WorldWideScience

Sample records for design update thermal

  1. Conceptual thermal design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Present thermal design tools and methods insufficiently support the development of structural concepts engaged by typical practicing designers. Research described in this thesis identifies the main thermal design problems in practice. In addition, models and methods are developed that support an

  2. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  3. Smart design requires updated design and analysis guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejovic, S.; Gajic, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reviews several cases where there is an obvious and important margin between the ideal of smart design and the practical reality which often makes due with obsolete guidelines, outdated recommendations and leads to expensive maintenance troubles. Stated alternatively, this paper is a plea for an attempt to better integrate high technology, experience, knowledge and economics so that both owner and human interests can be better supported and protected. To this end, several well-known plants (Sayano-Shushenskaya, Grand Coulee, Niagara Falls, Richard B Russell, Iron Gates 2, Jenpeg, Bajina Basta, Zvornik, to name a few) have been briefly analysed to clarify the crucial need for updated approaches. Of course, whether the plant is large or small, designing, constructing, operating and updating hydropower plants is a complex set of tasks. Any hydroelectric installation, as a rule, should be designed in several stages. At each stage, entire project documentation should be reviewed by independent reviewers. Reducing the number of analyses, or limiting their scope, with no clear justification except for an attempt to save a little on cost upfront, or worse yet, neglecting the design procedures, can put a project at risk. For a variety of reasons the continuity of knowledge and experience has been lost nearly everywhere. The paper argues that an organized and multidisciplinary transfer of experience is a priority task to be undertaken by the electricity sector. There is a clear need to plan, finance and implement various long-term initiatives; it is urgent that decisions to address this be made now to preserve the currently available knowledge and the almost 200-years of project experience.

  4. Updating design information questionnaire (DIQ) experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palafox-Garcia, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: 1. Introduction - Once the State signed with the International Atomic Energy Agency the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the State has to declare to the IAEA their facilities where they handle Nuclear Material. Each facility will have their own Safeguards Agreement and these are called Subsidiary Arrangements. In order to have a good control and accountability of this material, each facility is named Material Balance Area (MBA). Based on the Subsidiary Arrangements each MBA has to fill a proper IAEA format named DIQ in order to get the Facility Attachment. The DIQ format varies, relying on the kind of facility. 2. Facility - In the NNRI, we have two MBA's and the experiences that we have had to fill the DIQ formats had been, that it takes quite a time to get the proper Facility Attachment, because first you have to have the proper format, then you fill it properly with all their respective annexes and once it is reviewed and approved by the people involved, this is signed and sent to the IAEA, this first step took six months. Once the format is reviewed by the IAEA, they send it back to the facility, asking for proper comments in order to clarify it properly, this took three months. The facility update the comments and send it back, this took three months. With this format the IAEA prepares the Facility Attachment of the MBA and send it to the facility for its approval or comments, this took five months. The facility reviewed it and sent it back with some comments or doubts after tree months. The IAEA clarifies the comments and doubts and send to the facility the approved Facility Attachment, four months later. So in order to get the proper Facility Attachments for each of our MBA's, it has been taken 24 months (two years) at least. 3. Actual situation - At present, now that the nuclear activities have been diminished and consequently the nuclear material movements, because the Fuel Fabrication Pilot Plant (FFPP) we have, was stopped for financial reasons

  5. Key Updating Methods for Combinatorial Design Based Key Management Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonghuan Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network (WSN has become one of the most promising network technologies for many useful applications. However, for the lack of resources, it is different but important to ensure the security of the WSNs. Key management is a corner stone on which to build secure WSNs for it has a fundamental role in confidentiality, authentication, and so on. Combinatorial design theory has been used to generate good-designed key rings for each sensor node in WSNs. A large number of combinatorial design based key management schemes have been proposed but none of them have taken key updating into consideration. In this paper, we point out the essence of key updating for the unital design based key management scheme and propose two key updating methods; then, we conduct performance analysis on the two methods from three aspects; at last, we generalize the two methods to other combinatorial design based key management schemes and enhance the second method.

  6. Thermal power plant design and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Power Plant: Design and Operation deals with various aspects of a thermal power plant, providing a new dimension to the subject, with focus on operating practices and troubleshooting, as well as technology and design. Its author has a 40-long association with thermal power plants in design as well as field engineering, sharing his experience with professional engineers under various training capacities, such as training programs for graduate engineers and operating personnel. Thermal Power Plant presents practical content on coal-, gas-, oil-, peat- and biomass-fueled thermal power

  7. Update of bridge design standards in Alabama for AASHTO LRFD seismic design requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) has been required to update their bridge design to the LRFD Bridge Design Specifications. This transition has resulted in changes to the seismic design standards of bridges in the state. Multiple bridg...

  8. Coiled-Coil Design: Updated and Upgraded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils are ubiquitous protein-folding and protein-interaction domains in which two or more α-helical chains come together to form bundles. Through a combination of bioinformatics analysis of many thousands of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures, plus empirical protein engineering and design studies, there is now a deep understanding of the sequence-to-structure relationships for this class of protein architecture. This has led to considerable success in rational design and what might be termed in biro de novo design of simple coiled coils, which include homo- and hetero-meric parallel dimers, trimers and tetramers. In turn, these provide a toolkit for directing the assembly of both natural proteins and more complex designs in protein engineering, materials science and synthetic biology. Moving on, the increased and improved use of computational design is allowing access to coiled-coil structures that are rare or even not observed in nature, for example α-helical barrels, which comprise five or more α-helices and have central channels into which different functions may be ported. This chapter reviews all of these advances, outlining improvements in our knowledge of the fundamentals of coiled-coil folding and assembly, and highlighting new coiled coil-based materials and applications that this new understanding is opening up. Despite considerable progress, however, challenges remain in coiled-coil design, and the next decade promises to be as productive and exciting as the last.

  9. Design of Thermal Systems Using Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haertel, Jan Hendrik Klaas

    The goal of this thesis is to apply topology optimization to the design of di_erent thermal systems such as heat sinks and heat exchangers in order to improve the thermal performance of these systems compared to conventional designs. The design of thermal systems is a complex task that has...... of optimized designs are presented within this thesis.  The main contribution of the thesis is the development of several numerical optimization models that are applied to different design challenges within thermal engineering.  Topology optimization is applied in an industrial project to design the heat....... The design of 3D printed dry-cooled power plant condensers using a simpliffed thermouid topology optimization model is presented in another study. A benchmarking of the optimized geometries against a conventional heat exchanger design is conducted and the topology optimized designs show a superior...

  10. MHTGR thermal performance envelopes: Reliability by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etzel, K.T.; Howard, W.W.; Zgliczynski, J.B.

    1992-05-01

    This document discusses thermal performance envelopes which are used to specify steady-state design requirements for the systems of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor to maximize plant performance reliability with optimized design. The thermal performance envelopes are constructed around the expected operating point accounting for uncertainties in actual plant as-built parameters and plant operation. The components are then designed to perform successfully at all points within the envelope. As a result, plant reliability is maximized by accounting for component thermal performance variation in the design. The design is optimized by providing a means to determine required margins in a disciplined and visible fashion

  11. A design rule about thermal ratcheting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.; Lebey, J.; Roche, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of thermal ratcheting, and to give a practical design rule aimed at avoiding its detrimental effects. A practical method will thus be available to designers for dealing with one of the adverse effects of computed thermal stresses

  12. IRIS design overview and status update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Petrovic, B.; Conway, L.E.; Oriani, L.; Kling, C.L.; Miller, K.; Lombardi, C.V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Barroso, A.C.O.; Collado, J.M.; Cinotti, L.; Storai, S.; Berra, F.; Todreas, N.E.; Ninokata, H.; Cavlina, N.; Grgic, D.; Oriolo, F.; Moraes, M.M.; Frederico, C.; Henning, F.; Griffith, W.; Love, J.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Wood, R.; Alonso, G.; Kodochigov, N.; Polunichev, V.; Augutis, J.; Alzbutas, R.; Boroughs, R.D.; Naviglio, A.; Panella, B.

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced, integral, light-water cooled reactor of medium generating capacity (1000 MWt, or ∼335 MWe), geared at near term deployment (2012- 2015). It has been under development since the turn of the century by an international consortium--led by Westinghouse--that includes 21 organizations from 10 countries, and it is currently in the pre-application licensing process with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper describes its integral design (i.e., steam generators, pumps, pressurizer and control rod drive mechanisms are all included inside the reactor vessel, together with the core, control rods, and neutron reflector/shield) and discusses the unique ('safety-by-design') TM IRIS philosophy. This approach, by eliminating accidents at the design stage, or decreasing their consequences and probabilities when outright elimination is not possible, provides a very powerful first level of defense in depth. The ('safety by- design') TM allows a significant reduction and simplification of the passive safety systems, which not only improves safety but simultaneously reduces the overall cost. Moreover, it supports licensing the power plant without the need for off-site emergency response planning--an objective which is part of the pre-application with NRC and is also pursued within an international research project coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This would allow IRIS to be treated as any other industrial facility, located closer to population centers, and enable its effective dual-purpose use for electricity production and co-generation (district heating, desalination, industrial steam). The modular IRIS--with each module rated at ∼335 MWe--is an ideal size for developing countries as it allows to easily introducing single modules in regions only requiring a few hundred MWs, or a moderate amount of power on limited electric grids. IRIS can be also deployed in

  13. An updated point design for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Meier, W.R.; Abbott, R.P.; Barnard, J.J.; Brown, T.; Callahan, D.A.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Pemberton, S.J.; Peterson, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Sabbi, G-L.; Sharp, W.M.; Welch, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    An updated, self-consistent point design for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) power plant based on an induction linac driver, indirect-drive targets, and a thick liquid wall chamber has been completed. Conservative parameters were selected to allow each design area to meet its functional requirements in a robust manner, and thus this design is referred to as the Robust Point Design (RPD-2002). This paper provides a top-level summary of the major characteristics and design parameters for the target, driver, final focus magnet layout and shielding, chamber, beam propagation to the target, and overall power plant

  14. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  15. Final design of ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Kyu; Park, Sungwoo [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 52811 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dongkwon; Kang, Kyung-O. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungmun [SFA Engineering Corporation, Hwaseong-si 10060 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 49111 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Engineering design of thermal shield manifold is finalized. • Pipe routing, support design and flow balance are verified by analysis. • Mock-ups are fabricated to verify the design. - Abstract: The ITER thermal shield is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas. The helium coolant flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the final design of thermal shield manifold. Pipe design to accommodate the thermal contraction considering interface with adjacent components and detailed design of support structure are presented. R&D for the pipe branch connection is carried out to find a feasible manufacturing method. Global structural behavior and structural integrity of the manifold including pipe supports are investigated by a finite element analysis based on ASME B31.3 code. Flow analyses are performed to check the flow distribution.

  16. Parametric study for design of thermal sleeves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, A.B.; Mehra, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal sleeves are used inside nozzle in many reactor components. Basic aim in design of thermal sleeve is to arrive at a set of dimensions for gap and annulus length, which will give rise to minimum thermal gradient in the base metal of the associated nozzle. Study includes the minimisation of the thermal gradient in the crotch zone by suitable choice of gap and annulus length. Three different geometries of nozzle radii 50.00 mm., 100 mm. and 200.0 mm. are studied for single and two concentric thermal sleeves model. The paper also presents effect of parameters like velocity of flow, temperature of fluid, materials etc. on the design of thermal sleeves. (orig.)

  17. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the center of mass system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy

  18. Design of a thermal waist-pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursun Bahadir, S.; Sahin, U. K.; Acikgoz Tufan, H.

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the current study is designing a thermal waist-pad for people who have backaches with a sandwich-like multi-layered structure. Two model is developed; one is three-layered and second is five-layered with waterproof woven outer layer fabric, Thermolite® knitted fabric (for five-layered structures), wool knitted, polyester nonwoven fabric, polypropylene nonwoven fabric and viscose nonwoven fabric for mid-layer. 10 different structures are designed and produced. All samples are tested for thermal comfort properties of waist-pad. Multi-layer structures were tested, and according to their thermal performance and thermal comfort criteria, all results are evaluated for identifying the best product. These three factors are examined by analysis of thermal conductivity, thermal resistance, thermal absorptivity, relative water vapour/air permeability, water absorption. Highest thermal resistance test result, 150,42 mK/Wm2, is achieved in five-layered sandwich structure with waterproof fabric, Thermolite® fabric, wool based knitted fabric, Thermolite® fabric and waterproof fabric, respectively. Thermal conductivity result of this structure is 46,2 mW/mK, which is one of the lowest results among the alternative structures. Structures with Thermolite® fabric show higher thermal comfort when compared to others.

  19. Thermal energy systems design and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Penoncello, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionThermal Energy Systems Design and AnalysisSoftwareThermal Energy System TopicsUnits and Unit SystemsThermophysical PropertiesEngineering DesignEngineering EconomicsIntroductionCommon Engineering Economics NomenclatureEconomic Analysis Tool: The Cash Flow DiagramTime Value of MoneyTime Value of Money ExamplesUsing Software to Calculate Interest FactorsEconomic Decision MakingDepreciation and TaxesProblemsAnalysis of Thermal Energy SystemsIntroductionNomenclatureThermophysical Properties of SubstancesSuggested Thermal Energy Systems Analysis ProcedureConserved and Balanced QuantitiesConservation of MassConservation of Energy (The First Law of Thermodynamics)Entropy Balance (The Second Law of Thermodynamics)Exergy Balance: The Combined LawEnergy and Exergy Analysis of Thermal Energy CyclesDetailed Analysis of Thermal Energy CyclesProblemsFluid Transport in Thermal Energy SystemsIntroductionPiping and Tubing StandardsFluid Flow FundamentalsValves and FittingsDesign and Analysis of Pipe NetworksEconomi...

  20. Guidelines for CubeSat's Thermal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, Juan; Patel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop 2015, Silver Spring, MD. NCTS 19104-15. What does it take to thermally designlow cost, low mass cubesats? What are the differences in the approach when you compare with large scale missions?What additional risk is acceptable? What is the approach to hardware? How is the testing campaign run? These aresome of the questions that will be addressed in this course, which is designed to equip the attendees to support thedevelopment of cubesats at their organization.

  1. Structural Design Optimization On Thermally Induced Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yuanxian; Chen, Biaosong; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhao, Guozhong

    2002-01-01

    The numerical method of design optimization for structural thermally induced vibration is originally studied in this paper and implemented in application software JIFEX. The direct and adjoint methods of sensitivity analysis for thermal induced vibration coupled with both linear and nonlinear transient heat conduction is firstly proposed. Based on the finite element method, the structural linear dynamics is treated simultaneously with coupled linear and nonlinear transient heat structural linear dynamics is treated simultaneously with coupled linear and nonlinear transient heat conduction. In the thermal analysis model, the nonlinear heat conduction considered is result from the radiation and temperature-dependent materials. The sensitivity analysis of transient linear and nonlinear heat conduction is performed with the precise time integration method. And then, the sensitivity analysis of structural transient dynamics is performed by the Newmark method. Both the direct method and the adjoint method are employed to derive the sensitivity equations of thermal vibration, and there are two adjoint vectors of structure and heat conduction respectively. The coupling effect of heat conduction on thermal vibration in the sensitivity analysis is particularly investigated. With coupling sensitivity analysis, the optimization model is constructed and solved by the sequential linear programming or sequential quadratic programming algorithm. The methods proposed have been implemented in the application software JIFEX of structural design optimization, and numerical examples are given to illustrate the methods and usage of structural design optimization on thermally induced vibration

  2. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  3. System Design Description PFP Thermal Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a system design description (SDD) and design basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Thermal Stabilization project. The chief objective of the SDD is to document the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) that establish and maintain the facility Safety Envelope necessary for normal safe operation of the facility; as identified in the FSAR, the OSRs, and Safety Assessment Documents (SADs). This safety equipment documentation should satisfy guidelines for the SDD given in WHC-SD-CP-TI-18 1, Criteria for Identification and Control of Equipment Necessary for Preservation of the Safety Envelope and Safe Operation of PFP. The basis for operational, alarm response, maintenance, and surveillance procedures are also identified and justified in this document. This document and its appendices address the following elements of the PFP Thermal Stabilization project: Functional and design requirements; Design description; Safety Envelope Analysis; Safety Equipment Class; and Operational, maintenance and surveillance procedures

  4. Thermal design guidelines of solar power towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, M.R.; Soria-Verdugo, Antonio; Almendros-Ibáñez, José Antonio; Acosta-Iborra, Antonio; Santana, Domingo

    2014-01-01

    One of the main problems of solar power tower plants with molten salt as heat transfer fluid is the reliability of central receivers. The receiver must withstand high working temperatures, molten salt corrosion and important solar flux transients that lead to thermal stresses and fatigue. Despite these difficulties, it is necessary an estimation of the receiver thermal efficiency in order to have an accurate estimation of the investment cost of the solar plant and to assure the lifetime estimation of the receiver. A thermal, mechanical and hydrodynamic analysis of these receivers has been developing in this work, assuming constant heat flux in each axial discretized section of the tube wall but considering circumferential temperature variations in the perimeter of the tubes caused by the difference between the heat flux received by the front part of the tubes and by the rear part. The thermal analysis shows that the radiation losses are higher than in literature, and consequently the thermal efficiency is lower too. This is due to the fact that the effective tube wall temperature for radiation is higher than the mean tube wall temperature, especially if the rear temperature of the tubes is considered. Besides, it has been found that the highest temperatures and thermal stresses are sited on the eastern and western panels of the receivers. Film temperature is the most limiting parameter for the receiver design due to it is responsible for salt decomposition and tube corrosion. Therefore, once the tube material is chosen, the film temperature cannot exceed a critical value over which the corrosion ratio raises rapidly. Small tube diameters and low number of panels results in low film temperatures, although this kind of design increases the pressure drop. Therefore, a compromise between film temperature and pressure drop can lead to a receiver design that ensures its lifetime, and at the same time, optimizes the investment and operational cost of the receiver

  5. Ab initio design of coherent thermal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevillon, Jérémie; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2007-12-01

    Emission of thermal light from a hot body has been considered for a long time as broadband and quasi-isotropic. Today, we know that this paradigm is wrong and it has been shown that many micro- and nanostructured materials are able to radiate in narrow spectral bands and around specific directions of space. However, so far, only heuristic strategies based on trial and error have been followed for engineering such sources. Here, we present a general method for the ab initio design of coherent thermal sources by using only the first principles of optics. Our results pave the way toward the inverse design of new composite emitting structures for high performance applications in optics.

  6. Update on quadruple suspension design for Advanced LIGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, S M; Carbone, L; Cutler, R M; Hoyland, D; Barton, M A; Bland, B; Bell, A S; Beveridge, N; Cagnoli, G; Cantley, C A; Cumming, A V; Cunningham, L; Hammond, G D; Haughian, K; Hough, J; Brummitt, A J; Greenhalgh, R J S; Hayler, T M; Heptonstall, A; Heefner, J

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design of the suspension systems for the major optics for Advanced LIGO, the upgrade to LIGO—the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory. The design is based on that used in GEO600—the German/UK interferometric gravitational wave detector, with further development to meet the more stringent noise requirements for Advanced LIGO. The test mass suspensions consist of a four-stage or quadruple pendulum for enhanced seismic isolation. To minimize suspension thermal noise, the final stage consists of a silica mirror, 40 kg in mass, suspended from another silica mass by four silica fibres welded to silica ears attached to the sides of the masses using hydroxide-catalysis bonding. The design is chosen to achieve a displacement noise level for each of the seismic and thermal noise contributions of 10 −19 m/√Hz at 10 Hz, for each test mass. We discuss features of the design which has been developed as a result of experience with prototypes and associated investigations. (paper)

  7. Update of Continuous-Energy Data for Hydrogen and SiO2 Thermal Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parsons, Donald Kent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-23

    The Nuclear Data Team has released updated continuous-energy neutron data files for: 1) hydrogen, and 2) S (α; β) (thermal scattering) on SiO2. A list of new ZAIDs and the data that is updated (Old ZAID) is given in Table 1. The old data are still accessible, but are not the default.

  8. Thermal Propulsion Capture System Heat Exchanger Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges of manned spaceflight beyond low earth orbit and the moon is harmful radiation that astronauts would be exposed to on their long journey to Mars and further destinations. Using nuclear energy has the potential to be a more effective means of propulsion compared to traditional chemical engines (higher specific impulse). An upper stage nuclear engine would allow astronauts to reach their destination faster and more fuel efficiently. Testing these engines poses engineering challenges due to the need to totally capture the engine exhaust. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System is a concept for cost effectively and safely testing Nuclear Thermal Engines. Nominally, hydrogen exhausted from the engine is not radioactive, but is treated as such in case of fuel element failure. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System involves injecting liquid oxygen to convert the hydrogen exhaust into steam. The steam is then cooled and condensed into liquid water to allow for storage. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System concept for ground testing of a nuclear powered engine involves capturing the engine exhaust to be cooled and condensed before being stored. The hydrogen exhaust is injected with liquid oxygen and burned to form steam. That steam must be cooled to saturation temperatures before being condensed into liquid water. A crossflow heat exchanger using water as a working fluid will be designed to accomplish this goal. Design a cross flow heat exchanger for the Thermal Propulsion Capture System testing which: Eliminates the need for water injection cooling, Cools steam from 5800 F to saturation temperature, and Is efficient and minimizes water requirement.

  9. Assessment of the HPLWR thermal core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Maraczy, C. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI, Budapest (Hungary); Bernnat, W.; Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The core design concept of the High Performance Light Water Reactor features a thermal neutron spectrum, provided by additional moderator water in water boxes and in gaps between assembly boxes, and a heat-up of the coolant in three steps from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C. Intermediate coolant mixing has been foreseen by mixing chambers underneath and above the core to overcome the hot channel issue of a core design with a large enthalpy rise. The paper summarizes the various analyses performed within the project HPLWR-Phase 2 with respect to this core design and assesses how far the initial design target has been met. (author)

  10. Thermal probe design for Europa sample acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Mera F.

    2018-01-01

    The planned lander missions to the surface of Europa will access samples from the subsurface of the ice in a search for signs of life. A small thermal drill (probe) is proposed to meet the sample requirement of the Science Definition Team's (SDT) report for the Europa mission. The probe is 2 cm in diameter and 16 cm in length and is designed to access the subsurface to 10 cm deep and to collect five ice samples of 7 cm3 each, approximately. The energy required to penetrate the top 10 cm of ice in a vacuum is 26 Wh, approximately, and to melt 7 cm3 of ice is 1.2 Wh, approximately. The requirement stated in the SDT report of collecting samples from five different sites can be accommodated with repeated use of the same thermal drill. For smaller sample sizes, a smaller probe of 1.0 cm in diameter with the same length of 16 cm could be utilized that would require approximately 6.4 Wh to penetrate the top 10 cm of ice, and 0.02 Wh to collect 0.1 g of sample. The thermal drill has the advantage of simplicity of design and operations and the ability to penetrate ice over a range of densities and hardness while maintaining sample integrity.

  11. Thermal modeling and design of the anisogrid morphing structure for a modular optical telescope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Austin A.

    2017-10-01

    To meet the requirements for the next generation of optical space telescopes, a paradigm shift is required from current structures that are static, heavy, and stiff toward innovative structures that are adaptive, lightweight, versatile, and intelligent. A morphing or adaptive structure, the thermally actuated anisogrid morphing boom, can be used to meet the design requirements by making the primary structure actively adapt to the on-orbit environment. The adaptive anisogrid structure is actuated through the intelligent application of thermal gradients. This active primary structure improves structural and thermal stability performance, reduces mass, and enables mission architectures. This effort expands on the author's previous work by incorporating the impact of thermal coupling and demonstrating an updated architecture. This paper introduces a thermally isolated version of the thermal morphing anisogrid structure to enable control of the thermal losses between active members. To evaluate the isolation design, the stiffness and thermal conductivity of these isolating interfaces is addressed. This paper determines that the applied morphing error remains below 5% across all stiffnesses if the joint thermal conductivity is below 0.2 W/(mK). This paper investigates the performance of the thermal morphing system under a variety of structural and thermal isolation interface properties and determines the linear operational regime.

  12. Quantum thermal rectification to design thermal diodes and transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younes; Ordonez-Miranda, Jose [Univ. de Poitiers, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France). Inst. Pprime, CNRS

    2017-05-01

    We study in this article how heat can be exchanged between two-level systems, each of them being coupled to a thermal reservoir. Calculations are performed solving a master equation for the density matrix using the Born-Markov approximation. We analyse the conditions for which a thermal diode and a thermal transistor can be obtained as well as their optimisation.

  13. Design and development of a linear thermal actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, G.; Osborne, D.

    1985-01-01

    The design and development of a linear thermal actuator (LTA) for space applications is described. The actuator is driven by thermal energy and utilizes the property of thermal expansion to do work. Equations to predict performance are developed and used to optimize the design of the development model LTA. Design details and test results are presented and discussed.

  14. ACCESS: Thermal Mechanical Design, Performance, and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Morris, M. J.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic errors associated with astrophysical data used to probe fundamental astrophysical questions, such as SNeIa observations used to constrain dark energy theories, are now rivaling and exceeding the statistical errors associated with these measurements. ACCESS: Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments designed to enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 - 1.7μm bandpass. Achieving this level of accuracy requires characterization and stability of the instrument and detector including a thermal background that contributes less than 1% to the flux per resolution element in the NIR. We will present the instrument and calibration status with a focus on the thermal mechanical design and associated performance data. The detector control and performance will be presented in a companion poster (Morris, et al). NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  15. Thermal design trades for SAFIR architecture concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Paine, Christopher; Bradford, Matt; Dragovan, Mark; Nash, Al; Dooley, Jennifer; Lawrence, Charles

    2004-01-01

    SAFIR is a IO-meter, 4 K space telescope optimized for wavelengths between 20 microns and 1 mm. The combination of aperture diameter and telescope temperature will provide a raw sensitivity improvement of more than a factor of 1000 over presently-planned missions. The sensitivity will be comparable to that of the JWST and ALMA, but at the critical far-IR wavelengths where much of the universe's radiative energy has emerged since the origin of stars and galaxies. We examine several of the critical technologies for SAFIR which enable the large cold aperture, and present results of studies examining the telescope optics and the spacecraft thermal architecture. Both the method by which the aperture is filled, and the overall optical design for the telescope can impact the potential scientific return of SAFIR. Thermal architecture that goes far beyond the sunshades developed for the James Webb Space Telescope will be necessary to achieve the desired sensitivity of SAFIR. By combining active and passive cooling at critical points within the observatory, a significant reduction of the required level of active cooling can be obtained.

  16. Thermal Design of Power Electronic Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Künzi, R.

    2015-06-15

    The heart of every switched mode converter consists of several switching semiconductor elements. Due to their non-ideal behaviour there are ON state and switching losses heating up the silicon chip. That heat must effectively be transferred to the environment in order to prevent overheating or even destruction of the element. For a cost-effective design, the semiconductors should be operated close to their thermal limits. Unfortunately the chip temperature cannot be measured directly. Therefore a detailed understanding of how losses arise, including their quantitative estimation, is required. Furthermore, the heat paths to the environment must be understood in detail. This paper describes the main issues of loss generation and its transfer to the environment and how it can be estimated by the help of datasheets and/or experiments.

  17. Orbital maneuvering vehicle thermal design and analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapter, J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the OMV thermal design that is required to maintain components within temperature limits for all mission phases. A key element in the OMV thermal design is the application of a motorized thermal shade assembly that is a replacement for the more conventional variable conductance heat pipes or louvers. The thermal shade assembly covers equipment module radiator areas, and based upon the radiator temperature input to onboard computer, opens and closes the shade, varying the effective radiator area. Thermal design verification thermal analyses results are presented. Selected thermal analyses methods, including several unique subroutines, are discussed. A representation of enclosure Script F equations, in matrix form, is also included. Personal computer application to the development of the OMV thermal design is summarized.

  18. Thermal analysis and design of passive solar buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Athienitis, AK

    2013-01-01

    Passive solar design techniques are becoming increasingly important in building design. This design reference book takes the building engineer or physicist step-by-step through the thermal analysis and design of passive solar buildings. In particular it emphasises two important topics: the maximum utilization of available solar energy and thermal storage, and the sizing of an appropriate auxiliary heating/cooling system in conjunction with good thermal control.Thermal Analysis and Design of Passive Solar Buildings is an important contribution towards the optimization of buildings as systems th

  19. Updated conceptual design of helium cooling ceramic blanket for HCCB-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suhao [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Cao, Qixiang; Wu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guoshu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Feng, Kaiming, E-mail: fengkm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An updated design of Helium Cooled Ceramic breeder Blanket (HCCB) for HCCB-DEMO is proposed in this paper. • The Breeder Unit is transformed to TBM-like sub-modules, with double “banana” shape tritium breeder. Each sub-module is inserted in space formed by Stiffen Grids (SGs). • The performance analysis is performed based on the R&D development of material, fabrication technology and safety assessment in CN ITER TBM program. • Hot spots will be located at the FW bend side. - Abstract: The basic definition of the HCCB-DEMO plant and preliminary blanket designed by Southwestern Institution of Physics was proposed in 2009. The DEMO fusion power is 2550 MW and electric power is 800 MW. Based on development of R&D in breeding blanket, a conceptual design of helium cooled blanket with ceramic breeder in HCCB-DEMO was presented. The main design features of the HCCB-DEMO blanket were: (1) CLF-1 structure materials, Be multiplier and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} breeder; (2) neutronic wall load is 2.3 MW/m{sup 2} and surface heat flux is 0.43 MW/m{sup 2} (2) TBR ≈ 1.15; (3) geometry of breeding units is ITER TBM-like segmentation; (4)Pressure of helium is 8 MPa and inlet/outlet temperature is 300/500 °C. On the basis of these design, some important analytical results are presented in aspects of (i) neutronic behavior of the blanket; (ii) design of 3D structure and thermal-hydraulic lay-out for breeding blanket module; (iii) structural-mechanical behavior of the blanket under pressurization. All of these assessments proved current stucture fulfill the design requirements.

  20. Thermal Design and Flight Validation for Solid-state Transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state transmitter with large power and high heat flux is a key equipment of an HJ-1-C satellite; therefore, it has a great influence on satellite thermal design. Thermal design ensures that the solid-state transmitter works well within the allowable temperature limits of the equipment. The solid-state transmitter thermal design and solved key problems are provided in accordance with the HJ-1-C characteristics. Moreover, an analysis of satellites on orbit was performed. Based on the telemetry data, the thermal control design is shown to satisfy the temperature requirements of the solid-state transmitter.

  1. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  2. System Design Description PFP Thermal Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-01-27

    DOE has authorized in their letter of August 2, 1999, the operation of these three furnaces, quote ''Operation of the three uncompleted muffle furnaces (No.3, No.4, and No.5) located in Room 235B is authorized, using the same feed charge limits as the two existing furnaces (No.1, and No.2) located in Room 230C,''. The above statement incorrectly refers to Room 230C whereas the correct location is Room 230A. The current effort is directed to initiate the operation and to complete the design activities DOE authorized the operation of the furnaces based on their Safety Evaluation Report (SER). Based on analogy and the principle of similarity, the risks and consequences of accidents both onsite and offsite due to operation of three furnaces are not significantly larger than those already evaluated with the two operating furnaces. Thermal stabilization operations and the material of feed for furnaces in Glovebox HA-21 I are essentially the same as those currently being stabilized in furnaces in Glovebox HC-21 C. Therefore the accident analysis has utilized identical accident scenarios in evaluation and no additional failure modes are introduced by HA-21 I muffle furnace operation that would enhance the consequences of accidents. Authorization Basis documents as referenced below (PFP FSAR and DOE Letter authorizing the operation) appear to contradict each other, i.e. one allows and authorizes the operation and the other imposes the restriction on the operation. The purpose of the PFP FSAR restrictions was to review thoroughly the design and installation of three furnaces and perform acceptance testing before approving the startup for operation. With the experience of operating the two furnaces in Glovebox HC-21C, and the knowledge of risks and hazards the facility operation, the plant is adequately prepared to operate these additional furnaces. ECN 653595 has been prepared to incorporate operation of the muffle furnaces in Glovebox HA-21 I into the

  3. The neutron silicon lens. An update of the thermal neutron lens results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.W.; Daymond, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of the Neutron Silicon Lens (NSL) and provides and update on the experimental results achieved to date. The NSL design is a cylindrical neutron lens based on the use of multiple neutron mirrors supported and separated by silicon wafers. Such lenses would have many applications in both the primary and scattered beams on neutron instruments, and would lead to immediate improvements where the sample to be illuminated is small, as in high pressure or engineering strain scanning instruments. (author)

  4. Thermal Analysis and Design of an Advanced Space Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin H.; Campbell, Anthony B.; French, Jonathan D.; French, D.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal dynamics and design of an Advanced Space Suit are considered. A transient model of the Advanced Space Suit has been developed and implemented using MATLAB/Simulink to help with sizing, with design evaluation, and with the development of an automatic thermal comfort control strategy. The model is described and the thermal characteristics of the Advanced Space suit are investigated including various parametric design studies. The steady state performance envelope for the Advanced Space Suit is defined in terms of the thermal environment and human metabolic rate and the transient response of the human-suit-MPLSS system is analyzed.

  5. Thermal Design and Thermal Behaviour of Radio Telescopes and their Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Radio telescopes as well as communication antennas operate under the influence of gravity, temperature and wind. Among those, temperature influences may degrade the performance of a radio telescope through transient changes of the focus, pointing, path length and sensitivity, often in an unpredictable way. Thermal Design and Thermal Behaviour of Radio Telescopes and their Enclosures reviews the design and construction principles of radio telescopes in view of thermal aspects and heat transfer with the variable thermal environment; it explains supporting thermal model calculations and the application and efficiency of thermal protection and temperature control; it presents many measurements illustrating the thermal behaviour of telescopes in the environment of their observatory sites. The book benefits scientists and radio/communication engineers, telescope designers and construction firms as well as telescope operators, observatory staff, but also the observing astronomer who is directly confronted with the t...

  6. Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system design and flight experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System materials, design approaches associated with each material, and the operational performance experienced during fifty-five successful flights are described. The flights to date indicate that the thermal and structural design requirements were met and that the overall performance was outstanding.

  7. Design, implementation, and extension of thermal invisibility cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youming; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Baile

    2015-05-01

    A thermal invisibility cloak, as inspired by optical invisibility cloaks, is a device which can steer the conductive heat flux around an isolated object without changing the ambient temperature distribution so that the object can be "invisible" to external thermal environment. While designs of thermal invisibility cloaks inherit previous theories from optical cloaks, the uniqueness of heat diffusion leads to more achievable implementations. Thermal invisibility cloaks, as well as the variations including thermal concentrator, rotator, and illusion devices, have potentials to be applied in thermal management, sensing and imaging applications. Here, we review the current knowledge of thermal invisibility cloaks in terms of their design and implementation in cloaking studies, and their extension as other functional devices.

  8. Design, implementation, and extension of thermal invisibility cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youming Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thermal invisibility cloak, as inspired by optical invisibility cloaks, is a device which can steer the conductive heat flux around an isolated object without changing the ambient temperature distribution so that the object can be “invisible” to external thermal environment. While designs of thermal invisibility cloaks inherit previous theories from optical cloaks, the uniqueness of heat diffusion leads to more achievable implementations. Thermal invisibility cloaks, as well as the variations including thermal concentrator, rotator, and illusion devices, have potentials to be applied in thermal management, sensing and imaging applications. Here, we review the current knowledge of thermal invisibility cloaks in terms of their design and implementation in cloaking studies, and their extension as other functional devices.

  9. Design and development for updating national 1:50,000 topographic databases in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Jun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available 1.1 Objective Map databases are irreplaceable national treasure of immense importance. Their currency referring to its consistency with respect to the real world plays a critical role in its value and applications. The continuous updating of map databases at 1:50,000 scales is a massive and difficult task for larger countries of the size of more than several million’s kilometer squares. This paper presents the research and technological development to support the national map updating at 1:50,000 scales in China, including the development of updating models and methods, production tools and systems for large-scale and rapid updating, as well as the design and implementation of the continuous updating workflow. 1.2 Methodology The updating of map databases is different than its original creation, and a number of new problems should be solved, such as change detection using latest multi-source data, incremental object revision and relation amendment. The methodology of this paper consists of the following three parts: 1 Examine the four key aspects of map database updating and develop basic updating models/methods, such as currentness-oriented integration of multi-resource data, completeness-based incremental change detection in the context of existing datasets, consistency-aware processing of updated data sets, and user-friendly propagation and services of updates. 2 Design and develop specific software tools and packages to support the large-scale updating production with high resolution imagery and large-scale data generalization, such as map generalization, GIS-supported change interpretation from imagery, DEM interpolation, image matching-based orthophoto generation, data control at different levels. 3 Design a national 1:50,000 databases updating strategy and its production workflow, including a full coverage updating pattern characterized by all element topographic data modeling, change detection in all related areas, and whole process

  10. Thermal Radiation for Structural Fire Safety Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian

    1999-01-01

    The lecture note gives a short introduction of the theory of thermal radiation. The most elementary concepts and methods are presented in order to give a fundamental knowledge for calculation of the load bearing capacities of fire exposed building constructions....

  11. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  12. SCD1 thermal design and test result analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Humberto Pontes; Muraoka, Issamu; Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Leite, Rosangela M. G.

    1990-01-01

    The SCD 01 (Satelite de Coleta de Dados 01) is a spin stabilized low Earth orbit satellite dedicated to the collection and distribution of environmental data. It was completely developed at the Brazilian Institute for Space Research (INPE) and is scheduled to be launched in 1992. The SCD 01 passive thermal control design configuration is presented and the thermal analysis results are compared with the temperatures obtained from a Thermal Balance Test. The correlation between the analytical and experimental results is considered very good. Numerical flight simulations show that the thermal control design can keep all the subsystem temperatures within their specified temperature range.

  13. Review of updated design of SPWR with PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Tetsukuni; Muramatsu, Ken

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of a PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) of the SPWR (System-Integrated PWR), which is being developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as a medium sized innovative passive safe reactor, to assist in the design improvement of the SPWR at the basic or conceptual design phase by reviewing the design and identifying the design vulnerability. The first phase PSA, which was carried out in 1991, was a scoping analysis in order to understand overall plant characteristics and to search for general design weakness. After discussing the results of the first phase PSA, the SPWR designer group changed some designs of the SPWR. The second phase PSA of the SPWR was performed for the modified design in order to identify the design vulnerability as well as to grasp its overall safety level. Special items of these PSAs are as follows: (1) systematic identification of initiating events related to newly designed systems by the failure mode effect analysis (FMEA), (2) delineation of accident sequences for the internal initiating events using accident progression flow charts which is cost effective for conceptual design phase, (3) quantification of event trees based on many engineering judgement, and (4) lots of sensitivity analyses to examine applicability of data assignment. Qualitative and quantitative results of PSA provided very useful information for decision makings of design improvement and recommendations for further consideration in the process of detailed design. (author)

  14. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  15. 300 GeV Up-dated design study

    CERN Document Server

    1967-01-01

    The 'Report on the Design Study of a 300 GeV Proton Synchrotron' (document CERN/ 563) was issued in November 1964. An Addendum (document CERN/702) to this Design Study was issued on 30 May as one of the up-to-date set of documents and relevant costs presented to the June Council Meeting.

  16. Conceptual Design of the ITER ECE Diagnostic - An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M. E.; Pandya, H. K. B.; Beno, J.; Bryant, A. D.; Danani, S.; Ellis, R. F.; Feder, R.; Hubbard, A. E.; Kumar, S.; Ouroua, A.; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.

    2012-09-01

    The ITER ECE diagnostic has recently been through a conceptual design review for the entire system including front end optics, transmission line, and back-end instruments. The basic design of two viewing lines, each with a single ellipsoidal mirror focussing into the plasma near the midplane of the typical operating scenarios is agreed upon. The location and design of the hot calibration source and the design of the shutter that directs its radiation to the transmission line are issues that need further investigation. In light of recent measurements and discussion, the design of the broadband transmission line is being revisited and new options contemplated. For the instruments, current systems for millimeter wave radiometers and broad-band spectrometers will be adequate for ITER, but the option for employing new state-of-the-art techniques will be left open.

  17. Conceptual Design of the ITER ECE Diagnostic – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouroua A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ITER ECE diagnostic has recently been through a conceptual design review for the entire system including front end optics, transmission line, and back-end instruments. The basic design of two viewing lines, each with a single ellipsoidal mirror focussing into the plasma near the midplane of the typical operating scenarios is agreed upon. The location and design of the hot calibration source and the design of the shutter that directs its radiation to the transmission line are issues that need further investigation. In light of recent measurements and discussion, the design of the broadband transmission line is being revisited and new options contemplated. For the instruments, current systems for millimeter wave radiometers and broad-band spectrometers will be adequate for ITER, but the option for employing new state-of-the-art techniques will be left open.

  18. Design of outdoor urban spaces for thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriet J. Plumley

    1977-01-01

    Microclimates in outdoor urban spaces may be modified by controlling the wind and radiant environments in these spaces. Design guidelines were developed to specify how radiant environments may be selected or modified to provide conditions for thermal comfort. Fanger's human-thermal-comfort model was used to determine comfortable levels of radiant-heat exchange for...

  19. Thermal design for the high-power LED lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiaogai; Chen Wei; Zhang Jiyong

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes different kinds of heat sinks on the market for high power LED lamps. Analysis is made on the thermal model of LED, PCB and heat sink separately with a simplified mode provided. Two examples of simulation are illustrated as a demonstration for the thermal simulation as guidance for LED lamp design. (semiconductor devices)

  20. Updated reference design of a liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Garner, J.K.

    1985-09-01

    Detailed studies of key techinical issues for liquid metal cooled fusion breeder (fusion-fission hybrid blankets) have been performed during the period 1983-4. Based upon the results of these studies, the 1982 reference liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder blanket design was updated and is described. The updated reference blankets provides increased breeding and lower technological risk in comparison with the original reference blanket. In addition to the blanket design revisions, a plant concept, cost, and fuel cycle economics assessment is provided. The fusion breeder continues to promise an economical source of fissile fuel for the indefinite future

  1. Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor Thermal Design for Low Heater Power and Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The heater power available for the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS MAG sensor is less than half of the heritage value for other missions. Nominally the MAG sensors are in the spacecraft's umbra. In the worst hot case, approximately 200 spacecraft communication downlinks, up to 10 hours each, are required at 0.7 AU. These downlinks require the spacecraft to slew 45 deg. about the Y-axis, exposing the MAG sensors and boom to sunlight. This paper presents the thermal design to meet the MAG sensor thermal requirements in the extreme thermal environment and with low heater power. A thermal balance test on the MAG sensor engineering model has verified the thermal design and correlated the thermal model for flight temperature predictions.

  2. Thermal Comfort-CFD maps for Architectural Interior Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naboni, Emanuele; Lee, Daniel Sang-Hoon; Fabbri, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    opportunities of movable interior partitions (operated by the users) could be estimated, providing a new layer of information to the designer. The applicability of the thermal maps within an architectural design process is discussed adopting standard energy simulation comfort outputs as a reference...... moving a series of internal partitions so as to avoid the danger of over-heating. It is thus necessary that existing simulation software tools are tested to the purpose of modelling and visualizing the indoor thermal environment complexity. The research discusses how thermal comfort maps, which...... are prepared with the use of Computational Fluid Dynamic simulation method, could integrate energy simulation outputs to uphold qualitative architectural design decisions. Mean radiant temperature maps were thus used to design the retrofit of a small educational building in Copenhagen. The thermal...

  3. Thermal morphing anisogrid smart space structures: thermal isolation design and linearity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Austin A.

    2017-04-01

    To meet the requirements for the next generation of space missions, a paradigm shift is required from current structures that are static, heavy and stiff, toward innovative structures that are adaptive, lightweight, versatile, and intelligent. A novel morphing structure, the thermally actuated anisogrid morphing boom, can be used to meet the design requirements by making the primary structure actively adapt to the on-orbit environment. The anisogrid structure is able to achieve high precision morphing control through the intelligent application of thermal gradients. This active primary structure improves structural and thermal stability performance, reduces mass, and enables new mission architectures. This effort attempts to address limits to the author's previous work by incorporating the impact of thermal coupling that was initially neglected. This paper introduces a thermally isolated version of the thermal morphing anisogrid structure in order to address the thermal losses between active members. To evaluate the isolation design the stiffness and thermal conductivity of these isolating interfaces need to be addressed. This paper investigates the performance of the thermal morphing system under a variety of structural and thermal isolation interface properties.

  4. Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melese, G.; Katz, R.

    1984-01-01

    This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors

  5. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  6. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  7. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  8. How to update design floods after the construction of small ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several small reservoirs and a large number of check dams had been constructed in theWangkuai reservoirwatershed after 1970s, and flood time series lacked stationarity, which affected the original design floodhydrographs for the Wangkuai reservoir. Since the location, storage capacity and drainage area of thelarge ...

  9. How to update design floods after the construction of small ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    watershed after 1970s, and flood time series lacked stationarity, which affected the original design flood hydrographs for the Wangkuai reservoir. Since the location, storage capacity and drainage area of the large number of check dams were unknown, we present a method to estimate their total storage capacities.

  10. Development of Prototype Driver Models for Highway Design: Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    One of the high-priority research areas of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is the development of the Interactive Highway Safety Design Model (IHSDM). The goal of the IHSDM research program is to develop a systematic approach that will allow...

  11. On the design of thermally loaded fiber optics feedthroughs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Dragan Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-mechanical design aspects of various structures exposed to cyclic thermal loading have a crucial impact on their lifetime. This is particularly valid for fiber optics feedthroughs that involve several materials with significantly different thermal expansion ratios. Thermal loading in such structures may give rise to non-trivial thermally induced deformations and therewith stresses, which can be adequately predicted and assessed only by a detailed 3-D numerical simulation. This paper considers a couple of design solutions of fiber optics feedthroughs, which have exhibited certain weaknesses in their application. Numerical simulation by means of the finite element method has been conducted to reveal the weak points of the design.

  12. Thermally adapted design strategy of colonial houses in Surabaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaryama, I. G. N.; Ekasiwi, S. N. N.; Mappajaya, A.; Ulum, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Colonial buildings, including houses, have been considered as a representation of climate-responsive architecture. The design was thought to be a hybrid model of Dutch and tropical architecture. It was created by way of reinventing tropical and Dutch architecture design principles, and expressed in a new form, i.e. neither resembling Dutch nor tropical building. Aside from this new image, colonial house does show good climatic responses. Previous researches on colonial house generally focus on qualitative assessment of climate performance of the building. Yet this kind of study tends to concentrate on building elements, e.g. wall, window, etc. The present study is designed to give more complete picture of architecture design strategy of the house by exploring and analysing thermal performance of colonial buildings and their related architecture design strategies. Field measurements are conducted during the dry season in several colonial building in Surabaya. Air temperature and humidity are both taken, representing internal and external thermal conditions of the building. These data are then evaluated to determine thermal performance of the house. Finally, various design strategies are examined in order to reveal their significant contributions to its thermal performance. Results of the study in Surabaya confirm findings of the previous researches that are conducted in other locations, which stated that thermal performance of the house is generally good. Passive design strategies such as mass effect and ventilation play an important role in determining performance of the building.

  13. Thermal Design of a Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Suk Yang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System (PSICS cooled by a stirling cryocooler has been designed. The PSICS has an IR sensor inside the cold box which is cooled by a stirling cryocooler with refrigeration capacity of 500mW at 80K in a vacuum vessel. It is important to minimize the heat load so that the background thermal noise can be reduced. In order to design the cryogenic system with low heat load and to reduce the remained heat load, we have performed numerical analyses. In this paper, we present the design factors and the results obtained by the thermal analysis of the PSICS.

  14. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown

  15. Parametric fuselage design : Integration of mechanics and acoustic & thermal insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krakers, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Designing a fuselage is a very complex process, which involves many different aspects like strength and stability, fatigue, damage tolerance, fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation but also inspection, maintenance, production and repair aspects. It is difficult to include all design

  16. ISS-CREAM Thermal and Fluid System Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. The ISS-CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass for the International Space Station) payload is being developed by an international team and will provide significant cosmic ray characterization over a long time frame. Cold fluid provided by the ISS Exposed Facility (EF) is the primary means of cooling for 5 science instruments and over 7 electronics boxes. Thermal fluid integrated design and analysis was performed for CREAM using a Thermal Desktop model. This presentation will provide some specific design and modeling examples from the fluid cooling system, complex SCD (Silicon Charge Detector) and calorimeter hardware, and integrated payload and ISS level modeling. Features of Thermal Desktop such as CAD simplification, meshing of complex hardware, External References (Xrefs), and FloCAD modeling will be discussed.

  17. Thermal hydraulic aspects of the SBWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Alamgir, M.; Andersen, J.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is being developed by GE Nuclear Energy in cooperation with a number of international associates. The design philosophy stresses simplification of the system by relying to a large extent on passive features. The natural circulation driven core flow eliminates the need for external recirculation pumps and loops. Emergency core cooling is accomplished by a Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS). Passive energy removal from the containment is by condensers with natural circulation. The principles underlying these features are not novel, and have been proof tested in previous designs. However, their application in the SBWR results in significant differences in operational characteristics from other plants. In this paper, the phenomena that are important for the SBWR are identified, the qualification plan is discussed and sample qualification results are shown for TRACG, the GE version of TRAC-BWR. (orig.)

  18. Envelope Thermal Design Optimization for Urban Residential Buildings in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Kalua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to optimize the envelope thermal design of free-running urban residential buildings in Malawi. It specifically set out to improve the urban residential buildings’ thermal comfort and suggest optimal envelope thermal design features for these buildings. The research study was primarily dependent on computer simulations in EnergyPlus to replicate the typical Malawian urban residential building’s thermal behaviour and then study the impacts of various envelope configurations on the thermal comfort conditions registered in the building. The simulation model was experimentally validated to check its appropriateness to the climatic design conditions prevalent in Malawi and out of the three major cities that were considered, the model was found to be appropriate for use in the two cities of Mzuzu and Lilongwe leaving out the city of Blantyre. The optimization methodology that was employed involved the use of orthogonal arrays, statistical analyses and the listing method. It was found that the optimal envelope thermal design, which registered up to 18% lower discomfort hours than that of the typical urban residential building, consists of a 50 mm concrete floor slab, 230 mm burnt brick walls with an external layer of 19 mm EPS, tiled roof with an internal layer of sarking and 50 mm EPS, double Low-E Glazing with a transparency ratio of 45% and 0.2408 m2 of adaptable operational surface area for the air bricks. Out of all the envelope features that were studied, air infiltration registered the most significant contribution towards the ultimate residential building thermal performance. It was demonstrated that controlled air infiltration through the use of operable air bricks whose operational surface area is adaptable can be very effective in enhancing the building’s comfort levels. It was further observed that excessive insulation of the building envelope generally has a detrimental effect on the indoor space thermal comfort

  19. Design and Analysis of the Thermal Shield of EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Han; Liao Ziying

    2008-01-01

    EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is a tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operated at 4.5 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied on the surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system at a minimum, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and warm components is adopted. The main loads to which the thermal shield system is subjected are gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and thermal gradients. This study employed NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to analyze the stress under a spectrum of loading conditions and combinations, providing a theoretical basis for an optimization design of the structure.

  20. Design and analysis of the thermal shield of EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Han; Liao Ziying

    2007-01-01

    The EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is a Tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operating at 4.5 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied to surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system in minimal, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and warm components is adopted. The main loads to which the thermal shield system is subjected are gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and thermal gradients. This paper employed NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element software to analyze the stress under a spectrum of loading conditions and combinations, providing a basis in theory for optimization design of the structure. (authors)

  1. The Design and Development of Enhanced Thermal Desorption Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Humble

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study is based on a knowledge-transfer collaboration between The National Centre for Product Design and Development Research (PDR and Markes International Ltd. The aim of the two-year collaboration has been to implement design tools and techniques for the development of enhanced thermal desorption products. Thermal desorption is a highly-specialised technique for the analysis of trace-level volatile organic compounds. This technique allows minute quantities of these compounds to be measured; however, there is an increasing demand from customers for greater sensitivity over a wider range of applications, which means new design methodologies need to be evaluated. The thermal desorption process combines a number of disparate chemical, thermal and mechanical disciplines, and the major design constraints arise from the need to cycle the sample through extremes in temperature. Following the implementation of a comprehensive product design specification, detailed design solutions have been developed using the latest 3D CAD techniques. The impact of the advanced design techniques is assessed in terms of improved product performance and reduced development times, and the wider implications of new product development within small companies are highlighted.  

  2. Update of S-NPP VIIRS Thermal Emissive Bands Radiometric Calibration Stability Monitoring Using the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    The Suomi-NPP VIIRS thermal emissive bands (TEB) are radiometrically calibrated on-orbit with reference to an onboard blackbody (BB) regularly operated at approximately 292.5 K. The calibration stability at other temperature ranges can be evaluated based on the observations of remote targets with stable thermal properties, such as the Moon. VIIRS has scheduled viewings of the Moon on a nearly monthly basis at a phase angle of nearly -51 degrees. In this study, the brightness temperatures (BT) of the lunar surface retrieved using the detector gain coefficients calibrated with the BB are trended to monitor the calibration stability of VIIRS TEB. Since the Lunar surface temperatures are spatially non-uniform and vary greatly with the photometric geometry, the BT trending must be based on the same regions of the Moon under the same solar illumination condition. Also, the TEB lunar images are always partially saturated because the highest lunar surface temperatures are beyond the dynamic range of all VIIRS TEB detectors. Therefore, a temporally invariant dynamic mask is designed to clip a fraction of the lunar images corresponding to the regions of the Moon that may saturate the detector at any lunar event. The BT of the remaining hottest pixels are then trended. Results show that, since the launch of VIIRS to mid-2016, the radiometric calibration of all TEB detectors has been stable within 0.4 K at the BT range of as high as 350 K.

  3. Heat experiment design to estimate temperature dependent thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovski, M

    2008-01-01

    Experimental conditions are studied to optimize transient experiments for estimating temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. A mathematical model of a specimen is the one-dimensional heat equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. Thermal properties are assumed to vary nonlinearly with temperature. Experimental conditions refer to the thermal loading scheme, sampling times and sensor location. A numerical model of experimental configurations is studied to elicit the optimal conditions. The numerical solution of the design problem is formulated on a regularization scheme with a stabilizer minimization without a regularization parameter. An explicit design criterion is used to reveal the optimal sensor location, heating duration and flux magnitude. Results obtained indicate that even the strongly nonlinear experimental design problem admits the aggregation of its solution and has a strictly defined optimal measurement scheme. Additional region of temperature measurements with allowable identification error is revealed.

  4. Computational design and experimental validation of new thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The focus of this project is on the development of a reliable and efficient ab initio based computational high temperature material design method which can be used to assist the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) bond-coat and top-coat design. Experimental evaluations on the new TBCs are conducted to confirm the new TBCs’ properties. Southern University is the subcontractor on this project with a focus on the computational simulation method development. We have performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics simulation on screening the top coats and bond coats for gas turbine thermal barrier coating design and validation applications. For experimental validations, our focus is on the hot corrosion performance of different TBC systems. For example, for one of the top coatings studied, we examined the thermal stability of TaZr2.75O8 and confirmed it’s hot corrosion performance.

  5. Optimal Experiment Design for Thermal Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to investigate methods to accurately verify that designed , materials meet thermal specifications. The project involved heat transfer calculations and optimization studies, and no laboratory experiments were performed. One part of the research involved study of materials in which conduction heat transfer predominates. Results include techniques to choose among several experimental designs, and protocols for determining the optimum experimental conditions for determination of thermal properties. Metal foam materials were also studied in which both conduction and radiation heat transfer are present. Results of this work include procedures to optimize the design of experiments to accurately measure both conductive and radiative thermal properties. Detailed results in the form of three journal papers have been appended to this report.

  6. Designing solar thermal experiments based on simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huleihil, Mahmoud; Mazor, Gedalya

    2013-01-01

    In this study three different models to describe the temperature distribution inside a cylindrical solid body subjected to high solar irradiation were examined, beginning with the simpler approach, which is the single dimension lump system (time), progressing through the two-dimensional distributed system approach (time and vertical direction), and ending with the three-dimensional distributed system approach with azimuthally symmetry (time, vertical direction, and radial direction). The three models were introduced and solved analytically and numerically. The importance of the models and their solution was addressed. The simulations based on them might be considered as a powerful tool in designing experiments, as they make it possible to estimate the different effects of the parameters involved in these models

  7. Integrating Thermal Tools Into the Mechanical Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Siebes, Georg; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of mechanical design is to deliver a hardware product that meets or exceeds customer expectations, while reducing cycle time and cost. To this end, an integrated mechanical design process enables the idea of parallel development (concurrent engineering). This represents a shift from the traditional mechanical design process. With such a concurrent process, there are significant issues that have to be identified and addressed before re-engineering the mechanical design process to facilitate concurrent engineering. These issues also assist in the integration and re-engineering of the thermal design sub-process since it resides within the entire mechanical design process. With these issues in mind, a thermal design sub-process can be re-defined in a manner that has a higher probability of acceptance, thus enabling an integrated mechanical design process. However, the actual implementation is not always problem-free. Experience in applying the thermal design sub-process to actual situations provides the evidence for improvement, but more importantly, for judging the viability and feasibility of the sub-process.

  8. Update on Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors in Thermal Vacuum at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS), Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing a Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for use as a power system on space science missions. This generator would make use of Stirling cycle energy conversion to achieve higher efficiency than currently used alternatives. A test has been initiated at GRC to demonstrate functionality of Stirling conversion in a thermal vacuum environment over an extended period of time. The test article resembles the configuration of the SRG, but was designed without the requirement of low mass. Throughout the 8700 cumulative hours of operation, modifications to the supporting hardware were required to attain the desired operating conditions. These modifications, the status of testing, and the data recorded will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Thermal performance envelopes for MHTGRs - Reliability by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etzel, K.T.; Howard, W.W.; Zgliczynski, J.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal performance envelopes are used to specify steady-state design requirements for the systems of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) to maximize plant performance reliability with optimized design. The thermal performance envelopes are constructed around the expected operating point to account for uncertainties in actual plant as-built parameters and plant operation. The components are then designed to perform successfully at all points within the envelope. As a result, plant reliability is maximized by accounting for component thermal performance variation in the design. The design is optimized by providing a means to determine required margins in a disciplined and visible fashion. This is accomplished by coordinating these requirements with the various system and component designers in the early stages of the design, applying the principles of total quality management. The design is challenged by the more complex requirements associated with a range of operating conditions, but in return, high probability of delivering reliable performance throughout the plant life is ensured

  10. Core Thermal-Hydraulic Conceptual Design for the Advanced SFR Design Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chung Ho; Chang, Jin Wook; Yoo, Jae Woon; Song, Hoon; Choi, Sun Rock; Park, Won Seok; Kim, Sang Ji

    2010-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the advanced SFR design concepts from 2007 to 2009 under the National longterm Nuclear R and D Program. Two types of core designs, 1,200 MWe breakeven and 600 MWe TRU burner core have been proposed and evaluated whether they meet the design requirements for the Gen IV technology goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economics, proliferation resistance, and physical protection. In generally, the core thermal hydraulic design is performed during the conceptual design phase to efficiently extract the core thermal power by distributing the appropriate sodium coolant flow according to the power of each assembly because the conventional SFR core is composed of hundreds of ducted assemblies with hundreds of fuel rods. In carrying out the thermal and hydraulic design, special attention has to be paid to several performance parameters in order to assure proper performance and safety of fuel and core; the coolant boiling, fuel melting, structural integrity of the components, fuel-cladding eutectic melting, etc. The overall conceptual design procedure for core thermal and hydraulic conceptual design, i.e., flow grouping and peak pin temperature calculations, pressure drop calculations, steady-state and detailed sub-channel analysis is shown Figure 1. In the conceptual design phase, results of core thermal-hydraulic design for advanced design concepts, the core flow grouping, peak pin cladding mid-wall temperature, and pressure drop calculations, are summarized in this study

  11. Thermal insulating concrete wall panel design for sustainable built environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah; Lau, Denvid

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes.

  12. Research and Design for Thermal Comfort in Dutch Urban Squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenzholzer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal comfort in urban outdoor places was generally not an issue in Dutch urban design. This neglect shows problematic effects of discomfort, but also missed chances in urban life quality. The existing problems are alleviated due to the expected effects of climate change with even higher

  13. Thermal Insulating Concrete Wall Panel Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes. PMID:25177718

  14. Design and Thermal Analysis of a Solar Powered Cold Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and Thermal Analysis of a Solar Powered Cold Storage Ware-House Using a Phase- Change Material. ... of Nigeria of perishable agricultural products at different conservation temperatures corresponding to the solidification temperatures of phase change materials using cheap and abundant source of energy.

  15. Features in thermal-hydraulic design of TOMARI-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, J.; Kido, H.; Kasama, T.

    2004-01-01

    Hokkaido Electric Power Company. Inc is constructing 3-loop PWR named TOMARI-3 at TOMARI-mura, Hokkaido. Although basic design is almost same as existent 3-loop PWR, there are some improvements in thermal hydraulic design for a plant performance. Core bypass flow is increased to keep equipment integrity for a long time. Plant safety is confirmed by DNB analysis with this change. (author)

  16. Thermal-hydraulics for space power, propulsion, and thermal management system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotiuk, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses thermal-hydraulic aspects of current space projects, Space Station thermal management systems, the thermal design of the Space Station Free-Flying Platforms, the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System, advanced multi-MW space nuclear power concepts, chemical and electric propulsion systems, and such aspects of the Space Station two-phase thermal management system as its mechanical pumped loop and its capillary pumped loop's supporting technology. Also discussed are the startup thaw concept for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System, calculational methods and experimental data for microgravity conditions, an isothermal gas-liquid flow at reduced gravity, low-gravity flow boiling, computations of Space Shuttle high pressure cryogenic turbopump ball bearing two-phase coolant flow, and reduced-gravity condensation

  17. Nanofluid enhancement of mineral oil and thermal properties instrument design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilborn, Eli

    There are two purposes of this research, to design and build a heat transfer cell that could accurately calculate heat transport coefficients of various fluids and to determine if the increased heat transfer capabilities of nanofluids can be applied to cooling transformers by using the heat transfer cell to measure the enhancement. The design and construction of a heat transfer cell that could accurately calculate heat transport coefficients of various fluids was successful. A heat transfer cell was built and tested on several fluids to confirm the accuracy of the design and the experiments. Three fluids were successfully tested overall for their thermal conductivity values, and one fluid was tested for its convection coefficients in the heat transfer cells. Values for the thermal conductivity and the convection coefficients were obtained during this experiment that agreed with commonly accepted values for the testing fluids. The average value for the thermal conductivities for mineral oil of the first design in the ¼" diameter cell is 0.15W/ m2c', and agrees well with the commonly accepted values of mineral oils. The value commonly accepted value of thermal conductivity for mineral oil is 0.14W/m2c' at 25°C, the first heat transfer cell yielded a thermal conductivity value of approximately 0.16W/m2 c' at roughly 25C. The heat transfer cell was also used to calculated convection coefficients of mineral oil, and values were obtained within the limits for natural convection according to Incropera, contributing more to the validity of the results from this heat transfer cell. A second heat transfer cell was designed to determine the thermal conductivities of more thermally sensitive fluids, offering a wider range of materials that can be tested. The second design places the thermocouples directly at their assumed position of the wire and the wall temperatures for calculation purposes, yielding more accurate results and can therefore more accurately calculate the

  18. Staged Optimization Design for Updating Urban Drainage Systems in a City of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flooding has been reported more often than in the past in most cities of China in recent years. In response, China’s State Council has urged the 36 largest cities to update the preparedness to handle the 50-year rainfall, which would be a massive project with large investments. We propose a staged optimization design for updating urban drainage that is not only a flexible option against environmental changes, but also an effective way to reduce the cost of the project. The staged cost optimization model involving the hydraulic model was developed in Fuzhou City, China. This model was established to minimize the total present costs, including intervention costs and flooding costs, with full consideration of the constraints of specific local conditions. The results show that considerable financial savings could be achieved by a staged design rather than the implement-once scheme. The model’s sensitivities to four data parameters were analyzed, including rainfall increase rate, flood unit cost, storage unit cost, and discount rate. The results confirm the applicability and robustness of the model for updating drainage systems to meet the requirements. The findings of this study may have important implications on urban flood management in the cities of developing countries with limited construction investments.

  19. Thermal Design and Analysis for the Cryogenic MIDAS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth McElroy

    1997-01-01

    The Materials In Devices As Superconductors (MIDAS) spaceflight experiment is a NASA payload which launched in September 1996 on the Shuttle, and was transferred to the Mir Space Station for several months of operation. MIDAS was developed and built at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The primary objective of the experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity and spaceflight on the electrical properties of high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials. The thermal challenge on MIDAS was to maintain the superconductive specimens at or below 80 K for the entire operation of the experiment, including all ground testing and 90 days of spaceflight operation. Cooling was provided by a small tactical cryocooler. The superconductive specimens and the coldfinger of the cryocooler were mounted in a vacuum chamber, with vacuum levels maintained by an ion pump. The entire experiment was mounted for operation in a stowage locker inside Mir, with the only heat dissipation capability provided by a cooling fan exhausting to the habitable compartment. The thermal environment on Mir can potentially vary over the range 5 to 40 C; this was the range used in testing, and this wide range adds to the difficulty in managing the power dissipated from the experiment's active components. Many issues in the thermal design are discussed, including: thermal isolation methods for the cryogenic samples; design for cooling to cryogenic temperatures; cryogenic epoxy bonds; management of ambient temperature components self-heating; and fan cooling of the enclosed locker. Results of the design are also considered, including the thermal gradients across the HTS samples and cryogenic thermal strap, electronics and thermal sensor cryogenic performance, and differences between ground and flight performance. Modeling was performed in both SINDA-85 and MSC/PATRAN (with direct geometry import from the CAD design tool Pro/Engineer). Advantages of both types of models are discussed

  20. Engineering Aerothermal Analysis for X-34 Thermal Protection System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Kathryn E.; Riley, Christopher J.; Zoby, E. Vincent

    1998-01-01

    Design of the thermal protection system for any hypersonic flight vehicle requires determination of both the peak temperatures over the surface and the heating-rate history along the flight profile. In this paper, the process used to generate the aerothermal environments required for the X-34 Testbed Technology Demonstrator thermal protection system design is described as it has evolved from a relatively simplistic approach based on engineering methods applied to critical areas to one of detailed analyses over the entire vehicle. A brief description of the trajectory development leading to the selection of the thermal protection system design trajectory is included. Comparisons of engineering heating predictions with wind-tunnel test data and with results obtained using a Navier-Stokes flowfield code and an inviscid/boundary layer method are shown. Good agreement is demonstrated among all these methods for both the ground-test condition and the peak heating flight condition. Finally, the detailed analysis using engineering methods to interpolate the surface-heating-rate results from the inviscid/boundary layer method to predict the required thermal environments is described and results presented.

  1. Use of advanced modeling techniques to optimize thermal packaging designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formato, Richard M; Potami, Raffaele; Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2010-01-01

    Through a detailed case study the authors demonstrate, for the first time, the capability of using advanced modeling techniques to correctly simulate the transient temperature response of a convective flow-based thermal shipper design. The objective of this case study was to demonstrate that simulation could be utilized to design a 2-inch-wall polyurethane (PUR) shipper to hold its product box temperature between 2 and 8 °C over the prescribed 96-h summer profile (product box is the portion of the shipper that is occupied by the payload). Results obtained from numerical simulation are in excellent agreement with empirical chamber data (within ±1 °C at all times), and geometrical locations of simulation maximum and minimum temperature match well with the corresponding chamber temperature measurements. Furthermore, a control simulation test case was run (results taken from identical product box locations) to compare the coupled conduction-convection model with a conduction-only model, which to date has been the state-of-the-art method. For the conduction-only simulation, all fluid elements were replaced with "solid" elements of identical size and assigned thermal properties of air. While results from the coupled thermal/fluid model closely correlated with the empirical data (±1 °C), the conduction-only model was unable to correctly capture the payload temperature trends, showing a sizeable error compared to empirical values (ΔT > 6 °C). A modeling technique capable of correctly capturing the thermal behavior of passively refrigerated shippers can be used to quickly evaluate and optimize new packaging designs. Such a capability provides a means to reduce the cost and required design time of shippers while simultaneously improving their performance. Another advantage comes from using thermal modeling (assuming a validated model is available) to predict the temperature distribution in a shipper that is exposed to ambient temperatures which were not bracketed

  2. Thermal design of the space shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrtel, F. D.; Vaniman, J. L.; Stuckey, J. M.; Gray, C.; Widofsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    The shuttle external tank thermal design presents many challenges in meeting the stringent requirements established by the structures, main propulsion systems, and Orbiter elements. The selected thermal protection design had to meet these requirements, and ease of application, suitability for mass production considering low weight, cost, and high reliability. This development led to a spray-on-foam (SOFI) which covers the entire tank. The need and design for a SOFI material with a dual role of cryogenic insulation and ablator, and the development of the SOFI over SLA concept for high heating areas are discussed. Further issuses of minimum surface ice/frost, no debris, and the development of the TPS spray process considering the required quality and process control are examined.

  3. 77 FR 66483 - Public Comment on the Draft Federal Urban Design Element and the Draft Update to the Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... COMMISSION Public Comment on the Draft Federal Urban Design Element and the Draft Update to the Federal... Urban Design Element provides policies that will guide the design and management of federal buildings... resources. All interested parties are invited to submit written comment. The draft Federal Urban Design...

  4. Thermal and structural design study of divertor collector plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kazunori; Iida, Hiromasa; Sako, Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Thermal and structural design study of divertor collector plates for a Swimming Pool Type Tokamak Reactor (SPTR) is carried out. Co-axial tube type divertor plate is employed for the reduction of electromagnetic force caused by plasma disruption. Maximum heat flux on cooling surface is sufficiently below burn-out heat flux. High thermal stress appers at the brazing region between copper cooling tube and tungsten armor. Some measures are required to decrease the thermal stress for extending the life time of the plate. These will be decreasing the heat flux on the plate by the reduction of beam angle to the plate or promoting the boiling in the tube by the reduction of coolant pressure. The life time of the plate by erosion due to ion sputtering is estimated to be about 4 years. (author)

  5. Fatigue design of nuclear class 1 piping considering thermal stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Hyeong Do; Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Kang Yong

    2008-01-01

    In ASME B and PV Code, Section III, Subsection NB-3600, thermal stratification is not taken into account to determine the peak stress intensity range for fatigue design of nuclear class 1 piping. Therefore, the effects of several parameters such as boundary layer thickness, temperature difference, stratification length, wall thickness, inner diameter and material properties on peak temperature and peak stress intensity due to non-linear temperature distribution of thermal stratification in a pipe cross-section are studied through the numerical parametric study. The results of the parametric study are closely examined and consolidated to introduce an additional term into the equation of ASME so that the modified equation can be used to determine the peak stress intensity range due to all loads including thermal stratification

  6. Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) Instrument Thermal Subsystem Design and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Veronica; Mosier, Carol; Neuberger, David

    2013-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is one of two instruments on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is scheduled to launch in February of 2013. The TIRS instrument was officially added to the mission later in the flow, which led to a highly aggressive schedule that became one of the main drivers during instrument development. The thermal subsystem design of the TIRS Sensor Unit is comprised of five thermal zones which range in temperature from less than 43 Kelvin to 330 Kelvin. Most zones are proportional heater controlled, and all are within a volume of 35 cu.ft. A two-stage cryocooler is used to cool the "cold stage" including three QWIP detectors to less than 43 Kelvin, and cool the "warm stage" to 105 Kelvin. The excess power dissipation from the cryocooler is rejected via ammonia transport heat pipes to a dedicated Cryocooler Radiator with embedded ammonia heat pipes. The cryogenic subsystem includes a series of shells used to radiatively and conductively isolate the cold stage from the warmer surroundings. The Optical System (telescope) is passively cooled to 180-190 Kelvin using a "thermal link" (comprised of a Flexible Conductive Thermal Strap and an APG Bar) which couples the telescope stage to a dedicated radiator with embedded ethane heat pipes. The Scene Select Mechanism, which is responsible for moving the Scene Select Mirror to three distinct positions (including Nadir, Space, and On-board Black Body Calibrator pointing), runs nominally at 278 Kelvin and is thermally isolated from the cryogenic thermal zones. The On-board Black Body Calibrator requires a dedicated radiator which allows for a temperature range of 260-330 Kelvin at the Source. The detectors are powered by the FPE Box, which is mounted to the nadir external surface of the composite honeycomb structure. There are two additional electronics boxes which are wet-mounted directly to the spacecraft shear panel, the Main Electronics Box and Cryocooler Electronics Box; thermal

  7. Thermal Management Design for the X-33 Lifting Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslog, S.; Mammano, J.; Strauss, B.

    1998-01-01

    The X-33 Advantage Technology Demonstrator offers a rare and exciting opportunity in Thermal Protection System development. The experimental program incorporates the latest design innovation in re-useable, low life cycle cost, and highly dependable Thermal Protection materials and constructions into both ground based and flight test vehicle validations. The unique attributes of the X-33 demonstrator for design application validation for the full scale Reusable Launch Vehicle, (RLV), are represented by both the configuration of the stand-off aeroshell, and the extreme exposures of sub-orbital hypersonic re-entry simulation. There are several challenges of producing a sub-orbital prototype demonstrator of Single Stage to Orbit/Reusable Launch Vehicle (SSTO/RLV) operations. An aggressive schedule with budgetary constraints precludes the opportunity for an extensive verification and qualification program of vehicle flight hardware. However, taking advantage of off the shelf components with proven technologies reduces some of the requirements for additional testing. The effects of scale on thermal heating rates must also be taken into account during trajectory design and analysis. Described in this document are the unique Thermal Protection System (TPS) design opportunities that are available with the lifting body configuration of the X-33. The two principal objectives for the TPS are to shield the primary airframe structure from excessive thermal loads and to provide an aerodynamic mold line surface. With the relatively benign aeroheating capability of the lifting body, an integrated stand-off aeroshell design with minimal weight and reduced procurement and operational costs is allowed. This paper summarizes the design objectives of the X-33 TPS, the flight test requirements driven configuration, and design benefits. Comparisons are made of the X-33 flight profiles and Space Shuttle Orbiter, and lifting body Reusable Launch Vehicle aerothermal environments. The X-33

  8. SAGE III on ISS Lessons Learned on Thermal Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument - the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring vertical distribution of aerosols, ozone, and other trace gases in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere - is currently scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2016. The Instrument Adapter Module (IAM), one of many SAGE III subsystems, continuously dissipates a considerable amount of thermal energy during mission operations. Although a portion of this energy is transferred via its large radiator surface area, the majority must be conductively transferred to the ExPRESS Payload Adapter (ExPA) to satisfy thermal mitigation requirements. The baseline IAM-ExPA mechanical interface did not afford the thermal conductance necessary to prevent the IAM from overheating in hot on-orbit cases, and high interfacial conductance was difficult to achieve given the large span between mechanical fasteners, less than stringent flatness specifications, and material usage constraints due to strict contamination requirements. This paper will examine the evolution of the IAM-ExPA thermal interface over the course of three design iterations and will include discussion on design challenges, material selection, testing successes and failures, and lessons learned.

  9. Preliminary design of the thermal protection system for solar probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirling, R. B., Jr.; Loomis, W. C.; Heightland, C. N.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary design of the thermal protection system for the NASA Solar Probe spacecraft is presented. As presently conceived, the spacecraft will be launched by the Space Shuttle on a Jovian swing-by trajectory and at perihelion approach to three solar radii of the surface of the Earth's sun. The system design satisfies maximum envelope, structural integrity, equipotential, and mass loss/contamination requirements by employing lightweight carbon-carbon emissive shields. The primary shield is a thin shell, 15.5-deg half-angle cone which absorbs direct solar flux at up to 10-deg off-nadir spacecraft pointing angles. Secondary shields of sandwich construction and low thickness-direction thermal conductivity are used to reduce the primary shield infrared radiation to the spacecraft payload.

  10. Thermal design of a Mars oxygen production plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Iyer, Venkatesh A.

    1991-01-01

    The optimal design of the thermal components of a system that uses carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere to produce oxygen for spacecraft propulsion and/or life support is discussed. The gases are pressurized, heated and passed through an electrochemical cell. Carbon dioxide is reduced to carbon monoxide and oxygen due to thermal dissociation and electrocatalysis. The oxygen thus formed is separated from the gas mixture by the electrochemical cell. The objective of the design is to optimize both the overall mass and the power consumption of the system. The analysis shows that at electrochemical cell efficiencies of about 50 percent and lower, the optimal system would require unspent carbon dioxide in the exhaust gases to be separated and recycled. Various methods of efficiently compressing the intake gases to system pressures of 0.1 MPa are investigated. The total power requirement for oxygen production rates of 1, 5, and 10 kg/day at various cell efficiencies are presented.

  11. Various startup system designs of HPLWR and their thermal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Qi [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Jiejin, E-mail: chiven77@hotmail.com [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • An axial one-dimensional (1D) single channel model is developed for the HPLWR core. • Various startup systems for HPLWR have been investigated and found feasible. • Characteristics of the component required for HPLWR startup designs are studied. -- Abstract: This paper summarizes the results of various startup system designs and their thermal analysis of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) which is the European version of the various supercritical water cooled reactor proposals. In order to study the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the HPLWR core, a simplified axial one-dimensional (1D) single channel model is developed, which consists of fuel, cladding, coolant and moderator. The model is verified by the related results of Seppälä (2008). Both constant pressure startup systems and sliding pressure startup systems of HPLWR are presented. In constant pressure startup system, the reactor starts at supercritical pressure. It appears that compared with other SCWR designs, the weight of the component required for constant pressure startup of HPLWR is medium and reasonable. Constant pressure startup systems are found feasible from thermal analysis. And for sliding pressure startup, the reactor starts at subcritical pressure. The adequate core power of 25% with 28% flow rate and a feedwater temperature of 280 °C are determined during pressurization phase. The thermal analysis results show that the sliding pressure startup systems for HPLWR are also feasible. Considering the same flow rate as the supercritical-pressure light water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR), the component weight required is reduced in HPLWR.

  12. A modelling approach to designing microstructures in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.; Nylen, P.; Wigren, J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermomechanical properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) are strongly influenced by coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, thus making it essential to have a fundamental understanding of microstructure-property relationships in TBCs to produce a desired coating. Object-Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has been shown previously as an effective tool for evaluating thermal and mechanical material behaviour, as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as input to the model. In this work, OOF was used to predict the thermal conductivity and effective Young's modulus of TBC topcoats. A Design of Experiments (DoE) was conducted by varying selected parameters for spraying Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) topcoat. The microstructure was assessed with SEM, and image analysis was used to characterize the porosity content. The relationships between microstructural features and properties predicted by modelling are discussed. The microstructural features having the most beneficial effect on properties were sprayed with a different spray gun so as to verify the results obtained from modelling. Characterisation of the coatings included microstructure evaluation, thermal conductivity and lifetime measurements. The modelling approach in combination with experiments undertaken in this study was shown to be an effective way to achieve coatings with optimised thermo-mechanical properties.

  13. Thermal design and analysis of high power star sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The requirement for the temperature stability is very high in the star sensors as the high precision needs for the altitude information. Thermal design and analysis thus is important for the high power star sensors and their supporters. CCD, normally with Peltier thermoelectric cooler (PTC, is the most important sensor component in the star sensors, which is also the main heat source in the star sensors suite. The major objective for the thermal design in this paper is to design a radiator to optimize the heat diffusion for CCD and PTC. The structural configuration of star sensors, the heat sources and orbit parameters were firstly introduced in this paper. The influences of the geometrical parameters and coating material characteristics of radiators on the heat diffusion were investigated by heat flux analysis. Carbon–carbon composites were then chosen to improve the thermal conductivity for the sensor supporters by studying the heat transfer path. The design is validated by simulation analysis and experiments on orbit. The satellite data show that the temperatures of three star sensors are from 17.8 °C to 19.6 °C, while the simulation results are from 18.1 °C to 20.1 °C. The temperatures of radiator are from 16.1 °C to 16.8 °C and the corresponding simulation results are from 16.0 °C to 16.5 °C. The temperature variety of each star sensor is less than 2 °C, which satisfies the design objectives.

  14. Final design of thermal diagnostic system in SPIDER ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombin, M., E-mail: matteo.brombin@igi.cnr.it; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The prototype radio frequency source of the ITER heating neutral beams will be first tested in SPIDER test facility to optimize H{sup −} production, cesium dynamics, and overall plasma characteristics. Several diagnostics will allow to fully characterise the beam in terms of uniformity and divergence and the source, besides supporting a safe and controlled operation. In particular, thermal measurements will be used for beam monitoring and system protection. SPIDER will be instrumented with mineral insulated cable thermocouples, both on the grids, on other components of the beam source, and on the rear side of the beam dump water cooled elements. This paper deals with the final design and the technical specification of the thermal sensor diagnostic for SPIDER. In particular the layout of the diagnostic, together with the sensors distribution in the different components, the cables routing and the conditioning and acquisition cubicles are described.

  15. Design and construction of the 'Solar One' thermal storage subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friefeld, J. M.; Moore, A. E.; Morgan, G. R.

    The Solar One solar tower power plant thermal storage subsystem for generation during clouded periods and in the evening is detailed. A sensible heat storage technique was selected from various candidates, and consists of a low-cost, stationary rock bed. Charging proceeds by pumping the lower temperature heat transfer fluid (Caloria HT 43) from the bottom of the bed, routing it through a heat exchanger to gain thermal energy from the receiver steam, and returning the fluid to the top of the tank. Temperatures in the tank are maintained at 425-575 F with a pressure of 1465 psia. Design goals include a 148 MWt storage, with a capacity to alloy 7 MWe generation for 4 hr. The tank is 63 ft in diam, 44 ft tall, and contains granite rocks and sand. The flow rate can be varied by a factor of 20 through the use of variable speed pumps. Shakedown tests were being run in 1982.

  16. Dopant designing for thermally stable graded index plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Y.; Kondo, A.; Koike, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The graded index polymer optical fiber (GI POF) has been proposed as a media for very short reach network because of its high flexibility, low laying cost and excellent transmission characteristics. However, the plasticization efficiency which causes by the high refractive dopant decreases the glass transition temperature (Tg) in the center of the core and deteriorates thermal stability of fibers. In this paper, thermally stable PMMA based GI POF was successfully fabricated for the first time by designing dopant molecule which has little plasticizer effect. Tg at the core region was improved to 104 °C while that of conventional GI POF is 86 °C. Stability of attenuation at 85 °C/dry and 75 °C/85 %RH were clarified to be as high as that of non-doped step index POF.

  17. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2012-10-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DEFOA- 0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed Durability Test Rig.

  18. Thermal Performance Analysis of Staging Effect of Solar Thermal Absorber with Cross Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir Abdul Razak; Zafri Azran Abdul Majid; Mohd Hafidz Ruslan; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

    2015-01-01

    The type and shape of solar thermal absorber materials will impact on the operating temperature and thermal energy storage effect of a solar air thermal collector. For a standard flat-plate design, energy gain can be increased by expanding the thermal absorber area along the collector plane, subject to area limitation. This paper focuses on the staging effect of a metal hollow square rod absorber of aluminium, stainless steel, and a combination of the two with a cross design, for the heat gain and temperature characteristics of a solar air collector. Experiments were carried out with three cross design set-ups, with 30 minutes of heating and cooling, phase, respectively, under 485 W/ m 2 solar irradiance value, and at a constant air speed at 0.38 m/ s. One set aluminium set-up delivered the highest output temperature of 41.8 degree Celsius, followed by two-sets aluminium and one aluminium set + one stainless steel set at 39.3 and 38.2 degree Celsius, respectively. The lowest peak temperature is recorded on three sets of the aluminium absorber at 35 degree Celsius. The bi-metallic set-up performed better than the two aluminium set-up where each set-up obtained a temperature drop against heat gain gradient value of -0.4186 degree Celsius/ W and -0.4917 degree Celsius/ W, respectively. Results concluded that by increasing the number of sets, the volume and surface areas of the absorber material are also increased, and lead to a decrease in peak temperature output for each increase of sets. (author)

  19. Early Experience with a Tapered Titanium Porous Plasma Sprayed Stem with Updated Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocchio, Antonio G; Berend, Keith R; Morris, Michael J; Adams, Joanne B; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2017-12-22

    The Taperloc® Complete femoral stem (Zimmer Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) builds on the widespread clinical success of the original Taperloc design used since 1982. Enhancements to the Complete design include a lowered caput-collum-diaphyseal (CCD) angle from 138° to 133° for improved offset, optimized neck taper with polished neck flats to increase range of motion, reduced distal geometry to improve proximal canal fill, and gradual off-loading that is the goal of tapered geometry. A retrospective review was conducted to assess our early experience with the updated design. A query of our practice's arthroplasty registry revealed 97 consented patients (103 hips) who underwent primary cementless THA performed with a Taperloc® Complete femoral component between November 2010 and March 2011. A high offset option, accomplished by a constant 7.8mm medial shift of the trunnion, was utilized in 94 hips (91%). Mean age was 61.8 years and body mass index (BMI) was 31.3 kg/m2. Underlying diagnoses were osteoarthritis in 96 (93%), four avascular necrosis, two post-traumatic arthritis, and one acute fracture. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years (2-7). Harris hip scores improved from 53.6 preoperatively to 87.9 at most recent. One stem was revised for periprosthetic fracture. Other reoperations were one cup revised for iliopsoas impingement, one lateral femoral cutaneous neurectomy, and one incision and debridement for a non-healing wound. Postoperative radiographs revealed satisfactory position and alignment of components with no radiolucencies observed in all patients with no evidence of osteolysis, distal hypertrophy, or pedestal formation. In this group, good results with a low frequency of complications and stem revision were achieved with a tapered titanium porous plasma-sprayed femoral component with updated design features. No aseptic loosening or osteolysis occurred. Radiographic findings were excellent in all hips.

  20. Shuttle Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem design and flight experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Timothy A.; Metcalf, Jordan L.; Asuncion, Carmelo

    1991-01-01

    The paper examines the design of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem (ATCS) constructed for providing the vehicle and payload cooling during all phases of a mission and during ground turnaround operations. The operation of the Shuttle ATCS and some of the problems encountered during the first 39 flights of the Shuttle program are described, with special attention given to the major problems encountered with the degradation of the Freon flow rate on the Orbiter Columbia, the Flash Evaporator Subsystem mission anomalies which occurred on STS-26 and STS-34, and problems encountered with the Ammonia Boiler Subsystem. The causes and the resolutions of these problems are discussed.

  1. Thermal Design Considerations of the Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Teri H.; Newman, Miles

    2011-01-01

    The Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM) is a flight demonstration of the tasks required to perform robotic refueling of orbiting spacecraft. RRM will be mounted to an ExPress Adapter Plate (ExPA) for launch and installed onto the International Space Station (ISS) Express Logistics Carrier 4 (ELC4). RRM operations will be conducted using the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) robotic arm on the ISS with the ORU/Tool Changeout Mechanism (OTCM) for grasping tools and completing the refueling demonstration tasks. This paper presents the thermal considerations and design of the RRM including the tools required for the tasks.

  2. How to Design Rating Schemes of Risk Matrices: A Sequential Updating Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianping; Bao, Chunbing; Wu, Dengsheng

    2018-01-01

    Risk matrices have been widely used as a risk evaluation tool in many fields due to their simplicity and intuitive nature. Designing a rating scheme, i.e., determining the number of ratings used in a risk matrix and assigning different ratings to different cells, is an essential part of risk matrix construction. However, most of the related literature has focused on applying a risk matrix to various fields, instead of researching how to design risk matrices. Based on the analysis of several current rules, we propose a new approach, namely, the sequential updating approach (SUA), to design the rating scheme of a risk matrix in a reliable way. In this article, we propose three principles and a rating algorithm based on these principles. The three principles, namely, adjusted weak consistency, consistent internality, and continuous screening, characterize a good rating scheme. The resulting rating scheme has been proven to be unique. A global rating algorithm is then proposed to create the design that satisfies the three principles. We then explore the performance of the SUA. An illustrative application is first given to explain the feasibility of our approach. The sensitivity analysis shows that our method captures a resolution-reliability tradeoff for decisionmakers in choosing an appropriate rating scheme for a risk matrix. Finally, we compare the designs based on the SUA and Cox's axioms, highlighting the advantages of the SUA. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. Early Experience with a Short, Tapered Titanium Porous Plasma Sprayed Stem with Updated Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Adolph V; Manocchio, Antonio G; Berend, Keith R; Morris, Michael J; Adams, Joanne B

    2018-03-12

    Short stem femoral components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) have increased in popularity since the advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques. The concept of a short stem is particularly compatible with tapered designs where the goal is to offload forces proximally in the femur. The purpose of this retrospective review was to review our early experience with a short, tapered titanium femoral component with updated design features. Beginning in November 2011 through February 2012, 92 consented patients (93 hips), at a single center, were treated with primary cementless THA using a short stem, tapered femoral component (Taperloc® Complete Microplasty; Zimmer Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) and were available for review with a minimum two-year follow-up. Mean patient age at surgery was 63.2 years and body mass index (BMI) was 30.8 kg/m2. Mean stem length used was 110.3mm (range, 95-125). Mean follow-up was 4.5 years (2-6). Harris hip scores improved from 52.5 preoperatively to 84.7 at most recent. One stem was revised the same day for periprosthetic fracture. One patient with early infection was treated with single-stage exchange followed by recurrence that was treated successfully with two-stage exchange. A non-healing wound in one patient was treated with incision and debridement. Radiographic assessment demonstrated no evidence of loosening, osteolysis, distal hypertrophy, or pedestal formation in any hip, and all components appeared well fixed and in appropriate alignment. In this series of patients treated with primary THA using a short, tapered titanium porous plasma-sprayed femoral component with updated design features, good results were achieved with a low incidence of complications and revision. No aseptic loosening or osteolysis has occurred. Radiographic assessment was excellent for all patients.

  4. Urban Climate Design: Improving thermal comfort in Dutch neighbourhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Kleerekoper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This thesis presents research into the possibilities for climate adaptation in Dutch urban areas. We want to know how cities can best prepare for extreme rainfall, droughts, and heat waves in future climates. These events are likely to become more frequent and more extreme. The focus is on heat resistance as this has been a neglected concept in Dutch urban planning. The aim of this study is to extend our knowledge of the effects of climate-adaptation measures and to stimulate the implementation of such measures in the design of public space. Anticipating on the effects of climate change, the research was guided by the question: Which urban design principles can be applied in specific Dutch neighbourhoods to respond to the effects of climate change, especially in terms of outdoor thermal comfort and water management? The three stages of the project are:  • A literature review of existing knowledge on climate adaptation and knowledge gaps • Research into the specific field of urban climatology • Applied research on the broader field of urban planning The urban climate and adaptation measures In the evaluation of measures for climate robust urban areas it is important to gauge the extent of the effects of such measures. These effects are generally expressed in terms of air temperature. However, the comparison of results of measures from various studies is not a simple matter: there are significant differences in spatial, climatological and methodological variations adopted in these studies. Bringing results together from very specific studies may give an impression of the potential of certain measures. For example, most studies support the idea that greening has the highest effect on thermal comfort as it provides both shade and active cooling due to ‘evapotranspiration’1. Nevertheless, vegetation can also retain heat, as we can feel after sundown. Other measures that were investigated for their effects are water, urban morphology

  5. A study on the advanced statistical core thermal design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyuk

    1992-02-01

    A statistical core thermal design methodology for generating the limit DNBR and the nominal DNBR is proposed and used in assessing the best-estimate thermal margin in a reactor core. Firstly, the Latin Hypercube Sampling Method instead of the conventional Experimental Design Technique is utilized as an input sampling method for a regression analysis to evaluate its sampling efficiency. Secondly and as a main topic, the Modified Latin Hypercube Sampling and the Hypothesis Test Statistics method is proposed as a substitute for the current statistical core thermal design method. This new methodology adopts 'a Modified Latin Hypercube Sampling Method' which uses the mean values of each interval of input variables instead of random values to avoid the extreme cases that arise in the tail areas of some parameters. Next, the independence between the input variables is verified through 'Correlation Coefficient Test' for statistical treatment of their uncertainties. And the distribution type of DNBR response is determined though 'Goodness of Fit Test'. Finally, the limit DNBR with one-sided 95% probability and 95% confidence level, DNBR 95/95 ' is estimated. The advantage of this methodology over the conventional statistical method using Response Surface and Monte Carlo simulation technique lies in its simplicity of the analysis procedure, while maintaining the same level of confidence in the limit DNBR result. This methodology is applied to the two cases of DNBR margin calculation. The first case is the application to the determination of the limit DNBR where the DNBR margin is determined by the difference between the nominal DNBR and the limit DNBR. The second case is the application to the determination of the nominal DNBR where the DNBR margin is determined by the difference between the lower limit value of the nominal DNBR and the CHF correlation limit being used. From this study, it is deduced that the proposed methodology gives a good agreement in the DNBR results

  6. Design-by-analysis application to next generation BWR fuel thermal design method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Mitsutake, Toru

    2008-01-01

    For BWR core thermal design methods, the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic tests have been needed, such as the critical power measurement test, pressure drop measurement test and so on for more than thirty years since 1976. However, the full mock-up test required the high costs and large-scale test facility. Now, there are only a few test facilities in the world to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test. Moreover, for future BWR, the bundle size tends to be larger, because of reducing the plant construction costs and minimizing days taken for the periodic check. For instance, AB1600, improved ABWR, was proposed from Toshiba (Imaruoka et al., 2005), whose bundle size was 1.2 times larger than the conventional BWR fuel size. It is too expensive and far from realistic to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test for such a large size fuel bundle on every new bundle design. The new design procedure is exactly expected at reasonable costs and required to perform the large scale bundle design development, especially for the next generation BWR. Then, we propose a kind of Design by Analysis method combined with the alternative to the full mock-up tests. We called Practical Design-by-Analysis (PDBA) method even more effective and with better accuracy than Full Design-by-Analysis (FDBA). The PDBA method was applied successfully to produce the critical power correlation for the current 8x8 fuel. The estimation error was almost equal to that of the design correlation developed empirically with the full mock-up test data. (author)

  7. Thermal design of horizontal tube boilers: numerical and experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, Robert

    1999-01-01

    This work concerns the thermal design of kettle re-boilers. Current methods are highly inaccurate, regarded to the correlations for external heat transfer coefficient at one tube scale, as well as to two-phase flow modelling at boiler scale. The aim of this work is to improve these thermal design methods. It contains an experimental investigation with typical operating conditions of such equipment: an hydrocarbon (n-pentane) with low mass flux. This investigation has lead to characterize the local flow pattern through void fraction measurements and, from this, to develop correlations for void fraction, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. The approach is original, since the developed correlations are based on the liquid velocity at minimum cross section area between tubes, as variable characterizing the hydrodynamic effects on pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. These correlations are shown to give much better results than those suggested up to now in the literature, which are empirical transpositions from methods developed for inside tube flows. Furthermore, the numerical code MC3D has been applied using the correlations developed in this work, leading to a modelization of the two-phase flow in the boiler, which is a significant progress compared to current simplified methods. (author) [fr

  8. Design of materials with extreme thermal expansion using a three-phase topology optimization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Torquato, S.

    1997-01-01

    expansion, zero thermal expansion, and negative thermal expansion. Assuming linear elasticity, it is shown that materials with effective negative thermal expansion coefficients can be obtained by mixing two phases with positive thermal expansion coefficients and void. We also show......We show how composites with extremal or unusual thermal expansion coefficients can be designed using a numerical topology optimization method. The composites are composed of two different material phases and void. The optimization method is illustrated by designing materials having maximum thermal...... that there is no mechanistic relationship between negative thermal expansion and negative Poisson's ratio....

  9. An Update on Design Tools for Optimization of CMC 3D Fiber Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J.; DiCarlo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Describe and up-date progress for NASA's efforts to develop 3D architectural design tools for CMC in general and for SIC/SiC composites in particular. Describe past and current sequential work efforts aimed at: Understanding key fiber and tow physical characteristics in conventional 2D and 3D woven architectures as revealed by microstructures in the literature. Developing an Excel program for down-selecting and predicting key geometric properties and resulting key fiber-controlled properties for various conventional 3D architectures. Developing a software tool for accurately visualizing all the key geometric details of conventional 3D architectures. Validating tools by visualizing and predicting the Internal geometry and key mechanical properties of a NASA SIC/SIC panel with a 3D orthogonal architecture. Applying the predictive and visualization tools toward advanced 3D orthogonal SiC/SIC composites, and combining them into a user-friendly software program.

  10. Design for thermal sensation and comfort states in vehicles cabins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alahmer, Ali; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Omar, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript investigates the analysis and modeling of vehicular thermal comfort parameters using a set of designed experiments aided by thermography measurements. The experiments are conducted using a full size climatic chamber to host the test vehicle, to accurately assess the transient and steady state temperature distributions of the test vehicle cabin. Further investigate the thermal sensation (overall and local) and the human comfort states under artificially created relative humidity scenarios. The thermal images are calibrated through a thermocouples network, while the outside temperature and relative humidity are manipulated through the climatic environmental chamber with controlled soaking periods to guarantee the steady state conditions for each test scenario. The relative humidity inside the passenger cabin is controlled using a Total Humidity Controller (THC). The simulation uses the experimentally extracted boundary conditions via a 3-D Berkeley model that is set to be fully transient to account for the interactions in the velocity and temperature fields in the passenger compartment, which included interactions from turbulent flow, thermal buoyancy and the three modes of heat transfer conduction, convection and radiation. The model investigates the human comfort by analyzing the effect of the in-cabin relative humidity from two specific perspectives; firstly its effect on the body temporal variation of temperature within the cabin. Secondly, the Local Sensation (LS) and Comfort (LC) are analyzed for the different body segments in addition to the Overall Sensation (OS) and the Overall Comfort (OC). Furthermore, the human sensation is computed using the Fanger model in terms of the Predicted Mean Value (PMV) and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PPD) indices. The experimental and simulation results show that controlling the RH levels during the heating and the cooling processes (winter and summer conditions respectively) aid the A/C system to

  11. Evolutionary design of a satellite thermal control system: Real experiments for a CubeSat mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Emanuel; Diaz, Marcos; Zagal, Juan Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • GAs applied to automate design of CubeSat passive thermal control system (coating). • Simulation adapted with real physical data (mockup experiment in vacuum chamber). • Obtained coating patterns consistently outperform engineered solutions (by 5 K). • Evolved coating patterns are far superior (by 8 K) than unpainted aluminum. - Abstract: This paper studies the use of artificial evolution to automate the design of a satellite passive thermal control system. This type of adaptation often requires the use of computer simulations to evaluate fitness of a large number of candidate solutions. Simulations are required to be expedient and accurate so that solutions can be successfully transferred to reality. We explore a design process that involves three steps. On a first step candidate solutions (implemented as surface paint tiling patterns) are tested using a FEM model and ranked according to their quality to meet mission temperature requirements. On a second step the best individual is implemented as a real physical satellite mockup and tested inside a vacuum chamber, having light sources imitating the effect of solar light. On a third step the simulation model is adapted with data obtained during the real evaluation. These updated models can be further employed for continuing genetic search. Current differences between our simulation and our real physical setup are in the order of 1.45 K mean squared error for faces pointing toward the light source and 2.4 K mean squared errors for shadowed faces. We found that evolved tiling patterns can be 5 K below engineered patterns and 8 K below using unpainted aluminum satellite surfaces.

  12. The geothermal energy potential in Denmark - updating the database and new structural and thermal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Sparre Andersen, Morten; Balling, Niels; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Fuchs, Sven; Leth Hjuler, Morten; Kristensen, Lars; Mathiesen, Anders; Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of structural, hydraulic and thermal conditions of the subsurface is fundamental for the planning and use of hydrothermal energy. In the framework of a project under the Danish Research program 'Sustainable Energy and Environment' funded by the 'Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation', fundamental geological and geophysical information of importance for the utilization of geothermal energy in Denmark was compiled, analyzed and re-interpreted. A 3D geological model was constructed and used as structural basis for the development of a national subsurface temperature model. In that frame, all available reflection seismic data were interpreted, quality controlled and integrated to improve the regional structural understanding. The analyses and interpretation of available relevant data (i.e. old and new seismic profiles, core and well-log data, literature data) and a new time-depth conversion allowed a consistent correlation of seismic surfaces for whole Denmark and across tectonic features. On this basis, new topologically consistent depth and thickness maps for 16 geological units from the top pre-Zechstein to the surface were drawn. A new 3D structural geological model was developed with special emphasis on potential geothermal reservoirs. The interpretation of petrophysical data (core data and well-logs) allows to evaluate the hydraulic and thermal properties of potential geothermal reservoirs and to develop a parameterized numerical 3D conductive subsurface temperature model. Reservoir properties and quality were estimated by integrating petrography and diagenesis studies with porosity-permeability data. Detailed interpretation of the reservoir quality of the geological formations was made by estimating net reservoir sandstone thickness based on well-log analysis, determination of mineralogy including sediment provenance analysis, and burial history data. New local surface heat-flow values (range: 64-84 mW/m2) were determined for the Danish

  13. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  14. Parabolic Trough Photovoltaic/Thermal Collectors: Design and Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vanoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic trough concentrator and a linear triangular receiver. In that prototype, the bottom surfaces of the receiver are equipped with mono-crystalline silicon cells whereas the top surface is covered by an absorbing surface. The aperture area of the parabola was covered by a glass in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. In the modified version of the collector considered in this paper, two changes are implemented: the cover glass was eliminated and the mono-crystalline silicon cells were replaced by triple-junction cells. In order to analyze PVT performance, a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances. The simulation model calculates the temperatures of the main components of the system and the main energy flows Results showed that the performance of the system is excellent even when the fluid temperature is very high (>100 °C. Conversely, both electrical and thermal efficiencies dramatically decrease when the incident beam radiation decreases.

  15. Mechanical and thermal design of the Cascade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We present an improved Cascade fusion reaction chamber that is optimized with respect to chamber radius, wall thickness, and pebble blanket outlet temperature. We show results of a parameter study where we varied chamber radius from 3 to 6 m, wall thickness from 15 to 80 mm, and blanket outlet temperature from 900 to 1400 K. Based on these studies, we achieved an optimized chamber with 50% the volume of the original design and 60% of its blanket. Chamber radius is only 4.4 m and its half length is only 5.9 m, decreased from the original 5-m radius and 8-m half-length. In our optimization method, we calculate both thermal and mechanical stresses resulting from x-ray, fusion-pellet-debris, and neutron-generated momentum, pressure from ablated material, centrifugal action, vacuum inside the chamber, and gravity. We add the mechanical stresses to thermal stresses and keep the total less than the yield stress. Further, we require that fluctuations in these stresses be less than that which would produce creep-fatigue failure within the chamber 30-year lifetime

  16. Thermal design of an irradiation device with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkansky, David; Halpert, Silvia G.; Vazquez, Luis A.

    1999-01-01

    The thermal behavior of a device to transport 60 Co rods has been calculated. The device has been designed to be also used to radio sterilize medical supplies and hospital wastes. The calculations show that, in normal conditions, the maximum temperature of the external surface of the device is 55 C and that of the shielding lead is 110 C. In fire conditions, without taking into account the radiation of heath to or from the combustion gases, the lead does not reach the melting point. If the gases are taken into account, only 6.3 % of the lead is melted down. The transport-irradiation device complies with the IAEA recommendations on the safe transport of radioactive material

  17. Design considerations for Mars transfer vehicles using nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) utilizing nuclear propulsion will require that careful consideration be given to the nuclear radiation environment in which it will operate. The extremely high neutron and gamma fluxes characteristic of nuclear thermal propulsion systems will cause significant heating of the fluid systems in close proximity to the reactor, especially in the lower propellant tanks. Crew radiation doses are also a concern particularly late in a mission when there is less shielding from the propellant tanks. In this study, various vehicle configuration and shielding strategies were examined and the resulting time dependent radiation fields evaluated. A common cluster of three particle bed reactor (PBR) engines were used in all configurations examined. In general, it appears that long, relatively narrow vehicles perform the best from a radiation standpoint, however, good shield optimization will be critical in maintaining a low radiation environment while minimizing the shield weight penalty.

  18. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M [eds.

    1979-02-01

    The purpose for this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in solar heating systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating system, and stand-alone domestic hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  19. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  20. Finite element model updating in structural dynamics using design sensitivity and optimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Calvi, Adriano

    1998-01-01

    Model updating is an important issue in engineering. In fact a well-correlated model provides for accurate evaluation of the structure loads and responses. The main objectives of the study were to exploit available optimisation programs to create an error localisation and updating procedure of nite element models that minimises the "error" between experimental and analytical modal data, addressing in particular the updating of large scale nite element models with se...

  1. REVISING/UPDATING EPA 625/1-79-011, PROCESS DESIGN MANUAL FOR SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wishes to revise/update its very large and comprehensive 1979 Process Design Manual for Sludge Treatment and Disposal, EPA 625/1-79-011. As you might imagine the task is not trivial, as already in 1979 the original manual cost more tha...

  2. Recent updates for designing CCR5 antagonists as anti-retroviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshil R; Savjani, Jignasa Ketan

    2018-03-10

    The healthcare system faces various challenges in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy due to resistance to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) as a consequence of the evolutionary process. Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs like Zidovudine, Zalcitabine, Raltegravir WHO ranks HIV as one of the deadliest diseases with a mortality of one million lives in 2016. Thus, there emerges an urgency of developing a novel anti-retroviral agent that combat resistant HIV strains. The clinical development of ART from a single drug regimen to current triple drug combination is very slow. The progression in the structural biology of the viral envelope prompted the discovery of novel targets, which can be demonstrated a proficient approach for drug design of anti-retroviral agents. The current review enlightens the recent updates in the structural biology of the viral envelope and focuses on CCR5 as a validated target as well as ways to overcome CCR5 resistance. The article also throws light on the SAR studies and most prevalent mutations in the receptor for designing CCR5 antagonists that can combat HIV-1 infection. To conclude, the paper lists diversified scaffolds that are in pipeline by various pharmaceutical companies that could provide an aid for developing novel CCR5 antagonists. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. Helium Circulator Test Facility updated design cost estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Costs which are included in the cost estimate are: Titles I, II, and III Architect-Engineering Services; Titles I, II, and III General Atomic Services; site clearing, grading, and excavation; bulk materials and labor of installation; mechanical and electrical equipment with installation; allowance for contractors' overhead, profit, and insurance; escalation on materials and labor; a contingency; and installation of GAC supplied equipment and materials. The total estimated cost of the facility in As Spent Dollars is $27,700,000. Also included is a cost comparison of the updated design and the previous conceptual design. There would be a considerable penalty for the direct-cooled system over the indirect-cooled system due to the excessive cost of the large diameter helium loop piping to an outdoor heat exchanger. The indirect cooled system which utilizes a helium/Dowtherm G heat exchanger and correspondingly smaller and lower pressure piping to its outdoor air cooler proved to be the more economical of the two systems

  4. Determination of coefficient of thermal expansion effects on Louisiana's PCC pavement design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    With the development of the Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) as a new pavement design tool, the : coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is now considered a more important design parameter in estimating pavement : performance inclu...

  5. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Dupont, Mark (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Fratoni, Massimiliano (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Greenberg, Harris (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the

  6. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Robert; Dupont, Mark; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Carter, Joe; Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R and D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of

  7. Integrating planning and design optimization for thermal power generation in developing economies: Designs for Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John Dinh Chuong

    In the twenty first century, global warming and climate change have become environmental issues worldwide. There is a need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from thermal power plants through improved efficiency. This need is shared by both developed and developing countries. It is particularly important in rapidly developing economies (for example, Vietnam, South Korea, and China) where there is very significant need to increase generation capacity. This thesis addresses improving thermal power plant efficiency through an improved planning process that emphasizes integrated design. With the integration of planning and design considerations of key components in thermal electrical generation, along with the selection of appropriate up-to-date technologies, greater efficiency and reduction of emissions could be achieved. The major barriers to the integration of overall power plant optimization are the practice of individual island tendering packages, and the lack of coordinating efforts between major original equipment manufacturers (OEM). This thesis assesses both operational and design aspects of thermal power plants to identify opportunities for energy saving and the associated reduction of CO2 emissions. To demonstrate the potential of the integrated planning design approach, three advanced thermal power plants, using anthracite coal, oil and gas as their respective fuel, were developed as a case study. The three plant formulations and simulations were performed with the cooperation of several leading companies in the power industry including Babcock & Wilcox, Siemens KWU, Siemens-Westinghouse Power Corporation, Hitachi, Alstom Air Preheater, TLT-Covent, and ABB Flakt. The first plant is a conventional W-Flame anthracite coal-fired unit for base load operation. The second is a supercritical oil-fired plant with advanced steam condition, for two shifting and cycling operations. The third plant is a gas-fired combined cycle unit employing a modern steam-cooled gas

  8. Thermal hydraulic design features for the BNCT application. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, T.E.; Vafai, K.

    1993-06-01

    This project report is based on our investigations for thermal design of a heat pipe for removing generated heat resulting from Proton bombardments of a Lithium target for a BNCT application. In our investigation, an integral analysis was employed to investigate the vapor an liquid flow in a flat plate heat pipe heated asymmetrically for removal of the 75 kW generated from the BNCT application. The flat plate heat pipe configuration will be used for removing the heat which is generated as a result of proton bombardment of the lithium target. The working fluid in the heat pipe occurs in two phase namely liquid and vapor. The wick contains all the liquid phase and the vapor phase is mainly in the core region. Heat is applied by an external source at the evaporator section which vaporizes the working fluid in this section. This results in a pressure difference which drives the vapor to the condenser section where condenses and releases latent heat of vaporization to a heat sink in the condense section. Due to the vaporization of liquid in the evaporator, the liquid-vapor interface enters into the wick surface and hence capillary pressure is developed there. This capillary pressure causes the condensed liquid in the condenser to be pumped back to the evaporator again. The results of our investigation have enabled us to correlate such diverse information as; the thickness of the wick, the diameter of the heat pipe, the wetting angle, the capillary radius, the surface tension, the latent heat of evaporation, the permeability and porosity of the chosen wick, the length of the heat pipe, and the viscosity and density of the two phases; with the heat removal capabilities of the heat pipe. Expressions for the pressure and velocity distributions are obtained and discussed in relation to our application to BNCT. The present design clearly shows that it is possible to attain temperatures well below the melting temperature of the lithium in the BNCT application.

  9. Structural design and analysis of forces for the thermal shield of the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Han; Liao Ziying

    2005-01-01

    The EAST is a tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operating at 4 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied to surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system minimal, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and the warm components is adopted. The EAST thermal shield system consists of vacuum vessel thermal shield and cryostat thermal shield. The NASTRAN finite element software was employed to calculate different load conditions of the thermal shield after analyzing the thermal stress in operation and electromagnetic forces under plasma disruptions for optimization design of the structure. (authors)

  10. An Approach for Designing Thermal Management Systems for Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Battery Packs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.; Keyser, Matthew; Burch, Steve

    1999-01-01

    If battery packs for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are to operate effectively in all climates, thermal management of the packs is essential. In this paper, we will review a systematic approach for designing and evaluating battery pack thermal management systems. A thermal management system using air as the heat transfer medium is less complicated than a system using liquid cooling/heating. Generally, for parallel HEVs, an air thermal management system is adequate, whereas for EVs and series HEVs, liquid-based systems may be required for optimum thermal performance. Further information on battery thermal management can be found on the Web site www.ctts.nrel.gov/BTM

  11. Small-break loss-of-coolant accidents in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.; Harmony, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor developed by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). A unique feature of the PIUS concept is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is normally controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. ABB submitted the PIUS design to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for preapplication review, and Los Alamos supported the NRC`s review effort. Baseline analyses of small-break initiators at two locations were performed with the system neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis code TRAC-PF1/MOD2. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept to severe off-normal conditions having a very low probability of occurrence.

  12. Design of materials with extreme thermal expansion using a three-phase topology optimization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Torquato, S.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with extremal or unusual thermal expansion coefficients are designed using a three-phase topology optimization method. The composites are made of two different material phases and a void phase. The topology optimization method consists in finding the distribution of material phases...... materials having maximum directional thermal expansion (thermal actuators), zero isotropic thermal expansion, and negative isotropic thermal expansion. It is shown that materials with effective negative thermal expansion coefficients can be obtained by mixing two phases with positive thermal expansion...... on a finite-element discretization of the base cell. The optimization problem is solved using sequential linear programming. To benchmark the design method we first consider two-phase designs. Our optimal two-phase microstructures are in fine agreement with rigorous bounds and the so-called Vigdergauz...

  13. APT target/blanket design and thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Target/Blanket (T/B) system is comprised of an assembly of tritium producing modules supported by control, heat removal, shielding and retargeting systems. The T/B assembly produces tritium using a high-energy proton beam, a tungsten/lead spallation neutron source and 3 He gas as the tritium producing feedstock. For the nominal production mode, protons are accelerated to an energy of 1030 MeV at a current of 100 mA and are directed onto the T/B assembly. The protons are expanded using a raster/expansion system to illuminate a 0.19m by 1.9m beam spot on the front face of a centrally located tungsten neutron source. A surrounding lead blanket produces additional neutrons from scattered high-energy particles. The tungsten neutron source consists of nested, Inconel-718 clad tungsten cylinders assembled in horizontal Inconel-718 tubes. Each tube contains up to 6 cylinders with annular flow channel gaps of 0.102 cm. These horizontal tubes are manifolded into larger diameter vertical inlet and outlet pipes, which provide coolant. The horizontal and vertical tubes make up a structure similar to that of rungs on a ladder. The entire tungsten neutron source consists of 11 such ladders separated into two modules, one containing five ladders and the other six. Ladders are separated by a 0.3 m void region to increase nucleon leakage. The peak thermal-hydraulic conditions in the tungsten neutron source occur in the second ladder from the front. Because tungsten neutron source design has a significant number of parallel flow channels, the limiting thermal-hydraulic parameter is the onset of significant void (OSV) rather than critical heat flux (CHF). A blanket region surrounds the tungsten neutron source. The lateral blanket region is approximately 120 cm thick and 400 cm high. Blanket material consists of lead, 3 He gas, aluminum, and light-water coolant. The blanket region is subdivided into rows based on the local power density in

  14. Mitigation of thermal transients by tube bundle inlet plenum design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-06-01

    A multiphase program aimed at investigating the importance of thermal buoyancy to LMFBR steam-generator and heat-exchanger thermal hydraulics under low-flow transient conditions is being conducted in the Argonne Mixing Components Test Facility (MCTF) on a 60 0 sector shell-side flow model of the Westinghouse straight-tube steam generator being developed under the US/DOE large-component development program. A series of shell-side constant-flow thermal-downramp transient tests have been conducted focusing on the phenomenon of thermal-buoyancy-induced-flow channeling. In addition, it was discovered that a shell-inlet flow-distribution plenum can play a significant role in mitigating the severity of a thermal transient entering a steam generator or heat exchanger

  15. Apollo experience report: Thermal design of Apollo lunar surface experiments package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of the thermal design of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package central station from the basic concept to the final flight hardware is discussed, including results of development, prototype, and qualification tests that were used to verify that the flight hardware would operate adequately on the lunar surface. In addition, brief discussions of the thermal design of experiments included in the experiments package are presented. The flight thermal performance is compared with analytical results and thermal-vacuum test results, and design modifications for future lunar surface experiment packages are presented.

  16. Design of a bolted flange subjected to severe nuclear system thermal transients - A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, W.J.; Tomawski, R.J.; Ezekoye, L.I.; Lacey, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Flange design standards recognize that flanged joints may develop leakage should they be exposed to severe thermal gradients and recommend that such operating conditions be avoided. In nuclear power plants, severe thermal transients may be encountered in many plant and system operating and test conditions. In such applications, conformance with standard design practice may not ensure a leak-tight joint. This paper describes the proper consideration of thermal effects on flanged joints and how that can lead to the development of a successful leak-tight design. Similar procedures may be applied generally to evaluate and upgrade flanged joints in thermal shock applications

  17. Thermal design heat sinks, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, compact heat exchangers, and solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S

    2010-01-01

    The proposed is written as a senior undergraduate or the first-year graduate textbook,covering modern thermal devices such as heat sinks, thermoelectric generators and coolers, heat pipes, and heat exchangers as design components in larger systems. These devices are becoming increasingly important and fundamental in thermal design across such diverse areas as microelectronic cooling, green or thermal energy conversion, and thermal control and management in space, etc. However, there is no textbook available covering this range of topics. The proposed book may be used as a capstone design cours

  18. THERMAL COMFORT STUDY OF AN AIR-CONDITIONED DESIGN STUDIO IN TROPICAL SURABAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Agus Dwi Hariyanto

    2005-01-01

    This paper evaluates the current thermal comfort condition in an air-conditioned design studio using objective measurement and subjective assessment. Objective measurement is mainly to quantify the air temperature, MRT, relative humidity, and air velocity. Subjective assessment is conducted using a questionnaire to determine the occupants thermal comfort sensations and investigate their perception of the thermal comfort level. A design studio in an academic institution in Surabaya was chosen ...

  19. The Large UV/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR): Decadal Mission concept design update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Aloezos, Steve; Bly, Vincent T.; Collins, Christine; Crooke, Julie; Dressing, Courtney D.; Fantano, Lou; Feinberg, Lee D.; France, Kevin; Gochar, Gene; Gong, Qian; Hylan, Jason E.; Jones, Andrew; Linares, Irving; Postman, Marc; Pueyo, Laurent; Roberge, Aki; Sacks, Lia; Tompkins, Steven; West, Garrett

    2017-09-01

    In preparation for the 2020 Astrophysics Decadal Survey, NASA has commissioned the study of four large mission concepts, including the Large Ultraviolet / Optical / Infrared (LUVOIR) Surveyor. The LUVOIR Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) has identified a broad range of science objectives including the direct imaging and spectral characterization of habitable exoplanets around sun-like stars, the study of galaxy formation and evolution, the epoch of reionization, star and planet formation, and the remote sensing of Solar System bodies. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is providing the design and engineering support to develop executable and feasible mission concepts that are capable of the identified science objectives. We present an update on the first of two architectures being studied: a 15- meter-diameter segmented-aperture telescope with a suite of serviceable instruments operating over a range of wavelengths between 100 nm to 2.5 μm. Four instruments are being developed for this architecture: an optical / near-infrared coronagraph capable of 10-10 contrast at inner working angles as small as 2 λ/D the LUVOIR UV Multi-object Spectrograph (LUMOS), which will provide low- and medium-resolution UV (100 - 400 nm) multi-object imaging spectroscopy in addition to far-UV imaging; the High Definition Imager (HDI), a high-resolution wide-field-of-view NUV-Optical-IR imager; and a UV spectro-polarimeter being contributed by Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). A fifth instrument, a multi-resolution optical-NIR spectrograph, is planned as part of a second architecture to be studied in late 2017.

  20. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  1. Updated pipe break analysis for Advanced Neutron Source Reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will supply the highest continuous neutron flux levels of any reactor in the world. It uses plate-type fuel with high-mass-flux and highly subcooled heavy water as the primary coolant. The Conceptual Safety Analysis for the ANSR was completed in June 1992. The thermal-hydraulic pipe-break safety analysis (performed with a specialized version of RELAP5/MOD3) focused primarily on double-ended guillotine breaks of the primary piping and some core-damage mitigation options for such an event. Smaller, instantaneous pipe breaks in the cold- and hot-leg piping were also analyzed to a limited extent. Since the initial analysis for the conceptual design was completed, several important changes to the RELAP5 input model have been made reflecting improvements in the fuel grading and changes in the elevation of the primary coolant pumps. Also, a new philosophy for pipe-break safety analysis (similar to that adopted for the New Production Reactor) accentuates instantaneous, limited flow area pipe-break accidents in addition to finite-opening-time, double-ended guillotine breaks of the major coolant piping. This paper discloses the results of the most recent instantaneous pipe-break calculations

  2. Design of tandem mirror reactors with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    End-plug technologies for tandem mirror reactors include high-field superconducting magnets, neutral beam injectors, and gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). In addition to their normal use for sustenance of the end-plug plasmas, neutral beam injectors are used for ''pumping'' trapped ions from the thermal barrier regions by charge exchange. An extra function of the axially directed pump beams is the removal of thermalized alpha particles from the reactor. The principles of tandem mirror operation with thermal barriers will be demonstrated in the upgrade of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) in 1981 and the tandem configuration of the Mirror fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) in 1984

  3. A Proposed Multimedia Cone of Abstraction: Updating a Classic Instructional Design Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baukal, Charles E.; Ausburn, Floyd B.; Ausburn, Lynna J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced multimedia techniques offer significant learning potential for students. Dale (1946, 1954, 1969) developed a Cone of Experience (CoE) which is a hierarchy of learning experiences ranging from direct participation to abstract symbolic expression. This paper updates the CoE for today's technology and learning context, specifically focused…

  4. Update of the ITER MELCOR model for the validation of the Cryostat design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, M.; Labarta, C.; Terrón, S.; Izquierdo, J.; Perlado, J.M.

    2015-07-01

    Some transients can compromise the vacuum in the Cryostat of ITER and cause significant loads. A MELCOR model has been updated in order to assess this loads. Transients have been run with this model and its result will be used in the mechanical assessment of the cryostat. (Author)

  5. Thermal design and analysis of the HTGR fuel element vertical carbonizing and annealing furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1977-06-01

    Computer analyses of the thermal design for the proposed HTGR fuel element vertical carbonizing and annealing furnace were performed to verify its capability and to determine the required power input and distribution. Although the furnace is designed for continuous operation, steady-state temperature distributions were obtained by assuming internal heat generation in the fuel elements to simulate their mass movement. The furnace thermal design, the analysis methods, and the results are discussed herein

  6. SusDesign - An approach for a sustainable process system design and its application to a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Khandoker Abul; Khan, Faisal; Hawboldt, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a structured process design approach, SusDesign, for the sustainable development of process systems. At each level of process design, design alternatives are generated using a number of thermodynamic tools and applying pollution prevention strategies followed by analysis, evaluation and screening processes for the selection of potential design options. The evaluation and optimization are carried out based on an integrated environmental and cost potential (IECP) index, which has been estimated with the IECP tool. The present paper also describes a flowsheet optimization technique developed using different thermodynamic tools such as exergy/energy analysis, heat and mass integration, and cogeneration/trigeneration in a systematic manner. The proposed SusDesign approach has been successfully implemented in designing a 30 MW thermal power plant. In the case study, the IECP tool has been set up in Aspen HYSYS process simulator to carry out the analysis, evaluation and screening of design alternatives. The application of this approach has developed an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly thermal system design with an overall thermal efficiency of 70% and CO 2 and NO emissions of 0.28 kg/kW h and 0.2 g/kW h respectively. The cost of power generation is estimated as 4 cents /kW h. These achievements are significant compared to the conventional thermal power plant, which demonstrates the potential of the SusDesign approach for the sustainable development of process systems.

  7. Preliminary Design and Analysis of the ARES Atmospheric Flight Vehicle Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, J. F.; Dillman, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a proposed 2007 Mars Scout Mission that will be the first mission to deploy an atmospheric flight vehicle (AFV) on another planet. This paper will describe the preliminary design and analysis of the AFV thermal control system for its flight through the Martian atmosphere and also present other analyses broadening the scope of that design to include other phases of the ARES mission. Initial analyses are discussed and results of trade studies are presented which detail the design process for AFV thermal control. Finally, results of the most recent AFV thermal analysis are shown and the plans for future work are discussed.

  8. Ambient Temperature Based Thermal Aware Energy Efficient ROM Design on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Rishita; Bansal, Neha; Bansal, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal aware design is currently gaining importance in VLSI research domain. In this work, we are going to design thermal aware energy efficient ROM on Virtex-5 FPGA. Ambient Temperature, airflow, and heat sink profile play a significant role in thermal aware hardware design life cycle. Ambient...... temperature is a temperature of surroundings. Airflow is measured in Linear Feet per Minute (LFM). Medium profile and high profile are two different heat sink profile available in XPower analyzer.When frequency goes from 4.0GHz to 1.0GHz, there is 21.8% reduction in clock power, 75% reduction in I/O Power, 35...

  9. THERMAL COMFORT STUDY OF AN AIR-CONDITIONED DESIGN STUDIO IN TROPICAL SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Dwi Hariyanto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the current thermal comfort condition in an air-conditioned design studio using objective measurement and subjective assessment. Objective measurement is mainly to quantify the air temperature, MRT, relative humidity, and air velocity. Subjective assessment is conducted using a questionnaire to determine the occupants thermal comfort sensations and investigate their perception of the thermal comfort level. A design studio in an academic institution in Surabaya was chosen for the study. Results show that more than 80% of the occupants accepted the indoor thermal conditions even though both the environmental and comfort indices exceeded the limit of the standard (ASHRAE Standard 55 and ISO 7730. In addition, non-uniformity of spatial temperature was present in this studio. Some practical recommendations were made to improve the thermal comfort in the design studio.

  10. Design of a Thermal Precipitator for the Characterization of Smoke Particles from Common Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    A thermal precipitator (TP) was designed to collect smoke aerosol particles for microscopic analysis in fire characterization research. Information on particle morphology, size and agglomerate structure obtained from these tests supplements additional aerosol data collected. Modeling of the thermal precipitator throughout the design process was performed with the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element software package, including the Eulerian flow field and thermal gradients in the fluid. The COMSOL Particle Tracing Module was subsequently used to determine particle deposition. Modeling provided optimized design parameters such as geometry, flow rate and temperatures. The thermal precipitator was built and testing verified the performance of the first iteration of the device. The thermal precipitator was successfully operated and provided quality particle samples for microscopic analysis, which furthered the body of knowledge on smoke particulates. This information is a key element of smoke characterization and will be useful for future spacecraft fire detection research.

  11. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of a Cryogenic Tank Design Exposed to Extreme Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hanna, Gregory J.

    1991-01-01

    A cryogenic test article, the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank, was designed to qualitatively simulate the thermal response of transatmospheric vehicle fuel tanks exposed to the environment of hypersonic flight. One-dimensional and two-dimensional finite-difference thermal models were developed to simulate the thermal response and assist in the design of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank. The one-dimensional thermal analysis determined the required insulation thickness to meet the thermal design criteria and located the purge jacket to eliminate the liquefaction of air. The two-dimensional thermal analysis predicted the temperature gradients developed within the pressure-vessel wall, estimated the cryogen boiloff, and showed the effects the ullage condition has on pressure-vessel temperatures. The degree of ullage mixing, location of the applied high-temperature profile, and the purge gas influence on insulation thermal conductivity had significant effects on the thermal behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank. In addition to analysis results, a description of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank and the role it will play in future thermal structures and transatmospheric vehicle research at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility is presented.

  12. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  13. Optimal experimental designs for the estimation of thermal properties of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine P.; Moncman, Deborah A.

    1994-01-01

    Reliable estimation of thermal properties is extremely important in the utilization of new advanced materials, such as composite materials. The accuracy of these estimates can be increased if the experiments are designed carefully. The objectives of this study are to design optimal experiments to be used in the prediction of these thermal properties and to then utilize these designs in the development of an estimation procedure to determine the effective thermal properties (thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity). The experiments were optimized by choosing experimental parameters that maximize the temperature derivatives with respect to all of the unknown thermal properties. This procedure has the effect of minimizing the confidence intervals of the resulting thermal property estimates. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional experimental designs were optimized. A heat flux boundary condition is required in both analyses for the simultaneous estimation of the thermal properties. For the one-dimensional experiment, the parameters optimized were the heating time of the applied heat flux, the temperature sensor location, and the experimental time. In addition to these parameters, the optimal location of the heat flux was also determined for the two-dimensional experiments. Utilizing the optimal one-dimensional experiment, the effective thermal conductivity perpendicular to the fibers and the effective volumetric heat capacity were then estimated for an IM7-Bismaleimide composite material. The estimation procedure used is based on the minimization of a least squares function which incorporates both calculated and measured temperatures and allows for the parameters to be estimated simultaneously.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of the Thermal Response of 9975 Packaging Using Factorial Design Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Narendra K.

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for using the statistical design of experiment (2 k Factorial Design) technique in the sensitivity analysis of the thermal response (temperature) of the 9975 radioactive material packaging where multiple thermal properties of the impact absorbing and fire insulating material Celotex and certain boundary conditions are subject to uncertainty. 2 k Factorial Design method is very efficient in the use of available data and is capable of analyzing the impact of main variables (Factors) and their interactions on the component design. The 9975 design is based on detailed finite element (FE) analyses and extensive proof testing to meet the design requirements given in 10CFR71 [1]. However, the FE analyses use Celotex thermal properties that are based on published data and limited experiments. Celotex is an orthotropic material that is used in the home building industry. Its thermal properties are prone to variation due to manufacturing and fabrication processes, and due to long environmental exposure. This paper will evaluate the sensitivity of variations in thermal conductivity of the Celotex, convection coefficient at the drum surface, and drum emissivity (herein called Factors) on the thermal response of 9975 packaging under Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). Application of this methodology will ascertain the robustness of the 9975 design and it can lead to more specific and useful understanding of the effects of various Factors on 9975 performance

  15. Thermal and mechanical design of WITAMIR-I blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1980-10-01

    The design philosophy of WITAMIR-I, a Wisconsin Tandem Mirror Reactor design study, uses the experience obtained from our previous tokamak studies and combines it with the unique features of the tandem mirror to obtain an attractive design of a TM power reactor. It is aimed at maximizing the strengths of the tandem mirror while mitigating its weaknesses. The end product should be a safe, reliable, maintainable and a relatively economic power reactor. The general description of the reactor, the plasma calculations, the magnet design, the neutronic calculations and the maintenance considerations are presented elsewhere. This paper presents the blanket design of this reactor study

  16. Developing a cost effective rock bed thermal energy storage system: Design and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubscher, Hendrik Frederik; von Backström, Theodor Willem; Dinter, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Thermal energy storage is an integral part of the drive for low cost of concentrated solar power (CSP). Storage of thermal energy enables CSP plants to provide base load power. Alternative, cheaper concepts for storing thermal energy have been conceptually proposed in previous studies. Using rocks as a storage medium and air as a heat transfer fluid, the proposed concept offers the potential of lower cost storage because of the abundance and affordability of rocks. A packed rock bed thermal energy storage (TES) concept is investigated and a design for an experimental rig is done. This paper describes the design and modelling of an experimental test facility for a cost effective packed rock bed thermal energy storage system. Cost effective, simplified designs for the different subsystems of an experimental setup are developed based on the availability of materials and equipment. Modelling of this design to predict the thermal performance of the TES system is covered in this study. If the concept under consideration proves to be successful, a design that is scalable and commercially viable can be proposed for further development of an industrial thermal energy storage system.

  17. Determination of coefficient of thermal expansion effects on Louisiana's PCC pavement design : technical summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) has been widely considered as a fundamental property of : Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement but has never played an important role in the thickness design : procedure for PCC pavement until recently. I...

  18. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Sizing procedures are presented for latent heat thermal energy storage systems that can be used for electric utility off-peak energy storage, solar power plants and other preliminary design applications.

  19. Geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical factors which influence repository design in the bedded salt environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, J.P.; Nair, O.; Ortman, D.; Rowe, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical considerations applicable to repository design. The topics discussed in the report include: tectonic activity; geologic structure; stratigraphy; rock mechanical properties; and hydrologic properties

  20. Updates on the Construction of an Eyeglass-Supported Nasal Prosthesis Using Computer-Aided Design and Rapid Prototyping Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Tarsitano, Achille; Marchetti, Claudio; Scotti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to design an updated connection system for an eyeglass-supported nasal prosthesis using rapid prototyping techniques. The substructure was developed with two main endpoints in mind: the connection to the silicone and the connection to the eyeglasses. The mold design was also updated; the mold was composed of various parts, each carefully designed to allow for easy release after silicone processing and to facilitate extraction of the prosthesis without any strain. The approach used in this study enabled perfect transfer of the reciprocal position of the prosthesis with respect to the eyeglasses, from the virtual to the clinical environment. Moreover, the reduction in thickness improved the flexibility of the prosthesis and promoted adaptation to the contours of the skin, even during functional movements. The method described here is a simplified and viable alternative to standard construction techniques for nasal prostheses and offers improved esthetic and functional results when no bone is available for implant-supported prostheses. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Determination of thermally induced effects and design guidelines of optomechanical accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qianbo; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei; Jiao, Xufen; Han, Dandan; Chen, Peiwen; Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Yang, Guoguang

    2017-11-01

    Thermal effects, including thermally induced deformation and warm up time, are ubiquitous problems for sensors, especially for inertial measurement units such as accelerometers. Optomechanical accelerometers, which contain light sources that can be regarded as heat sources, involve a different thermal phenomenon in terms of their specific optical readout, and the phenomenon has not been investigated systematically. This paper proposes a model to evaluate the temperature difference, rise time and thermally induced deformation of optomechanical accelerometers, and then constructs design guidelines which can diminish these thermal effects without compromising other mechanical performances, based on the analysis of the interplay of thermal and mechanical performances. In the model, the irradiation of the micromachined structure of a laser source is considered a dominant factor. The experimental data obtained using a prototype of an optomechanical accelerometer approximately confirm the validity of the model for the rise time and response tendency. Moreover, design guidelines that adopt suspensions with a flat cross-section and a short length are demonstrated with reference to the analysis. The guidelines can reduce the thermally induced deformation and rise time or achieve higher mechanical performances with similar thermal effects, which paves the way for the design of temperature-tolerant and robust, high-performance devices.

  2. Design of the thermal neutron detection system for CJPL-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhao-Ming; Gong, Hui; Li, Jian-Min; Yue, Qian; Zeng, Zhi; Cheng, Jian-Ping

    2017-05-01

    A low background thermal neutron flux detection system has been designed to measure the ambient thermal neutron flux of the second phase of the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL-II), right after completion of the rock bolting work. A 3He proportional counter tube combined with an identical 4He proportional counter tube was employed as the thermal neutron detector, which has been optimised in energy resolution, wall effect and radioactivity of construction materials for low background performance. The readout electronics were specially designed for long-term stable operation and easy maintenance in an underground laboratory under construction. The system was installed in Lab Hall No. 3 of CJPL-II and accumulated data for about 80 days. The ambient thermal neutron flux was determined under the assumption that the neutron field is fully thermalized, uniform and isotropic at the measurement position. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475094)

  3. Modeling of Li-Ion Battery Packs as Basis for Design of Battery Thermal Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu

    Li-ion batteries are one of the most popular battery types on the market, due to their prime properties such as high capacity, low self-discharge rate, zero-maintenance, high energy density and long lifetime. However, safety still remains a major drawback, due to overheating and thermal runaway...... conservation equations, and the results were compared against experimental data from the open literature; 2. A simplified thermal runaway model for investigating the propagation of thermal runaway in a battery pack designed by NASA for astronaut spacesuits. A simplified model was initially built for single...... battery cells with an internal short circuit device (ISCD) implanted inside, used for triggering thermal runaway at low temperatures. The simplified lumped model was then coupled with a 2D thermal FEM for investigating the pack design. The simplification consists of implementing an efficiency factor term...

  4. Thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical design of plasma facing components for SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Santra, P.; Chenna Reddy, D.; Parashar, S.K.S.

    2014-01-01

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) are one of the major sub-systems of ssT-1 tokamak. PFC of ssT-1 consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and limiters are designed to be compatible for steady state operation. The main consideration in the design of the PFC cooling is the steady state heat removal of up to 1 MW/m 2 . The PFC has been designed to withstand the peak heat fluxes and also without significant erosion such that frequent replacement of the armor is not necessary. Design considerations included 2-D steady state and transient tile temperature distribution and resulting thermal loads in PFC during baking, and cooling, coolant parameters necessary to maintain optimum thermal-hydraulic design, and tile fitting mechanism. Finite Element (FE) models using ANSYS have been developed to carry out the heat transfer and stress analyses of the PFC to understand its thermal and mechanical behaviors. The results of the calculation led to a good understanding of the coolant flow behavior and the temperature distribution in the tube wall and the different parts of the PFC. Thermal analysis of the PFC is carried out with the purpose of evaluating the thermal mechanical behavior of PFCs. The detailed thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical designs of PFCs of ssT-1 are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  5. FGM (Functionally Graded Material) Thermal Barrier Coatings for Hypersonic Structures - Design and Thermal Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-29

    composites. An earlier work by Wakashima and Tsukamoto1-2 applied the mean-field micromechanical concepts to estimating the thermal stresses in a FGM plate ...some studies24 took into consideration time-dependent deformation such as creep in FGM plates , for which the constitutive relations derived from...OUTLINE OF ANALYSIS 4.1.1 FGM plates and thermo-mechanical loadings The outline of the analytical method mentioned here is based on the study by one

  6. Analysis and Design of Phase Change Thermal Control for Light Emitting Diode (LED) Spacesuit Helmet Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Nguyen, Hiep X.; Keller, John R.

    2010-01-01

    LED Helmet Extravehicular Activity Helmet Interchangeable Portable (LEHIP) lights for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) have been built and tested and are currently being used on the International Space Station. A design is presented of the passive thermal control system consisting of a chamber filled with aluminum foam and wax. A thermal math model of LEHIP was built and correlated by test to show that the thermal design maintains electronic components within hot and cold limits for a 7 hour spacewalk in the most extreme EVA average environments, and do not pose a hazard to the crew or to components of the EMU.

  7. Thermal stress and creep fatigue limitations in first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Harkness, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of a lithium cooled cylindrical first wall module has been analyzed as a function of the incident neutron wall loading. Three criteria were established for the purpose of defining the maximum wall loading allowable for modules constructed of Type 316 stainless steel and a vanadium alloy. Of the three, the maximum structural temperature criterion of 750 0 C for vanadium resulted in the limiting wall loading value of 7 MW/m 2 . The second criterion limited thermal stress levels to the yield strength of the alloy. This led to the lowest wall loading value for the Type 316 stainless steel wall (1.7 MW/m 2 ). The third criterion required that the creep-fatigue characteristics of the module allow a lifetime of 10 MW-yr/m 2 . At wall temperatures of 600 0 C, this lifetime could be achieved in a stainless steel module for wall loadings less than 3.2 MW/m 2 , while the same lifetime could be achieved for much higher wall loadings in a vanadium module

  8. Optical and thermal design of light emitting diodes omnidirectional bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhi Ting; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chen, Cheng-Huan

    2015-10-01

    The penetration of LED light bulbs into the lighting market is growing quickly in recent years due to significant increase of LED efficiency and reduction of cost. One major issue to be improved is the overall light bulb efficiency, which can fulfill "Energy Star for Lamps" while keeping sufficiently high efficiency. The efficiency issue results mainly from the high directionality of the LED sources and the corresponding solutions to make the emission more diverse. In this paper, a diffusion white reflection sheet (DWRS) with an array of holes is proposed as a high efficiency solution for modulating a light emission profile with SMD type LED source. The hole size is adjusted with fixed hole pitch to both maximize the efficiency and meet the omnidirectional specification. In addition, the concept of thermal plastic insertion molding metal is proposed for thermal management without fins for cooling. The prototype demonstrates the efficiency (Ef.) of 87.6% and LED pad temperature of 85°C, which shows the feasibility as a total solution for high efficiency LED omnidirectional bulbs.

  9. Challenges in thermal design of industrial single-phase power inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of thermal aspects in design process of an industrial single-phase inverter, choice of its topology and components. Stringent design inputs like very high overload level, demand for natural cooling and very wide input voltage range have made conventional circuit topology inappropriate therefore asking for alternative solution. Different power losses calculations in semiconductors are performed and compared, outlining the guidelines how to choose the final topology. Some recommendations in power magnetic components design are given. Based on the final project, a 20kVA single-phase inverter for thermal power plant supervisory and control system is designed and commissioned.

  10. Thermal Jacket Design Using Cellulose Aerogels for Heat Insulation Application of Water Bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai M. Duong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal jacket design using eco-friendly cellulose fibers from recycled paper waste is developed in this report. Neoprene as an outmost layer, cellulose aerogels in the middle and Nylon as an innermost layer can form the best sandwiched laminate using the zigzag stitching method for thermal jacket development. The temperature of the ice slurry inside the water bottle covered with the designed thermal jackets remains at 0.1 °C even after 4 h, which is the average duration of an outfield exercise. Interestingly, the insulation performance of the designed thermal jackets is much better than the commercial insulated water bottles like FLOE bottles and is very competition to that of vacuum flasks for a same period of 4 h and ambient conditions.

  11. Impact of Building Design Parameters on Thermal Energy Flexibility in a Low-Energy Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarran, Lucile; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Gianniou, Panagiota

    appears to have the largest impact on thermal flexibility. The importance of window design, namely the size, U-value and orientation, is underlined due to its critical influence on solar gains and heat losses. It is eventually observed that thermal mass has a secondary influence on the evaluated......This work focuses on demand-side management potential for the heating grid in residential buildings. The possibility to increase the flexibility provided to the heat network through specific building design is investigated. The role of different parts of the building structure on thermal...... flexibility is assessed through a parameter variation on a building model. Different building designs are subjected to heat cut-offs, and flexibility is evaluated with respect to comfort preservation and heating power peak creation. Under the conditions of this study, the thermal transmittance of the envelope...

  12. AP600 design certification thermal hydraulics testing and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Piplica, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute, have been developing an advanced light water reactor design; the AP600. The AP600 is a 1940 Mwt, 600Mwe unit which is similar to a Westinghouse two-loop Pressurized Water Reactor. The accumulated knowledge on reactor design to reduce the capital costs, construction time, and the operational and maintenance cost of the unit once it begins to generate electrical power. The AP600 design goal is to maintain an overall cost advantage over fossil generated electrical power.

  13. Thermal capacitator design rationale. Part 1: Thermal and mechanical property data for selected materials potentially useful in thermal capacitor design and construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. A.; Liao, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal properties of paraffin hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures which may be used as the phase change material (PCM) in thermal capacitors are discussed. The paraffin hydrocarbons selected for consideration are those in the range from C11H24 (n-Undecane) to C20H42 (n-Eicosane). A limited amount of data is included concerning other properties of paraffin hydrocarbons and the thermal and mechanical properties of several aluminum alloys which may find application as constructional materials. Data concerning the melting temperature, transition temperature, latent heat of fusion, heat of transition, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of pure and commercial grades of paraffin hydrocarbons are given. An index of companies capable of producing paraffin hydrocarbons and information concerning the availability of various grades (purity levels) is provided.

  14. Design study on the efficiency of the thermal scheme of power unit of thermal power plants in hot climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlov, A.; Dorokhov, Y.; Rybakov, B.; Nenashev, A.

    2017-11-01

    At the stage of pre-proposals unit of the thermal power plants for regions with a hot climate requires a design study on the efficiency of possible options for the structure of the thermal circuit and a set of key parameters. In this paper, the thermal circuit of the condensing unit powerfully 350 MW. The main feature of the external conditions of thermal power plants in hot climates is the elevated temperature of cooling water of the turbine condensers. For example, in the Persian Gulf region as the cooling water is sea water. In the hot season of the year weighted average sea water temperature of 30.9 °C and during the cold season to 22.8 °C. From the turbine part of the steam is supplied to the distillation-desalination plant. In the hot season of the year heat scheme with pressure fresh pair of 23.54 MPa, temperature 570/560 °C and feed pump with electric drive (EDP) is characterized by a efficiency net of 0.25% higher than thermal schem with feed turbine pump (TDP). However, the supplied power unit with PED is less by 11.6 MW. Calculations of thermal schemes in all seasons of the year allowed us to determine the difference in the profit margin of units of the TDP and EDP. During the year the unit with the TDP provides the ability to obtain the profit margin by 1.55 million dollars more than the unit EDP. When using on the market subsidized price of electricity (Iran) marginal profit of a unit with TDP more at 7.25 million dollars.

  15. Microfabricated thermal modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional micro gas chromatography: design, thermal modeling, and preliminary testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Reidy, Shaelah M; Block, Bruce P; Wise, Kensall D; Zellers, Edward T; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2010-07-07

    In comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC), a modulator is placed at the juncture between two separation columns to focus and re-inject eluting mixture components, thereby enhancing the resolution and the selectivity of analytes. As part of an effort to develop a microGC x microGC prototype, in this report we present the design, fabrication, thermal operation, and initial testing of a two-stage microscale thermal modulator (microTM). The microTM contains two sequential serpentine Pyrex-on-Si microchannels (stages) that cryogenically trap analytes eluting from the first-dimension column and thermally inject them into the second-dimension column in a rapid, programmable manner. For each modulation cycle (typically 5 s for cooling with refrigeration work of 200 J and 100 ms for heating at 10 W), the microTM is kept approximately at -50 degrees C by a solid-state thermoelectric cooling unit placed within a few tens of micrometres of the device, and heated to 250 degrees C at 2800 degrees C s(-1) by integrated resistive microheaters and then cooled back to -50 degrees C at 250 degrees C s(-1). Thermal crosstalk between the two stages is less than 9%. A lumped heat transfer model is used to analyze the device design with respect to the rates of heating and cooling, power dissipation, and inter-stage thermal crosstalk as a function of Pyrex-membrane thickness, air-gap depth, and stage separation distance. Experimental results are in agreement with trends predicted by the model. Preliminary tests using a conventional capillary column interfaced to the microTM demonstrate the capability for enhanced sensitivity and resolution as well as the modulation of a mixture of alkanes.

  16. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-30

    The conceptual design of a power system for application to the OTEC 100-MWe Demonstration Plant is presented. System modeling, design, and performance are described in detail. Materials considerations, module assembly, and cost considerations are discussed. Appendices include: A) systems analysis, B) general arrangements, C) system equipment, D) ammonia system material considerations; E) ammonia cycle, F) auxiliary subsystems, G) DACS availability analysis, H) heat exchanger supporting data, I) rotating machinery, and J) platform influences. (WHK)

  17. Thermal hydraulic design of hydride fueled PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, J.A.; Todreas, N.E.; Romano, A.

    2004-01-01

    The neutronic characteristics of hydride fuels permit increased fuel to coolant volume ratios in the core. A parametric study was developed to determine the optimum combination of lattice pitch, rod diameter, and channel shape - further referred to as geometry - for minimizing the total cost of operating existing PWRs loaded with UZrH 1.6 fuel. Results of the thermal hydraulic and fuel performance studies are presented here, and will be integrated into an economic model in the next stage of the research. The thermal hydraulic analysis was used to determine the maximum power that can be achieved by a given geometry, subject to four constraints - MDNBR, pressure drop, fuel temperature, and coolant flow velocity. The fuel performance analysis was used to determine the maximum burnup that can be achieved by a given geometry, subject to three additional constraints - fuel internal pressure and fission gas release, clad oxidation, and clad strain. This methodology was successfully validated by comparison of the predicted power and burnup of the current PWR geometry, with the actual power and burnup of an existing PWR. Assuming a 60 psia pressure drop can be sustained through the fuel bundle, we concluded the following for square channels: the peak achievable power is 5556 MWt for a rod diameter of 6.5 mm and a P/D ratio of 1.43, and the highest power that can be achieved using the existing 12.6 mm pitch and 10.2 mm fuel rods is 4586 MWt. These power levels are significantly higher than the 3800 MWt of the reference PWR. (author)

  18. Designing thermal diode and heat pump based on DNA nanowire: Multifractal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnia, S., E-mail: s.behnia@iaurmia.ac.ir; Panahinia, R.

    2017-07-12

    The management of heat flow in DNA nano wire was considered. Thermal diode effect in DNA and the domain of its appearance dependent to system parameters have been detected. The appearance of directed thermal flow in thermodynamic sizes proposes the possibility of designing the macroscopic thermal rectifier. By applying driven force, pumping effect has been also observed. The resonance frequency of DNA and threshold amplitudes of driving force for attaining permanent pumping effect have been detected. Forasmuch as detecting negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR) phenomenon, DNA can act as a thermal transistor. By using an analytical parallel investigation based on Rényi spectrum analysis, threshold values to transition to NDTR and pumping regimes have been detected. - Highlights: • The control and management of heat current in DNA have been investigated. • Directed thermal flow and NDTR in DNA have been identified. • By increasing the system size, the reversed thermal rectification appeared. So, it is proposed the possibility of designing the macroscopic thermal rectifier. • Pumping effect accompanied with detection of resonance frequency of DNA has been observed. • To verify the results, we did a parallel analysis based on multifractal concept to detect threshold values for transition to pumping state and NDTR regime.

  19. Thermal emissivity analysis of a GEMINI 8-meter telescopes design

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair Dinger, Ann

    1993-01-01

    The GEMINI 8-meter Telescopes Project is designing twin 8-meter telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Chile. The GEMINI telescopes will have interchangeable secondary mirrors for use in the visible and IR. The APART/PADE program is being used to evaluate the effective IR emissivity of the IR configuration plus enclosure as a function of mirror contamination at three IR wavelengths. The goal is to design a telescope whose effective IR emissivity is no more than 2 percent when the mirrors are clean.

  20. Thermal Analysis of Iodine Satellite (iSAT) from Preliminary Design Review (PDR) to Critical Design Review (CDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSAT) is a 12U cubesat with a primary mission to demonstrate the iodine fueled Hall Effect Thruster (HET) propulsion system. The spacecraft (SC) will operate throughout a one year mission in an effort to mature the propulsion system for use in future applications. The benefit of the HET is that it uses a propellant, iodine, which is easy to store and provides a high thrust-to-mass ratio. This paper will describe the thermal analysis and design of the SC between Preliminary Design Review (PDR) and Critical Design Review (CDR). The design of the satellite has undergone many changes due to a variety of challenges, both before PDR and during the time period discussed in this paper. Thermal challenges associated with the system include a high power density, small amounts of available radiative surface area, localized temperature requirements of the propulsion components, and unknown orbital parameters. The thermal control system is implemented to maintain component temperatures within their respective operational limits throughout the mission, while also maintaining propulsion components at the high temperatures needed to allow gaseous iodine propellant to flow. The design includes heaters, insulation, radiators, coatings, and thermal straps. Currently, the maximum temperatures for several components are near to their maximum operation limit, and the battery is close to its minimum operation limit. Mitigation strategies and planned work to solve these challenges will be discussed.

  1. Design and thermal dynamic analyses on the intermediate heat exchanger for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, M.; Mizuno, M.; Ito, M.; Urabe, S.

    1986-01-01

    The intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), one of the most important components in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), is a high performance helium/helium (He/He) heat exchanger operated at a very high temperature above 900 0 C to transmit the nuclear heat from the reactor core to the nuclear heat utilization systems such as the chemical plant. Having to meet, in addition, the requirement of the pressure boundary as the Class-1 it demands the accurate estimation of thermal performance and analytical prediction of thermal behaviors to secure its integrity throughout the service life. In the present works, the newly-developed analytical codes carry out designing thermal performance and analyzing dynamic thermal behaviors of the IHX. These codes have been developed on a great deal of data and studies related to the research and development on the 1.5 MWt- and the 25 MWt-IHXs. This paper shows the design on the IHX, the results of the dynamic analyses on the 1.5 MWt-IHX with the comparison to the experimental data and the analytical predictions of the dynamic thermal behaviors on the 25 MWt-IHX. The results calculated are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data on the 1.5 MWt-IHX, the fact that has verified the analytical codes to be reasonable and much useful for the thermal design of the IHX. These presented results and data are available for the design of the IHX of HTGR

  2. Automatically updating predictive modeling workflows support decision-making in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muegge, Ingo; Bentzien, Jörg; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Hughes, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    Using predictive models for early decision-making in drug discovery has become standard practice. We suggest that model building needs to be automated with minimum input and low technical maintenance requirements. Models perform best when tailored to answering specific compound optimization related questions. If qualitative answers are required, 2-bin classification models are preferred. Integrating predictive modeling results with structural information stimulates better decision making. For in silico models supporting rapid structure-activity relationship cycles the performance deteriorates within weeks. Frequent automated updates of predictive models ensure best predictions. Consensus between multiple modeling approaches increases the prediction confidence. Combining qualified and nonqualified data optimally uses all available information. Dose predictions provide a holistic alternative to multiple individual property predictions for reaching complex decisions.

  3. Design, construction and test operation of a thermal incinerator for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Montfort type intermittent incinerator for combusting medical wastes were the waste types, fuel, chimney size, and flue gas residence time. The design analysis was based on flue gas flow rate of 0.13 m3/s, maximum primary chamber ...

  4. Design and Development of a Solar Thermal Collector with Single Axis Solar Tracking Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theebhan Mogana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar energy is a source of energy that is abundant in Malaysia and can be easily harvested. However, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, it is impossible to harvest the solar energy to the maximum capacity if the solar thermal collector is placed fix to a certain angle. In this research, a solar thermal dish with single axis solar tracking mechanism that will rotate the dish according to the position of the sun in the sky is designed and developed, so that more solar rays can be reflected to a focal point and solar thermal energy can be harvested from the focal point. Data were collected for different weather conditions and performance of the solar thermal collector with a solar tracker were studied and compared with stationary solar thermal collector.

  5. Thermal characteristic of insulation for optimum design of RI transport package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S.; Seo, K. S.

    2002-01-01

    A package to transport the high level radioactive materials in required to withstand the hypothetical accident conditions as well as normal transport conditions according to IAEA and domestic regulations. The regulations require that the package should maintain the shielding, thermal and structural integrities to release no radioactive material. Thermal characteristics of insulations were evaluated and optimum insulation thickness was deduced for RI transport package. The package has a maximum capacity of 600 Curies for Ir-192 sealed source. The insulation thickness was decided with 10 mm of polyurethane form to maintain the thermal safety under fire accident condition. Thermal analysis was carried out for RI transport package, and it was shown that the thermal integrity of the package was maintained. The results obtained this study will be applied to a basic data for design of RI transport cask

  6. Design of a Protection Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Material Coupled to a Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, D.; Falcoz, Q.; Ferrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is the key for a stable electricity production in future Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. This work presents a study on the thermal protection of the central receiver of CSP plant using a tower which is subject to considerable thermal stresses in case of cloudy events. The very high temperatures, 800 °C at design point, impose the use of special materials which are able to resist at high temperature and high mechanical constraints and high level of concentrated solar flux. In this paper we investigate a TES coupling a metallic matrix drilled with tubes of Phase Change Material (PCM) in order to store a large amount of thermal energy and release it in a short time. A numerical model is developed to optimize the arrangement of tubes into the TES. Then a methodology is given, based from the need in terms of thermal capacity, in order to help the choice of the geometry.

  7. The Impact of Urban Design Descriptors on Outdoor Thermal Environment: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingying Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review on urban design indicators addressing the impact of urban geometry and vegetation on the outdoor thermal environment at the pedestrian level, as urban geometry and vegetation have been regarded as the most influential urban design factors that affect outdoor microclimate. The thermal balance concept is first introduced to elaborate how each component of energy fluxes is affected by the urban built environment, which helps to explore the underlying thermophysical mechanisms of how urban design modifies the outdoor thermal environment. The literature on numerous urban design descriptors addressing urban geometric characteristics is categorized into five groups in this paper according to the design features that the parameters entail, including land use intensity, building form, canyon geometry, space enclosure and descriptive characteristics. The literature on urban vegetation descriptors is reviewed together, followed by the combined effect of urban geometry and vegetation. This paper identifies a series of important urban design parameters and shows that the impact of design parameters on thermal environment varies with time, season, local climate and urban contexts. Contradictory impacts often occur between daytime and nighttime, or different seasons, which requests trade-offs to be achieved when proposing design strategies.

  8. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: I - Design and X-Ray Transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collura, A.; Varisco, S.; Barbera, M.; Basso, S.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ayers, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Simbol-X mission is designed to fly in formation flight configuration. As a consequence, the telescope has both ends open to space, and thermal shielding at telescope entrance and exit is required to maintain temperature uniformity throughout the mirrors. Both mesh and meshless solutions are presently under study for the shields. We discuss the design and the X-ray transmission.

  9. Integrated luminous and thermal design : a cold climate approach to zero-energy carbon-neutral design education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzowski, M.; Abraham, L. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Architecture

    2009-07-01

    In order to address environmental concerns, the School of Architecture at the University of Minnesota recently eliminated all of the required environmental technology courses in the professional graduate architecture program and replaced them with a new studio/technology hybrid course that focuses on the integration of luminous and thermal design for zero energy and carbon-neutral architecture. The purpose was to ask students to consider how architectural design can respond to global warming and climate change and to explore the role of solar design in shaping the next generation of sustainable architecture. In particular, the new course focused on a cold-climate approach to zero-energy carbon-neutral design education. It emphasized the role of daylighting, passive cooling, natural ventilation in significantly reducing or eliminating fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thermal and bioclimatic considerations for cold climate architecture were also investigated. This paper described the methods used in the design studio and how they were integrated into the ecological and environmental content of zero-energy and carbon-neutral design processes. The design studio curriculum content, methods, outcomes, and lessons learned were discussed, as well as the design tools and assessment and analytical methods. It was concluded that the integrated ecological design model succeeded in helping students to meaningfully integrate zero-energy and carbon-neutral design thinking into their personal design and decision-making processes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation (Two-Year Gradient Stress Relaxation Testing Update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

    2009-09-01

    Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. A previous report (ORNL/TM-2008/089) discusses the testing and results from the original three year duration of the project. This testing included compression testing to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K, subsequent compression testing on cylindrical specimens to determine loading rates for stress relaxation testing, isothermal stress relaxation testing, and gradient stress relaxation testing. This report presents the results from the continuation of the gradient temperature stress relaxation testing and the resulting updated modeling.

  11. Thermally optimized lithium neutron producing target design for accelerator-based BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park Shane; Joo Hyeong Min; Jang Byeong Ill; Jeun, Gyoodong; Kim Jong Kyung; Chai, Jong Seo

    2006-01-01

    In accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction is prevalently used as a neutron source. However, lithium has a very low melting point and poor thermal conductivity. Thus lithium target needs an efficient cooling. In this study, ways of increasing proton beam diameter and slanting target are proposed to reduce the heat density of lithium target. Thermal analysis on the lithium target design shows that water cooling is feasible if the proton beam diameter and target slopes are in the available range of the contour plots generated from this study. On the basis of the thermal analysis, the prototype of target system was designed and manufactured. Full-model thermal analysis and temperature measuring experiment were subsequently performed. The calculated temperature distribution coincided with the contour plots and the experimental results. These results will be used in the manufacture of the prototype accelerator-based BNCT facility at Hanyang University. (author)

  12. On-Orbit Thermal Design and Validation of 1 U Standardized CubeSat of STEP Cube Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jin Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cube Laboratory for Space Technology Experimental Projects (STEP Cube Lab is a cube satellite (CubeSat classified as a pico-class satellite of 1 U (unit size. Its main mission objective is to exploit core space technologies researched by domestic universities and verify the effectiveness of these technologies through on-orbit tests using the CubeSat. To guarantee a successful mission under extreme space thermal environments, proper thermal design is important. This paper describes the development process undertaken in the thermal design of the STEP Cube Lab, based on a passive approach, and its validation test. The system functionality and thermal design were verified through thermal vacuum and thermal balance tests under space simulated thermal vacuum environment condition. Finally, the orbital temperature of each component was predicted using a highly reliable correlated thermal mathematical model of the CubeSat obtained from the thermal balance test.

  13. Risk Identification in the Early Design Stage Using Thermal Simulations—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Masoud Sajjadian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The likely increasing temperature predicted by UK Climate Impacts Program (UKCIP underlines the risk of overheating and potential increase in cooling loads in most of UK dwellings. This could also increase the possibility of failure in building performance evaluation methods and add even more uncertainty to the decision-making process in a low-carbon building design process. This paper uses a 55-unit residential unit project in Cardiff, UK as a case study to evaluate the potential of thermal simulations to identify risk in the early design stage. Overheating, increase in energy loads, carbon emissions, and thermal bridges are considered as potential risks in this study. DesignBuilder (DesignBuilder Software Ltd., Stroud, UK was the dynamic thermal simulation software used in this research. Simulations compare results in the present, 2050, and 2080 time slices and quantifies the overall cooling and heating loads required to keep the operative temperature within the comfort zone. Overall carbon emissions are also calculated and a considerable reduction in the future is predicted. Further analysis was taken by THERM (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and Psi THERM (Passivate, London, UK to evaluate the thermal bridge risk in most common junctions of the case study and the results reveal the potential of thermal assessment methods to improve design details before the start of construction stage.

  14. Design and characterization of a high resolution microfluidic heat flux sensor with thermal modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung-Ki; Kim, Jung-Kyun; Cho, Sung-Cheon; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-frequency noise from the sensor output, and various amounts of fluidic heat were applied to the sensor to investigate its suitability for microfluidic applications. For sensor design and analysis of signal output, a method of modeling and simulating electro-thermal behavior in a microfluidic heat flux sensor with an integrated electronic circuit is presented and validated. The electro-thermal domain model was constructed by using system dynamics, particularly the bond graph. The electro-thermal domain system model in which the thermal and the electrical domains are coupled expresses the heat generation of samples and converts thermal input to electrical output. The proposed electro-thermal domain system model is in good agreement with the measured output voltage response in both the transient and the steady state.

  15. Design and Characterization of a High Resolution Microfluidic Heat Flux Sensor with Thermal Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Kyu Lee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-frequency noise from the sensor output, and various amounts of fluidic heat were applied to the sensor to investigate its suitability for microfluidic applications. For sensor design and analysis of signal output, a method of modeling and simulating electro-thermal behavior in a microfluidic heat flux sensor with an integrated electronic circuit is presented and validated. The electro-thermal domain model was constructed by using system dynamics, particularly the bond graph. The electro-thermal domain system model in which the thermal and the electrical domains are coupled expresses the heat generation of samples and converts thermal input to electrical output. The proposed electro-thermal domain system model is in good agreement with the measured output voltage response in both the transient and the steady state.

  16. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wu, W; Shi, X H; Zeng, X Y; Deng, K; Lu, Z H

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing.

  17. Thermal and structural design aspects of high-temperature blankets for fusion synfuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Reich, M.

    1981-01-01

    The most promising process, high temperature electrolysis (HTE) of steam at temperatures of greater than or equal to 1000 0 C is examined. In HTE, a large fraction (up to approx. 50%) of the energy input to split water to hydrogen and oxygen comes from thermal energy. For the projected operating conditions achieved by high temperature fusion blankets, overall efficiencies for hydrogen production should be on the order of 60%. The design, thermal-hydraulics, and materials for such blankets are discussed

  18. Modelling and Design of Active Thermal Controls for Power Electronics of Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke

    2017-01-01

    of active thermal control methods for the power devices of a motor drive application. The motor drive system together with the thermal cycling of the power devices have been modelled, and adverse temperature swings could be noticed during the start-up and deceleration periods of the motor. Based...... on the electrical response of the system, the junction temperature of the semiconductor devices is estimated, and consequently three active thermal control methods are proposed and practically designed with respect to the following parameters: switching frequency, deceleration slope and modulation technique....... Finally, experimental results are provided in order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control methods....

  19. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  20. Inserts thermal coupling analysis in hexagonal honeycomb plates used for satellite structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemai, A.; Mankour, A.; Salem, H.; Amri, R.; Hocine, R.; Chouchaoui, B.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical joints and fasteners are essential elements in joining structural components in mechanical systems. The thermal coupling effect between the adjacent inserts depends to a great extent on the thermal properties of the inserts and the clearance. In this paper the Finite-Element Method (FEM) has been employed to study the insert thermal coupling behaviour of the hexagonal honeycomb panel. Fully coupled thermal analysis was conducted in order to predict thermal coupling phenomena caused by the adjacent inserts under extreme thermal loading conditions. Detailed finite elements models for a honeycomb panel are developed in this study including the insert joints. New approach of the adhesive joint is modelled. Thermal simulations showed that the adjacent inserts cause thermal interference and the adjacent inserts are highly sensitive to the effect of high temperatures. The clearance and thermal interference between the adjacent inserts have an important influence on the satellite equipments (such as the electronics box), which can cause the satellite equipments failures. The results of the model presented in this analysis are significant in the preliminary satellites structural dimensioning which present an effective approach of development by reducing the cost and the time of analysis. - Highlights: •In this work we perform thermal analysis of honeycomb plates using finite element method. •Detailed finite elements models for honeycomb panel are developed in this study including the insert joints. •New approach of the adhesive joint is modelled. •The adjacent inserts cause the thermal interference. •We conclude that this work will help in the analysis and the design of complex satellite structures

  1. Thermal-hydraulics design comparisons for the tandem mirror hybrid reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Yang, Y.S.; Schultz, K.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor (TMHR) is a cylindrical reactor, and the fertile materials and tritium breeding fuel elements can be arranged with radial or axial orientation in the blanket module. Thermal-hydraulics performance comparisons were made between plate, axial rod and radial rod fuel geometrices. The three configurations result in different coolant/void fractions and different clad/structure fractions. The higher void fraction in the two rod designs means that these blankets will have to be thicker than the plate design blanket in order to achieve the same level of nuclear interactions. Their higher structural fractions will degrade the uranium breeding ratio and energy multiplication factor of the design. One difficulty in the thermal-hydraulics analysis of the plate design was caused by the varying energy multiplication of the blanket during the lifetime of the plate which forced the use of designs that operated in the transition flow regime at some point during life. To account for this, an approach was adopted from Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) experience for the pressure drop calculation and the corresponding heat transfer coefficient that was used for the film drop thermal calculation. Because of the superior nuclear performance, the acceptable thermal-hydraulic characteristics and the mechanical design feasibility, the plate geometry concept was chosen for the reference gas-cooled TMHR blanket design

  2. Design and thermal analysis of a mold used in the injection of elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekiri, Nasser; Canto, Cécile; Madec, Yannick; Mousseau, Pierre; Plot, Christophe; Sarda, Alain

    2017-10-01

    In the process of injection molding of elastomers, improving the energy efficiency of the tools is a current challenge for industry in terms of energy consumption, productivity and product quality. In the rubber industry, 20% of the energy consumed by capital goods comes from heating processes; more than 50% of heat losses are linked to insufficient control and thermal insulation of Molds. The design of the tooling evolves in particular towards the reduction of the heated mass and the thermal insulation of the molds. In this paper, we present a complex tool composed, on one hand, of a multi-cavity mold designed by reducing the heated mass and equipped with independent control zones placed closest to each molding cavity and, on the other hand, of a regulated channel block (RCB) which makes it possible to limit the waste of rubber during the injection. The originality of this tool lies in thermally isolating the regulated channel block from the mold and the cavities between them in order to better control the temperature field in the material which is transformed. We present the design and the instrumentation of the experimental set-up. Experimental measurements allow us to understand the thermal of the tool and to show the thermal heterogeneities on the surface of the mold and in the various cavities. Tests of injection molding of the rubber and a thermal balance on the energy consumption of the tool are carried out.

  3. Thermal modeling of nuclear waste package designs for disposal in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockman, J.N.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in the design and testing of high-level nuclear waste packages. Many of the aspects of waste package design and testing (e.g., corrosion and leaching) depend in part on the temperature history of the emplaced packages. This paper discusses thermal modeling and analysis of various emplaced waste package conceptual designs including the models used, the assumptions and approximations made, and the results obtained. 6 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  4. Design and construction of a demonstration residence utilizing natural thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. F.; Ghaffari, H. T.

    The Brookhaven House is an energy conserving residence which demonstrates how thermal mass combined with solar energy can be used to reduce heating costs in a conventional single family house. The purpose of the project was to develop a prototypical house design that could result in immediate energy savings by being an acceptable, attractive design to developers, builders, and home buyers. Investigations were limited to only materials and methods of construction that were considered presently available and of Natural Thermal Storage design. Natural thermal storage is simply the heat storage obtained through architectural application of massive building materials integrated into the living space and structure of a residence. It has been concluded that relatively thin mass walls of masonry directly irradiated through a multiglazed south facing aperture can significantly reduce annual heating requirements.

  5. STDAC: Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center annual report fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia is a resource provided by the DOE Solar Thermal Program. The STDAC`s major objective is to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems by providing direct technical assistance to users in industry, government, and foreign countries; cooperating with industry to test, evaluate, and develop renewable energy systems and components; and educating public and private professionals, administrators, and decision makers. This FY94 report highlights the activities and accomplishments of the STDAC. In 1994, the STDAC continued to provide significant direct technical assistance to domestic and international organizations in industry, government, and education, Applying solar thermal technology to solve energy problems is a vital element of direct technical assistance. The STDAC provides information on the status of new, existing, and developing solar technologies; helps users screen applications; predicts the performance of components and systems; and incorporates the experience of Sandia`s solar energy personnel and facilities to provide expert guidance. The STDAC directly enhances the US solar industry`s ability to successfully bring improved systems to the marketplace. By collaborating with Sandia`s Photovoltaic Design Assistance Center and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory the STDAC is able to offer each customer complete service in applying solar thermal technology. At the National Solar Thermal Test Facility the STDAC tests and evaluates new and innovative solar thermal technologies. Evaluations are conducted in dose cooperation with manufacturers, and the results are used to improve the product and/or quantify its performance characteristics. Manufacturers, in turn, benefit from the improved design, economic performance, and operation of their solar thermal technology. The STDAC provides cost sharing and in-kind service to manufacturers in the development and improvement of solar technology.

  6. STDAC: Solar thermal design assistance center annual report fiscal year 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia is a resource provided by the DOE Solar Thermal Program. The STDAC's major objective is to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems by providing direct technical assistance to users in industry, government, and foreign countries; cooperating with industry to test, evaluate, and develop renewable energy systems and components; and educating public and private professionals, administrators, and decision makers. This FY94 report highlights the activities and accomplishments of the STDAC. In 1994, the STDAC continued to provide significant direct technical assistance to domestic and international organizations in industry, government, and education, Applying solar thermal technology to solve energy problems is a vital element of direct technical assistance. The STDAC provides information on the status of new, existing, and developing solar technologies; helps users screen applications; predicts the performance of components and systems; and incorporates the experience of Sandia's solar energy personnel and facilities to provide expert guidance. The STDAC directly enhances the US solar industry's ability to successfully bring improved systems to the marketplace. By collaborating with Sandia's Photovoltaic Design Assistance Center and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory the STDAC is able to offer each customer complete service in applying solar thermal technology. At the National Solar Thermal Test Facility the STDAC tests and evaluates new and innovative solar thermal technologies. Evaluations are conducted in dose cooperation with manufacturers, and the results are used to improve the product and/or quantify its performance characteristics. Manufacturers, in turn, benefit from the improved design, economic performance, and operation of their solar thermal technology. The STDAC provides cost sharing and in-kind service to manufacturers in the development and improvement of solar technology.

  7. Application of a statistical thermal design procedure to evaluate the PWR DNBR safety analysis limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robeyns, J.; Parmentier, F.; Peeters, G.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of safety analysis for the Belgian nuclear power plants and for the reload compatibility studies, Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE) has developed, to define a 95/95 DNBR criterion, a statistical thermal design method based on the analytical full statistical approach: the Statistical Thermal Design Procedure (STDP). In that methodology, each DNBR value in the core assemblies is calculated with an adapted CHF (Critical Heat Flux) correlation implemented in the sub-channel code Cobra for core thermal hydraulic analysis. The uncertainties of the correlation are represented by the statistical parameters calculated from an experimental database. The main objective of a sub-channel analysis is to prove that in all class 1 and class 2 situations, the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) remains higher than the Safety Analysis Limit (SAL). The SAL value is calculated from the Statistical Design Limit (SDL) value adjusted with some penalties and deterministic factors. The search of a realistic value for the SDL is the objective of the statistical thermal design methods. In this report, we apply a full statistical approach to define the DNBR criterion or SDL (Statistical Design Limit) with the strict observance of the design criteria defined in the Standard Review Plan. The same statistical approach is used to define the expected number of rods experiencing DNB. (author)

  8. PATIENT-CENTRED SCREENING FOR PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCY, A MULTI-STAGE DIAGNOSTIC PROTOCOL DESIGNED FOR NONIMMUNOLOGISTS: 2011 UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. de Vries

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Members of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID and other colleagues have updated themulti-stage expert-opinion-based diagnostic protocol for non-immunologists incorporating newly defined primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs. The protocol presented here aims to increase the awareness of PIDs among doctors working in different fields. Prompt identification of PID is important for prognosis, but this may not be an easy task. The protocol therefore starts from the clinical presentation of the patient. Because PIDs may present at all ages, this protocol is aimed at both adult and paediatric physicians. The multi-stage design allows cost-effective screening for PID of the large number of potential cases in the early phases, with more expensive tests reserved for definitive classification in collaboration with a specialist in the field of immunodeficiency at a later stage.

  9. Thermal design and validation of radiation detector for the ChubuSat-2 micro-satellite with high-thermal-conductive graphite sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daeil; Miyata, Kikuko; Nagano, Hosei

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes thermal design of the radiation detector (RD) for the ChubuSat-2 with the use of high-thermal-conductive materials. ChubuSat-2 satellite is a 50-kg-class micro-satellite joint development with Nagoya University and aerospace companies. The main mission equipment of ChubuSat-2 is a RD to observe neutrons and gamma rays. However, the thermal design of the RD encounters a serious problem, such as no heater for RD and electric circuit alignment constrain. To solve this issue, the RD needs a new thermal design and thermal control for successful space missions. This paper proposes high-thermal-conductive graphite sheets to be used as a flexible radiator fin for the RD. Before the fabrication of the device, the optimal thickness and surface area for the flexible radiator fin were determined by thermal analysis. Consequently, the surface area of flexible radiator fin was determined to be 8.6×104 mm2. To verify the effects of the flexible radiator fin, we constructed a verification model and analyzed the temperature distributions in the RD. Also, the thermal vacuum test was performed using a thermal vacuum chamber, which was evacuated at a pressure of around 10-4 Pa, and its internal temperature was cooled at -80 °C by using a refrigerant. As a result, it has been demonstrated that the flexible radiator fin is effective. And the thermal vacuum test results are presented good correlation with the analysis results.

  10. Design Considerations for Thermally Insulating Structural Sandwich Panels for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2016-01-01

    Simplified thermal/structural sizing equations were derived for the in-plane loading of a thermally insulating structural sandwich panel. Equations were developed for the strain in the inner and outer face sheets of a sandwich subjected to uniaxial mechanical loads and differences in face sheet temperatures. Simple equations describing situations with no viable solution were developed. Key design parameters, material properties, and design principles are identified. A numerical example illustrates using the equations for a preliminary feasibility assessment of various material combinations and an initial sizing for minimum mass of a sandwich panel.

  11. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design: Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, Scot [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Power electronics that use high-temperature devices pose a challenge for thermal management. With the devices running at higher temperatures and having a smaller footprint, the heat fluxes increase from previous power electronic designs. This project overview presents an approach to examine and design thermal management strategies through cooling technologies to keep devices within temperature limits, dissipate the heat generated by the devices and protect electrical interconnects and other components for inverter, converter, and charger applications. This analysis, validation, and demonstration intends to take a multi-scale approach over the device, module, and system levels to reduce size, weight, and cost.

  12. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Design, specifications, and diagrams for the thermal storage subsystem for the 10-MW pilot tower focus power plant are presented in detail. The Honeywell thermal storage subsystem design features a sensible heat storage arrangement using proven equipment and materials. The subsystem consists of a main storage containing oil and rock, two buried superheater tanks containing inorganic salts (Hitec), and the necessary piping, instrumentation, controls, and safety devices. The subsystem can provide 7 MW(e) for three hours after twenty hours of hold. It can be charged in approximately four hours. Storage for the commercial-scale plant consists of the same elements appropriately scaled up. Performance analysis and tradeoff studies are included.

  13. Design and Evaluation of a Thermal Tactile Display for Colour Rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Jia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel method of manipulating both thermal change rate and thermal intensity to convey colour information by using a thermal tactile display. The colour-space transformation from {red, green, blue} to {hue, saturation, intensity} is introduced, and the mapping between colour and temperature is established based on warm and cold colours. Considering the lower resolution of the tactile channel, six limited stimulation levels are generated to represent colours. Based on the semi-infinite body model, the thermal response within the skin for each stimulation form is investigated. The Peltier element of the display is designed to convey different thermal stimuli to the human finger. Two experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of the display: colour identification and discrimination. Experimental results indicate that there is a response bias among the perceived colours for the traditional method of only employing thermal intensity, but there is no response bias for the proposed method; subjects’ mean recognition accuracy with the proposed method is significantly higher than that gained using the traditional method. Furthermore, colour information of the captured images can be reliably discriminated by using this devised thermal tactile display.

  14. Thermal Design and Analysis of an ISS Science Payload - SAGE III on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin, A. K.; Amundsen, Ruth M.; Davis, Warren T.; Carrillo, Laurie Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be launched in the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2017 and mounted to an external stowage platform on the International Space Station (ISS) to begin its three-year mission. The SAGE III thermal team at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) worked with ISS thermal engineers to ensure that SAGE III, as an ISS payload, would meet requirements specific to ISS and the Dragon vehicle. This document presents an overview of the SAGE III thermal design and analysis efforts, focusing on aspects that are relevant for future ISS payload developers. This includes development of detailed and reduced Thermal Desktop (TD) models integrated with the ISS and launch vehicle models, definition of analysis cases necessary to verify thermal requirements considering all mission phases from launch through installation and operation on-orbit, and challenges associated with thermal hardware selection including heaters, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and thermal tapes.

  15. Nuclear-thermal-coupled optimization code for the fusion breeding blanket conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia, E-mail: lijia@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Jiang, Kecheng; Zhang, Xiaokang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China); Nie, Xingchen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui (China); Zhu, Qinjun; Liu, Songlin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A nuclear-thermal-coupled predesign code has been developed for optimizing the radial build arrangement of fusion breeding blanket. • Coupling module aims at speeding up the efficiency of design progress by coupling the neutronics calculation code with the thermal-hydraulic analysis code. • Radial build optimization algorithm aims at optimal arrangement of breeding blanket considering one or multiple specified objectives subject to the design criteria such as material temperature limit and available TBR. - Abstract: Fusion breeding blanket as one of the key in-vessel components performs the functions of breeding the tritium, removing the nuclear heat and heat flux from plasma chamber as well as acting as part of shielding system. The radial build design which determines the arrangement of function zones and material properties on the radial direction is the basis of the detailed design of fusion breeding blanket. For facilitating the radial build design, this study aims for developing a pre-design code to optimize the radial build of blanket with considering the performance of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic simultaneously. Two main features of this code are: (1) Coupling of the neutronics analysis with the thermal-hydraulic analysis to speed up the analysis progress; (2) preliminary optimization algorithm using one or multiple specified objectives subject to the design criteria in the form of constrains imposed on design variables and performance parameters within the possible engineering ranges. This pre-design code has been applied to the conceptual design of water-cooled ceramic breeding blanket in project of China fusion engineering testing reactor (CFETR).

  16. The ITER thermal shields for the magnet system: Design evolution and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Krasikov, Yu.; Grigoriev, S.; Komarov, V.; Krylov, V.; Labusov, A.; Pyrjaev, V.; Chiocchio, S.; Smirnov, V.; Sorin, V.; Tanchuk, V.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal shield (TS) system provides the required reduction of thermal loads to the cold structures operating at 4.5 K. This paper presents the rationale for the TS design evolution, details of the recent modifications that affect the TS cooling panels, the central TS ports and support system, interface labyrinths and TS structural joints. The modern results of thermal-hydraulic, thermal, seismic, static and dynamic structural analyses, that involve sub-modeling and sub-structuring finite element analysis techniques, are also reported. The modifications result in considerable reduction of TS mass, surface area and heat loads to/from the TS, simplification of TS assembly procedure and in-cryostat maintenance

  17. Numerical Analysis and Design of Thermal Management System for Lithium Ion Battery Pack Using Thermoelectric Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A new design of thermal management system for lithium ion battery pack using thermoelectric coolers (TECs is proposed. Firstly, the 3D thermal model of a high power lithium ion battery and the TEC is elaborated. Then the model is calibrated with experiment results. Finally, the calibrated model is applied to investigate the performance of a thermal management system for a lithium ion battery pack. The results show that battery thermal management system (BTMS with TEC can cool the battery in very high ambient temperature. It can also keep a more uniform temperature distribution in the battery pack than common BTMS, which will extend the life of the battery pack and may save the expensive battery equalization system.

  18. Design of a solar home with BIPV-thermal system and ground source heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athienitis, A.K. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The design of a 2-storey single family detached solar home in Montreal was discussed. The house was designed to exceed the energy performance of Natural Resources Canada's advanced houses program but be more cost-effective than net zero energy solar homes. Features of the house included a direct passive solar design that emphasized the use of distributed thermal mass in the south-facing part of the ground floor; an open loop building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system; a 2-stage ground-source heat pump with an electronically commutated motor (ECM) fan used to heat and cool air in the house; an auxiliary floor heating system that was integrated in the floor mass of the direct gain zone; and a 2-zone air distribution system controlled by a multizone programmable thermostat. Design of the building focused on the ability to separately control the 2 zones for increased thermal comfort. Heat recovered from the roof was used for domestic hot water preheating as well as to heat the garage and part of the basement. Design flow rate of the BIPV/T roof and estimates of air temperature rise were selected using a 5-section model of the roof. Transient thermal network models were used to size south-facing windows in order to prevent overheating. A 6-node 3-capacitance thermal network model was used to analyze the house and optimize window-mass ratio. The design approach emphasized architectural integration of solar energy collection in the roof, and optimization of the passive solar design of the direct gain area of the house. An efficient geothermal heat pump was also used in the direct gain zone of the house. It was concluded that the installation of a BIPV/T system can be more cost-effective than the addition of insulation in the walls of a solar house. 8 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  19. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  20. SATCAP-C : a program for thermal hydraulic design of pressurized water injection type capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Someya, Hiroyuki; Asoh, Tomokazu; Niimi, Motoji

    1992-10-01

    There are capsules called 'Pressure Water Injection Type Capsule' as a kind of irradiation devices at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). A type of the capsules is a 'Boiling Water Capsule' (usually named BOCA). The other type is a 'Saturated Temperature Capsule' (named SATCAP). When the water is kept at a constant pressure, the water temperature does not become higher than the saturated temperature so far as the water does not fully change to steam. These type capsules are designed on the basis of the conception of applying the water characteristic to the control of irradiation temperature of specimens in the capsules. In designing of the capsules in which the pressurized water is injected, thermal performances have to be understood as exactly as possible. It is not easy however to predict thermal performances such as axially temperature distribution of water injected in the capsule, because there are heat-sinks at both side of inner and outer of capsule casing as the result that the water is fluid. Then, a program (named SATCAP-C) for the BOCA and SATCAP was compiled to grasp the thermal performances in the capsules and has been used the design of the capsules and analysis of the data obtained from some actual irradiation capsules. It was confirmed that the program was effective in thermal analysis for the capsules. The analysis found out the values for heat transfer coefficients at various surfaces of capsule components and some thermal characteristics of capsules. (author)

  1. Resolution of thermal-hydraulic safety and licensing issues for the system 80+{sup {trademark}} design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentino, S.E.; Ritterbusch, S.E.; Schneider, R.E. [ABB-Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The System 80+{sup {trademark}} Standard Design is an evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) with a generating capacity of 3931 MWt (1350 MWe). The Final Design Approval (FDA) for this design was issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in July 1994. The design certification by the NRC is anticipated by the end of 1995 or early 1996. NRC review of the System 80+ design has involved several new safety issues never before addressed in a regulatory atmosphere. In addition, conformance with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) required that the System 80+ plant address nuclear industry concerns with regard to design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. A large number of these issues/concerns deals with previously unresolved generic thermal-hydraulic safety issues and severe accident prevention and mitigation. This paper discusses the thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations performed for the System 80+ design to resolve safety and licensing issues relevant to both the Nuclear Stream Supply System (NSSS) and containment designs. For the NSSS design, the Safety Depressurization System mitigation capability and resolution of the boron dilution concern are described. Examples of containment design issues dealing with containment shell strength, robustness of the reactor cavity walls and hydrogen mixing under severe accident conditions are also provided. Finally, the overall approach used in the application of NRC`s new (NUREG-1465) radiological source term for System 80+ evaluation is described. The robustness of the System 80+ containment design to withstand severe accident consequences was demonstrated through detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations. This advanced design to shown to meet NRC severe accident policy goals and ALWR URD requirements without any special design features and unnecessary costs.

  2. Thermal simulations of the new design for the BELLE silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragic, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The experienced imperfections of the BELLE silicon vertex detector, SVD1 motioned the design of a new detector, SVD2, which targets on improving the main weaknesses encountered in the old design. In this report we focus on tile thermal aspects of the SVD2 ladder, whereby sufficient cooling of the detector is necessary in order to minimise the detector leakage currents. It is estimated that reducing the temperature of the silicon detector from 25 deg C to 15 deg C would result in a 50% reduction in leak current. Further, cooling the detector would help minimize mechanical stresses from the thermal cycling. Our task is to ensure that the heat generated by the readout chips is conducted down the SVD hybrid unit effectively, such that the chip and the hybrid temperature does not overbear the SVD silicon sensor temperature. We considered the performance of two materials to act as a heat spreading plate which is glued between the two hybrids in order to improve the heat conductivity of the hybrid unit, namely Copper and Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG). The effects of other ladder components were also considered in order to enhance the cooling of the silicon detectors. Finite element analysis with ANSYS software was used to simulate the thermal conditions of the SVD2 hybrid unit, in accordance with the baseline design for the mechanical structure of the ladder. It was found that Cu was a preferred material as it achieved equivalent silicon sensor cooling (3.6 deg C above cooling point), while its mechanical properties rendered it a lot more practical. Suppressing, the thermal path via a rib support block, by increasing its thermal resistivity, as well as increasing thermal conductivity of the ribs in the hybrid region, were deemed essential in the effective cooling of the silicon sensors

  3. Comparative Studies of Core Thermal Hydraulic Design Methods for the Prototype Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Lim, Jae Yong; Kim, Sang Ji

    2013-01-01

    In this work, various core thermal-hydraulic design methods, which have arisen during the development of a prototype SFR, are compared to establish a proper design procedure. Comparative studies have been performed to determine the appropriate design method for the prototype SFR. The results show that the minimization method show a lower cladding midwall temperature than the fixed outlet temperature methods and superior thermal safety margin with the same coolant flow. The Korea Atomic energy Research Institute (KAERI) has performed a conceptual SFR design with the final goal of constructing a prototype plant by 2028. The main objective of the SFR prototype plant is to verify the TRU metal fuel performance, reactor operation, and transmutation ability of high-level wastes. The core thermal-hydraulic design is used to ensure the safe fuel performance during the whole plant operation. Compared to the critical heat flux in typical light water reactors, nuclear fuel damages in SFR subassemblies are arisen from a creep induced failure. The creep limit is evaluated based on both the maximum cladding temperature and the uncertainties of the design parameters. Therefore, the core thermalhydraulic design method, which eventually determines the cladding temperature, is highly important to assure a safe and reliable operation of the reactor systems

  4. Protection Heater Design Validation for the LARP Magnets Using Thermal Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Marchevsky, M; Cheng, D W; Felice, H; Sabbi, G; Salmi, T; Stenvall, A; Chlachidze, G; Ambrosio, G; Ferracin, P; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Perez, J C; Todesco, E

    2016-01-01

    Protection heaters are essential elements of a quench protection scheme for high-field accelerator magnets. Various heater designs fabricated by LARP and CERN have been already tested in the LARP high-field quadrupole HQ and presently being built into the coils of the high-field quadrupole MQXF. In order to compare the heat flow characteristics and thermal diffusion timescales of different heater designs, we powered heaters of two different geometries in ambient conditions and imaged the resulting thermal distributions using a high-sensitivity thermal video camera. We observed a peculiar spatial periodicity in the temperature distribution maps potentially linked to the structure of the underlying cable. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of heat diffusion and spatial heat distribution have been conducted, and the results of simulation and experiment have been compared. Imaging revealed hot spots due to a current concentration around high curvature points of heater strip of varying cross sections and visuali...

  5. Conceptual thermal design and analysis of a far-infrared/mid-infrared remote sensing instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettker, William A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual thermal design and analysis results for the Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far-Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) instrument. SAFIRE has been proposed for Mission to Planet Earth to study ozone chemistry in the middle atmosphere using remote sensing of the atmosphere in the far-infrared (21-87 microns) and mid-infrared (9-16 microns) spectra. SAFIRE requires that far-IR detectors be cooled to 3-4 K and mid-IR detectors to 80 K for the expected mission lifetime of five years. A superfluid helium dewar and Stirling-cycle cryocoolers provide the cryogenic temperatures required by the infrared detectors. The proposed instrument thermal design uses passive thermal control techniques to reject 465 watts of waste heat from the instrument.

  6. Design of plate directional heat transmission structure based on layered thermal metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Invisibility cloaks based on transformation optics are often closed structures; however, such a structure limits the kinds of objects that can be placed in the cloak. In this work, we adopt a transformation thermodynamics approach to design an “open cloak”, called a plate directional heat transmission structure, which is capable of guiding heat fluxes to the flank region of the metamaterial device. The most fascinating and unique feature of the device is that the lower surface can remain at a lower temperature compared with the SiO2 aerogel thermal insulation material. Our results are expected to markedly enhance capabilities in thermal protection, thermal-energy utilization, and domains beyond. In addition to the theoretical analysis, the present design is demonstrated in numerical simulations based on finite element calculations.

  7. Design of plate directional heat transmission structure based on layered thermal metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L. K.; Yu, Z. F.; Huang, J., E-mail: slk-0-1999@163.com [China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang 621000 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Invisibility cloaks based on transformation optics are often closed structures; however, such a structure limits the kinds of objects that can be placed in the cloak. In this work, we adopt a transformation thermodynamics approach to design an “open cloak”, called a plate directional heat transmission structure, which is capable of guiding heat fluxes to the flank region of the metamaterial device. The most fascinating and unique feature of the device is that the lower surface can remain at a lower temperature compared with the SiO{sub 2} aerogel thermal insulation material. Our results are expected to markedly enhance capabilities in thermal protection, thermal-energy utilization, and domains beyond. In addition to the theoretical analysis, the present design is demonstrated in numerical simulations based on finite element calculations.

  8. On the collaborative design and simulation of space camera: stop structural/thermal/optical) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Pengfei; Lei, Wenping

    2017-11-01

    A number of disciplines (mechanics, structures, thermal, and optics) are needed to design and build Space Camera. Separate design models are normally constructed by each discipline CAD/CAE tools. Design and analysis is conducted largely in parallel subject to requirements that have been levied on each discipline, and technical interaction between the different disciplines is limited and infrequent. As a result a unified view of the Space Camera design across discipline boundaries is not directly possible in the approach above, and generating one would require a large manual, and error-prone process. A collaborative environment that is built on abstract model and performance template allows engineering data and CAD/CAE results to be shared across above discipline boundaries within a common interface, so that it can help to attain speedy multivariate design and directly evaluate optical performance under environment loadings. A small interdisciplinary engineering team from Beijing Institute of Space Mechanics and Electricity has recently conducted a Structural/Thermal/Optical (STOP) analysis of a space camera with this collaborative environment. STOP analysis evaluates the changes in image quality that arise from the structural deformations when the thermal environment of the camera changes throughout its orbit. STOP analyses were conducted for four different test conditions applied during final thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing of the payload on the ground. The STOP Simulation Process begins with importing an integrated CAD model of the camera geometry into the collaborative environment, within which 1. Independent thermal and structural meshes are generated. 2. The thermal mesh and relevant engineering data for material properties and thermal boundary conditions are then used to compute temperature distributions at nodal points in both the thermal and structures mesh through Thermal Desktop, a COTS thermal design and analysis code. 3. Thermally induced structural

  9. Thermal design, analysis and comparison on three concepts of space solar power satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Hou, Xinbin; Wang, Li

    2017-08-01

    Space solar power satellites (SSPS) have been widely studied as systems for collecting solar energy in space and transmitting it wirelessly to earth. A previously designed planar SSPS concept collects solar power in two huge arrays and then transmits it through one side of the power-conduction joint to the antenna. However, the system's one group of power-conduction joints may induce a single point of failure. As an SSPS concept, the module symmetrical concentrator (MSC) architecture has many advantages. This architecture can help avoid the need for a large, potentially failure-prone conductive rotating joint and limit wiring mass. However, the thermal control system has severely restricted the rapid development of MSC, especially in the sandwich module. Because of the synchronous existence of five suns concentration and solar external heat flux, the sandwich module will have a very high temperature, which will surpass the permissible temperature of the solar cells. Recently, an alternate multi-rotary joints (MR) SSPS concept was designed by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST). This system has multiple joints to avoid the problem of a single point of failure. Meanwhile, this concept has another advantage for reducing the high power and heat removal in joints. It is well known to us that, because of the huge external flux in SSPS, the thermal management sub-system is an important component that cannot be neglected. Based on the three SSPS concepts, this study investigated the thermal design and analysis of a 1-km, gigawatt-level transmitting antenna in SSPS. This study compares the thermal management sub-systems of power-conduction joints in planar and MR SSPS. Moreover, the study considers three classic thermal control architectures of the MSC's sandwich module: tile, step, and separation. The study also presents an elaborate parameter design, analysis and discussion of step architecture. Finally, the results show the thermal characteristics of each SSPS

  10. Thermal design and development of actively cooled brushes for compact homopolar generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, D. B.

    1986-11-01

    The thermal and hydraulic design of actively cooled current transfer brushes for compact homopolar generators (HPG) is described. The development of high-energy-density HPG's at the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin requires brushgear capable of handling high current densities and large thermal loads. Platelet technology has been applied in the design of actively cooled brushes with coolant injection directly from the brush contact face into the brush-rotor interface. Coolant channels a few thousandths of an inch in diameter have been designed in brushes constructed of photoetched platelets of copper (0.020 to 0.005 in. thick) and then bonded to form the cooled brush. Platelet construction of brushes also permits the incorporation of internal instrumentation for temperature measurement. The brushes have been designed to provide data on the effects of rotor speed, current level, coolant flow rate, and coolant injection pattern.

  11. Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataraja, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design

  12. Thermal Performance of Precast Concrete Sandwich Panel (PCSP) Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Peniel Ang Soon; Ling, Lim Mei; Kasim, Narimah; Hamid, Zuhairi Abd; Masrom, Md Asrul Nasid Bin

    2017-10-01

    Malaysia’s awareness of performance criteria in construction industry towards a sustainable built environment with the use of precast concrete sandwich panel (PCSP) system is applied in the building’s wall to study the structural behaviour. However, very limited studies are conducted on the thermal insulation of exterior and interior panels in PCSP design. In hot countries such as Malaysia, proper designs of panel are important to obtain better thermal insulation for building. This study is based on thermal performance of precast concrete sandwich panel design for sustainable built environment in Malaysia. In this research, three full specimens, which are control specimen (C), foamed concrete (FC) panels and concrete panels with added palm oil fuel ash (FC+ POFA), where FC and FC+POFA sandwiched with gypsum board (G) were produced to investigate their thermal performance. Temperature difference of exterior and interior surface of specimen was used as indicators of thermal-insulating performance of PCSP design. Heat transfer test by halogen lamp was carried out on three specimens where the exterior surface of specimens was exposed to the halogen lamp. The temperature reading of exterior and interior surface for three specimens were recorded with the help of thermocouple. Other factors also studied the workability, compressive strength and axial compressive strength of the specimens. This study has shown that FC + POFA specimen has the strength nearer to normal specimen (C + FC specimen). Meanwhile, the heat transfer results show that the FC+POFA has better thermal insulation performance compared to C and FC specimens with the highest temperature difference, 3.4°C compared to other specimens. The results from this research are useful to be implemented in construction due to its benefits such as reduction of energy consumption in air-conditioning, reduction of construction periods and eco-friendly materials.

  13. A Curriculum Model: Engineering Design Graphics Course Updates Based on Industrial and Academic Institution Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meznarich, R. A.; Shava, R. C.; Lightner, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering design graphics courses taught in colleges or universities should provide and equip students preparing for employment with the basic occupational graphics skill competences required by engineering and technology disciplines. Academic institutions should introduce and include topics that cover the newer and more efficient graphics…

  14. Ventilation and Thermal Considerations in School Building Design. School Buildings Series Report 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, J. F.; And Others

    The planning and design of school buildings for South Africa are discussed in light of climatic factors and the effect of the weather on educational plants and classroom environment. Thermal and ventilation needs and requirements for school buildings are developed with regard to facility tests and research. The variables and problems of cooling…

  15. Hollow ceramic block: containment of water for thermal storage in passive solar design. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winship, C.T.

    1983-12-27

    The project activity has been the development of designs, material compositions and production procedures to manufacture hollow ceramic blocks which contain water (or other heat absorptive liquids). The blocks are designed to serve, in plurality, a dual purpose: as an unobtrusive and efficient thermal storage element, and as a durable and aesthetically appealing surface for floors and walls of passive solar building interiors. Throughout the grant period, numerous ceramic formulas have been tested for their workabilty, thermal properties, maturing temperatures and color. Blocks have been designed to have structural integrity, and textured surfaces. Methods of slip-casting and extrusion have been developed for manufacturing of the blocks. The thermal storage capacity of the water-loaded block has been demonstrated to be 2.25 times greater than that of brick and 2.03 times greater than that of concrete (taking an average of commonly used materials). Although this represents a technical advance in thermal storage, the decorative effects provided by application of the blocks lend them a more significant advantage by reducing constraints on interior design in passive solar architecture.

  16. Design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of PFC baking for SST-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Reddy, D. Chenna; Khirwadkar, S.; Prakash, N. Ravi; Santra, P.; Saxena, Y.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Steady-State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is a medium-size tokamak with super-conducting magnetic field coils. Plasma facing components (PFC) of the SST-1, consisting of divertors, passive stabilisers, baffles, and poloidal limiters, are designed to be compatible for steady-state operation. Except for the poloidal limiters, all other PFC are structurally continuous in the toroidal direction. As SST-1 is designed to run double-null divertor plasmas, these components also have up-down symmetry. A closed divertor configuration is chosen to produce high recycling and high pumping speed in the divertor region. The passive stabilisers are located close to the plasma to provide stability against the vertical instability of the elongated plasma. The main consideration in the design of the PFC is the steady-state heat removal of up to 1 MW/m 2 . In addition to removing high heat fluxes, the PFC are also designed to be compatible for baking at 350 deg. C. Different flow parameters and various tube layouts have been examined to select the optimum thermal-hydraulic parameters and tube layout for different PFC of SST-1. Thermal response of the PFC during baking has been performed analytically (using a Fortran code) and two-dimensional finite element analysis using ANSYS. The detailed thermal hydraulics and thermal responses of PFC baking is presented in this paper

  17. An investigation on the role of thermal fins in the design of micro heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omidvarnia, Farzaneh; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Sarhadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    heat exchanger in comparison with the effective factors in designing its macro counterpart ar e investigated. Numerical si mulations in the finite element software COMSOL are used to evaluate the thermal performance of both micro and macro heat exchangers. The result of the analysis reveals the fact...

  18. Thermal hydraulic design of a hydride-fueled inverted PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, J.A.; Todreas, N.E.; Hejzlar, P.; Ferroni, P.; Bergles, A.

    2009-01-01

    An inverted PWR core design utilizing U(45%, w/o)ZrH 1.6 fuel (here referred to as U-ZrH 1.6 ) is proposed and its thermal hydraulic performance is compared to that of a standard rod bundle core design also fueled with U-ZrH 1.6 . The inverted design features circular cooling channels surrounded by prisms of fuel. Hence the relative position of coolant and fuel is inverted with respect to the standard rod bundle design. Inverted core designs with and without twisted tape inserts, used to enhance critical heat flux, were analyzed. It was found that higher power and longer cycle length can be concurrently achieved by the inverted core with twisted tape relative to the optimal standard core, provided that higher core pressure drop can be accommodated. The optimal power of the inverted design with twisted tape is 6869 MW t , which is 135% of the optimally powered standard design (5080 MW t -determined herein). Uncertainties in this design regarding fuel and clad dimensions needed to accommodate mechanical loads and fuel swelling are presented. If mechanical and neutronic feasibility of these designs can be confirmed, these thermal assessments imply significant economic advantages for inverted core designs.

  19. SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

  20. Analytical Study on Thermal and Mechanical Design of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kim, Eung-Soo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The analytical methodologies for the thermal design, mechanical design and cost estimation of printed circuit heat exchanger are presented in this study. In this study, three flow arrangements of parallel flow, countercurrent flow and crossflow are taken into account. For each flow arrangement, the analytical solution of temperature profile of heat exchanger is introduced. The size and cost of printed circuit heat exchangers for advanced small modular reactors, which employ various coolants such as sodium, molten salts, helium, and water, are also presented.

  1. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed development, Part 1 - Design and fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.E.; Estochen, E.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used first generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and third generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed. (authors)

  2. THERMAL ENHANCEMENT CARTRIDGE HEATER MODIFIED TECH MOD TRITIUM HYDRIDE BED DEVELOPMENT PART I DESIGN AND FABRICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.; Estochen, E.

    2014-03-06

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used 1{sup st} generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and 3{sup rd} generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen 3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed.

  3. Updated Assessment of an Open Rotor Airplane Using an Advanced Blade Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Eric S.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Application of open rotor propulsion systems (historically referred to as "advanced turboprops" or "propfans") to subsonic transport aircraft received significant attention and research in the 1970s and 1980s when fuel efficiency was the driving focus of aeronautical research. Recent volatility in fuel prices and concern for aviation's environmental impact have renewed interest in open rotor propulsion, and revived research by NASA and a number of engine manufacturers. Over the last few years, NASA has revived and developed analysis capabilities to assess aircraft designs with open rotor propulsion systems. These efforts have been described in several previous papers along with initial results from applying these capabilities. The initial results indicated that open rotor engines have the potential to provide large reductions in fuel consumption and emissions. Initial noise analysis indicated that current noise regulations can be met with modern baseline blade designs. Improved blades incorporating low-noise features are expected to result in even lower noise levels. This paper describes improvements to the initial assessment, plus a follow-on study using a more advanced open rotor blade design to power the advanced singleaisle transport. The predicted performance and environmental results of these two advanced open rotor concepts are presented and compared.

  4. Updated free span design procedure DNV RP-F105 Ormen Lange experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyrileiv, Olav; Moerk, Kim; Chezhian, Muthu [Det Norsk Veritas (Norway)

    2005-07-01

    The Ormen Lange gas field is located within a prehistoric slide area with varying water depths from 250 to 1100 m. Due to the slide area, the seabed is very uneven including steep slopes and seabed obstacles up to 50 meters tall. The major technical challenges with respect to pipeline design in this area are: extreme seabed topography combined with inhomogeneous soil conditions; uncertainties related to current velocities and distribution; high number of spans including some very long spans; deep waters and therefore difficult and costly seabed preparation/span intervention; flowlines with large potential to buckle laterally in combination with free spans. In order to minimise span intervention costs, a major testing campaign and research programme has been conducted in the Ormen Lange project to come up with a design procedure in compliance with the DNV-RP-F105 (DNV, 2002) design philosophy. The improvements in terms of reduced seabed intervention and rock dumping costs are in the order of several 100 MNOKs. The lessons learned and the improved knowledge will also be a great value for other project dealing with similar free span problems. (author)

  5. Thermal design studies in superconducting rf cavities: Phonon peak and Kapitza conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aizaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal design studies of superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities involve two thermal parameters, namely the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Nb at low temperatures and the heat transfer coefficient at the Nb-He II interface, commonly known as the Kapitza conductance. During the fabrication process of the SRF cavities, Nb sheet is plastically deformed through a deep drawing process to obtain the desired shape. The effect of plastic deformation on low temperature thermal conductivity as well as Kapitza conductance has been studied experimentally. Strain induced during the plastic deformation process reduces the thermal conductivity in its phonon transmission regime (disappearance of phonon peak by 80%, which may explain the performance limitations of the defect-free SRF cavities during their high field operations. Low temperature annealing of the deformed Nb sample could not recover the phonon peak. However, moderate temperature annealing during the titanification process recovered the phonon peak in the thermal conductivity curve. Kapitza conductance measurements for the Nb-He II interface for various surface topologies have also been carried out before and after the annealing. These measurements reveal consistently increased Kapitza conductance after the annealing process was carried out in the two temperature regimes.

  6. Quantification of thermal bioclimate for the management of urban design in Mediterranean climate of Barcelona, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Algeciras, José Abel; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In order to contribute to the sustainability of the outdoor environment, knowledge about the urban thermal bioclimate should be transferred into climatic guidelines for planning. The general framework of this study responds to the need of analyzing thermal bioclimate in Mediterranean climate regions and its influence as an urban design factor. The paper analyzes the background of the urban climate and thermal bioclimate conditions in Barcelona (Spain), through the effect of shade conditions and wind speed variations. Simulations of shade and wind speed variations were performed to evaluate changes in thermal bioclimate due to modifications in urban morphology. Air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation for the period from January, 2001 to January, 2015 were used to calculate physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) using the RayMan model. The results demonstrate that shade is the most important strategy to improve urban microclimatic conditions. In Barcelona, human thermal comfort conditions can be improved by shade and wind speed increase in terms of PET above 23 °C and by a wind speed decrease for thresholds of PET below 18 °C. Heat stress situations can be mitigated by shade and wind speed increase in conditions above 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The results of the study are an important contribution for urban planners, due to their possibilities and potential for the description of microclimatic conditions in Mediterranean climate regions. The knowledge is useful for improved human thermal comfort conditions, from the suitable configuration of urban form and architecture.

  7. Quantification of thermal bioclimate for the management of urban design in Mediterranean climate of Barcelona, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Algeciras, José Abel; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In order to contribute to the sustainability of the outdoor environment, knowledge about the urban thermal bioclimate should be transferred into climatic guidelines for planning. The general framework of this study responds to the need of analyzing thermal bioclimate in Mediterranean climate regions and its influence as an urban design factor. The paper analyzes the background of the urban climate and thermal bioclimate conditions in Barcelona (Spain), through the effect of shade conditions and wind speed variations. Simulations of shade and wind speed variations were performed to evaluate changes in thermal bioclimate due to modifications in urban morphology. Air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation for the period from January, 2001 to January, 2015 were used to calculate physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) using the RayMan model. The results demonstrate that shade is the most important strategy to improve urban microclimatic conditions. In Barcelona, human thermal comfort conditions can be improved by shade and wind speed increase in terms of PET above 23 °C and by a wind speed decrease for thresholds of PET below 18 °C. Heat stress situations can be mitigated by shade and wind speed increase in conditions above 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The results of the study are an important contribution for urban planners, due to their possibilities and potential for the description of microclimatic conditions in Mediterranean climate regions. The knowledge is useful for improved human thermal comfort conditions, from the suitable configuration of urban form and architecture.

  8. Construction of a rapid simulation design tool for thermal responses to laser-induced feature patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2017-11-01

    There are many emerging manufacturing processes whereby surface structures are processed by spatially laser patterning of an entire feature at a time, as opposed to rastering a small beam. It is important to ascertain and ideally control the induced thermal fields underneath the pattern. This paper develops a computational framework to rapidly evaluate the induced thermal fields due to application of a laser on the surface. The aggregate thermal fields are efficiently computed by superposing individual "beamlet" heat-kernel solutions, based on Green's functions, to form complex surface patterns. The utility of the approach is that laser-process designers can efficiently compute the results of selecting various system parameters, such as spatially-variable laser intensity within a pattern. This allows one to rapidly compute system parameter studies needed in the manufacturing of new products. Included are: A computational framework to compute the time-transient thermal response from a spatio-temporally non-uniform laser beam in an arbitrary spatial pattern and An analysis of how the results can be used to track the evolution of the thermal gradients and their correlation to thermal stresses. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the technique. The utility of the approach is that an analyst can efficiently ascertain a large number of laser-input scenarios without resorting to computationally-intensive numerical procedures, such the Finite Element Method.

  9. DC Thermal Plasma Design and Utilization for the Low Density Polyethylene to Diesel Oil Pyrolysis Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The exponential increase of plastic production produces 100 million tonnes of waste plastics annually which could be converted into hydrocarbon fuels in a thermal cracking process called pyrolysis. In this research work, a direct current (DC thermal plasma circuit is designed and used for conversion of low density polyethylene (LDPE into diesel oil in a laboratory scale pyrolysis reactor. The experimental setup uses a 270 W DC thermal plasma at operating temperatures in the range of 625 °C to 860 °C for a low density polyethylene (LDPE pyrolysis reaction at pressure = −0.95, temperature = 550 °C with τ = 30 min at a constant heating rate of 7.8 °C/min. The experimental setup consists of a vacuum pump, closed system vessel, direct current (DC plasma circuit, and a k-type thermocouple placed a few millimeters from the reactant sample. The hydrocarbon products are condensed to diesel oil and analyzed using flame ionization detector (FID gas chromatography. The analysis shows 87.5% diesel oil, 1,4-dichlorobenzene (Surr, benzene, ethylbenzene and traces of toluene and xylene. The direct current (DC thermal plasma achieves 56.9 wt. % of diesel range oil (DRO, 37.8 wt. % gaseous products and minimal tar production. The direct current (DC thermal plasma shows reliability, better temperature control, and high thermal performance as well as the ability to work for long operation periods.

  10. Minimization of lumen depreciation in LED lamps using thermal transient behavior analysis and design optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Nisa

    2016-02-10

    We expansively investigate thermal behaviors of various general-purpose light-emitting diode (LED) lamps and apply our measured results, validated by simulation, to establish lamp design rules for optimizing their optical and thermal properties. These design rules provide the means to minimize lumen depreciation over time by minimizing the periods for lamps to reach thermal steady-state while maintaining their high luminous efficacy and omnidirectional light distribution capability. While it is well known that minimizing the junction temperature of an LED leads to a longer lifetime and an increased lumen output, our study demonstrates, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that it is also important to minimize the time it takes to reach thermal equilibrium because doing so minimizes lumen depreciation and enhances light output and color stability during operation. Specifically, we have found that, in addition to inadequate heat-sink fin areas for a lamp configuration, LEDs mounted on multiple boards, as opposed to a single board, lead to longer periods for reaching thermal equilibrium contributing to larger lumen depreciation.

  11. Nanostructure design for drastic reduction of thermal conductivity while preserving high electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    The design and fabrication of nanostructured materials to control both thermal and electrical properties are demonstrated for high-performance thermoelectric conversion. We have focused on silicon (Si) because it is an environmentally friendly and ubiquitous element. High bulk thermal conductivity of Si limits its potential as a thermoelectric material. The thermal conductivity of Si has been reduced by introducing grains, or wires, yet a further reduction is required while retaining a high electrical conductivity. We have designed two different nanostructures for this purpose. One structure is connected Si nanodots (NDs) with the same crystal orientation. The phonons scattering at the interfaces of these NDs occurred and it depended on the ND size. As a result of phonon scattering, the thermal conductivity of this nanostructured material was below/close to the amorphous limit. The other structure is Si films containing epitaxially grown Ge NDs. The Si layer imparted high electrical conductivity, while the Ge NDs served as phonon scattering bodies reducing thermal conductivity drastically. This work gives a methodology for the independent control of electron and phonon transport using nanostructured materials. This can bring the realization of thermoelectric Si-based materials that are compatible with large scale integrated circuit processing technologies.

  12. Fuel Design for Particle-Bed Reactors for Thermal Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Dewayne L.; Evans, Robert S.; Jensen, Russell R.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    The design of particle bed reactor (PBR) fuels is an iterative process involving close coordination of design and manufacturing operations. The process starts with the generation of an initial particle design, based on a knowledge of the system requirements and interfaces (such as, fissile loading requirements, coolant type, exit gas temperatures, operation time, number of cycles, contacting materials, etc.). The designer must consider materials property data, heat-transfer and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the particle and particle bed, and available (or anticipated) manufacturing technology. The design process also uses parametric studies to identify the influences of composition, size, and coating thickness on fuel performance. This resulting design is then used to provide a target manufacturing specification against which initial manufacturing development can be assessed and which provides the framework for manufacturing and testing derived feedback that can be incorporated into the subsequent particle design modifications. In this paper, an example of this design process for a hypothetical particle using a (U,Zr)C kernel and a NbC outer coating designed for a thermal propulsion application is given.

  13. Thermal-hydraulic criteria for the APT tungsten neutron source design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    1998-03-01

    This report presents the thermal-hydraulic design criteria (THDC) developed for the tungsten neutron source (TNS). The THDC are developed for the normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis accidents. The requirements of the safety analyses are incorporated into the design criteria, consistent with the integrated safety management and the safety-by-design philosophy implemented throughout the APT design process. The phenomenology limiting the thermal-hydraulic design and the confidence level requirements for each limit are discussed. The overall philosophy of the uncertainty analyses and the confidence level requirements also are presented. Different sets of criteria are developed for normal operations, operational transients, anticipated accidents, unlikely accidents, extremely unlikely accidents, and accidents during TNS replacement. In general, the philosophy is to use the strictest criteria for the high-frequency events. The criteria is relaxed as the event frequencies become smaller. The THDC must be considered as a guide for the design philosophy and not as a hard limit. When achievable, design margins greater than those required by the THDC must be used. However, if a specific event sequence cannot meet the THDC, expensive design changes are not necessary if the single event sequence results in sufficient margin to safety criteria and does not challenge the plant availability or investment protection considerations

  14. Thermal hydraulic method for whole core design analysis of an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huning, A. J.; Garimella, S.

    2013-01-01

    A new thermal hydraulic method and initial results are presented for core-wide steady state analysis of prismatic High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The method allows for the complete solution of temperature and coolant mass flow distribution by solving quasi-steady energy balances for the discretized core. Assembly blocks are discretized into unit cells for which the average temperature of each unit cell is determined. Convective heat removal is coupled to the unit cell energy balances by a 1-D axial flow model. The flow model uses established correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number. Bypass flow is explicitly calculated by using an initial guess for mass flow distribution and determining the exit pressure of each flow channel. The mass flow distribution is updated until a uniform core exit pressure condition is reached. Results are obtained for the MHTGR-350 with emphasis on the change in thermal hydraulic parameters due to various steady state power profiles and bypass gap widths. Steady state temperature distribution and its variations are discussed. (authors)

  15. Reactor scram events in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.; Harmony, S.C.; Stumpf, H.J.; Lime, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor concept developed by Asea Brown Boveri. A unique feature of PIUS is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. Los Alamos supported the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's preapplication review of the PIUS reactor. Baseline calculations of the PIUS design were performed for active and passive reactor scrams using TRAC-PF1/MOD2. Additional sensitivity studies examined flow blockage and boron dilution events to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept for low-probability combination events following active-system scrams

  16. Design of solar thermal systems utilizing pressurized hot water storage for industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Govind N.; Kedare, Shireesh B.; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu [Energy Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2008-08-15

    A large number of industrial processes demand thermal energy in the temperature range of 80-240{sup o}C. In this temperature range, solar thermal systems have a great scope of application. However, the challenge lies in the integration of a periodic, dilute and variable solar input into a wide variety of industrial processes. Issues in the integration are selection of collectors, working fluid and sizing of components. Application specific configurations are required to be adopted and designed. Analysis presented in this paper lays an emphasis on the component sizing. The same is done by developing a design procedure for a specific configuration. The specific configuration consists of concentrating collectors, pressurized hot water storage and a load heat exchanger. The design procedure follows a methodology called design space approach. In the design space approach a mathematical model is built for generation of the design space. In the generation of the design space, design variables of concern are collector area, storage volume, solar fraction, storage mass flow rate and heat exchanger size. Design space comprises of constant solar fraction curves traced on a collector area versus storage volume diagram. Results of the design variables study demonstrate that a higher maximum storage mass flow rates and a larger heat exchanger size are desired while limiting storage temperature should be as low as possible. An economic optimization is carried out to design the overall system. In economic optimization, total annualized cost of the overall system has been minimized. The proposed methodology is demonstrated through an illustrative example. It has been shown that 23% reduction in the total system cost may be achieved as compared to the existing design. The proposed design tool offers flexibility to the designer in choosing a system configuration on the basis of desired performance and economy. (author)

  17. Design and Development of a Solar Thermal Collector with Single Axis Solar Tracking Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Theebhan Mogana; Long Chua Yaw; Tiong Tay Tee

    2016-01-01

    The solar energy is a source of energy that is abundant in Malaysia and can be easily harvested. However, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, it is impossible to harvest the solar energy to the maximum capacity if the solar thermal collector is placed fix to a certain angle. In this research, a solar thermal dish with single axis solar tracking mechanism that will rotate the dish according to the position of the sun in the sky is designed and developed, so that more solar ray...

  18. Thermal energy storage technologies for sustainability systems design, assessment and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaiselvam, S

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage Technologies for Sustainability is a broad-based overview describing the state-of-the-art in latent, sensible, and thermo-chemical energy storage systems and their applications across industries. Beginning with a discussion of the efficiency and conservation advantages of balancing energy demand with production, the book goes on to describe current state-of-the art technologies. Not stopping with description, the authors also discuss design, modeling, and simulation of representative systems, and end with several case studies of systems in use.Describes how thermal energ

  19. Engineering and thermal-hydraulic design of water cooled PFC for SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paritosh Chaudhuri; Santra, P.; Rabi Prakash, N.; Khirwadkar, S.; Arun Prakash, A.; Ramash, G.; Dubey, S.; Chenna Reddy, D.; Saxena, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Steady state Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with superconducting magnetic field coils. It is a large aspect ratio tokamak with a major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. SST-1 is designed for plasma discharge duration of ∼1000 seconds to obtain fully steady state plasma with total input power up to 1.0 MW. First Wall or Plasma Facing Components (PFC) is one or the major sub-systems of SST-1 tokamak consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles, and poloidal limiters are designed to be compatible for steady state operation. All the PFC has the same basic configuration: graphite tiles are mechanically attached to a back plate made of high strength copper alloy, and SS tubes are embedded in the groove made in the back plate. Same tube will be used for cooling during plasma operation and baking during wall conditioning. The main consideration in the design of the PFC is the steady state heat removal of up to 1 MW/m 2 . In addition to remove high heat fluxes, the PFC are also designed to be compatible for high temperature baking at 350 deg. C. Water was chosen as the coolant because of its appropriate thermal properties, and while baking, hot nitrogen gas would flow through these tubes to bake the PFC at high temperature. Extensive studies, involving different flow parameters and various cooling layouts, has been done to select the final cooling parameters and layout, compatible for cooling and baking. During steady state operation, divertor and passive stabilizer heat loads are expected to be 0.6 and 0.25 MW/m 2 . The PFC also has been design to withstand the peak heat fluxes without significant erosion such that frequent replacement is not necessary. Since the tile must be mechanically attached to the back plate (heat sink), the fitting technique must provide the highest mechanical stress so that thermal transfer efficiency is maximized. Proper brazing of cooling tube on the copper back

  20. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic design analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, G.L. Jr.; Dixon, J.R.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Felde, D.K.; Giles, G.E.; Harrington, R.M.; Morris, D.G.; Nelson, W.R.; Ruggles, A.E.; Siman-Tov, M.; Stovall, T.K.

    1994-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This reactor will be a user facility with the major objective of providing the highest continuous neutron beam intensities of any reactor in the world. Additional objectives for the facility include providing materials irradiation facilities and isotope production facilities as good as, or better than, those in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. To achieve these objectives, the reactor design uses highly subcooled heavy water as both coolant and moderator. Two separate core halves of 67.6-L total volume operate at an average power density of 4.5 MW(t)/L, and the coolant flows upward through the core at 25 m/s. Operating pressure is 3.1 MPa at the core inlet with a 1.4-MPa pressure drop through the core region. Finally, in order to make the resources available for experimentation, the fuel is designed to provide a 17-d fuel cycle with an additional 4 d planned in each cycle for the refueling process. This report examines the codes and models used to develop the thermal-hydraulic design for ANS, as well as the correlations and physical data; evaluates thermal-hydraulic uncertainties; reports on thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis; describes experimentation in support of the ANS reactor design and safety analysis; and provides an overview of the experimental plan

  1. Virtual method for the determination of an optimum thermal design of hot stamping tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, W.; Koplenig, M.; Alb, M.; Graf, J.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a new virtual method for the optimised thermal design of hot stamping tools. It provides optimal positions of the tool's tempering ducts with respect to the average working temperature and its homogeneous distribution on the surface of a tool. It consists of a specific procedure for hot stamping tool design and a software framework in order to interconnect three domains: (I) a parametrised CAD tool model, (II) a linear thermal solver using a fast boundary element method and (III) an optimisation algorithm. This enables the automated set-up, simulation and optimisation of a duct topology. The boundary conditions for the simulations are derived from a reduced model of the thermal loading of the tool. The virtual method proposed is demonstrated on simplified tool segment geometries. The results are transferred to complex tool designs used in industry. For a selected use case, the number of ducts could be reduced by 50% through the application of the proposed method. These results are validated virtually based on an existing design. Hence, the new virtual method contributes to a CAE-driven tool design and a more efficient tool manufacturing.

  2. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator. PMID:26978370

  3. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Eckert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  4. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  5. Characteristics of Core Thermal-Hydraulic Design of SMART-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Kyong-Won; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Chung-Chan

    2006-01-01

    The SMART (System-Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is an integral-type advanced light water reactor which is purposed to be utilized as an energy source for sea water desalination as well as a small scale power generation. A prototype of this reactor, named SMART-P, has been studied at KAERI in order to demonstrate the relevant technologies incorporated in the SMART design. Due to the closed-channel type fuel assemblies and low mass velocity in the reactor core, the thermal hydraulic design features of SMART-P revealed fairly different characteristics in comparison with existing PWRs. The allowable operating region of the core, from the aspect of the thermal integrity of the fuel, should be primarily limited by two design parameters; critical heat flux (CHF) and fuel temperature. The occurrence of CHF may cause a sudden increase of the cladding temperature which eventually results in the fuel failure. The fuel temperature limit is relevant to a fuel failure mechanism such as a fuel centerline melting or a phase change of metallic fuels. Two phase flow instability is also an important design parameter since a flow oscillation may trigger a CHF or mechanical vibration of the channel. The characteristics of important thermal-hydraulic design parameters have been investigated for the SMART-P core with the closed-channel type fuel assemblies which contained non-square arrayed SSF (Self-sustained Square Finned) fuel rods

  6. Optimal allocation of thermodynamic irreversibility for the integrated design of propulsion and thermal management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Adam Charles

    More electric aircraft systems, high power avionics, and a reduction in heat sink capacity have placed a larger emphasis on correctly satisfying aircraft thermal management requirements during conceptual design. Thermal management systems must be capable of dealing with these rising heat loads, while simultaneously meeting mission performance. Since all subsystem power and cooling requirements are ultimately traced back to the engine, the growing interactions between the propulsion and thermal management systems are becoming more significant. As a result, it is necessary to consider their integrated performance during the conceptual design of the aircraft gas turbine engine cycle to ensure that thermal requirements are met. This can be accomplished by using thermodynamic subsystem modeling and simulation while conducting the necessary design trades to establish the engine cycle. However, this approach also poses technical challenges associated with the existence of elaborate aircraft subsystem interactions. This research addresses these challenges through the creation of a parsimonious, transparent thermodynamic model of propulsion and thermal management systems performance with a focus on capturing the physics that have the largest impact on propulsion design choices. This modeling environment, known as Cycle Refinement for Aircraft Thermodynamically Optimized Subsystems (CRATOS), is capable of operating in on-design (parametric) and off-design (performance) modes and includes a system-level solver to enforce design constraints. A key aspect of this approach is the incorporation of physics-based formulations involving the concurrent usage of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, which are necessary to achieve a clearer view of the component-level losses across the propulsion and thermal management systems. This is facilitated by the direct prediction of the exergy destruction distribution throughout the system and the resulting quantification of available

  7. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  8. Design parameters for single pipe thermal insulation systems for offshore flow assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Adam; Johnsen, Erik; Kopystynski, Adam; Simonsen, Eirik; Boye-Hansen, Allan [Bredero Shaw (Thermotite), Orkanger (Norway)

    2005-07-01

    Limit state design of subsea thermal insulation systems has been shown to be feasible and robust. This requires careful implementation of extensive long-term laboratory data and property models into verified FEA / FDA tools. Such simulations allow for the determination of not only the steady state response, but also the transient response of the system as a function of temperature, hydrostatic loading, ageing, water ingress and time. This departure from the traditional use of monolithic thermal conductivities, heat capacities and water absorption values can allow in some cases for a reduction in the thickness of insulation, whilst simultaneously enabling control of conservatism. The current paper discusses the important influences affecting the performance of insulant systems and the results of verification testing along with design examples where the generally accepted design method is compared to the limit state approach. (author)

  9. Thermal Modeling and Cryogenic Design of a Helical Superconducting Undulator Cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Fuerst, J.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.

    2017-06-01

    A conceptual design for a helical superconducting undulator (HSCU) for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been completed. The device differs sufficiently from the existing APS planar superconducting undulator (SCU) design to warrant development of a new cryostat based on value engineering and lessons learned from the existing planar SCU. Changes include optimization of the existing cryocooler-based refrigeration system and thermal shield as well as cost reduction through the use of standard vacuum hardware. The end result is a design that provides significantly larger 4.2 K refrigeration margin in a smaller package for greater installation flexibility in the APS storage ring. This paper presents ANSYS-based thermal analysis of the cryostat, including estimated static and dynamic

  10. Design of Thermal Barrier Coatings Thickness for Gas Turbine Blade Based on Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs are deposited on the turbine blade to reduce the temperature of underlying substrate, as well as providing protection against the oxidation and hot corrosion from high temperature gas. Optimal ceramic top-coat thickness distribution on the blade can improve the performance and efficiency of the coatings. Design of the coatings thickness is a multiobjective optimization problem due to the conflicts among objectives of high thermal insulation performance, long operation durability, and low fabrication cost. This work developed a procedure for designing the TBCs thickness distribution for the gas turbine blade. Three-dimensional finite element models were built and analyzed, and weighted-sum approach was employed to solve the multiobjective optimization problem herein. Suitable multiregion top-coat thickness distribution scheme was designed with the considerations of manufacturing accuracy, productivity, and fabrication cost.

  11. Metal complexes in cancer therapy – an update from drug design perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndagi U

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umar Ndagi, Ndumiso Mhlongo, Mahmoud E Soliman Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, South Africa Abstract: In the past, metal-based compounds were widely used in the treatment of disease conditions, but the lack of clear distinction between the therapeutic and toxic doses was a major challenge. With the discovery of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg in 1960, a milestone in the history of metal-based compounds used in the treatment of cancers was witnessed. This forms the foundation for the modern era of the metal-based anticancer drugs. Platinum drugs, such as cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, are the mainstay of the metal-based compounds in the treatment of cancer, but the delay in the therapeutic accomplishment of other metal-based compounds hampered the progress of research in this field. Recently, however, there has been an upsurge of activities relying on the structural information, aimed at improving and developing other forms of metal-based compounds and nonclassical platinum complexes whose mechanism of action is distinct from known drugs such as cisplatin. In line with this, many more metal-based compounds have been synthesized by redesigning the existing chemical structure through ligand substitution or building the entire new compound with enhanced safety and cytotoxic profile. However, because of increased emphasis on the clinical relevance of metal-based complexes, a few of these drugs are currently on clinical trial and many more are awaiting ethical approval to join the trial. In this review, we seek to give an overview of previous reviews on the cytotoxic effect of metal-based complexes while focusing more on newly designed metal-based complexes and their cytotoxic effect on the cancer cell lines, as well as on new approach to metal-based drug design and molecular target in cancer therapy. We are optimistic that the concept of selective

  12. The correct lens mount lightweighting design of thermal cycle stress in Cassegrain telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M. Y.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, Ming-Ying

    2011-10-01

    The Cassegrain telescope system was design for space environment. The correct lens mount assembly is included as correct lens, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The system mass budget allocated to correct lens assembly was 5 Kg. Meanwhile, according to optical design the correct lens is made from fused silica, the lens diameter is 130 mm, and the mass is 2.3 Kg. Therefore, remain mass budget is 2.7 Kg; including the lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The telescope system deformation is mainly caused by thermal deformation on space orbit. The correct lens mount was made from invar material in initial design. The CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) of invar is only 1* 10-6/°C, low CTE would be resistant to thermal deformation, but invar density is 8* 10-6 kg/mm3. If all components were made from invar, the total mass was over 2.7 kg. Thus, the components material would consider titanium alloy (CTE is 8.6* 10-6/°C, density is 4.43* 10-6 kg/mm3) or aluminum alloy (CTE is 23.6* 10-6/°C, density is 2.81* 10-6 kg/mm3). The titanium alloy density is 1.83 times lighter than invar, but CTE is 8.6 times higher. The aluminum alloy density is 2.84 times lighter then invar, but CTE is 23.6 times higher. The lens mount thermal deformation would effect correct lens surface wavefront error and introduce optical aberration. This article analyzes the correct lens assembly thermal deformation and optical performance in different lens mount material. From above conditions, using FEM (Finite Element Method) and optical software, simulation and optimization on the lens mount design have been performed to achieve system mass requirement.

  13. RIP INPUT TABLES FROM WAPDEG FOR LA DESIGN SELECTION: HIGHER THERMAL LOADING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Mon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to document (1) the Waste Package Degradation (WAPDEG) version 3.09 (CRWMS M and O 1998b. Software Routine Report for WAPDEG (Version 3.09)) simulations used to analyze waste package degradation and failure under the repository exposure conditions characterized by the higher thermal loading repository design feature and, (2) post-processing of these results into tables of waste package degradation time histories suitable for use as input into the Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems version 5.19.01 (RIP) computer program (Golder Associates 1998). Specifically, the WAPDEG simulations discussed in this calculation correspond to waste package emplacement conditions (repository environment and design) defined in the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA), with the exception that the higher thermal loading Design Feature (Design Feature 26) of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) analysis was analyzed. Higher thermal loading would keep the drift temperature above the boiling point of water for a longer period of time, thereby minimizing moisture around the waste packages during a longer post-closure period. The higher thermal loading would also affect the surrounding rock, which may have adverse effects. The only failure mechanism of this feature would be if the effects on the surrounding rock were determined to be unacceptable. As a result of the change in waste package placement relative to the TSPA-VA base-case design, different temperature and relative humidity time histories at the waste package surface are calculated (input to the WAPDEG simulations), and consequently different waste package failure histories (as calculated by WAPDEG) result

  14. Design approach of the vacuum vessel and thermal shields towards assembly at the ITER-site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utin, Yu. [ITER Organization, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France)], E-mail: yuri.utin@iter.org; Ioki, K.; Bachmann, Ch. [ITER Organization, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Chung, W. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Her, N.I.; Johnson, G. [ITER Organization, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Jones, L. [Fusion for Energy, C Josep Pla 2, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Jun, C.H. [ITER Organization, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kim, B.C. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kuzmin, E. [NTC Sintez, Efremov Inst., Metallostroy, St. Petersburg 189631 (Russian Federation); Macklin, B.; Sannazzaro, G.; Shaw, R.; Wang, X.; Yu, J. [ITER Organization, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2009-06-15

    Recent progress of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) and thermal shields (TS) design is presented. As the ITER construction phase approaches, the design of the VV and TS (in particular, the vacuum vessel TS-VVTS) has been improved and developed in more detail with the focus on better performance, improved manufacturing ability and successful assembly at the ITER-site. In addition to the design progress, the main principles and operations for assembly of the VV, VVTS and other TS components at the ITER-site are described.

  15. Design aspects of integrated compact thermal storage system for solar dryer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaraman, R.; Velraj, R.; Renganarayanan, S.

    2000-01-01

    Solar energy is an excellent source for drying of crops, fruits, vegetables and other agricultural and forest products. Though the availability of solar energy is plenty, it is time dependent in nature. The energy need for some applications is also time dependent, but in a different pattern and phase from the solar energy supply. This implies that the solar dryer should be integrated with an efficient thermal storage system to match the time-dependent supply and end-use requirements. Based on the studies carried out on Latent Heat Thermal Storage (LHTS) Systems, it is observed that when air is used as the heat transfer fluid in LHTS system, nearly uniform surface heat flux can be achieved. Hence the LHTS systems are most suitable for air based solar drying applications. In the present work some major conclusions arrived from the investigations on LHTS systems and the design considerations for the integrated latent heat thermal storage for the solar dryer are reported. (Author)

  16. The correct lens mount lightweighting design and thermal stress OPD analysis in Cassegrain telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chan, Chia-Yen; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-09-01

    This study is trying to evaluate different lens barrel material, caused lens stress OPD (Optical Path Different) in different temperature condition. The Cassegrain telescope's correct lens assembly are including as correct lens, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The lens barrel initial design is made by invar, but system mass limit is need to lightweighting to meet requirement. Therefore, the lens barrel material is tried to replace to lower density material, such as aluminum and titanium alloy. Meanwhile, the aluminum or titanium alloy material properties CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) are larger then invar. Thus, the high CTE material will introduce larger thermal stress into the optical system in different temperature condition. This article is analysis the correct lens assembly thermal stress and optical performance in different lens mount material. From above conditions, using FEM (Finite Element Method) and optical software, simulation and optimization the lens mount to achieve system mass requirement.

  17. Update and Improve Subsection NH - Simplified Elastic and Inelastic Design Analysis Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Hanna, Jeries J.; Marriott, Douglas L.; McGreevy, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this subtask is to develop a template for the 'Ideal' high temperature design Code, in which individual topics can be identified and worked on separately in order to provide the detail necessary to comprise a comprehensive Code. Like all ideals, this one may not be attainable as a practical matter. The purpose is to set a goal for what is believed the 'Ideal' design Code should address, recognizing that some elements are not mutually exclusive and that the same objectives can be achieved in different way. Most, if not all existing Codes may therefore be found to be lacking in some respects, but this does not mean necessarily that they are not comprehensive. While this subtask does attempt to list the elements which individually or in combination are considered essential in such a Code, the authors do not presume to recommend how these elements should be implemented or even, that they should all be implemented at all. The scope of this subtask is limited to compiling the list of elements thought to be necessary or at minimum, useful in such an 'Ideal' Code; suggestions are provided as to their relationship to one another. Except for brief descriptions, where these are needed for clarification, neither this repot, nor Task 9 as a whole, attempts to address details of the contents of all these elements. Some, namely primary load limits (elastic, limit load, reference stress), and ratcheting (elastic, e-p, reference stress) are dealt with specifically in other subtasks of Task 9. All others are merely listed; the expectation is that they will either be the focus of attention of other active DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks, e.g. creep-fatigue, or to be considered in future DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks. Since the focus of this Task is specifically approximate methods, the authors have deemed it necessary to include some discussion on what is meant by 'approximate'. However, the topic will be addressed in one or more later subtasks. This report describes

  18. Update and Improve Subsection NH - Simplified Elastic and Inelastic Design Analysis Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeries J. Abou-Hanna; Douglas L. Marriott; Timothy E. McGreevy

    2009-06-27

    The objective of this subtask is to develop a template for the 'Ideal' high temperature design Code, in which individual topics can be identified and worked on separately in order to provide the detail necessary to comprise a comprehensive Code. Like all ideals, this one may not be attainable as a practical matter. The purpose is to set a goal for what is believed the 'Ideal' design Code should address, recognizing that some elements are not mutually exclusive and that the same objectives can be achieved in different way. Most, if not all existing Codes may therefore be found to be lacking in some respects, but this does not mean necessarily that they are not comprehensive. While this subtask does attempt to list the elements which individually or in combination are considered essential in such a Code, the authors do not presume to recommend how these elements should be implemented or even, that they should all be implemented at all. The scope of this subtask is limited to compiling the list of elements thought to be necessary or at minimum, useful in such an 'Ideal' Code; suggestions are provided as to their relationship to one another. Except for brief descriptions, where these are needed for clarification, neither this repot, nor Task 9 as a whole, attempts to address details of the contents of all these elements. Some, namely primary load limits (elastic, limit load, reference stress), and ratcheting (elastic, e-p, reference stress) are dealt with specifically in other subtasks of Task 9. All others are merely listed; the expectation is that they will either be the focus of attention of other active DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks, e.g. creep-fatigue, or to be considered in future DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks. Since the focus of this Task is specifically approximate methods, the authors have deemed it necessary to include some discussion on what is meant by 'approximate'. However, the topic will be addressed in one or

  19. Designing a solar powered Stirling heat engine based on multiple criteria: Maximized thermal efficiency and power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein; Sayyaadi, Hoseyn; Dehghani, Saeed; Hosseinzade, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic model of a solar-dish Stirling engine was presented. • Thermal efficiency and output power of the engine were simultaneously maximized. • A final optimal solution was selected using several decision-making methods. • An optimal solution with least deviation from the ideal design was obtained. • Optimal solutions showed high sensitivity against variation of system parameters. - Abstract: A solar-powered high temperature differential Stirling engine was considered for optimization using multiple criteria. A thermal model was developed so that the output power and thermal efficiency of the solar Stirling system with finite rate of heat transfer, regenerative heat loss, conductive thermal bridging loss, finite regeneration process time and imperfect performance of the dish collector could be obtained. The output power and overall thermal efficiency were considered for simultaneous maximization. Multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) based on the NSGA-II algorithm were employed while the solar absorber temperature and the highest and lowest temperatures of the working fluid were considered the decision variables. The Pareto optimal frontier was obtained and a final optimal solution was also selected using various decision-making methods including the fuzzy Bellman–Zadeh, LINMAP and TOPSIS. It was found that multi-objective optimization could yield results with a relatively low deviation from the ideal solution in comparison to the conventional single objective approach. Furthermore, it was shown that, if the weight of thermal efficiency as one of the objective functions is considered to be greater than weight of the power objective, lower absorber temperature and low temperature ratio should be considered in the design of the Stirling engine

  20. Comparisons of thermal SCWR assembly designs by in- or inter-assembly moderation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Wang, K. [Tsinghua Univ., Dept. of Engineering Physics, Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    As one of the six GEN-IV reactor systems and the only one with water as coolant, SCWR is thought to be the most hopeful future nuclear energy system. Many designs have already been proposed worldwide. For thermal SCWR designs, a key consideration factor is how to provide the dedicated moderation, which leads to various designs with water as moderator. It is much like BWR, where under-moderation is an important issue and central water rods are adopted to account for it. Naturally, water rods can be adopted in SCWR assemblies too, but with counter-flow scheme to increase the outlet temperature and thermal efficiency which is unlike the co-flow scheme in BWR. This type can be seen in the American, Japanese and European HPLWR designs. As the other option, moderation could be provided with inter-assembly gap like CANDU-SCWR design. It is worthy of review of these designs for better understanding the water moderating effects and putting forward any new designs. (author)

  1. The CHANDRA X-Ray Observatory: Thermal Design, Verification, and Early Orbit Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David A.; Freeman, Mark D.; Lynch, Nicolie; Lavois, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The CHANDRA X-ray Observatory (formerly AXAF), one of NASA's "Great Observatories" was launched aboard the Shuttle in July 1999. CHANDRA comprises a grazing-incidence X-ray telescope of unprecedented focal-length, collecting area and angular resolution -- better than two orders of magnitude improvement in imaging performance over any previous soft X-ray (0.1-10 keV) mission. Two focal-plane instruments, one with a 150 K passively-cooled detector, provide celestial X-ray images and spectra. Thermal control of CHANDRA includes active systems for the telescope mirror and environment and the optical bench, and largely passive systems for the focal plans instruments. Performance testing of these thermal control systems required 1-1/2 years at increasing levels of integration, culminating in thermal-balance testing of the fully-configured observatory during the summer of 1998. This paper outlines details of thermal design tradeoffs and methods for both the Observatory and the two focal-plane instruments, the thermal verification philosophy of the Chandra program (what to test and at what level), and summarizes the results of the instrument, optical system and observatory testing.

  2. A simplified tool for building layout design based on thermal comfort simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Anand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort aspects of indoor spaces are crucial during the design stages of building layout planning. This study presents a simplified tool based on thermal comfort using predicted mean vote (PMV index. Thermal comfort simulations were performed for 14 different possible room layouts based on window configurations. ECOTECT 12 was used to determine the PMV of these rooms for one full year, leading to 17,808 simulations. Simulations were performed for three different climatic zones in India and were validated using in-situ measurements from one of these climatic zones. For moderate climates, rooms with window openings on the south façade exhibited the best thermal comfort conditions for nights, with comfort conditions prevailing for approximately 79.25% of the time annually. For operation during the day, windows on the north façade are favored, with thermal comfort conditions prevailing for approximately 77.74% of the time annually. Similar results for day and night time operation for other two climatic zones are presented. Such an output is essential in deciding the layout of buildings on the basis of functionality of the different rooms (living room, bedroom, kitchen corresponding to different operation times of the day.

  3. The Mercury Thermal Environment As A Design Driver and A Scientific Objective of The Bepicolombo Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotto, V.; Malosti, T.; Martino, R.; Briccarello, M.; Anselmi, A.

    The thermal environment of Mercury is extremely severe and a strong design driver for any mission to the planet. The main factors are the large amount of energy both di- rectly received from the sun and reflected/re-emitted from the planet, and the variation of such energy with time. The total thermal flux received by an object in orbit or on the surface of Mercury is a combination of the above-mentioned contributions, weighted according to the orbit characteristics, or the morphology of the surface. For a lander mission, the problems are compounded by the uncertainty in the a-priori knowledge of the surface properties and morphology. The thermal design of the orbiting and land- ing elements of the BepiColombo mission has a major role in the Definition Study being carried out under ESA contract by a team led by Alenia Spazio. The project en- compasses a spacecraft in low, near-circular, polar orbit (Mercury Planetary Orbiter, MPO), a spacecraft in high-eccentricity, polar orbit (Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, MMO, provided by ISAS, Japan) and a lander (Mercury Surface Element, MSE). The approach to a feasible mission design must rely on several provisions. For the orbiting elements, the orientation of the orbit plane with respect to the line of apsides of the or- bit of Mercury is found to have a major effect on the achievable orbiter temperatures. The spacecraft configuration, and its attitude with respect to the planet and the sun, drive the accommodation of the scientific instruments. Once the optimal orientation, attitude and configuration are determined, specific thermal control solutions must be elaborated, to maintain all components including the instruments in the required tem- perature range. The objective is maximizing the scientific return under constraints such as the available on-board resources and the project budget. A major outcome of the study so far has been the specification of requirements for improved thermal con- trol technologies, which are

  4. Development of NASA's Sample Cartridge Assembly: Design, Thermal Analysis, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian; Hernandez, Deborah; Duffy, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) project is responsible for designing and validating a payload that contains a materials research sample in a sealed environment. The SCA will be heated in the European Space Agency's (ESA) Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) that is housed inside the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) located in the International Space Station (ISS). Sintered metals and crystal growth experiments in microgravity are examples of some of the types of materials research that may be performed with a SCA. The project's approach has been to use thermal models to guide the SCA through several design iterations. Various layouts of the SCA components were explored to meet the science and engineering requirements, and testing has been done to help prove the design. This paper will give an overview of the SCA design. It will show how thermal analysis is used to support the project. Also some testing that has been completed will also be discussed, including changes that were made to the thermal profile used during brazing.

  5. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process.

  6. Lead coolant test facility systems design, thermal hydraulic analysis and cost estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khericha, Soli, E-mail: slk2@inel.gov [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Harvego, Edwin; Svoboda, John; Evans, Robert [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Dalling, Ryan [ExxonMobil Gas and Power Marketing, Houston, TX 77069 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T and FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed below: Bullet Develop and demonstrate feasibility of submerged heat exchanger. Bullet Develop and demonstrate open-lattice flow in electrically heated core. Bullet Develop and demonstrate chemistry control. Bullet Demonstrate safe operation. Bullet Provision for future testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimated. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 Degree-Sign C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  7. Engineering and thermal-hydraulics design of PFC cooling for SST-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Reddy, D. Chenna; Santra, P.; Khiwadkar, S.; Prakash, N. Rabi; Ramash, G.; Dubey, Santosh; Prakash, Arun; Saxena, Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    The main consideration in the design of the PFC cooling for SST-1 tokamak is the steady state heat removal of upto 1MW/m2. The PFC also has been design to withstand the peak heat fluxes without significant erosion such that frequent replacement is not necessary. Proper brazing of cooling tube on the copper back plate is necessary for the efficient heat transfer from the tube to the back plate. Design considerations included 2-D steady state and transient tile temperature distribution and resulting thermal loads in PFC during baking, and cooling, coolant parameters necessary to maintain optimum thermal-hydraulic design, and tile fitting mechanism. Finite Element (FE) models using ANSYS have been developed to conduct the heat transfer and stress analyses of the PFC to understand its thermal and mechanical behaviors. The temperature distribution results for different PFC obtained by FE results were assessed by comparison with 2-D Finite Difference code. The results of the calculation led to a good understanding of the coolant flow behavior and the temperature distribution in the tube wall and the different parts of the PFC. The contact at the brazed joint of the tube to the backplate is critical for the above application. The manufactured modules need to be evaluated for the quality of brazed joint. Using an infra-red-camera, spatial and temporal evaluation of the temperature profile is studied under various flow parameters. These results of this study will be presented in details in this paper

  8. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic considerations for designing a lithium-cooled tokamak blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, J.; Mikic, B.; Todreas, N.

    1978-12-01

    A methodology for the design of lithium cooled blankets is developed. The thermal-hydraulics, neutronics and interactions between them are extensively investigated. In thermal hydraulics, two models illustrate the methodology used to obtain the acceptable ranges for a set of design parameters. The methodology can be used to identify the limiting constraints for a particular design. A complete neutronic scheme is set up for the calculations of the volumetric heating rate as a function of the distance from the first wall, the breeding ratio as a function of the amount of structural material in the blanket, and the radiation damage in terms of atom displacements and gas production rate. Different values of the volume percent of Type-316 stainless steel are assigned in four breeding zones to represent a nonuniformly distributed structural material which satisfies various thermal-hydraulic requirements. The role that the radiation damage plays in the overall design methodology is described. The product of the first wall lifetime and neutron loading is limited by the radiation damage which degrades the mechanical properties of the material

  9. Search method optimization technique for thermal design of high power RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, N.K.; Joshi, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    RRCAT has taken up the development of 3 MeV RFQ structure for the low energy part of 100 MeV H - ion injector linac. RFQ is a precision machined resonating structure designed for high rf duty factor. RFQ structural stability during high rf power operation is an important design issue. The thermal analysis of RFQ has been performed using ANSYS finite element analysis software and optimization of various parameters is attempted using Search Method optimization technique. It is an effective optimization technique for the systems governed by a large number of independent variables. The method involves examining a number of combinations of values of independent variables and drawing conclusions from the magnitude of the objective function at these combinations. In these methods there is a continuous improvement in the objective function throughout the course of the search and hence these methods are very efficient. The method has been employed in optimization of various parameters (called independent variables) of RFQ like cooling water flow rate, cooling water inlet temperatures, cavity thickness etc. involved in RFQ thermal design. The temperature rise within RFQ structure is the objective function during the thermal design. Using ANSYS Programming Development Language (APDL), various multiple iterative programmes are written and the analysis are performed to minimize the objective function. The dependency of the objective function on various independent variables is established and the optimum values of the parameters are evaluated. The results of the analysis are presented in the paper. (author)

  10. Optimised design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of the IFMIF/HFTM test section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Lang, K.H.; Moeslang, A.; Schleisiek, K.; Slobodtchouk, V.; Stratmanns, E.

    2003-10-01

    On the basis of previous concepts, analyses and experiments, the high flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) was further optimised. The work focused on the design and the thermal hydraulic analysis of the HFTM section containing the material specimens to be irradiated, the ''test section'', with the main objective to improve the concept with respect to the optimum use of the available irradiation volume and to the temperature of the specimens. Particular emphasis was laid on the application of design principles which assure stable and reproducible thermal conditions. The present work has confirmed the feasibility and suitability of the optimised design of the HFTM test section with chocolate plate like shaped rigs. In particular it has been shown that the envisaged irradiation temperatures can be reached with acceptable temperature differences inside the specimen stack. The latter can be achieved only by additional electrical heating of the axial ends of the capsules. Division of the heater in three sections with separate power supply and control units is necessary. Maintaining of the temperatures during beam-off periods likewise requires electrical heating. The required electrical heaters - mineral isolated wires - are commercially available. The potential of the CFD code STAR-CD for the thermal hydraulic analysis of complex systems like the HFTM was confirmed. Nevertheless, experimental confirmation is desirable. Suitable experiments are under preparation. To verify the assumptions made on the thermal conductivity of the contact faces and layers between the two shells of the rig, dedicated experiments are suggested. The present work must be complemented by a thermal mechanical analysis of the module. Most critical component in this respect seems to be the rig wall. Furthermore, it will be necessary to investigate the response of the HFTM to power transients, and to determine the requirements

  11. Ground Thermal Inertia for Energy Efficient Building Design: A Case Study on Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando R. Mazarrón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The search for energy efficient construction solutions is still pending in the agro-food industry, in which a large amount of energy is often consumed unnecessarily when storing products. The main objective of this research is to promote high energy efficiency built environments, which aim to reduce energy consumption in this sector. We analyze the suitability of using the thermal inertia of the ground to provide an adequate environment for the storage and conservation of agro-food products. This research compares different construction solutions based on the use of ground thermal properties, analyzing their effectiveness to decrease annual outdoor variations and provide adequate indoor conditions. The analysis undertaken is based on over five million pieces of data, obtained from an uninterrupted four year monitoring process of various constructions with different levels of thermal mass, ranging from high volume constructions to others lacking this resource. It has been proven that constructive solutions based on the use of ground thermal inertia are more effective than other solutions when reducing the effects of outdoor conditions, even when these have air conditioning systems. It is possible to reach optimal conditions to preserve agro-food products such as wine, with a good design and an adequate amount of terrain, without having to use air conditioning systems. The results of this investigation could be of great use to the agro-food industry, becoming a reference when it comes to the design of energy efficient constructions.

  12. Current status of design technology on core thermal-hydraulic performance in FLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Kobayashi, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) has been progressed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency in collaboration with power utilities, reactor vendors and universities. The FLWR adopts a triangular tight-lattice rod bundle with around 1mm gap width between rods and the thermal-hydraulic performance is being recognized as one of the major subjects. We have performed the R and D using large-scale test facility (37-rod bundle with full-height and full-pressure), model experiments and advanced numerical simulation technology. This paper described the master plan for the development of design technology and showed an executive summary for this project. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics in the tight-lattice configuration were investigated and the feasibility was confirmed based on the experiments. We have developed the design technology including subchannel and 3-D numerical simulation one to evaluate the effects of geometry/scale on the thermal-hydraulic behaviors. (author)

  13. Thermal-Hydrologic Sensitivity Analysis of Engineered Barrier System Design Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, B.

    2000-01-01

    This sensitivity study presents the effects that changing the ventilation time and initial linear power loading can have on specific thermal-hydrologic response parameters, such as waste package peak temperatures. Results show that an approximate 55 C drop in waste package peak temperature can be expected from the reference case design if the initial line loading is reduced to 0.90 kW/m or if the ventilation time is increased to 125 years. Increasing the waste package to waste package spacing in order to reduce the linear load to 0.90 kW/m requires additional emplacement drifts and an expansion of the area that the repository occupies. Increasing the ventilation duration requires that the repository remains open and is maintained for long periods of time. The effectiveness and expense of each design alternative must be weighed in determining the best way to achieve a particular thermal goal. Also, this sensitivity study shows that certain thermal goals may not be reached if only using ventilation, sometimes only the reduction of the linear load or a combination of linear loading and ventilation can reduce the thermal response to lower temperature specifications, if considered. As an example, Figure 1 shows that waste package peak temperatures below 96 C would require both a reduction in the linear load and an increase in ventilation duration

  14. Mefenamic acid conjugates based on a hydrophilic biopolymer hydroxypropylcellulose: novel prodrug design, characterization and thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.A.; Kausar, R.; Amin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular prodrugs (MPDs) of mefenamic acid were designed onto a cellulose ether derivative hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as ester conjugates. Fabrication of HPC-mefenamic acid conjugates was achieved by using p-toluenesulfonyl chloride as carboxylic acid (a functional group in drug) activator at 80 degree C for 24 h under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction was preceded under homogeneous reaction conditions as HPC was dissolved before use in DMAc solvent. Imidazole was used as a base. Easy workup reactions resulted in good yields (55-65%) and degree of substitution (DS) of drug (0.37-0.99) onto HPC. The DS was calculated by acid-base titration after saponification and UV/Vis spectrophotometry after hydrolysis. DS by both of the methods was found in good agreement with each other. Aqueous and organic soluble novel prodrugs of mefenamic acid were purified and characterized by different spectroscopic and thermal analysis techniques. The initial, maximum and final degradation temperatures of HPC, mefenamic acid and HPC-mefenamic acid conjugates were drawn from thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative TG curves and compared to access relative thermal stability. The TG analysis has indicated that samples obtained were thermally more stable especially with increased stability of mefenamic acid in HPC-mefenamic acid conjugates. These novel MPDs of mefenamic acid (i.e., HPC-mefenamic acid conjugates) may have potential applications in pharmaceutically viable drug design due to wide range of solubility and extra thermal stability imparted after MPD formation. (author)

  15. Thermal comfort and the integrated design of homes for older people with dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hoof, J. [Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Bolognalaan 101, 3584 CJ Utrecht (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kort, H.S.M. [Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Bolognalaan 101, 3584 CJ Utrecht (Netherlands); Vilans, Catharijnesingel 47, 3511 GC Utrecht (Netherlands); Hensen, J.L.M.; Rutten, P.G.S. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Duijnstee, M.S.H. [Hogeschool Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Care, Research Centre for Innovation in Health Care, Bolognalaan 101, 3584 CJ Utrecht (Netherlands); Academy of Health Sciences Utrecht, Universiteitsweg 98, 3584 CG Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    People with dementia may have an altered sensitivity to indoor environmental conditions compared to other older adults and younger counterparts. This paper, based on literature review and qualitative research, provides an overview of needs regarding thermal comfort and the design and implementation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems for people with dementia and other relevant stakeholders through the combined use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and the Model of Integrated Building Design. In principle, older adults do not perceive thermal comfort differently from younger adults. Due to the pathology of people with dementia, as well as their altered thermoregulation, the perception of the thermal environment might be changed. Many people with dementia express their discomfort through certain behaviour that is considered a problem for both family and professional carers. Ethical concerns are raised as well in terms of who is in charge over the thermal conditions, and the protection against temperature extremes in hot summers or cold winters. When implementing heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems one should consider aspects like user-technology interaction, diverging needs and preferences within group settings, safety issues, and minimising negative behavioural reactions and draught due to suboptimal positioning of outlets. At the same time, technology puts demands on installers who need to learn how to work with customers with dementia and their family carers. (author)

  16. Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions: An Update on Breakthrough Therapy Designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Martin; Foster, Theresa; Steinberg, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to describe the regulatory pathways made available by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expedite the drug development and approval process, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of the Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD) pathway. Published materials consisting of journal articles, press releases, government documents, and news articles from pharmaceutical publishers were identified through online databases (ie, Medline and Scopus), the FDA website, and Internet search engines (eg, Google). To encourage pharmaceutical innovation and increase the number of products being approved each year, the FDA has introduced 4 expedited regulatory pathways to accelerate the drug development and approval process. The most recent program, enacted in July 2012, was BTD that is given to drugs that treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition; and preliminary clinical evidence suggests the potential for these drugs to provide a substantial improvement over the current standard of care. The primary basis for the creation of BTD is to provide patients with serious conditions with earlier access to FDA-approved medications. In 2014, 22% of the new molecular entities approved within the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research had BTD status, as opposed to only 11% in 2013, which indicates both the popularity and success of this expedited pathway. Additionally, the creation of BTD has produced a more collaborative working relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA because both parties have a vested interest in the drug's success. Some of the more notable concerns surrounding these approved breakthrough therapies have been the abbreviated tolerability and efficacy evidence available from accelerated clinical development programs, ensuring the manufacturing aspects keep pace with these accelerated clinical programs, and finally, managing the strain on resources for both the pharmaceutical companies and the FDA. BTD has already

  17. Whole Core Thermal-Hydraulic Design of a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Considering the Gamma Energy Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Back, Min Ho; Park, Won Seok; Kim, Sang Ji

    2012-01-01

    Since a fuel cladding failure is the most important parameter in a core thermal-hydraulic design, the conceptual design stage only involves fuel assemblies. However, although non-fuel assemblies such as control rod, reflector, and B4C generate a relatively smaller thermal power compared to fuel assemblies, they also require independent flow allocation to properly cool down each assembly. The thermal power in non-fuel assemblies is produced from both neutron and gamma energy, and thus the core thermal-hydraulic design including non-fuel assemblies should consider an energy redistribution by the gamma energy transport. To design non-fuel assemblies, the design-limiting parameters should be determined considering the thermal failure modes. While fuel assemblies set a limiting factor with cladding creep temperature to prevent a fission product ejection from the fuel rods, non-fuel assemblies restrict their outlet temperature to minimize thermally induced stress on the upper internal structure (UIS). This work employs a heat generation distribution reflecting both neutron and gamma transport. The whole core thermal-hydraulic design including fuel and non-fuel assemblies is then conducted using the SLTHEN (Steady-State LMR Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code Based on ENERGY Model) code. The other procedures follow from the previous conceptual design

  18. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial

  19. Protein thermal stability enhancement by designing salt bridges: a combined computational and experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wen Lee

    Full Text Available Protein thermal stability is an important factor considered in medical and industrial applications. Many structural characteristics related to protein thermal stability have been elucidated, and increasing salt bridges is considered as one of the most efficient strategies to increase protein thermal stability. However, the accurate simulation of salt bridges remains difficult. In this study, a novel method for salt-bridge design was proposed based on the statistical analysis of 10,556 surface salt bridges on 6,493 X-ray protein structures. These salt bridges were first categorized based on pairing residues, secondary structure locations, and Cα-Cα distances. Pairing preferences generalized from statistical analysis were used to construct a salt-bridge pair index and utilized in a weighted electrostatic attraction model to find the effective pairings for designing salt bridges. The model was also coupled with B-factor, weighted contact number, relative solvent accessibility, and conservation prescreening to determine the residues appropriate for the thermal adaptive design of salt bridges. According to our method, eight putative salt-bridges were designed on a mesophilic β-glucosidase and 24 variants were constructed to verify the predictions. Six putative salt-bridges leaded to the increase of the enzyme thermal stability. A significant increase in melting temperature of 8.8, 4.8, 3.7, 1.3, 1.2, and 0.7°C of the putative salt-bridges N437K-D49, E96R-D28, E96K-D28, S440K-E70, T231K-D388, and Q277E-D282 was detected, respectively. Reversing the polarity of T231K-D388 to T231D-D388K resulted in a further increase in melting temperatures by 3.6°C, which may be caused by the transformation of an intra-subunit electrostatic interaction into an inter-subunit one depending on the local environment. The combination of the thermostable variants (N437K, E96R, T231D and D388K generated a melting temperature increase of 15.7°C. Thus, this study

  20. Optimization of electronic enclosure design for thermal and moisture management using calibrated models of progressive complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and moisture management of electronic enclosures are fields of high interest in recent years. It is now generally accepted that the protection of electronic devices is dependent on avoiding critical levels of relative humidity (typically 60–90%) during operations. Leveraging...... focus the parameter-value space, before shifting to 3D CFD models for final evaluations and verification. The approach results in a system capable of predicting optimum design features for the thermal and moisture management of electronic enclosures in a time-efficient and practically implementable...... the development of rigorous calibrated CFD models as well as simple predictive numerical tools, the current paper tackles the optimization of critical features of a typical two-chamber electronic enclosure. The progressive optimization strategy begins the design parameter selection by initially using simpler...

  1. Thermal-hydraulic design concept of the solid-target system of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, F.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.; Takeda, T.; Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In relation to thermal-hydraulic design of the N-Arena solid-target system of the JHF project, heat transfer experiments were performed to obtain experimental data systematically on heat transfer coefficient and CHF for vertical upward and horizontal flows in a thin rectangular channel simulating a coolant channel of the proposed spallation neutron source. Thermal-hydraulic correlations which can be used for design calculations were proposed based on the obtained data. Finally tentative results of feasibility study on maximum beam power which could be attained with a solid target were presented. The result indicated that the condition for the onset of nucleate boiling is the most significant limiting factor to the maximum beam power. (author)

  2. Commercial tandem mirror reactor design with thermal barriers: WITAMIR-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Emmert, G.A.; Maynard, C.W.

    1980-10-01

    A conceptual design of a near term commercial tandem mirror power reactor is presented. The basic configuration utilizes yin-yang minimum-B plugs with inboard thermal barriers. The maximum magnetic fields are 6.1 T, 8.1 T, and 15 T in the central cell, yin-yang, and thermal barrier magnets, respectively. The blanket utilizes Pb 83 Li 17 as the coolant and HT-9 as the structural material. This yields a high energy multiplication (1.37), a sufficient tritium breeding ratio (1.07) and has a major advantage with respect to maintenance. The plasma Q is 28 at a fusion power level of 3000 MW(t); the net electrical output is 1530 MW(e); and the overall efficiency is 39%. Cost estimates indicate that WITAMIR-I is competitive with recent tokamak power reactor designs

  3. RESOLUTION STRATEGY FOR GEOMECHANICALLY-RELATED REPOSITORY DESIGN FOR THERMAL-MECHANICAL EFFECTS (RDTME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, M.

    2003-01-01

    In September of 2000, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2000). The Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements on Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) were jointly developed at the Technical Exchange and Management Meeting held on February 6-8, 2001 in Las Vegas, Nevada. In that report, a number of geomechanically-related issues were raised regarding the determination of rock properties, the estimation of the impacts of geologic variability, the use of numerical models, and the examination of drift degradation and design approach to the ground support system for the emplacement drifts. Ultimately, the primary end products of the KTI agreement resolution processes are an assessment of the preclosure stability of emplacement drifts and the associated ground support requirements. There is also an assessment of the postclosure degradation of the excavations when subjected to thermal and seismic-related stresses as well as in situ loading over time

  4. Thermal design of a pressure electroslag remelting furnace applied for 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz M, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Actual work defines the thermal design methodology for pressure electroslag remelting furnaces (P ESR) of variable capacity, applied for 5 Kg. It begins with classification and description of secondary refining furnaces, after PESR process and the concept of thermal design are described. Next, in base of the steel weight to remelt (5 Kg); ingot, crucible and electrode dimensions are obtained. These elements will be inside of pressure vessel whose thickness are determined according to ASME Code (Section 8, Division 1, U G-27). It was developed a computer program, where the furnace capacity can be modified, so like other conditions, and display principal dimensions of the furnace. Current and voltage are obtained from the heat necessary to remelt the ingot and the heat transfer in the crucible, is analysed because of it is the most critical element. It was selected too the equipment to registry temperatures and pressure in base of thermocouple characteristics. (Author)

  5. Thermal Design, Test and Analysis of PharmaSat, a Small Class D Spacecraft with a Biological Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Aguado, Millan F.; VanOutryve, Cassandra; Ghassemiah, Shakib; Beasley, Christopher; Schooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Small spacecraft have been increasing in popularity because of their low cost, short turnaround and relative efficiency. In the past, small spacecraft have been primarily used for technology demonstrations, but advances in technology have made the miniaturization of space science possible [1,2]. PharmaSat is a low cost, small three cube size spacecraft, with a biological experiment on board, built at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center. The thermal design of small spacecraft presents challenges as their smaller surface areas translate into power and thermal constraints. The spacecraft is thermally designed to run colder in the Low Earth Orbit space environment, and heated to reach the temperatures required by the science payload. The limited power supply obtained from the solar panels on small surfaces creates a constraint in the power used to heat the payload to required temperatures. The pressurized payload is isolated with low thermally conductance paths from the large ambient temperature changes. The thermal design consists of different optical properties of section surfaces, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI), low thermal conductance materials, flexible heaters and thermal spreaders. The payload temperature is controlled with temperature sensors and flexible heaters. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and testing were used to aid the thermal design of the spacecraft. Various tests were conducted to verify the thermal design. An infrared imager was used on the electronic boards to find large heat sources and eliminate any possible temperature runaways. The spacecraft was tested in a thermal vacuum chamber to optimize the thermal and power analysis and qualify the thermal design of the spacecraft for the mission.

  6. Life support and internal thermal control system design for the Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R.; Mitchell, K.; Reuter, J.; Carrasquillo, R.; Beverly, B.

    1991-01-01

    A Review of the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) as well as the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) design, including recent changes resulting from an activity to restructure the program, is provided. The development state of the original Space Station Freedom ECLSS through the restructured configuration is considered and the selection of regenerative subsystems for oxygen and water reclamation is addressed. A survey of the present ground development and verification program is given.

  7. Design of directional prism resonator made DPL operate in TEM00 mode with thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Changyong; Wang, Xiaobing; Sun, Bin; Guo, Yanlong; Wang, Guchang; Lin, Yi; Wan, Qiang

    2005-01-01

    An alignment-free directional prism resonator that ensures the laser TEM00 mode with thermal stability in a certain range is designed by using g* parameter equivalent method. The output of all solid state laser is about of 150mJ, and the beam divergence is of 3mrad with 20Hz repetition rate, moreover, when the laser operates from 10 to 30Hz, the beam divergence is steady. This laser meets the needs of special engineering application.

  8. Design and construction of thermal desorption measurement system for tritium contained materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, M.; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Shimada, M.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-mode thermal desorption analysis system was designed and built in Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to examine the evolution of the hydrogen isotope gas from materials. The system is equipped with a mass spectrometer for stable hydrogen isotopes and an ionization chamber for tritium components. The performance of the system built was tested with using tritium contained materials. The evolution of tritiated gas species from contaminated materials was measured successfully by using the system. (author)

  9. Design, enhanced Thermal and Flow efficiency of a 2KW active magnetic regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallolio, Stefano; Eriksen, Dan; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    power of 1500 W over a temperature span of 25 K. This paper explains several details of the device, such as the design of the magnet, the regenerator housing and the flow system. In particular, this paper investigates the best geometry for the regenerator bed to achieve a thermal and mechanically....... These quantities have been decreased by creating an embossment on the bottom surface of the regenerator and by placing a thin rubber sheet between the magnetocaloric material and the steel lid, respectively....

  10. Proof test on thermal and hydraulic design reliability of Japanese PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Inoue, Akira; Miyazaki, Keiji; Abeta, Sadaaki; Hori, Keiichi; Mukasa, Tomio; Oishi, Masao; Aoki, Toshimasa; Makihara, Yoshiaki.

    1990-01-01

    A series of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) tests for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was performed at the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. The objective was to prove the reliability of fuel assembly design by confirming the thermal margin of heat transfer. The present method for evaluating the DNB ratio in a Japanese 17 x 17 PWR core is adequate according to the newly obtained DNB test data

  11. Design optimization and analysis of selected thermal devices using self-adaptive Jaya algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.V.; More, K.C.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-adaptive Jaya algorithm is proposed for optimal design of thermal devices. • Optimization of heat pipe, cooling tower, heat sink and thermo-acoustic prime mover is presented. • Results of the proposed algorithm are better than the other optimization techniques. • The proposed algorithm may be conveniently used for the optimization of other devices. - Abstract: The present study explores the use of an improved Jaya algorithm called self-adaptive Jaya algorithm for optimal design of selected thermal devices viz; heat pipe, cooling tower, honeycomb heat sink and thermo-acoustic prime mover. Four different optimization case studies of the selected thermal devices are presented. The researchers had attempted the same design problems in the past using niched pareto genetic algorithm (NPGA), response surface method (RSM), leap-frog optimization program with constraints (LFOPC) algorithm, teaching-learning based optimization (TLBO) algorithm, grenade explosion method (GEM) and multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). The results achieved by using self-adaptive Jaya algorithm are compared with those achieved by using the NPGA, RSM, LFOPC, TLBO, GEM and MOGA algorithms. The self-adaptive Jaya algorithm is proved superior as compared to the other optimization methods in terms of the results, computational effort and function evalutions.

  12. Preliminary fluid channel design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of glow discharge cleaning permanent electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Lijun, E-mail: cailj@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Lin, Tao; Wang, Yingqiao; Wang, Mingxu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Maruyama, So; Yang, Yu; Kiss, Gabor [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The plasma facing closure cap has to survive after 30,000 thermal heat load cycles. • 0.35 MW/m2 radiation heat load plus nuclear heat load are very challenging for stainless steel. • Multilayer structure has been designed by using advanced welding and drilling technology to solve the neutron heating problem. • Accurate volumetric load application in analysis model by CFX has been mastered. - Abstract: Glow discharge cleaning (GDC) shall be used on ITER device to reduce and control impurity and hydrogenic fuel out-gassing from in-vessel plasma facing components. After first plasma, permanent electrode (PE) will be used to replace Temporary Electrode (TE) for subsequent operation. Two fundamental scenarios i.e., GDC and Plasma Operation State (POS) should be considered for electrode design, which requires the heat load caused by plasma radiation and neutron heating must be taken away by cooling water flowing inside the electrode. In this paper, multilayer cooling channels inside PE are preliminarily designed, and snakelike route in each layer is adopted to improve the heat exchange. Detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses have been done to validate the design feasibility or rationality. The analysis results show that during GDC the cooling water inlet and outlet temperature difference is far less than the allowable temperature rise under water flow rate 0.15 kg/s compromised by many factors. For POS, the temperature rise and pressure drop are within the design goals, but high thermal stress occurs on the front surface of closure cap of electrode. After several iterations of optimization of the closure cap, the equivalent strain range after 30,000 loading cycles for POS is well below 0.3% design goals.

  13. Design and Preliminary Thermal Performance of the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Beatty, John; Kelly, Frank; Birur, Gajanana; Bhandari, Pradeep; Pauken, Michael; Illsley, Peter; Liu, Yuanming; Bame, David; Miller, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The challenging range of proposed landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover requires a rover thermal management system that is capable of keeping temperatures controlled across a wide variety of environmental conditions. On the Martian surface where temperatures can be as cold as -123 degrees Centigrade and as warm as 38 degrees Centigrade, the Rover relies upon a Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) and external radiators to maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 degrees Centigrade to 50 degrees Centigrade range. The MPFL also manages significant waste heat generated from the Rover power source, known as the Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG). The MMRTG produces 110 Watts of electrical power while generating waste heat equivalent to approximately 2000 Watts. Two similar Heat Exchanger (HX) assemblies were designed to both acquire the heat from the MMRTG and radiate waste heat from the onboard electronics to the surrounding Martian environment. Heat acquisition is accomplished on the interior surface of each HX while heat rejection is accomplished on the exterior surface of each HX. Since these two surfaces need to be at very different temperatures in order for the MPFL to perform efficiently, they need to be thermally isolated from one another. The HXs were therefore designed for high in-plane thermal conductivity and extremely low through-thickness thermal conductivity by using aerogel as an insulator inside composite honeycomb sandwich panels. A complex assembly of hand welded and uniquely bent aluminum tubes are bonded onto the HX panels and were specifically designed to be easily mated and demated to the rest of the Rover Heat Recovery and Rejection System (RHRS) in order to ease the integration effort. During the cruise phase to Mars, the HX assemblies serve the additional function of transferring heat from the Rover MPFL to the separate Cruise Stage MPFL so that heat

  14. Solar engineering of thermal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Duffie, John A

    2013-01-01

    The updated fourth edition of the ""bible"" of solar energy theory and applications Over several editions, Solar Engineering of Thermal Processes has become a classic solar engineering text and reference. This revised Fourth Edition offers current coverage of solar energy theory, systems design, and applications in different market sectors along with an emphasis on solar system design and analysis using simulations to help readers translate theory into practice. An important resource for students of solar engineering, solar energy, and alternative energy as well

  15. The design of a position-sensitive thermal-neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yi; Chen Ziyu; Shen Ji

    2007-01-01

    We design a type of position-sensitive thermal-neutron detector. The design is based on the nuclear reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li, and solid boron-10 is used as the target material while the alpha and lithium-7 particles from the reaction are caught as the source of position information of the original neutrons. With the help of MCNP software, we simulate the distribution of alpha particles in the boron target, which leads to the optimal thickness of target, physical efficiency and position resolution. (authors)

  16. Study of NPP core thermal-hydraulics design of ABWR on steady state condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isnaini, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The core thermal-hydraulics calculation of ABWR on steady state condition using COBRA IV-1 code has been carried out. For simplifying the problem, the calculation was done on a fuel bundle of ABWR as a model. The calculation used several data design as input, such as the reactor power 3926 MWt, the core coolant flowrate 115.1 Mlb/hr and coolant enthalpy at core inlet 527.7 Btu/lb. From this simple calculation was hope that it could be used as an introduction to studi the thermohydraulics design of ABWR

  17. Mechanical and thermal design of an experiment aboard the space shuttle: the Spacelab spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrometer designed by ONERA and IASB (Belgium Space Aeronomy Institute) to measure atmospheric trace constituents was flown aboard Spacelab 1 during the 9 th mission of the American Space Shuttle from November 28 to December 8, 1983. After a brief summary of the history of the project related to Spacelab, the mechanical and thermal design of the spectrometer is described. Some methods, calculations and characteristic tests are detailed as examples. The behaviour of the experiment during the mission and the results of the post-flight tests are shortly analyzed in order to prepare the qualification for a reflight [fr

  18. Clock Gating Based Energy Efficient and Thermal Aware Design of Latin Unicode Reader for Natural Language Processing on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ritu; Kalia, Kartik; Minver, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract-In this paper we have aimed to design an energy efficient and thermally aware Latin Unicode Reader. Our design is based on 28nm FPGA (Kintex-7) and 40nm FPGA (Artix-7). In order to test the portability of our design, we are operating our design with respective frequency of different mobile...

  19. Thermal Hydraulic design parameters study for severe accidents using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Keun Sun [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To provide the information on severe accident progression is very important for advanced or new type of nuclear power plant (NPP) design. A parametric study, therefore, was performed to investigate the effect of thermal hydraulic design parameters on severe accident progression of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Nine parameters, which are considered important in NPP design or severe accident progression, were selected among the various thermal hydraulic design parameters. The backpropagation neural network (BPN) was used to determine parameters, which might more strongly affect the severe accident progression, among nine parameters. For training, different input patterns were generated by the latin hypercube sampling (LHS) technique and then different target patterns that contain core uncovery time and vessel failure time were obtained for Young Gwang Nuclear (YGN) Units 3 and 4 using modular accident analysis program (MAAP) 3.0B code. Three different severe accident scenarios, such as two loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and station blackout (SBO), were considered in this analysis. Results indicated that design parameters related to refueling water storage tank (RWST), accumulator and steam generator (S/G) have more dominant effects on the progression of severe accidents investigated, compared to the other six parameters. 9 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  20. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Design Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume describes system operation, a complete test program to verify mechanical reliability and thermal performance, fabrication and installation operations, and a cost analysis. (WHK)

  1. Design and experimental study of an integrated vapor chamber-thermal energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Krishna M.

    Future defense, aerospace and automotive technologies involve electronic systems that release high pulsed waste heat like during high power microwave and laser diode applications in tactical and combat aircraft, and electrical and electronic systems in hybrid electric vehicles, which will require the development of an efficient thermal management system. A key design issue is the need for fast charging so as not to overheat the key components. The goal of this work is to study the fabrication and technology implementation feasibility of a novel high energy storage, high heat flux passive heat sink. Key focus is to verify by theory and experiments, the practicability of using phase change materials as a temporary storage of waste heat for heat sink applications. The reason for storing the high heat fluxes temporarily is to be able to reject the heat at the average level when the heat source is off. Accordingly, a concept of a dual latent heat sink intended for moderate to low thermal duty cycle electronic heat sink applications is presented. This heat sink design combines the features of a vapor chamber with rapid thermal energy storage employing graphite foam inside the heat storage facility along with phase change materials and is attractive owing to its passive operation unlike some of the current thermal management techniques for cooling of electronics employing forced air circulation or external heat exchangers. In addition to the concept, end-application dependent criteria to select an optimized design for this dual latent heat sink are presented. A thermal resistance concept based design tool/model has been developed to analyze and optimize the design for experiments. The model showed that it is possible to have a dual latent heat sink design capable of handling 7 MJ of thermal load at a heat flux of 500 W/cm2 (over an area of 100 cm 2) with a volume of 0.072 m3 and weighing about 57.5 kg. It was also found that with such high heat flux absorption capability

  2. The working out of a design rule in case of structures submitted to thermal striping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeail, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal striping is a complex phenomenon involving incomplete mixing of hot and cold jets of fluid near a component surface, thus submitted to random fast temperature fluctuations. Because of his nature, the zones where thermal striping can occur in a fast breeder reactor are well known; these areas can suffer fatigue damage. It has been studied by several authors and some thermomechanical design rules against this fatigue damage have been proposed. In the french point of view, the problem is the determination of the margin between the mean and the design strain controlled fatigue curves, giving the allowable maximum temperature range that a component can sustain during his life without crack initiation. The purpose of this paper is the presentation of literature results (particularly on uniaxial smooth specimens) concerning the effects of different factors such as surface finish, environment, weldments, ageing, scatter of fatigue results, prior high strain cycling...on the high temperature fatigue life, which are of first importance for the determination of design factors in case of thermal striping. The remaining question is the combination of these factors. For the analysis of thermal striping test results, it is of great interest and importance to compare the crack initiation cycles and to use a coherent strain for uniaxial and equibiaxial fatigue results, as we show in the interpretation of FAENA and SPLASH tests (performed respectively by Y. Bergamaschi and B. Marini). An analysis based on elastic calculations as proposed in the RCCMR design code gives a good correlation, despite the ambiguous choice of some coefficients in best fit analysis. This problem disappears entirely in case of high cycles/low temperature variations. Then we present a strategy for the accomplishment of simplified thermal striping tests on the FAENA sodium loop in view of acquiring a better design factor knowledge. With this experimental program, we intend to study the interaction of

  3. Design and Testing of a Thermal Storage System for Electric Vehicle Cabin Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Mingyu [MAHLE Behr Troy Inc.; WolfeIV, Edward [MAHLE Behr Troy Inc.; Craig, Timothy [MAHLE Behr Troy Inc.; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Without the waste heat available from the engine of a conventional automobile, electric vehicles (EVs) must provide heat to the cabin for climate control using energy stored in the vehicle. In current EV designs, this energy is typically provided by the traction battery. In very cold climatic conditions, the power required to heat the EV cabin can be of a similar magnitude to that required for propulsion of the vehicle. As a result, the driving range of an EV can be reduced very significantly during winter months, which limits consumer acceptance of EVs and results in increased battery costs to achieve a minimum range while ensuring comfort to the EV driver. To minimize the range penalty associated with EV cabin heating, a novel climate control system that includes thermal energy storage has been designed for use in EVs and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The system uses the stored latent heat of an advanced phase change material (PCM) to provide cabin heating. The PCM is melted while the EV is connected to the electric grid for charging of the electric battery, and the stored energy is subsequently transferred to the cabin during driving. To minimize thermal losses when the EV is parked for extended periods, the PCM is encased in a high performance insulation system. The electrical PCM-Assisted Thermal Heating System (ePATHS) was designed to provide enough thermal energy to heat the EV s cabin for approximately 46 minutes, covering the entire daily commute of a typical driver in the U.S.

  4. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Preliminary design report, Appendices, Part 1 (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the developed computer models, water system dynamic studies, miscellaneous performance analysis, materials and processes, detailed equipment lists, turbine design studies, tube cleaner design, ammonia leak detection, and heat exchanger design supporting data. (WHK)

  5. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  6. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were

  7. An in-orbit Thermal Design of Optical Window in Space Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ran; Zhang, Hai-ying

    2017-10-01

    A complex space environment will influence a space solar telescope during its in-orbit operation, and the temperature change of the optical window will affect directly the imaging quality of the optical system behind it. The purpose of the thermal design is to ensure that all the parts of the optical window keep their temperature in a normal range, more importantly, to ensure that the window can rapidly return to its working state as soon as the Earth shadowing is ended, and to complete the operation in a whole period. In order to obtain the temperature distribution and the temperature variation of the window under the space thermal load in the whole period, we have made the steady-state simulation analysis and transient-state simulation analysis of the window with and without heating during the Earth-shadow time. A good thermal control result is obtained by comparing the two kinds of transient state simulation results of the temperature distribution, and by accordingly taking the appropriate thermal control measures on the window.

  8. Approaches to Outdoor Thermal Comfort Thresholds through Public Space Design: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Santos Nouri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Köppen Geiger (KG classification system, this review article examines existing studies and projects that have endeavoured to address local outdoor thermal comfort thresholds through Public Space Design (PSD. The review is divided into two sequential stages, whereby (1 overall existing approaches to pedestrian thermal comfort thresholds are reviewed within both quantitative and qualitative spectrums; and (2 the different techniques and measures are reviewed and framed into four Measure Review Frameworks (MRFs, in which each type of PSD measure is presented alongside its respective local scale urban specificities/conditions and their resulting thermal attenuation outcomes. The result of this review article is the assessment of how current practices of PSD within three specific subcategories of the KG ‘Temperate’ group have addressed microclimatic aggravations such as elevated urban temperatures and Urban Heat Island (UHI effects. Based upon a bottom-up approach, the interdisciplinary practice of PSD is hence approached as a means to address existing and future thermal risk factors within the urban public realm in an era of potential climate change.

  9. Hydration of Magnesium Carbonate in a Thermal Energy Storage Process and Its Heating Application Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickard Erlund

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available First ideas of applications design using magnesium (hydro carbonates mixed with silica gel for day/night and seasonal thermal energy storage are presented. The application implies using solar (or another heat source for heating up the thermal energy storage (dehydration unit during daytime or summertime, of which energy can be discharged (hydration during night-time or winter. The applications can be used in small houses or bigger buildings. Experimental data are presented, determining and analysing kinetics and operating temperatures for the applications. In this paper the focus is on the hydration part of the process, which is the more challenging part, considering conversion and kinetics. Various operating temperatures for both the reactor and the water (storage tank are tested and the favourable temperatures are presented and discussed. Applications both using ground heat for water vapour generation and using water vapour from indoor air are presented. The thermal energy storage system with mixed nesquehonite (NQ and silica gel (SG can use both low (25–50% and high (75% relative humidity (RH air for hydration. The hydration at 40% RH gives a thermal storage capacity of 0.32 MJ/kg while 75% RH gives a capacity of 0.68 MJ/kg.

  10. Thermal Properties of Microstrain Gauges Used for Protection of Lithium-Ion Cells of Different Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to use microstrain gauges to monitor minute changes in temperature along with material properties of the metal cans and pouches used in the construction of lithium-ion cells. The sensitivity of the microstrain gauges to extremely small changes in temperatures internal to the cells makes them a valuable asset in controlling the hazards in lithium-ion cells. The test program on lithium-ion cells included various cell configurations, including the pouch type configurations. The thermal properties of microstrain gauges have been found to contribute significantly as safety monitors in lithium-ion cells that are designed even with hard metal cases. Although the metal cans do not undergo changes in material property, even under worst-case unsafe conditions, the small changes in thermal properties observed during charge and discharge of the cell provide an observable change in resistance of the strain gauge. Under abusive or unsafe conditions, the change in the resistance is large. This large change is observed as a significant change in slope, and this can be used to prevent cells from going into a thermal runaway condition. For flexible metal cans or pouch-type lithium-ion cells, combinations of changes in material properties along with thermal changes can be used as an indication for the initiation of an unsafe condition. Lithium-ion cells have a very high energy density, no memory effect, and almost 100-percent efficiency of charge and discharge. However, due to the presence of a flammable electrolyte, along with the very high energy density and the capability of releasing oxygen from the cathode, these cells can go into a hazardous condition of venting, fire, and thermal runaway. Commercial lithium-ion cells have current and voltage monitoring devices that are used to control the charge and discharge of the batteries. Some lithium-ion cells have internal protective devices, but when used in multi-cell configurations, these protective

  11. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  12. SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

    1980-03-01

    The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

  13. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  14. Improving SFR Economics through Innovations from Thermal Design and Analysis Aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Vincent Mousseau; Per F. Peterson

    2008-06-01

    Achieving economic competitiveness as compared to LWRs and other Generation IV (Gen-IV) reactors is one of the major requirements for large-scale investment in commercial sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) power plants. Advances in R&D for advanced SFR fuel and structural materials provide key long-term opportunities to improve SFR economics. In addition, other new opportunities are emerging to further improve SFR economics. This paper provides an overview on potential ideas from the perspective of thermal hydraulics to improve SFR economics. These include a new hybrid loop-pool reactor design to further optimize economics, safety, and reliability of SFRs with more flexibility, a multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle to improve plant thermal efficiency and reduce safety related overnight and operation costs, and modern multi-physics thermal analysis methods to reduce analysis uncertainties and associated requirements for over-conservatism in reactor design. This paper reviews advances in all three of these areas and their potential beneficial impacts on SFR economics.

  15. Thermal Modelling and Design of On-board DC-DC Power Converter using Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Pittini, R.

    2014-01-01

    Power electronic converters are widely used and play a pivotal role in electronics area. The temperature causes around 54 % of all power converters failures. Thermal loads are nowadays one of the bottlenecks in the power system design and the cooling efficiency of a system is primarily determined...... the potential of such analysis was demonstrated by real-world measurements and comparison of obtained results. Thermal modelling was accomplished using finite element analysis software COMSOL and thermo-imaging camera was used to measure the thermal field distribution. Also, the improved configuration of power...... by numerical modelling techniques. Therefore, thermal design through thermal modelling and simulation is becoming an integral part of the design process as less expensive compared to the experimental cut-and-try approach. Here the investigation is performed using finite element method-based modelling, and also...

  16. Thermal Modeling and Design of On-board DC-DC Power Converter using Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Power electronic converters are widely used and play a pivotal role in electronics area . The temperature causes around 54 % of all power converters failures. Thermal loads are nowadays one of the bottlenecks in the power system design and the cooling efficiency of a system is primarily determined...... , and also the potential of such analysis was demonstrated by real - world measurements and comparison of obtained results . Thermal modeling was accomplishe d using finite element anal ysis software COMSOL and thermo - imaging camera was used to measure the thermal field distribution. Also, the improved...... by numerical modeling techniques. Therefore, thermal design through thermal modeling and simulation is becoming an integral part of the design process as less expensive compared to the experimenta l cut - and - try approach. Here the investigation is performed using finite element method - based modeling...

  17. Design and implementation of mixing chambers to improve thermal decomposition of urea for NOX abatement

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Junggil

    2012-10-01

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been reported as the most promising technique for adherence to NOX emissions regulations. In the urea-SCR process, NH3 is generated by urea thermal decomposition and hydrolysis and is then used as a reductant of NOX in the SCR catalyst. Therefore, improving the NOX conversion efficiency of urea-SCR requires enhancement of thermal decomposition upstream of the SCR catalyst. In the present work, two types of mixing chambers were designed and fabricated to improve urea thermal decomposition, and experiments with and without a mixing chamber were carried out to analyze thermal-decomposition characteristics of urea in the exhaust pipe with respect to inlet velocity (4-12μm/s) and temperature (350°C-500°C). Urea thermal decomposition is greatly enhanced at higher gas temperatures. At an inlet velocity of 6μm/s in the A-type mixing chamber, NH3 concentrations generated along the exhaust pipe were about 171% and 157% greater than those without the mixing chamber for inlet temperatures of 400°C and 500°C, respectively. In the case of the B-type mixing chamber, NH3 concentrations generated at inlet temperatures of 400°C and 500°C were about 147% and 179% greater than those without the mixing chamber, respectively. Note that the implementation of mixing chambers significantly enhanced conversion of urea to NH3 because it increased the residence time of urea in the exhaust pipe and improved mixing between urea and exhaust gas. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  18. Influence of site on thermal design of a two floor ZEH in the desert

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents the results of investigating the effect of Latitude angle and environmental temperature on the thermal behavior and performance of a fully equipped, air-conditioned, zero energy house located in a desert residential compound. It makes use of the thermal design and analysis tools presented in other work and extends the investigation to include different site environmental characteristics. Data from eight different meteorological sites in the KSA where considered. It is demonstrated that for the same house and occupancy profile, the PV modules, battery storage, and air-conditioning equipment requirements can differ markedly depending on local environment properties. During Summer and Spring the main heat load is due to cooling, but during winter season the load can vary from full cooling, to mixed cooling and heating, to even full heating; the heating load sometimes dictating the size of the required equipment. © 2010 IEEE.

  19. Design of Particle-Based Thermal Energy Storage for a Concentrating Solar Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiwen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Ruichong [Colorado School of Mines; Sawaged, Fadi [Colorado School of Mines

    2017-06-03

    Solid particles can operate at higher temperature than current molten salt or oil, and they can be a heat-transfer and storage medium in a concentrating solar power (CSP) system. By using inexpensive solid particles and containment material for thermal energy storage (TES), the particle-TES cost can be significantly lower than other TES methods such as a nitrate-salt system. The particle-TES system can hold hot particles at more than 800 degrees C with high thermal performance. The high particle temperatures increase the temperature difference between the hot and cold particles, and they improve the TES capacity. The particle-based CSP system is able to support high-efficiency power generation, such as the supercritical carbon-dioxide Brayton power cycle, to achieve >50% thermal-electric conversion efficiency. This paper describes a solid particle-TES system that integrates into a CSP plant. The hot particles discharge to a heat exchanger to drive the power cycle. The returning cold particles circulate through a particle receiver to absorb solar heat and charge the TES. This paper shows the design of a particle-TES system including containment silos, foundation, silo insulation, and particle materials. The analysis provides results for four TES capacities and two silo configurations. The design analysis indicates that the system can achieve high thermal efficiency, storage effectiveness (i.e., percentage usage of the hot particles), and exergetic efficiency. An insulation method for the hot silo was considered. The particle-TES system can achieve high performance and low cost, and it holds potential for next-generation CSP technology.

  20. Information integration of cad tools for thermal design of microelectronic devises components at critical modes of functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Fedasyuk, D.; Bobalo, S.; Markelov, O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the concepts of the Network-based information integration of CAD tools for the thermal design. The system architecture is built on power information technologies and provides remote access to the thermal modeling engine of icroelectronic devices and their components via Internet/Intranet.

  1. Total System Performance Assessment- License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis for Higher Thermal Load (Feature 26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N. Erb

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the effect of potential changes to the TSPA-VA base case design on long-term repository performance. The design feature that is evaluated in this report is a higher thermal load (Feature 26 or F26). The following paragraph briefly describes the motivation for evaluating higher thermal loading. Higher thermal load has been identified as a design feature that might have a beneficial effect on long-term repository performance. A higher thermal load will increase temperatures and decrease relative humidity on the waste package surface. The decrease in relative humidity may delay the onset of corrosion, thus delaying the failure of waste packages and the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system (EBS). For the current calculation a thermal load of 109 MTU/acre (metric tons of uranium per acre) is considered. Two cases are evaluated, one with the base case inventory and a higher thermal load and a second with an increased inventory that would cover the current repository footprint at the higher thermal load. This report documents the modeling assumptions and calculations conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of higher thermal loading. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories with the new design feature to that for the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M and O, 1998a)

  2. Total System Performance Assessment- License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis for Higher Thermal Loa (Feature 26)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Erb

    1999-06-11

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the effect of potential changes to the TSPA-VA base case design on long-term repository performance. The design feature that is evaluated in this report is a higher thermal load (Feature 26 or F26). The following paragraph briefly describes the motivation for evaluating higher thermal loading. Higher thermal load has been identified as a design feature that might have a beneficial effect on long-term repository performance. A higher thermal load will increase temperatures and decrease relative humidity on the waste package surface. The decrease in relative humidity may delay the onset of corrosion, thus delaying the failure of waste packages and the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system (EBS). For the current calculation a thermal load of 109 MTU/acre (metric tons of uranium per acre) is considered. Two cases are evaluated, one with the base case inventory and a higher thermal load and a second with an increased inventory that would cover the current repository footprint at the higher thermal load. This report documents the modeling assumptions and calculations conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of higher thermal loading. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories with the new design feature to that for the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O, 1998a).

  3. Mechanical design and thermal hydraulic considerations for a self-cooled lithium-lead blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid lithium-lead eutectic alloy (17 at-% Li83 at-% Pb, referred to herein as Li-Pb) is currently being considered as a candidate breeding material for fusion reactors. Some important considerations in the design of a Li-Pb blanket are compatibility with the structure, tritium containment and recovery, and safety. Additional design complexities arise because of the high density of Li-Pb, the relatively high melting temperature (235 0 C), and the high tritium overpressure associated with this alloy. In this study, the Li-Pb eutectic was considered both as the breeder and as the coolant. Thermal hydraulic and stress analyses were conducted to assess the technical feasibility of using Li-Pb as the breeder and coolant based on DEMO reactor conditions. The results of the thermo-mechanical analyses showed that the elongated cylindrical blanket modules made from either HT-9 or vanadium alloy offer a viable first wall/blanket design concept

  4. Efficient Thermally Conductive Strap Design for Cryogenic Propellant Tank Supports and Plumbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.; Christie, R.; Gebby, P.; Kashani, A.

    2012-01-01

    After evalu1ating NASA space architecture goals, the Office of Chief Technologist identified the need for developing enabling technology for long term loiters in space with cryogenic fluids. One such technology is structural heat interception. In this prototype, heat interception at the tank support strut was accomplished using a thermally conductive link to the broad area cooled shield. The design methodology for both locating the heat intercept and predicting the reduction in boil-off heat leak is discussed in detail. Results from the chosen design are presented. It was found that contact resistance resulting from different mechanical attachment techniques played a significant role in the form and functionality of a successful design.

  5. Solid-State Fault Current Limiter Development : Design and Testing Update of a 15kV SSCL Power Stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ram Adapa; Mr. Dante Piccone

    2012-04-30

    limiting or current interrupting capabilities. It can be applied to variety of applications from distribution class to transmission class power delivery grids and networks. It can also be applied to single major commercial and industrial loads and distributed generator supplies. The active switching of devices can be further utilized for protection of substation transformers. The stress on the system can be reduced substantially improving the life of the power system. It minimizes the voltage sag by speedy elimination of heavy fault currents and promises to be an important element of the utility power system. DOE Perspective This development effort is now focused on a 15kV system. This project will help mitigate the challenges of increasing available fault current. DOE has made a major contribution in providing a cost effective SSCL designed to integrate seamlessly into the Transmission and Distribution networks of today and the future. Approach SSCL development program for a 69kV SSCL was initiated which included the use of the Super GTO advanced semiconductor device which won the 2007 R&D100 Award. In the beginning, steps were identified to accomplish the economically viable design of a 69kV class Solid State Current Limiter that is extremely reliable, cost effective, and compact enough to be applied in urban transmission. The prime thrust in design and development was to encompass the 1000A and the 3000A ratings and provide a modular design to cover the wide range of applications. The focus of the project was then shifted to a 15kV class SSCL. The specifications for the 15kV power stack are reviewed. The design changes integrated into the 15kV power stack are discussed. In this Technical Update the complete project is summarized followed by a detailed test report. The power stack independent high voltage laboratory test requirements and results are presented. Keywords Solid State Current Limiter, SSCL, Fault Current Limiter, Fault Current Controller, Power electronics

  6. Thermal hydraulic design of the active part of the MEGAPIE target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tak, Nam Il; Cheng, X.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic analyses and design of the active part of the MEGAPIE target have been performed using the CFX 4.3 code in the present work. Three types of geometric configurations, i.e. with a flat guide tube, with a slanted guide tube and with an injection bypass are investigated with the main emphasis on the coolability of the beam window and the heat removal from the active part of the target. In the target with a flat guide tube flow stagnation occurs in the region near the window center. This leads to an excessive hot spot on the window surface. To improve the coolability of the window, two methods are proposed. By the first method the lower end of the inner cylinder is cut with an inclined cross sectoin. In this way, the axial-symmetry of the flow is destroyed and the flow stagnation zone near the window center is reduced. However, the improvement of heat transfer is insufficient to keep the window temperature below the design value. The second method is to introduce a bypass injection to remove the flow stagnation zone from the window center region. The CFX results show that with a bypass injection, the beam window can be sufficiently cooled down and the heat deposited in the target can be safely removed from the active part of the target. More optimization studies are required for designing a target with a bypass injection to obtain an optimum thermal hydraulic performance

  7. Optimizing the design of nanostructures for improved thermal conduction within confined spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jintu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maintaining constant temperature is of particular importance to the normal operation of electronic devices. Aiming at the question, this paper proposes an optimum design of nanostructures made of high thermal conductive nanomaterials to provide outstanding heat dissipation from the confined interior (possibly nanosized to the micro-spaces of electronic devices. The design incorporates a carbon nanocone for conducting heat from the interior to the exterior of a miniature electronic device, with the optimum diameter, D 0, of the nanocone satisfying the relationship: D0 2 (x ∝ x 1/2 where x is the position along the length direction of the carbon nanocone. Branched structure made of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs are shown to be particularly suitable for the purpose. It was found that the total thermal resistance of a branched structure reaches a minimum when the diameter ratio, β* satisfies the relationship: β* = γ -0.25b N -1/k* , where γ is ratio of length, b = 0.3 to approximately 0.4 on the single-walled CNTs, b = 0.6 to approximately 0.8 on the multiwalled CNTs, k* = 2 and N is the bifurcation number (N = 2, 3, 4 .... The findings of this research provide a blueprint in designing miniaturized electronic devices with outstanding heat dissipation. PACS numbers: 44.10.+i, 44.05.+e, 66.70.-f, 61.48.De

  8. Clock Gating Based Energy Efficient and Thermal Aware Design for Vedic Equation Solver on 28nm and 40nm FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Bishwajeet; Pandey, Sujeet; Sharma, Shivani

    2016-01-01

    equate that sum to zero and find the value of unknown variable. In order to test the portability of our design, we are operating our design with respective frequency of different mobile architecture. Operating frequency of iPhone 6 is 2100MHz. For thermal analysis of our energy efficient design, we have...

  9. Thermal aspects in the design of an HTGR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, U.S.

    1979-08-01

    HTGR graphite-based spent fuel has been thermally analyzed to provide data for a reprocessing design. Steps include crushing, burning in fluidized beds, size classification, dissolution, and solvent extraction. The principal problem is that the bunkers holding feed and product between steps need sizing for decay heat. Constraints have been set for different modes of cooling. However, criticality may prove stricter. Adverse effects of solvent degradation products in the Acid--Thorex process, mainly dibutyl phosphate (DBP), are reduced by using a partition flowsheet and by adding fluoride ions to the 1BX and 1CX columns

  10. Design and Characterization of a High Resolution Microfluidic Heat Flux Sensor with Thermal Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nam; Kim; Cho; Lee

    2010-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible process was used in the design and fabrication of a suspended membrane microfluidic heat flux sensor with a thermopile for the purpose of measuring the heat flow rate. The combination of a thirty-junction gold and nickel thermoelectric sensor with an ultralow noise preamplifier, a low pass filter, and a lock-in amplifier can yield a resolution 20 nW with a sensitivity of 461 V/W. The thermal modulation method is used to eliminate low-freque...

  11. Design and Fabrication of a Soil Moisture Meter Using Thermal Conductivity Properties of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir DAS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Study of soil for agricultural purposes is one of the main focuses of research since the beginning of civilization as food related requirements is closely linked with the soil. The study of soil has generated an interest among the researchers for very similar other reasons including understanding of soil water dynamics, evolution of agricultural water stress and validation of soil moisture modeling. In this present work design of a soil moisture measurement meter using thermal conductivity properties of soil has been proposed and experimental results are reported.

  12. Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic calculations to support recirculating steam generator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a number of applications of the THIRST thermal-hydraulics code to help resolve potential performance and reliability problems related to flow and energy maldistributions on the shell-side of recirculating steam generators. The applications considered are: flow-induced vibration of U-bend tubes subjected to non-uniform two-phase cross-flow, optimization of flow distribution baffle designs to maximize flow penetration of the tube bundle above the tubesheet and assessment of non-uniform steam-water separator loadings

  13. Design, simulation and optimization of a solar dish collector with spiral-coil thermal absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Saša R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient conversion of solar radiation into heat at high temperature levels requires the use of concentrating solar collectors. The goal of this paper is to present the optical and the thermal analysis of a parabolic dish concentrator with a spiral coil receiver. The parabolic dish reflector consists of 11 curvilinear trapezoidal reflective petals constructed by PMMA with silvered mirror layer and has a diameter of 3.8 m, while its focal distance is 2.26m. This collector is designed with commercial software SolidWorks and simulated, optically and thermally in its Flow Simulation Studio. The optical analysis proved that the ideal position of the absorber is at 2.1m from the reflector in order to maximize the optical efficiency and to create a relative uniform heat flux over the absorber. In thermal part of the analysis, the energetic efficiency was calculated approximately 65%, while the exergetic efficiency is varied from 4% to 15% according to the water inlet temperature. Moreover, other important parameters as the heat flux and temperature distribution over the absorber are presented. The pressure drop of the absorber coil is calculated at 0.07bar, an acceptable value.

  14. Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analysis of liquid lithium blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analyses were performed for the first-wall and blanket systems of tokamak-type fusion reactors under a typical set of design and operating conditions. The analytical results for lithium-cooled blanket cells show that with stainless steel as construction material and with no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 2 MW/m 2 and is limited by thermal stress criteria. With vanadium alloy as construction material and no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 8 MW/m 2 and is limited by an interplay of constraints imposed on the maximum allowable structural temperature and the minimum allowable coolant inlet temperature. With a divertor these wall loadings can be increased by from 40 to 90 percent. The cost of the vanadium system is found to be competitive with the stainless steel system because of the higher allowable structural temperatures and concomitant higher thermal efficiencies afforded by the vanadium alloys

  15. Thermal Design of the LORELEI Test Device Using a COMSOL Inverse Solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenha, H.; Gitelman, D.; Preker, I.; Arbel-Haddad, M.; Ferry, L.; Sasson, A.; Weiss, Y.; Katz, M.

    2014-01-01

    The LORELEI (Light-Water One-Rod Equipment for LOCA Experimental Investigation) test device in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is dedicated to study fuel thermo-mechanical behavior during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in power reactors. By using a displacement device, the fuel sample moves in the neutron flux field and generates heat according to its location. A typical fuel clad temperature variation has been defined which simulates some specific thermal conditions as in a real LOCA scenario. The design of the LORELEI test device should be able to produce this temperature variation profile by the movement of the experimental setup on the displacement device. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model that calculates, for a given geometry, the transient device position that will generate the desired clad temperature profile. The LOCA-type transient sequence has four major features: „h An adiabatic heating of the fuel up to the ballooning and burst occurrence. „h High temperature plateau which will promote clad oxidation. „h Passive precooling by thermal inertia. This work will present the thermal analysis of the LORELEI test device, performed using the COMSOL model. The sensitivity of cladding temperature to various parameters such as cladding strain level, fuel porosity and oxidation reaction model was investigated. Figure 1 presents schematic representation of the cladding ballooning and strain level and experimental observation of cladding burst. Some results of the parametric study will be presented

  16. Thermal Design Feasibility of Th-{sup 233}U PWR Breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volasky, Daphna; Shwageraus, Eugene [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Fridman, Emil [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung, Dresden 01314 (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The Light Water Breeder Reactor program (LWBR) proved that a sustainable closed fuel cycle based on reprocessed uranium {sup 233}U and {sup 232}Th feed is possible without the need to develop an advanced and costly fast reactor technology. The LWBR design relied on a complex movable fuel reactivity control to achieve neutron economy necessary for breeding ratio (BR) higher than unity. Theoretically, Th-{sup 233}U is the only practical combination capable of self-sustainable breeding in the thermal spectrum. Recently, sustainable development with respect to energy and natural resources consumption has become one of the top research priorities. Therefore, Th-based fuel cycle should be reconsidered with a shift in the design objectives, where savings in natural resources becomes important, in addition to non-proliferation and waste issues. In previous studies, we explored the basic possibility of achieving a self-sustainable, with respect to fissile material requirements, Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle that can be adopted in the current generation of Pressurized Water Reactors. Clearly, the use of movable fuel for reactivity control, as employed in LWBR, is not an option nowadays. However, high conversion ratio can be achieved in LWRs through the use of advanced materials, heterogeneous reactor core structure and careful optimization of fuel composition. Neutronic studies performed on fuel assembly level for the modified PWR assembly designs with BOXER computer code suggested that net breeding of {sup 233}U is possible in principle within a typical PWR operating envelope. As shown previously, considerable core design tradeoffs would be necessary to achieve breeding in PWRs without movable fuel reactivity control. In the new assembly design, most of the initial fissile material is concentrated in relatively small 'seed' regions, which causes a large power peak. Therefore, some reduction in the core power density would be required in order to assure the core safety

  17. Road Edge of Pavement, Pavement Condition Ratings and Maintenance Designations per Street Centerline. Updated frequently by Public Works Streets Division, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, City of Asheville Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Road Edge of Pavement dataset current as of 2006. Pavement Condition Ratings and Maintenance Designations per Street Centerline. Updated frequently by Public Works...

  18. Steam generator thermal hydraulic design & functional architecture features and related operational and reliability issues requiring consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarner, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Proper thermal hydraulic design and functional architecture are critical to successful steam generator operation and long term reliability. The evolution of steam generators has been a gradual learning process that has benefited from continuous industry operational experience (OPEX). Inadequate thermal hydraulic design can lead to numerous degradation mechanisms such as excessive deposition, corrosion, flow and level instabilities, fluid-elastic instabilities and tube wear. The functional architecture determines the health of the tube bundle and the other internals during manufacturing, handling and operation. It also determines thermal performance as well as establishing global thermal-hydraulic characteristics such as water level shrink and swell response. This paper discusses the range of operational and reliability issues and relates them to the thermal hydraulic attributes and functional architecture of steam generators (many SG reliability issues are further discussed in other presentations at this conference). In pursuing such issues, the paper focuses on the four major features of the equipment, identifying in each case the goals and requirements such features must meet. Typical approaches and the means by which such requirements are addressed in current equipment are discussed. The four features are: 1. Tubing Material and Tube Bundle Heat Transfer Performance; a. Two materials are in current use – Alloy 690 TT and Alloy 800. Both are good materials with excellent performance records which serve their owners very well (the reliability attributes of Alloy 800 and 690 are discussed in other papers at this conference). Caution is advised in the supply of any material: – material quality is only assured by what is specified to material suppliers in procurement specifications – i.e. - all the knowledge and research in the world assures nothing if its findings are not reflected in procurement requirements. b. Heat transfer performance in addition to being

  19. Robust design for shape parameters of high pressure thermal vapor compressor by numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Il Seouk

    2008-01-01

    A high motive pressure Thermal Vapor Compressor(TVC) for a commercial Multi-Effect Desalination(MED) plant is designed to have a high entraining performance and its robustness is also considered in the respect of operating stability at the abrupt change of the operating pressures like the motive and suction steam pressure which can be easily fluctuated by the external disturbance. The TVC having a good entraining performance of more than entrainment ratio 6.0 is designed through the iterative CFD analysis for the various primary nozzle diameter, mixing tube diameter and mixing tube length. And then for a couple of TVC having a similar entrainment ratio, the changes of the entrainment ratio are checked along the motive and suction pressure change. The system stability is diagnosed through the analyzing the changing pattern of the entrainment ratio

  20. Evolutionary algorithms for multi-objective energetic and economic optimization in thermal system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffolo, A.; Lazzaretto, A.

    2002-01-01

    Thermoeconomic analyses in thermal system design are always focused on the economic objective. However, knowledge of only the economic minimum may not be sufficient in the decision making process, since solutions with a higher thermodynamic efficiency, in spite of small increases in total costs, may result in much more interesting designs due to changes in energy market prices or in energy policies. This paper suggests how to perform a multi-objective optimization in order to find solutions that simultaneously satisfy exergetic and economic objectives. This corresponds to a search for the set of Pareto optimal solutions with respect to the two competing objectives. The optimization process is carried out by an evolutionary algorithm, that features a new diversity preserving mechanism using as a test case the well-known CGAM problem. (author)

  1. Feasibility study for objective oriented design of system thermal hydraulic analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Jeong, Jae Jun; Hwang, Moon Kyu

    2008-01-01

    The system safety analysis code, such as RELAP5, TRAC, CATHARE etc. have been developed based on Fortran language during the past few decades. Refactoring of conventional codes has been also performed to improve code readability and maintenance. However the programming paradigm in software technology has been changed to use objects oriented programming (OOP), which is based on several techniques, including encapsulation, modularity, polymorphism, and inheritance. In this work, objective oriented program for system safety analysis code has been tried utilizing modernized C language. The analysis, design, implementation and verification steps for OOP system code development are described with some implementation examples. The system code SYSTF based on three-fluid thermal hydraulic solver has been developed by OOP design. The verifications of feasibility are performed with simple fundamental problems and plant models. (author)

  2. Redefining thermal regimes to design reserves for coral reefs in the face of climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana Chollett

    Full Text Available Reef managers cannot fight global warming through mitigation at local scale, but they can use information on thermal patterns to plan for reserve networks that maximize the probability of persistence of their reef system. Here we assess previous methods for the design of reserves for climate change and present a new approach to prioritize areas for conservation that leverages the most desirable properties of previous approaches. The new method moves the science of reserve design for climate change a step forwards by: (1 recognizing the role of seasonal acclimation in increasing the limits of environmental tolerance of corals and ameliorating the bleaching response; (2 using the best proxy for acclimatization currently available; (3 including information from several bleaching events, which frequency is likely to increase in the future; (4 assessing relevant variability at country scales, where most management plans are carried out. We demonstrate the method in Honduras, where a reassessment of the marine spatial plan is in progress.

  3. Thermal/structural/optical integrated design for optical sensor mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaopeng; Yang, Hongtao; Mei, Chao; Wu, Dengshan; Shi, Kui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology and the promotion of many local wars in the world, altitude optical sensor mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle is more widely applied in the airborne remote sensing, measurement and detection. In order to obtain high quality image of the aero optical remote sensor, it is important to analysis its thermal-optical performance on the condition of high speed and high altitude. Especially for the key imaging assembly, such as optical window, the temperature variation and temperature gradient can result in defocus and aberrations in optical system, which will lead to the poor quality image. In order to improve the optical performance of a high speed aerial camera optical window, the thermal/structural/optical integrated design method is developed. Firstly, the flight environment of optical window is analyzed. Based on the theory of aerodynamics and heat transfer, the convection heat transfer coefficient is calculated. The temperature distributing of optical window is simulated by the finite element analysis software. The maximum difference in temperature of the inside and outside of optical window is obtained. Then the deformation of optical window under the boundary condition of the maximum difference in temperature is calculated. The optical window surface deformation is fitted in Zernike polynomial as the interface, the calculated Zernike fitting coefficients is brought in and analyzed by CodeV Optical Software. At last, the transfer function diagrams of the optical system on temperature field are comparatively analyzed. By comparing and analyzing the result, it can be obtained that the optical path difference caused by thermal deformation of the optical window is 138.2 nm, which is under PV ≤1 4λ . The above study can be used as an important reference for other optical window designs.

  4. Design and analysis of a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket reactor engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Satira, E-mail: Satira.Labib@duke-energy.com; King, Jeffrey, E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three NTR reactors are optimized for the single stage launch of 1–15 MT payloads. • The proposed rocket engines have specific impulses in excess of 700 s. • Reactivity and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each reactor. - Abstract: Recent advances in the development of high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This paper describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 800 s. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. The 40 cm long reactor meets the submersion criticality requirements (a shutdown margin of at least $1 subcritical in all submersion scenarios) with no further modifications. The 80 and 120 cm long reactors include small amounts of gadolinium nitride as a spectral shift absorber to keep them subcritical upon submersion in seawater or wet sand following a launch abort.

  5. The Influence of PV Module Materials and Design on Solder Joint Thermal Fatigue Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Nick; Silverman, Timothy J.; Kurtz, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Finite element model (FEM) simulations have been performed to elucidate the effect of flat plate photovoltaic (PV) module materials and design on PbSn eutectic solder joint thermal fatigue durability. The statistical method of Latin Hypercube sampling was employed to investigate the sensitivity of simulated damage to each input variable. Variables of laminate material properties and their thicknesses were investigated. Using analysis of variance, we determined that the rate of solder fatigue was most sensitive to solder layer thickness, with copper ribbon and silicon thickness being the next two most sensitive variables. By simulating both accelerated thermal cycles (ATCs) and PV cell temperature histories through two characteristic days of service, we determined that the acceleration factor between the ATC and outdoor service was independent of the variables sampled in this study. This result implies that an ATC test will represent a similar time of outdoor exposure for a wide range of module designs. This is an encouraging result for the standard ATC that must be universally applied across all modules.

  6. Mechatronics design and experimental verification of an electric-vehicle-based hybrid thermal management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Hung

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an electric-vehicle-based thermal management system was designed for dual energy sources. An experimental platform developed in a previous study was modified. Regarding the mechanical components, a heat exchanger with a radiator, proportional valve, coolant pipes, and coolant pump was appropriately integrated. Regarding the electric components, two heaters emulating waste heat were controlled using two programmable power supply machines. A rapid-prototyping controller with two temperature inputs and three outputs was designed. Rule-based control strategies were coded to maintain optimal temperatures for the emulated proton exchange membrane fuel cells and lithium batteries. To evaluate the heat power of dual energy sources, driving cycles, energy management control, and efficiency maps of energy sources were considered for deriving time-variant values. The main results are as follows: (a an advanced mechatronics platform was constructed; (b a driving cycle simulation was successfully conducted; and (c coolant temperatures reached their optimal operating ranges when the proportional valve, radiator, and coolant pump were sequentially controlled. The benefits of this novel electric-vehicle-based thermal management system are (a high-efficiency operation of energy sources, (b low occupied volume integrated with energy sources, and (c higher electric vehicle traveling mileage. This system will be integrated with real energy sources and a real electric vehicle in the future.

  7. Design experiences of the first solar parabolic thermal power plant for various regions in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizian, K.; Yaghoubi, M.; Kenary, A.

    2002-01-01

    The basic design is made for a 250 kw solar power plant. The main element of the plant is the collectors. Base on system simulation, a parabolic collector constructed and tested for one year. The model is first validated with experimental measurement and a detail numerical model is also developed to study effects of various optical properties of mirrors and receiver on the thermal performance of the collectors. It is observed that due to poor optical properties of the present collector, it would not be able to produce hot oil with desired temperature. Improving the material of the mirrors and the receiver tube, thermal performances exceed substantially from the design conditions. By considering available optical properties simulation is made to estimate yearly steady and unsteady behavior and the performance of the power plant for three locations: Shiraz, Yazd and Lar in Iran. Comparison of the yearly performance of the cycle shows that unsteady behavior reveals different results and simulations approach a reliable technique to study such cycle

  8. Design, fabrication and performance of a hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) active solar still

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Shiv; Tiwari, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Two solar stills (single slope passive and single slope photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) active solar still) were fabricated and tested at solar energy park, IIT New Delhi (India) for composite climate. Photovoltaic operated DC water pump was used between solar still and photovoltaic (PV) integrated flat plate collector to re-circulate the water through the collectors and transfer it to the solar still. The newly designed hybrid (PV/T) active solar still is self-sustainable and can be used in remote areas, need to transport distilled water from a distance and not connected to grid, but blessed with ample solar energy. Experiments were performed for 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 m water depth, round the year 2006-2007 for both the stills. It has been observed that maximum daily yield of 2.26 kg and 7.22 kg were obtained from passive and hybrid active solar still, respectively at 0.05 m water depth. The daily yield from hybrid active solar still is around 3.2 and 5.5 times higher than the passive solar still in summer and winter month, respectively. The study has shown that this design of the hybrid active solar still also provides higher electrical and overall thermal efficiency, which is about 20% higher than the passive solar still.

  9. Design and construction of a thermal evaporation unit for laser isotope separation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazmati, A. K.; Al-Khawwam, A.

    2008-01-01

    A thermal evaporation unit has been ,especially, designed and constructed to fit in the laboratory chamber, which is already constructed for laser isotope separation project. The evaporation unit consists of three parts: an evaporator, a thermal isolation unit and a cooling jacket. The evaporator designed so that it produces the Yb metal vapour through a thin slit. The sheet of the vapour that comes out of the slit diverts and crosses the three laser beams that are needed for the isotope separation process. The diversion of the metal vapour sheet helps in optimizing the interaction volume between the metal vapour and the laser beams. The temperature of the evaporator can reach up to 800 Centigrade homogeneously along the slit. Less than 800 Centigrade temperature is needed to sublimate the Yb metal (powder form) in the vacuum chamber at about 10-6 mbar as has been tested. The temperature of the evaporator is controlled by the current , which passes through the heating wires. (author)

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Desigh Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume presents the preliminary design configuration and system optimization. (WHK)

  11. Effects of street canyon design on pedestrian thermal comfort in the hot-humid area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Du, Xiaohan; Shi, Yurong

    2017-08-01

    The design characteristics of street canyons were investigated in Guangzhou in the hot-humid area of China, and the effects of the design factors and their interactions on pedestrian thermal comfort were studied by numerical simulations. The ENVI-met V4.0 (BASIC) model was validated by field observations and used to simulate the micrometeorological conditions and the standard effective temperature (SET) at pedestrian level of the street canyons for a typical summer day of Guangzhou. The results show that the micrometeorological parameters of mean radiant temperature (MRT) and wind speed play key roles in pedestrian thermal comfort. Street orientation has the largest contribution on SET at pedestrian level, followed by aspect ratio and greenery, while surface albedo and interactions between factors have small contributions. The street canyons oriented southeast-northwest or with a higher aspect ratio provide more shade, higher wind speed, and better thermal comfort conditions for pedestrians. Compared with the east-west-oriented street canyons, the north-south-oriented street canyons have higher MRTs and worse pedestrian thermal comfort due to their wider building spacing along the street. The effects of greenery change with the road width and the time of the day. Street canyon design is recommended to improve pedestrian thermal comfort. This study provides a better understanding of the effects of street canyon design on pedestrian thermal comfort and is a useful guide on urban design for the hot-humid area of China.

  12. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  13. Environmental conditions using thermal-hydraulics computer code GOTHIC for beyond design basis external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleskunas, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi beyond design basis accident in March 2011, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Order EA-12-049, 'Issuance of Order to Modify Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation Strategies Beyond-Design-Basis-External-Events'. To outline the process to be used by individual licensees to define and implement site-specific diverse and flexible mitigation strategies (FLEX) that reduce the risks associated with beyond design basis conditions, Nuclear Energy Institute document NEI 12-06, 'Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (FLEX) Implementation Guide', was issued. A beyond design basis external event (BDBEE) is postulated to cause an Extended Loss of AC Power (ELAP), which will result in a loss of ventilation which has the potential to impact room habitability and equipment operability. During the ELAP, portable FLEX equipment will be used to achieve and maintain safe shutdown, and only a minimal set of instruments and controls will be available. Given these circumstances, analysis is required to determine the environmental conditions in several vital areas of the Nuclear Power Plant. The BDBEE mitigating strategies require certain room environments to be maintained such that they can support the occupancy of personnel and the functionality of equipment located therein, which is required to support the strategies associated with compliance to NRC Order EA-12-049. Three thermal-hydraulic analyses of vital areas during an extended loss of AC power using the GOTHIC computer code will be presented: 1) Safety-related pump and instrument room transient analysis; 2) Control Room transient analysis; and 3) Auxiliary/Control Building transient analysis. GOTHIC (Generation of Thermal-Hydraulic Information for Containment) is a general purpose thermal-hydraulics software package for the analysis of nuclear power plant containments, confinement buildings, and system components. It is a volume/path/heat sink

  14. Experimental design for the evaluation of high-T(sub c) superconductive thermal bridges in a sensor satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine P.; Lee, Kasey M.

    1994-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites, which consist of cryogenic infrared sensor detectors, electrical instrumentation, and data acquisition systems, are used to monitor the conditions of the earth's upper atmosphere in order to evaluate its present and future changes. Currently, the electrical connections (instrumentation), which act as thermal bridges between the cryogenic infrared sensor and the significantly warmer data acquisition unit of the sensor satellite system, constitute a significant portion of the heat load on the cryogen. As a part of extending the mission life of the sensor satellite system, the researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) are evaluating the effectiveness of replacing the currently used manganin wires with high-temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as the electrical connections (thermal bridges). In conjunction with the study being conducted at NASA-LaRC, the proposed research is to design a space experiment to determine the thermal savings on a cryogenic subsystem when manganin leads are replaced by HTS leads printed onto a substrate with a low thermal conductivity, and to determine the thermal conductivities of HTS materials. The experiment is designed to compare manganin wires with two different types of superconductors on substrates by determining the heat loss by the thermal bridges and providing temperature measurements for the estimation of thermal conductivity. A conductive mathematical model has been developed and used as a key tool in the design process and subsequent analysis.

  15. Thermohydraulic Design Analysis Modeling for Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival, although the harsh space environment imposes lots of severe challenges to space pioneers. To date, almost all space programs have relied upon Chemical Rockets (CRs) rating superior thrust level to transit from the Earth's surface to its orbit. However, CRs inherently have insurmountable barrier to carry out deep space missions beyond Earth's orbit due to its low propellant efficiency, and ensuing enormous propellant requirement and launch costs. Meanwhile, nuclear rockets typically offer at least two times the propellant efficiency of a CR and thus notably reduce the propellant demand. Particularly, a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term manned missions to Mars and beyond because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high efficiency. The superior efficiency of NTRs is due to both high energy density of nuclear fuel and the low molecular weight propellant of Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) over the chemical reaction by-products. A NTR uses thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat the H{sub 2} propellant and then exhausted the highly heated propellant through a propelling nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (I{sub s}p) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the propellant consumption rate. If the average exhaust H{sub 2} temperature of a NTR is around 3,000 K, the I{sub s}p can be achieved as high as 1,000 s as compared with only 450 - 500 s of the best CRs. For this reason, NTRs are favored for various space applications such as orbital tugs, lunar transports, and manned missions to Mars and beyond. The best known NTR development effort was conducted from 1955 to1974 under the ROVER and NERVA programs in the USA. These programs had successfully designed and tested many different reactors and engines. After these projects, the researches on NERVA derived

  16. The 25 kWe solar thermal Stirling hydraulic engine system: Conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Maurice; Emigh, Grant; Noble, Jack; Riggle, Peter; Sorenson, Torvald

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to a 11 meter test bed concentrator is documented. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000 hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, more than 33.3 percent overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk.

  17. Summary of particle bed reactor designs for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1993-09-01

    A summary report of the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designs considered for the space nuclear thermal propulsion program has been prepared. The first chapters outline the methods of analysis, and their validation. Monte Carlo methods are used for the physics analysis, several new algorithms are used for the fluid dynamics heat transfer and engine system analysis, and commercially available codes are used for the stress analysis. A critical experiment, prototypic of the PBR was used for the physics validation, and blowdown experiments using fuel beds of prototypic dimensions were used to validate the power extraction capabilities from particle beds. In all four different PBR rocket reactor designs were studied to varying degrees of detail. They varied in power from 400 MW to 2000 MW. These designs were all characterized by a negative prompt coefficient, due to Doppler feedback, and the feedback due to moderator heat up varied from slightly negative to slightly positive. In all practical cases, the coolant worth was positive, although core configurations with negative coolant worth could be designed. In all practical cases the thrust/weight ratio was greater than 20.

  18. The HYSPIRI Decadal Survey Mission: Update on the Mission Concept and Science Objectives for Global Imaging Spectroscopy and Multi-Spectral Thermal Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Hook, Simon J.; Middleton, Elizabeth; Turner, Woody; Ungar, Stephen; Knox, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The NASA HyspIRI mission is planned to provide global solar reflected energy spectroscopic measurement of the terrestrial and shallow water regions of the Earth every 19 days will all measurements downlinked. In addition, HyspIRI will provide multi-spectral thermal measurements with a single band in the 4 micron region and seven bands in the 8 to 12 micron region with 5 day day/night coverage. A direct broadcast capability for measurement subsets is also planned. This HyspIRI mission is one of those designated in the 2007 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey: Earth Science and Applications from Space. In the Decadal Survey, HyspIRI was recognized as relevant to a range of Earth science and science applications, including climate: "A hyperspectral sensor (e.g., FLORA) combined with a multispectral thermal sensor (e.g., SAVII) in low Earth orbit (LEO) is part of an integrated mission concept [described in Parts I and II] that is relevant to several panels, especially the climate variability panel." The HyspIRI science study group was formed in 2008 to evaluate and refine the mission concept. This group has developed a series of HyspIRI science objectives: (1) Climate: Ecosystem biochemistry, condition & feedback; spectral albedo; carbon/dust on snow/ice; biomass burning; evapotranspiration (2) Ecosystems: Global plant functional types, physiological condition, and biochemistry including agricultural lands (3) Fires: Fuel status, fire frequency, severity, emissions, and patterns of recovery globally (4) Coral reef and coastal habitats: Global composition and status (5) Volcanoes: Eruptions, emissions, regional and global impact (6) Geology and resources: Global distributions of surface mineral resources and improved understanding of geology and related hazards These objectives are achieved with the following measurement capabilities. The HyspIRI imaging spectrometer provides: full spectral coverage from 380 to 2500 at 10 nm sampling; 60 m spatial sampling

  19. JPL Thermal Design Modeling Philosophy and NASA-STD-7009 Standard for Models and Simulations - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The Standard JPL thermal engineering practice prescribes worst-case methodologies for design. In this process, environmental and key uncertain thermal parameters (e.g., thermal blanket performance, interface conductance, optical properties) are stacked in a worst case fashion to yield the most hot- or cold-biased temperature. Thus, these simulations would represent the upper and lower bounds. This, effectively, represents JPL thermal design margin philosophy. Uncertainty in the margins and the absolute temperatures is usually estimated by sensitivity analyses and/or by comparing the worst-case results with "expected" results. Applicability of the analytical model for specific design purposes along with any temperature requirement violations are documented in peer and project design review material. In 2008, NASA released NASA-STD-7009, Standard for Models and Simulations. The scope of this standard covers the development and maintenance of models, the operation of simulations, the analysis of the results, training, recommended practices, the assessment of the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) credibility, and the reporting of the M&S results. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project thermal control system M&S activity was chosen as a case study determining whether JPL practice is in line with the standard and to identify areas of non-compliance. This paper summarizes the results and makes recommendations regarding the application of this standard to JPL thermal M&S practices.

  20. Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: thermal storage subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 8 (Approved)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-17

    The Thermal Storage Subsystem Research Experiment is designed to give maximum information for evaluating the design, performance, and operating parameters of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. The experiment is summarized, and the experiment components detail design and integration are described. The experiment test and operation is described which is designed to collect engineering data to allow the design, performance, and operational characteristics to be specified for the Pilot Plant. Appended are: design documentation; pressure drop calculations; materials studies for thermal energy storage; flow charts for data acquisition and control; condenser detail design; instrumentation error analysis; logic diagrams for the control system; literature survey to evaluate the two-phase forced convection heat transfer; and the vaporizer performance model. (LEW)

  1. Design and Tests of a High-Performance Long-Wave Infrared Refractive Thermal Imager: Freeform Lens in Coaxial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we used a freeform lens in a long-wave, un-cooled, refractive infrared (IR thermal imager and present the design strategy and test results. This optical system is composed of only one freeform lens and several spheres. It can correct the distortion issue inherent to wide field-of-view systems more effectively, and achieve a better thermal imaging performance simultaneously compared to traditional aspheric optical lenses. Such a design model can alleviate the calculation load and cater for the demand of the ultra-precision turning on single crystal germanium. It satisfies the design idea of freeform surfaces with machining feasibility. The refractive freeform IR imager can be realized from the theoretical design to the engineering applications. The research contents of this paper are helpful for the further application of the freeform lens to a more complex cooled infrared refractive thermal imager.

  2. Design of a compact thermal ionization mass spectrometer for isotopic ratio measurement of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.K.; Yadav, V.K.; Ravisankar, E.; Nataraju, V.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    High precision isotope ratio analysis of materials of interest in nuclear and geological applications is carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) technique. One of the important mandates of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been developing these instruments and several TIMS instruments have been developed and deployed at user sites covering a wide range material of interest relevant to various stages of the nuclear power cycle. The instrument designs for above applications are based on two geometries of magnetic sector ie., 15 cm sector radius and 30 cm sector radius with resolutions as 200 and 400 respectively. There has been a conscious effort to improve the the sensitivity and precision of these models by modifying the designs of the sub-systems. In the recent past, a new ion optical element viz., variable dispersion zoom optics (VDZO) was introduced in the collector system of the standard model with 30cm radius magnet, to increase the dispersion of the ion beams which enabled to fix the locations of the Faraday cups (upto 6 nos.) instead of the conventional movable ones. After establishing the usefulness of VDZO, an attempt is being made to design and develop a 20 cm magnet based TIMS which will have a much smaller foot print compared to the standard 30 cm model and also covers the usual range of elements (viz. Li - U). The ion optical design was optimized using computer simulations with SIMION 7.0 software and subsequently the mechanical design was carried out using Autocad computer software. Some of the details of this new design are presented in this abstract

  3. Computational Design of Non-natural Sugar Alcohols to Increase Thermal Storage Density: Beyond Existing Organic Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Taichi; Ishida, Toyokazu

    2016-09-14

    Thermal storage, a technology that enables us to control thermal energy, makes it possible to reuse a huge amount of waste heat, and materials with the ability to treat larger thermal energy are in high demand for energy-saving societies. Sugar alcohols are now one promising candidate for phase change materials (PCMs) because of their large thermal storage density. In this study, we computationally design experimentally unknown non-natural sugar alcohols and predict their thermal storage density as a basic step toward the development of new high performance PCMs. The non-natural sugar alcohol molecules are constructed in silico in accordance with the previously suggested molecular design guidelines: linear elongation of a carbon backbone, separated distribution of OH groups, and even numbers of carbon atoms. Their crystal structures are then predicted using the random search method and first-principles calculations. Our molecular simulation results clearly demonstrate that the non-natural sugar alcohols have potential ability to have thermal storage density up to ∼450-500 kJ/kg, which is significantly larger than the maximum thermal storage density of the present known organic PCMs (∼350 kJ/kg). This computational study suggests that, even in the case of H-bonded molecular crystals where the electrostatic energy contributes mainly to thermal storage density, the molecular distortion and van der Waals energies are also important factors to increase thermal storage density. In addition, the comparison between the three eight-carbon non-natural sugar alcohol isomers indicates that the selection of preferable isomers is also essential for large thermal storage density.

  4. Design principles of a simple and safe 200-MW(thermal) nuclear district heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzmann, C.; Bittermann, D.; Gobel, A.

    1987-01-01

    Kraftwerk Union AG has almost completed the development of a dedicated 200-MW(thermal) nuclear district heating plant to provide environmentally clean energy at a predictably low cost. The concept can easily be adapted to meet power requirements within the 100- to 500-MW(thermal) range. This technology is the product of the experience gained with large pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor power plants, with respect to both plant and fuel performance. The major development task is that of achieving sufficiently low capital cost by tailoring components and systems designed for large plants to the specific requirements of district heating. These requirements are small absolute power, low temperatures and pressures, and modest load following, all of which result in the characteristics that are summarized. A fully integrated primary system with natural circulation permits a very compact reactor building containing all safety-related systems and components. Plant safety is essentially guaranteed by inherent features. The reactor containment is tightly fitted around the reactor pressure vessel in such a way that, in the event of any postulated coolant leak, the core cannot become uncovered, even temporarily. Shutdown is assured by gravity drop of the control rods mounted above the core. Decay heat is removed from the core by means of natural circulation via dedicated intermediate circuits of external aircoolers

  5. To MARS and Beyond with Nuclear Power - Design Concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung

    2013-01-01

    The President Park of ROK has also expressed support for space program promotion, praising the success of NARO as evidence of a positive outlook. These events hint a strong signal that ROK's space program will be accelerated by the national eager desire. In this national eager desire for space program, the policymakers and the aerospace engineers need to pay attention to the advanced nuclear technology of ROK that is set to a major world nuclear energy country, even exporting the technology. The space nuclear application is a very much attractive option because its energy density is the most enormous among available energy sources in space. This paper presents the design concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANuTER) that is one of the advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine developing in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) for space application. Solar system exploration relying on CRs suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard, nuclear propulsion is a very attractive option for that because of higher performance and already demonstrated technology. Although ROK was a late entrant into elite global space club, its prospect as a space racer is very bright because of the national eager desire and its advanced technology. Especially it is greatly meaningful that ROK has potential capability to launch its nuclear technology into space as a global nuclear energy leader and a soaring space adventurer. In this regard, KANuTER will be a kind of bridgehead for Korean space nuclear application

  6. Examination of the CLIC drive beam pipe design for thermal distortion caused by distributed beam loss

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, C D

    1997-01-01

    Beam transport programs are widely used to estimate the distribution of power deposited in accelerator structures by particle beams, either intentionally as for targets or beam dumps or accidentally owing to beam loss incidents. While this is usually adequate for considerations of radiation safety, it does not reveal the expected temperature rise and its effect on structural integrity. To find this, thermal diffusion must be taken into account, requiring another step in the analysis. The method that has been proposed is to use the output of a transport program, perhaps modified, as input for a finite element analysis program that can solve the thermal diffusion equation. At CERN, the design of the CLIC drive beam pipe has been treated in this fashion. The power distribution produced in the walls by a distributed beam loss was found using the electron gamma shower code EGS4. The distribution of power density was then used to form the input for the finite element analysis program ANSYS, which was able to find t...

  7. Design, fabrication, and application of a directional thermal processing system for controlled devitrification of metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Megan Anne Lamb

    The potential of using metallic glass as a pathway to obtaining novel morphologies and metastable phases has been garnering attention since their discovery. Several rapid solidification techniques; such as gas atomization, melt spinning, laser melting, and splat quenching produce amorphous alloys. A directional thermal processing system (DTPS) was designed, fabricated and characterized for the use of zone processing or gradient-zone processing of materials. Melt-spun CuZr metallic glass alloy was subjected to the DTPS and the relaxation and crystallization responses of the metallic glass were characterized. A range of processing parameters were developed and analyzed that would allow for devitrification to occur. The relaxation and crystallization responses were compared with traditional heat treatment methods of metallic glasses. The new processing method accessed equilibrium and non-equilibrium phases of the alloy and the structures were found to be controllable and sensitive to processing conditions. Crystallized fraction, crystallization onset temperature, and structural relaxation were controlled through adjusting the processing conditions, such as the hot zone temperature and sample velocity. Reaction rates computed from isothermal (TTT) transformation data were not found to be reliable, suggesting that the reaction kinetics are not additive. This new processing method allows for future studying of the thermal history effects of metallic glasses.

  8. Numerical analysis of thermal creep flow in curved channels for designing a prototype of Knudsen micropump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leontidis, V; Baldas, L; Colin, S; Brandner, J J

    2012-01-01

    The possibility to generate a gas flow inside a channel just by imposing a tangential temperature gradient along the walls without the existence of an initial pressure difference is well known. The gas must be under rarefied conditions, meaning that the system must operate between the slip and the free molecular flow regimes, either at low pressure or/and at micro/nano-scale dimensions. This phenomenon is at the basis of the operation principle of Knudsen pumps, which are actually compressors without any moving parts. Nowadays, gas flows in the slip flow regime through microchannels can be modeled using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics softwares, because in this regime the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate boundary conditions are still valid. A simulation procedure has been developed for the modeling of thermal creep flow using ANSYS Fluent®. The implementation of the boundary conditions is achieved by developing User Defined Functions (UDFs) by means of C++ routines. The complete first order velocity slip boundary condition, including the thermal creep effects due to the axial temperature gradient and the effect of the wall curvature, and the temperature jump boundary condition are applied. The developed simulation tool is used for the preliminary design of Knudsen micropumps consisting of a sequence of curved and straight channels.

  9. Simulation, design and thermal analysis of a solar Stirling engine using MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazly, J.H.; Hafez, A.Z.; El Shenawy, E.T.; Eteiba, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Modeling and simulation for a prototype of the solar-powered Stirling engine. • The solar-powered Stirling engine working at the low temperature range. • Estimating output power from the solar Stirling engine using Matlab program. • Solar radiation simulation program presents a solar radiation data using MATLAB. - Abstract: This paper presents the modeling and simulation for a prototype of the solar-powered Stirling engine working at the low temperature range. A mathematical model for the thermal analysis of the solar-powered low temperature Stirling engine with heat transfer is developed using Matlab program. The model takes into consideration the effect of the absorber temperature on the thermal analysis like as radiation and convection heat transfer between the absorber and the working fluid as well as radiation and convection heat transfer between the lower temperature plate and the working fluid. Hence, the present analysis provides a theoretical guidance for designing and operating of the solar-powered low temperature Stirling engine system, as well as estimating output power from the solar Stirling engine using Matlab program. This study attempts to demonstrate the potential of the low temperature Stirling engine as an option for the prime movers for Photovoltaic tracking systems. The heat source temperature is 40–60 °C as the temperature available from the sun directly

  10. Anisotropy in thermal conductivity of graphite flakes–SiC{sub p}/matrix composites: Implications in heat sinking design for thermal management applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, J.M., E-mail: jmmj@ua.es [Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, | E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Louis, E. [Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Unidad Asociada del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, | E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    Within the frame of heat dissipation for electronics, a very interesting family of anisotropic composite materials, fabricated by liquid infiltration of a matrix into preforms of oriented graphite flakes and SiC particles, has been recently proposed. Aiming to investigate the implications of the inherent anisotropy of these composites on their thermal conductivity, and hence on their potential applications, materials with matrices of Al–12 wt.% Si alloy and epoxy polymer have been fabricated. Samples have been cut at a variable angle with respect to the flakes plane and thermal conductivity has been measured by means of two standard techniques, namely, steady state technique and laser flash method. Experimental results are presented and discussed in terms of current models, from which important technological implications for heat sinking design can be derived. - Highlights: • Anisotropy in thermal conductivity of graphite flakes-based composites is evaluated. • Samples are cut in a direction forming a variable angle with the oriented flakes. • For angles 0° and 90°, thermal conductivity does not depend on sample geometry. • For intermediate angles, thermal conductivity strongly depends on sample geometry. • “Thin” samples must be thicker than 600 μm, “thick” samples must be encapsulated.

  11. On-Orbit Thermal Design and Validation of 1 U Standardized CubeSat of STEP Cube Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Soo-Jin; Oh, Hyun-Ung

    2016-01-01

    The Cube Laboratory for Space Technology Experimental Projects (STEP Cube Lab) is a cube satellite (CubeSat) classified as a pico-class satellite of 1 U (unit) size. Its main mission objective is to exploit core space technologies researched by domestic universities and verify the effectiveness of these technologies through on-orbit tests using the CubeSat. To guarantee a successful mission under extreme space thermal environments, proper thermal design is important. This paper describes the ...

  12. Design and Evaluation of a Photovoltaic/Thermal-Assisted Heat Pump Water Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Liang Tsai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, modelling and performance evaluation of a photovoltaic/thermal-assisted heat pump water heating (PVTA-HPWH system. The cooling effect of a refrigerant simultaneously enhances the PVT efficiency and effectively improves the coefficient of performance (COP of the HPWH system. The proposed model was built in the MATLAB/Simulink environment by considering the reciprocal energy exchange between a PVT evaporator and a HPWH system. In addition, the power consumption needs of the HPWH are provided by the PV electricity using a model-based control methodology. System performance is evaluated through a real field test. The results have demonstrated the power autarchy of the proposed PVTA-HPWH system with better PVT efficiency and COP. In addition, the good agreement between the model simulation and the experimental measurements demonstrate the proposed model with sufficient confidence.

  13. Cryogenic and thermal design for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Brooks, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The 1-meter class cryogenically cooled Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) planned by NASA, is scheduled for a 1992 launch. SIRTF would be deployed from the Shuttle, and placed into a sun synchronous polar orbit of 700 km. The facility has been defined for a mission with a minimum initial lifetime of one year in orbit with mission extension that could be made possible through in-orbit servicing of the superfluid helium cryogenic system, and use of a thermal control system. The superfluid dewar would use an orbital disconnect system for the tank supports, and vapor cooling of the barrel baffle. The transient analysis of the design shows that the superfluid helium tank with no active feedback comes within temperature requirements for the nominal orbital aperture heat load, quiescent instrument, and chopper conditions.

  14. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed

  15. Thermal design of a modern, air-conditioned, single-floor, solar-powered desert house

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents a thermal analysis of a single-floor, solar-powered desert house. The house is air-conditioned and provides all modern comforts and facilities. Electrical power, which drives the entire energy system, is generated by roof-mounted photovoltaic modules. The modules are fixed on special cradles which fold at night to expose the roof to the night sky, thereby enhancing night-time cooling, which is substantial in the desert environment. A detailed dynamic heat transfer analysis is conducted for the building envelope, coupled with a solar radiation model. Application to a typical Middle-Eastern desert site reveals that indeed such a design is feasible with present-day technology; and should be even more attractive with future advances in technology. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  16. Photovoltaic optimizer boost converters: Temperature influence and electro-thermal design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graditi, G.; Adinolfi, G.; Tina, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The influence of temperature on DC–DC converter devices properties is considered. • An electro-thermal design method for PV power optimizer converters is proposed. • The electro-thermal design method proposed is applied to DR boost and SR boost. • Efficiency results of the designed SR converter and DR converters are presented. - Abstract: Objective: Photovoltaic (PV) systems can operate in presence of not uniform working conditions caused by continuously changing temperature and irradiance values and mismatching and shadowing phenomena. The more the PV system works in these conditions, the more its energy performances are negatively affected. Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking (DMPPT) converters are now increasingly used to overcome this problem and to improve PV applications efficiency. A DMPPT system consists in a DC–DC converters equipped with a suitable controller dedicated to the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) of a single PV module. It is arranged either inside the junction-box or in a separate box close to the PV generator. Many power optimizers are now commercially available. In spite of different adopted DC–DC converter topologies, the shared interests of DMPPT systems designers are the high efficiency and reliability values. It is worth noting that to obtain so high performances converters, electronic components have to be carefully selected between the whole commercial availability and appropriately matched together. In this scenario, an electro-thermal design methodology is proposed and a reliability study by means of the Military Handbook 217F is carried out. Method: The developed DMPPT converters design method is constituted by many steps. In fact, beginning from installation site, PV generators and load data, this process selects power optimizers commercially available devices and it verifies their electro-thermal behavior to the aim to identify a set of suitable components for DMPPT applications. Repeating this

  17. SSTL based thermal and power efficient RAM design on 28nm FPGA for spacecraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalia, Kartik; Pandey, Bishwajeet; Hussain, D. M.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach is made to design a Thermal and Power efficient RAM for that reason we have used DDR4L memory and six different members of SSTL I/Os standards on 28nm technology. Every spacecraft requires most energy efficient electronic system and for that very purpose we have designed...... the most energy efficient RAM. In this design, we have taken two main parameters for analysis that is frequency (1600 MHz) and Voltage (1.05V). DDR4L operates at the lowest Voltage compared to available RAM's. Environment (LFM, Heat Sink, and Capacitance) is kept constant. For the simulation of the logic......, Xilinx is used with Verilog as hardware description language. We have done our analysis with different I/O standards for DDR4L RAM. When we scale down from 288.15K to 348.15K there is maximum total power reduction in SSTL135-R as compared to all considered I/O standards. When we compared different...

  18. Guidelines for conceptual design and evaluation of aquifer thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.F.; Hauz, W.

    1980-10-01

    Guidelines are presented for use as a tool by those considering application of a new technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The guidelines will assist utilities, municipalities, industries, and other entities in the conceptual design and evaluation of systems employing ATES. The potential benefits of ATES are described, an overview is presented of the technology and its applications, and rules of thumb are provided for quickly judging whether a proposed project has sufficient promise to warrant detailed conceptual design and evaluation. The characteristics of sources and end uses of heat and chill which are seasonally mismatched and may benefit from ATES (industrial waste heat, cogeneration, solar heat, and winter chill, for space heating and air conditioning) are discussed. Storage and transport subsystems and their expected performance and cost are described. A 10-step methodology is presented for conceptual design of an ATES system and evaluation of its technical and economic feasibility in terms of energy conservation, cost savings, fuel substitution, improved dependability of supply, and abatement of pollution, with examples, and the methodology is applied to a hypothetical proposed ATES system, to illustrate its use.

  19. Development of Thermal Design Program for an Electronic Telecommunication System Using Heat Sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, Jong Man; Chun, Ji Hwan; Bae, Chul Ho; Suh, Myung Won

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the cooling performance of heat sinks for an electronic telecommunication system by adequate natural convection. Heat generation rates of electronic components and the temperature distributions of heat sinks and surrounding air are analyzed experimentally and numerically. In order to perform the heat transfer analysis for the thermal design of telecommunication system, a program is developed. The program used the graphic user interface environment to determine the arrangement of heat sources, interior fan capacity, and heat sink configuration. The simulation results showed that the heat sinks were able to achieve a cooling capacity of up to 230W at the maximum temperature difference of 19 .deg. C. To verify the results from the numerical simulation, an experiment was conducted under the same condition as the numerical simulation, and their results were compared. The design program gave good prediction of the effects of various parameters involved in the design of a heat sinks for an electronic telecommunication system

  20. Thermal design of a modern, two floor, zero energy house in a desert compound

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents a thermal analysis and design of a fully equipped, air-conditioned, zero energy house located in a desert compound at 24.5° latitude. Unlike previous designs the home is two floors high, which makes the balancing of energy supply and demand even more challenging. The roof of the house carries an array of retractable Photovoltaic modules and cover. During day light hours the modules convert the incident sun energy into useful electrical power, while shielding the roof from direct sun-radiation. At night time, the roof cover and modules are retracted to expose the roof to the cool night-sky, thus enhancing cooling. The paper employs time-dependent modeling of Solar input and heat transfer to predict the roof, wall and window temperature distributions and cooling loads, as well as energy generated by the modules. With the aid of battery storage, the modules provide the entire energy needs of the house. The paper displays the results of energy balances for three key days of the year which demonstrate that the proposed two floor design is indeed capable of operating without external energy. © 2010 IEEE.

  1. The Design of Sample Driver System for Gamma Irradiator Facility at Thermal Column of Kartini Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyamto; Tasih Mulyono; Setyo Atmojo

    2007-01-01

    The design and construction of sample driver system for gamma irradiator facility at thermal column of Kartini reactor post operation has been carried out. The design and construction is based on the space of thermal column and the sample speed rotation which has to as low as possible in order the irradiation process can be more homogeneity. The electrical and mechanical calculation was done after fixation the electrical motor and transmission system which will be applied. By the assumption that the maximum sample weight is 50 kg, the electric motor specification is decided due to its rating i.e. single phase induction motor, run capacitor type, 0.5 HP; 220 V; 3.61 A, CCW and CW, rotation speed 1430 rpm. To achieve the low load rotation speed, motor speed was reduced twice using the conical reduction gear with the reduction ratio 3.9 and thread reduction gear with the reduction ratio 60. From the calculation it is found that power of motor is 118.06 watt, speed rotation of load sample is 6.11 rpm due to the no load rotation of motor 1430 rpm. From the test by varying weight of load up to 75 kg it is known that the device can be operated in a good condition, both in the two direction with the average speed of motor 1486 rpm and load 6.3 rpm respectively. So that the slip is 0.268 % and 0.314 % for no load and full load condition. The difference input current to the motor during no load and full load condition is relative small i.e. 0.14 A. The safety factor of motor is 316 % which is correspond to the weight of load 158 kg. (author)

  2. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  3. Experimental design and analysis and their reporting II: updated and simplified guidance for authors and peer reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael J; Alexander, Steve; Cirino, Giuseppe; Docherty, James R; George, Christopher H; Giembycz, Mark A; Hoyer, Daniel; Insel, Paul A; Izzo, Angelo A; Ji, Yong; MacEwan, David J; Sobey, Christopher G; Stanford, S Clare; Teixeira, Mauro M; Wonnacott, Sue; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2018-04-01

    This article updates the guidance published in 2015 for authors submitting papers to British Journal of Pharmacology (Curtis et al., 2015) and is intended to provide the rubric for peer review. Thus, it is directed towards authors, reviewers and editors. Explanations for many of the requirements were outlined previously and are not restated here. The new guidelines are intended to replace those published previously. The guidelines have been simplified for ease of understanding by authors, to make it more straightforward for peer reviewers to check compliance and to facilitate the curation of the journal's efforts to improve standards. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Design of lithium cobalt oxide electrodes with high thermal conductivity and electrochemical performance using carbon nanotubes and diamond particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eungje; Salgado, Ruben Arash; Lee, Byeongdu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rajh, Tijana; Johnson, Christopher; Balandin, Alexander A.; Shevchenko, Elena V.

    2018-04-01

    Thermal management remains one of the major challenges in the design of safe and reliable Li-ion batteries. We show that composite electrodes assembled from commercially available 100 μm long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and LiCoO2 (LCO) particles demonstrate the in-plane thermal conductivity of 205.8 W/m*K. This value exceeds the thermal conductivity of dry conventional laminated electrodes by about three orders of magnitude. The cross-plane thermal conductivity of CNT-based electrodes is in the same range as thermal conductivities of conventional laminated electrodes. The CNT-based electrodes demonstrate a similar capacity to conventional laminated design electrodes, but revealed a better rate performance and stability. The introduction of diamond particles into CNT-based electrodes further improves the rate performance. Our lightweight, flexible electrode design can potentially be a general platform for fabricating polymer binder- and aluminum and copper current collector- free electrodes from a broad range of electrochemically active materials with efficient thermal management.

  5. Design and simulation of a low concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosell, J.I.; Vallverdu, X.; Lechon, M.A.; Ibanez, M.

    2005-01-01

    The advantages of photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) collectors and low solar concentration technologies are combined into a photovoltaic/thermal system to increase the solar energy conversion efficiency. This paper presents a prototype 11X concentration rate and two axis tracking system. The main novelty is the coupling of a linear Fresnel concentrator with a channel photovoltaic/thermal collector. An analytical model to simulate the thermal behaviour of the prototype is proposed and validated. Measured thermal performance of the solar system gives values above 60%. Theoretical analysis confirms that thermal conduction between the PV cells and the absorber plate is a critical parameter

  6. Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis of a liquid metal reactor design with the COMMIX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Y.W.

    1988-01-01

    Steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) design have been performed with the COMMIX computer code and the results are discussed. The LMR design analyzed includes an inherent safety feature which enables the decay heat removal by natural convection of ambient air, and the purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the inherent safety feature of the LMR design. COMMIX is a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. A single-phase version of COMMIX has been used. Radiation plays an important role in the overall heat transfer, and the COMMIX version used includes the radiation capability. The theoretical formulation of COMMIX, including the treatment of thermal structures and radiation, is also discussed. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Design of an optical thermal sensor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell temperature measurement using phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kristopher; Wang, Xia; Sangeorzan, Brian

    Internal temperatures in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell govern the ionic conductivities of the polymer electrolyte, influence the reaction rate at the electrodes, and control the water vapor pressure inside the cell. It is vital to fully understand thermal behavior in a PEM fuel cell if performance and durability are to be optimized. The objective of this research was to design, construct, and implement thermal sensors based on the principles of the lifetime-decay method of phosphor thermometry to measure temperatures inside a PEM fuel cell. Five sensors were designed and calibrated with a maximum uncertainty of ±0.6 °C. Using these sensors, surface temperatures were measured on the cathode gas diffusion layer of a 25 cm 2 PEM fuel cell. The test results demonstrate the utility of the optical temperature sensor design and provide insight into the thermal behavior found in a PEM fuel cell.

  8. Thermal mass vs. insulation building envelope design in six climatic regions of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumirai, T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This chapter aims to evaluate the impact of thermal mass and high insulation (Rvalue) building envelope on energy consumption (space heating and space cooling) in six South African major cities using a building thermal simulation programme (Ecotect...

  9. Design and Operation of an IR-CAGE For Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Communication Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuersching, C.

    2004-08-01

    A specific infrared radiation device was designed and manufactured for infrared simulation on a communication satellite. For the thermal vacuum test of this satellite, radiation fields with different sizes, shapes and radiation intensities were required to deliver additional heating power onto the space- craft panels. Five of the six sides of the cube- shaped satellite had to be equipped with flat IR- frames so that a cage surrounding the S/C had to be designed. The following features of the IR-cage were re- quired: A lightweight, but still rigid construction of the frame with space-proofed materials; using of standard components for cost reasons; radiation intensities of 400 to 1100 W/m2; a computer-based system for individual control of the heating circuits; a user friendly and safe handling of the operation panel and the recording of all operational parame- ter. The mechanical construction was realised by using aluminium profiles. The standard components al- lowed completing the mechanical set-up within a short time. After some investigation concerning the heating devices it was decided to use heating strips for the radiation fields of low intensity and com- mercial IR-quartz radiators for fields with higher intensity. A special suspension for the heating strips was designed to keep them under defined tension. The power supplies for the heating circuits were computer-controlled. The software allowed the individual power setting of each heater. Addition- ally an automatic mode for controlling the heaters by a reference thermocouple was foreseen. Beside design features of the cage, this paper will also describe the heater concept and the control system, and it will have a look at QA relevant mat- ters.

  10. Thermal contact conductance

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudana, Chakravarti V

    2013-01-01

    The work covers both theoretical and practical aspects of thermal contact conductance. The theoretical discussion focuses on heat transfer through spots, joints, and surfaces, as well as the role of interstitial materials (both planned and inadvertent). The practical discussion includes formulae and data that can be used in designing heat-transfer equipment for a variety of joints, including special geometries and configurations. All of the material has been updated to reflect the latest advances in the field.

  11. SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan Update for 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Prochnow, David Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-20

    The Packaging Surveillance Program section of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual 441.1-­1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual (DOE 2008), requires DOE contractors to “ensure that a surveillance program is established and implemented to ensure the nuclear material storage package continues to meet its design criteria.”This 2017 update reflects changes to the surveillance plan resulting from surveillance findings as documented in Reeves et al. 2016. These findings include observations of corrosion in SAVY and Hagan containers and the indication (in one SAVY container) of possible filter membrane thermal degradation. This surveillance plan update documents the rationale for selecting surveillance containers, specifies the containers for 2017 surveillance, and identifies a minimum set of containers for 2018 surveillance. This update contains important changes to the previous surveillance plans.

  12. Circular Updates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Circular Updates are periodic sequentially numbered instructions to debriefing staff and observers informing them of changes or additions to scientific and specimen...

  13. Optimization of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System Design Using Comprehensive Coupled Simulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Formhals, Julian; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is a promising technology in the development of sustainable, renewable and low-emission district heating concepts. Such systems consist of several components and assemblies like the borehole heat exchangers (BHE), other heat sources (e.g. solarthermics, combined heat and power plants, peak load boilers, heat pumps), distribution networks and heating installations. The complexity of these systems necessitates numerical simulations in the design and planning phase. Generally, the subsurface components are simulated separately from the above ground components of the district heating system. However, as fluid and heat are exchanged, the subsystems interact with each other and thereby mutually affect their performances. For a proper design of the overall system, it is therefore imperative to take into account the interdependencies of the subsystems. Based on a TCP/IP communication we have developed an interface for the coupling of a simulation package for heating installations with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the underground installations. This allows for a co-simulation of all system components, whereby the interaction of the different subsystems is considered. Furthermore, the concept allows for a mathematical optimization of the components and the operational parameters. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system can be ensured and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be realized.

  14. Design of a system to measure thermal diffusivity of metals in the form of miniature disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerschied, M.K.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the design of a system to measure the thermal diffusivity of stainless steel alloy specimens in the form of 3-mm-diameter, 0.3-mm-thick disks. To measure these tiny specimens, the flash method devised by Parker et al. is employed; in this method, one surface of the specimen is exposed to a pulse of energy and the temperature response of the opposite surface is recorded. Derivations of the governing equations are included; these derivations differ from the work of Parker et al. bcause the heat pulse irradiating the specimen in this system is a square wave (in intensity vs time) rather than triangular, and the equation for estimating the maximum temperature of the irradiated surface of the specimen was simplified by the elimination of several variables. The design, selection, or modification of each of the components of the system to meet the criteria of the flash method is described. The capability of this system to perform in accordance with the assumptions of the flash method is discussed, and recommendations for improvement of the present system and extension of its capabilities are included

  15. Control system design of the CERN/CMS tracker thermal screen

    CERN Document Server

    Carrone, E

    2003-01-01

    The Tracker is one of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid experiment) subdetectors to be installed at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) accelerator, scheduled to start data taking in 2007 at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). The tracker will be operated at a temperature of -10 degree C in order to reduce the radiation damage on the silicon detectors; hence, an insulated environment has to be provided by means of a screen that introduces a thermal separation between the Tracker and the neighboring detection systems. The control system design includes a formal description of the process by means of a thermodynamic model; then, the electrical equivalence is derived. The transfer function is inferred by the ratio of the voltage on the outer skin and the voltage input, i.e. the ratio of the temperature outside the tracker and the heat generated (which is the controlled variable). A PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) controller has been designed using MatLab. The results achieved so far prove that thi...

  16. Sensitivity analysis of efficiency thermal energy storage on selected rock mass and grout parameters using design of experiment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wołoszyn, Jerzy; Gołaś, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paper propose a new methodology to sensitivity study of underground thermal storage. • Using MDF model and DOE technique significantly shorter of calculations time. • Calculation of one time step was equal to approximately 57 s. • Sensitivity study cover five thermo-physical parameters. • Conductivity of rock mass and grout material have a significant impact on efficiency. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of selected parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. In this paper, besides thermal conductivity, the effect of such parameters as specific heat, density of the rock mass, thermal conductivity and specific heat of grout material was investigated. Implementation of this objective requires the use of an efficient computational method. The aim of the research was achieved by using a new numerical model, Multi Degree of Freedom (MDF), as developed by the authors and Design of Experiment (DoE) techniques with a response surface. The presented methodology can significantly reduce the time that is needed for research and to determine the effect of various parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. Preliminary results of the research confirmed that thermal conductivity of the rock mass has the greatest impact on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage, and that other parameters also play quite significant role

  17. Thermal pasteurization of ready-to-eat foods and vegetables: Critical factors for process design and effects on quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Tang, Juming; Barrett, Diane M; Sablani, Shyam S; Anderson, Nathan; Powers, Joseph R

    2017-09-22

    Increasing consumer desire for high quality ready-to-eat foods makes thermal pasteurization important to both food producers and researchers. To be in compliance with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), food companies seek regulatory and scientific guidelines to ensure that their products are safe. Clearly understanding the regulations for chilled or frozen foods is of fundamental importance to the design of thermal pasteurization processes for vegetables that meet food safety requirements. This article provides an overview of the current regulations and guidelines for pasteurization in the U.S. and in Europe for control of bacterial pathogens. Poorly understood viral pathogens, in terms of their survival in thermal treatments, are an increasing concern for both food safety regulators and scientists. New data on heat resistance of viruses in different foods are summarized. Food quality attributes are sensitive to thermal degradation. A review of thermal kinetics of inactivation of quality-related enzymes in vegetables and the effects of thermal pasteurization on vegetable quality is presented. The review also discusses shelf-life of thermally pasteurized vegetables.

  18. Design of Parallel Air-Cooled Battery Thermal Management System through Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In electric vehicles, the battery pack is one of the most important components that strongly influence the system performance. The battery thermal management system (BTMS is critical to remove the heat generated by the battery pack, which guarantees the appropriate working temperature for the battery pack. Air cooling is one of the most commonly-used solutions among various battery thermal management technologies. In this paper, the cooling performance of the parallel air-cooled BTMS is improved through choosing appropriate system parameters. The flow field and the temperature field of the system are calculated using the computational fluid dynamics method. Typical numerical cases are introduced to study the influences of the operation parameters and the structure parameters on the performance of the BTMS. The operation parameters include the discharge rate of the battery pack, the inlet air temperature and the inlet airflow rate. The structure parameters include the cell spacing and the angles of the divergence plenum and the convergence plenum. The results show that the temperature rise and the temperature difference of the batter pack are not affected by the inlet air flow temperature and are increased as the discharge rate increases. Increasing the inlet airflow rate can reduce the maximum temperature, but meanwhile significantly increase the power consumption for driving the airflow. Adopting smaller cell spacing can reduce the temperature and the temperature difference of the battery pack, but it consumes much more power. Designing the angles of the divergence plenum and the convergence plenum is an effective way to improve the performance of the BTMS without occupying more system volume. An optimization strategy is used to obtain the optimal values of the plenum angles. For the numerical cases with fixed power consumption, the maximum temperature and the maximum temperature difference at the end of the five-current discharge process for

  19. MODELING COMPARATIVE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF LIGHTWEIGHT FABRICS USING A COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN TOOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    PERSON Judith Sennett a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code ) (508) 233-4218 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8...evaporation), thermal transport ( conduction and convection of heat), and air flow through the fabric (air permeability or air flow resistance). Fabric...Fabric ID Thermal Resistance  (Rc) Thermal  Resistance Thermal  Resistance Thermal  Conductivity   m²‐°C/Watt m²‐°C/Watt m²‐°C/Watt W/m‐°C Fabric + Plate

  20. Thermal design, rating and second law analysis of shell and tube condensers based on Taguchi optimization for waste heat recovery based thermal desalination plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakanth, Balaji; Venkatesan, G; Prakash Kumar, L. S. S; Jalihal, Purnima; Iniyan, S

    2018-03-01

    The present work discusses the design and selection of a shell and tube condenser used in Low Temperature Thermal Desalination (LTTD). To optimize the key geometrical and process parameters of the condenser with multiple parameters and levels, a design of an experiment approach using Taguchi method was chosen. An orthogonal array (OA) of 25 designs was selected for this study. The condenser was designed, analysed using HTRI software and the heat transfer area with respective tube side pressure drop were computed using the same, as these two objective functions determine the capital and running cost of the condenser. There was a complex trade off between the heat transfer area and pressure drop in the analysis, however second law analysis was worked out for determining the optimal heat transfer area vs pressure drop for condensing the required heat load.

  1. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development (PSD) II. Preliminary design report. Appendix II: supporting data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-10

    The trade studies, calculations, and reports which provide the rationale for design conclusions for the 10 MWe OTEC power system are presented in this volume. These appendices include: (1) system design and optimization model; (2) system off-design performance computer model; (3) seawater system dynamics; (4) system mechanical design studies; (5) electrical design studies; (6) structural design studies; (7) tube cleaner design report and proposed brush test program; (8) heat exchangers: mechanical design; (9) heat exchangers: thermal hydraulic computer model; (10) heat exchangers: manufacturing flow plan; (11) heat exchangers: installation and removal procedures; (12) heat exchangers: stainless steel conceptual design; (13) heat exchangers: cost studies; (14)heat exchangers: materials selection and corrosion; and (15) heat exchangers: quality assurance. (WHK)

  2. Thermal analysis of a conceptual design for a 250 W(e) GPHS/FPSE space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccomas, T.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    A thermal analysis has been performed for a 250-W(e) space nuclear power system which combines the US Department of Energy's general purpose heat source (GPHS) modules with a state-of-the-art free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE). The focus of the analysis is on the temperature of the indium fuel clad within the GPHS modules. The thermal analysis results indicate fuel clad temperatures slightly higher than the design goal temperature of 1573 K. The results are considered favorable due to numerous conservative assumptions used. To demonstrate the effects of the conservatism, a brief sensitivity analysis is performed in which a few of the key system parameters are varied to determine their effect on the fuel clad temperatures. It is shown that thermal analysis of a more detailed thermal mode should yield fuel clad temperatures below 1573 K. 3 refs

  3. A novel solar trigeneration system based on concentrating photovoltaic/thermal collectors. Part 1: Design and simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; Calise, Francesco; Dentice d'Accadia, Massimo; Vanoli, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thermodynamic performance of high-temperature PhotoVoltaic/Thermal (PVT) solar collectors. The collector is based on a combination of a parabolic dish concentrating solar thermal collector and a high efficiency solar photovoltaic collector. The PVT system under investigation allows one to produce simultaneously electrical energy and high-temperature thermal energy by solar irradiation. The main aim of this study is the design and the analysis of a concentrating PVT which is able to operate at reasonable electric and thermal efficiency up to 180 °C. In fact, the PVT is designed to be integrated in a Solar Heating and Cooling system and it must drive a two-effect absorption chiller. This capability is quite new since conventional PVT collectors usually operate below 45 °C. Among the possible high-temperature PVT systems, this paper is focused on a system consisting in a dish concentrator and in a triple-junction PV layer. In particular, the prototype consists in a parabolic dish concentrator and a planar receiver. The system is equipped with a double axis tracking system. The bottom surface of the receiver is equipped with triple-junction silicon cells whereas the top surface is insulated. In order to analyze the performance of the Concentrating PVT (CPVT) collector a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances on the control volumes of the system. The simulation model allows one to calculate in detail the temperatures of the main components of the system (PV layer, concentrator, fluid inlet and outlet and metallic substrate) and the main energy flows (electrical energy, useful thermal energy, radiative losses, convective losses). The input parameters of the model include all the weather conditions (temperature, insolation, wind velocity, etc.) and the geometrical/material parameters of the systems (lengths, thermal resistances, thicknesses, etc.). Results showed that both electrical

  4. Electromagnetic-Thermal Integrated Design Optimization for Hypersonic Vehicle Short-Time Duty PM Brushless DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High reliability is required for the permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PM-BLDCM in an electrical pump of hypersonic vehicle. The PM-BLDCM is a short-time duty motor with high-power-density. Since thermal equilibrium is not reached for the PM-BLDCM, the temperature distribution is not uniform and there is a risk of local overheating. The winding is a main heat source and its insulation is thermally sensitive, so reducing the winding temperature rise is the key to the improvement of the reliability. In order to reduce the winding temperature rise, an electromagnetic-thermal integrated design optimization method is proposed. The method is based on electromagnetic analysis and thermal transient analysis. The requirements and constraints of electromagnetic and thermal design are considered in this method. The split ratio and the maximum flux density in stator lamination, which are highly relevant to the windings temperature rise, are optimized analytically. The analytical results are verified by finite element analysis (FEA and experiments. The maximum error between the analytical and the FEA results is 4%. The errors between the analytical and measured windings temperature rise are less than 8%. It can be proved that the method can obtain the optimal design accurately to reduce the winding temperature rise.

  5. Design of the Building Envelope: A Novel Multi-Objective Approach for the Optimization of Energy Performance and Thermal Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Ascione

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the increasing worldwide attention to energy and the environmental performance of the building sector, building energy demand should be minimized by considering all energy uses. In this regard, the development of building components characterized by proper values of thermal transmittance, thermal capacity, and radiative properties is a key strategy to reduce the annual energy need for the microclimatic control. However, the design of the thermal characteristics of the building envelope is an arduous task, especially in temperate climates where the energy demands for space heating and cooling are balanced. This study presents a novel methodology for optimizing the thermo-physical properties of the building envelope and its coatings, in terms of thermal resistance, capacity, and radiative characteristics of exposed surfaces. A multi-objective approach is adopted in order to optimize energy performance and thermal comfort. The optimization problem is solved by means of a Genetic Algorithm implemented in MATLAB®, which is coupled with EnergyPlus for performing dynamic energy simulations. For demonstration, the methodology is applied to a residential building for two different Mediterranean climates: Naples and Istanbul. The results show that for Naples, because of the higher incidence of cooling demand, cool external coatings imply significant energy savings, whereas the insulation of walls should be high but not excessive (no more than 13–14 cm. The importance of high-reflective coating is clear also in colder Mediterranean climates, like Istanbul, although the optimal thicknesses of thermal insulation are higher (around 16–18 cm. In both climates, the thermal envelope should have a significant mass, obtainable by adopting dense and/or thick masonry layers. Globally, a careful design of the thermal envelope is always necessary in order to achieve high-efficiency buildings.

  6. HTGR analytical methods and design verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Northup, T.E.

    1982-05-01

    Analytical methods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) include development, update, verification, documentation, and maintenance of all computer codes for HTGR design and analysis. This paper presents selected nuclear, structural mechanics, seismic, and systems analytical methods related to the HTGR core. This paper also reviews design verification tests in the reactor core, reactor internals, steam generator, and thermal barrier

  7. Design and verification of focal plane assembly thermal control system of one space-based astronomy telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-gang; Fan, Xue-wu; Wang, Chen-jie; Wang, Ying-hao; Feng, Liang-jie; Du, Yun-fei; Ren, Guo-rui; Wang, Wei; Li, Chuang; Gao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    One space-based astronomy telescope will observe astronomy objects whose brightness should be lower than 23th magnitude. To ensure the telescope performance, very low system noise requirements need extreme low CCD operating temperature (lower than -65°C). Because the satellite will be launched in a low earth orbit, inevitable space external heat fluxes will result in a high radiator sink temperature (higher than -65°C). Only passive measures can't meet the focal plane cooling specification and active cooling technologies must be utilized. Based on detailed analysis on thermal environment of the telescope and thermal characteristics of focal plane assembly (FPA), active cooling system which is based on thermo-electric cooler (TEC) and heat rejection system (HRS) which is based on flexible heat pipe and radiator have been designed. Power consumption of TECs is dependent on the heat pumped requirements and its hot side temperature. Heat rejection capability of HRS is mainly dependent on the radiator size and temperature. To compromise TEC power consumption and the radiator size requirement, thermal design of FPA must be optimized. Parasitic heat loads on the detector is minimized to reduce the heat pumped demands of TECs and its power consumption. Thermal resistance of heat rejection system is minimized to reject the heat dissipation of TECs from the hot side to the radiator efficiently. The size and surface coating of radiator are optimized to compromise heat reject ion requirements and system constraints. Based on above work, transient thermal analysis of FPA is performed. FPA prototype model has been developed and thermal vacuum/balance test has been accomplished. From the test, temperature of key parts and working parameters of TECs in extreme cases have been acquired. Test results show that CCD can be controlled below -65°C and all parts worked well during the test. All of these verified the thermal design of FPA and some lessons will be presented in this

  8. Technology update: Nickel-hydrogen Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) 2.5V twin stack cell designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Tim; Miller, Lee

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the nickel hydrogen common pressure vessel (CPV) 2.5V twin stack cell designs. Information given includes an energy analysis, a CPV design comparison, a summary of CPV characterization testing, a comparison of discharge voltage among designs, and life test performance summaries.

  9. Design Issues for Low Power Integrated Thermal Flow Sensors with Ultra-Wide Dynamic Range and Low Insertion Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bruschi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow sensors are the key elements in most systems for monitoring and controlling fluid flows. With the introduction of MEMS thermal flow sensors, unprecedented performances, such as ultra wide measurement ranges, low power consumptions and extreme miniaturization, have been achieved, although several critical issues have still to be solved. In this work, a systematic approach to the design of integrated thermal flow sensors, with specification of resolution, dynamic range, power consumption and pressure insertion loss is proposed. All the critical components of the sensors, namely thermal microstructure, package and read-out interface are examined, showing their impact on the sensor performance and indicating effective optimization strategies. The proposed design procedures are supported by experiments performed using a recently developed test chip,including several different sensing structures and a flexible electronic interface.

  10. Design of performance and analysis of dynamic and transient thermal behaviors on the intermediate heat exchanger for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Michitsugu; Mizuno, Minoru; Itoh, Mitsuyoshi; Urabe, Shigemi

    1985-01-01

    The intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) is designed as the high temperature heat exchanger for HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor), which transmits the primary coolant helium's heat raised up to about 950 0 C in the reactor core to the secondary helium or the nuclear heat utilization. Having to meet, in addition, the requirement of the primary coolant pressure boundary as the Class-1 component, it must be secured integrity throughout the service life. This paper will show (1) the design of the thermal performance; (2) the results of the dynamic analyses of the 1.5 MWt-IHX with its comparison to the experimental data; (3) the analytical predictions of the dynamic thermal behaviors under start-up and of the transient thermal behaviors during the accident on the 25 MWt-IHX. (author)

  11. Designing a software for systematic registration of oral and maxillofacial diseases based on the latest update of the World Health Organization ICD-10 classification system in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mansorian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Classification is a fundamental issue in quantitative studies of any phenomenon and has been known as a necessity for the advancement of science. Using a standard record system for diseases is critical for research purposes and also could improve the quality of medical health services. In this study, after evaluating current codding systems in oral medicine, we designed a software for systematic coding and registration of Oral and Maxillofacial diseases based on the latest update of the World Health Organization ICD-10 classification system in 2010.   Materials and Methods: Based on the latest WHO ICD-10 update in 2010 and by using software s as: vb.net, net framework, SQL Server and Microsoft Visual Studio, standard coding software for recording patient's data at the department of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences was designed. Data from all patients were codded by standard ICD-10 codes and registered by the software. Also an online portal for recording patient's data which could be used nationwide was designed. By d esigning this software the process of forming and registering patient's records, and their treatment process is facilitated . An archive of patient data was also stablished .   Conclusion: As a result , this software in addition to maintaining patient data , facilitate studies and research projects greatly. It’s recommended that the Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education as the concessioner of this software, improves codding and registration systems of oral diseases at the dental schools by developing this software.

  12. Design optimization of an axial-field eddy-current magnetic coupling based on magneto-thermal analytical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontchastagner Julien

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design optimization of an axial-flux eddy-current magnetic coupling. The design procedure is based on a torque formula derived from a 3D analytical model and a population algorithm method. The main objective of this paper is to determine the best design in terms of magnets volume in order to transmit a torque between two movers, while ensuring a low slip speed and a good efficiency. The torque formula is very accurate and computationally efficient, and is valid for any slip speed values. Nevertheless, in order to solve more realistic problems, and then, take into account the thermal effects on the torque value, a thermal model based on convection heat transfer coefficients is also established and used in the design optimization procedure. Results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  13. Design and feasibility of high temperature nanoparticle fluid filter in hybrid thermal/photovoltaic concentrating solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Drew; Brekke, Nick; Tunkara, Ebrima; Hari, Parameswar; Roberts, Kenneth; Otanicar, Todd

    2015-09-01

    A nanoparticle fluid filter used with concentrating hybrid solar/thermal collector design is presented. Nanoparticle fluid filters could be situated on any given concentrating system with appropriate customized engineering. This work shows the design in the context of a trough concentration system. Geometric design and physical placement in the optical path was modeled using SolTrace. It was found that a design can be made that blocks 0% of the traced rays. The nanoparticle fluid filter is tunable for different concentrating systems using various PV cells or operating at varying temperatures.

  14. Box-Behnken statistical design to optimize thermal performance of energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalian, Iman Joz; Mohammadiun, Mohammad; Moqadam, Hamid Hashemi; Mohammadiun, Hamid

    2017-11-01

    Latent heat thermal storage (LHTS) is a technology that can help to reduce energy consumption for cooling applications, where the cold is stored in phase change materials (PCMs). In the present study a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation is performed on a LHTES system containing RT25 as phase change material (PCM). Process optimization of the experimental conditions (inlet air temperature and velocity and number of slabs) was carried out by means of Box-Behnken design (BBD) of Response surface methodology (RSM). Two parameters (cooling time and COP value) were chosen to be the responses. Both of the responses were significantly influenced by combined effect of inlet air temperature with velocity and number of slabs. Simultaneous optimization was performed on the basis of the desirability function to determine the optimal conditions for the cooling time and COP value. Maximum cooling time (186 min) and COP value (6.04) were found at optimum process conditions i.e. inlet temperature of (32.5), air velocity of (1.98) and slab number of (7).

  15. Thermal Design and Analysis of a Multi-Stage 30K Radiative Cooling System for EPIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso; Bock, Jamie; Holmes, Warren; Raab, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology (EPIC) is an implementation of the NASA Einstein Inflation Probe mission, to answer questions about the physics of Inflation in the early Universe by measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The mission relies on a passive cooling system to cool the enclosure of a telescope to 30 K; a cryocooler then cools this enclosure to 18 K and the telescope to 4 K. Subsequently, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator further cools a large focal plane to approx.100 mK. For this mission, the telescope has an aperture of 1.4 m, and the spacecraft's symmetry axis is oriented approx. 45 degrees relative to the direction of the sun. The spacecraft will be spun at approx. 0.5 rpm around this axis, which then precesses on the sky at 1 rph. The passive system must both supply the necessary cooling power for the cryocooler and meet demanding temperature stability requirements. We describe the thermal design of a passive cooling system consisting of four V-groove radiators for shielding of solar radiation and cooling the telescope to 30 K. The design realizes loads of 20 and 68 mW at the 4 K and 18 K stages on the cooler, respectively. A lower cost option for reaching 40 K with three V-groove radiators is also described. The analysis includes radiation coupling between stages of the radiators and sunshields, and parasitic conduction in the bipod support, harnesses, and ADR leads. Dynamic effects are also estimated, including the very small variations in temperature due to the scan motion of the spacecraft.

  16. Box-Behnken experimental design for investigation of stability and thermal conductivity of TiO{sub 2} nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfizadeh Dehkordi, Babak, E-mail: babakld@siswa.um.edu.my; Ghadimi, Azadeh; Metselaar, Henk S. C., E-mail: h.metselaar@um.edu.my [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Malaysia)

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of ultrasonication on the stability and thermal conductivity of TiO{sub 2} water nanofluids. A UV-Vis spectrophotometer was employed to determine the relative stability of nanofluids. Response surface methodology based on the Box-Behnken design was implemented to investigate the influence of power of sonication (20-80 %), time of sonication (2-20 min), and volume concentration (0.1-1 vol%) of nanofluids as the independent variables. Second-order polynomial equations were established to predict the responses, thermal conductivity, and stability of nanofluids with the intervals of 1 week and 1 month. The significance of the models was tested by means of analysis of variance (ANOVA). The optimum stability and thermal conductivity of TiO{sub 2} nanofluids with various sonication power and time at volume concentrations of 0.1, 0.55, and 1 % were studied. In addition, a correlation between the stability and thermal conductivity enhancement was derived in this study. The results revealed that, at low concentrations, nanofluids would become stable by low power and short period of sonication; however, no enhancement was observed in the thermal conductivity. Conversely, at high concentrations, stability and high thermal conductivity of nanofluids coincided at 1 vol%.

  17. Box–Behnken experimental design for investigation of stability and thermal conductivity of TiO2 nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfizadeh Dehkordi, Babak; Ghadimi, Azadeh; Metselaar, Henk S. C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of ultrasonication on the stability and thermal conductivity of TiO 2 water nanofluids. A UV–Vis spectrophotometer was employed to determine the relative stability of nanofluids. Response surface methodology based on the Box–Behnken design was implemented to investigate the influence of power of sonication (20–80 %), time of sonication (2–20 min), and volume concentration (0.1–1 vol%) of nanofluids as the independent variables. Second-order polynomial equations were established to predict the responses, thermal conductivity, and stability of nanofluids with the intervals of 1 week and 1 month. The significance of the models was tested by means of analysis of variance (ANOVA). The optimum stability and thermal conductivity of TiO 2 nanofluids with various sonication power and time at volume concentrations of 0.1, 0.55, and 1 % were studied. In addition, a correlation between the stability and thermal conductivity enhancement was derived in this study. The results revealed that, at low concentrations, nanofluids would become stable by low power and short period of sonication; however, no enhancement was observed in the thermal conductivity. Conversely, at high concentrations, stability and high thermal conductivity of nanofluids coincided at 1 vol%.

  18. Proposition of updating the method used in calculating the heat demand based on a new concept of design outdoor temperature and of building – soil boundary heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan CONSTANTINESCU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimensioning of the heating systems equipping new and existing buildings, in the case of their energy-related upgrading is an extremely important activity in the context of reaching the targets of the European Directive 31 /2010 / UE concerning the Buildings Energy Performance (PEC. The accurate determination, phenomenological based, of the buildings thermal response leads to determining the climatic parameters representative for the climatic zones and for the buildings structure.Unlike the EN 12831: 2003 European Regulation, the design outdoor temperature in the conditions of Romania’s various zones was determined by the identification of the thermal response specific to the transient conditions of the heat transfer through the composite structures of the opaque and glazing closing components with the thermal response in idealized, steadystate conditions; thus, the design outdoor temperature was determined, which is conditioned by an acceptable discomfort during the coldest pentads of a 48 years climatic statistics (1961-2008. The climatic parameter which generates the modeling similitude is the virtual outdoor temperature which allows the use of the steady-state conditions mathematical formalism in issues of heat transfer in transient conditions. A dependency relation between the design indoor temperature, identical to the resulting indoor temperature (different from the operational temperature and the air volume average temperature is emphasized.Special attention is given to the heat transfer at the building-soil boundary, in the form of various practical solutions (buildings the basement of which is not directly heated, equipped or not with heating systems, directly heated and occupied, as well as buildings on plinths; in all the cases, the solutions approached are specific to the envelope which is or not thermally insulated.

  19. Practical lighting design with LEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Lenk, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The second edition of Practical Lighting Design with LEDs has been revised and updated to provide the most current information for developing light-emitting diodes products. The authors, noted authorities in the field, offer a review of the most relevant topics including optical performance, materials, thermal design, and modeling and measurement. Comprehensive in scope, the text covers all the information needed to design LEDs into end products.

  20. Modeling based on design of thermal management systems for vertical elevation applications powered by lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Martín, Leire; Gastelurrutia, Jon; Nieto, Nerea; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Alejandro; Gil, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A TMS is designed for a cylindrical Li-ion BP using CFD tools. • The model is experimentally validated with a maximum time-averaged error of 1.5 °C. • Cell temperature and module thermal dispersion are below 39 °C and 3 °C. • The prototype design fulfills all thermal requirements. • Design improvements are proposed to minimize the cost and the TMS consumption. - Abstract: Environmental sustainability, more efficient use of energy, and active safety concepts are becoming important requirements for the actual elevation sector. In this context IK4-IKERLAN and ORONA have designed an auxiliary energy storage system (ESS) for a residential elevation application based on lithium-ion cells. Safety and specially lifetime are two of the main concerns surrounding this new technology, which is closely related to the cells operating behavior and temperature asymmetries in the complete ESS. Therefore, the temperature of the cells in battery packs (BPs) needs to be controlled in an efficient way. This paper describes the development of the thermal management system (TMS) designed for this application based on various Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mathematical models. The accuracy of Transient model is validated by using a single module to compare the simulation temperature results with experimental measurements, with a maximum time-averaged temperature prediction error of 1.5 °C. The proposed design is validated as it fulfills the requirements for a wide operating window, with a maximum cell temperature of 39 °C and a thermal dispersion at system level below 3 °C for the worst tested case. A more realistic current profile is checked numerically in the worst ambient and operative conditions for different virtual design variants to propose improvements.

  1. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) for the ISS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2002-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of spaceborne remote sensing instruments developed by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for monitoring global distribution of aerosols and gaseous constituents using the solar occultation approach. SAGE III will provide global profiles of atmospheric aerosol, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen trioxide, temperature, and chlorine dioxide in the mesosphere, stratosphere, and troposphere. The instrument is designed to be completely self-calibrating making it well-suited for long-term monitoring of atmospheric species which are important for global change study. To help achieve the desired long-term global coverage, three instruments have been built for different missions. The thermal design of SAGE III is primarily passive using surface finishes and high thermal resistance spacers. Active thermal control consists of operational and survival heaters along with a thermoelectric cooler to maintain the CCD detector temperature within tolerances. While the overall thermal design is consistent among the three instruments, some modifications were necessary to meet the individual mission requirements. The first SAGE III instrument is scheduled for launch on the Russian built METEOR-3M spacecraft in December 2000. This 2.5-ton spacecraft is 5 meters long and 1.5 meters in diameter and will fly a sun-synchronous, polar orbit at an altitude of 1020 km. The second instrument will fly on the International Space Station using an EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Pallet Adapter. This flight has been particularly challenging for designers because of the constraints of the ISS as well as the differences in program schedules (the SAGE instrument has been fabricated and delivered while the EXPRESS project has yet to reach PDR.) For example, the attitude of the ISS can vary substantially making solar occultation difficult. To overcome this, a

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Design Parameters for Hydronic Embedded Thermally Active Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Meson, Victor; Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; E. Poulsen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    indoo½rs and heat loss outdoors of a vertical panel, and calculates an optimized solution based on the Desirability Function Approach. This study reveals a large impact of the panel thermal conductivity on the thermal performance of embedded TAS, and the experiments indicate a large potential...

  3. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8: Design overview and pre-launch characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8 is the latest thermal sensor in that series of missions. Unlike the previous single channel sensors, TIRS uses two channels to cover the 10-12 micron band. It is also a pushbroom imager; a departure from the previous whiskbroom approach. Nevertheles...

  4. A sub-μs thermal time constant electrically driven Pt nanoheater: thermo-dynamic design and frequency characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottonello Briano, Floria, E-mail: floria@kth.se; Sohlström, Hans; Forsberg, Fredrik; Stemme, Göran; Gylfason, Kristinn B. [Micro and Nanosystems, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Osquldas väg 10, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Renoux, Pauline; Ingvarsson, Snorri [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavík (Iceland)

    2016-05-09

    Metal nanowires can emit coherent polarized thermal radiation, work as uncooled bolometers, and provide localized heating. In this paper, we engineer the temperature dynamics of electrically driven Pt nanoheaters on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. We present three designs and we electrically characterize and model their thermal impedance in the frequency range from 3 Hz to 3 MHz. Finally, we show a temperature modulation of 300 K while consuming less than 5 mW of power, up to a frequency of 1.3 MHz. This result can lead to significant advancements in thermography and absorption spectroscopy.

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Design and Analysis of a Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket with Superheated Steam for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoman; Ma, Xuebin; Jiang, Kecheng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-09-01

    The water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) is one of the blanket candidates for China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR). In order to improve power generation efficiency and tritium breeding ratio, WCCB with superheated steam is under development. The thermal-hydraulic design is the key to achieve the purpose of safe heat removal and efficient power generation under normal and partial loading operation conditions. In this paper, the coolant flow scheme was designed and one self-developed analytical program was developed, based on a theoretical heat transfer model and empirical correlations. Employing this program, the design and analysis of related thermal-hydraulic parameters were performed under different fusion power conditions. The results indicated that the superheated steam water-cooled blanket is feasible. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  6. Use of the 1993 AASHTO Guide, MEPDG and historical performance to update the WSDOT Pavement Design Catalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    "This report describes the preparation of a revised pavement thickness design catalog for the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) using the 1993 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guide, the ...

  7. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update '92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress

  8. A simplified method for the thermal design of buildings in overseas departments; Methode simplifiee pour la conception thermique du batiment dans les DOM-TOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    The main principles of climate (more especially tropical climate), thermal comfort and thermal architectural design are first reviewed, with emphasis on wall, roof and window heat transfers and natural and artificial air conditioning in tropical houses and buildings, with the objective of minimizing energy consumption and maximizing thermal comfort. Meteorological data and calculation diagrams are given for site and orientation optimization and building envelope dimensioning and design in tropical zones (example of New Caledonia)

  9. Infrared nondestructive measurement of thermal resistance between liner and engine block: design of experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloue, P.; L' Ecolier, J.; Nigon, F. [PSA Peugeot Citroen, Laboratoire Optique et Thermique, 45 rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud, 78 300 Poissy (France); Bissieux, C.; Henry, J.-F.; Pron, H. [Universite de Reims, Unite de Thermique et Analyse Physique, EA 3802, Laboratoire de Thermophysique, UFR Sciences, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51 687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-03-15

    Thermal resistances between liners and engine blocks are nondestructively studied by photothermal infrared thermography. Under controlled sinusoidal light irradiation, the thermal response of the sample is measured by means of an infrared camera. A numerical lock-in procedure yields amplitude and absolute phase maps of the thermal field periodic component. Then, apart from classical qualitative detection of air layers, a quantitative characterization of thermal resistance becomes available. An analytical modeling, associated with an inverse procedure using the Gauss-Newton parameter estimation method, allows to identify the thermal resistance on academic samples representative of the liner-engine block interface. Simply joined cast iron and aluminum plates present thermal resistances about 2 x 10{sup -3} K m{sup 2} W{sup -1}. The implementation of a numerical modeling allows to study two-dimensional defects. When the samples are pressed on their periphery, thus straightened, contact resistances ranging from 2 x 10{sup -4} to 7 x 10{sup -4} K m{sup 2} W{sup -1} have been measured. Then, the method is applied to liner-engine block interfaces where the thermal resistances fall to about 2 x 10{sup -5} K m{sup 2} W{sup -1}, matching the values obtained when a cast iron plate is locally pressed against an aluminum plate. (author)

  10. Optimum thermal design of steam pipelines and its impact on environment pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, A.M.; Karameldin, A.

    1999-01-01

    The majority portion of electric power generated production all over the world - produced by conventional and nuclear fuels produced by steam. Moreover, steam is used extensively in electronic, food, seawater desalination, and many other industries. In the last fifty years, little improvements have been made on the thermal efficiency of steam boilers. The major developments have been carried out in the direction of maintaining this efficiency on low-grade fuel and reducing labor and maintenance charges. Because the annual cost of fuel (nuclear and non-nuclear) is often greater than the combined cost of other expenses in steam power plants, greater amount of money can be saved. Designing steam pipelines in such a way that minimizing the total annual cost of pipes can do this. This can be done by optimal design of the total annual cost of the pipe lines, which includes the cost of insulation material, the cost of burned fuel plus the cost of maintenance. To deal with such situation, a case study of a superheated main steam pipeline at Shobrah Elkhema power plant is investigated. A general simplified working formula for calculating the heat transfer coefficient round a tube has been correlated and verified to facilitate the development for of the heat transfer mathematical model together with the steam pipeline total cost algorithm. The total cost algorithm has been optimized and solved by a digital computer program derived specially for this study. Accordingly, the obtained results are presented in a graphical form and analyzed. The results revealed that the optimal steam pipeline insulation must be chosen carefully. The insulation thickness of 0.225 up to 0.235 m, covers the operating time of 10-20 years, and fuel price of 0.125 up to more than 0.2$/kg. The calculated optimized insulation thickness minimizes the emission of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide from 375, 75 and 26,778 kg/m/y to less than 7, 1.7 and 590 kg/m.y respectively

  11. Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets

  12. Effects of irradiation and design basis accident conditions on thermal properties of epoxy coating system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Lee, Jae-Rock

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the thermal properties of epoxy coating system on carbon steel liner in an atomic reactor container have been investigated in terms of irradiation and design basis accident (DBA) conditions. Two epoxy coating systems were irradiated by different dose rates, i.e. 1x10 6 and 5x10 5 rad/h in a total dosage of 2x10 8 rad/h. And, DBA tests were applied to them based on the specification. The glass transition temperature (T g ) and thermal stability of the epoxy coating systems after tests were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. As a result, the irradiation led to the fracture of internal structure in cured epoxy systems, resulting in significantly decreasing the thermal stability, as well as, the T g . Also, the higher dose rate made a relaxation of epoxy resins to reduce the hardening of the network system. Whereas, the DBA test made an important role in the thermal stability in the epoxy coating systems, resulting in post-curing of the uncured epoxy resins. Consequently, it could be found that the thermal properties of the epoxy coating system were greatly influenced on the irradiation and DBA tests, which were probably due to the modification of internal network structure of the epoxy resins

  13. Thermal-hydraulic stability tests for newly designed BWR rod bundle (step-III fuel type A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, T.; Chuman, K.; Miura, S.; Morooka, S.; Moriya, K.; Kitamura, H.; Toba, A.; Omoto, A.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic stability tests have been performed on electrically heated bundles to simulate the newly designed Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuels in a parallel channel test loop. The objective of the current experimental program is to investigate how the newly designed bundle could improve the thermal-hydraulic stability. Measurements of the thermal-hydraulic instability thresholds in two vertical rod bundles have been conducted in steam-water two-phase flow conditions at the TOSHIBA test loop. Fluid conditions were BWR operating conditions of 7 MPa system pressure, 1.0-2.0x10 6 kg/m 2 /h inlet mass flux and 28-108 kJ/kg inlet subcooling. The parallel channel test loop consists of a main bundle of 3x3 indirectly heated rods of 1/9 symmetry of 9x9 full lattice and a bypass bundle of 8x8. These are both simulated BWR rod bundles in respect of rod diameter, heated length, rod configuration, fuel rod spacer, core inlet hydraulic resistance and upper tie plate. There are three types of the 3x3 test bundles with different configurations of a part length rod of two-thirds the length of the other rods and an axial power shape. The design innovation of the part length rod for a 9x9 lattice development, though addition of more fuel rods increases bundle pressure drop, reduces pressure drop in the two-phase portion of the bundle, and enhances the thermal hydraulic stability. Through the experiments, the parameter dependency on the channel stability threshold is obtained for inlet subcooling, inlet mass flux, inlet flow resistance, axial power shape and part length rod. The main conclusion is that the stability threshold is about 10% greater with the part length rod than without the part length rod. The new BWR bundle consisting of the part length rod has been verified in respect of thermal hydraulic stability performance. (author)

  14. Mechanical and Thermal Design of the CEBAF Hall A Beam Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bevins, Michael E; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A; Freyberger, Arne; Gilman, Ronald; Saha, Arun; Slachtouski, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    A calorimeter has been proposed to provide 0.5% - 1.0% absolute measurements of beam current in the Hall A end station of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) CEBAF machine. Silver and copper calorimeters built in the 1960's achieved precisions of about 1%. Modern powder metallurgy processes have produced high density, high thermal conductivity tungsten-copper composite materials that will minimize beam loss while maintaining a rapid thermal response time. Heat leaks will be minimized by mounting the mass in vacuum on glass ceramic mounts. A conduction cooling scheme utilizes an advanced carbon fiber compliant thermal interface material. Transient finite difference and finite element models were developed to estimate heat leaks and thermal response times.

  15. Determination of coefficient of thermal expansion effects on Louisiana's PCC pavement design : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    PROBLEM: The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is a fundamental property of construction : materials such as steel and concrete. Although the CTE of steel is a well-defined : constant, the CTE of concrete varies substantially with aggregate type...

  16. Diamond Microchannel Heat Sink Designs For High Heat Flux Thermal Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corbin, Michael

    2002-01-01

    ...) are expected in laser slabs and power amplifier tube collectors. These impressive heat flux levels frequently combine with strict operating temperature requirements to further compound the thermal control problem...

  17. Effect of urban design on microclimate and thermal comfort outdoors in warm-humid Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Moohammed Wasim; Johansson, Erik; Thorsson, Sofia; Lindberg, Fredrik; Rasmussen, Maria Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Due to the complexity of built environment, urban design patterns considerably affect the microclimate and outdoor thermal comfort in a given urban morphology. Variables such as building heights and orientations, spaces between buildings, plot coverage alter solar access, wind speed and direction at street level. To improve microclimate and comfort conditions urban design elements including vegetation and shading devices can be used. In warm-humid Dar es Salaam, the climate consideration in urban design has received little attention although the urban planning authorities try to develop the quality of planning and design. The main aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between urban design, urban microclimate, and outdoor comfort in four built-up areas with different morphologies including low-, medium-, and high-rise buildings. The study mainly concentrates on the warm season but a comparison with the thermal comfort conditions in the cool season is made for one of the areas. Air temperature, wind speed, mean radiant temperature (MRT), and the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) are simulated using ENVI-met to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the existing urban design. An analysis of the distribution of MRT in the areas showed that the area with low-rise buildings had the highest frequency of high MRTs and the lowest frequency of low MRTs. The study illustrates that areas with low-rise buildings lead to more stressful urban spaces than areas with high-rise buildings. It is also shown that the use of dense trees helps to enhance the thermal comfort conditions, i.e., reduce heat stress. However, vegetation might negatively affect the wind ventilation. Nevertheless, a sensitivity analysis shows that the provision of shade is a more efficient way to reduce PET than increases in wind speed, given the prevailing sun and wind conditions in Dar es Salaam. To mitigate heat stress in Dar es Salaam, a set of recommendations and guidelines on

  18. Effect of urban design on microclimate and thermal comfort outdoors in warm-humid Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Moohammed Wasim; Johansson, Erik; Thorsson, Sofia; Lindberg, Fredrik; Rasmussen, Maria Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Due to the complexity of built environment, urban design patterns considerably affect the microclimate and outdoor thermal comfort in a given urban morphology. Variables such as building heights and orientations, spaces between buildings, plot coverage alter solar access, wind speed and direction at street level. To improve microclimate and comfort conditions urban design elements including vegetation and shading devices can be used. In warm-humid Dar es Salaam, the climate consideration in urban design has received little attention although the urban planning authorities try to develop the quality of planning and design. The main aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between urban design, urban microclimate, and outdoor comfort in four built-up areas with different morphologies including low-, medium-, and high-rise buildings. The study mainly concentrates on the warm season but a comparison with the thermal comfort conditions in the cool season is made for one of the areas. Air temperature, wind speed, mean radiant temperature (MRT), and the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) are simulated using ENVI-met to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the existing urban design. An analysis of the distribution of MRT in the areas showed that the area with low-rise buildings had the highest frequency of high MRTs and the lowest frequency of low MRTs. The study illustrates that areas with low-rise buildings lead to more stressful urban spaces than areas with high-rise buildings. It is also shown that the use of dense trees helps to enhance the thermal comfort conditions, i.e., reduce heat stress. However, vegetation might negatively affect the wind ventilation. Nevertheless, a sensitivity analysis shows that the provision of shade is a more efficient way to reduce PET than increases in wind speed, given the prevailing sun and wind conditions in Dar es Salaam. To mitigate heat stress in Dar es Salaam, a set of recommendations and guidelines on

  19. Effect of urban design on microclimate and thermal comfort outdoors in warm-humid Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Moohammed Wasim; Johansson, Erik; Thorsson, Sofia; Lindberg, Fredrik; Rasmussen, Maria Isabel

    2017-06-01

    Due to the complexity of built environment, urban design patterns considerably affect the microclimate and outdoor thermal comfort in a given urban morphology. Variables such as building heights and orientations, spaces between buildings, plot coverage alter solar access, wind speed and direction at street level. To improve microclimate and comfort conditions urban design elements including vegetation and shading devices can be used. In warm-humid Dar es Salaam, the climate consideration in urban design has received little attention although the urban planning authorities try to develop the quality of planning and design. The main aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between urban design, urban microclimate, and outdoor comfort in four built-up areas with different morphologies including low-, medium-, and high-rise buildings. The study mainly concentrates on the warm season but a comparison with the thermal comfort conditions in the cool season is made for one of the areas. Air temperature, wind speed, mean radiant temperature (MRT), and the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) are simulated using ENVI-met to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the existing urban design. An analysis of the distribution of MRT in the areas showed that the area with low-rise buildings had the highest frequency of high MRTs and the lowest frequency of low MRTs. The study illustrates that areas with low-rise buildings lead to more stressful urban spaces than areas with high-rise buildings. It is also shown that the use of dense trees helps to enhance the thermal comfort conditions, i.e., reduce heat stress. However, vegetation might negatively affect the wind ventilation. Nevertheless, a sensitivity analysis shows that the provision of shade is a more efficient way to reduce PET than increases in wind speed, given the prevailing sun and wind conditions in Dar es Salaam. To mitigate heat stress in Dar es Salaam, a set of recommendations and guidelines on

  20. Impact of façade window design on energy, daylighting and thermal comfort in nearly zero-energy houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhoutteghem, Lies; Skarning, Gunnlaug Cecilie Jensen; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2015-01-01

    a solution space defined by targets for daylighting and thermal comfort. In contrast with existing guidelines, the results show an upper limit for energy savings and utilisation of solar gains in south-oriented rooms. Instead, low U-values are needed in both north- and south oriented rooms before large......Appropriate window solutions are decisive for the design of 'nearly zero-energy' buildings with healthy and comfortable indoor environment. This paper focuses on the relationship between size, orientation and glazing properties of façade windows for different side-lit room geometries in Danish...... 'nearly zero-energy' houses. The effect of these parameters on space heating demand, daylighting and thermal environment is evaluated by means of EnergyPlus and DAYSIM and presented in charts illustrating how combinations of design parameters with minimum space heating demand can be selected within...

  1. Thermal analysis of the forced cooled conductor for the TF [toroidal field] superconducting coils in the TIBER II ETR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) is being designed to provide nuclear testing capabilities for first wall and blanket design concepts. The baseline design for TIBER II is to provide steady-state nuclear burn capabilities. These objectives must be met using reactor relevant components, such as state-of-the-art current drive schemes coupled with superconducting toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coils. The design is also constrained to be cost effective, which forces the machine to be as small as possible. This last constraint limits the nuclear shielding in TIBER. Therefore, the TF coils will have a high nuclear heat load of up to 4.5 kW per coil. The cooling scheme and the thermal analysis for this design are presented

  2. 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant: solar facilities design integration. Construction package No. 10 (RADL Item 7-34) field erected tanks. Part I. Thermal storage unit (TUS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The final design, fabrication and erection of two different tanks upon foundations are given. Technical specifications and supplemental construction drawings are included for both the thermal storage unit and the plant support system caloria makeup tank for use at the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plnat. (LEW)

  3. A systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to enhance teaching effectiveness: A 10-year update: BEME Guide No. 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Mann, Karen; Anderson, Brownell; Barnett, Bonnie Maureen; Centeno, Angel; Naismith, Laura; Prideaux, David; Spencer, John; Tullo, Ellen; Viggiano, Thomas; Ward, Helena; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-08-01

    This review, which focused on faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness, synthesized findings related to intervention types, study characteristics, individual and organizational outcomes, key features, and community building. This review included 111 studies (between 2002 and 2012) that met the review criteria. Overall satisfaction with faculty development programs was high. Participants reported increased confidence, enthusiasm, and awareness of effective educational practices. Gains in knowledge and skills, and self-reported changes in teaching behaviors, were frequently noted. Observed behavior changes included enhanced teaching practices, new educational initiatives, new leadership positions, and increased academic output. Organizational changes were infrequently explored. Key features included evidence-informed educational design, relevant content, experiential learning, feedback and reflection, educational projects, intentional community building, longitudinal program design, and institutional support. This review holds implications for practice and research. Moving forward, we should build on current success, broaden the focus beyond individual teaching effectiveness, develop programs that extend over time, promote workplace learning, foster community development, and secure institutional support. We should also embed studies in a theoretical framework, conduct more qualitative and mixed methods studies, assess behavioral and organizational change, evaluate transfer to practice, analyse key features, and explore the role of faculty development within the larger organizational context.

  4. An updated front-end data link design for the Phase-2 upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Silverstein, Samuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a new design of the advanced Link Daughter Board (DB) for the front-end electronics upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) for Phase-II. The new TileCal front-end comprises 1024 “mini-drawers” (MD) installed in 256 calorimeter modules. Each MD serves up to 12 PMT channels, with ADCs and calibration provided by one “main board” (MB) per MD. The DB is connected to the MB through a dense, high-speed FMC connector, and provides bi-directional multi-Gb/s optlcal links to the off-detector electronics for timing, control, and continuous high-speed readout of the ADC channels on the MB. The DB is designed for redundancy and fault-tolerance, and previous versions have already been successfully tested at CERN and elsewhere. The new revision includes Kintex Ultrascale+ FPGAs for improved link timing and radiation tolerance, an expanded role for the rad-tolerant GBTx ASICs, and a simpler design requiring fewer components and optical links.

  5. An Updated Front-End Data Link Design for the Phase-2 Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Silverstein, Samuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a new design for the advanced Link Daughter Board (DB) for the front-end electronics upgrade of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter. The DB provides control, configuration and continuous ADC readout for the front-end, as well as bi-directional multi-GB/s optical links to the off-detector readout system. The DB will operate in high luminosity LHC conditions with limited detector access, so the design is fault tolerant with a high level of redundancy to avoid single-point failure modes. The DB is divided longitudinally, with an FPGA serving the ADC channels on its respective side. The new design is based on the new Xilinx Kintex Ultrascale+ FPGA family, which provides improved high-speed link timing performance as well as better signal compatibility with the CERN-developed GBTx link and timing distribution ASICs. Two GBTx ASICs each provide redundant phase-adjusted, LHC synchronous clocks, parallel control buses and remote JTAG configuration access to both FPGAs on the DB.

  6. 3-D TECATE/BREW: Thermal, stress, and birefringent ray-tracing codes for solid-state laser design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Nelson, R. G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the physics, code formulations, and numerics that are used in the TECATE (totally Eulerian code for anisotropic thermo-elasticity) and BREW (birefringent ray-tracing of electromagnetic waves) codes for laser design. These codes resolve thermal, stress, and birefringent optical effects in 3-D stationary solid-state systems. This suite of three constituent codes is a package referred to as LASRPAK.

  7. Design and high-volume manufacture of low-cost molded IR aspheres for personal thermal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazny, A. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Deegan, J. P.; Bundschuh, B.; Patton, E. K.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for infrared optical elements, particularly those made of chalcogenide materials, is rapidly increasing as thermal imaging becomes affordable to the consumer. The use of these materials in conjunction with established lens manufacturing techniques presents unique challenges relative to the cost sensitive nature of this new market. We explore the process from design to manufacture, and discuss the technical challenges involved. Additionally, facets of the development process including manufacturing logistics, packaging, supply chain management, and qualification are discussed.

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket/Vehicle Design Options for Future NASA Missions to the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Corban, Robert R.; Mcguire, Melissa L.; Beke, Erik G.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides a unique propulsion capability to planners/designers of future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. In addition to its high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight ratio (approximately 3-10), the NTR can also be configured as a 'dual mode' system capable of generating electrical power for spacecraft environmental systems, communications, and enhanced stage operations (e.g., refrigeration for long-term liquid hydrogen storage). At present the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) is examining a variety of mission applications for the NTR ranging from an expendable, single-burn, trans-lunar injection (TLI) stage for NASA's First Lunar Outpost (FLO) mission to all propulsive, multiburn, NTR-powered spacecraft supporting a 'split cargo-piloted sprint' Mars mission architecture. Each application results in a particular set of requirements in areas such as the number of engines and their respective thrust levels, restart capability, fuel operating temperature and lifetime, cryofluid storage, and stage size. Two solid core NTR concepts are examined -- one based on NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor (NDR) technology, and a second concept which utilizes a ternary carbide 'twisted ribbon' fuel form developed by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The NDR and CIS concepts have an established technology database involving significant nuclear testing at or near representative operating conditions. Integrated systems and mission studies indicate that clusters of two to four 15 to 25 klbf NDR or CIS engines are sufficient for most of the lunar and Mars mission scenarios currently under consideration. This paper provides descriptions and performance characteristics for the NDR and CIS concepts, summarizes NASA's First Lunar Outpost and Mars mission scenarios, and describes characteristics for representative cargo and piloted vehicles compatible with a

  9. Green Building between Tradition and Modernity Study Comparative Analysis between Conventional Methods and Updated Styles of Design and Architecture Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Elshimy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Green house   concept appeared from the ancient to the modern age ages and there is a tendency to use a traditional architecture with a pristine ecological environment areas and through sophisticated systems arrived to modern systems of the upgraded systems by Treatment architectural achieve environmental   sustainability   in   recent   years,   sustainability concept has become the common interest of numerous disciplines. The reason for this popularity is to perform the sustainable development. The Concept of Green Architecture, also known as "sustainable architecture” or “green house,” is the theory, science and style of buildings designed and constructed in accordance   with environmentally   friendly   principles.   Green house strives to minimize the number of resources consumed in the   building's  construction,   use   and   operation,   as  well  as curtailing  the  harm  done  to  the  environment  through  the emission, pollution and waste of its components.To design, construct, operate and maintain buildings energy, water and new materials are utilized as well as amounts of waste causing negative effects to health and environment is generated. In order to limit these effects and design environmentally sound and resource efficient buildings; "green building systems" must be introduced, clarified, understood and practiced.This paper aims at highlighting these difficult and complex issues of sustainability which encompass the scope of almost every aspect of human life.

  10. Thermal stability in a newly designed columnar-conical fluidized bed for combustion of rice husk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozainee, M.; Salema, A.A.; Ngo, S.P.; Chye, G.B. [Malaysian Technological Univ., Johor Bahru (Malaysia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The effects of fluidizing and liquid propane gas (LPG) flow rates on thermal stability of a fluidized bed were examined. The aim of the study was to hybridize a columnar and conical fluidized bed (CCFB) in order to encourage the combustion of low-calorific fuels such as rice husks. Experiments were conducted to examine the thermal stability of the CCFB. Premixed primary air and liquid propane gas (LPG) was fed into the bed in order to verify its thermal stability. Temperature profiles of the combustor and bed were measured. The impact of the fluidizing velocity and LPG flow rate on the temperature profile was examined in order to analyze the influence of the fluidizing velocity and LPG rate on combustion rates. Results of the study showed that the combustion of the CCFB was sustained at a fluidizing velocity of 1.5 U{sub mf} and at an LPG flow rate of 8 liters per minute. Results of the study showed that fluidizing velocity played an important role on the thermal stability of the bed. It was concluded that the thermal stability of the combustor is sufficient for the CCFB. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. Model-based thermal system design optimization for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Niedner, Malcolm B.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2017-10-01

    Spacecraft thermal model validation is normally performed by comparing model predictions with thermal test data and reducing their discrepancies to meet the mission requirements. Based on thermal engineering expertise, the model input parameters are adjusted to tune the model output response to the test data. The end result is not guaranteed to be the best solution in terms of reduced discrepancy and the process requires months to complete. A model-based methodology was developed to perform the validation process in a fully automated fashion and provide mathematical bases to the search for the optimal parameter set that minimizes the discrepancies between model and data. The methodology was successfully applied to several thermal subsystems of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Global or quasiglobal optimal solutions were found and the total execution time of the model validation process was reduced to about two weeks. The model sensitivities to the parameters, which are required to solve the optimization problem, can be calculated automatically before the test begins and provide a library for sensitivity studies. This methodology represents a crucial commodity when testing complex, large-scale systems under time and budget constraints. Here, results for the JWST Core thermal system will be presented in detail.

  12. Design and Research of the Movable Hybrid Photovoltaic-Thermal (PVT System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the development of photovoltaic system and photo-thermal system technology, hybrid photovoltaic-thermal (PVT technology has been a breakthrough in many aspects. This paper describes the movable hybrid PVT system from the aspects of appearance structure, energy flow, and control circuit. The system is equipped with rolling wheels and the simulated light sources also can be removed so that the system can be used in the outdoor conditions. The movable system is also suitable for the PVT system and its related applications without any external power supply. This system combines two technologies: photovoltaic power generation and photo-thermal utilization. The first part of the power supply is for the systems own output power supply, and the second part is for generating thermal energy. The two separate parts can be controlled and monitored respectively through the control circuits and the touch screens. The experimental results show that the system can generate 691 kWh electric energy and 3047.8 kWh thermal energy each year under normal working conditions. The efficiency of the proposed movable hybrid PVT system is calculated to be approximately 42.82% using the revised equations that are proposed in this paper. Therefore, the movable hybrid PVT system can meet the daily demands of hot water and electricity power in remote areas or islands and other non-grid areas. It also can be used to conduct experiment tests for the PVT system.

  13. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  14. Design and Operation of an Optically-Accessible Modular Reactor for Diagnostics of Thermal Thin Film Deposition Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, W A; Sperling, B A; Maslars, J E

    2015-01-01

    The design and operation of a simple, optically-accessible modular reactor for probing thermal thin film deposition processes, such as atomic layer deposition processes (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is described. This reactor has a nominal footprint of 225 cm(2) and a mass of approximately 6.6 kg, making it small enough to conveniently function as a modular component of an optical train. The design is simple, making fabrication straightforward and relatively inexpensive. Reactor operation is characterized using two infrared absorption measurements to determine exhaust times for tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium and water, proto-typical ALD precursors, in a pressure and flow regime commonly used for ALD.

  15. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc) could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults.

  16. Memory updating and mental arithmetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ching eHan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults.

  17. A Novel Approach to Thermal Design of Solar Modules: Selective-Spectral and Radiative Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Dubey, Rajiv; Chattopadhyay, Shashwata; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Chavali, Raghu Vamsi; Silverman, Timothy J.; Kottantharayil, Anil; Vasi, Juzer; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-11-21

    For commercial solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 degrees C higher than the ambient. In the long run, extreme self-heating may erode efficiency and shorten lifetime, thereby, dramatically reducing the total energy output by almost ~10% Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical cooling methods to combat PV self-heating. In this paper, we explore two fundamental sources of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical and thermal properties of the solar module to eliminate the parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance the thermal emission to the cold cosmos (radiative cooling). The proposed technique should cool the module by ~10 degrees C, to be reflected in significant long-term energy gain (~ 3% to 8% over 25 years) for PV systems under different climatic conditions.

  18. Performance of Polycrystalline Photovoltaic and Thermal Collector (PVT on Serpentine-Parallel Absorbers Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustofa Mustofa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance of an unglazed polycrystalline photovoltaic-thermal PVT on 0.045 kg/s mass flow rate. PVT combine photovoltaic modules and solar thermal collectors, forming a single device that receive solar radiation and produces heat and electricity simultaneously. The collector figures out serpentine-parallel tubes that can prolong fluid heat conductivity from morning till afternoon. During testing, cell PV, inlet and outlet fluid temperaturs were recorded by thermocouple digital LM35 Arduino Mega 2560. Panel voltage and electric current were also noted in which they were connected to computer and presented each second data recorded. But, in this performance only shows in the certain significant time data. This because the electric current was only noted by multimeter device not the digital one. Based on these testing data, average cell efficieny was about 19%, while thermal efficiency of above 50% and correspondeng cell efficiency of 11%, respectively

  19. CFD Analysis for Optimum Thermal Design of Carbon Nanotube Based Micro-Channel Heatsink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahbub

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT is considered as an ideal material for thermal management in electronic packaging because of its extraordinary high thermal conductivity. Fabricated onto a silicon substrate to form micro-channels, the CNT based cooling fins show high heat dissipation efficiency. A series of 2D and 3D CFD simulations have been carried out for CNT based micro-channel cooling architectures based on one and two dimensional fin array in this paper using COMSOL 4.0a software. Micro-channels are generally regarded as an effective method for the heat transfer in electronic products. The influence of various fluids, micro-fin structures, fluid velocity and heating powers on cooling effects have been simulated and compared in this study. Steady-state thermal stress analyses for the forced convection heat transfer are also performed to determine maximum allowable stress and deflections for the different types of cooling assembly.

  20. Design, materials and R ampersand R issues of innovative thermal contact joints for high heat flux applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Chiocchio, S.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma facing components in fusion machines are generally designed with a layer of low-Z material facing the plasma, and some other material in contact with the coolant. One of the most critical issues associated with making the proposed design concept work, from a power handling point of view, is achieving the necessary contact conductance between the armor and the heat sink. Bonded attachments (i.e., brazed joints) have been favored in the past because of their superior thermal conductance with respect to mechanical attachment schemes based, for example, on the use of solid compliant layers. As a matter of fact, providing the high contact pressure required to ensure a high level of thermal conductance across the interface, over most of the area, will be a challenge even on initial installation. Maintaining that high level over the life of the component, given the dimension and stress effects resulting from irradiation, will be very difficult. However, for brazed joints, most of the database available today is still inconclusive in terms of the integrity and the expected lifetime of the interface in such designs for typical reactor conditions. This paper describes new design/materials ideas which could represent promising alternatives to some of the existing concepts. The underlying design approach is to combine a sacrificial armor to an actively cooled permanent part via a compliant layer of a conventional solder alloy in the rheocast condition