WorldWideScience

Sample records for deserti ferocactus acanthodes

  1. Thermal Energy Exchange Model and Water Loss of a Barrel Cactus, Ferocactus acanthodes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Donald A.; Nobel, Park S.

    1977-01-01

    The influences of various diurnal stomatal opening patterns, spines, and ribs on the stem surface temperature and water economy of a CAM succulent, the barrel cactus Ferocactus acanthodes, were examined using an energy budget model. To incorporate energy exchanges by shortwave and longwave irradiation, latent heat, conduction, and convection as well as the heat storage in the massive stem, the plant was subdivided into over 100 internal and external regions in the model. This enabled the average surface temperature to be predicted within 1 C of the measured temperature for both winter and summer days. Reducing the stem water vapor conductance from the values observed in the field to zero caused the average daily stem surface temperature to increase only 0.7 C for a winter day and 0.3 C for a summer day. Thus, latent heat loss does not substantially reduce stem temperature. Although the surface temperatures averaged 18 C warmer for the summer day than for the winter day for a plant 41 cm tall, the temperature dependence of stomatal opening caused the simulated nighttime water loss rates to be about the same for the 2 days. Spines moderated the amplitude of the diurnal temperature changes of the stem surface, since the daily variation was 17 C for the winter day and 25 C for the summer day with spines compared with 23 C and 41 C, respectively, in their simulated absence. Ribs reduced the daytime temperature rise by providing 54% more area for convective heat loss than for a smooth circumscribing surface. In a simulation where both spines and ribs were eliminated, the daytime average surface temperature rose by 5 C. PMID:16660148

  2. Thermal Energy Exchange Model and Water Loss of a Barrel Cactus, Ferocactus acanthodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D A; Nobel, P S

    1977-10-01

    The influences of various diurnal stomatal opening patterns, spines, and ribs on the stem surface temperature and water economy of a CAM succulent, the barrel cactus Ferocactus acanthodes, were examined using an energy budget model. To incorporate energy exchanges by shortwave and longwave irradiation, latent heat, conduction, and convection as well as the heat storage in the massive stem, the plant was subdivided into over 100 internal and external regions in the model. This enabled the average surface temperature to be predicted within 1 C of the measured temperature for both winter and summer days.Reducing the stem water vapor conductance from the values observed in the field to zero caused the average daily stem surface temperature to increase only 0.7 C for a winter day and 0.3 C for a summer day. Thus, latent heat loss does not substantially reduce stem temperature. Although the surface temperatures averaged 18 C warmer for the summer day than for the winter day for a plant 41 cm tall, the temperature dependence of stomatal opening caused the simulated nighttime water loss rates to be about the same for the 2 days.Spines moderated the amplitude of the diurnal temperature changes of the stem surface, since the daily variation was 17 C for the winter day and 25 C for the summer day with spines compared with 23 C and 41 C, respectively, in their simulated absence. Ribs reduced the daytime temperature rise by providing 54% more area for convective heat loss than for a smooth circumscribing surface. In a simulation where both spines and ribs were eliminated, the daytime average surface temperature rose by 5 C.

  3. The Effect of Aqueous Extract of Launaea Acanthodes on the Hormones of Pituitary-Gonadal Axis and Testis Histological Changes in Male Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Tafakkor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Diabetes impairs the reproduction with gonadal damage and changes in sex hormone secretion. Due to the antioxidant and hypoglycemia properties of Launaea acanthodes the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of Launaea acanthodes on the hormones of pituitary-gonad axis and testis histological changes in male diabetic rats. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 32 male rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Control, diabetic control and experimental diabetic treated with aqueous extract of Launaea acanthodes (100 and 200 mg/kg. The diabetes was induced using an intraperitoneal injection of alloxan. Aqueous extract of Launaea acanthodes was intraperitoneally injected into the experimental diabetic groups, alternate days for one month. Sterile distilled water was injected to the animals of control and diabetic control groups. At the end of injection period, serum levels of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrogen, LH and FSH were measured by ELISA method. Then, the testis sections were prepared and were examined by means of light microscope. Results: Compared to the diabetic control group serum levels of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrogen, LH, FSH, also the average diameter and the average thickness of germinal epithelium seminiferous tubules in diabetic groups treated with concentration of 100 and 200 mg/kg Launaea acanthodes extract dose-dependently increased (p<0.05. Conclusion: Administration of Launaea acanthodes extract increases the activity of pituitary-gonad axis in male diabetic rats and also it has protective effect against testicular damage induced by diabetes.

  4. The study of the extreme radiation tolerance mechanisms of the bacterium Deinococcus deserti by a functional genomics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulermo, R.

    2009-12-01

    The genome of Deinococcus deserti, a highly radiation-tolerant bacterium, was analyzed and compared to those of D. radiodurans and D. geothermalis. About 230 proteins are specifically conserved in these 3 species, including IrrE, a regulator protein essential for radio tolerance. D.deserti has several supplementary DNA repair genes, like imuY and dnaE2 (trans-lesion DNA polymerases). Moreover, D. deserti has 3 recA that code for 2 different RecA proteins (RecAC et RecAP). To study these genes, genetic tools were developed for D. deserti. Different results suggest that IrrE, required for the induction of several genes after irradiation, has peptidase activity. The 2 RecA proteins are functional for DNA repair. D. deserti is mutable by UV, which requires ImuY, DnaE2 and RecAC, but not RecAP. (author)

  5. Composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil of Marrubium deserti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouer, Hocine; Yabrir, Benalia; Djeridane, Amar; Yousfi, Mohamed; Beldovini, Nicolas; Lamamra, Mebarka

    2009-08-01

    The essential oil from aerial part of Marrubium deserti De Noé (Lamiaceae), obtained by hydrodistillation was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activity. The antioxidant activity was determined using three in vitro assays: scavenging effect on DPPH, the ABTS test and the phosphomolybdenum method. Thirty-seven compounds were identified in the oil, with germacrene D as the major component (45.7%). This oil was characterized by an important hydrocarbon fraction (78.1%) and by the predominance of sesquiterpenes (67.4%). M. deserti essential oil had no activity on the tested microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Echerichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). However the oil presented an antioxidant activity.

  6. Major soluble proteome changes in Deinococcus deserti over the earliest stages following gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedieu, Alain; Sahinovic, Elodie; Guerin, Philippe; Armengaud, Jean; Blanchard, Laurence; Fochesato, Sylvain; Groot, Arjan de; Meunier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus deserti VCD115 has been isolated from Sahara surface sand. This radio-tolerant bacterium represents an experimental model of choice to understand adaptation to harsh conditions encountered in hot arid deserts. We analysed the soluble proteome dynamics in this environmentally relevant model after exposure to 3 kGy gamma radiation, a non-lethal dose that generates massive DNA damages. For this, cells were harvested at different time lapses after irradiation and their soluble proteome contents have been analysed by 2-DE and mass spectrometry. In the first stage of the time course we observed accumulation of DNA damage response protein DdrB (that shows the highest fold change ∼11), SSB, and two different RecA proteins (RecAP and RecAC). Induction of DNA repair protein PprA, DNA damage response protein DdrD and the two gyrase subunits (GyrA and GyrB) was also detected. A response regulator of the SarP family, a type II site-specific deoxyribonuclease and a putative N-acetyltransferase are three new proteins found to be induced. In a more delayed stage, we observed accumulation of several proteins related to central metabolism and protein turn-over, as well as helicase UvrD and novel forms of both gyrase subunits differing in terms of isoelectric point and molecular weight. Conclusions: Post-translational modifications of GyrA (N-terminal methionine removal and acetylation) have been evidenced and their significance discussed. We found that the Deide-02842 restriction enzyme, which is specifically found in D. deserti, is a new potential member of the radiation/desiccation response regulon, highlighting the specificities of D. deserti compared to the D. radiodurans model. (authors)

  7. The effects of Artemisia deserti ethanolic extract on pathology and function of rat kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noori

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Medicinal plants played an important role in human health. The kidney is a major organ for elimination the additional materials of body. Some of metabolic waste products are excreted through the kidneys, give us useful information about kidney health. Therefore, the aim of this research was to study the effects of A. deserti flowering tips extract on kidney. Materials and Methods: Three groups of animal were studied. Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Group 1 was injected with saline, group 2 and 3 were injected with extract, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, respectively. The animals were anesthetized, blood samples were collected 2 days after the last injection, then urea, uric acid and creatinine levels were assayed. Also, the kidney histology was studied. Results: No significant changes in urea and uric acid were observed. But, creatinine concentration was changed significantly in group 3 compared to other groups. The extract caused histologic changes in the kidney, including, glomerular atrophy, congestion of inflammatory cells and degeneration of the renal tubules. Conclusion: The results showed that A. deserti extract was able to damage the kidney tissue. However, the reason for these histopathological changes remains to be clarified.

  8. De novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant CAM plants, Agave deserti and Agave tequilana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Stephen M; Martin, Jeffrey A; Simpson, June; Abraham-Juarez, María Jazmín; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2013-08-19

    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to xeric environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis), and existing technologies for ethanol production, agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, built from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having a minimum of approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in agave species. Additionally, a focus on the transcriptomics of the A. deserti juvenile leaf confirms evolutionary conservation of monocotyledonous leaf physiology and development along the proximal-distal axis. Our work presents a comprehensive transcriptome resource for two Agave species and provides insight into their biology and physiology. These resources are a foundation for further investigation of agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Drought-Tolerant CAM plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Stephen M.; Martin, Jeffrey A.; Simpson, June; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2013-03-25

    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to hot and arid environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis) and existing technologies for ethanol production, agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in agave species. Additionally, we use RNA-seq data to gain insights into biological functions along the A. deserti juvenile leaf proximal-distal axis. Our work presents a foundation for further investigation of agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

  10. A new Labdane Diterpene and Other Constituents from Marrubium deserti Noe ex coss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocine Dendougui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical study of the chloroform soluble part of the hydroalcoholic extract of Marrubium deserti allowed us to describe a new labdane diterpene, 6-dehydroxy-19-acetyl-marrubenol (3 beside three other diterpenes : 19-acetyl-marrubenol (6 , 6-acetyl-marrubenol (7 and 16-epoxy-9-hydroxy-labda-13(16, 14- diene (1. This latter derivative is described for the first time as natural compound. Phytol (2, and three sterols: b -sitosterol (4, stigmasterol (5 and b -sitosterol 3-O-glucoside (8 were also isolated from this species. Structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was accomplished by means of spectroscopic techniques, especially NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  11. Siccirubricoccus deserti gen. nov., sp. nov., a proteobacterium isolated from a desert sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Wen; Salam, Nimaichand; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Liu, Bing-Bing; Han, Ming-Xian; Fang, Bao-Zhu; Wang, Dong; Xiao, Min; Hozzein, Wael N; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-11-01

    Strain SYSU D8009 T was isolated from a desert sample collected from Saudi Arabia. The taxonomic position of the isolate was investigated by a polyphasic approach. The novel isolate was Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, aerobic and non-spore-forming. It was able to grow at 4-45 °C and pH 4.0-8.0, and exhibited NaCl tolerance of up to 1.5 % (w/v). Strain SYSU D8009 T shared the closest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with members of the family Acetobacteraceae, with a value of less than 96.0 %. In the phylogenetic dendrograms, the strain clustered with the genera Paracraurococcus, Craurococcus and Crenalkalicoccus within the family Acetobacteraceae but with a distinct lineage, thereby demonstrating that the strain should be classified within the family Acetobacteraceae. The respiratory ubiquinone was found to be Q-10. The polar lipids of the strain comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and four unidentified aminolipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain SYSU D8009 T was determined to be 71.6 mol%. Based on the results of the phylogenetic analyses and differences in the physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain SYSU D8009 T merits representation of a novel species of a new genus within the family Acetobacteraceae, for which the name Siccirubricoccus deserti gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Siccirubricoccus deserti sp. nov. is SYSU D8009 T (=CGMCC 1.15936 T =KCTC 62088 T ).

  12. Antioxidant and antigenotoxic properties of compounds isolated from Marrubium deserti de Noé.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaabat, Nabila; Hay, Anne-Emmanuelle; Michalet, Serge; Darbour, Nicole; Bayet, Christine; Skandrani, Inès; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Akkal, Salah; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève

    2011-12-01

    In our continual course toward the valorization of traditionally used endemic flora through the analysis of its chemobiodiversity, the phytochemical analysis of aerial parts of Marrubium deserti de Noé was undertaken. Dichloromethane and methanol extracts led to the isolation of terpenoid derivatives among which two were new labdane diterpenes named marrulibacetal A and desertine, respectively. Six of them were known compounds (a mixture of the isomers cyllenin A and 15-epi-cyllenin A, marrubiin, marrulactone, marrulibacetal and β-stigmasterol) and seven known phenolic compounds were also isolated: apigenin and several 7-O-substituted derivatives (apigenin-7-O-β-neohesperidoside, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, terniflorin and apigenin-7-O-glucuronide) together with two phenylethanoid glucosides (acteoside and forsythoside B). The structures and relative configurations of the new compounds were elucidated by MS and a series of 1D and 2D NMR analyses. Some pure compounds have been evaluated for their antioxidant activities through different methods: DPPH and ABTS assays as well as CUPRAC assay. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic activities of extracts and pure compounds were also evaluated in vitro on Escherichia coli PQ37 cells by the SOS Chromotest. Some of the isolated compounds like phenylethanoid derivatives showed stronger antioxidant capacity than trolox and were also able to significantly inhibit β-galactosidase induction caused by the mutagen agent nitrofurantoin. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Efecto de diferentes reguladores de crecimiento vegetal sobre la germinación de semillas y desarrollo de plántulas de dos especies de Ferocactus (Cactaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Amador-Alférez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el efecto de la adición de tres regu-ladores de crecimiento vegetal (RCV sobre la respuesta germinativa y crecimiento de plántulas en las especiesFerocactus histrixyF. latispinus(Cactaceae. Grupos de semillas se germinaron con la adición de diferentes concentraciones (125, 250, 500 ppm de áci-do indolacético (AIA, ácido naftalenacético (ANA y ácido giberélico (AG3, mientras que otras semillas (control se sembraron con agua destilada solamente. Cada tercer día y durante 30 días se llevó a cabo el registro de porcentaje de germinación (%G, el índice de velocidad de germinación (IVG y de coeficientes de regresión; los caracteres morfológicos durante el crecimiento inicial de las plántulas provenientes de dichos experimentos también fueron registrados. Los resultados demostraron diferencias estadísticas significativas (Tukey, P Ferocactus, se registraron en el tratamiento control. El AIA a una concentración de 125 ppm promovió 51% de germinación enF. latispinusal noveno día del experimento, un 62% de germinación se registró paraF. histrixen el sexto día con 250 ppm de ANA; mientras que el porcentaje de germinación más bajo (

  14. Physiological integration of parents and ramets of Agave deserti: Carbon relations during vegetative and sexually reproductive growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    Agave deserti is a semelparous perennial occurring in the northwestern Sonoran Desert that flowers after 50-55 years, but propagates primarily vegetatively by ramets. Shading ramets in the field to light compensation for two years did not decrease their relative growth rate compared with unshaded ramets. However, parents experienced a 30% decrease in total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) level, indicating that carbohydrates were translocated from parents to ramets. Parents were also shaded in the field for two years and about 10% of the growth of the shaded parents was attributed to TNC received from their attached, unshaded ramets indicating bidirectional translocation of carbohydrates between parents and ramets. The amount of carbon imported by a ramet from its parent, measured using 14 CO 2 techniques, was related to its photosynthetically active radiation environment, shaded ramets received 2.1 times more carbon than unshaded ramets, and was inversely related to the mass of the ramet, small ramets received up to 4.5 times more carbon than large ramets. The physiological integration of parents and ramets allows ramets to draw upon the reserves of the parent, thereby facilitating ramet growth and establishment in a resource-limited environment. Rosettes of Agave deserti must attain a minimum size (> 1,000 g dry mass) to initiate flowering, unless they are connected to a large flowering parent. Ramets that flower precociously can not complete formation of their inflorescence unless partially supported by carbon supplied by their attached parent. TNC reserves of the parent provided 70% of the carbon required to produce its own inflorescence, typically 4 m tall and 1.5 kg in dry mass, and CO 2 uptake by the leaves and the inflorescence provided the remaining 30%

  15. Classification of thermophilic actinobacteria isolated from arid desert soils, including the description of Amycolatopsis deserti sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busarakam, Kanungnid; Brown, Ros; Bull, Alan T; Tan, Geok Yuan Annie; Zucchi, Tiago D; da Silva, Leonardo José; de Souza, Wallace Rafael; Goodfellow, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The taxonomic position of 26 filamentous actinobacteria isolated from a hyper-arid Atacama Desert soil and 2 from an arid Australian composite soil was established using a polyphasic approach. All of the isolates gave the diagnostic amplification product using 16S rRNA oligonucleotide primers specific for the genus Amycolatopsis. Representative isolates had chemotaxonomic and morphological properties typical of members of the genus Amycolatopsis. 16S rRNA gene analyses showed that all of the isolates belong to the Amycolatopsis methanolica 16S rRNA gene clade. The Atacama Desert isolates were assigned to one or other of two recognised species, namely Amycolatopsis ruanii and Amycolatopsis thermalba, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, DNA:DNA relatedness and phenotypic data; emended descriptions are given for these species. In contrast, the two strains from the arid Australian composite soil, isolates GY024(T) and GY142, formed a distinct branch at the periphery of the A. methanolica 16S rRNA phyletic line, a taxon that was supported by all of the tree-making algorithms and by a 100 % bootstrap value. These strains shared a high degree of DNA:DNA relatedness and have many phenotypic properties in common, some of which distinguished them from all of the constituent species classified in the A. methanolica 16S rRNA clade. Isolates GY024(T) and GY142 merit recognition as a new species within the A. methanolica group of thermophilic strains. The name proposed for the new species is Amycolatopsis deserti sp. nov.; the type strain is GY024(T) (=NCIMB 14972(T) = NRRL B-65266(T)).

  16. Seeding Success on Topsoiled and Nontopsoiled Slopes at Adobe Dam,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    Olneya tesota (Ironwood), Prosopis glandulosa var torreyana (Honey Mesquite), and Psorothamnus spinosa (Smoketree) are common. Common associates...Ferocactus acanthodes (Barrel cactus) (Brown 1982). Gasser (1983) noted that Skunk Creek is lined with Cer~cidium floridum, Prosopis glandulosa var...Lycium and Prosopis . When areas predominated by Saltbush are disturbed by heavy livestock graiing, exotic annuals such as Schismus (Mediterranean Grass

  17. Archaeological Test Sampling of Sites within the La Quinta Flood Control Channel Easement,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    more important economic plants in this community (for a fuller description of the variety of plants, see Wilke 1976: 44-47) are the mesquite ( Prosopis ... glandulosa var. torreyana), screwbean (P. pubescens), barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes), pricklypear (Opuntia sp.), creosote (Larrea tridentata

  18. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti.

  19. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Launaea acanthodes on DNA Oxidative Damage and Antioxidant Enzymes Activities in Diabetic Rats Testes Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tafakko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As one of the most prevalent disorders in the adolescents, the comorbidity of social anxiety disorder and depression leads to bad outcomes for them. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the midfulness-based cognitive therapy on the cognitive-behavioral avoidance and mental rumination in patients with comorbidity of social anxiety and depression. Materials & Methods: In the controlled follow-up pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study, 30 female high-school students with the social anxiety and depression comorbiduty were studied in Khorramabad in the academic year 2015-16. The subjects, selected via purposeful sampling method, were randomly divided into two 15-person groups including experimental and control groups. Data was collected by the structured clinical interview for Axis 1 disorders, the social anxiety questionnaire for the adolescents, Beck depression inventory- second edition, the cognitive-behavioral avoidance scale, and the ruminative responces scale. Eight 2-hour group mindfulness-based cognitive-therapy training sessions (one session per week were conducted in experimental group, while control group received no intervention. Finally, posttest was conducted in both groups and a follow-up step was conducted 2 month latter. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using multi-variable covariance analysis test. Findings: The mean scores of the cognitive-behavioral avoidance and mental rumination items in the posttest and follow-up steps significantly decreased in experimental group compared to control group (p<0.01. Conclusion: The mindfulness-based cognitive therapy reduces the cognitive-behavioral avoidance, as well as the mental rumination, in the patients with the social anxiety and depression comorbidity.

  20. Kangaroo rats: intraspecific variation in Dipodomys spectabilis Merriam and Dipodomys deserti Stephens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nader, Iyad A

    1978-01-01

    Twenty morpholoigcl characters in addition to color were studied throughout the geographic range of two species of kangaroo rats, the banner-tailed kangaroo rat Dipodomys spectabilis and the desert...

  1. Linking Narrative Storylines and Quantitative Models to Combat Deserti ication in the Guadalentín Watershed (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, K.; Delden, van H.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification in Spain is largely a society-driven problem, which can be effectively managed only through a thorough understanding of the principal ecological, sociocultural, and economic driving forces (UNCCD 1994). This calls for a more active role of decision-makers and other stakeholders. We

  2. Anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity evaluation of aqueous infusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Marrubium deserti de Noé, which is locally known as “Merriouet saharaui”, is widely used in Algeria as a traditional treatment of many ailments. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity of the aqueous infusion extract from aerial parts of Marrubium deserti were investigated. Meanwhile, acute oral ...

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11181-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available id:none) Pyrobaculum aerophilum str. IM2,... 94 2e-17 AM944373_1( AM944373 |pid:n...one) Propionibacterium freudenreichii s... 93 3e-17 CP001114_2205( CP001114 |pid:none) Deinococcus deserti V

  4. Saad et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016) 13(1):71-75 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF ADEWUNMI

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity of the aqueous infusion extract from aerial parts of Marrubium deserti were investigated. Meanwhile, acute oral .... High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed using a Waters Alliance 2695 chromatography system and UV detector with bars of diodes ...

  5. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saad, Somia. Vol 13, No 1 (2016) - Articles Anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity evaluation of aqueous infusion extract obtained from aerial parts of Marrubium deserti de Noé growing in Algeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0189-6016. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  6. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chabane, Djamila. Vol 13, No 1 (2016) - Articles Anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity evaluation of aqueous infusion extract obtained from aerial parts of Marrubium deserti de Noé growing in Algeria Abstract PDF · Vol 14, No 3 (2017) - Articles Ethnobotanical survey of Phoenix dactylifera L. Pollen used for the treatment of ...

  7. Glechoma longituba (Lamiaceae) alleviates apoptosis in calcium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    properties of compounds isolated from Marrubium deserti de Noé. Food Chem Toxicol 2011; 49:3328-. 3335. 19. Döring AS, Petersen M. Production of caffeic, chlorogenic and rosmarinic acids in plants and suspension cultures of Glechoma hederacea. Phytochem Lett 2014; 10: cxi- cxvii. 20. Liang Q, Li X, Zhou W, Su Y, He ...

  8. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Th. ME+SA-SI+S-Z. 26.7. Resedaceae. Ochradenus baccatus Delile. Per. Nph. SA-SI. 33.3. Reseda decursiva Forssk. Ann. Th. SA-SI. 6.7. Rutaceae. Haplophyllum tuberculatum (Forssk.) Juss. Per. H. SA-SI. 3.3. Scrophulariaceae. Kickxia aegyptiaca (L.) NÜbelek. Per. Ch. ME+SA-SI. 3.3. Scophularia deserti Delile. Per. Ch.

  9. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible P ars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  10. Healing potential of Iranian traditional medicinal plants on burn wounds in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghasemi Pirbalouti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Malva sylvestris, Punica granatum, Amygdalus communis, Arnebia euchroma and Scrophularia deserti are important medicinal plants in Iranian traditional medicine (Unani whose have been used as remedy against edema, burn, and wound and for their carminative, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. The ethanol extracts of M. sylvestris and P. granatum flowers, A. communis leaves, A. euchroma roots and S. deserti stems were used to evaluate the burn healing activity in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Burns were induced in Wistar rats divided into nine groups as following; Group-I: normal rats were treated with simple ointment base (control, Group-II: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base (control, Groups-III and -VII: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of extracts (diabetic animals, Groups VIII: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of mixed extracts, Group-IX: diabetic rats received the standard drug (Silver Sulfadiazine. The efficacy of treatments was evaluated based on wound area, epithelialization time and histopathological characteristics. Wound contraction showed that there is high significant difference between the different groups (p<0.001. At the 18th day, A. euchroma, S. deserti, A. communis and mixed extract ointment treated groups healed 80-90%. At the 9th and 18th days the experiment, the best results were obtained with A. communis and standard drug, when compared to the other groups as well as to the controls. It may be concluded that almond leaves (sweet and bitter formulated in the simple ointment base is effective in the treatment of burns and thus supports its traditional use.

  11. Evolutionary history of the genus Tarentola (Gekkota: Phyllodactylidae from the Mediterranean Basin, estimated using multilocus sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rato Catarina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pronounced morphological conservatism within Tarentola geckos contrasted with a high genetic variation in North Africa, has led to the hypothesis that this group could represent a cryptic species complex, a challenging system to study especially when trying to define distinct evolutionary entities and address biogeographic hypotheses. In the present work we have re-examined the phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationships between and within all Mediterranean species of Tarentola, placing the genealogies obtained into a temporal framework. In order to do this, we have investigated the sequence variation of two mitochondrial (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA, and four nuclear markers (ACM4, PDC, MC1R, and RAG2 for 384 individuals of all known Mediterranean Tarentola species, so that their evolutionary history could be assessed. Results Of all three generated genealogies (combined mtDNA, combined nDNA, and mtDNA+nDNA we prefer the phylogenetic relationships obtained when all genetic markers are combined. A total of 133 individuals, and 2,901 bp of sequence length, were used in this analysis. The phylogeny obtained for Tarentola presents deep branches, with T. annularis, T. ephippiata and T. chazaliae occupying a basal position and splitting from the remaining species around 15.38 Mya. Tarentola boehmei is sister to all other Mediterranean species, from which it split around 11.38 Mya. There are also two other major groups: 1 the T. mauritanica complex present in North Africa and Europe; and 2 the clade formed by the T. fascicularis/deserti complex, T. neglecta and T. mindiae, occurring only in North Africa. The cladogenesis between these two groups occurred around 8.69 Mya, coincident with the late Miocene. Contrary to what was initially proposed, T. neglecta and T. mindiae are sister taxa to both T. fascicularis and T. deserti. Conclusions At least in the Iberian Peninsula and Northwest Africa, the lineages obtained have some

  12. Biometric and statistical investigations on the cnidoma of the genus Hydra (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Deserti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals about the nematocysts like a source of biometric information for comparison between the species Hydra vulgaris Pallas, 1766, Hydra vulgaris pedunculata Deserti et al., 2011 and Hydra pseudoligactis (Hyman, 1931. This biometric tool lets us carry out statistical comparisons and adding these results to the identification of specimens from different classificatory groups. In this particular study, we obtained significant differences between species, individuals of each species and nematocysts type when compared the biometry of its nematocysts. Another result was the variation in of particular nematocysts, like atrichous isorhiza and holotrichous isorhiza for the species H. vulgaris in relation to the column size.

  13. The Comparison of the anti Limnatis nilotica effets of albendazole and some of the Iranian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Bahmani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aquatic leech invade mucosal membrane and causes anemia. Until now, there is not any commercial effective drug for controlling of this parasite. In this experimental study, investigated the effect of some chemical and herbal drugs against leech (Limnatis nilotica. Methods: Methanolic extract of Artemisia kermanensis and Artemisia spp and hydroalcoholic extracts of Scrophularia deserti, Quercus brantii and Achillea spp was prepared. . Each drugs was tested in one group with 9 replicates. Each leech preserve in one separated jar and drugs were added to each jar. Albendazole used as commercial anti-parasite and distilled water was used as negative control. The movement and respond of each Leech was recorded for 720 minutes. Also, the leeches were monitored for paralysis and death in this duration. Results: In this study, leeches receiving albendazol (600mg died at 138 min after exposure with albendazol. But exposure with methanolic extracts of Artemisia kermanensis (600 mg, Artemisia spp (600 mg and hydroalcoholic extracts of Quercus brantii (600 mg, Achillea spp (600 mg and Scrophularia deserti (600 mg have no effect on liviability of leeches. Methanolic extract of Artemisia kermanensis with doses of 1800 and 2400 mg, caused death in leeches after 720, 635 and 188 minutes, respectively. Also, methanolic extracts of Arthemisia spp with doses of 1200, 1800 and 2400 mg, caused death in leeches after 720 , 600 and 601 minutes, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the herbal drugs that used in this study with compare to albendazole have no considering effect on Limniatis nilotica.

  14. Agave turneri (Agavaceae), a new species from northeastern Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Salazar-Ceseña, J. Mario

    2011-01-01

    Agave turneri, a new species of Agave from the Sierras Cucapá and El Mayor in northeastern Baja California, Mexico, is a medium-sized species that does not produce offsets, has a relatively short and narrow panicle, and has a distinctive flower structure. The closest relatives to this new species are Agave moranii, which occurs approximately 200 km to the south of the type locality, and A. deserti var. simplex, which occurs in Arizona and California. This new species is a narrow endemic restricted to specific granodiorite and tonalite habitats in a hyperarid environment. Agave turneri appears to be a critically endangered owing to its habitat preference for specific types of granite in the Sierra Cucapá, threats due to prolonged drought and global change, and its close proximity to the Mexicali metropolitan area.

  15. Effects of root, shoot, leaf and seed extracts of seven Artemisia species on HIV-1 replication and CD4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mohabatkar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of flower, leaf, shoot and root extracts of seven Artemisia species on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs toxicity and HIV-1 replication. Methods: The studied Artemisia species were Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia khorasanica, Artemisia deserti, Artemisia fragrans, Artemisia aucheri, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia vulgaris. The activity of these plant extracts on HIV-1 replication and CD4 expression was performed by HIV-1 p24 antigen kit and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results demonstrated that flower extracts of all species increased PBMCs number more than shoot, leaf and root extracts. However, the frequency of CD4 expression in PBMC was not increased in the presence of all flower extracts. The flower extracts of all species had inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results demonstrated that flower extracts of Artemisia species are good candidates for further studies as anticancer agents.

  16. Variation in the Distribution of Four Cacti Species Due to Climate Change in Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Cortes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is about four cacti species in the state of Chihuahua, (Coryphantha macromeris, Mammillaria lasiacantha, Echinocereus dasyacanthus and Ferocactus wislizenii. Geographic distribution was inferred with MaxEnt. Projection was estimated under three scenarios simulated from IPCC (A2, B1 and A1B and four periods (2000, 2020, 2050 and 2080 with 19 climatic variables. MaxEnt projects a species decrease in 2020 under scenario A2, increasing in the following years. In 2080 all species, except E. dasyacanthus, will occupy a larger area than their current one. Scenario B1 projected for 2050 a decrease for all species, and in 2080 all species except E. dasyacanthus will increase their area. With A1B, C. macromeris decreases 27% from 2020 to 2050. E. dasyacanthus increases from 2020 to 2050 and decreases 73% from 2020 to 2080. M. lasiacantha decreases 13% from 2020 to 2080 and F. wislizenii will increase 13% from 2020 to 2080. Some species will remain stable on their areas despite climate changes, and other species may be affected under the conditions of the A1B scenario. It is important to continue with studies which give a broader perspective about the consequences of climate change, thus enabling decision-making about resource management.

  17. Variation in the distribution of four cacti species due to climate change in Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Leonor; Domínguez, Irma; Lebgue, Toutcha; Viramontes, Oscar; Melgoza, Alicia; Pinedo, Carmelo; Camarillo, Javier

    2013-12-24

    This study is about four cacti species in the state of Chihuahua, (Coryphantha macromeris, Mammillaria lasiacantha, Echinocereus dasyacanthus and Ferocactus wislizenii). Geographic distribution was inferred with MaxEnt. Projection was estimated under three scenarios simulated from IPCC (A2, B1 and A1B) and four periods (2000, 2020, 2050 and 2080) with 19 climatic variables. MaxEnt projects a species decrease in 2020 under scenario A2, increasing in the following years. In 2080 all species, except E. dasyacanthus, will occupy a larger area than their current one. Scenario B1 projected for 2050 a decrease for all species, and in 2080 all species except E. dasyacanthus will increase their area. With A1B, C. macromeris decreases 27% from 2020 to 2050. E. dasyacanthus increases from 2020 to 2050 and decreases 73% from 2020 to 2080. M. lasiacantha decreases 13% from 2020 to 2080 and F. wislizenii will increase 13% from 2020 to 2080. Some species will remain stable on their areas despite climate changes, and other species may be affected under the conditions of the A1B scenario. It is important to continue with studies which give a broader perspective about the consequences of climate change, thus enabling decision-making about resource management.

  18. The demographic consequences of mutualism: ants increase host-plant fruit production but not population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R; Ness, Joshua H; Bronstein, Judith L; Morris, William F

    2015-10-01

    The impact of mutualists on a partner's demography depends on how they affect the partner's multiple vital rates and how those vital rates, in turn, affect population growth. However, mutualism studies rarely measure effects on multiple vital rates or integrate them to assess the ultimate impact on population growth. We used vital rate data, population models and simulations of long-term population dynamics to quantify the demographic impact of a guild of ant species on the plant Ferocactus wislizeni. The ants feed at the plant's extrafloral nectaries and attack herbivores attempting to consume reproductive organs. Ant-guarded plants produced significantly more fruit, but ants had no significant effect on individual growth or survival. After integrating ant effects across these vital rates, we found that projected population growth was not significantly different between unguarded and ant-guarded plants because population growth was only weakly influenced by differences in fruit production (though strongly influenced by differences in individual growth and survival). However, simulations showed that ants could positively affect long-term plant population dynamics through services provided during rare but important events (herbivore outbreaks that reduce survival or years of high seedling recruitment associated with abundant precipitation). Thus, in this seemingly clear example of mutualism, the interaction may actually yield no clear benefit to plant population growth, or if it does, may only do so through the actions of the ants during rare events. These insights demonstrate the value of taking a demographic approach to studying the consequences of mutualism.

  19. Studying the effect of elevation and edaphic variables on vegetation composition in Khezrabad rangelands using principal component analysis (PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhollah TAGHIZADEH MEHRJARDI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A major scientific challenge in plant ecology is to identify and quantify the strength of environmental factors that are responsible for the distribution and abundance of plant species within and among ecosystems. Hence, this study is focused on relation between plant communities and environmental variables in Khezrabad region of Iran. Based on field surveys, eight vegetation types including Artemisia sieberi-Acantholimon erinaceum, Artemisia sieberi-Hertia angustifolia, Artemisia sieberi-Launea acanthodes, Artemisia sieberi-Salsola tomentosa, Artemisia sieberi-Zygophyllum atriplicoides, Artemisia aucheri-Astrgalus albispinus, Artemisia sieberi-Fortuynia bungei, Haloxylon aphyllum were identified. With respecting to the present variance between vegetation and environmental factors, four samples were established in each vegetation type in 0–30 cm depth. The studied soil variables affecting plant communities were texture, EC, pH, Na+, k+, Cl-, Ca2+, Mg2+, SP, O.M, CaCO3, HCO3 - and CEC. Among the topographic conditions, elevation was recorded in sampling regions as well. Data matrix of environmental factors and vegetation type was made using the windows (ver. 4.17 of PC-ORD. Results according to PCA showed that in the study area, among different environmental factors, the distribution of vegetation types was most strongly correlated with some agents such as soil texture, salinity and sodicity. In fact, soil texture controls distribution of plant species by affecting moisture availability, ventilation and distribution of plant roots. Beside, soil salinity and sodicity because of habitat condition, plant ecological needs and tolerance range can have negative affect on plant diversity. In addition, results indicated that increasing of elevation had negative effect on plant distribution. However, soil characteristics have more influence on vegetation separation than to the elevation in this study.

  20. Multilocus phylogeny of the avian family Alaudidae (larks) reveals complex morphological evolution, non-monophyletic genera and hidden species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alström, Per; Barnes, Keith N; Olsson, Urban; Barker, F Keith; Bloomer, Paulette; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Qureshi, Masood Ahmed; Guillaumet, Alban; Crochet, Pierre-André; Ryan, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    The Alaudidae (larks) is a large family of songbirds in the superfamily Sylvioidea. Larks are cosmopolitan, although species-level diversity is by far largest in Africa, followed by Eurasia, whereas Australasia and the New World have only one species each. The present study is the first comprehensive phylogeny of the Alaudidae. It includes 83.5% of all species and representatives from all recognised genera, and was based on two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci (in total 6.4 kbp, although not all loci were available for all species). In addition, a larger sample, comprising several subspecies of some polytypic species was analysed for one of the mitochondrial loci. There was generally good agreement in trees inferred from different loci, although some strongly supported incongruences were noted. The tree based on the concatenated multilocus data was overall well resolved and well supported by the data. We stress the importance of performing single gene as well as combined data analyses, as the latter may obscure significant incongruence behind strong nodal support values. The multilocus tree revealed many unpredicted relationships, including some non-monophyletic genera (Calandrella, Mirafra, Melanocorypha, Spizocorys). The tree based on the extended mitochondrial data set revealed several unexpected deep divergences between taxa presently treated as conspecific (e.g. within Ammomanes cinctura, Ammomanes deserti, Calandrella brachydactyla, Eremophila alpestris), as well as some shallow splits between currently recognised species (e.g. Certhilauda brevirostris-C. semitorquata-C. curvirostris; Calendulauda barlowi-C. erythrochlamys; Mirafra cantillans-M. javanica). Based on our results, we propose a revised generic classification, and comment on some species limits. We also comment on the extraordinary morphological adaptability in larks, which has resulted in numerous examples of parallel evolution (e.g. in Melanocorypha mongolica and Alauda leucoptera [both

  1. Impact of global climate change on ecosystem-level interactions among sympatric plants from all three photosynthetic pathways. Terminal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.

    1997-12-17

    The proposed research will determine biochemical and physiological responses to variations in environmental factors for plants of all three photosynthetic pathways under competitive situations in the field. These responses will be used to predict the effects of global climatic change on an ecosystem in the northwestern Sonoran Desert where the C{sub 3} subshrub Encelia farinosa, the C{sub 4} bunchgrass Hilaria rigida, and the CAM succulent Agave deserti are co-dominants. These perennials are relatively short with overlapping shallow roots facilitating the experimental measurements as well as leading to competition for soil water. Net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods measured in the laboratory will be analyzed using an environmental productivity index (EPI) that can incorporate simultaneous effects of soil water, air temperature, and light. Based on EPI, net CO{sub 2} uptake and hence plant productivity will be predicted for the three species in the field under various treatments. Activity of the two CO{sub 2} fixation enzymes, Rubisco and PEPCase, will be determined for these various environmental conditions; also, partitioning of carbon to various organs will be measured based on {sup 14}CO{sub 2} labeling and dry weight analysis. Thus, enzymatic and partitioning controls on competition among sympatric model plants representing all three photosynthetic pathways will be investigated.

  2. New insights into plant glycoside hydrolase family 32 in Agave species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eAvila-de Dios

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the use of agaves for commercial applications, an understanding of fructan metabolism in these species at the molecular and genetic level is essential. Based on transcriptome data, this report describes the identification and molecular characterization of cDNAs and deduced amino acid sequences for genes encoding fructosyltransferases, invertases and fructan exohydrolases (enzymes belonging to plant glycoside hydrolase family 32 from four different agave species (A. tequilana, A. deserti, A. victoriae-reginae and A. striata. Conserved amino acid sequences and a hypervariable domain allowed classification of distinct isoforms for each enzyme type. Notably however neither 1-FFT nor 6-SFT encoding cDNAs were identified. In silico analysis revealed that distinct isoforms for certain enzymes found in a single species, showed different levels and tissue specific patterns of expression whereas in other cases expression patterns were conserved both within the species and between different species. Relatively high levels of in silico expression for specific isoforms of both invertases and fructosyltransferases were observed in floral tissues in comparison to vegetative tissues such as leaves and stems and this pattern was confirmed by Quantitative Real Time PCR using RNA obtained from floral and leaf tissue of A. tequilana. Thin layer chromatography confirmed the presence of fructans with degree of polymerization (DP greater than DP three in both immature buds and fully opened flowers also obtained from A. tequilana.

  3. CO{sub 2} exchange environmental productivity indices, and productivity of agaves and cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net C0{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  4. CO{sub 2} exchange, environmental productivity indices, and productivity of Agaves and Cacti under current and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. Terminal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The research described in the proposal investigated net CO{sub 2} uptake and biomass accumulation for an extremely productive CAM plant, the prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, under conditions of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations for relatively long periods. The influences of soil water status, air temperature, and the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods were evaluated to enable predictions to be made based on an Environmental Productivity Index (EPI). Specifically, EPI predicts the fraction of maximal daily net CO{sub 2} uptake based on prevailing environmental conditions. It is the product of indices for temperature, soil water, and intercepted PPF, each of which range from 0.00 when that index factor completely inhibits net CO{sub 2} uptake to 1.00 when no limitation occurs. For instance, the Water Index is 1.00 under wet conditions and decreases to 0.00 during prolonged drought. Although the major emphasis of the research was on net CO{sub 2} uptake and the resulting biomass production for O. ficus-indica, effects of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations on root: shoot ratios and on the activities of the two carboxylating enzymes were also investigated. Moreover, experiments were also done on other CAM plants, including Agave deserti, Agave salmiana, and Hylocereus undatus, and Stenocereus queretaroensis.

  5. New insights into plant glycoside hydrolase family 32 in Agave species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila de Dios, Emmanuel; Gomez Vargas, Alan D.; Damián Santos, Maura L.; Simpson, June

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize the use of agaves for commercial applications, an understanding of fructan metabolism in these species at the molecular and genetic level is essential. Based on transcriptome data, this report describes the identification and molecular characterization of cDNAs and deduced amino acid sequences for genes encoding fructosyltransferases, invertases and fructan exohydrolases (FEH) (enzymes belonging to plant glycoside hydrolase family 32) from four different agave species (A. tequilana, A. deserti, A. victoriae-reginae, and A. striata). Conserved amino acid sequences and a hypervariable domain allowed classification of distinct isoforms for each enzyme type. Notably however neither 1-FFT nor 6-SFT encoding cDNAs were identified. In silico analysis revealed that distinct isoforms for certain enzymes found in a single species, showed different levels and tissue specific patterns of expression whereas in other cases expression patterns were conserved both within the species and between different species. Relatively high levels of in silico expression for specific isoforms of both invertases and fructosyltransferases were observed in floral tissues in comparison to vegetative tissues such as leaves and stems and this pattern was confirmed by Quantitative Real Time PCR using RNA obtained from floral and leaf tissue of A. tequilana. Thin layer chromatography confirmed the presence of fructans with degree of polymerization (DP) greater than DP three in both immature buds and fully opened flowers also obtained from A. tequilana. PMID:26300895

  6. Rare birds in Slovenia in 2015 – Slovenian Rarities Committee’s Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanžel Jurij

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This report by the Slovenian Rarities Committee presents records of rare bird species in Slovenia in 2015, with some addenda for previous years. The numbers in brackets refer to the number of records (first number and individuals (second number recorded between 1 Jan 1950 and 31 Dec 2014. Since 1 Jan 2013, submission to the Committee has been required for 37 additional species, 17 of which are regional rarities. Records of these species are not numbered, since records from previous years were not collected by the Committee. One new species, the Desert Wheatear Oenanthe deserti, was added to category A. Other notable observations were the first record of Parrot Crossbill Loxia pytyopsittacus after 1909, the second record of Baillon’s Crake Zapornia pusilla, the third and fourth records of Calandra Lark Melanocorypha calandra, the fourth of Long-legged Buzzard Buteo rufinus, the fifth of Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi and the sixth of Grey Phalarope Phalaropus fulicarius. Four species were added to category E: Bahama Pintail Anas bahamensis, Rosy-billed Pochard Netta peposaca, Harris’s Hawk Parabuteo unicinctus and Alexandrine Parakeet Psittacula eupatria. The list of birds recorded in Slovenia (as of 31 Dec 2015 contains 386 species (371 in category A, 6 in category B, 9 exclusively in category C; 4 species are both in categories A and C. Category D contains 6 species, while category E contains 38, two of which are classified into subcategory E*. These two categories are not part of the list.

  7. First description of a Pliocene ichthyofauna from Central Africa (site KL2, Kolle area, Eastern Djurab, Chad): What do we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Olga; Pinton, Aurélie; Mackaye, Hassan Taisso; Likius, Andossa; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2009-06-01

    This is the first extensive study of a freshwater fish fauna from a Pliocene site in Central Africa, based on fossils collected at the KL2 site in the fossiliferous area of Kolle (Lower Pliocene, Chad). A relatively high fish diversity is revealed, confirming the presence of 19 taxa: Polypteriformes, Polypteridae ( Polypterus sp.); Osteoglossiformes, Osteoglossidae ( Heterotis sp.), Mormyriformes, Gymnarchidae ( Gymnarchus sp. cf. niloticus); Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae ( Labeo sp.); Characiformes, Alestidae ( Hydrocynus; Alestinae type Alestes/ Brycinus; Sindacharax sp. cf. deserti, Sindacharax sp.), Distichodontidae ( Distichodus sp.); Siluriformes, Ariidae (cf. Calarius), ?Bagridae (cf. Bagrus), Claroteidae (cf. Clarotes), Mochokidae ( Synodontis sp.), Clariidae ( Clarias sp. or Heterobranchus sp.); Perciformes family indet. ( Semlikiichthys sp. cf. darsao), Latidae ( Lates sp. cf. niloticus), Cichlidae indet., and Perciformes indet.; Tetraodontiformes Tetraodontidae ( Tetraodon sp.). The aquatic environment corresponding to the fossil fish assemblage might be a floodplain crossed by well-oxygenated open waters. Compared with a contemporaneous East African region, the mid-Pliocene Chadian fish diversity reveals a certain endemicity, while connections between the Niger and the Chadian basin are suspected because of the presence of a freshwater ariid fish in Kolle.

  8. Complex oligomeric structure of a truncated form of DdrA: A protein required for the extreme radio-tolerance of Deinococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsche, I.; Vujicic-Zagar, A.; Serre, L.; Siebert, X.; Servant, P.; Vannier, F.; Sommer, S.; Castaing, B.; Gallet, B.; Heulin, T.; De Groot, A.

    2008-01-01

    In order to preserve their genome integrity, organisms have developed elaborate tactics for genome protection and repair. The Deinococcus radiodurans bacteria famous for their extraordinary tolerance toward high doses of radiations or long period of desiccation, possess some specific genes with unknown function which are related to their survival in such extreme conditions. Among them, ddrA is an orphan gene specific of Deinococcus genomes. DdrA, the product of this gene was suggested to be a component of the DNA end protection system. Here we provide a three-dimensional reconstruction of the Deinococcus deserti DdrA(1-160) by electron microscopy. Although not functional in vivo, this truncated protein keeps its DNA binding ability at the wild-type level. DdrA(1-160) has a complex three-dimensional structure based on a hepta-meric ring that can self-associate to form a larger molecular weight assembly. We suggest that the complex architecture of DdrA plays a role in the substrate specificity and favors an efficient DNA repair. (authors)

  9. Structural revision of some recently published iridoid glucosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Søren R; Caliş, Ihsan; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Søtofte, Inger

    2007-01-01

    The structures of six different iridoid glucosides have been revised. Three compounds isolated from Eremostachys glabra and designated 6,9-epi-8-O-acetylshanziside (1), 5,9-epi-penstemoside (2), and 5,9-epi-7,8-didehydropenstemoside (3) have been shown to be identical to the known iridoids barlerin (4, 8-O-acetylshanziside), penstemoside (5), and 7,8-didehydropenstemoside (6), respectively. Another compound named harpagoside-B, isolated from Scrophularia deserti and proposed to be 9-epi-6-O-methylharpagoside (11), was demonstrated from the spectroscopic data given to be the known harpagoside (10b). Finally, two alleged iridoid galactosides from Buddleja crispa named buddlejosides A and B (12a and 12b) have been shown to be the corresponding glucosides; the former is identical to agnuside (13a), while the latter is 3,4-dihydroxybenzoylaucubin (13b), an iridoid glucoside not previously published. This clearly showed that care should be taken with the interpretation of NOEs involving bridgehead protons in iridoid structures because they can be capricious and lead to erroneous structural assignments.

  10. Neutralization of Vipera and Macrovipera venoms by two experimental polyvalent antisera: a study of paraspecificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archundia, Irving G; de Roodt, Adolfo R; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Olguín-Pérez, Laura; Alagón, Alejandro; Stock, Roberto P

    2011-06-01

    We conducted an extensive study of neutralization of lethality of 11 species and one subspecies of snakes of the genus Vipera, and of five species of Macrovipera, by two experimental equine antisera. One antiserum was a trivalent preparation raised against the venoms of Vipera aspis aspis, Vipera berus berus and Vipera ammodytes ammodytes; the other was a pentavalent preparation that also included venoms of Vipera (now Montivipera) xanthina and Macrovipera lebetina obtusa. We measured specific neutralization of lethality against all venoms included in the immunization schemes, and paraspecific neutralization against the venoms of Vipera ammodytes montandoni, Vipera (Montivipera) bornmuelleri, Vipera latastei, Vipera (Mo.) latifii, Vipera (Mo.) lotievi, Vipera (Daboia) palaestinae, Vipera (Mo.) raddei and Vipera seoanei, as well as against Macrovipera (D.) deserti, Macrovipera lebetina cernovi, Macrovipera lebetina turanica and Macrovipera schweitzeri. We found an important degree of paraspecific protection within each genera (omitting recent reclassification) that was quite independent of both the lethal potency of the venoms and their geographic origin. This information may be of use to clinicians charged with the treatment of Vipera or Macrovipera envenomations with non-specific antivenoms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study into wild Egyptian plants of potential medicinal activity. Ninth communication: hypoglycaemic activity of some selected plants in normal fasting and alloxanised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabana, M M; Mirhom, Y W; Genenah, A A; Aboutabl, E A; Amer, H A

    1990-01-01

    31 desert plants belonging to 17 families were collected from different Egyptian localities. 21 plants extracts were orally given to normal rats, and 15 were tested on fasted and to alloxanised rats. The results were compared with a standard oral hypoglycaemic drug (Daonil, Hoechst) used as a positive control. The following findings were obtained: 8 plants exhibited persistent hypoglycaemic effects, Lycium shawii, Salvia (S.) aegyptiaca, Pergularia tomentosa, Convolvulus (C.) althaeoides, Haloxylon salicornicum, Ephedra alata, Scrophularia deserti, and Crotalaria aegyptiaca. Transient hypoglycaemic effects appeared only 1 hour after administration in response to 4 plants, Silena succulenta, Lygos raetam, C. lanatus, and Pulicaria incisa. In the cases of Ochradenus baccatus and Zygophyllum album, slow hypoglycaemic activity was produced and appeared 3 hours after administration. 5 plants showed hypoglycaemic effects viz, Thymus capitatus, Launaea nudicaulis, Conyza dioscorides, Nitraria retusa, and Limonium tubiflorum. Among the 15 plant extracts tested on alloxanised diabetic rats only 4 showed hypoglycaemic effects more potent than those of the administered dose of Daonil. These were Matthiola livida, S. aegyptiaca, Astragalus species, and Arthrocnemum glaucum. The hypoglycaemic effect of S. aegyptiaca in fasting rats has been confirmed also in alloxanised diabetic animals. This emphasises the importance of conducting both experiments in order to obtain a reliable conclusion.

  12. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions in plant water: species effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species—specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and 18 O have not been studied for different plants growing together. Accordingly, to learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and 18 O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions we tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show higher slopes (m in the leaf water equation °D = m ° 18 O + b) than in C 3 plants. We determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen (°D) and oxygen (° 18 O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. Slopes (m in the above leaf water equation) ranged from 1.50 to 3.21, compared to °8 for meteoric water, but differences in slope could not be attributed to carboxylation pathway (CAM vs. C 3 ) nor climate (coastal California vs. Sonoran Desert). Higher slopes were correlated with greater overall ranges of leaf water enrichment of D and 18 O. Water in plants with higher slopes also differed most from unaltered meteoric water. Leaf water isotope ratios in plants with lower slopes were better correlated with temperature and humidity. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes

  13. Factors determining Gekkotan (Reptilia, Sauria distribution in Tunisia (North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wided Tlili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tunisian geckos count nine species (1 is insular relict, 1 is endemic, 2 are ubiquitous and 5 are enfeoffed. We aim to determine factors influencing their distributions. Surveys were founded on environmental divisions. Presence/absence data for 113 grids were analyzed using multivariate tools. 18 environmental variables were revealed and clustered into five factors to model species distributions. Established models were further projected on non-explored areas within Tunisian territory. The distribution of continental geckos follows an indirect bidirectional gradient; the South-northward one is physiologically stressful and the North-southward one is biologically stressful. Five biogeographic regions were established showing concordance with climatic and vegetation regionalization. The distribution of non-anthropophilic species is positively correlated to thermal amplitudes gradient. The distribution of anthropophilic taxa is positively correlated to agricultural land-use. Oasis, sebkhas and chotts are particular landscapes that disturb both distributions. Predicted areas follow the yielded distribution patterns despite some discrepancy for S. sthenodactylus. The niche characterizing shows that land use and altitude increase the probability of occurrence of H. turcicus and T. mauritanica. Alternatively, they decrease the probability of the presence of T. deserti, T. neglecta, T. tripolitanus and S. petrii. Models could also show that the absence of S. sthenodactylus in northern regions is attributed to high altitudes and cereal land-use. As to T. fascicularis, the displacement of the northern limits of its range is mostly attributed to an improvement of field investigations. Established model of its distribution shows a restricted area of probable occurrence in central Tunisia confirming its endemism.

  14. Aplicação dos modelos PESERA e MEDALUS para avaliação dos riscos de erosão do solo e de desertificação da bacia hidrográfica do Vale do Gaio Use of PESERA and MEDALUS models to assess soil erosion risks and land desertification in Vale do Gaio watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho testaram-se duas metodo­logias de avaliação dos riscos de erosão do solo e de desertificação na bacia hidrográfi­ca de Vale do Gaio (513 km², localizada no Alentejo. Os solos dominantes na bacia são os Cambissolos, Luvissolos e Regossolos. Os sistemas de Montado de Azinho e Sobro e os sistemas agrícolas de sequeiro domi­nam, por sua vez, a ocupação dos solos. O risco de erosão foi avaliado por estimativas das perdas do solo por erosão hídrica, atra­vés do modelo PESERA. As áreas em risco de desertificação foram determinadas com base na metodologia MEDALUS. As três classes mais representativas de perdas do solo por erosão hídrica, com base nos dados meteorológicos de 2001-2006, foram: In this study two methodologies were tested to assess soil erosion and land deserti­fication risks in Vale do Gaio watershed (513 km², located in the Alentejo region. Cambisols, Luvisols, and Regosols are the dominant soils in the watershed. Oak tree Mediterranean woodland, Agricultural crops and pastures are the major land uses. Soil erosion risks were assessed by estimating soil loss by water erosion with the PESERA model. Land area at risk of desertification was determined based on the MEDALUS methodology. Based on meteorological data from the period 2001-2006, the three most representative classes of soil loss by water erosion were: <0.5 t/ha/year in 32.1% of the area; 5-10 t/ha/year in 23.3% of the area; and 10-20 t/ha/year in 16.9% of the area. Considering the same time period, the land area at risk of desertification was classified: 1.8% as none threatened; 3.9% as potential; 68.4% as fragile; and 25.9% as critical to desertification.

  15. Po-Basin Atmospheric Composition during the Pegasos Field Campaign (summer 2012): Evaluation of ninfa/aodeM Simulation with In-Situ e Remote Sensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Tony C.; Bonafe, Giovanni; Stortini, Michele; Minguzzi, Enrico; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Giulianelli, Lara; Sandrini, Silvia; Gilardoni, Stefania; Rinaldi, Matteo; Ricciardelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    Guillaume, Catherine Liousse, Sophie Moukhtar, Betty Pun, Christian Seigneur, and Michaël Schulz (2008). "Regional modeling of carbonaceous aerosols over europe-focus on secondary organic aerosols." Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 61, no. 3 : 175-202. Landi Tony Christian (2013). AODEM: A post-processing tool for aerosol optical properties calculation in the Chemical Transport Models. Book published by LAP - Lambert Academic Publishing ISBN: 978-3-659-31802-3. Steppeler, J., G. Doms, U. Schättler, H. W. Bitzer, A. Gassmann, U. Damrath, and G. Gregoric (2003). "Meso-gamma scale forecasts using the nonhydrostatic model LM." Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics 82, no. 1-4 : 75-96. M. Stortini, M. Deserti, G. Bonafè, and E. Minguzzi. Long-term simulation and validation of ozone and aerosol in the Po Valley. In C.Borrego and E.Renner, editors, Developments in Environmental Sciences, volume 6, pages 768-770. Elsevier, 2007.