser input, an open-circuit voltage and output power of 247 mV and 347 nW, respectively, were generated. This translates to a temperature difference of 63°C across the thermoelements. This paper demonstrates that HWCVD, which is a cost-effective way of producing solar cells, can also be applied in the production of TEGs. By establishing that HWCVD polysilicon can be an effective thermoelectric material, further work on developing photovoltaic-thermoelectric (PV-TE) hybrid microsystems that are cost-effective and better performing can be explored.

  7. Identification, design and synthesis of oxygenated hydrocarbon-based carbon dioxide-soluble polymers for chemical and petroleum engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lei

    Over the past two decades the use of sub/supercritical CO2 has received much attention as a green alternative to organic solvents for chemical processes because of its pressure-tunable physicochemical properties and economic advantages. However the advantages are diminished because of a relative narrow range of CO2-soluble materials. The goal of this work is to identify, design and synthesize oxygenated hydrocarbon-based CO 2-soluble polymers that are able to serve as construction blocks for copolymers, dispersants, surfactants, and thickeners. Without concerning on the cost and the environmental persistence like fluorinated materials, the inexpensive and environmentally benign materials would significantly enhance the viability of sub/supercritical CO2-based technology. Based on both experimental heuristics and ab initio simulation of molecular modeling (performed by Dr. Johnson's group), we proposed specific new polymer structures: poly (3-acetoxy oxetane) (PAO), poly (vinyl methoxymethyl ether) (PVMME), poly (vinyl 1-methoxyethyl ether) (PVMEE), and cellulose triacetate (CTA) oligomers. Phase behavior studies were also performed with novel CO 2-philic compounds containing vinyl acetate, propylene glycol, or multiple tert-butyl groups. PAO, PVMME and PVMME were soluble in CO2, but not as soluble as poly (vinyl acetate). Oligomers of cellulose triacetate with as many as four repeat units solubilized into dense CO2 less than 14 MPa in the concentration range of 1-5 wt%. Phase behaviors of more than twenty compounds in dense CO2 were studied in this project. A new type of phase behavior for solid CO2-philes that melt and dissolve in CO 2 was detailed using a model binary mixture of beta-D-maltose octaacetate and CO2. Copolymers of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and vinyl acetate (VAc) exhibited lower miscibility pressures than either of the homopolymers, probably due to quadradentate binding configurations with CO 2. Phase behavior investigation of poly (propylene glycol

  8. New research discovery may mean less radioactive contamination, safer nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-20

    Murph has now made another nanoparticle breakthrough that could benefit various work environments such as nuclear power plants. Murph and her team have created nanoparticle treated stainless steel filters that are capable to capturing radioactive vapor materials. Just like air filters capture dust and dirt, these filters are capable of capturing large amounts of radioactive vapors. The new research may one day mean that nuclear power plant workers, and other workers in related fields, will have a safer working environment.

  9. Pregnancy Intentions and Safer Pregnancy Knowledge Among Female Sex Workers in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Amrita; Baral, Stefan; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Lambert, Andrew; Kose, Zamakayise; Mcingana, Mfezi; Holland, Claire; Ketende, Sosthenes; Schwartz, Sheree

    2016-07-01

    To assess the association between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pregnancy intentions and safer conception knowledge among female sex workers in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. This cross-sectional study recruited female sex workers in Port Elizabeth using respondent-driven sampling and completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire alongside HIV testing and counseling. In this secondary analysis, robust Poisson regression was used to model prevalence ratios for positive fertility intentions in this cross-sectional study. Knowledge of safer conception methods by HIV status was compared using Fisher exact tests. Overall 391 women were represented in the analyses. More than 50% had a prior HIV diagnosis, and an additional 12% were diagnosed with HIV during the study. Approximately half (n=185) of the women reported future pregnancy intentions. In univariate analysis, a prior HIV diagnosis was negatively associated with pregnancy intentions as compared with HIV-negative women (prevalence ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.85). Only parity remained independently associated with future pregnancy intentions in multivariate regression after controlling for HIV status, age, race, relationship status, and years selling sex. Knowledge of safer conception methods such as timed sex without a condom, preexposure prophylaxis, or self-insemination was low and similar between those with and without future pregnancy plans. Pregnancy intentions did not significantly vary according to HIV status. Fertility intentions were high, however, and knowledge of safer conception methods low, suggesting a need to provide female sex workers with advice around options to conceive safely in the context of high HIV prevalence.

  10. 'On the same level': facilitators' experiences running a drug user-led safer injecting education campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callon, Cody; Charles, Grant; Alexander, Rick; Small, Will; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-03-06

    Unsafe injection practices play a major role in elevated rates of morbidity and mortality among people who inject drugs (IDU). There is growing interest in the direct involvement of IDU in interventions that seek to address unsafe injecting. This study describes a drug user-led safer injecting education campaign, and explores facilitators' experiences delivering educational workshops. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 8 members of the Injection Support (IS) Team who developed and facilitated a series of safer injecting education workshops. Interviews explored facilitator's perceptions of the workshops, experiences being a facilitator, and perspectives on the educational campaign. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. IS Team facilitators described how the workshop's structure and content enabled effective communication of information about safer injecting practices, while targeting the unsafe practices of workshop participants. Facilitators' identity as IDU enhanced their ability to relate to workshop participants and communicate educational messages in language accessible to workshop participants. Facilitators reported gaining knowledge and skills from their involvement in the campaign, as well as positive feelings about themselves from the realization that they were helping people to protect their health. Overall, facilitators felt that this campaign provided IDU with valuable information, although facilitators also critiqued the campaign and suggested improvements for future efforts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of involving IDU in educational initiatives targeting unsafe injecting. Findings illustrate how IDU involvement in prevention activities improves relevance and cultural appropriateness of interventions while providing individual, social, and professional benefits to those IDU delivering education.

  11. Sexually active older Australian's knowledge of sexually transmitted infections and safer sexual practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Anthony; Heywood, Wendy; Fileborn, Bianca; Minichiello, Victor; Barrett, Catherine; Brown, Graham; Hinchliff, Sharron; Malta, Sue; Crameri, Pauline

    2017-06-01

    Rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are rising among older Australians. We conducted a large survey of older people's knowledge of STIs and safer sexual practices. A total of 2,137 Australians aged 60 years and older completed the survey, which included 15 questions assessing knowledge of STIs and safer sexual practices. We examined both levels of knowledge and factors associated with an overall knowledge score. In total, 1,652 respondents reported having sex in the past five years and answered all knowledge questions. This group had good general knowledge but poorer knowledge in areas such as the protection offered by condoms and potential transmission modes for specific STIs. Women had better knowledge than men. Men in their 60s, men with higher education levels, and men who thought they were at risk of STIs reported better knowledge than other men. Knowledge was also better among men and women who had been tested for STIs or reported 'other' sources of knowledge on STIs. Many older Australians lack knowledge of STIs and safer sexual practices. Implications for public health: To reverse current trends toward increasing STI diagnoses in this population, policies and education campaigns aimed at improving knowledge levels may need to be considered. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Providers' perspectives on preconception counseling and safer conception for HIV-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Alison S; Potter, JoNell E; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Alcaide, Maria L; Cook, Ryan; Jones, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Unplanned pregnancy among HIV-infected women can have negative health consequences for women, partners, and neonates. Despite recommendations, preconception counseling (PCC) appears to be infrequently addressed in HIV care. This study explored knowledge, attitudes, and practices among health-care providers regarding PCC, safer conception and pregnancy among HIV-infected women. Physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners (n = 14) providing obstetric/gynecological and HIV care in urban south Florida public and private hospitals completed structured qualitative interviews. Dominant themes arising included provider perceptions of patient knowledge and practices, provider knowledge and attitudes regarding safer conception, and provider practices regarding reproductive health. Providers perceived patients to have limited reproductive knowledge. Patients' internalized HIV stigma was a barrier to patient initiation of conception-focused discussions. Provider knowledge and utilization of PCC protocols were limited. PCC barriers included competing medical priorities, failure to address fertility desires, limited knowledge, time limitations, and unclear standard of care. Providers routinely used condom-based HIV prevention as a proxy for addressing reproductive intentions. Provider, patient, and structural factors prevented implementation of PCC and provision of information on safer conception; neither were routinely discussed during consultations. Both providers and patients may benefit from interventions to enhance communication on conception.

  13. Integrated computer-aided framework for chemical product and process application design and optimization for waste heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cignitti, Stefano; Woodley, John; Abildskov, Jens

    2017-01-01

    This contribution presents an integrated framework for product-process design. The framework integrates the two design problems into one and finds the optimal solution through simultaneous optimization. The framework consists of four hierarchical steps and uses a set of methods, tools and databases...... for property prediction, novel fluid design and mathematical programming. The application of the framework is targeted for waste heat recovery design systems, where the sensitivity of product and process design variables is high and the simultaneous design is necessary. The sustainable design solutions...... are showcased in this paper for mixed refrigeration design....

  14. Unconventional, Chemically Stable, and Soluble Two-Dimensional Angular Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: From Molecular Design to Device Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lei

    2015-03-17

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consisting of laterally fused benzene rings, are among the most widely studied small-molecule organic semiconductors, with potential applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Linear acenes, including tetracene, pentacene, and their derivatives, have received particular attention due to the synthetic flexibility in tuning their chemical structure and properties and to their high device performance. Unfortunately, longer acenes, which could exhibit even better performance, are susceptible to oxidation, photodegradation, and, in solar cells which contain fullerenes, Diels-Alder reactions. This Account highlights recent advances in the molecular design of two-dimensional (2-D) PAHs that combine device performance with environmental stability. New synthetic techniques have been developed to create stable PAHs that extend conjugation in two dimensions. The stability of these novel compounds is consistent with Clar\\'s sextet rule as the 2-D PAHs have greater numbers of sextets in their ground-state configuration than their linear analogues. The ionization potentials (IPs) of nonlinear acenes decrease more slowly with annellation in comparison to their linear counterparts. As a result, 2-D bistetracene derivatives that are composed of eight fused benzene rings are measured to be about 200 times more stable in chlorinated organic solvents than pentacene derivatives with only five fused rings.Single crystals of the bistetracene derivatives have hole mobilities, measured in OFET configuration, up to 6.1 cm2 V-1 s-1, with remarkable Ion/Ioff ratios of 107. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations can provide insight into the electronic structures at both molecular and material levels and to evaluate the main charge-transport parameters. The 2-D acenes with large aspect ratios and appropriate substituents have the potential to provide favorable interstack electronic interactions

  15. Develop and implement preconditioning techniques to control face ejection rockbursts for safer mining in seismically hazardous areas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Toper, AZ

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This research report discusses the development of preconditioning techniques to control face bursts, for safer mining in seismically hazardous areas. Preconditioning involves regularly setting off carefully tailored blasts in the fractured rock...

  16. The Design of a Chemical Virtual Instrument Based on LabVIEW for Determining Temperatures and Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Bin; Li, Jang-Yuan; Wu, Qi-Jun

    2007-01-01

    A LabVIEW-based self-constructed chemical virtual instrument (VI) has been developed for determining temperatures and pressures. It can be put together easily and quickly by selecting hardware modules, such as the PCI-DAQ card or serial port method, different kinds of sensors, signal-conditioning circuits or finished chemical instruments, and software modules such as data acquisition, saving, proceeding. The VI system provides individual and extremely flexible solutions for automatic measurements in physical chemistry research.

  17. A Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Processing Design for Production of Molybdenum-99 with Crystalline Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Gary Michael

    Medical radioisotopes are used in tens of millions of procedures every year to detect and image a wide variety of maladies and conditions in the human body. The most widely-used diagnostic radioisotope is technetium-99m, a metastable isomer of technetium-99 that is generated by the radioactive decay of molybdenum-99. For a number of reasons, the supply of molybdenum-99 has become unreliable and the techniques used to produce it have become unattractive. This has spurred the investigation of new technologies that avoid the use of highly enriched uranium to produce molybdenum-99 in the United States, where approximately half of the demand originates. The first goal of this research is to develop a critical nuclear reactor design powered by solid, discrete pins of low enriched uranium. Analyses of single-pin heat transfer and whole-core neutronics are performed to determine the required specifications. Molybdenum-99 is produced directly in the fuel of this reactor and then extracted through a series of chemical processing steps. After this extraction, the fuel is left in an aqueous state. The second goal of this research is to describe a process by which the uranium may be recovered from this spent fuel solution and reconstituted into the original fuel form. Fuel recovery is achieved through a crystallization step that generates solid uranyl nitrate hexahydrate while leaving the majority of fission products and transuranic isotopes in solution. This report provides background information on molybdenum-99 production and crystallization chemistry. The previously unknown thermal conductivity of the fuel material is measured. Following this is a description of the modeling and calculations used to develop a reactor concept. The operational characteristics of the reactor core model are analyzed and reported. Uranyl nitrate crystallization experiments have also been conducted, and the results of this work are presented here. Finally, a process flow scheme for uranium

  18. Design, synthesis of novel lipids as chemical permeation enhancers and development of nanoparticle system for transdermal drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srujan Marepally

    Full Text Available In the present study, we designed and developed novel lipids that include (Z-1-(Octadec-9-en-1-yl-pyrrolidine (Cy5T, 1, 1-Di-((Z-octadec-9-en-1-ylpyrrolidin-1-ium iodide (Cy5, (Z-1-(Octadec-9-en-1-yl-piperidine (Cy6T, and 1, 1-Di-((Z-octadec-9-en-1-yl piperidin-1-ium iodide (Cy6 to enhance the transdermal permeation of some selected drugs. Firstly, we evaluated the transdermal permeation efficacies of these lipids as chemical permeation enhancers in vehicle formulations for melatonin, ß-estradiol, caffeine, α-MSH, and spantide using franz diffusion cells. Among them Cy5 lipid was determined to be the most efficient by increasing the transdermal permeation of melatonin, ß-estradiol, caffeine, α-MSH, and spantide by 1.5 to 3.26-fold more at the epidermal layer and 1.3 to 2.5-fold more at the dermal layer, in comparison to either NMP or OA. Hence we developed a nanoparticle system (cy5 lipid ethanol drug nanoparticles to evaluate any further improvement in the drug penetration. Cy5 lipid formed uniformly sized nanoparticles ranging from 150-200 nm depending on the type of drug. Further, Cy5 based nanoparticle system significantly (p<0.05 increased the permeation of all the drugs in comparison to the lipid solution and standard permeation enhancers. There were about 1.54 to 22-fold more of drug retained in the dermis for the Cy5 based nanoparticles compared to OA/NMP standard enhancers and 3.87 to 66.67-fold more than lipid solution. In addition, epifluorescent microscopic analysis in rhodamine-PE permeation studies confirmed the superior permeation enhancement of LEDs (detection of fluorescence up to skin depth of 340 μm more than lipid solution, which revealed fluorescence up to skin depth of only 260 μm. In summary the present findings demonstrate that i cationic lipid with 5 membered amine heterocyclic ring has higher permeating efficacy than the 6 membered amine hertocyclic ring. ii The nanoparticle system prepared with Cy5 showed

  19. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Mette

    This publication is unique in its demystification and operationalization of the complex and elusive nature of the design process. The publication portrays the designer’s daily work and the creative process, which the designer is a part of. Apart from displaying the designer’s work methods...... and design parameters, the publication shows examples from renowned Danish design firms. Through these examples the reader gets an insight into the designer’s reality....

  20. Face mask removal is safer than helmet removal for emergent airway access in American football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Erik E; Mihalik, Jason P; Beltz, Nora M; Day, Molly A; Decoster, Laura C

    2014-06-01

    -camera three-dimensional motion system and a three-point one-segment marker set were used to record motion of the head. Face mask removal resulted in less motion in all three planes, required less completion time, and was easier to perform than HR. The RIQ helmet resulted in less frontal plane motion and less time to task completion, and was easier to remove than VSR4 helmets. Inflated helmets-regardless of helmet type-required less removal time but did not result in greater cervical spine motion or difficulty. It is safer to remove the face mask in the prehospital setting for the potential spine-injured American football player than to remove the helmet, based on results from both a traditional and newer football helmet designs. Deflating the air bladder inside the helmet does not provide an advantage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An application of safer for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, C.T.; Provost, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) has been applied at the US Department of Energy's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Y-12 Plant is an operationally and hydrogeologically complex area located within the watershed of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC). The plant has been in operation since 1943 and nearly 175 potentially contaminated sites resulting from past waste management practices have been identified. The need to complete Remedial Investigations (RIs) for the sites in a timely and cost-effective manner has resulted in an approach that considers the entire watershed of UEFPC, which has been designated a open-quotes Characterization Areaclose quotes (CA). This approach emphasizes the watershed rather than individual sites, focuses on key questions and issues, and maximizes the use of existing data. The goal of this approach is to focus work toward the resolution of key questions and decisions necessary to complete the remediation of the CA. An evaluation of the potentially contaminated sites, the development of key questions, and the compilation and analysis of existing data are progressing. A SAFER workshop will be held in 1996, which will allow the project team and stakeholders to discuss the status of the RI, identify additional key questions and issues, and determine the activities necessary to complete the RI. This investigation demonstrates an approach to streamlining the RI process that could be applied successfully to other complex sites

  2. Theoretical and practical aspects of improving the durability of steel reinforcement in transport designs, using passivation and plasticizing chemical additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, Evgenij; Talipov, Linar

    2017-10-01

    The article deals with the problem of steel reinforcement corrosion in reinforced concrete structures exposed to aggressive media, in particular in reinforced concrete construction of transport infrastructure, in snowy areas, and subject to the influence of chlorides contained in applied deicing agents. Basic schemes for preventing the reinforcement corrosion in reinforced-concrete structures have been considered and analyzed. Prospects of primary protection against corrosion of reinforcement by introducing chemical additives with plasticizing/passivating action in a concrete mixture with mixing water have been considered in detail. The physical/chemical mechanism of the protective action of a superplasticizer together with a passivator has been highlighted.

  3. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  4. Advancing the science of measurement of diagnostic errors in healthcare: the Safer Dx framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostic errors are major contributors to harmful patient outcomes, yet they remain a relatively understudied and unmeasured area of patient safety. Although they are estimated to affect about 12 million Americans each year in ambulatory care settings alone, both the conceptual and pragmatic scientific foundation for their measurement is under-developed. Health care organizations do not have the tools and strategies to measure diagnostic safety and most have not integrated diagnostic error into their existing patient safety programs. Further progress toward reducing diagnostic errors will hinge on our ability to overcome measurement-related challenges. In order to lay a robust groundwork for measurement and monitoring techniques to ensure diagnostic safety, we recently developed a multifaceted framework to advance the science of measuring diagnostic errors (The Safer Dx framework). In this paper, we describe how the framework serves as a conceptual foundation for system-wide safety measurement, monitoring and improvement of diagnostic error. The framework accounts for the complex adaptive sociotechnical system in which diagnosis takes place (the structure), the distributed process dimensions in which diagnoses evolve beyond the doctor's visit (the process) and the outcomes of a correct and timely "safe diagnosis" as well as patient and health care outcomes (the outcomes). We posit that the Safer Dx framework can be used by a variety of stakeholders including researchers, clinicians, health care organizations and policymakers, to stimulate both retrospective and more proactive measurement of diagnostic errors. The feedback and learning that would result will help develop subsequent interventions that lead to safer diagnosis, improved value of health care delivery and improved patient outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Predicting the future: opportunities and challenges for the chemical industry to apply 21st-century toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settivari, Raja S; Ball, Nicholas; Murphy, Lynea; Rasoulpour, Reza; Boverhof, Darrell R; Carney, Edward W

    2015-03-01

    Interest in applying 21st-century toxicity testing tools for safety assessment of industrial chemicals is growing. Whereas conventional toxicology uses mainly animal-based, descriptive methods, a paradigm shift is emerging in which computational approaches, systems biology, high-throughput in vitro toxicity assays, and high-throughput exposure assessments are beginning to be applied to mechanism-based risk assessments in a time- and resource-efficient fashion. Here we describe recent advances in predictive safety assessment, with a focus on their strategic application to meet the changing demands of the chemical industry and its stakeholders. The opportunities to apply these new approaches is extensive and include screening of new chemicals, informing the design of safer and more sustainable chemical alternatives, filling information gaps on data-poor chemicals already in commerce, strengthening read-across methodology for categories of chemicals sharing similar modes of action, and optimizing the design of reduced-risk product formulations. Finally, we discuss how these predictive approaches dovetail with in vivo integrated testing strategies within repeated-dose regulatory toxicity studies, which are in line with 3Rs principles to refine, reduce, and replace animal testing. Strategic application of these tools is the foundation for informed and efficient safety assessment testing strategies that can be applied at all stages of the product-development process.

  6. Students' Pilot Laboratory for Homogeneous Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design in Olive Mill Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando-Pulido, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Granada have endeavored to make a number of high quality experiments to familiarize our students with our latest research and also scale-up of processes. A pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant was set-up to give students a close practical view of the treatments of effluents by-produced in…

  7. Designing monitoring programs for chemicals of emerging concern in potable reuse ⋯ What to include and what not to include?

    KAUST Repository

    Drewes, Jorg

    2012-11-01

    This study discussed a proposed process to prioritize chemicals for reclaimed water monitoring programs, selection of analytical methods required for their quantification, toxicological relevance of chemicals of emerging concern regarding human health, and related issues. Given that thousands of chemicals are potentially present in reclaimed water and that information about those chemicals is rapidly evolving, a transparent, science-based framework was developed to guide prioritization of which compounds of emerging concern (CECs) should be included in reclaimed water monitoring programs. The recommended framework includes four steps: (1) compile environmental concentrations (e.g., measured environmental concentration or MEC) of CECs in the source water for reuse projects; (2) develop a monitoring trigger level (MTL) for each of these compounds (or groups thereof) based on toxicological relevance; (3) compare the environmental concentration (e.g., MEC) to the MTL; CECs with a MEC/MTL ratio greater than 1 should be prioritized for monitoring, compounds with a ratio less than \\'1\\' should only be considered if they represent viable treatment process performance indicators; and (4) screen the priority list to ensure that a commercially available robust analytical method is available for that compound. © IWA Publishing 2013.

  8. Camel Milk Is a Safer Choice than Goat Milk for Feeding Children with Cow Milk Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlayel, Mohammad; Bener, Abdulbari; Abu Hazeima, Khalid; Al-Mesaifri, Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Background. Various sources of mammalian milk have been tried in CMA. Objectives. To determine whether camel milk is safer than goat milk in CMA. Methods. Prospective study conducted at Hamad Medical Corporation between April 2007 and April 2010, on children with CMA. Each child had medical examination, CBC, total IgE, cow milk-specific IgE and SPT. CMA children were tested against fresh camel and goat milks. Results. Of 38 children (median age 21.5 months), 21 (55.3%) presented with urticari...

  9. Passionate scholarship 2001-2010: a vision for making academe safer for joyous risk-takers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T

    2010-01-01

    What is passionate scholarship? According to students and graduates from a nursing doctoral program interviewed 10 years ago, passionate scholars must risk committing to a personally meaningful and socially relevant topic close to the heart. This insight spawned a string of exploratory inquiries and educational interventions in search of the "ideal conditions" that foster passionate scholarship. Updating the findings of that original study published in Advances in Nursing Science in 2001, this article describes a 3-year, faculty development initiative. Beyond increasing scholarly productivity, the findings suggest that turning faculty groups into communities of scholarly caring can make academic environments safer for passionate risk-takers.

  10. Cutting the cost of South African antiretroviral therapy using newer, safer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W F Venter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretrovirals are a significant cost driver for HIV programmes. Current first-line regimens have performed well in real-life programmes, but have a low barrier to virological resistance and still carry toxicity that limits adherence. New drug developments may mean that we have access to safer, more robust and cheaper regimens, but only if the appropriate clinical trials are conducted. We briefly discuss these trials, and demonstrate the large cost savings to the South African HIV programme if these are successful.

  11. Pregnancy termination in Matlab, Bangladesh: trends and correlates of use of safer and less-safe methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaVanzo, Julie; Rahman, Mizanur

    2014-09-01

    Menstrual regulation (MR), a relatively safe form of pregnancy termination, is legal in Bangladesh during the early stages of pregnancy. However, little is known about the factors associated with whether women who terminate pregnancies choose this method or a less-safe one. Data from the Matlab Demographic Surveillance System on 122,691 pregnancies-5,221 (4.3%) of which were terminated-were used to examine trends between 1989 and 2008 in termination and in use of safer methods (MR or dilation and curettage) and less-safe (all other) methods of pregnancy termination. Logistic and multinomial logistic regressions were used to assess factors associated with whether women terminate pregnancies and whether they use safer methods. Sixty-seven percent of pregnancy terminations were by safer methods and 33% by less-safe means. The proportion of pregnancies that were terminated increased between 1989 and 2008; this increase was entirely due to increased use of safer methods. Women younger than 18 and those 25 or older were more likely than women aged 20-24 to terminate their pregnancies (odds ratios ranged from 1.5 among women aged 16-17 or 25-29 to 26.1 among those aged 45 or older). Among women who terminated their pregnancies, those aged 25-44 were more likely than those aged 20-24 to use a safer method. Compared with women who had no formal education, those with some education were more likely to terminate their pregnancies and to do so using safer methods. A growing proportion of pregnancies in Matlab are terminated, and these terminations are increasingly done using safer methods.

  12. Design and Use of Nanostructured Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Selective Transformation of Fine Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiro Dal Santo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured single-site heterogeneous catalysts possess the advantages of classical solid catalysts, in terms of easy recovery and recycling, together with a defined tailored chemical and steric environment around the catalytically active metal site. The use of inorganic oxide supports with selected shape and porosity at a nanometric level may have a relevant impact on the regio- and stereochemistry of the catalytic reaction. Analogously, by choosing the optimal preparation techniques to obtain spatially isolated and well-characterised active sites, it is possible to achieve performances that are comparable to (or, in the most favourable cases, better than those obtained with homogeneous systems. Such catalysts are therefore particularly suitable for the transformation of highly-functionalised fine chemicals and some relevant examples where high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity are crucial will be described.

  13. Phase equilibria for mixtures containing very many components. development and application of continuous thermodynamics for chemical process design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotterman, R.L.; Bender, R.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    For some multicomponent mixtures, where detailed chemical analysis is not feasible, the compositio of the mixture may be described by a continuous distribution function of some convenient macroscopic property suc as normal boiling point or molecular weight. To attain a quantitative description of phase equilibria for such mixtures, this work has developed thermodynamic procedures for continuous systems; that procedure is called continuous thermodynamics. To illustrate, continuous thermodynamics is used to calculate dew points for natural-gas mixtures, solvent loss in a high-pressure absorber, and liquid-liquid phase equilibria in a polymer fractionation process. Continuous thermodynamics provides a rational method for calculating phase equilibria for those mixtures where complete chemical analysis is not available but where composition can be given by some statistical description. While continuous thermodynamics is only the logical limit of the well-known pseudo-component method, it is more efficient than that method because it is less arbitrary and it often requires less computer time

  14. Crime Prevention through Environmental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Rick; Cadzow, Emma

    2004-01-01

    Applying CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design) strategies to schools can significantly contribute to a safer learning environment by influencing the behaviour of students and visitors. CPTED has three overlapping primary concepts that are intended to reduce opportunities for crime as well as fear of crime: access control,…

  15. Combination of Functional Nanoengineering and Nanosecond Laser Texturing for Design of Superhydrophobic Aluminum Alloy with Exceptional Mechanical and Chemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Modin, Evgeny B; Sayfutdinova, Adeliya R; Emelyanenko, Kirill A; Vasiliev, Alexander L; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M

    2017-10-24

    Industrial application of metallic materials is hindered by several shortcomings, such as proneness to corrosion, erosion under abrasive loads, damage due to poor cold resistance, or weak resistance to thermal shock stresses, etc. In this study, using the aluminum-magnesium alloy as an example of widely spread metallic materials, we show that a combination of functional nanoengineering and nanosecond laser texturing with the appropriate treatment regimes can be successfully used to transform a metal into a superhydrophobic material with exceptional mechanical and chemical properties. It is demonstrated that laser chemical processing of the surface may be simultaneously used to impart multimodal roughness and to modify the composition and physicochemical properties of a thick surface layer of the substrate itself. Such integration of topographical and physicochemical modification leads to specific surface nanostructures such as nanocavities filled with hydrophobic agent and hard oxynitride nanoinclusions. The combination of superhydrophobic state, nano- and micro features of the hierarchical surface, and the appropriate composition of the surface textured layer allowed us to provide the surface with the outstanding level of resistance of superhydrophobic coatings to external chemical and mechanical impacts. In particular, experimental data presented in this study indicate high resistance of the fabricated coatings to pitting corrosion, superheated water vapor, sand abrasive wear, and rapid temperature cycling from liquid nitrogen to room temperatures, without notable degradation of superhydrophobic performance.

  16. AutoGrow 3.0: an improved algorithm for chemically tractable, semi-automated protein inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Jacob D; Lindert, Steffen; McCammon, J Andrew

    2013-07-01

    We here present an improved version of AutoGrow (version 3.0), an evolutionary algorithm that works in conjunction with existing open-source software to automatically optimize candidate ligands for predicted binding affinity and other druglike properties. Though no substitute for the medicinal chemist, AutoGrow 3.0, unlike its predecessors, attempts to introduce some chemical intuition into the automated optimization process. AutoGrow 3.0 uses the rules of click chemistry to guide optimization, greatly enhancing synthesizability. Additionally, the program discards any growing ligand whose physical and chemical properties are not druglike. By carefully crafting chemically feasible druglike molecules, we hope that AutoGrow 3.0 will help supplement the chemist's efforts. To demonstrate the utility of the program, we use AutoGrow 3.0 to generate predicted inhibitors of three important drug targets: Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and dihydrofolate reductase. In all cases, AutoGrow generates druglike molecules with high predicted binding affinities. AutoGrow 3.0 is available free of charge (http://autogrow.ucsd.edu) under the terms of the GNU General Public License and has been tested on Linux and Mac OS X. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endocrine active chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other chemicals of concern in surface water, wastewater-treatment plant effluent, and bed sediment, and biological characteristics in selected streams, Minnesota-design, methods, and data, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Martinovic, Dalma; Woodruff, Olivia R.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Brown, Greg K.; Taylor, Howard E.; Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the study design, environmental data, and quality-assurance data for an integrated chemical and biological study of selected streams or lakes that receive wastewater-treatment plant effluent in Minnesota. This study was a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Cloud State University, the University of St. Thomas, and the University of Colorado. The objective of the study was to identify distribution patterns of endocrine active chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other organic and inorganic chemicals of concern indicative of wastewater effluent, and to identify biological characteristics of estrogenicity and fish responses in the same streams. The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed water, bed-sediment, and quality-assurance samples, and measured or recorded streamflow once at each sampling location from September through November 2009. Sampling locations included surface water and wastewater-treatment plant effluent. Twenty-five wastewater-treatment plants were selected to include continuous flow and periodic release facilities with differing processing steps (activated sludge or trickling filters) and plant design flows ranging from 0.002 to 10.9 cubic meters per second (0.04 to 251 million gallons per day) throughout Minnesota in varying land-use settings. Water samples were collected from the treated effluent of the 25 wastewater-treatment plants and at one point upstream from and one point downstream from wastewater-treatment plant effluent discharges. Bed-sediment samples also were collected at each of the stream or lake locations. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pharmaceuticals, phytoestrogens and pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and other neutral organic chemicals, carboxylic acids, and steroidal hormones. A subset (25 samples) of the bed-sediment samples were analyzed for carbon, wastewater-indicator chemicals, and steroidal hormones; the

  18. Advanced and safer lithium-ion battery based on sustainable electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Xiang

    2018-02-17

    Seeking advanced and safer lithium-ion battery with sustainable characteristic is significant for the development of electronic devices and electric vehicles. Herein, a new porous TiO nanobundles (PTNBs) is synthesized though a scalable and green hydrothermal strategy from the TiO powders without using any high-cost and harmful organic titanium-based compounds. The PTNBs exhibits an extremely high lithium storage capacity of 296 mAh g at 100 mA g, where the capacity can maintain over 146 mAh g even after 500 cycles at 1000 mA g. To pursue more reliable Li-ion batteries, full batteries of PTNBs/LiNiMnO (x = 0, 0.5) using spinel structured cathode are constructed. The batteries have the features of sustainability and deliver high capacities of 112 mAh g and 102 mAh g with stable capacity retentions of 99% and 90% over 140 cycles. Note that the energy densities can achieve as high as 267 and 270 Wh kg (535 and 540 Wh kg ) respectively, which is feasible to satisfy diverse requirements for energy storage products. We believe that the universal synthetic strategy, appealing structure and intriguing properties of PTNBs is applicable for wider applications, while the concept of sustainable strategy seeking reliable and safer Li-ion battery can attract broad interest.

  19. Safer Conception Needs for HIV Prevention among Female Sex Workers in Burkina Faso and Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheree R. Schwartz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reproductive health programming for female sex workers (FSW may include contraceptive services but rarely addresses safer pregnancy planning. Methods. Adult FSW were enrolled into a cross-sectional study across four sites in Burkina Faso and Togo using respondent-driven sampling. Sociobehavioral questionnaires and HIV counseling and testing were administered. Sample statistics and engagement in HIV treatment were described and compared using Chi-squared statistics. Results. 1,349 reproductive-aged FSW were enrolled from January to July 2013. Overall, 267 FSW (19.8% were currently trying to conceive. FSW trying to conceive were more likely to test positive for HIV at enrollment as compared to women not trying to become pregnant (24.5% versus 17.7%, P<0.01; however awareness of HIV status was similar across groups. Among FSW trying to conceive, 79.0% (211/267 had previously received HIV testing, yet only 33.8% (23/68 of HIV-infected FSW reported a previous HIV diagnosis. Overall 25.0% (17/68 of HIV-infected FSW trying to conceive were on antiretroviral therapy. Conclusion. FSW frequently desire children. However engagement in the HIV prevention and treatment cascade among FSW trying to conceive is poor potentiating periconception transmission risks to partners and infants. Programs to facilitate earlier HIV diagnosis for FSW and safer conception counseling are needed as components of effective combination HIV prevention services.

  20. Urban Vulnerability in Bantul District, Indonesia—Towards Safer and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rijanta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Assuring safer and sustainable development in seismic prone areas requires predictive measurements, i.e., hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment. This research aims to assess urban vulnerability due to seismic hazard through a risk based spatial plan. The idea is to indicate current and future potential losses due to specified hazards with given spatial and temporal units. Herein, urban vulnerability refers to the classic separation between social and physical vulnerability assessments. The research area covers six sub-districts in Bantul, Indonesia. It experienced 6.2 Mw earthquakes on May, 27th, 2006 and suffered a death toll of 5700, economic losses of up to 3.1 billion US$ and damage to nearly 80% of a 508 km2 area. The research area experienced the following regional issues: (1 seismic hazard; (2 rapid land conversion and (3 domination of low-income group. This research employs spatial multi criteria evaluations (SMCE for social vulnerability (SMCE-SV and for physical vulnerability (SMCE-PV. The research reveals that (1 SMCE-SV and SMCE-PV are empirically possible to indicate the urban vulnerability indices; and (2 integrating the urban vulnerability assessment into a spatial plan requires strategic, technical, substantial and procedural integration. In summary, without adequate knowledge and political support, any manifestation towards safer and sustainable development will remain meager and haphazard.

  1. Advanced and safer lithium-ion battery based on sustainable electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiang; Huang, Xiaobing; Jin, Junling; Ming, Hai; Wang, Limin; Ming, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Seeking advanced and safer lithium-ion battery with sustainable characteristic is significant for the development of electronic devices and electric vehicles. Herein, a new porous TiO2 nanobundles (PTNBs) is synthesized though a scalable and green hydrothermal strategy from the TiO2 powders without using any high-cost and harmful organic titanium-based compounds. The PTNBs exhibits an extremely high lithium storage capacity of 296 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1, where the capacity can maintain over 146 mAh g-1 even after 500 cycles at 1000 mA g-1. To pursue more reliable Li-ion batteries, full batteries of PTNBs/LiNixMn1-xO4 (x = 0, 0.5) using spinel structured cathode are constructed. The batteries have the features of sustainability and deliver high capacities of 112 mAh gcathode-1 and 102 mAh gcathode-1 with stable capacity retentions of 99% and 90% over 140 cycles. Note that the energy densities can achieve as high as 267 and 270 Wh kgcathode-1 (535 and 540 Wh kganode-1) respectively, which is feasible to satisfy diverse requirements for energy storage products. We believe that the universal synthetic strategy, appealing structure and intriguing properties of PTNBs is applicable for wider applications, while the concept of sustainable strategy seeking reliable and safer Li-ion battery can attract broad interest.

  2. Building social capital in healthcare organizations: thinking ecologically for safer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyer, Anne; Marck, Patricia B

    2008-01-01

    Research on patient safety and health human resources, 2 critical issues for 21st century healthcare, converges on similar findings. Specifically, it is apparent that along with the patients, families, and communities we serve, nurses and other healthcare professionals navigate a volatile health care system where persistent restructuring, market pressures, and workforce instability present ongoing threats to the delivery of safer care. Drawing from the fields of nursing, healthcare ethics, health systems management, and ecological restoration, we outline the role of social capital for organizational integrity, healthy workplace cultures, sustainable resource management, improved nurse retention, effective knowledge translation, and safer patient care. Nursing leaders can use ecological thinking to build the vital resource of social capital by taking concrete steps to commit the necessary human and material resources to: (1) forge relations to foster bonding, bridging and linking social capital; (2) build solidarity and trust; (3) foster collective action and cooperation; (4) strengthen communication and knowledge exchange; and (5) create capacity for social cohesion and inclusion.

  3. Safer sex decision-making among men with haemophilia and HIV and their female partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, K L; Cotton, D; Huszti, H C; Parsons, J T

    2001-01-01

    An exploratory qualitative study of adult heterosexual men with haemophilia and HIV and women who were their sexual partners was conducted as formative research to better understand cognitive factors involved in behavioural intentions and practices which comprise HIV risk-reduction for sexual transmission. The study sought to generate hypotheses, uncover themes, and develop a broad perspective on possible determinants of behaviours related to HIV transmission risk reduction. Qualitative analysis of these data served as a basis for developing a subsequent quantitative, hypothesis-testing survey and an intervention. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 23 single men and 28 married men with haemophilia and HIV infection, and 28 married women partners selected through stratified, purposeful sampling. The interviews identified beliefs, attitudes, and values underlying decisions regarding target behaviours related to preventing sexual transmission of HIV, including (1) using condoms consistently during vaginal intercourse and (2) talking to partners about risk reduction. The interviews elicited information about perceived advantages and disadvantages of performing each of the targeted behaviours, and factors that facilitate or prevent performing them. Qualitative analysis of coded responses yielded important themes regarding how choices are made about sexual activity and safer sex. Most notably, communication between partners (1) plays a direct, key role in facilitating condom use and (2) forms the basis for maintaining emotional intimacy in these relationships. The link between condom use and communicating about safer sex was viewed as pivotal in achieving HIV prevention for individuals in serodiscordant couples. Recommendations for risk reduction intervention development are discussed.

  4. Gender and knowledge about HIV, risky sexual behavior, and safer sex practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadack, R A; Hyde, J S; Keller, M L

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in knowledge about HIV, the reported incidence of risky sexual behavior, and comfort with safer sexual practices among young adults. The conceptual framework was social role theory, which argues for the influence of gender roles on beliefs and social behaviors. Participants were 141 female and 131 male college students who responded to questions regarding their knowledge of HIV, risk-taking behaviors with respect to HIV, and comfort with safer sexual behaviors. Overall, respondents had accurate knowledge about HIV. However, men reported engaging in significantly more risky behaviors than women. More men reported that intercourse without a condom occurred in unplanned, spontaneous situations, while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or with a person not well known. More women reported that intercourse without a condom occurred in long-term relationships. Women were significantly more comfortable abstaining from sexual intercourse and asking partners about their sexual history while men were significantly more comfortable buying condoms. Both men and women reported comfort using condoms. Gender roles help to explain why men are willing to take more risks, and in what situations risk taking is apt to occur.

  5. Acceptability and preferences for safer conception HIV prevention strategies: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheree R; West, Nora; Phofa, Rebecca; Yende, Nompumelelo; Sanne, Ian; Bassett, Jean; Van Rie, Annelies

    2016-10-01

    Safer conception strategies to reduce the HIV transmission risk include antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive partners, pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-negative partners, condomless sex limited to fertile periods, and home-based self-insemination. Resistance to taking treatment or cultural concerns may limit uptake of strategies and intervention success. Understanding the acceptability and preferences between different approaches is important to optimise service delivery. Between February and July 2013, 42 adults (21 HIV-positive and 21 HIV-negative) receiving primary care at Witkoppen Health and Welfare Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa, participated in focus group discussions or in-depth interviews. Themes were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Acceptability of antiretroviral-based strategies varied. Concerns over side effects, antiretroviral treatment duration and beliefs that treatment is only for the sick were common barriers; however, desperation for a child was noted as a facilitator for uptake. HIV-negative men and HIV-positive women had favourable attitudes towards self-insemination, though paternity and safety concerns were raised. Self-insemination was generally preferred over pre-exposure prophylaxis by HIV-negative men, and antiretroviral-based strategies were preferred by couples with HIV-negative female partners, despite concerns raised about condomless sex while virally suppressed. Knowledge about the fertile window was low. A strong counselling component will be required for effective uptake and adherence to safer conception services. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Impediments to safer heterosexual sex: a review of research with young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, D

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the existing British literature on the micro-social details of young people's heterosexual encounters, emphasizing the cultural factors which impede the adoption of health education advice. Most of the findings cited come from qualitative projects that relied primarily on detailed interviews or group discussions. Six issues are highlighted: difficulties in talking about sex; the gender-role expectations brought to an encounter; the primary function of condoms as contraceptives; problems in buying, carrying and using condoms; how the stage of a particular relationship affects behaviour, and gendered power relations. Several important issues are not addressed in the existing literature. The survey data on sexual behaviour suggest that HIV has had little impact on sexual activity, apart from a reported increase in condom use. Qualitative studies reveal the moral categories, gender-role expectations, power inbalances and other cultural factors that prevent a high level of knowledge about HIV transmission from being translated into safer heterosexual behaviour. Their findings provide important insights into how realistic and practical safer sex messages are. They suggest that to promote health in respect to HIV it is necessary not only to advocate specific precautionary behaviour, such as using condoms, but also to address wider cultural issues relating to the taboos around the discussion of sex and the empowerment of women.

  7. Does the real-time ultrasound guidance provide safer venipuncture in implantable venous port implantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, İlknur; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Bademler, Süleyman; Özgür, İlker; Demiray, Mukaddes; Karanlık, Hasan

    2018-03-01

    To examine whether the real-time ultrasound-guided venipuncture for implantable venous port placement is safer than the traditional venipuncture. The study analyzed the results of 2153 venous ports placed consecutively from January 2009 to January 2016. A total of 922 patients in group 1 and 1231 patients in group 2 were admitted with venous port placed using the traditional landmark subclavian approach and real-time ultrasound-guided axillary approach, respectively. Sociodemographic characteristics of patients, early (pneumothorax, pinch-off syndrome, arterial puncture, hematoma, and malposition arrhythmia) and late (deep vein thrombosis, obstruction, infection, erosion-dehiscence, and rotation of the port chamber) complications and the association of these complications with the implantation method were evaluated. There were no significant differences in the sociodemographic characteristics of the patients between the two groups. The overall and early complications in group 2 were significantly lower than those in group 1. Pinch-off syndrome only developed in group 1. Seven patients and two patients had pneumothorax in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Puncture number was significantly associated with the development of the overall complications. The ultrasound-guided axillary approach may be preferred as a method to reduce the risk of both early and late complications. Large, randomized, controlled prospective trials will be helpful in determining a safer implantable venous port implantation technique.

  8. Risk reduction as an accepted framework for safer-sex promotion among women who have sex with women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Peta; McNair, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    Safer-sex information for women who have sex with women (WSW) is often very difficult to locate. Girl2girl.info is one of the only websites focussed on safer sex for WSW. The present article describes the predevelopment consultation and evaluation of girl2girl.info. A risk-reduction framework was used to develop the website. Girl2girl.info was developed in 2004 using questionnaires and focus groups with 36 consumers who were WSW, largely based in Canberra, Australia. In 2006-2007 the site was evaluated using mixed methods of questionnaires with 74 WSW and interviews with 17 health professionals around Australia. This research has identified some key attitudes toward safer sex of WSW participants, in particular a misperception that the majority of WSW are at low risk for sexually transmissible infections and a consistent aversion to using latex for safer sex. The article concludes that the promotion of a risk-reduction approach - including non-latex-based safer-sex practices - for WSW is both a theoretically appropriate and engaging form of health promotion for WSW.

  9. Sustainable catalysis challenges and practices for the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter J; Krische, Michael J; Williams, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Opens the door to the sustainable production of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals Driven by both public demand and government regulations, pharmaceutical and fine chemical manufacturers are increasingly seeking to replace stoichiometric reagents used in synthetic transformations with catalytic routes in order to develop greener, safer, and more cost-effective chemical processes. This book supports the discovery, development, and implementation of new catalytic methodologies on a process scale, opening the door to the sustainable production of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals

  10. Systematic methods and tools for design of sustainable chemical processes for CO2 utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongpanna, Pichayapan; Babi, Deenesh K.; Pavarajarn, Varong

    2016-01-01

    and databases is based on a combined process synthesis-design-intensification method. The method consists of three stages. The synthesis-stage involves superstructure based optimization to identify promising networks that convert a given set of raw materials to a desired set of products. The design......-stage involves selection and analysis of the identified networks as a base case design in terms of operational feasibility, economics, life cycle assessment factors and sustainability measures, which are employed to establish targets for improvement in the next-stage. The innovation-stage involves generation...

  11. Physical and chemical aging of aluminum(III) 8-hydroxyquinoline: Failure and materials design in organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Keith Andrew

    1999-11-01

    The chemical and physical aging of aluminum(III) 8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq3) films was studied by a variety of techniques. The products of these mechanisms produce electron trap states below the conduction band, or lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level (LUMO), of Alq3. The distribution of these trap states was shown to affect the charge transport and luminescence characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on this material. The chief route of chemical decomposition is the substitution of water with one of the ligands of Alq3. This reaction was characterized by gas chromatography, and quantitative kinetics were obtained to measure the impact of chemical aging in real device architectures. Electrochemical reduction of either Alq3 or the free ligand, 8-hydroxyquinoline (Hq), facilitates dissociation of the complex, especially when oxygen is present. The reduced form of Hq is unstable and forms quinones, hydroquinones, and charge transfer complexes, the latter of which will cause an additional loss in the performance of OLEDs due to luminescence quenching. This instability is particularly important because Hq traps electrons during device operation. Physical aging and crystallization were observed by X-ray diffraction, calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Films which were amorphous upon deposition, crystallized rapidly upon annealing at temperatures below their glass transition. Blends of Alq3 with aluminum(III) 5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline were proposed for thermally stable amorphous emitting layers in OLEDs. Films coevaporated at a 1:1 ratio did not show evidence of crystallization even after long annealing periods at temperatures as high as 160°C. Conduction in Alq3 was considered based on trap-charge limited conduction of electrons in the bulk. The evolution of a narrow Gaussian distribution of localized trap states below the LUMO, lying against a natural exponential background, was used to explain the changes in the current

  12. Computer aided design of medicinal products based on interactive chemical/herbal ingredients - An R&D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontorou, Christina G.

    2012-12-01

    Herbal products have gained increasing popularity in the last decades, and are now broadly used to treat illness and improve health. Notwithstanding the public opinion, both, safety and efficacy, are major sources of dispute among the scientific community, mainly due to lack of (or scarcity or scattered) conclusive data linking a herbal constituent to pharmacological action in vivo, in a way that benefit overrides risk. This paper presents a methodological framework for addressing natural medicine in a systematic and holistic way with a view to providing medicinal products based on interactive chemical/herbal ingredients.

  13. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Pettiway, Keon

    2017-01-01

    by designers, planners, etc. (staging from above) and mobile subjects (staging from below). A research agenda for studying situated practices of mobility and mobilities design is outlined in three directions: foci of studies, methods and approaches, and epistemologies and frames of thinking. Jensen begins......In this chapter, Ole B. Jensen takes a situational approach to mobilities to examine how ordinary life activities are structured by technology and design. Using “staging mobilities” as a theoretical approach, Jensen considers mobilities as overlapping, actions, interactions and decisions...... with a brief description of how movement is studied within social sciences after the “mobilities turn” versus the idea of physical movement in transport geography and engineering. He then explains how “mobilities design” was derived from connections between traffic and architecture. Jensen concludes...

  14. Estimation of environment-related properties of chemicals for design of sustainable processes: development of group-contribution+ (GC+) property models and uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao; Kalakul, Sawitree; Sarup, Bent; Young, Douglas M; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-11-26

    of the developed property models for the estimation of environment-related properties and uncertainties of the estimated property values is highlighted through an illustrative example. The developed property models provide reliable estimates of environment-related properties needed to perform process synthesis, design, and analysis of sustainable chemical processes and allow one to evaluate the effect of uncertainties of estimated property values on the calculated performance of processes giving useful insights into quality and reliability of the design of sustainable processes.

  15. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Mette

    Design - proces & metode iBog®  er enestående i sit fokus på afmystificering og operationalisering af designprocessens flygtige og komplekse karakter. Udgivelsen går bag om designerens daglige arbejde og giver et indblik i den kreative skabelsesproces, som designeren er en del af. Udover et bredt...... indblik i designerens arbejdsmetoder og designparametre giver Design - proces & metode en række eksempler fra anerkendte designvirksomheder, der gør det muligt at komme helt tæt på designerens virkelighed....

  16. Design of chemically activated polymer microwells by one-step UV-lithography for stem cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Pancera, Sabrina; Trouillet, Vanessa; Petershans, Andre; Fichtner, Dagmar; Lyapin, Andrey; Bruns, Michael; Schimmel, Thomas; Wedlich, Doris; Reichlmaier, Stefan; Weidler, Peter G; Gliemann, Hartmut

    2010-02-02

    A novel method to produce sub-microwalled chemically activated polymer microwells by one-step UV-lithography under ambient conditions which are selectively coated with gelatin is introduced. The dimensions as well as the shape of the resulting polystyrene structures are both tunable merely by the irradiation time through one and the same mask. It is shown that the UV-irradiation initiates three effects at those surface areas which are not covered by the mask: (i) oxidation, (ii) cross-linking, and (iii) degradation of polystyrene. The superposition of those effects results in the formation of microscaled, oxidized polymer wells separated by polymer walls, whereas the polymer walls are formed below the mask structures. Topographical changes induced by the UV-irradiation are investigated by atomic force microscopy after different irradiation times. It is shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometric investigations that the chemical composition of the irradiated areas and the degradation of polystyrene reach an equilibrium state after an irradiation time of 10 min. The lateral distribution of the cross-linked and oxidized and of the nonmodified polystyrene after irradiation was determined by fluorescence microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. After the irradiated samples were treated with gelatin solution, it was found that stem cells selectively attach to the irradiated areas. This is due to the selective immobilization of the gelatin on the irradiated polymer areas, which was proved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments.

  17. Rational chemical design of the carbohydrate in a glycoconjugate vaccine enhances IgM-to-IgG switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttormsen, Hilde-Kari; Paoletti, Lawrence C; Mansfield, Keith G; Jachymek, Wojcieck; Jennings, Harold J; Kasper, Dennis L

    2008-04-15

    Many pathogens are sheltered from host immunity by surface polysaccharides that would be ideal as vaccines except that they are too similar to host antigens to be immunogenic. The production of functional IgG is a desirable response to vaccines; because IgG is the only isotype that crosses the placenta, it is of particular importance in maternal vaccines against neonatal disease due to group B Streptococcus (GBS). Clinical studies found a substantially lower proportion of IgG-relative to IgM-among antibodies elicited by conjugates prepared with purified GBS type V capsular polysaccharide (CPS) than among those evoked by CPSs of other GBS serotypes. The epitope specificity of IgG elicited in humans by a conjugate prepared with type V CPS is for chemically desialylated type V CPS (dV CPS). We studied desialylation as a mechanism for enhancing the ability of type V CPS to induce IgM-to-IgG switching. Desialylation did not affect the structural conformation of type V CPS. Rhesus macaques, whose isotype responses to GBS conjugates match those of humans, produced functionally active IgG in response to a dV CPS-tetanus toxoid conjugate (dV-TT), and 98% of neonatal mice born to dams vaccinated with dV-TT survived lethal challenge with viable GBS. Targeted chemical engineering of a carbohydrate to create a molecule less like host self may be a rational approach for improving other glycoconjugates.

  18. Chemical Equilibrium And Transport (CET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    Powerful, machine-independent program calculates theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Aids in design of compressors, turbines, engines, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment.

  19. Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  20. Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Pettiway, Keon

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, Ole B. Jensen takes a situational approach to mobilities to examine how ordinary life activities are structured by technology and design. Using “staging mobilities” as a theoretical approach, Jensen considers mobilities as overlapping, actions, interactions and decisions by desig......In this chapter, Ole B. Jensen takes a situational approach to mobilities to examine how ordinary life activities are structured by technology and design. Using “staging mobilities” as a theoretical approach, Jensen considers mobilities as overlapping, actions, interactions and decisions...... by designers, planners, etc. (staging from above) and mobile subjects (staging from below). A research agenda for studying situated practices of mobility and mobilities design is outlined in three directions: foci of studies, methods and approaches, and epistemologies and frames of thinking. Jensen begins...... with a brief description of how movement is studied within social sciences after the “mobilities turn” versus the idea of physical movement in transport geography and engineering. He then explains how “mobilities design” was derived from connections between traffic and architecture. Jensen concludes...

  1. A Strategic Design of an Opto-Chemical Security Device with Resettable and Reconfigurable Password Based Upon Dual Channel Two-in-One Chemosensor Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tapas; Haldar, Basudeb; Mallick, Arabinda

    2017-02-20

    A simple strategy is proposed to design and develop an intelligent device based on dual channel ion responsive spectral properties of a commercially available molecule, harmine (HM). The system can process different sets of opto-chemical inputs generating different patterns as fluorescence outputs at specific wavelengths which can provide an additional level of protection exploiting both password and pattern recognitions. The proposed system could have the potential to come up with highly secured combinatorial locks at the molecular level that could pose valuable real time and on-site applications for user authentication.

  2. Development of Computer Aided Modelling Templates for Model Re-use in Chemical and Biochemical Process and Product Design: Importand export of models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Tolksdorf, Gregor; Fillinger, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges in model development related to model reuse and compatibility and integration of different tools that are used in modelling. A link between two modelling tools, the computer-aided modelling framework of the ICAS system and the modelling environment, MOSAIC, has...... been established, in order to provide a wider range of modelling capabilities. Through this link, developed models can be exported/imported to/from other modelling-simulation software environments to allow model reusability in chemical and biochemical product and process design. The use of this link...

  3. A Strategic Design of an Opto-Chemical Security Device with Resettable and Reconfigurable Password Based Upon Dual Channel Two-in-One Chemosensor Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tapas; Haldar, Basudeb; Mallick, Arabinda

    2017-02-01

    A simple strategy is proposed to design and develop an intelligent device based on dual channel ion responsive spectral properties of a commercially available molecule, harmine (HM). The system can process different sets of opto-chemical inputs generating different patterns as fluorescence outputs at specific wavelengths which can provide an additional level of protection exploiting both password and pattern recognitions. The proposed system could have the potential to come up with highly secured combinatorial locks at the molecular level that could pose valuable real time and on-site applications for user authentication.

  4. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  5. Design and chemical synthesis of iodine-containing molecules for application to solar-pumped I* lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Christopher S.

    1986-01-01

    Research is directed toward the design and synthesis of new media for solar-pumped I* lasers. Since the most effective existing lasants are perfluoroalkyl iodides, a strategy was proposed for the development of improved materials of this type with absorption maxima at 300 nm. Absorption spectra were synthesized and measured for prototypical species containing iodine bound to boron, iron, and cobalt.

  6. Robust C–C bonded porous networks with chemically designed functionalities for improved CO2 capture from flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Thirion

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective carbon dioxide (CO2 capture requires solid, porous sorbents with chemically and thermally stable frameworks. Herein, we report two new carbon–carbon bonded porous networks that were synthesized through metal-free Knoevenagel nitrile–aldol condensation, namely the covalent organic polymer, COP-156 and 157. COP-156, due to high specific surface area (650 m2/g and easily interchangeable nitrile groups, was modified post-synthetically into free amine- or amidoxime-containing networks. The modified COP-156-amine showed fast and increased CO2 uptake under simulated moist flue gas conditions compared to the starting network and usual industrial CO2 solvents, reaching up to 7.8 wt % uptake at 40 °C.

  7. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  8. SAFER Latinos: a community partnership to address contributing factors for Latino youth violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Mark; Cleary, Sean D; Andrade, Elizabeth; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bazurto, Martha; Rivera, Maria Ivonne; Montero, Luisa; Calderon, Melba

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a multilevel youth violence prevention effort called SAFER Latinos (Seguridad, Apoyo, Familia, Educacion, y Recursos), a collaboration between The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (GWU) and two key Latino community organizations. To implement and evaluate an intervention addressing factors within the social ecology of an immigrant Latino community. The intervention includes (1) Social promotores for family outreach and problem resolution; (2) Youth peer advocates at the high school level; (3) a drop-in center with support services for families and youth; and (4) community events, capacity building, and messages. Evaluation includes a baseline and follow-up surveys (N = 1,400) and focus groups. (1) Community circumstances change, requiring regular program adaptation. (2) Community interventions with research face potential contradictions in purpose impacting management of the collaboration and model fidelity. (3) Etiological models tied to interventions may have to be revisited owing to changes in the character and dynamics of the immigrant community.

  9. Exosome: A Novel and Safer Therapeutic Refinement of Mesenchymal Stem Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Wee Yeh Yeo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC has just been approved as the first “off-the-shelf” stem cell pharmaceutical drug with an anticipation of more approvals following completion of numerous rigorous clinical trials. Despite this progress, the rationale for MSC therapeutic efficacy remains tenuous and is increasingly rationalized on a secretion rather than differentiation mechanism. Recent studies identifying exosome as the secreted agent mediating MSC therapeutic efficacy could potentially reduce a cell-based drug to a safer biologic-based alternative. Here we review the development of MSC exosome as a potential first-in-class therapeutic, and the unique challenges in the manufacture and regulatory oversight of this new class of therapeutics.

  10. NanoSafer vs. 1.1 - Nanomaterial risk assessment using first order modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Keld A.; Saber, Anne T.; Kristensen, Henrik V.

    2013-01-01

    for safe use of MN based on first order modeling. The hazard and case specific exposure as sessments are combined for an integrated risk evaluation and final control banding. Requested material da ta are typically available from the producers’ technical information sheets. The hazard data are given...... in the SDS for the closest analogue bulk material for which the requested occupational exposure limit (OEL) is given as well. The emission potential is either given by a constant release rate or the dustiness level determined us ing the EN15051 rotating drum or similar. The exposure assessment is estimated...... of the nearest analogue bulk material a nd the specific surface area. The NanoSafer control banding tool is now available in Danish and English and contains help tools, including a data library with dustiness data and an inspirational nanosafety e learning tool for companies’ risk management. The ability...

  11. Goneis.gr: Training Greek Parents on ICT and Safer Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouselis, Nikos; Riviou, Katerina; Palavitsinis, Nikos; Giannikopoulou, Vasiliki; Tsanakas, Panayotis

    Children's use of the Internet has significantly risen in the last decade. Nevertheless, children spend a lot of time online which makes them susceptible to various threats (such as inappropriate material, offensive language, etc). Parents are the last frontier to this menace but they also need to be educated and trained in order to protect their children. Goneis.gr is an initiative launched by the Greek government that aims to educate parents on safer Internet and the use of parental control software. Parents are also entitled to distance learning courses covering basic computer skills. This paper presents the results of two separate surveys that took place in the last few months (December 2008-January 2009). The first survey targeted the parents that have completed the programme and the second one the educational providers that participate in the programme and offer the training to the beneficiaries.

  12. Rechargeable nickel-3D zinc batteries: An energy-dense, safer alternative to lithium-ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joseph F; Chervin, Christopher N; Pala, Irina R; Machler, Meinrad; Burz, Michael F; Long, Jeffrey W; Rolison, Debra R

    2017-04-28

    The next generation of high-performance batteries should include alternative chemistries that are inherently safer to operate than nonaqueous lithium-based batteries. Aqueous zinc-based batteries can answer that challenge because monolithic zinc sponge anodes can be cycled in nickel-zinc alkaline cells hundreds to thousands of times without undergoing passivation or macroscale dendrite formation. We demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3D) zinc form-factor elevates the performance of nickel-zinc alkaline cells in three fields of use: (i) >90% theoretical depth of discharge (DOD Zn ) in primary (single-use) cells, (ii) >100 high-rate cycles at 40% DOD Zn at lithium-ion-commensurate specific energy, and (iii) the tens of thousands of power-demanding duty cycles required for start-stop microhybrid vehicles. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. The global health law trilogy: towards a safer, healthier, and fairer world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostin, Lawrence O; DeBartolo, Mary Clare; Katz, Rebecca

    2017-10-21

    Global health advocates often turn to medicine and science for solutions to enduring health risks, but law is also a powerful tool. No state acting alone can ward off health threats that span borders, requiring international solutions. A trilogy of global health law-the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, International Health Regulations (2005), and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework-strives for a safer, healthier, and fairer world. Yet, these international agreements are not well understood, and contain gaps in scope and enforceability. Moreover, major health concerns remain largely unregulated at the international level, such as non-communicable diseases, mental health, and injuries. Here, we offer reforms for this global health law trilogy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of problem-specific evolutionary algorithm/mixed-integer programming hybrids: two-stage stochastic integer programming applied to chemical batch scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urselmann, Maren; Emmerich, Michael T. M.; Till, Jochen; Sand, Guido; Engell, Sebastian

    2007-07-01

    Engineering optimization often deals with large, mixed-integer search spaces with a rigid structure due to the presence of a large number of constraints. Metaheuristics, such as evolutionary algorithms (EAs), are frequently suggested as solution algorithms in such cases. In order to exploit the full potential of these algorithms, it is important to choose an adequate representation of the search space and to integrate expert-knowledge into the stochastic search operators, without adding unnecessary bias to the search. Moreover, hybridisation with mathematical programming techniques such as mixed-integer programming (MIP) based on a problem decomposition can be considered for improving algorithmic performance. In order to design problem-specific EAs it is desirable to have a set of design guidelines that specify properties of search operators and representations. Recently, a set of guidelines has been proposed that gives rise to so-called Metric-based EAs (MBEAs). Extended by the minimal moves mutation they allow for a generalization of EA with self-adaptive mutation strength in discrete search spaces. In this article, a problem-specific EA for process engineering task is designed, following the MBEA guidelines and minimal moves mutation. On the background of the application, the usefulness of the design framework is discussed, and further extensions and corrections proposed. As a case-study, a two-stage stochastic programming problem in chemical batch process scheduling is considered. The algorithm design problem can be viewed as the choice of a hierarchical decision structure, where on different layers of the decision process symmetries and similarities can be exploited for the design of minimal moves. After a discussion of the design approach and its instantiation for the case-study, the resulting problem-specific EA/MIP is compared to a straightforward application of a canonical EA/MIP and to a monolithic mathematical programming algorithm. In view of the

  15. Quantum Chemical Design Guidelines for Absorption and Emission Color Tuning of fac-Ir(ppy)₃ Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Yoshiki; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Aoki, Shogo; Teramoto, Rena; Tada, Hayato; Era, Iori; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2018-03-05

    The fac -Ir(ppy)₃ complex, where ppy denotes 2-phenylpyridine, is one of the well-known luminescent metal complexes having a high quantum yield. However, there have been no specific molecular design guidelines for color tuning. For example, it is still unclear how its optical properties are changed when changing substitution groups of ligands. Therefore, in this study, differences in the electronic structures and optical properties among several substituted fac -Ir(ppy)₃ derivatives are examined in detail by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. On the basis of those results, we present rational design guidelines for absorption and emission color tuning by modifying the species of substituents and their substitution positions.

  16. Quantum Chemical Design Guidelines for Absorption and Emission Color Tuning of fac-Ir(ppy3 Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Natori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The fac-Ir(ppy3 complex, where ppy denotes 2-phenylpyridine, is one of the well-known luminescent metal complexes having a high quantum yield. However, there have been no specific molecular design guidelines for color tuning. For example, it is still unclear how its optical properties are changed when changing substitution groups of ligands. Therefore, in this study, differences in the electronic structures and optical properties among several substituted fac-Ir(ppy3 derivatives are examined in detail by density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT calculations. On the basis of those results, we present rational design guidelines for absorption and emission color tuning by modifying the species of substituents and their substitution positions.

  17. Relationships Between Molecular Structure and Chemical Reactivity in Hypergolic Ionic Liquids: Progress Toward Designing Green Fuels for Bipropellant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    waxy, hygroscopic solid at room temperature, where the additional products in the HP series exist as liquids at room 9 temperature. In general...in Hypergolic Ionic Liquids : Progress Toward Designing "Green" Fuels for Bipropellant Applications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Hypergolic ionic liquids have the potential to replace the toxic and volatile hydrazine derivatives

  18. Molecular structure, vibrational spectra and quantum chemical MP2/DFT studies toward the rational design of hydroxyurea imprinted polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Rai, Garima

    2013-03-01

    In this study, both experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of template (hydroxyurea, HU), monomer (N-(4,6-bisacryloyl amino-[1,3,5] triazine-2-yl-)-acryl amide, TAT), and HU-TAT complexes were compared and these were respectively found to be in good agreement. Binding energies of HU, when complexed with different monomers, were computed using second order Moller Plesset theory (MP2) at 6-311++G(d,p) level both in the gas as well as solution phases. HU is an antineoplastic agent extensively being used in the treatment of polycythaemia Vera and thrombocythemia. It is also used to reduce the frequency of painful attacks in sickle cell anemia. It has antiretroviral property in disease like AIDS. All spectral characterizations were made using Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP employing 6-31+g(2d, 2p) basis set. The theoretical values for 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts were found to be in accordance with the corresponding experimental values. Of all different monomers studied for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) systems, the monomer TAT (2 mol) was typically found to have a best binding score requisite for complexation with HU (1 mol) at the ground state.

  19. A framework for an alternatives assessment dashboard for evaluating chemical alternatives applied to flame retardants for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of alternatives assessment (AA) is to facilitate a comparison of alternatives to a chemical of concern, resulting in the identification of safer alternatives. A two-stage methodology for comparing chemical alternatives was developed. In the first stage, alternatives are ...

  20. A Short Review of Chemical Reaction Database Systems, Computer-Aided Synthesis Design, Reaction Prediction and Synthetic Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Wendy A

    2014-06-01

    This article is the text for a pedagogical lecture to be given at the Strasbourg Summer School in Chemoinformatics in June 2104. It covers a very wide range of reaction topics including structure and reaction representation, reaction centers, atom-to-atom mapping, reaction retrieval systems, computer-aided synthesis design, retrosynthesis, reaction prediction and synthetic feasibility. In the time available the coverage of each topic can only be cursory; the main usefulness of this article to the research community is the extensive bibliography. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Area 25 and Area 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    , LLC. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each Railroad Tracks CAS in CAU 539. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 539: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect in situ dose measurements. • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., lead bricks) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • If no COCs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. If a COC is present at a CAS, NNES will consult NDEP to determine the path forward, then either: • Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or • Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-08-01

    needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  3. A Randomised Controlled Trial Using Mobile Advertising to Promote Safer Sex and Sun Safety to Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, J.; Aitken, C. K.; Dixon, H. G.; Lim, M. S. C.; Gouillou, M.; Spelman, T.; Wakefield, M.; Hellard, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile phone text messages (SMS) are a promising method of health promotion, but a simple and low cost way to obtain phone numbers is required to reach a wide population. We conducted a randomised controlled trial with simultaneous brief interventions to (i) evaluate effectiveness of messages related to safer sex and sun safety and (ii) pilot the…

  4. Does Motivational Interviewing Counseling Time Influence HIV-Positive Persons’ Self-Efficacy to Practice Safer Sex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariyeva, Zulfiya; Golin, Carol E.; Earp, Jo Anne; Suchindran, Chirayath

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the impact of motivational interviewing (MI) counseling time on self-efficacy to practice safer sex for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Methods In 4 month intervals we followed a cohort of 490 PLWHA for 12 months. We conducted hierarchical linear regression models to examine changes in safer sex self-efficacy when participants received zero, low to moderate (5–131 minutes) and high (132–320 minutes) doses of MI time. We conducted a similar analysis using number of counseling sessions as the predictor variable. Results Participants with low to moderate doses of MI counseling had 0.26 higher self-efficacy scores than participants with zero MI time (p=0.01). Also, they had 0.26 lower self-efficacy scores than participants with high amounts of MI time (p=0.04). Participants with high doses of MI had a 0.5 higher self-efficacy score than participants with zero amount of MI time (p<0.0001). Participants who received 3–4 counseling sessions had 0.41 greater self-efficacy scores than participants who did not receive any sessions (p<0.0001) but did not differ from participants receiving 1–2 sessions. Conclusion MI time is a key to enhancing safer sex self-efficacy among PLWHA. Practice Implications Safer sex self-efficacy improves the more MI counseling time and sessions PLWHA receive. PMID:21890300

  5. Minority Stress and Safer Sex Practices Among Sexual Minority Women in Toronto, Canada: Results from a Cross-Sectional Internet-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; MacKenzie, Rachel K; Poteat, Tonia

    2016-12-01

    Sexual stigma is a chronic stressor that enhances vulnerability to mental health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer people. Sexual stigma has also been associated with reduced uptake of safer sex practices, such as condom use, among gay and bisexual men. Scant research has examined the relationship between sexual stigma and safer sex practices among sexual minority women (SMW), including lesbian, bisexual, and queer women. We explored associations between sexual stigma and safer sex practices among SMW. We also tested the interaction between sexual stigma, social support, and resilient coping in this relationship. A cross-sectional internet-based survey was administered to SMW in Toronto, Canada. Among 388 participants with complete measurement data, simple linear regression indicated both perceived and enacted sexual stigma were positively associated with uptake of safer sex practices. In multivariable analyses, significant interactions were found between perceived sexual stigma and resilient coping, and between enacted sexual stigma and social support. At low levels of resilient coping, higher levels of perceived sexual stigma were associated with fewer safer sex practices, while at high levels of resilient coping the relationship was reversed. At low levels of social support, higher levels of enacted sexual stigma were associated with fewer safer sex practices, while at high levels of social support the relationship was reversed. These findings document complex relationships between sexual stigma dimensions, coping, social support, and safer sex practices. Understanding the role these variables play in uptake of safer sex practices can inform sexual health interventions tailored for SMW.

  6. Chemical fields during Southeast Nexus (SENEX) field experiment and design of verification metrics for efficacy of capturing wild fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfires are commonplace in North America. Air pollution resulted from wildfires pose a significant risk for human health and crop damage. The pollutants alter the vertical distribution of many atmospheric constituents including O3 and many fine particulate (PM) species. Compared to anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants, emissions from wildfires are largely uncontrolled and unpredictable. Therefore, quantitatively describing wildfire emissions and their contributions to air pollution remains a substantial challenge for atmospheric modeler and air quality forecasters. In this study, we investigated the modification and redistribution of atmospheric composition within the Conterminous U.S (CONUS) by wild fire plumes originated within and outside of the CONUS. We used the National Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC) to conduct the investigation. NAQFC uses dynamic lateral chemical boundary conditions derived from the National Weather Service experimental global aerosol tracer model accounting for intrusion of fire-associated aerosol species. Within CONUS, the NAQFC derives both gaseous and aerosol wildfire associated species from the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) hazard mapping system (HMS) hot-spot detection, and US Forestry Service Blue-sky protocol for quantifying fire characteristics, and the US EPA Sparse Matrix Object Kernel Emission (SMOKE) calculation for plume rise. Attributions of both of these wildfire influences inherently reflect the aged plumes intruded into the CONUS through the model boundaries as well as the fresher emissions from sources within the CONUS. Both emission sources contribute significantly to the vertical structure modification of the atmosphere. We conducted case studies within the fire active seasons to demonstrate some possible impacts on the vertical structures of O3 and PM species by the wildfire activities.

  7. New non-chemically amplified molecular resist design with switchable sensitivity for multi-lithography applications and nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neha; Guruprasad Reddy, Pulikanti; Nandi, Santu; Yogesh, Midathala; Sharma, Satinder K.; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P.; Ghosh, Subrata; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.

    2017-12-01

    The development of new photoresist materials for multi-lithography applications is crucial but a challenging task for semiconductor industries. During the last few decades, given the need for new resists to meet the requirements of semiconductor industries, several research groups have developed different resist materials for specific lithography applications. In this context, we have successfully synthesized a new molecular non-chemically amplified resist (n-CAR) (C3) based on the functionalization of aromatic hydroxyl core (4,4‧-(9H-fluorene-9,9-diyl)diphenol) with radiation sensitive sulfonium triflates for various lithography applications. While, micron scale features have been developed using i-line (365 nm) and DUVL (254 nm) exposure tools, electron beam studies on C3 thin films enabled us to pattern 20 nm line features with L/3S (line/space) characteristics on the silicon substrate. The sensitivity and contrast were calculated from the contrast curve analysis as 280 µC cm‑2 and 0.025 respectively. Being an important parameter for any newly developed resists, the line edge roughness (LER) of 30 nm (L/5S) features were calculated, using SUMMIT metrology package, to be 3.66  ±  0.3 nm and found to be within the acceptable range. AFM analysis further confirmed 20 nm line width with smooth pattern wall. No deformation of patterned features was observed during AFM analysis which indicated good adhesion property between patterned resists and silicon substrates.

  8. Design of a rotary reactor for chemical-looping combustion. Part 2: Comparison of copper-, nickel-, and iron-based oxygen carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2014-04-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising option for several applications including carbon capture (CC), fuel reforming, H 2 generation, etc. Previous studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing CLC in a novel rotary design with micro-channel structures. Part 1 of this series studied the fundamentals of the reactor design and proposed a comprehensive design procedure, enabling a systematic methodology of designing and evaluating the rotary CLC reactor with different OCs and operating conditions. This paper presents the application of the methodology to the designs with three commonly used OCs, i.e., copper, nickel, and iron. The physical properties and the reactivities of the three OCs are compared at operating conditions suitable for the rotary CLC. Nickel has the highest reduction rate, but relatively slow oxidation reactivity while the iron reduction rate is most sensitive to the fuel concentration. The design parameters and the operating conditions for the three OCs are selected, following the strategies proposed in Part 1, and the performances are evaluated using a one-dimensional plug-flow model developed previously. The simulations show that for all OCs, complete fuel conversion and high carbon separation efficiency can be achieved at periodic stationary state with reasonable operational stabilities. The nickel-based design includes the smallest dimensions because of its fast reduction rate. The operation of nickel case is mainly limited to the slow oxidation rate, and hence a relatively large share of air sector is used. The iron-based design has the largest size, due to its slow reduction reactivity near the exit or in the fuel purge sector where the fuel concentration is low. The gas flow temperature increases monotonically for all the cases, and is mainly determined by the solid temperature. In the periodic state, the local temperature variation is within 40 K and the thermal distortion is limited. The design of the rotary CLC is

  9. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  10. Experiences Using Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for Safer Conception Among HIV Serodiscordant Heterosexual Couples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Angela R; Leech, Ashley A; Biancarelli, Dea L; Sullivan, Meg; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2017-08-01

    Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising HIV prevention strategy for HIV serodiscordant couples (HIV-infected male, uninfected female) seeking safer conception. However, most research on PrEP for safer conception has focused on couples in sub-Saharan Africa; little is known about the perspectives or experiences of heterosexual couples in the United States. We conducted qualitative interviews with six couples (six women and five of their male partners) receiving PrEP for conception services at an urban safety net hospital in the US Northeast. In-depth interview guides explored couple relationships and contextual factors and attitudes, perceptions, and decision-making processes surrounding PrEP for safer conception. Thematic analyses focused on identifying the following emergent themes. We found that couple relationships were situated within broader social and cultural contexts of immigration, family, and community that shaped their experiences with HIV and serodiscordant relationship status. Despite strong partner support within relationships, HIV stigma and disapproval of serodiscordant relationships contributed to couples' feelings of social isolation and subsequent aspirations to have "normal" families. By enabling "natural" conception through condomless sex, PrEP for safer conception provided a sense of enhanced relationship intimacy. Couples called for increasing public awareness of PrEP through positive messaging as a way to combat HIV stigma. Findings suggest that relationship dynamics and broader social contexts appear to shape HIV serodiscordant couples' fertility desires and motivations to use PrEP. However, increased public awareness of PrEP for safer conception may be needed to combat HIV stigma at the community level.

  11. Influence of design, physico-chemical and environmental parameters on pharmaceuticals and fragrances removal by constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijosa-Valsero, M; Matamoros, V; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Pedescoll, A; Martín-Villacorta, J; García, J; Bayona, J M; Bécares, E

    2011-01-01

    The ability of several mesocosm-scale and full-scale constructed wetlands (CWs) to remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from urban wastewater was assessed. The results of three previous works were considered as a whole to find common patterns in PPCP removal. The experiment took place outdoors under winter and summer conditions. The mesocosm-scale CWs differed in some design parameters, namely the presence of plants, the vegetal species chosen (Typha angustifolia versus Phragmites australis), the flow configuration (surface flow versus subsurface flow), the primary treatment (sedimentation tank versus HUSB), the feeding regime (batch flow versus continuous saturation) and the presence of gravel bed. The full-scale CWs consisted of a combination of various subsystems (ponds, surface flow CWs and subsurface flow CWs). The studied PPCPs were ketoprofen, naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, salicylic acid, carbamazepine, caffeine, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide and tonalide. The performance of the evaluated treatment systems was compound dependent and varied as a function of the CW-configuration. In addition, PPCP removal efficiencies were lower during winter. The presence of plants favoured naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, salicylic acid, caffeine, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide and tonalide removal. Significant positive correlations were observed between the removal of most PPCPs and temperature or redox potential. Accordingly, microbiological pathways appear to be the most likely degradation route for the target PPCPs in the CWs studied.

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akio Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Enrique Iglesia

    2005-09-30

    This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rate, selectivity for feedstocks consisting of synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third reporting period, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based FT catalysts with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During this fourth reporting period, we have determined the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance. More specifically, we have found that the sequence in which promoters are introduced has a marked positive impact on rates and selectivities. Cu or Ru chemical promoters should be impregnated before K to achieve higher Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates. The catalyst prepared in this way was evaluated for 240 h, showing a high catalytic activity and stability after an initial period of time necessary for the formation of the active phases. Concurrently, we are studying optimal activation procedures, which involve the reduction and carburization of oxide precursors during the early stages of contact with synthesis gas. Activation at low temperatures (523 K), made possible by optimal introduction of Cu or Ru, leads to lower catalyst surface area than higher activation temperatures, but to higher reaction rates, because such low temperatures avoid concurrent deactivation

  13. An Overview of the Challenges in Designing, Integrating, and Delivering BARD: A Public Chemical-Biology Resource and Query Portal for Multiple Organizations, Locations, and Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Andrea; Bittker, Joshua A; Lahr, David L; Brudz, Steve; Chatwin, Simon; Oprea, Tudor I; Waller, Anna; Yang, Jeremy J; Southall, Noel; Guha, Rajarshi; Schürer, Stephan C; Vempati, Uma D; Southern, Mark R; Dawson, Eric S; Clemons, Paul A; Chung, Thomas D Y

    2014-06-01

    Recent industry-academic partnerships involve collaboration among disciplines, locations, and organizations using publicly funded "open-access" and proprietary commercial data sources. These require the effective integration of chemical and biological information from diverse data sources, which presents key informatics, personnel, and organizational challenges. The BioAssay Research Database (BARD) was conceived to address these challenges and serve as a community-wide resource and intuitive web portal for public-sector chemical-biology data. Its initial focus is to enable scientists to more effectively use the National Institutes of Health Roadmap Molecular Libraries Program (MLP) data generated from the 3-year pilot and 6-year production phases of the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN), which is currently in its final year. BARD evolves the current data standards through structured assay and result annotations that leverage BioAssay Ontology and other industry-standard ontologies, and a core hierarchy of assay definition terms and data standards defined specifically for small-molecule assay data. We initially focused on migrating the highest-value MLP data into BARD and bringing it up to this new standard. We review the technical and organizational challenges overcome by the interdisciplinary BARD team, veterans of public- and private-sector data-integration projects, who are collaborating to describe (functional specifications), design (technical specifications), and implement this next-generation software solution. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  14. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Carsten; Alfreider, Albin; Lorbeer, Helmut; Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd; Boehme, Olaf; Weiss, Holger; Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar

    2002-01-01

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L -1 ; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found

  15. Designing novel Sn-Bi, Si-C and Ge-C nanostructures, using simple theoretical chemical similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdetsis Aristides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A framework of simple, transparent and powerful concepts is presented which is based on isoelectronic (or isovalent principles, analogies, regularities and similarities. These analogies could be considered as conceptual extensions of the periodical table of the elements, assuming that two atoms or molecules having the same number of valence electrons would be expected to have similar or homologous properties. In addition, such similar moieties should be able, in principle, to replace each other in more complex structures and nanocomposites. This is only partly true and only occurs under certain conditions which are investigated and reviewed here. When successful, these concepts are very powerful and transparent, leading to a large variety of nanomaterials based on Si and other group 14 elements, similar to well known and well studied analogous materials based on boron and carbon. Such nanomaterias designed in silico include, among many others, Si-C, Sn-Bi, Si-C and Ge-C clusters, rings, nanowheels, nanorodes, nanocages and multidecker sandwiches, as well as silicon planar rings and fullerenes similar to the analogous sp2 bonding carbon structures. It is shown that this pedagogically simple and transparent framework can lead to an endless variety of novel and functional nanomaterials with important potential applications in nanotechnology, nanomedicine and nanobiology. Some of the so called predicted structures have been already synthesized, not necessarily with the same rational and motivation. Finally, it is anticipated that such powerful and transparent rules and analogies, in addition to their predictive power, could also lead to far-reaching interpretations and a deeper understanding of already known results and information.

  16. Designing and testing a chemical demulsifier dosage controller in a crude oil desalting plant: an artificial Intelligence-Based network approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshehri, A.K.; Ricardez-Sandoval, L.A.; Elkamel, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this paper is to present an artificial neural network (ANN) controller trained on a historical data set that covers a wide operating range of the fundamental parameters that affect the demulsifier dosage in a crude oil desalting process. The designed controller was tested and implemented on-line in a gas-oil separation plant. The results indicate that the current control strategy overinjects chemical demulsifier into the desalting process whereas the proposed ANN controller predicts a lower demulsifier dosage while keeping the salt content within its specification targets. Since an on-line salt analyzer is not available in the desalting plant, an ANN based on historical measurements of the salt content in the desalting process was also developed. The results show that the predictions made by this ANN controller can be used as an on-line strategy to predict and control the salt concentration in the treated oil. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  18. A safer and flexible method for the oxygen functionalization of carbon nanotubes by nitric acid vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santangelo, Saveria; Piperopoulos, Elpida; Fazio, Enza; Faggio, Giuliana; Ansari, Shabana; Lanza, Maurizio; Neri, Fortunato; Messina, Giacomo; Milone, Candida

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization by nitric acid vapors at azeotropic concentration has been recently proposed to eliminate drawbacks of the widely utilized liquid phase functionalization method. This work suggests to exploit the so-called “salt effect” to improve the vapor phase oxidation method in terms of safety and flexibility. Increasing the relative volatility of acid, the addition of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 salt to the HNO 3 + H 2 O solution allows (i) obtaining vapors with HNO 3 at the azeotropic concentration from a more diluted liquid solution (i.e. operating under safer conditions), and (ii) varying the concentration of HNO 3 in the vapor phase even above the azeotropic concentration limit (with improved process flexibility). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy systematic analyses are carried out on pristine and oxidized nanotubes in order to assess their functionalization degree, surface chemistry and structural evolution. The most relevant finding of this preliminary study is that the nanotube functionalization extent increases linearly with the HNO 3 vapor concentration.

  19. A safer and flexible method for the oxygen functionalization of carbon nanotubes by nitric acid vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santangelo, Saveria, E-mail: saveria.santangelo@unirc.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, dell’Energia, dell’Ambiente e dei Materiali (DICEAM), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Piperopoulos, Elpida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Fazio, Enza [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Faggio, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Ansari, Shabana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanza, Maurizio [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF) del CNR, 98158 Messina (Italy); Neri, Fortunato [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Messina, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Milone, Candida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    The functionalization by nitric acid vapors at azeotropic concentration has been recently proposed to eliminate drawbacks of the widely utilized liquid phase functionalization method. This work suggests to exploit the so-called “salt effect” to improve the vapor phase oxidation method in terms of safety and flexibility. Increasing the relative volatility of acid, the addition of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt to the HNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O solution allows (i) obtaining vapors with HNO{sub 3} at the azeotropic concentration from a more diluted liquid solution (i.e. operating under safer conditions), and (ii) varying the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the vapor phase even above the azeotropic concentration limit (with improved process flexibility). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy systematic analyses are carried out on pristine and oxidized nanotubes in order to assess their functionalization degree, surface chemistry and structural evolution. The most relevant finding of this preliminary study is that the nanotube functionalization extent increases linearly with the HNO{sub 3} vapor concentration.

  20. National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: Recommendations for Safer Outpatient Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; York, Andrew; Hu, Dale J; Perfetto, Deborah; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-12-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a major patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) in August 2014. The ADE Action Plan focuses on surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives, and oversights, additional research needs as well as possible measures and metrics to track progress of ADE prevention within three drug classes: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids.Objectives and Recommendations. With outpatient opioid prescriptions being a great concern among many healthcare providers, this article focuses on recommendations from the ADE Action Plan to help guide safer opioid use in healthcare delivery settings. Its aim is to discuss current federal methods in place to prevent opioid ADEs while also providing evidence to encourage providers and hospitals to innovate new systems and practices to increase prevention. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Making licensed venues safer for patrons: what environmental factors should be the focus of interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homel, Ross; Carvolth, Russell; Hauritz, Marge; McIlwain, Gillian; Teague, Rosie

    2004-03-01

    The Queensland Safety Action Projects operationalized a problem-focused responsive regulatory model in order to make nightclubs and other venues safer. A problem-focused approach requires a careful analysis of the total environment of licensed venues, including drinking and its controls but also the social and physical environments, patron mix and management practices. We present new analyses of observational data collected in 1994 and 1996 in the north Queensland cities of Cairns, Townsville and Mackay. Major reductions in aggression and violence were observed, as well as improvements in many aspects of the venue environment and management practices. We do not argue in this paper that the interventions caused the environmental and management changes, although we believe this to be true. Rather, our assumption is that whatever caused them, some of the environmental and management changes were critical to the reductions in aggression. Regression techniques were used to identify those factors that best explained the declines in aggression. For reduced physical violence four key predictors were identified: improved comfort, availability of public transport, less overt sexual activity and fewer highly drunk men. For reduced non-physical aggression, four key predictors were: fewer Pacific Islander patrons, less male swearing, fewer intoxicated patrons requiring that management be called and more chairs with armrests. The analyses are consistent with the argument that the control of drinking is necessary but not sufficient to reduce aggression and violence.

  2. Anatomy of Meckel's cave and the trigeminal ganglion: anatomical landmarks for a safer approach to them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Mehmet; Deda, Haluk; Avci, Emel; Elhan, Alaittin; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Tubbs, R Shane; Silav, Gokalp; Yilmaz, Erdal; Baskaya, Mustafa Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Surgical approaches to Meckel's cave (MC) are often technically difficult and sometimes associated with postoperative morbidity. The relationship of surgical landmarks to relevant anatomy is important. Therefore, we attempted to delineate quantitatively their anatomy and the relationships between MC and surrounding structures. With the aid of a surgical microscope, MC and its contents were studied in 15 formalin-fixed cadaver head specimens. Measurements were made and their relationships were observed. The distance from the zygomatic arch and the lateral end of the petrous ridge to MC was 26.5 and 34.4 mm, respectively. The distance from the arcuate eminence, the facial nerve hiatus, and the foramen spinosum to MC was 16.6, 12.8 and 7.46 mm respectively. The TG lay 5.81 mm posterior to the foramen ovale. The distance from the abducens, trochlear and oculomotor nerves to the trigeminal ganglion was 1.87, 5.53 and 6.57 mm respectively. The distance from the posterior and the anterior walls of the sigmoid sinus to the trigeminal porus was 43.6 and 33.1 mm respectively. The trigeminal porus was on average 7.19 mm from the anterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus. The anatomical landmarks as presented herein regarding MC may be used for a safer skull base approach to the region.

  3. Syringaresinol: A Renewable and Safer Alternative to Bisphenol A for Epoxy-Amine Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Marine; Hollande, Louis; Jaufurally, Abdus Samad; Pernes, Miguel; Ménard, Raphaël; Grimaldi, Marina; Beaugrand, Johnny; Balaguer, Patrick; Ducrot, Paul-Henri; Allais, Florent

    2017-02-22

    A renewable bisepoxide, SYR-EPO, was prepared from syringaresinol, a naturally occurring bisphenol deriving from sinapic acid, by using a chemo-enzymatic synthetic pathway. Estrogenic activity tests revealed no endocrine disruption for syringaresinol. Its glycidylation afforded SYR-EPO with excellent yield and purity. This biobased, safe epoxy precursor was then cured with conventional and renewable diamines for the preparation of epoxy-amine resins. The resulting thermosets were thermally and mechanically characterized. Thermal analyses of these new resins showed excellent thermal stabilities (T d5 % =279-309 °C) and T g ranging from 73 to 126 °C, almost reaching the properties of those obtained with the diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), extensively used in the polymer industry (T d5 % =319 °C and T g =150 °C for DGEBA/isophorone diamine resins). Degradation studies in NaOH and HCl aqueous solutions also highlighted the robustness of the syringaresinol-based resins, similar to bisphenol A (BPA). All these results undoubtedly confirmed the potential of syringaresinol as a greener and safer substitute for BPA. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Application showcases for a small scale membrane contactor for fine chemical processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelands, C.P.M.; Ngene, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from batch to continuous processing in fine-chemicals industries offers many advantages; among these are a high volumetric productivity, improved control over reaction conditions resulting in a higher yield and selectivity, a small footprint and a safer process due to a smaller

  5. Progressive Design of Plasmonic Metal-Semiconductor Ensemble toward Regulated Charge Flow and Improved Vis-NIR-Driven Solar-to-Chemical Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chuang; Quan, Quan; Chen, Hao Ming; Sun, Yugang; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-mediated photocatalysis without the bandgap limitations of traditional semiconductor has aroused significant attention in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. However, the photocatalytic efficiency barely initiated by the SPR effects is still challenged by the low concentration and ineffective extraction of energetic hot electrons, slow charge migration rates, random charge diffusion directions, and the lack of highly active sites for redox reactions. Here, the tunable, progressive harvesting of visible-to-near infrared light (vis-NIR, λ > 570 nm) by designing plasmonic Au nanorods and metal (Au, Ag, or Pt) nanoparticle codecorated 1D CdS nanowire (1D CdS NW) ensemble is reported. The intimate integration of these metal nanostructures with 1D CdS NWs promotes the extraction and manipulated directional separation and migration of hot charge carriers in a more effective manner. Such cooperative synergy with tunable control of interfacial interaction, morphology optimization, and cocatalyst strategy results in the distinctly boosted performance for vis-NIR-driven plasmonic photocatalysis. This work highlights the significance of rationally progressive design of plasmonic metal-semiconductor-based composite system for boosting the regulated directional flow of hot charge carrier and thus the more efficient use of broad-spectrum solar energy conversion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A two-step leaching method designed based on chemical fraction distribution of the heavy metals for selective leaching of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb from metallurgical sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Yu, Junxia; Xiong, Wanli; Xu, Yuanlai; Chi, Ru-An

    2018-01-01

    For selective leaching and highly effective recovery of heavy metals from a metallurgical sludge, a two-step leaching method was designed based on the distribution analysis of the chemical fractions of the loaded heavy metal. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) was used as a leaching agent in the first step to leach the relatively labile heavy metals and then ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) was applied to leach the residual metals according to their different fractional distribution. Using the two-step leaching method, 82.89% of Cd, 55.73% of Zn, 10.85% of Cu, and 0.25% of Pb were leached in the first step by 0.7 M HCl at a contact time of 240 min, and the leaching efficiencies for Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb were elevated up to 99.76, 91.41, 71.85, and 94.06%, by subsequent treatment with 0.2 M EDTA at 480 min, respectively. Furthermore, HCl leaching induced fractional redistribution, which might increase the mobility of the remaining metals and then facilitate the following metal removal by EDTA. The facilitation was further confirmed by the comparison to the one-step leaching method with single HCl or single EDTA, respectively. These results suggested that the designed two-step leaching method by HCl and EDTA could be used for selective leaching and effective recovery of heavy metals from the metallurgical sludge or heavy metal-contaminated solid media.

  7. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel highly selective polo-like kinase 2 inhibitors based on the tetrahydropteridin chemical scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Mei-Miao; Yang, Yang; Luo, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xing-Xing; Xiao, Xuan; Li, Shiyu; Cheng, Kai; Xie, Zhouling; Tu, Zhengchao; Liao, Chenzhong

    2018-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2) is a potential target for the treatment of cancer, which displays an important role in tumor cell proliferation and survival. In this report, according to the analysis of critical amino acid residue differences among Plk1, Plk2 and Plk3, and structure-based drug design strategies, two novel series of selective Plk2 inhibitors based on tetrahydropteridin chemical scaffold were designed and synthesized to target two specific residues, Lys86 and Tyr161 of Plk2. All compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against Plk1-Plk3 and the cellular inhibition activity on six different human cancer cell lines. All efforts led to the identification of the most potent compounds C2 (3.40 nM against Plk2) and C21 (4.88 nM against Plk2) from the first and second series of selective Plk2 inhibitors respectively. Additionally, the selectivity of C21 over Plk1/3 was significantly increased with the selectivity indexes of 12.57 and 910.06. Moreover, most of our compounds exhibited antitumor activity in the nanomolar range in the MTT assay, indicating that our compounds, especially C2 and C21 could be promising Plk2 inhibitors for further anticancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Safer Conception Methods and Counseling: Psychometric Evaluation of New Measures of Attitudes and Beliefs Among HIV Clients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldetsadik, Mahlet Atakilt; Goggin, Kathy; Staggs, Vincent S; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Beyeza-Kashesya, Jolly; Mindry, Deborah; Finocchario-Kessler, Sarah; Khanakwa, Sarah; Wagner, Glenn J

    2016-06-01

    With data from 400 HIV clients with fertility intentions and 57 HIV providers in Uganda, we evaluated the psychometrics of new client and provider scales measuring constructs related to safer conception methods (SCM) and safer conception counselling (SCC). Several forms of validity (i.e., content, face, and construct validity) were examined using standard methods including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was established using Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient. The final scales consisted of measures of attitudes towards use of SCM and delivery of SCC, including measures of self-efficacy and motivation to use SCM, and perceived community stigma towards childbearing. Most client and all provider measures had moderate to high internal consistency (alphas 0.60-0.94), most had convergent validity (associations with other SCM or SCC-related measures), and client measures had divergent validity (poor associations with depression). These findings establish preliminary psychometric properties of these scales and should facilitate future studies of SCM and SCC.

  9. Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography: a potentially useful tool for safer free tissue transfer to complicated regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Cifci, Mehmet; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer to compli......Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer...... be kept in mind, especially inthe patients with peripheral vascular disease. 3D-MSCTA has the potential to replace digital subtraction angiography for planning of microvascular reconstructions and newer devices with higher resolutions will probably increase the reliability of this technique. (c) 2009...

  10. Joint Production of Safer, Cleaner and Animal Friendlier Beef: Do Consumers Join it Too? - Insights from Focus Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Ines; Santos, Jose Manuel Lima; Fontes, Magda Aguiar

    2011-01-01

    Consumers’ motivations and behaviour towards food safety, animal welfare and the environment in beef production and beef products were discussed in several focus groups, within a broader research program aiming at determining Portuguese consumers’ willingness to pay for safer, cleaner and animal friendlier beef. Regarding the supply context, food safety, animal welfare and environmental protection are, to some extent, jointly produced within beef production systems. From the demand perspectiv...

  11. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  12. Measures of condom and safer sex social norms and stigma towards HIV/AIDS among Beijing MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yifei; Lu, Hongyan; Raymond, H Fisher; Sun, Yanming; Sun, Jiangping; Jia, Yujiang; He, Xiong; Fan, Song; Xiao, Yan; McFarland, Willi; Ruan, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    Social norms around condom use and safe sex as well as HIV/AIDS stigma are used to identify persons at higher risk for HIV. These measures have been developed and tested in a variety of settings and populations. While efforts have been undertaken to develop context specific measures of these domains among Chinese MSM, the feasibility of using existing measures is unknown. A survey of MSM, based on respondent-driven sampling, was conducted in Beijing. Existing measures of condom social norms, attitudes towards safer sex and HIV/AIDS stigma were piloted. Internal consistency of all measures was high. As expected higher levels of condom social norms and positive attitudes towards safer sex were associated with condom use. HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination had a significant relationship with never having an HIV test and lack of discussion of HIV/AIDS with male partners. Correlates of low condom social norms were age, education, employment and resident status. Existing measures of condom social norms, attitudes towards safer sex and HIV/AIDS stigma appear to be appropriate for use among Chinese MSM. Using existing measures as opposed to developing new measures has the potential to expedite investigations into psychosocial correlates of HIV risk behavior.

  13. Start Talking About Risks: Development of a Motivational Interviewing-Based Safer Sex Program for People Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golin, Carol E.; Patel, Shilpa; Tiller, Katherine; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Grodensky, Catherine A.; Boland, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of HIV infection in the US in general, and in the southeast, in particular, has shifted dramatically over the past two decades, increasingly affecting women and minorities. The site for our intervention was an infectious diseases clinic based at a university hospital serving over 1,300 HIV-infected patients in North Carolina. Our patient population is diverse and reflects the trends seen more broadly in the epidemic in the southeast and in North Carolina. Practicing safer sex is a complex behavior with multiple determinants that vary by individual and social context. A comprehensive intervention that is client-centered and can be tailored to each individual’s circumstances is more likely to be effective at reducing risky behaviors among clients such as ours than are more confrontational or standardized prevention messages. One potential approach to improving safer sex practices among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is Motivational Interviewing (MI), a non-judgmental, client-centered but directive counseling style. Below, we describe: (1) the development of the Start Talking About Risks (STAR) MI-based safer sex counseling program for PLWHA at our clinic site; (2) the intervention itself; and (3) lessons learned from implementing the intervention. PMID:17701337

  14. Fertility Intentions, Pregnancy, and Use of PrEP and ART for Safer Conception Among East African HIV Serodiscordant Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Renee; Thomson, Kerry; Celum, Connie; Haberer, Jessica; Ngure, Kenneth; Mugo, Nelly; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Katabira, Elly; Odoyo, Josephine; Bulya, Nulu; Asiimwe, Stephen; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-09-11

    African HIV serodiscordant couples often desire pregnancy, despite sexual HIV transmission risk during pregnancy attempts. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduce HIV risk and can be leveraged for safer conception but how well these strategies are used for safer conception is not known. We conducted an open-label demonstration project of the integrated delivery of PrEP and ART among 1013 HIV serodiscordant couples from Kenya and Uganda followed quarterly for 2 years. We evaluated fertility intentions, pregnancy incidence, the use of PrEP and ART during peri-conception, and peri-conception HIV incidence. At enrollment, 80% of couples indicated a desire for more children. Pregnancy incidence rates were 18.5 and 18.7 per 100 person years among HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected women, and higher among women who recently reported fertility intention (adjusted odds ratio 3.43, 95% CI 2.38-4.93) in multivariable GEE models. During the 6 months preceding pregnancy, 82.9% of couples used PrEP or ART and there were no HIV seroconversions. In this cohort with high pregnancy rates, integrated PrEP and ART was readily used by HIV serodiscordant couples, including during peri-conception periods. Widespread scale-up of safer conception counseling and services is warranted to respond to strong desires for pregnancy among HIV-affected men and women.

  15. Chemical Design of Functional Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten

    This thesis deals with a very specific class of functional nanomaterials known as mesoporous zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate minerals characterized by featuring pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. Mesoporous zeolites are zeol...

  16. Intraoperative Endotracheal Cuff Pressure Study: How Education and Availability of Manometers Help Guide Safer Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gregory J; Warfel, Joel W; Aden, James K; Blackwell, Scott D

    2018-02-13

    Endotracheal intubation is a medical procedure that is often indicated in both the perioperative and critical care environments. Cuffed endotracheal tubes (ETT) allow for safer and more efficient delivery of positive pressure ventilation, as well as create a barrier to reduce the risk of micro-aspiration and anesthetic pollution in the operating room environment. Over-inflation of the endotracheal cuff can lead to serious and harmful sequelae. This study aimed to assess if departmental education paired with ready access to a manometer to assess cuff pressure would result in an improvement in the proportion of ETT cuff pressures in the goal range. A quality improvement study was conducted at the San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC; Department of Defense hospital in San Antonio, TX). The initiative was divided into three key periods: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. During the pre-implementation period, ETT cuff pressures were obtained to assess the baseline state of ETT cuff pressures for patients in the operating room; the proportion of in-range (20-30 cmH2O) pressures was calculated. During the implementation phase, operating rooms were equipped with manometers and anesthesia departmental education was performed regarding the use of the manometers. Three months later, post-implementation cuff pressures were measured in the OR, and the proportion of in-range pressures was again calculated. The pre-implementation data showed an average cuff pressure of 48.92 cmH2O and a median of 38.5 cmH2O. Of the 100 pre-implementation pressures, 20 were in the goal range. Post-implementation data had an average cuff pressure of 41.96 cmH2O and a median of 30 cmH2O. A chi-squared test of pressures in the safe range from the pre-implementation versus post-implementation values yielded a highly significant p-value of 0.0003. The data from this study clearly demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the proportion of in-range cuff

  17. Comparison of complications in midlines versus central venous catheters: Are midlines safer than central venous lines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Ammara; Navalkele, Bhagyashri; Kaur, Maninder; Krishna, Amar; Saleem, Aleena; Rana, Natasha; Gera, Sonia; Chandramohan, Suganya; Surapaneni, Malini; Chopra, Teena

    2018-03-07

    With the rising use of midline catheters (MCs), validation of their safety is essential. Our study aimed to evaluate the incidence of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and other complications related to the use of MCs and central venous catheters (CVCs). A retrospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary care hospital in Detroit, Michigan, from March-September 2016. Adult patients with either MC or CVC were included. Outcomes assessed were catheter-related BSI (CRBSI), mechanical complications, hospital length of stay, readmission within 90 days of discharge (RA), and mortality. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. A total of 411 patients with MC and 282 patients with CVC were analyzed. More CRBSIs were seen in patients with CVC (10/282) than MC (1/411) (3.5% vs 0.2%, respectively; P = .0008). More mechanical complications were seen in patients with MC (2.6%) than CVC (0.3%; P = .03). Patients with CVC had a higher crude mortality (17.3% vs 5.3%; P < .0001), RA (58% vs 35%; P ≤ .0001), line-related RA (2.8% vs 0.2%; P = .0041), and transfer to intensive care unit after line placement (9% vs 5%; P = .01). CVC was a significant exposure for a composite of mortality, CRBSI, mechanical issues, thrombosis, and readmission because of a line-related complication (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-5.8). Our findings show use of MC is safer than CVC, but larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. EM Safety Innovations Aim Toward Safer Technologies and Better Information for Users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankford, M.; Geiger, J.; Carpenter, C.

    2002-02-26

    Beginning in 2000, the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science and Technology (OST) has substantially re-examined and improved our approach to worker safety and health. Consistent with OST's responsibilities for safety, these initiatives can be categorized generally as: (1) Making our technologies inherently safer to use; and (2) Providing useful safety and health information about our technologies to the sites and technology operators. This evolved through a collaborative process by the EM Office of Safety, Health and Security, the EM Office of Science and Technology, EM Focus Areas and others. It was, initially, largely in response to a set of eight recommendations by the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) and to lessons learned from a serious accident in August, 2000 involving an OST-funded new technology. The cornerstone of this effort is the Policy for Occupational Safety and Health in EM's Science and Technology Program, issued in January 2001. DOE Focus Areas are focusing more attention on worker safety and health in their solicitations and procurement documents for new technology research and development (R&D) projects. EM Headquarters is working with Focus Areas, site environmental contractors, technology developers, and their respective DOE field organizations to ensure that roles and responsibilities for worker safety and health are clearly defined when a new technology is demonstrated at an environmental management site. The peer review process administered by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) now requires technology developers to think through their approach to safety and health in a more detailed, focused way than previously. In Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSRs), developers are comparing their new technologies to baseline technologies on the basis of safety and health. Technology Safety Data Sheets (TSDSs) are being prepared for new technologies when

  19. Safety culture and the 5 steps to safer surgery: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M R; Roberts, M J; Alderson, M L; Gale, T C E

    2015-06-01

    Improvements in safety culture have been postulated as one of the mechanisms underlying the association between the introduction of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist with perioperative briefings and debriefings, and enhanced patient outcomes. The 5 Steps to Safer Surgery (5SSS) incorporates pre-list briefings, the three steps of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) and post-list debriefings in one framework. We aimed to identify any changes in safety culture associated with the introduction of the 5SSS in orthopaedic operating theatres. We assessed the safety culture in the elective orthopaedic theatres of a large UK teaching hospital before and after introduction of the 5SSS using a modified version of the Safety Attitude Questionnaire - Operating Room (SAQ-OR). Primary outcome measures were pre-post intervention changes in the six safety culture domains of the SAQ-OR. We also analysed changes in responses to two items regarding perioperative briefings. The SAQ-OR survey response rate was 80% (60/75) at baseline and 74% (53/72) one yr later. There were significant improvements in both the reported frequency (Pimportance (P=0.018) of briefings, and in five of the six safety culture domain scores (Working Conditions, Perceptions of Management, Job Satisfaction, Safety Climate and Teamwork Climate) of the SAQ-OR (P<0.001 in all cases). Scores in the sixth domain (Stress Recognition) decreased significantly (P=0.028). Implementation of the 5SSS was associated with a significant improvement in the safety culture of elective orthopaedic operating theatres. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than its non-transgenic counterpart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangsheng Li

    Full Text Available Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems.