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Sample records for dermatomyositis autoantigen mi-2

  1. Tamoxifen- Induced Dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Debabrata

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38 year old woman developed dermatomyositis after radical mastectomy and tamoxifen therapy for metastatic breast carcinoma. The possibility of the drug as the underlying cause of the connective tissue disease is discussed.

  2. Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise C. Pyndt Raun; Sanner, Helga; Sjaastad, Ivar

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs), collectively called myositis, are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting adults and children. The IIMs are characterized by symmetrical, proximal muscle weakness and by inflammatory infiltrates in skeletal muscles. Based on differences in clinical...... and histopathological features, they can be divided into different subgroups, the most common forms being dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), and in children juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Other organs are frequently involved in patients with IIM eg, lungs...

  3. Juvenile Dermatomyositis in Pregnancy

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    Anthony Emeka Madu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile dermatomyositis has variable clinical presentations both in and outside of pregnancy. A literature review indicated that optimal maternal and fetal outcomes can be anticipated when the pregnancy is undertaken while the disease is in remission. Poorer outcomes are associated with flare-up of the disease in early pregnancy compared with exacerbation in the second or third trimester, when fetal prognosis is usually good. We present a case of JDM in pregnancy with disease exacerbation late in pregnancy and review of the relevant literature.

  4. Immunogenicity of autoantigens

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    Keller Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoantibodies against self-antigens have been associated not only with autoimmune diseases, but also with cancer and are even found in healthy individuals. The mechanism causing the autoantibody response remains elusive for the majority of the immunogenic antigens. To deepen the understanding of autoantibody responses, we ask whether natural-occurring, autoimmunity-associated and tumor-associated antigens have structural or biological features related to the immune response. To this end, we have carried out the most comprehensive in-silicio study of different groups of autoantigens including large antigen sets identified by our groups combined with publicly available antigen sets. Results We found evidence for an enrichment of genes with a larger exon length increasing the probability of the occurrence of potential immunogenic features such as mutations, SNPs, immunogenic sequence patterns and structural epitopes, or alternative splicing events. While SNPs seem to play a more central role in autoimmunity, somatic mutations seem to be stronger enriched in tumor-associated antigens. In addition, antigens of autoimmune diseases are different from other antigen sets in that they appear preferentially secreted, have frequently an extracellular location, and they are enriched in pathways associated with the immune system. Furthermore, for autoantibodies in general, we found enrichment of sequence-based properties including coiled-coils motifs, ELR motifs, and Zinc finger DNA-binding motifs. Moreover, we found enrichment of proteins binding to proteins or nucleic acids including RNA and enrichment of proteins that are part of ribosome or spliceosome. Both, homologies to proteins of other species and an enrichment of ancient protein domains indicate that immunogenic proteins are evolutionary conserved and that mimicry might play a central role. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that proteins which i are evolutionary conserved

  5. Radiometallating antibodies and autoantigenic peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Lewis, D.; Cole, D.A.; Newmyer, S.L.; Schulte, L.D.; Mixon, P.L.; Schreyer, S.A.; Burns, T.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Figard, S.D.; McCormick, D.J.; Lennon, V.A.; Hayashi, M.; Lavallee, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N- benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have one functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies and have developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides (fragments of the acetylcholine receptor), which are pertinent to myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules, the radiometallation chemistry, and biological characterization of the radiolabeled compounds will be discussed

  6. Dermatomyositis and myastenia gravis: An uncommon association with therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Méndez Perles, Clara; Barbadillo, Carmen; Godoy, Hildegarda; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The association of dermatomyositis with myasthenia gravis (MG) is uncommon, having been reported so far in only 26 cases. We report the case of a 69 year-old man diagnosed with MG two years ago and currently treated with piridostigmyne. The patient developed acute proximal weakness, shoulder pain and elevated creatine-kinase (CK). He also developed generalized facial erythema and Gottron's papules. Laboratory tests showed positive antinuclear and anti-Mi2 antibodies. Further analysis confirmed CK levels above 1000 U/l. The clinical management of the patient and the therapeutic implications derived from the coexistence of both entities are discusssed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Dermatomyositis with Calcinosis Cutis Universalis

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    S L Wadhwa

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available An eleven year old child with dermatomyositis and calcinosis cutis universalis is presented. She showed heliotrope bloating of eyelids, Gottrons sign, proximal muscle wasting with contractures and extensive areas of calcification over the shoulder, pelvic girdles and proximal extremities. The dignosis was confirmed by biochemical and histopatholo "cal studies as 91 well as electromyography. High doses of steroids and supportive measures made the patient ambulatory.

  8. Myositis-specific autoantibodies and their association with malignancy in Italian patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceribelli, Angela; Isailovic, Natasa; De Santis, Maria; Generali, Elena; Fredi, Micaela; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Franceschini, Franco; Cantarini, Luca; Satoh, Minoru; Selmi, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to characterize myositis-specific antibodies in a well-defined cohort of patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to determine their association with cancer. Sera from 40 patients with polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and controls were tested by protein and RNA immunoprecipitation to detect autoantibodies, and immunoprecipitation-Western blot was used for anti-MJ/NXP-2, anti-MDA5, and anti-TIF1γ/α identification. Medical records were re-evaluated with specific focus on cancer. Anti-MJ/NXP-2 and anti-TIF1γ/α were the most common antibodies in dermatomyositis. In six dermatomyositis cases, we found five solid forms of cancer and one Hodgkin's lymphoma in long-term remission. Among patients with cancer-associated dermatomyositis, three were positive for anti-TIF1γ/α, two for anti-Mi-2, and one for anti-MJ/NXP-2. The strongest positivity of anti-TIF1γ was seen in two active forms of cancer, and this antibody was either negative or positive at low titers in the absence of cancer or in the 7-year remission Hodgkin's lymphoma. Four out of twenty (20 %) patients with polymyositis had solid cancer, but no specific association with autoantibodies was identified; further, none of the four cases of antisynthetase syndrome had a history of cancer. No serum myositis-associated autoantibody was observed in control sera, resulting in positive predictive value 75 %, negative predictive value 78.5 %, sensitivity 50 %, specificity 92 %, and area under the ROC curve 0.7083 for the risk of paraneoplastic DM in anti-TIF1γ/α (+) patients. Myositis-specific autoantibodies can be identified thanks to the use of immunoprecipitation, and their association with cancer is particularly clear for anti-TIF1γ/α in dermatomyositis. This association should be evaluated in a prospective study by immunoprecipitation in clinical practice.

  9. Dermatomyositis Sine Myositis with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis

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    Mohammad Bagher Owlia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by involvement of proximal musculature and skin. We report a 52-year-old woman with a 6-year history of dermatomyositis sine myositis, who developed lower extremity edema and proteinuria. Pathological examination of renal biopsy showed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. She received steroid, cyclophosphamide, and mycophenolate mofetil. Over the 9 to 10 months after the beginning of treatment, the proteinuria was improved.

  10. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  11. Dermatomyositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appears to be the most promising. When your muscles get stronger, your provider may tell you to slowly cut back on your doses. Many people with this condition must take a ... condition, the muscle weakness and rash may get better when the ...

  12. MR findings of polymyositis / dermatomyositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Moon, Won Jin; Lee, Tae Hee; Park, Ki Ho; Park, Dong Woo; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MR findings and useful sequences in Polymyositis/ Dermatomyositis, and to correlate MR findings with disease activity. Materials and Methods: The study included nine clinically proven cases of Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis, eight involving the thigh and one, the shoulder (2 cases, 1 follow-up). The contrast between affected and normal muscles and difference in signal intensity ratio in the muscle groups were retrospectively evaluated on Gd-enhanced T1WI and T2WI. We also evaluated the magnitude of involvement of muscle groups, fatty replacement of muscle and change of subcutaneous fat layer, and correlated signal intensity ratio with serum level of muscle enzymes. Differences in signal intensity ratio and the frequency of chemical shift artifact were evaluated on T2WI as active and inactive groups classified according to clinical findings, and the chemical shift artifact was correlated with the finding of Gd-enhanced T1WI. Except in the case of one shoulder, statistical analysis was assessed by the Anova test and-test. Results: On Gd-enhanced T1WI and T2WI contrast was 0.54 and 0.82, respectively and p value was 0.02. With regard to difference in signal intensity ratios of muscle groups, as seen on Gd-enhanced T1WI and T2WI, p valves were 0.07 and < 0.01, respectively. Muscle involvement was thus clearly visualized on T2WI. The order of frequency of involved muscle groups was vastus muscles, gluteus maximus, sartorius muscles, adductor muscles, gracilis muscle, and hamstring muscles. Fatty replacement and subcutaneous fatty change were visualized in five cases and one, respectively. The correlation coefficient between the signal intensity seen on T2WI and muscle enzymes was 0.59 (CPK) and 0.52 (LDH). The chemical-shift artifact was detected in both clinical groups (four active two inactive) and corresponded to one case of muscle involvement and five of perimuscular edema, as seen on Gd-enhanced T1WI. Conclusion: T2WI is

  13. Redefining dermatomyositis: a description of new diagnostic criteria that differentiate pure dermatomyositis from overlap myositis with dermatomyositis features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanov, Yves; Targoff, Ira N; Payette, Marie-Pier; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Chartier, Suzanne; Goulet, Jean-Richard; Bourré-Tessier, Josiane; Rich, Eric; Grodzicky, Tamara; Fritzler, Marvin J; Joyal, France; Koenig, Martial; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2014-11-01

    cutaneous score and chronicity. Concurrent heliotrope rash and Gottron papules (positive predictive value [PPV] 91%), as well as the V-sign and/or shawl sign (PPV 100%), were diagnostic of pure DM. Anti-Mi-2, anti-MJ, and anti-p155 autoantibodies were present in 50% of pure DM patients and were restricted to this subset (PPV 100%). Cancer was present in 21% of pure DM patients. The 15-year survival was excellent (92%).In contrast, in patients with OMDM, the first manifestation was proximal muscle weakness or other skeletal muscle-related complaints. The DM rash appeared at diagnosis or at follow-up, was associated with a low cutaneous extent score and was transient. Adermatopathic DM, which was absent in pure DM, was highly predictive (PPV 100%) of OMDM. Overlap autoantibodies (including anti-Jo-1, anti-PL-7, anti-PM-Scl, anti-U1RNP, and/or anti-U5-RNP) were found in 70% of OMDM patients. OMDM was not associated with cancer, but the 15-year survival was significantly decreased (65%).Perifascicular atrophy occurred as commonly in OMDM (n = 6/20, 30%) as in pure DM (n = 4/24, 17%) patients. These 6 OMDM patients had adermatopathic DM at myositis diagnosis, and only 1 of them developed a DM rash at follow-up, emphasizing the lack of specificity of perifascicular atrophy for pure DM.In conclusion, using the modified Bohan and Peter classification of AIM allowed identification of OMDM, a new clinical subset of OM. Furthermore, identification of OMDM allowed recognition of pure DM as a new entity that was distinct from OMDM or from OM without DM features. However, the absolute specificity of a DM rash and perifascicular muscle atrophy for the diagnosis of pure DM was lost. The distinctive clinical manifestations and autoantibody profiles presented are proposed as diagnostic criteria to differentiate pure DM from OMDM.

  14. [The practice guideline 'Dermatomyositis, polymyositis and sporadic inclusion body myositis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk, J.E.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Lindeman, E.J.M.; Royen-Kerkhof, A. van; Rie, M.A. de; Visser, M. de; Jennekens, F.G.I.

    2005-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dermatomyositis, polymyositis and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) according to the best available evidence. Characteristic skin abnormalities can be sufficient for the diagnosis of dermatomyositis. In case of doubt, a

  15. Richtlijn 'dermatomyositis, polymyositis en sporadische "inclusion body"-myositis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk, J. E.; Bijlsma, J. W. J.; van Engelen, B. G. M.; Lindeman, E.; van Royen-Kerkhof, A.; de Rie, M. A.; de Visser, M.; Jennekens, F. G. I.

    2005-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dermatomyositis, polymyositis and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) according to the best available evidence. Characteristic skin abnormalities can be sufficient for the diagnosis of dermatomyositis. In case of doubt, a

  16. Juvenile Dermatomyositis in a Nigerian Girl: a Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Juvenile Dermatomyositis in a Nigerian Girl: a Case Report. MG Mustapha, MG Ashir, AA Mayun, Y Machoco, AB Ibrahim. Abstract. A case of Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) in a 10 year old Nigerian girl is herein reported to discuss some of the features of the disease and challenges in management of such a rare but ...

  17. Polymyositis and dermatomyositis: Disease spectrum and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siba P Raychaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle inflammation and weakness are the key features of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs. In addition IIMs are frequently associated with cutaneous and pulmonary involvement. In clinical practice the three common inflammatory myopathies we come across are polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM and inclusion body myositis (IBM. The Bohan and Peter criteria combine clinical, laboratory, and pathologic features to define PM and DM. They did not recognize inclusion body myositis (IBM or other inflammatory myopathies, such as granulomatous and eosinophilic myositis. Thus the disease spectrum is wide and IIMs are a heterogeneous group of autoimmune disorders. To address these issues in this article we have discussed the currently developing newer classifications of IIMs.

  18. Epigenetics of Autoantigens: New Opportunities for Therapy of Autoimmune Diseases

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    Marko Radic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of epigenetics requires that traditional divisions between scientific disciplines give way to cross-fertilization of concepts and ideas from different areas of investigation. Such is the case with research in autoimmunity. Recent discoveries of stimuli that induce autoimmunity reveal that epigenetic marks of autoantigens are recognized by autoreactive B and T cell receptors. Thus, insights into the initiation of autoimmunity, its prevention and therapy will arise from understanding the biochemistry, cell biology and microbiology of autoantigen epigenetics. Here, we highlight potential benefits from the inhibition of a histone modifying enzyme and the administration of a phosphorylated, spliceosome-derived peptide, in the treatment of autoimmunity.

  19. Autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in juvenile dermatomyositis are associated with calcinosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gunawardena, H

    2009-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: The identification of novel autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) may have etiologic and clinical implications. The aim of this study was to describe autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in children recruited to the Juvenile DM National Registry and Repository for UK and Ireland. METHODS: Clinical data and sera were collected from children with juvenile myositis. Sera that recognized a 140-kd protein by immunoprecipitation were identified. The identity of the p140 autoantigen was investigated by immunoprecipitation\\/immunodepletion, using commercial monoclonal antibodies to NXP-2, reference anti-p140, and anti-p155\\/140, the other autoantibody recently described in juvenile DM. DNA samples from 100 Caucasian children with myositis were genotyped for HLA class II haplotype associations and compared with those from 864 randomly selected UK Caucasian control subjects. RESULTS: Sera from 37 (23%) of 162 patients with juvenile myositis were positive for anti-p140 autoantibodies, which were detected exclusively in patients with juvenile DM and not in patients with juvenile DM-overlap syndrome or control subjects. No anti-p140 antibody-positive patients were positive for other recognized autoantibodies. Immunodepletion suggested that the identity of p140 was consistent with NXP-2 (the previously identified MJ autoantigen). In children with anti-p140 antibodies, the association with calcinosis was significant compared with the rest of the cohort (corrected P < 0.005, odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 3.0-16.1). The clinical features of patients with anti-p140 autoantibodies were different from those of children with anti-p155\\/140 autoantibodies. The presence of HLA-DRB1*08 was a possible risk factor for anti-p140 autoantibody positivity. CONCLUSION: This study has established that anti-p140 autoantibodies represent a major autoantibody subset in juvenile DM. This specificity may identify a further immunogenetic and clinical phenotype within the

  20. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of new celiac disease autoantigens using proteomic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stulík, J.; Hernychová, L.; Porkertová, S.; Pozler, O.; Tučková, Ludmila; Sánchez, Daniel; Bureš, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2003), s. 951-956 ISSN 1615-9853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/00/1373; GA AV ČR IBS5020203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : autoantigens * cells disease Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.766, year: 2003

  2. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. Methods This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Results Videofluoroscopy sw...

  3. Interstitial lung disease in patients with polymyositis, dermatomyositis and amyopathic dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, E H; Lee, E B; Shin, K C; Im, C H; Chung, D H; Han, S K; Song, Y W

    2005-10-01

    To assess the prevalence, characteristics and prognostic factors of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in Korean patients with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM). We reviewed the medical records of 72 consecutive PM and DM patients, including six patients with ADM, who were seen at the Rheumatology Clinic of Seoul National University Hospital between 1984 and 2003. Twenty-nine PM/DM patients (40.3%) developed ILD. Anti-Jo-1 antibody and arthralgia were associated with the presence of ILD (P = 0.022 and P = 0.041, respectively), whereas dysphagia was more frequently found in patients without ILD (P = 0.041). Lung biopsies revealed diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (n = 2), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) with DAD (n = 2), UIP (n = 1), and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (n = 2). Of the 29 patients, 11 (37.9%) died. The mean survival time in ILD patients was significantly shorter than in those without ILD (13.8+/-1.8 vs 19.2+/-0.9 yr, P = 0.017). Poor survival in ILD patients was associated with a Hamman-Rich-like presentation (P = 0.0000), ADM features (P = 0.0001) and an initial forced vital capacity (FVC) poor survival. A Hamman-Rich-like presentation, ADM features and an initial FVC poor survival in ILD.

  4. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  5. Clinical presentation and evaluation of dermatomyositis

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    Umaima Marvi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin and muscles. Evidence supports that DM is an immune-mediated disease and 50-70% of patients have circulating myositis-specific auto-antibodies. Gene expression microarrays have demonstrated upregulation of interferon signaling in the muscle, blood, and skin of DM patients. Patients with classic DM typically present with symmetric, proximal muscle weakness, and skin lesions that demonstrate interface dermatitis on histopathology. Evaluation for muscle inflammation can include muscle enzymes, electromyogram, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or muscle biopsy. Classic skin manifestations of DM include the heliotrope rash, Gottron′s papules, Gottron′s sign, the V-sign, and shawl sign. Additional cutaneous lesions frequently observed in DM patients include periungual telangiectasias, cuticular overgrowth, "mechanic′s hands", palmar papules overlying joint creases, poikiloderma, and calcinosis. Clinically amyopathic DM is a term used to describe patients who have classic cutaneous manifestations for more than 6 months, but no muscle weakness or elevation in muscle enzymes. Interstitial lung disease can affect 35-40% of patients with inflammatory myopathies and is often associated with the presence of an antisynthetase antibody. Other clinical manifestations that can occur in patients with DM include dysphagia, dysphonia, myalgias, Raynaud phenomenon, fevers, weight loss, fatigue, and a nonerosive inflammatory polyarthritis. Patients with DM have a three to eight times increased risk for developing an associated malignancy compared with the general population, and therefore all patients with DM should be evaluated at the time of diagnosis for the presence of an associated malignancy. This review summarizes the immunopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and evaluation of patients with DM.

  6. Dermatomyositis som markør for lungecancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    A 76-year-old female was referred because of violaceous dermatitis on sun-exposed skin. She had associated muscle weakness, dysphagia, dysarthria and reported an unintended weight loss. The clinical presentation gave a suspicion of dermatomyositis, and diagnostic procedures revealed a small...

  7. A rare case of juvenile dermatomyositis and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali T Bharani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are rare group of systemic connective tissue diseases. The hallmark of these disorders is symmetrical chronic inflammation and weakness of proximal muscles. Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is the most common inflammatory myositis in children. We describe a rare case of JDM in a 4-year-old female child who presented with characteristic cutaneous rash and proximal muscle weakness.

  8. Long-term outcome in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, P; Hegaard, H; Herlin, Troels

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a group of 53 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), on average 13.9 years after disease onset, in order to describe the long-term disease outcome and to identify disease-related parameters associated with poor disease outcome....

  9. Dermatomyositis Associated with Celiac Disease: Response to a Gluten-Free Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Song

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between dermatomyositis and celiac disease in children has been well documented. In the adult population, however, the association has not been clearly established. A rare case of concomitant dermatomyositis and celiac disease in a 40-year-old woman is presented. After having been diagnosed with dermatomyositis and iron deficiency anemia, this patient was referred to the gastroenterology clinic to exclude a gastrointestinal malignancy. Blood tests revealed various vitamin deficiencies consistent with malabsorption. The results of gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy were consistent with celiac disease. After she was put on a strict gluten-free diet, both nutritional deficiencies and the dermatomyositis resolved. The patient’s human leukocyte antigen haplotype study was positive for DR3 and DQ2, which have been shown to be associated with both juvenile dermatomyositis and celiac disease. It is suggested that patients with newly diagnosed dermatomyositis be investigated for concomitant celiac disease even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  10. Respiratory disorders in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Alekseyevna Antelava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM are rare disorders characterized by inflammatory lesions in skeletal muscles. These diseases include polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM, and inclusion body myositis, which exhibit clinicoimmunological heterogeneity and give different response to therapy. The most frequent manifestation in PM/DM patients is respiratory system dysfunction. The developing respiratory disorders are varied and may outpace the presentation of muscle pathology.

  11. Osteopontin is a tumor autoantigen in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    TILLI, TATIANA M.; SILVA, ELOÍSIO A.; MATOS, LÍVIA C.; FAGET, DOUGLAS V.; DIAS, BIANCA F.P.; VASCONCELOS, JULIANA S.P.; YOKOSAKI, YASUYUKI; GIMBA, ETEL R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-tumor antibodies act as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Osteopontin (OPN) is overexpressed in PCa cells and contributes to the progression of the disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether OPN evokes a humoral immune response in PCa patients and whether the reactivity levels of anti-OPN antibodies may be used to better differentiate PCa from benign and healthy donor plasma samples. Plasma samples from biopsy-proven PCa patients (29), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) (18) and control healthy donors (HD) (30) were tested by immunoblots using the recombinant human OPN. The frequency of anti-OPN antibodies was significantly higher in PCa (66%) plasma samples as compared to BPH (33%) and HD controls (10%). Anti-OPN antibodies were detected in a high proportion of plasma samples from patients with a Gleason score of less than 6 (57%), prostate-specific antigen levels lower than 10 ng/ml (67%) and pT2 organ-confined disease (70%), suggesting that anti-OPN antibodies may be used as an early serum marker for PCa. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of OPN as a tumor autoantigen and one of the most reactive individual autoantigens described thus far. These data support the inclusion of OPN in a multiplex of tumor antigens in order to perform antibody profiling in PCa as well as in other malignancies overexpressing OPN. PMID:22870138

  12. Identification of human cytochrome P450s as autoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, M P; Johnson, E F

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrosomal antibodies in inflammatory liver diseases all seem to be directed against members of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. These autoantigens seem to be genetically polymorphic, the autoantibodies are inhibitory, and the autoepitopes are generally conserved among species. Anti-P450 autoantibodies share these characteristics with other autoantibodies, for example, antinuclear antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. The identification of P450s as human autoantigens is clinically important. Diagnostic tests will be developed on the basis of cloned antigen, facilitating a better diagnosis of drug-induced and idiopathic autoimmune hepatitis. It is unknown what triggers autoantibody production against cytochrome P450 proteins. Furthermore, their pathogenetic role and thus their involvement in tissue destruction is unclear. In this context LKM1 autoantibodies may serve as a model. Although LKM1 antibodies are inhibitory, all LKM1 antibody-positive patients tested so far are extensive metabolizers for drug metabolism mediated by P450IID6 and express this protein in their livers. Thus, the inhibitory LKM1 autoantibody does not sufficiently penetrate through the intact liver cell membrane to inhibit enzyme function in vivo. Presumably, tissue destruction in autoimmune hepatitis is mediated by liver-infiltrating T lymphocytes. T lymphocytes have been cloned from liver tissue that specifically proliferate in the presence of recombinant cytochrome P450IID6. The construction of overlapping cDNA subclones is also valuable to identify immunodominant B cell as well as relevant T cell epitopes.

  13. Automated microfluidic assay system for autoantibodies found in autoimmune diseases using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Saki; Wada, Akira; Suwa, Akira; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Tomida, Maiko; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes are characterized by the production of autoantibodies that serve as useful diagnostic markers, surrogate markers, and prognostic factors. We devised an in vitro system to detect these clinically pivotal autoantibodies using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray. Photoimmobilization was useful for preparing the autoantigen microarray, where autoantigens are covalently immobilized on a plate, because it does not require specific functional groups of the autoantigens and any organic material can be immobilized by a radical reaction induced by photoirradiation. Here, we prepared the microarray using a very convenient method. Aqueous solutions of each autoantigen were mixed with a polymer of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and a photoreactive crosslinker, and the mixtures were microspotted on a plate and dried in air. Finally, the plate was irradiated with an ultraviolet lamp to obtain immobilization. In the assay, patient serum was added to the microarray plate. Antigen-specific IgG adsorbed on the microspotted autoantigen was detected by peroxidase-conjugated anti-IgG antibody. The chemical luminescence intensities of the substrate decomposed by the peroxidase were detected with a sensitive CCD camera. All autoantigens were immobilized stably by this method and used to screen antigen-specific IgG. In addition, the plate was covered with a polydimethylsiloxane sheet containing microchannels and automated measurement was carried out.

  14. Discovery of native autoantigens via antigen surrogate technology: application to type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Todd M; Simanski, Scott; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-02-20

    A fundamental goal in understanding the mechanisms of autoimmune disease is the characterization of autoantigens that are targeted by autoreactive antibodies and T cells. Unfortunately, the identification of autoantigens is a difficult problem. We have begun to explore a novel route to the discovery of autoantibody/autoantigen pairs that involves comparative screening of combinatorial libraries of unnatural, synthetic molecules for compounds that bind antibodies present at much higher levels in the serum of individuals with a given autoimmune disease than in the serum of control individuals. We have shown that this approach can yield "antigen surrogates" capable of capturing disease-specific autoantibodies from serum. In this report, we demonstrate that the synthetic antigen surrogates can be used to affinity purify the autoantibodies from serum and that these antibodies can then be used to identify their cognate autoantigen in an appropriate tissue lysate. Specifically, we report the discovery of a peptoid able to bind autoantibodies present in about one-third of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The peptoid-binding autoantibodies were highly enriched through peptoid affinity chromatography and employed to probe mouse pancreatic and brain lysates. This resulted in identification of murine GAD65 as the native autoantigen. GAD65 is a known humoral autoantigen in human type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but its existence in mice had been controversial. This study demonstrates the potential of this chemical approach for the unbiased identification of autoantigen/autoantibody complexes.

  15. Dermatomyositis with Kaposi’s Sarcoma in a Patient without Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Liang

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of dermatomyositis complicating cutaneous and visceral Kaposi’s sarcoma is presented in a 75-year-old man without human immunodeficiency virus infection. Dermatomyositis preceded a definitive diagnosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma by six months, although in retrospect unrecognized lesions may have presented simultaneously. He was treated with prednisone and azathioprine, thus raising the possibility of the role of immunosuppression in promoting progression of the sarcoma. It is suggested that although the association between dermatomyositis and Kaposi’s sarcoma occurs rarely, dermatomyositis should be considered a paraneoplastic syndrome of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Further, the finding of cutaneous lesions of Kaposi’s sarcoma could predict gastrointestinal involvement when dermatomyositis and Kaposi’s sarcoma occur in the same patient.

  16. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, autoantigenic and total antibody concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen Ullitz; Pipper, Christian B; Johannesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    conducted within this field. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate if higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were inversely associated with β-cell autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (isoform 65) (GADA) and insulinoma associated antigen-2A (IA-2A). Further, we also wanted to examine......BACKGROUND: B cells have recently entered the stage as an important accessory player in type 1 diabetes (T1D) etiopathogenesis. Experimental studies suggest regulatory functions of vitamin D on B cells. However, only a few human studies, with considerable methodological limitations, have been...... the relationship between 25(OH)D and total antibody concentrations. METHODS: We randomly selected 500 patients with newly diagnosed T1D and 500 siblings for 25(OH)D, antibody and genetic analysis from the population-based Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes. The relative change (RC) in the mean...

  17. Investigations of Caspr2, an autoantigen of encephalitis and neuromyotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric; Huijbers, Maartje GM; Bar, Vered; Boronat, Anna; Wong, Andrew; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Wilson, Christina; Jacobs, Dina; Lai, Meizan; Walker, Russell W; Graus, Francesc; Bataller, Luis; Illa, Isabel; Markx, Sander; Strauss, Kevin A.; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S; Dalmau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Objective To report clinical and immunological investigations of contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), an autoantigen of encephalitis and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) previously attributed to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC). Methods Clinical analysis of patients with encephalitis, PNH, or both. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to identify the antigen and to develop an assay with Caspr2-expressing cells. Immunoabsorption with Caspr2 and comparative immunostaining of brain and peripheral nerve of wild-type and Caspr2-null mice were used to assess antibody specificity. Results Using Caspr2-expressing cells, antibodies were identified in 8 patients but not in 140 patients with several types of autoimmune or viral encephalitis, PNH, or mutations of the Caspr2-encoding gene. Patients’ antibodies reacted with brain and peripheral nerve in a pattern that co-localized with Caspr2. This reactivity was abrogated after immunoabsorption with Caspr2 and was absent in tissues from Caspr2-null mice. Of the 8 patients with Caspr2 antibodies, 7 had encephalopathy or seizures, 5 neuropathy or PNH, and 1 isolated PNH. Three patients had also myasthenia gravis, bulbar weakness, or symptoms that initially suggested motor neuron disease. None of the patients had active cancer; 7 responded to immunotherapy and were healthy or only mildly disabled at last follow-up (median 8 months, range 6–84). Interpretation Caspr2 is an autoantigen of encephalitis and PNH previously attributed to VGKC antibodies. The occurrence of other autoantibodies may result in a complex syndrome that at presentation could be mistaken for a motor neuron disorder. Recognition of this disorder is important because it responds to immunotherapy. PMID:21387375

  18. Renal cell carcinoma-associated adult dermatomyositis treated laparoscopic nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Nevins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old female, who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis and hypothyroidism, developed severe muscle weakness. Clinical features, blood results and muscle biopsy suggested a possible diagnosis of dermatomyositis. A computed tomography of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed a solid mass in the left kidney. She underwent a left laparoscopic nephrectomy and histology confirmed conventional (clear cell renal cell carcinoma. She recovered slowly and almost back to normal life after 6 months. Early appreciation of the typical skin rash may provide a clue to the diagnosis and screening for neoplasm may improve prognosis.

  19. Aerobic training in persons who have recovered from juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, M; Mathiesen, P R; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    A recent study has shown that 36 persons who had recovered from juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) have on average an 18% decrease in maximal oxygen uptake. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 12-week aerobic training program in this group, and assess whether aerobic training...... can normalize aerobic capacity to the expected level for age and gender. The patients participating in the study, one male and nine females (16-42years of age), were in remission from JDM, defined as no clinical or biochemical evidence of disease activity and no medical treatment for 1year...

  20. Autoantigens targeted in scleroderma patients with vascular disease are enriched in endothelial lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.; Cottrell, Tricia R.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Antiochos, Brendan; Zambidis, Elias T.; Park, Tea Soon; Halushka, Marc K.; Gutierrez-Alamillo, Laura; Cimbro, Raffaello; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Scleroderma patients with autoantibodies to centromere proteins (CENPs) and/or interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) are at increased risk of severe vascular complications. We set out to define whether these autoantigens are enriched in cells of the vasculature. Methods Successive stages of embryoid bodies (EBs) as well as vascular progenitors were used to evaluate the expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENP by immunoblotting. CD31 was included to mark early blood vessels. IFI16 and CD31 expression were defined in skin paraffin sections from scleroderma patients and from healthy controls. IFI16 expression was determined by flow cytometry in circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating progenitor cells (CPCs). Results Expression of CENP-A, IFI16 and CD31 was enriched in EBs at days 10 and 12 of differentiation, and particularly in cultures enriched in vascular progenitors (IFI16, CD31, CENPs A and-B). This pattern was distinct from that of comparator autoantigens. Immunohistochemical staining of skin paraffin sections showed enrichment of IFI16 in CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells in biopsies from scleroderma patients and normal controls. Flow cytometry analysis revealed IFI16 expression in CPCs, but minimal expression in CECs. Conclusion Expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENPs, which are associated with severe vascular disease, is increased in vascular progenitors and mature endothelial cells. High level, lineage-enriched expression of autoantigens may explain the striking association between clinical phenotypes and the immune targeting of specific autoantigens. PMID:27159521

  1. Dermatomyositis in five Shetland sheepdogs in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, E A; Cerundolo, R; Lloyd, D H; Rest, J; Cappello, R

    2000-02-19

    Five cases of dermatomyositis in four Shetland sheepdog puppies and one adult bitch are described. The dogs all had well-defined patches of scaling, crusting and alopecia over the muzzle, periorbital skin and distal limbs, and the tail, perineum and pinnae were affected in some of them. The affected puppies were all sired by the same stud dog. The affected adult bitch was unrelated to the puppies. Three of the four dogs tested had high serum creatine kinase concentrations and electromyographic abnormalities were detected in three of the four dogs tested. The histological changes observed in the skin of four of the dogs strongly supported the diagnosis of dermatomyositis, and in the fifth dog they were compatible with this diagnosis. Two of the puppies were euthanised shortly after being diagnosed. In the other two puppies and the adult the disease remains stable and non-progressive 15 to 18 months after diagnosis. The sire of the four affected puppies has been used extensively because it was considered to be genetically clear of collie eye anomaly.

  2. First report of anti-TIF1γ dermatomyositis in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Palterer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myopathies as para-neoplastic phenomena were first described by Sterz in 1916. Recently, myositis specific autoantibodies were described in cancer-associated myositis. Anti-transcription intermediary factor 1 gamma (anti-TIF1γ antibodies have been found in both young adults affected by juvenile dermatomyositis and in elderly patients with cancer-associated myositis. In this regard, we report herein the first case of anti-TIF1γ dermatomyositis secondary to a myelodysplastic syndrome.

  3. Paraneoplastic SIADH and Dermatomyositis in Cervical Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Jones

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first known case of a patient with cervical squamous cell carcinoma complicated by paraneoplastic syndromes of both dermatomyositis and inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH. The patient in this case presented with generalized body pain and vaginal bleeding. Her cervical cancer was diagnosed as stage IIB by physical exam, imaging, and cervical biopsy, her dermatomyositis was confirmed by muscle and skin biopsy, and her SIADH was diagnosed based on laboratory findings.

  4. Medical image of the week: subcutaneous calcification in dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natt B

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year old woman was referred to our Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD clinic for evaluation of dyspnea. A high-resolution CT scan of the chest showed perivascular reticular and ground glass opacities with air trapping, consistent with non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (Figure 1. She was diagnosed with connective tissue associated ILD. On review of previous images extensive subcutaneous calcifications were seen (Figure 2. Calcinosis is an uncommon manifestation of dermatomyositis in adults (1. It is usually seen around areas of frequent trauma like the hands and elbows. In her case, a pelvic inflammatory disease may have been a trigger for this calcinosis. Calcinosis is a difficult complication to treat with some success seen with diltiazem, aluminum hydroxide, and even alendronate in children. Surgical excision may be required in some cases.

  5. A Practical Approach to Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Juvenile Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Liza J; Pain, Clare E

    2016-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis and juvenile scleroderma are rare multisystem autoimmune disorders. Although they share some pathognomonic hallmarks with adult onset myositis or scleroderma, there are significant differences in presentation, characteristics and associated features when the diseases present in childhood. In view of this, and the rarity of the conditions, it is important for care to be led by teams with expertise in pediatric rheumatology conditions. Prognosis has improved significantly in the West; likely due to early diagnosis and aggressive treatment with immunosuppressive medications. However, this trend is not replicated in the developing world. Early recognition of these diseases is crucial to achieve rapid and sustained remission and prevent disease or medication associated complications. This article aims to provide a practical overview for recognition, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  6. High levels of serum hyaluronic acid in adults with dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Ausciutti Victorino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background / objectives. Hyaluronic acid (HA is rarely described in dermatomyositis (DM. Thus, we determined any clinical association of serum levels of hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with dermatomyositis (DM. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional single-center analysis 75 DM and 75 healthy individuals, during the period from January 2012 to July 2013. An anti-HA antibody assay was performed using specific ELISA/EIA kits, according to the manufacturer’s protocol. Results. The patients with DM and control subjects had comparable demographic distributions (p>0.05. The median time duration between disease diagnosis and initial symptoms was 6.0 [3.0-12.0] months, with a median DM disease duration of 4.0 [1.0-7.0] years. The median level of serum HA was significantly increased in patients with DM compared to the control group [329.0 (80.0-958.0 vs. 133.0 (30.0-262.0 ng/mL, respectively; p0.05. Serum HA also did not correlate with gender, ethnicity, auto-antibodies or drug use (p>0.05, but did correlate with cutaneous features, such as photosensitivity (p=0.001, “shawl” sign (p=0.018, “V-neck” sign (p=0.005 and cuticular hypertrophy (p=0.014. Conclusions. A high level of serum AH was observed in DM compared to healthy individuals. In DM, HA did not correlate to demographic, auto-antibodies and therapy parameters. However, HA correlated specifically with some cutaneous features, suggesting that this glycosaminoglycan could be involved in modulating cutaneous inflammation in this population. More studies are necessary to understand the correlation between AH and patients with DM.

  7. Evaluation of soft-tissue calcifications in dermatomyositis with /sup 99m/Tc--phosphate compounds: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, A.H.; Alba, J.; Lanaro, A.E.; Dietrich, R.

    1975-01-01

    A whole-body scan with /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate and 85 Sr-nitrate demonstrates extension of calcinosis in one case of dermatomyositis with cutaneous, subcutaneous, and muscular calcinosis. The authors suggest the potential use of /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate compounds as an auxiliary instrument in the evaluation of dermatomyositis--polymyositis syndrome. (U.S.)

  8. Dermatomyositis as the first manifestation of a lung tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Castro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is a rare disease characterized by proximal muscle weakness and a typical cutaneous rash. The muscle biopsy shows inflammatory lesions consistent with myositis, being related to an increased risk of cancer, often being considered as a paraneoplastic syndrome. The authors present a case of a 63-year-old man, with progressive proximal muscle weakness and cutaneous rash, appearing in two months. The muscle and skin biopsies were consistent with DM. Chest tomography showed that a nodular image in the lingular region and bronchy biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. This clinical case intends to enhance the importance of a thorough diagnostic study in patients with DM, as it is often a paraneoplastic syndrome. Resumo: A dermatomiosite (DM é uma doença rara, caracterizada por fraqueza muscular proximal associada a exantema cutâneo típico. A biopsia muscular apresenta lesões inflamatórias compatíveis com miosite, estando associada a um aumento de risco de neoplasia, frequentemente considerada como síndrome paraneoplásico. Os autores apresentam um caso de um homem de 63 anos, com quadro de fraqueza muscular proximal progressiva e exantema cutâneo com 2 meses de evolução. A biopsia cutânea e muscular foram compatíveis com DM. A tomografia tórax mostrou imagem nodular paracardíaca esquerda e a biopsia brônquica confirmou diagnóstico de carcinoma pulmão pequenas células. Este caso clínico pretende realçar a importância da realização do estudo diagnóstico exaustivo em doentes com DM, visto que esta patologia surge frequentemente como síndrome paraneoplásico. Keywords: Dermatomyositis, Lung neoplasms, Paraneoplastic syndrome, Palavras-chave: Dermatomiosite, Neoplasias pulmonares, Síndrome paraneoplásico

  9. Expression of recombinant proteinase 3, the autoantigen in Wegener's granulomatosis, in insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Geld, YM; Smook, MLF; Huitema, MG; Harmsen, MC; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    2002-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the major autoantigen for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. Little is known about the major antigenic sites on PR3. To facilitate epitope mapping, PR3 was cloned in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. Four

  10. Paradoxical effect of pertussis toxin on the delayed hypersensitivity response to autoantigens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajwahrdhan Yadav

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis toxin (PTX, an exotoxin of Bordetella pertussis, enhances the development of experimental autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rodent models. The mechanisms of the promotion of experimental autoimmune diseases by PTX may be based upon PTX-induced disruption of the blood eye/brain barriers facilitating the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the modulation of inflammatory cell migration and the enhancement of the activation of inflammatory cells. We hypothesized that the facilitation of experimental autoimmunity by PTX suggests that its influence on the in vivo immune response to auto-antigen may differ from its influence on non-self antigens.We have evaluated the effect of PTX on the simultaneous generation of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and autoimmune responses to uveitogenic interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein peptide (IRBP161-180, encephalitogenic myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55 or ovalbumin (OVA. PTX injection of mice immunized to IRBP peptide161-180 led to (i the development of EAU as shown by histopathology of the retina, (ii pro-inflammatory cytokine production by splenocytes in response to IRBP peptide161-180, and (iii symptomatic EAE in mice immunized with encephalitogenic MOG peptide35-55. However, mice that received PTX had a reduced DTH response to IRBP161-180 peptide or MOG peptide35-55 when challenged distal to the site affected by autoreactive T cells. Moreover, footpad challenge with MOG35-55 peptide reduced EAE in mice immunized with MOG peptide. In contrast, the use of PTX when immunizing with OVA protein or an OVA immunogenic peptide did not affect the DTH response to OVA.The results suggest that that the reduced DTH response in mice receiving PTX may be specific for autoantigens and autoantigen-reactive T cells are diverted away from ectopic sites that received the autoantigen and towards

  11. Diagnosis of dermatomyositis and polymyositis: a study of 102 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCOLA ROSANA HERMINIA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with dermatomyositis (DM or polymyositis (PM were studied retrospectively. The patients were divided into four groups: definite PM 24, probable PM 19, definite DM 34 and mild-early DM 25 cases. PM patients complained more often proximal muscle weakness [p <0.01]. DM patients complained more arthralgia [p <0.05], dysphagia [p <0.03] and weight loss [p <0.04]. Five patients had a malignant neoplasm and 9 had other connective-tissue disease. DM presented higher ESR than PM [p <0.002]. PM presented more significant increase in creatine kinase (CK [p <0.02] and in alanine aminotransferase (ALT [p <0.001] levels. Electromyography showed myopathic pattern in 76%. Muscle biopsy was the definitive test. Perifascicular atrophy was more frequent in definite DM than in mild-early DM group [p <0.03]. CONCLUSION: A small association with connective-tissue diseases and neoplasms was found. DM and PM are clinically different. DM presents systemic involvement affecting the skin, developing more severe arthralgia, dysphagia and weight loss and presenting higher values of ESR. PM presents a restricted and more significant involvement of muscles generating more weakness complaints and higher levels of serum muscle enzymes.

  12. Whole-body /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy in dermatomyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Yoshio; Okazaki, Yoshio; Murakami, Kiminori; Inoue, Nobuhiro; Noriyasu, Toshiaki; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Setsuo; Aono, Kaname

    1987-10-01

    The presence or absence of abnormal accumulation of gallium-67 in soft tissues was studied in 11 patients undergoing /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy out of 25 patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis (DM-PM) who had visited our hospital during the period between July 1981 and March 1987 and met the diagnostic criteria of muscle biopsy, etc. A definite image of abnormal accumulation was obtained by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy in 3 of the patients. Although the positive site tended to be in agreement with the site of muscular symptoms in the DM-PM active stage, the accumulation was not necessarily correlated with the variations in creatine phosphokinase. From these results, it seems necessary to keep in mind the possibility that gallium-67 may also accumulate abnormally in the soft tissue lesion owing to the pathogenic process specific to DM-PM when /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy is undertaken for the purpose of screening, etc., for complication by a malignant tumor in DM-PM patients

  13. Different Mi-2 complexes for various developmental functions in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Myriam Passannante

    Full Text Available Biochemical purifications from mammalian cells and Xenopus oocytes revealed that vertebrate Mi-2 proteins reside in multisubunit NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase complexes. Since all NuRD subunits are highly conserved in the genomes of C. elegans and Drosophila, it was suggested that NuRD complexes also exist in invertebrates. Recently, a novel dMec complex, composed of dMi-2 and dMEP-1 was identified in Drosophila. The genome of C. elegans encodes two highly homologous Mi-2 orthologues, LET-418 and CHD-3. Here we demonstrate that these proteins define at least three different protein complexes, two distinct NuRD complexes and one MEC complex. The two canonical NuRD complexes share the same core subunits HDA-1/HDAC, LIN-53/RbAp and LIN-40/MTA, but differ in their Mi-2 orthologues LET-418 or CHD-3. LET-418 but not CHD-3, interacts with the Krüppel-like protein MEP-1 in a distinct complex, the MEC complex. Based on microarrays analyses, we propose that MEC constitutes an important LET-418 containing regulatory complex during C. elegans embryonic and early larval development. It is required for the repression of germline potential in somatic cells and acts when blastomeres are still dividing and differentiating. The two NuRD complexes may not be important for the early development, but may act later during postembryonic development. Altogether, our data suggest a considerable complexity in the composition, the developmental function and the tissue-specificity of the different C. elegans Mi-2 complexes.

  14. Dermatomyositis, clinically presenting with cutaneous ulcers, with histopathologic evidence of perforating collagenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Rachel; Martires, Kathryn; Christman, Mitalee; Terushkin, Vitaly; Meehan, Shane A; Seminara, Nicole; Golden, Brian D; Franks, Andrew G

    2016-12-15

    Dermatomyositis is a systemic, autoimmune diseasewith a variety of clinical features that often includemyositis and characteristic cutaneous findings. Asubset of patients with dermatomyositis developcutaneous ulcers, often in the setting of vasculitis orvasculopathy. We present a case of dermatomyositiswith cutaneous ulcers that show perforatingcollagenosis on histopathologic examination.Acquired reactive perforating collagenosistypically occurs in the setting of diabetes mellitus,chronic renal failure, and other pruritic conditions,and this case represents a rare association withdermatomyositis, which may ultimately be helpful inelucidating the pathophysiology of this perforatingdisorder.

  15. Quantitative analysis of Esophageal Transit of Radionuclide in Patients with Dermatomyositis-Polymyositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Myung Hae

    1989-01-01

    Esophageal transit of radionuclide was quantitatively analyzed in 29 patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed retention of tracer in oropharynx. The mean value of percent retention of oropharynx was 15.5+16.6%. Esophageal dysfunction was found in 19 patients (65.5%). Among them 4 showed mild, 12 showed moderate and 3 showed severe esophageal dysfunction. Dysphagia was found in 11 patients (37.9%), which was closely related to percent retention of oropharynx. Quantitative analysis of esophageal transit of radionuclide seemed to be a useful technique for evaluation of dysphagia in patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis.

  16. Isaacs' syndrome in a patient with dermatomyositis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertnawapan, Ratchaya; Kulkantrakorn, Kongkiat

    2017-08-01

    This is a case report of Isaacs' syndrome in dermatomyositis. The patient presented with proximal muscle weakness, rash, elevated muscle enzyme, myopathic electromyograph and typical muscle biopsy. Ultimately he developed typical symptoms of Isaacs' syndrome which is an autoimmune channelopathy from voltage gated potassium channel antibody (anti-VGKC) leading to dysfunction of axonal discharge at neuromuscular junctions. It shares some similar characteristics with dermatomyositis such as autoimmunity, its association with malignancy and the response to treatment. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Small cell lung cancer presenting as dermatomyositis: mistaken for single connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guanqun; Fang, Lizheng; Lu, Chongrong; Chen, Zhouwen

    2012-06-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is well-known to be associated with several types of malignancy. This case emphasizes the importance of a thorough examination for an underlying cancer, in patients with the symptoms of dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 62-year-old Chinese man who presented with a two-month history of edema of face and neck, together with erythema of the eyelids diagnosed of small cell lung cancer. Initially, it was thought to be single connective tissue disease such as DM. This study highlights the importance of a thorough physical examination when visiting a patient.

  18. Acute lyme infection presenting with amyopathic dermatomyositis and rapidly fatal interstitial pulmonary fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Hanh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dermatomyositis has been described in the setting of lyme infection in only nine previous case reports. Although lyme disease is known to induce typical clinical findings that are observed in various collagen vascular diseases, to our knowledge, we believe that our case is the first presentation of acute lyme disease associated with amyopathic dermatomyositis, which was then followed by severe and fatal interstitial pulmonary fibrosis only two months later. Case presentation We present a case of a 64-year-old African-American man with multiple medical problems who was diagnosed with acute lyme infection after presenting with the pathognomonic rash and confirmatory serology. In spite of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for lyme infection, he developed unexpected amyopathic dermatomyositis and then interstitial lung disease. Conclusions This case illustrates a potential for lyme disease to produce clinical syndromes that may be indistinguishable from primary connective tissue diseases. An atypical and sequential presentation (dermatomyositis and interstitial lung disease of a common disease (lyme infection is discussed. This case illustrates that in patients who are diagnosed with lyme infection who subsequently develop atypical muscular, respiratory or other systemic complaints, the possibility of severe rheumatological and pulmonary complications should be considered.

  19. QUANTITATIVE MUSCLE ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN THE FOLLOW-UP OF JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habers, G. Esther A.; van Brussel, Marco; Bhansing, Kavish J.; Hoppenreijs, Esther P.; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Pillen, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We explored the use of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (QMUS) for follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods: Seven JDM patients were evaluated at diagnosis and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) and QMUS. Muscle thickness (MT)

  20. Dermatomyositis-like syndrome induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, J J; Collet, A M; Bonerandi, J J

    1989-01-01

    A dermatomyositis-like syndrome developed in a patient treated with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAI), niflumic acid, and regressed after the cessation of treatment. Previously an eruption had occurred under treatment with another NSAI, diclofenac. Our report shows that NSAI can induce not only lupus-like syndromes but also other connective tissue disorders.

  1. Dysregulated homeostasis of target tissues or autoantigens - A novel principle in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Frank; Yue, Xiaoyang; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Yu, Xinhua

    2017-06-01

    Monogenic autoimmune disorders provide a powerful tool for our understanding of the principles of autoimmunity due to the obvious impact of a single gene on the disease. So far, approximately 100 single gene defects causing murine monogenic autoimmune disorders have been reported and the functional characterization of these genes will provide significant progress in understanding the nature of autoimmunity. According to their function, genes leading to monogenic autoimmune disorders can be categorized into two groups. An expectable first group contains genes involved in the homeostasis of the immune system, including homeostasis of immune organs and immune cells. Intriguingly, the second group consists of genes functionally involved in the homeostasis of target tissues or autoantigens. According to our novel hypothesis, we propose that autoimmunity represents a consequence of a dysregulated homeostasis of the immune system and/or its targets including autoantigens and target tissues. In this review we refer to both aspects of homeostasis in autoimmunity with a highlight on the role of the homeostasis of target tissues and autoantigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular DNA Traps Induce Autoantigen Production by Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoo Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of autoimmune involvement in asthma has received much recent interest. Autoantibodies, such as anti-cytokeratin (CK 18, anti-CK19, and anti-α-enolase antibodies, react with self-antigens and are found at high levels in the sera of patients with severe asthma (SA. However, the mechanisms underlying autoantibody production in SA have not been fully determined. The present study was conducted to demonstrate that neutrophil extracellular DNA traps (NETs, cytotoxic molecules released from neutrophils, are a key player in the stimulation of airway epithelial cells (AECs to produce autoantigens. This study showed that NETs significantly increased the intracellular expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG but did not affect that of CK18 in AECs. NETs induced the extracellular release of both tTG and CK18 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, NETs directly degraded intracellular α-enolase into small fragments. However, antibodies against neutrophil elastase (NE or myeloperoxidase (MPO attenuated the effects of NETs on AECs. Furthermore, each NET isolated from healthy controls (HC, nonsevere asthma (NSA, and SA had different characteristics. Taken together, these findings suggest that AECs exposed to NETs may exhibit higher autoantigen production, especially in SA. Therefore, targeting of NETs may represent a new therapy for neutrophilic asthma with a high level of autoantigens.

  3. Diffuse Muscular Pain, Skin Tightening, and Nodular Regenerative Hyperplasia Revealing Paraneoplastic Amyopathic Dermatomyositis due to Testicular Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Norrenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic dermatomyositis (DM associated with testicular cancer is extremely rare. We report the case of a patient with skin tightening, polymyalgia, hypereosinophilia, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia revealing seminoma and associated paraneoplastic DM.

  4. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  5. Peritendinous calcinosis of calcaneus tendon associated with dermatomyositis: correlation between conventional radiograph, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and gross surgical pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Gomide, Lidyane Marques de Paula; Lemes, Marcella Stival

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial calcinosis is an uncommon condition in which there is either localized or widely disseminated deposition of calcium in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, muscles, and tendons. Calcinosis is often associated with collagen diseases, scleroderma and dermatomyositis. The authors report a case of interstitial calcinosis associated with dermatomyositis studied with conventional radiograph, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and correlate the imaging findings with the results of surgical pathology gross examination. (author)

  6. Association between a C8orf13-BLK polymorphism and polymyositis/dermatomyositis in the Japanese population: an additive effect with STAT4 on disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tomoko; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Goto, Kanako; Hayashi, Yukiko; Gono, Takahisa; Furuya, Takefumi; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that several non-HLA genes are involved in the susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of C8orf13-BLK, one of the strongest candidate genes for autoimmune diseases, in susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis in the Japanese population. A possible gene-gene interaction between C8orf13-BLK and STAT4, which we recently showed to be associated with Japanese polymyositis/dermatomyositis, was also analyzed. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in C8orf13-BLK (dbSNP ID: rs13277113) was investigated in the Japanese population using a TaqMan assay in 283 polymyositis patients, 194 dermatomyositis patients, and 656 control subjects. The C8orf13-BLK rs13277113A allele was associated with overall polymyositis/dermatomyositis (Prs7574865 T alleles had an additive effect on polymyositis/dermatomyositis susceptibility. The strongest association was observed in dermatomyositis, with an OR of 3.07 (95% CI; 1.57-6.02) for the carriers of four risk alleles at the two SNP sites, namely, rs1327713 and rs7574865. This study established C8orf13-BLK as a new genetic susceptibility factor for polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Both C8orf13-BLK and STAT4 exert additive effects on disease susceptibility. These observations suggested that C8orf13-BLK, in combination with STAT4, plays a pivotal role in creating genetic susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis in Japanese individuals.

  7. Successful Immunoglobulin Treatment in Severe Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia Caused by Dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In connective tissue diseases, autoantibodies cause pulmonary interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, and patients require treatment with an immunosuppressive agent such as a steroid. Dermatomyositis is an incurable, uncommon form of connective tissue disease that occasionally causes diffuse pulmonary inflammation leading to acute severe respiratory failure. In such cases, the prognosis is very poor despite treatment with high-dose steroid. In the present case, a 46-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea. He was diagnosed with dermatomyositis combined with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP with respiratory failure and underwent treatment with steroid and an immunosuppressive agent, but the COP was not improved. However, the respiratory failure did improve after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, which therefore can be considered a treatment option in cases where steroids and immunosuppressive agents are ineffective.

  8. Generalized subcutaneous edema as a rare manifestation of dermatomyositis: clinical lesson from a rare feature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is a very rare manifestation of inflammatory myopathies. A 61-year-old woman presented with classic signs and symptoms of dermatomyositis. She was also noted to have generalized edema that was so florid that an alternative diagnosis was considered. Her disease was resistant to corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Intravenous administration of immunoglobulins was started because of marked worsening of her disease-muscle weakness, generalized anasarca, and involvement of her bulbar muscles. This led to dramatic resolution of her subcutaneous edema and significant improvement of her skin and muscle disease. As the initial screen for malignancy was negative, a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was requested, which interestingly showed a metabolically active cervical tumor. Anasarca is an unusual manifestation of dermatomyositis. In treatment-refractory cases, it seems reasonable to consider positron emission tomography scan in excluding underlying malignant disease.

  9. A La autoantigen homologue is required for the internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of giardiavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Garlapati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Translation of Giardiavirus (GLV mRNA is initiated at an internal ribosome entry site (IRES in the viral transcript. The IRES localizes to a downstream portion of 5' untranslated region (UTR and a part of the early downstream coding region of the transcript. Recent studies indicated that the IRES does not require a pre-initiation complex to initiate translation but may directly recruit the small ribosome subunit with the help of a number of trans-activating protein factors. A La autoantigen homologue in the viral host Giardia lamblia, GlLa, was proposed as one of the potential trans-activating factors based on its specific binding to GLV-IRES in vitro. In this study, we further elucidated the functional role of GlLa in GLV-IRES mediated translation in Giardia by knocking down GlLa with antisense morpholino oligo, which resulted in a reduction of GLV-IRES activity by 40%. An over-expression of GlLa in Giardia moderately stimulated GLV-IRES activity by 20%. A yeast inhibitory RNA (IRNA, known to bind mammalian and yeast La autoantigen and inhibit Poliovirus and Hepatitis C virus IRES activities in vitro and in vivo, was also found to bind to GlLa protein in vitro and inhibited GLV-IRES function in vivo. The C-terminal domain of La autoantigen interferes with the dimerization of La and inhibits its function. An over-expression of the C-terminal domain (200-348aa of GlLa in Giardia showed a dominant-negative effect on GLV-IRES activity, suggesting a potential inhibition of GlLa dimerization. HA tagged GlLa protein was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of Giardia, thus supporting a primary role of GlLa in translation initiation in Giardiavirus.

  10. The systemic management of cutaneous dermatomyositis: Results of a stepwise strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Anyanwu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of dermatomyositis (DM is often achieved with a stepwise algorithm. However, the literature lacks quality evidence to support the use of this therapeutic strategy. The result of a stepwise therapeutic strategy in the management of skin-only DM is presented to better understand the clinical outcomes and allow for future studies. A cohort of 102 patients with DM, 41 of whom had skin-only disease, were seen between July 2009 and April 2013 at a referral-based connective tissue disease clinic. The Cutaneous Dermatomyositis Disease Area and Severity Index was used to prospectively assess disease severity and the outcomes in 41 adult patients with skin-only DM were analyzed. Of the 41 patients with skin-only DM, 23 patients (56.1% received antimalarial medications alone and 18 patients (43.9% received second- or third-line agents. Ten patients (24.4% remained at the first level of the treatment algorithm and received only hydroxychloroquine. Prednisone was included in the treatment regimen for 11 patients with skin-only disease (26.8%. The results show that management of cutaneous DM often requires second-line agents because antimalarial medications alone are insufficient to treat most patients with skin-only disease. Keywords: dermatomyositis, antimalarial, immunosuppressive, CDASI, outcome measures, treatment

  11. A case report of life-threatening acute dysphagia in dermatomyositis: Challenges in diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jung Soo; Kim, Yeo Hyung

    2018-04-01

    Although dysphagia is a known complication of dermatomyositis, sudden onset of dysphagia without the notable aggravation of other symptoms can make the diagnosis and treatment challenging. A 53-year-old male diagnosed as dermatomyositis 1 month ago came to our emergency department complaining of a sudden inability to swallow solid foods and liquids. The patient showed generalized edema, but the muscle power was not different compared with 1 month ago. Serum creatine kinase level was lower than that measured 2 weeks ago. Computed tomography scan of the larynx, chest, abdomen, and pelvis, an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and brain magnetic resonance imaging were unremarkable. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study revealed inadequate pharyngeal contraction and slightly decreased upper esophageal sphincter opening with silent aspiration. Treatment with oral prednisolone, intravenous methylprednisolone, azathioprine, and intravenous immunoglobulins was applied. During the course of medical treatment for life-threatening dysphagia, he continued with rehabilitative therapy. He could swallow saliva at 2 months and showed normal swallowing function at 3 months from the onset of dysphagia. Dysphagia has not recurred for 3 years after recovery. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to diagnose severe acute dysphagia due to exacerbation of underlying dermatomyositis rather than other structural or neurological causes. Appropriate supportive care is important because dysphagia can be life-threatening and last for a long time.

  12. Paniculitis en paciente con dermatomiositis Panniculitis in a patient with dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Arias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available La paniculitis es una manifestación cutánea infrecuente de la dermatomiositis. Puede preceder hasta en 14 meses a otras manifestaciones de la dermatomiositis. En todos los casos, la miositis y la paniculitis presentan mejoría simultánea durante el tratamiento. Describimos una paciente de sexo femenino de 30 años que presenta lesiones clínica e histológicamente compatibles con paniculitis luego de 2 meses de que el compromiso muscular y cutáneo permitió el diagnóstico de dermatomiositis. Las lesiones cutáneas remitieron con el tratamiento esteroideo.Panniculitis is a rarely reported clinical finding in dermatomyositis. It may precede the other manifestations associated with dermatomyositis by as much as 14 months. In all cases, myositis and panniculitis improve simultaneously during treatment. The present report describes the case of a 30-year-old female patient with clinical and histopathological findings consistent with panniculitis two months after the onset of the muscle and cutaneous symptoms that permitted diagnosis of dermatomyositis. The skin lesions regressed following steroid treatment.

  13. Case Report: Clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis presenting acutely with isolated facial edema [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymia Pappa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old Asian man presented with acute-onset periorbital and facial edema associated with pyrexia. Muscle weakness was absent. Initial laboratory investigations showed an inflammatory reaction, while screening for infections was negative. Serum muscle enzyme levels were normal. He was hospitalized and treated empirically with antibiotics and corticosteroids, pending the result of facial skin and muscle biopsy. He showed a good clinical and laboratory response but an attempt to discontinue corticosteroids led to a prompt relapse of facial edema and pyrexia, associated with rising laboratory indices of inflammation. Biopsy findings were typical of dermatomyositis. Reintroduction of corticosteroid treatment resulted in complete clinical and laboratory remission. Facial edema as the sole clinical manifestation of dermatomyositis is extremely rare. There have been no previous reports of isolated facial edema in the setting of acute, clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis in adults. A high level of suspicion is required to make the diagnosis in the absence of myopathy and the hallmark cutaneous manifestations of the disease (heliotrope rash, Gottron papules.

  14. Tir8/Sigirr prevents murine lupus by suppressing the immunostimulatory effects of lupus autoantigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Pfeiffer, Stephanie; Savarese, Emina; Krug, Anne; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The Sigirr gene (also known as Tir8) encodes for an orphan receptor of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin 1 receptor family that inhibits TLR-mediated pathogen recognition in dendritic cells. Here, we show that Sigirr also inhibits the activation of dendritic cells and B cells upon exposure to RNA and DNA lupus autoantigens. To evaluate the functional role of Sigirr in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we generated Sigirr-deficient C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. These mice developed a progressive lymphoproliferative syndrome followed by severe autoimmune lung disease and lupus nephritis within 6 mo of age as compared with the minor abnormalities observed in C57BL/6-lpr/lpr mice. Lack of Sigirr was associated with enhanced activation of dendritic cells and increased expression of multiple proinflammatory and antiapoptotic mediators. In the absence of Sigirr, CD4 T cell numbers were increased and CD4+CD25+ T cell numbers were reduced. Furthermore, lack of Sigirr enhanced the activation and proliferation of B cells, including the production of autoantibodies against multiple nuclear lupus autoantigens. These data identify Sigirr as a novel SLE susceptibility gene in mice. PMID:18644972

  15. Review of autoantigens in Sjögren’s syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong L

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Louis Tong,1–4 Vanessa Koh,3 Bernard Yu-Hor Thong5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2Corneal and External Eye Disease, Singapore National Eye Centre, 3Ocular Surface Research Group, Singapore Eye Research Institute, 4Eye Academic Clinical Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, 5Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Abstract: Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation in exocrine glands, resulting in reduced secretion of tears and saliva, manifesting as xerophthalmia and xerostomia, respectively. It is commonly associated with Sjögren’s syndrome type A (Ro and Sjögren’s syndrome type B (La antigens. However, in most patients, the identity of the triggering antigen is not known. Factors such as genetics of histocompatibility, dysregulation of T-cells, B-cells and viral infections have been implicated. Several important studies on autoantigens in pSS have been published since a review in 2012, and the aim of this review is to provide an update on further peer-reviewed original articles in this field. Oxidative damage of Ro60 antigen may explain the epitope spreading during the immune activation in pSS. Immune-mediated destruction of the muscarinic receptor-3-expressing cells has been associated with a reduction in parasympathetic function, which could cause reduced secretory function of exocrine glands. Such a process also activates reactive oxidative species and antioxidants, which are linked to the triggering of inflammatory responses. Elevated levels of kallikrein, yet another antigen present in the lacrimal gland and other tissues, are similarly involved in triggering an autoimmune T-cell response against target glands. Studying additional antigens, the platelet-selectin and vasoactive intestinal peptides, in patients with pSS can help to elucidate the origin and process of

  16. Immunological cross-reactivity to multiple autoantigens in patients with liver kidney microsomal type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, K; Gregorio, G V; Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    1998-11-01

    We describe two patients with liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1)-positive autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with associated endocrinopathies. The first patient had insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), and the second patient had Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism, and is also positive for islet cell antibodies, without overt diabetes. To account for the existence of multiple endocrinopathy in these patients, we investigated whether there is sequence similarity between the target of LKM1 antibodies, cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6), and other human proteins, and if so, whether this structural similarity produces a detectable cross-reactive immune response. Our database search identified two proteins, carboxypeptidase H, an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes, and 21-hydroxylase, the major autoantigen in Addison's disease, that share sequence similarity to the second major LKM1 epitope on CYP2D6. We tested the reactivity of sera from these patients to the homologous regions of the three autoantigens using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cut-off for positivity was established by testing sera from 22 healthy children. To determine the significance of reactivity to the peptide homologues of the three autoantigens, we investigated 16 additional patients with LKM1 AIH and 20 children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection as pathological controls. We found that reactivity to the second major epitope of CYP2D6 is significantly associated with reactivity to the homologous regions of carboxypeptidase H (CPH) and 21-hydroxylase (21-OHase) in patients with LKM1 AIH, and that this simultaneous recognition is cross-reactive. We suggest that a cross-reactive immune response between homologous autoantigens may contribute to the development of multiple endocrinopathies in LKM1 AIH.

  17. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) was performed for all patients with clinical dysphagia (n = 13, 14.1%) but not for patients without clinical dysphagia. Typical findings of dysphagia (pharyngeal pooling, n = 11 and/or nasal regurgitation, n = 4) was detected by VFSS in all patients with clinical dysphagia. Eleven patients with dysphagia (84.6%) had anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ) antibody. By univariate analysis, the average age and the male to female ratio, internal malignancy, and anti-TIF-1γ antibody were significantly higher and the frequency of interstitial lung diseases and manual muscle testing (MMT) scores of sternomastoid and dertoid muscles were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia than in patients without dysphagia. Among patients with anti-TIF-1γ antibody, the mean age, the ratios of male to female and internal malignancy were significantly higher and mean MMT scores of sternomastoid muscle were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia compared with patients without dysphagia. By multivariable analysis, the risk of dysphagia was strongly associated with the existence of internal malignancy and ant-TIF-1γ antibody and was also associated with reduced scores of manual muscle test of sternomastoid muscle. Dysphagia was markedly improved after the treatment against myositis in all 13 patients. These findings indicate that dysphagia can develop frequently in patients with internal malignancy, anti-TIF-1γ antibody, or severe muscle weakness of sternomastoid muscle.

  18. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M r 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects

  19. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Review of autoantigens in Sjögren's syndrome: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Louis; Koh, Vanessa; Thong, Bernard Yu-Hor

    2017-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation in exocrine glands, resulting in reduced secretion of tears and saliva, manifesting as xerophthalmia and xerostomia, respectively. It is commonly associated with Sjögren's syndrome type A (Ro) and Sjögren's syndrome type B (La) antigens. However, in most patients, the identity of the triggering antigen is not known. Factors such as genetics of histocompatibility, dysregulation of T-cells, B-cells and viral infections have been implicated. Several important studies on autoantigens in pSS have been published since a review in 2012, and the aim of this review is to provide an update on further peer-reviewed original articles in this field. Oxidative damage of Ro60 antigen may explain the epitope spreading during the immune activation in pSS. Immune-mediated destruction of the muscarinic receptor-3-expressing cells has been associated with a reduction in parasympathetic function, which could cause reduced secretory function of exocrine glands. Such a process also activates reactive oxidative species and antioxidants, which are linked to the triggering of inflammatory responses. Elevated levels of kallikrein, yet another antigen present in the lacrimal gland and other tissues, are similarly involved in triggering an autoimmune T-cell response against target glands. Studying additional antigens, the platelet-selectin and vasoactive intestinal peptides, in patients with pSS can help to elucidate the origin and process of autoimmunity, or even lead to potential biomarkers. In conclusion, the understanding of autoantigens has led to exciting major advances in the biology of pSS and may influence diagnosis and management of pSS in future.

  1. Association between a C8orf13–BLK Polymorphism and Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis in the Japanese Population: An Additive Effect with STAT4 on Disease Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tomoko; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Goto, Kanako; Hayashi, Yukiko; Gono, Takahisa; Furuya, Takefumi; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has shown that several non-HLA genes are involved in the susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of C8orf13–BLK, one of the strongest candidate genes for autoimmune diseases, in susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis in the Japanese population. A possible gene–gene interaction between C8orf13–BLK and STAT4, which we recently showed to be associated with Japanese polymyositis/dermatomyositis, was also analyzed. Methods A single-nucleotide polymorphism in C8orf13–BLK (dbSNP ID: rs13277113) was investigated in the Japanese population using a TaqMan assay in 283 polymyositis patients, 194 dermatomyositis patients, and 656 control subjects. Results The C8orf13–BLK rs13277113A allele was associated with overall polymyositis/dermatomyositis (Prs7574865 T alleles had an additive effect on polymyositis/dermatomyositis susceptibility. The strongest association was observed in dermatomyositis, with an OR of 3.07 (95% CI; 1.57–6.02) for the carriers of four risk alleles at the two SNP sites, namely, rs1327713 and rs7574865. Conclusions This study established C8orf13–BLK as a new genetic susceptibility factor for polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Both C8orf13–BLK and STAT4 exert additive effects on disease susceptibility. These observations suggested that C8orf13–BLK, in combination with STAT4, plays a pivotal role in creating genetic susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis in Japanese individuals. PMID:24632671

  2. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis in patients with antinuclear antibody negative systemic lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Yeon; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Song, Soon Young [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) occurring in association with collagen vascular disease is an unusual combination that presents with intramural gas in the gastrointestinal tract. We report two cases of PCI, one with antinuclear antibody (ANA) negative SLE and the other with dermatomyositis, with a review of the relevant literature.

  3. Calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis : a possible role for the vitamin K-dependent protein matrix Gla protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Summeren, M. J. H.; Spliet, W. G. M.; Van Royen-Kerkhof, A.; Vermeer, C.; Lilien, M.; Kuis, W.; Schurgers, L. J.

    Objectives. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether the calcification inhibitor matrix Gla protein (MGP) is expressed in muscle biopsies of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), and whether different forms of MGP are differentially expressed in JDM patients with and without

  4. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  5. Dermatomyositis Leading to Necrotizing Vasculitis: A Perfect Response to Applied Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbaryan, Mahmood; Darabi, Farideh; Soltani, Zahra

    2016-12-01

    Dermatomyositis is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that cause skin and muscle complications. The ethiology is not understood well yet. Released cytokines including interferon and interleukins are suggested to make inflammatory responses in the skin or muscle. Muscle weakness and skin lesions including heliotrope rash, shawl sign and Gottron's papules are the most common symptoms. A biopsy (muscle or skin) is always the most reliable method for diagnosis. Corticosteroids in association with immunosuppressive agents are used as standard treatment. The patient was a 30 years old woman who got involved with dermatomyositis for 10 years. She has been under therapy with Methotrexate, Prednisolon and Azathioprine until she came to us suffering from progressive skin lesions. Experiments and examinations were normal except the lesions and detected lipoatrophy. Because of immune cells infiltration and observations necrotizing vasculitis was diagnosed. After three month of high dose prednisolon and intravenous cyclophosphamide therapy the lesions vanished remarkable. True and immediate diagnosis gives physicians the chance not only to assess the best treatment but have adequate time to apply the procedure. However shortening the therapy and diminishing morbidity of the disease need more investigations and efforts.

  6. Genome and Proteome Analysis of Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2: Elucidation of the 4,4´-Dithiodibutyric Acid Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Heba; Meinert, Christina; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf; Voigt, Birgit; Riedel, Katharina; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 has the extraordinary ability to utilize the xenobiotic 4,4´-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB). Cleavage of DTDB by the disulfide-reductase Nox, which is the only verified enzyme involved in DTDB-degradation, raised 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB). 4MB could act as building block of a novel polythioester with unknown properties. To completely unravel the catabolism of DTDB, the genome of R. erythropolis MI2 was sequenced, and subsequently the proteome was analyzed. The draft genome sequence consists of approximately 7.2 Mbp with an overall G+C content of 62.25% and 6,859 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome of strain MI2 is composed of three replicons: one chromosome and two megaplasmids with sizes of 6.45, 0.4 and 0.35 Mbp, respectively. When cells of strain MI2 were cultivated with DTDB as sole carbon source and compared to cells grown with succinate, several interesting proteins with significantly higher expression levels were identified using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A putative luciferase-like monooxygenase-class F420-dependent oxidoreductase (RERY_05640), which is encoded by one of the 126 monooxygenase-encoding genes of the MI2-genome, showed a 3-fold increased expression level. This monooxygenase could oxidize the intermediate 4MB into 4-oxo-4-sulfanylbutyric acid. Next, a desulfurization step, which forms succinic acid and volatile hydrogen sulfide, is proposed. One gene coding for a putative desulfhydrase (RERY_06500) was identified in the genome of strain MI2. However, the gene product was not recognized in the proteome analyses. But, a significant expression level with a ratio of up to 7.3 was determined for a putative sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (RERY_02710), which could also be involved in the abstraction of the sulfur group. As response to the toxicity of the intermediates, several stress response proteins were strongly expressed, including a superoxide dismutase (RERY_05600) and an osmotically induced

  7. Genome and Proteome Analysis of Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2: Elucidation of the 4,4´-Dithiodibutyric Acid Catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Khairy

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 has the extraordinary ability to utilize the xenobiotic 4,4´-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB. Cleavage of DTDB by the disulfide-reductase Nox, which is the only verified enzyme involved in DTDB-degradation, raised 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB. 4MB could act as building block of a novel polythioester with unknown properties. To completely unravel the catabolism of DTDB, the genome of R. erythropolis MI2 was sequenced, and subsequently the proteome was analyzed. The draft genome sequence consists of approximately 7.2 Mbp with an overall G+C content of 62.25% and 6,859 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome of strain MI2 is composed of three replicons: one chromosome and two megaplasmids with sizes of 6.45, 0.4 and 0.35 Mbp, respectively. When cells of strain MI2 were cultivated with DTDB as sole carbon source and compared to cells grown with succinate, several interesting proteins with significantly higher expression levels were identified using 2D-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A putative luciferase-like monooxygenase-class F420-dependent oxidoreductase (RERY_05640, which is encoded by one of the 126 monooxygenase-encoding genes of the MI2-genome, showed a 3-fold increased expression level. This monooxygenase could oxidize the intermediate 4MB into 4-oxo-4-sulfanylbutyric acid. Next, a desulfurization step, which forms succinic acid and volatile hydrogen sulfide, is proposed. One gene coding for a putative desulfhydrase (RERY_06500 was identified in the genome of strain MI2. However, the gene product was not recognized in the proteome analyses. But, a significant expression level with a ratio of up to 7.3 was determined for a putative sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (RERY_02710, which could also be involved in the abstraction of the sulfur group. As response to the toxicity of the intermediates, several stress response proteins were strongly expressed, including a superoxide dismutase (RERY_05600 and an

  8. Apoptosis and Redistribution of the Ro Autoantigen in Balb/c Mouse Like in Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In subacute cutaneous lupus eryhematosus (SCLE the cutaneous antigens constitute the main source of Ro and La autoantigens. The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate if UV light increases the availability of Ro autoantigen in the skin, also the blocking effect of Ac-DEVD-CMK a caspase inhibitor was assessed. For this purpose newborn Balb/c mice were UVB irradiated (5–30 mJ/cm2 equivalent to a moderate to severe sunburn. Animals were injected with monoclonal anti-Ro antibodies from SCLE patients. Apoptosis was also induced by anti-Fas antibody injection. Skin samples were examined by direct immunofluoresence, by TUNEL, and the expression of caspase 3 by RT-PCR. Major findings of present studies were: 1. UVB irradiation and anti-Fas induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. 2. Apoptosis redistribute the Ro antigen on cell surface and is better triggered by Ro antibody. 3. The caspase 3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK decreases the availability of Ro autoantigen in epidermis and prevents deposition of anti-Ro. In conclusion, the caspase pathway would be blocked to avoid anti-Ro deposition along skin; this finding would be a prospect in the treatment of SCLE patients.

  9. Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Jun-Tao; Hu, Shui-Yi; Li, Jian-Nan; Wang, Miao; Wang, Chen; Chen, Min; Cui, Zhao; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-09-01

    In a substantial number of patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis, both anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are detected simultaneously. ANCA is presumed to be the initial event but the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, aiming to reveal the mechanisms of the coexistence of the two kinds of autoantibodies. Thirty-one patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis were enrolled in this study. Twenty-four overlapping linear peptides were synthesized across the whole sequence of Goodpasture autoantigen. Serum antibodies against linear peptides were detected by ELISA and their associations with clinical features were further analyzed. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one (80.6%) sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis possessed antibodies against linear peptides on Goodpasture autoantigen. These antibodies could be detected in 50% of patients with normal renal function (Scr ≤ 133 μmol/L), 70% of patients with moderate renal dysfunction (133 μmol/L  600 μmol/L) (P = 0.032). The highest recognition frequencies were found for peptides P4 (51.6%), P14 (54.8%), and P24 (54.8%), which contained the sequences that constitute the conformational epitopes of E A (P4) and E B (P14) recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. The level of anti-P4 antibodies was positively correlated with the percentage of crescents in glomeruli (r = 0.764, P = 0.027). Patients with anti-P24 antibodies had a significantly higher prevalence of renal dysfunction on diagnosis (88.2 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.018). Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen could be detected in sera of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, which might mediate the production of antibodies towards the conformational epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen, namely, the anti-GBM antibodies.

  10. The risk of cancer in patients with connective tissue diseases but without dermatomyositis or polymyositis: A multicenter cohort study conducted over 15 years in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Huan; Liu, Zhi; Chen, Chen; Lei, Cong-Cong

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the relative risk of cancer in Chinese patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD) associated with and without dermatomyositis or polymyositis. A retrospective, multicenter cohort study investigated 32,380 CTD patients (2334 diagnosed with dermatomyositis or polymyositis) without a history of malignancies treated from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2011. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) of cancers determined the incidence of malignancies during follow-up. The data was compared with the cancer morbidity of the general population from the Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report of National Central Cancer Registry. A total of 113 patients (348.98 per 100,000) developed cancer during follow-up, 75 (249.62 per 100,000) were patients with CTD without dermatomyositis or polymyositis. The risk of cancer among patients with CTD was increased (SIR=1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.71), and this risk increased with age (60 years SIR=2.34 (95%CI 0.93-2.77]) and the time of follow-up (cancer risk among CTD patients without dermatomyositis or polymyositis was not affected (SIR=0.93, 95%CI 0.75-1.16), regardless of gender, age, or follow-up. The cancer risk for patients with CTD without dermatomyositis or polymyositis was not increased or decreased, but it was increased when patients with dermatomyositis or polymyositis were included. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of a Type-1 Diabetes Vaccine Candidate Using Edible Plants Expressing a Major Autoantigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Bertini

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes (T1D is a metabolic disease involving the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. It is often diagnosed by the detection of autoantibodies, typically those recognizing insulin itself or the 65-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. Oral insulin can be used to induce systemic immunological tolerance and thus prevent or delay the onset of T1D, suggesting that combination treatments with other autoantigens such as GAD65 could be even more successful. GAD65 has induced oral tolerance and prevented T1D in preclinical studies but it is difficult to produce in sufficient quantities for clinical testing. Here we combined edible plant systems, namely spinach (Spinacia oleracea cv Industra and red beet (Beta vulgaris cv Moulin Rouge, with the magnICON® expression system to develop a safe, cost-effective and environmentally sustainable platform for the large-scale production of GAD65. The superior red beet platform was extensively characterized in terms of recombinant protein yields and bioequivalence to wild-type plants, and the product was tested for its ability to resist simulated gastric digestion. Our results indicate that red beet plants are suitable for the production of a candidate oral vaccine based on GAD65 for the future preclinical and clinical testing of T1D immunotherapy approaches.

  12. Oral delivery of human biopharmaceuticals, autoantigens and vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Herzog, Roland; Daniell, Henry

    2013-06-15

    Among 12billion injections administered annually, unsafe delivery leads to >20million infections and >100million reactions. In an emerging new concept, freeze-dried plant cells (lettuce) expressing vaccine antigens/biopharmaceuticals are protected in the stomach from acids/enzymes but are released to the immune or blood circulatory system when plant cell walls are digested by microbes that colonize the gut. Vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells upon oral delivery after priming, conferred both mucosal and systemic immunity and protection against bacterial, viral or protozoan pathogens or toxin challenge. Oral delivery of autoantigens was effective against complications of type 1 diabetes and hemophilia, by developing tolerance. Oral delivery of proinsulin or exendin-4 expressed in plant cells regulated blood glucose levels similar to injections. Therefore, this new platform offers a low cost alternative to deliver different therapeutic proteins to combat infectious or inherited diseases by eliminating inactivated pathogens, expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and sterile injections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. State of the art on nailfold capillaroscopy in dermatomyositis and polymyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolazzi, Chiara; Cutolo, Maurizio; Smith, Vanessa; Gutierrez, Marwin

    2017-12-01

    To provide an overview of the main nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) changes described in dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) and to discuss the current evidence supporting its clinical relevance and applications in daily practice. All relevant literature in the field of NFC and DM and PM published in the last 30 years has been systematically reviewed. A systematic research was performed in the electronic databases PubMed and EMBASE. A total of 540 publications were identified according to the proposed filters and 27 were included for the review. The articles have been critically analyzed with a focus on technical aspects, examined anatomical areas, main pathological capillaroscopy findings ,and the relationship between NFC alterations and critical parameters of DM and PM. The overview confirms that NFC is a safe and noninvasive tool able to help the clinician in the diagnosis of DM and PM and to better characterize the phase of disease activity of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery calcification in adults with polymyositis and dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise C. Pyndt Raun; Diederichsen, Axel C P; Simonsen, Jane A

    2015-01-01

    : Traditional CV risk factors were assessed in a cross-sectional, observational study of 76 patients with PM/DM and in 48 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. CAC was quantified by means of cardiac computed tomography scan and expressed in Agatston units. The associations between CV risk factors, PM......OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence of traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) compared to healthy controls and to assess the association between CV risk factors, PM/DM, and CAC score. METHODS...... of triglycerides (P = 0.0009). High CAC score occurred more frequently in patients (20% versus 4%; P = 0.04). In multivariate analysis of patient factors associated with CAC were age (P = 0.02) and smoking (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: In this study, traditional CV risk factors and severe CAC were commonly found...

  15. Exacerbation of pneumomediastinum after air travel in a patient with dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiuyue; Zhang, Lu; Tian, Xinlun; Shi, Juhong

    2011-07-01

    Although the presence of pneumothorax is generally considered an absolute contraindication to air travel, reports on pneumomediastinum after air travel are extremely rare. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, exacerbation of existing pneumomediastinum after commercial air travel has never been reported. We report on a case of a patient (the first case that we are aware of) who suffered exacerbation of pneumomediastinum after commercial air travel. This patient, with confirmed pneumomediastinum before air travel, flew to our city for medical care without being warned about exacerbation by the local hospital or airlines. Obvious exacerbation of pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema was noticed after the travel. Subsequently, a diagnosis of amyopathic dermatomyositis with interstitial lung disease and pneumomediastinum was made. The patient died despite treatment with corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide and intravenous immunoglobulin. This report discusses this rare condition and offers suggestions regarding air travel for patients with presence of pneumomediastinum at the time of flight.

  16. Invasive tracheobronchial aspergillosis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus-dermatomyositis overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Mitsuru; Saraya, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Sato, Shinji; Wakayama, Megumi; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Takizawa, Hajime; Goto, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a 3-month history of dyspnea, polyarthralgia, myalgia and weight loss. He was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus/dermatomyositis overlap syndrome with lung involvement, which presented as organizing pneumonia. However, a bronchoscopic examination revealed the presence of multiple plaque-like white lesions with ulcers on the bronchial membrane, located mainly in the central airway. The pathological specimens obtained from bronchoscopy showed numerous filamentous fungal hyphae that were aggressively invading the bronchial walls, suggesting a diagnosis of invasive tracheobronchial aspergillosis. The present case, along with a review of the literature, demonstrates that invasive tracheobronchial aspergillosis can occur in patients who do not appear to be immunosuppressed. This case of aspergillosis should thus be recognized as an extremely rare presentation of an Aspergillus infection.

  17. Dermatomyositis presenting with severe subcutaneous edema: five additional cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisenda, José C; Doti, Pamela I; Prieto-González, Sergio; Grau, Josep M

    2014-10-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) constitutes a subset of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies clinically characterized by proximal muscle weakness and skin involvement. Some of the dermatologic manifestations are highly prevalent and characteristic, but others such as generalized or limb edema are truly rare. The aim of the present study was to describe five cases of edematous DM diagnosed at our institution and to perform a review of the literature, as well as identify clinical, laboratory, or pathological data associated with this manifestation. We performed a retrospective clinical, laboratory, and pathological evaluation of five cases of this edematous presentation out of 86 DM cases diagnosed at our hospital from 2004 to 2013. Moreover, we undertook a medical literature search using inflammatory myopathy, dermatomyositis, and edema as key words, limited to articles published in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS database in English and Spanish from 1987 to 2013. A total of 19 patients were identified, five diagnosed at our hospital and 14 cases from the literature. Overall, the median time from disease onset to diagnosis was 2 months, and most of the patients (16/84 patients, 21%) required more aggressive therapy, including immunosuppressive agents and intravenous immunoglobulin (12/63 patients, 15%). Microinfarction was present 2.3 times more frequently in DM patients with edema compared with those without edema. The presence of edema in DM is uncommon but seems to be a sign of severe disease, requiring early and aggressive treatment. Microischemia-producing microinfarction may play an important pathophysiological role and determine the degree of disease severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between a C8orf13-BLK polymorphism and polymyositis/dermatomyositis in the Japanese population: an additive effect with STAT4 on disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Sugiura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence has shown that several non-HLA genes are involved in the susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of C8orf13-BLK, one of the strongest candidate genes for autoimmune diseases, in susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis in the Japanese population. A possible gene-gene interaction between C8orf13-BLK and STAT4, which we recently showed to be associated with Japanese polymyositis/dermatomyositis, was also analyzed. METHODS: A single-nucleotide polymorphism in C8orf13-BLK (dbSNP ID: rs13277113 was investigated in the Japanese population using a TaqMan assay in 283 polymyositis patients, 194 dermatomyositis patients, and 656 control subjects. RESULTS: The C8orf13-BLK rs13277113A allele was associated with overall polymyositis/dermatomyositis (P<0.001, odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.73, as well as polymyositis (P = 0.011, OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.06-1.64 and dermatomyositis (P<0.001, OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.26-2.12. No association was observed between the C8orf13-BLK rs13277113A allele and either interstitial lung disease or anti-Jo-1 antibody positivity. The C8orf13-BLK rs13277113 A and STAT4 rs7574865 T alleles had an additive effect on polymyositis/dermatomyositis susceptibility. The strongest association was observed in dermatomyositis, with an OR of 3.07 (95% CI; 1.57-6.02 for the carriers of four risk alleles at the two SNP sites, namely, rs1327713 and rs7574865. CONCLUSIONS: This study established C8orf13-BLK as a new genetic susceptibility factor for polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Both C8orf13-BLK and STAT4 exert additive effects on disease susceptibility. These observations suggested that C8orf13-BLK, in combination with STAT4, plays a pivotal role in creating genetic susceptibility to polymyositis/dermatomyositis in Japanese individuals.

  19. A Study on Clinical Activity of Myositis by the Use of Radioisotope Bone Scan in the Patients with Dermatomyositis - polymyositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Jae; Koh, Chang Soon

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of radioisotope bone scan and clinical activity of myositis, bone scan using 99m Tc-Methylene diphosphonate was serially done before and after treatment with prednisolone in 10 patients with well- documented dermatomyositis-polymyositis. The observed results were as follows. 1. In all 10 patients before treatment with prednisolone, the bone scans showed evidence of increased muscle uptake. Muscle uptake was markedly increased in 4 patients, moderately increased in 3 patients and minimally increased in 3 patients. 2. The site of increased muscle uptake was consistent with the site of clinically involved muscle which was weak and tender. 3. The degree of muscle uptake correlated with the severity of the muscle weakness and tenderness at the scan was done. In all 10 patients treated with high dose prednisolone, muscle uptake was decreased following therapy. Above results suggest the radioisotope bone scanning may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of patient with dermatomyositis-polymyositis.

  20. Dermatomyositis: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  1. Dermatomyositis (Juvenile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OII) Timed Up & Go (TUG) Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Young Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient ...

  2. PML nuclear body component Sp140 is a novel autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Yang, Wei-Hong; Muratori, Luigi; Lim, Mark J; Nakajima, Ayako; Ferri, Silvia; Pappas, Georgios; Quarneti, Chiara; Bianchi, Francesco B; Bloch, Donald B; Muratori, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have antinuclear antibodies (ANAs). These ANAs include the "multiple nuclear dots" (MND) staining pattern, targeting promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) components, such as "speckled 100-kD" protein (Sp100) and PML. A new PML NB protein, designated as Sp140, was identified using serum from a PBC patient. The aim of this study was to analyze the immune response against Sp140 protein in PBC patients. We studied 135 PBC patients and 157 pathological controls with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We used indirect immunofluorescence and a neuroblastoma cell line expressing Sp140 for detecting anti-Sp140 antibodies, and a commercially available immunoblot for detecting anti-Sp100 and anti-PML antibodies. Anti-Sp140 antibodies were present in 20 (15%) PBC patients but not in control samples, with a higher frequency in antimitochondrial antibody (AMA)-negative cases (53 vs. 9%, P<0.0001). Anti-Sp140 antibodies were found together with anti-Sp100 antibodies in all but one case (19 of 20, 90%) and with anti-PML antibodies in 12 (60%) cases. Anti-Sp140 positivity was not associated with a specific clinical feature of PBC. Our study identifies Sp140 as a new, highly specific autoantigen in PBC for the first time. The very frequent coexistence of anti-Sp140, anti-Sp100 and anti-PML antibodies suggests that the NB is a multiantigenic complex in PBC and enhances the diagnostic significance of these reactivities, which are particularly useful in AMA-negative cases.

  3. Identification of critical residues of linear B cell epitope on Goodpasture autoantigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu Jia

    Full Text Available The autoantigen of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease has been identified as the non-collagenous domain 1 of α3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IVNC1. Our previous study revealed a peptide on α3(IVNC1 as a major linear epitope for B cells and potentially nephrogenic, designated as P14 (α3129-150. This peptide has also been proven to be the epitope of auto-reactive T cells in anti-GBM patients. This study was aimed to further characterize the critical motif of P14.16 patients with anti-GBM disease and positive anti-P14 antibodies were enrolled. A set of truncated and alanine substituted peptides derived from P14 were synthesized. Circulating antibodies against the peptides were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.We found that all sera with anti-P14 antibodies reacted with the 13-mer sequence in the C-terminus of P14 (P14c exclusively. The level of antibodies against P14 was highly correlated with the level of antibodies against P14c (r=0.970, P<0.001. P14c was the core immunogenic region and the amino acid sequence (ISLWKGFSFIMFT was highly hydrophobic. Each amino acid residue in P14c was sequentially replaced by alanine. Three residues of glycine142, phenylalanine143, and phenylalanine145 were identified crucial for antibody binding based on the remarkable decline (P<0.001 of antibody reaction after each residue replacement.We defined GFxF (α3142, 143,145 as the critical motif of P14. It may provide some clues for understanding the etiology of anti-GBM disease.

  4. Immunohistochemical analysis of medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens in different histological types of breast carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostianets Olga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the past decade a plethora of investigations were directed on identification of molecules involved in breast tumorogenesis, which could represent a powerful tool for monitoring, diagnostics and treatment of this disease. In current study we analyzed six previously identified medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens including LGALS3BP, RAD50, FAM50A, RBPJ, PABPC4, LRRFIP1 with cancer restricted serological profile in different histological types of breast cancer. Methods Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of 20 tissue samples including medullary breast carcinoma, invasive ductal carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma and non-cancerous tissues obtained from patients with fibrocystic disease (each of five was performed using specifically generated polyclonal antibodies. Differences in expression patterns were evaluated considering percent of positively stained cells, insensitivity of staining and subcellular localization in cells of all tissue samples. Results All 6 antigens predominantly expressed in the most cells of all histological types of breast tumors and non-cancerous tissues with slight differences in intensity of staining and subcellular localization. The most significant differences in expression pattern were revealed for RAD50 and LGALS3BP in different histological types of breast cancer and for PABPC4 and FAM50A antigens in immune cells infiltrating breast tumors. Conclusions This pilot study made possible to select 4 antigens LGALS3BP, RAD50, PABPC4, and FAM50A as promising candidates for more comprehensive research as potential molecular markers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapy. Virtual slides The virtual slides’ for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1860649350796892

  5. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  6. Aberrant accumulation of the diabetes autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi membranes in conditions of ER stress and autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in beta cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes GABA......, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary beta cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes...... release from stressed and/or damaged beta cells, triggering autoimmunity....

  7. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism associated with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Yanqing Li,1 Peihong Wang,2 Lei Li,3 Fei Wang,4 Yuxiu Liu5 1Department of Pharmacy Intravenous Admixture Services, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 2Department of Interventional Oncology, Weifang Tumor Hospital, Weifang, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 5School of Nursing, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People’s Republic of China Objective: Polymyositis and dermatomyositis (PM/DM have been implicated in the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE. Previous studies investigating the association between PM/DM and VTE risk had yielded inconsistent findings. The aim of this study was to precisely estimate this association by meta-analysis of all available publications.Methods: Two investigators independently performed a comprehensive literature search in databases of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for eligible studies. The strength for the association was weighed by pooled odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs. Stratified analysis and sensitivity analysis were performed for further analysis.Results: Six studies including 9,045 patients with PM/DM were analyzed. The pooled OR suggested that inflammatory myositis was associated with increased risk of VTE (OR =4.31, 95% CI: 2.55–7.29, P<0.001. Besides, significantly elevated risk of VTE was related with PM and DM, respectively (for PM: OR =6.87, 95% CI: 4.12–11.46, P<0.001; for DM: OR =11.59, 95% CI: 6.54–20.55, P<0.001. In addition, inflammatory myositis could increase the risk of DVT (OR =4.85, 95% CI: 1.38–17.12, P<0.05 and PE (OR =4.74, 95% CI: 2.18–10.30, P<0.05. Sensitivity analysis did not materially alter the pooled results.Conclusion: Our study shows strong evidence that patients with inflammatory myositis have an increased risk of VTE. Keywords: polymyositis

  8. Production of the main celiac disease autoantigen by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Soledad Marin Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy that remains widely undiagnosed and implementation of massive screening tests is needed to reduce the long term complications associated to untreated CD. The main CD autoantigen, human tissue transglutaminase (TG2, is a challenge for the different expression systems available since its cross-linking activity affects cellular processes. Plant-based transient expression systems can be an alternative for the production of this protein. In this work, a transient expression system for the production of human TG2 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was optimized and reactivity of plant-produced TG2 in CD screening test was evaluated. First, a subcellular targeting strategy was tested. Cytosolic, secretory, endoplasmic reticulum (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion and vacuolar (C-terminal KISIA fusion TG2 versions were transiently expressed in leaves and recombinant protein yields were measured. ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 levels were 9 to 16 fold higher than their cytosolic and secretory counterparts. As second strategy, TG2 variants were co-expressed with a hydrophobic elastin-like polymer (ELP construct encoding for 36 repeats of the pentapeptide VPGXG in which the guest residue X were V and F in ratio 8:1. Protein bodies (PB were induced by the ELP, with a consequent 2 fold-increase in accumulation of both ER-TG2 and vac-TG2. Subsequently, ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were produced and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Plant purified ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were recognized by three anti-TG2 monoclonal antibodies that bind different epitopes proving that plant-produced antigen has immunochemical characteristics similar to those of human TG2. Lastly, an ELISA was performed with sera of CD patients and healthy controls. Both vac-TG2 and ER-TG2 were positively recognized by IgA of CD patients while they were not recognized by serum from non-celiac controls. These results confirmed the usefulness of plant

  9. Pulmonary autoimmunity as a feature of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and identification of KCNRG as a bronchial autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Dubois, Noémie; Sköldberg, Filip; Hallgren, Asa; Tardivel, Isabelle; Hedstrand, Håkan; Haavik, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Meloni, Antonella; Janson, Christer; Vialettes, Bernard; Kajosaari, Merja; Egner, William; Sargur, Ravishankar; Pontén, Fredrik; Amoura, Zahir; Grimfeld, Alain; De Luca, Filippo; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kämpe, Olle; Carel, Jean-Claude

    2009-03-17

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) suffer from multiple organ-specific autoimmunity with autoantibodies against target tissue-specific autoantigens. Endocrine and nonendocrine organs such as skin, hair follicles, and liver are targeted by the immune system. Despite sporadic observations of pulmonary symptoms among APS-1 patients, an autoimmune mechanism for pulmonary involvement has not been elucidated. We report here on a subset of APS-1 patients with respiratory symptoms. Eight patients with pulmonary involvement were identified. Severe airway obstruction was found in 4 patients, leading to death in 2. Immunoscreening of a cDNA library using serum samples from a patient with APS-1 and obstructive respiratory symptoms identified a putative potassium channel regulator (KCNRG) as a pulmonary autoantigen. Reactivity to recombinant KCNRG was assessed in 110 APS-1 patients by using immunoprecipitation. Autoantibodies to KCNRG were present in 7 of the 8 patients with respiratory symptoms, but in only 1 of 102 APS-1 patients without respiratory symptoms. Expression of KCNRG messenger RNA and protein was found to be predominantly restricted to the epithelial cells of terminal bronchioles. Autoantibodies to KCNRG, a protein mainly expressed in bronchial epithelium, are strongly associated with pulmonary involvement in APS-1. These findings may facilitate the recognition, diagnosis, characterization, and understanding of the pulmonary manifestations of APS-1.

  10. New Onset of Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis during Anti-TNF-α Therapies: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Maria Giovanna Brunasso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic search of databases from 1990 to 2013 to identify articles concerning the new onset of dermatomyositis/polymyositis (DM/PM in patients treated with anti-TNF-α therapy. We retrieved 13 publications describing 20 patients where the new onset of DM/PM after anti-TNF-α therapy was recorded. 17 patients were affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA, one by Crohn’s disease, one by ankylosing spondilytis, and one by seronegative arthritis. In 91% of the cases antinuclear autoantibodies were detected after the introduction of anti-TNF-α therapy. In 6 patients antisynthetase antibodies were detected and other clinical findings as interstitial lung disease (ILD were recorded. Improvement of DM/PM after anti-TNF suspension (with the concomitant use of other immunosuppressors was recorded in 94% of cases. The emergence of DM/PM and antisynthetase syndrome seem to be associated with the use of anti-TNF-α agents, especially in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases (mainly RA with positive autoantibodies before therapy initiation. In particular, physicians should pay attention to patients affected by RA with positive antisynthetase antibodies and/or history of ILD. In those cases, the use of the TNF-α blocking agents may trigger the onset of PM/DM or antisynthetase syndrome or may aggravate/trigger the lung disease.

  11. Efficacy of thalidomide in a girl with inflammatory calcinosis, a severe complication of juvenile dermatomyositis

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    Inayama Yoshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a 14-year-old girl with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM complicated by severe inflammatory calcinosis successfully treated with thalidomide. She was diagnosed as JDM when she was 4 years old after a few months of increasing lethargy, muscle pain, muscle weakness, and rash. During three months, clinical manifestations and abnormal laboratory findings were effectively treated with oral prednisolone. However, calcinosis was recognized 18 months after disease onset. Generalized calcinosis rapidly progressed with high fever, multiple skin/subcutaneous inflammatory lesions, and increased level of CRP. Fifty mg/day (1.3 mg/kg day of oral thalidomide was given for the first four weeks, and then the dose was increased to 75 mg/day. Clinical manifestations subsided, and inflammatory markers had clearly improved. Frequent high fever and local severe pain with calcinosis were suppressed. The levels of FDP-E, IgG, and tryglyceride, which were all elevated before the thalidomide treatment, were gradually returned to the normal range. Over the 18 months of observation up to the present, she has had no inflammatory calcinosis, or needed any hospitalization, although established calcium deposits still remain. Her condition became painless, less extensive and less inflammatory with the CRP level below 3.08 mg/dL. Recent examination by whole-body 18F-FDG-PET-CT over the 15 months of thalidomide treatment demonstrated fewer hot spots around the subcutaneous calcified lesions.

  12. Antioxidant status of serum bilirubin and uric acid in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhibo; Su, Zhongqian; Pang, Wanhui; Huang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Jie; Ding, Zhangna; Wu, Senmin; Xu, Shunyao; Quan, Weiwei; Zheng, Juzeng; Chen, Huale; Li, Zhengzheng; Li, Xiang; Li, Jia; Weng, Yiyun; Zhang, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Oxidative stress and variations in antioxidant status are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Polymyositis and dermatomyositis (PM/DM) are autoimmune diseases with inflammatory cells infiltrating into skeletal muscles, and the antioxidant status is still controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation between PM/DM and the antioxidant status of serum bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil) and uric acid (UA). We measured serum concentrations of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil) and uric acid in 384 individuals, including 110 PM/DM patients and 274 healthy controls. We found that PM/DM patients had significantly lower serum concentrations of bilirubin (Tbil and Ibil) and uric acid than healthy controls, whether male or female. Also, after separately adjusting the covariances of age and gender, Tbil, Dbil, Ibil and UA were all relevant factors for PM/DM. Moreover, there were no significant differences in serum antioxidant molecule levels between PM and DM subgroups. Our study demonstrated the low serum levels of bilirubin and uric acid in patients with PM/DM. This suggested low antioxidant status in PM/DM patients with excessive oxidative stress.

  13. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Nagano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer.

  14. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posgai, Amanda L; Wasserfall, Clive H; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-02-13

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3 + and LAP + regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Melanoma inhibitor of apoptosis protein (ML-IAP) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes cross-react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek Sørensen, Rikke; Faurschou, Mikkel; Troelsen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of melanoma patients host a spontaneous T-cell response specifically against ML-IAP-derived peptides. In this study, we describe that some ML-IAP-specific cytotoxic T cells isolated from melanoma patients cross react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56. SS56 is a recentl...

  16. Mammalian peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) mRNA expression can be modulated by the La autoantigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenet, Fabienne; Dussault, Nadège; Borch, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of peptidylglycine substrates, yielding amidated products. We have previously reported a putative regulatory RNA binding protein (PAM mRNA-BP) that binds specifically to the 3' untranslated...... region (UTR) of PAM-mRNA. Here, the PAM mRNA-BP was isolated and revealed to be La protein using affinity purification onto a 3' UTR PAM RNA, followed by tandem mass spectrometry identification. We determined that the core binding sequence is approximately 15-nucleotides (nt) long and is located 471 nt...... downstream of the stop codon. Moreover, we identified the La autoantigen as a protein that specifically binds the 3' UTR of PAM mRNA in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, La protein overexpression caused a nuclear retention of PAM mRNAs and resulted in the down-regulation of endogenous PAM activity. Most...

  17. Rituximab as a first-line agent for the treatment of dermatomyositis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    B cells may play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of DM, and reports have claimed that targeting B cells is a viable treatment option in patients with dermatomyositis. A 20-year-old girl presented in October 2007, with few weeks\\' history of proximal muscle weakness. Gottron\\'s papules were noted on her knuckles. She had normal inflammatory markers and negative autoantibody screen. Her CPK was 7,000 U\\/L (normal range 0-170) with an LDH of 1,300 U\\/L (normal range 266-500). EMG and muscle biopsy was consistent with active myositis. She had normal pulmonary function tests. HRCT showed no interstitial lung disease. She was started with 60 mg glucocorticoids (1 mg\\/kg), with a good clinical response. However, any attempt to taper down the steroid dose led to recurrence of her symptoms. The options of available immunosuppressive therapies, including the experimental usage of rituximab, were discussed with her; averse to long-term systemic treatments, she opted to try a course of rituximab. She had rituximab 1,000 mg on days 0 and 14, and her glucocorticoids were tapered in next few weeks. Now, 24 months since her rituximab infusions, she remains in complete clinical and biochemical remission and is naive to other immunosuppressive agents apart from glucocorticoids and rituximab. Depleting peripheral B cells with rituximab (one course) in our patient has led not only to complete resolution of muscle and skin disease (induction) but also remains off all immunosuppressives including glucocorticoids.

  18. Antinuclear Matrix Protein 2 Autoantibodies and Edema, Muscle Disease, and Malignancy Risk in Dermatomyositis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayda, Jemima; Pinal-Fernandez, Iago; Huang, Wilson; Parks, Cassie; Paik, Julie; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Danoff, Sonye K; Johnson, Cheilonda; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Mammen, Andrew L

    2017-11-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) patients typically present with proximal weakness and autoantibodies that are associated with distinct clinical phenotypes. We observed that DM patients with autoantibodies recognizing the nuclear matrix protein NXP-2 often presented with especially severe weakness. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features associated with anti-NXP-2 autoantibodies. There were 235 DM patients who underwent testing for anti-NXP-2 autoantibodies. Patient characteristics, including muscle strength, were compared between those with and without these autoantibodies. The number of cancer cases observed in anti-NXP-2-positive subjects was compared with the number expected in the general population. Of the DM patients, 56 (23.8%) were anti-NXP-2-positive. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of proximal extremity weakness in patients with and without anti-NXP-2. In contrast, anti-NXP-2-positive patients had more prevalent weakness in the distal arms (35% versus 20%; P = 0.02), distal legs (25% versus 8%; P edema (36% versus 19%; P = 0.01) than anti-NXP-2-negative patients. Five anti-NXP-2-positive subjects (9%) had cancer-associated myositis, representing a 3.68-fold increased risk (95% confidence interval 1.2-8.6) compared to the expected prevalence in the general population. In DM, anti-NXP-2 autoantibodies are associated with subcutaneous edema, calcinosis, and a muscle phenotype characterized by myalgia, proximal and distal weakness, and dysphagia. As anti-NXP-2-positive patients have an increased risk of cancer, we suggest that they undergo comprehensive cancer screening. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Work ability in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: An explorative and descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Welin Henriksson, Elisabet; Sandqvist, Jan; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Schult, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) are rare, chronic inflammatory diseases leading to muscle weakness and low muscle endurance. The muscle weakness may lead to restrictions in daily activities and low health-related quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the work situation, work ability, work-related risk factors, and influence of the physical and psycho-social work environment in patients with PM and DM. Patients with PM/DM were assessed using the Work Ability Index (WAI), and the Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS). Forty-eight patients (PM n = 25 and DM n = 23) participated (women/men: 29/19) with a mean age of 54 years (range 28-67 years, SD.10) and mean disease duration of nine years (SD.9). Forty-four percent worked full-time, 31% part-time and 25% were on full-time sick leave. More than 50% self-rated work ability as "poor" or "less good". Physically strenuous work components were present "quite to very often" in 23-79% and more in patients on sick leave ≥ 2 years. For those working, the interfering factors in the work environment concerned task and time demands. Supporting factors concerned meaning of work, interactions with co-workers and others. Self-rated work ability correlated moderately-highly positive with percentage of full-time employment, work-related risk factors and opportunities and constraints in the work environment. Poor self-rated work ability is common in patients with PM/DM indicating a need to identify interfering risk factors and support patients to enhance work performance.

  20. Responsiveness to exercise training in juvenile dermatomyositis: a twin case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roschel Hamilton

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM often present strong exercise intolerance and muscle weakness. However, the role of exercise training in this disease has not been investigated. Purpose this longitudinal case study reports on the effects of exercise training on a 7-year-old patient with JDM and on her unaffected monozygotic twin sister, who served as a control. Methods Both the patient who was diagnosed with JDM as well as her healthy twin underwent a 16-week exercise training program comprising aerobic and strengthening exercises. We assessed one repetition-maximum (1-RM leg-press and bench-press strength, balance, mobility and muscle function, blood markers of inflammation and muscle enzymes, aerobic conditioning, and disease activity scores. As a result, the healthy child had an overall greater absolute strength, muscle function and aerobic conditioning compared to her JDM twin pair at baseline and after the trial. However, the twins presented comparable relative improvements in 1-RM bench press, 1-RM leg press, VO2peak, and time-to-exhaustion. The healthy child had greater relative increments in low-back strength and handgrip, whereas the child with JDM presented a higher relative increase in ventilatory anaerobic threshold parameters and functional tests. Quality of life, inflammation, muscle damage and disease activity scores remained unchanged. Results and Conclusion this was the first report to describe the training response of a patient with non-active JDM following an exercise training regimen. The child with JDM exhibited improved strength, muscle function and aerobic conditioning without presenting an exacerbation of the disease.

  1. Interferon and biologic signatures in dermatomyositis skin: specificity and heterogeneity across diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatomyositis (DM is an autoimmune disease that mainly affects the skin, muscle, and lung. The pathogenesis of skin inflammation in DM is not well understood. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We analyzed genome-wide expression data in DM skin and compared them to those from healthy controls. We observed a robust upregulation of interferon (IFN-inducible genes in DM skin, as well as several other gene modules pertaining to inflammation, complement activation, and epidermal activation and differentiation. The interferon (IFN-inducible genes within the DM signature were present not only in DM and lupus, but also cutaneous herpes simplex-2 infection and to a lesser degree, psoriasis. This IFN signature was absent or weakly present in atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, acne vulgaris, systemic sclerosis, and localized scleroderma/morphea. We observed that the IFN signature in DM skin appears to be more closely related to type I than type II IFN based on in vitro IFN stimulation expression signatures. However, quantitation of IFN mRNAs in DM skin shows that the majority of known type I IFNs, as well as IFN g, are overexpressed in DM skin. In addition, both IFN-beta and IFN-gamma (but not other type I IFN transcript levels were highly correlated with the degree of the in vivo IFN transcriptional response in DM skin. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: As in the blood and muscle, DM skin is characterized by an overwhelming presence of an IFN signature, although it is difficult to conclusively define this response as type I or type II. Understanding the significance of the IFN signature in this wide array of inflammatory diseases will be furthered by identification of the nature of the cells that both produce and respond to IFN, as well as which IFN subtype is biologically active in each diseased tissue.

  2. 64,000-Mr autoantigen in type I diabetes. Evidence against its surface location on human islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, P.G.; Campbell, I.L.; Kay, T.W.; Harrison, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The sera of type I (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects are reported to contain autoantibodies against a 64,000-Mr protein identified in [ 35 S]methionine biosynthetically labeled pancreatic islet cells. We have attempted to localize this autoantigen to the surface of the beta-cell and to define its properties. Sera from 10 newly diagnosed type I diabetic subjects, including five of the index sera originally used to identify the autoantigen, were shown to specifically precipitate a reduced protein of 67,000 Mr from Triton-solubilized, surface 125 I-labeled cultured adult human islet and rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells but not from fresh rat spleen cells. Further characterization revealed that this protein was bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed to cells from fetal calf serum (FCS)-supplemented culture medium and precipitated by BSA antibodies present in many diabetic sera. No labeled proteins were specifically precipitated when surface 125 I-labeled and solubilized human islet or RINm5F cells were precleared with anti-BSA immunoglobulins or when cells were first cultured in human serum. In contrast, a 64,000-Mr protein, clearly not BSA, was precipitated by diabetic globulins from human islets but not from RINm5F cells labeled with [ 35 S]methionine. In addition, a protein of the same size as well as proteins of approximately 35,000, 43,000, 140,000, and 200,000 Mr were specifically precipitated by diabetic globulins from freshly isolated human islets solubilized in Triton X-100 and then labeled with 125 I. These findings suggest that the 64,000-Mr antigen is not expressed on the surface of human islet cells, at least in culture, and therefore question its relevance as a target for islet cell surface antibodies in initiating beta-cell damage

  3. High grade serous ovarian carcinoma with serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma in a case presented with atypical glandular cell favor neoplasm cervical cytology and dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun-Kun Hong

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The patient had serous carcinoma of the ovary with tubal STIC, which presented as dermatomyositis. The AGC-FN identified from a Pap smear hinted at a diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. These presentations point to an occult malignancy in the genital tract and demand careful diagnostic workup.

  4. Use of High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in a Pregnant Woman with Dermatomyositis-Related Interstitial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old pregnant woman was referred to our hospital with respiratory distress at 30 weeks of gestation. Chest computed tomography (CT scans revealed pulmonary infiltrates along the bronchovascular bundles and ground-glass opacities in both lungs. Despite immediate treatment with steroid pulse therapy for suspected interstitial pneumonia, the patient’s condition worsened. Respiratory distress was slightly alleviated after the initiation of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC oxygen therapy (40 L/min, FiO2 40%. We suspected clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM complicating rapidly progressive refractory interstitial pneumonia. In order to save the life of the patient, the use of combination therapy with immunosuppressants was necessary. The patient underwent emergency cesarean section and was immediately treated with immunosuppressants while continuing HFNC oxygen therapy. The neonate was treated in the neonatal intensive care unit. The patient’s condition improved after 7 days of hospitalization; by this time, she was positive for myositis-specific autoantibodies and was diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia preceding dermatomyositis. This condition can be potentially fatal within a few months of onset and therefore requires early combination immunosuppressive therapy. This case demonstrates the usefulness of HFNC oxygen therapy for respiratory management as it negates the need for intubation and allows for various treatments to be quickly performed.

  5. Male occult triple-negative breast cancer with dermatomyositis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Le Zhang,1 Chenghua Zhang,2 Zhaoying Yang,1 Miao He,3 Lijuan Zhang,1 Shereen Ezzat,4 Xi Liang5 1Department of Breast Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China; 2Endoscopy Department, Jilin Cancer Hospital, Changchun, Jilin,China; 3Department of Anesthesia, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China; 4Ontario Cancer Institute and The Endocrine Oncology Site Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Department of Breast Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China Abstract: Occult breast cancer is defined by the presence of axillary metastases without an identifiable primary breast tumor. Here, we report a rare case of a male occult breast cancer with dermatomyositis. We performed a modified radical mastectomy consisting of whole breast mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses demonstrated an adenocarcinoma likely of breast origin, which was an occult triple-negative breast cancer. Interestingly, the patient’s previously noted periorbital dermatomyositis resolved promptly following surgical excision. Keywords: male breast cancer, occult breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, dermato­myositis 

  6. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES AND GENE MUTATIONS IN HEMOSTASIS OF CHILDREN WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Solntseva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilia in children with diffuse connective tissue disorders as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM could arise from various causes including peripherial blood circulation of antiphospholipid antibodies (APH and genetic mutations in the system of hemostasis. Thrombosis is a serious and prognostically unfavorable complication that has negative impact on the underlying disease course. The study included 96 children, 65 of them had diagnosed SLE and the other 31 had JDM. The Elisa method was used to detect antiphospholipid antibodies, coagulation method was used to detect lupus anticoagulant (LAC and antibodies to cardiolipins (anticl, ?2:glycoprotein 1 (anti ? 2 gp 1 and prothrombin (APT. The PCR method (DNA diagnostics was used to detect DNA mutations as factor resistance to of activated protein c (Leiden 5,10 methylen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene polymorphism. The incidence of APL antibodies was registered in 61.5% patients with SLE and in 32.2% of patients with JDM. Ac ligg, anti ?2 gp 1 Igg were clinically significant in thrombotic events in patients with SLE and JDM, and so was LAC in patients with SLE. The prevalence of the hemostasis system mutations is concordant with reported data. Conclusion thrombophilia is frequently associated with APH antibodies or combination of APH antibodies with genetic abnormalities. Sole genetic mutations are salient in patients with JDM.Key words: thrombophilia, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, leiden, prothrombin, methylentet rahydrofolate reductase.

  7. Immune mechanisms in polymyositis and dermatomyositis and potential targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venalis, Paulius; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-03-01

    PM and DM are characterized clinically by weakness and low endurance of skeletal muscle. Other organs are frequently involved, suggesting that idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are systemic inflammatory diseases. Involvement of immune mechanisms in IIMs is supported by the presence of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells in muscle tissue, by the presence of autoantibodies and by HLA-DR being a strong genetic risk factor. T cells may have direct and indirect toxic effects on muscle fibres, causing muscle fibre necrosis and muscle weakness, but the target of the immune reaction is not known. A newly identified T cell subset, CD28(null) T cells, may have cytotoxic effects in the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell phenotype. These cells are apoptosis resistant and may contribute to treatment resistance. Several myositis-specific autoantibodies have been identified, but they are all directed against ubiquitously expressed autoantigens and the specificity of the T cell reactivity is not known. These autoantibodies are associated with distinct clinical phenotypes and some with distinct molecular pathways; e.g. sera from patients with anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies may activate the type I IFN system and these sera also contain high levels of B cell activating factor compared with other IIM subsets. The characterization of patients into subgroups based on autoantibody profiles seems to be a promising way to learn more about the specificities of the immune reactions. Careful phenotyping of infiltrating immune cells in muscle tissue before and after specific therapies and relating the molecular findings to clinical outcome measures may be another way to improve knowledge on specific immune mechanism in IIMs. Such information will be important for the development of new therapies.

  8. Dermatomyositis with anti-TIF-1γ antibodies as a presenting symptom of underlying triple-negative breast cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubeček, Ondřej; Soukup, Tomáš; Paulík, Adam; Kopecký, Jindřich

    2016-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is an autoimmune myopathy characterized by proximal muscle weakness, muscle inflammation, and typical skin findings. It is a rare disease with an incidence of ~1/100 000. About 15–30 % of adult-onset cases are caused by underlying malignancy and dermatomyositis can be the first symptom of undiagnosed cancer, mainly in the case of anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (anti-TIF-1γ) antibodies presence. TIF-1γ is a transcriptional cofactor which is implicated in TGFβ signaling pathway that controls cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Its expression was shown to be associated with younger age, higher tumor grade, more estrogen receptor negativity, tumors larger than 2 cm, and tendency towards poor outcome in early breast cancer. No association between anti-TIF-1γ antibodies and prognosis has been proposed yet. We report a case of a 43-year-old premenopausal woman presenting with the symptoms of systemic rheumatic disease, the most prominent being a typical skin rash and muscle pain. After a series of investigations, the patient was diagnosed with anti-TIF-1γ positive dermatomyositis and concurrent triple-negative breast cancer (cT1c N3c M0) as an underlying cause. Immediate intravenous corticosteroid therapy relieved the symptoms and enabled anticancer therapy to be commenced. Considering the tumor stage, neoadjuvant therapy with 4 courses of AC (Doxorubicin/Cyclophosphamide) followed by 4 courses of Paclitaxel/Carboplatin was administered. However, no tumor regression was documented and radiotherapy was chosen as the definitive treatment. Early detection of anti-TIF-1γ autoantibodies can contribute to a rapid diagnosis of tumor-associated dermatomyositis and enable immediate anticancer treatment. We demonstrate the emerging role of anti-TIF-1γ antibodies in the diagnostics of tumor-associated dermatomyositis. Furthermore, we propose a potential role of anti-TIF-1γ antibodies as a prognostic marker in early

  9. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Hansen, Paul; Apaz, Maria; Bowyer, Suzanne; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Reed, Ann; Rennebohm, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods. We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  10. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis : An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; De Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Miller, Frederick W.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Erman, Brian; Bayat, Nastaran; Pistorio, Angela; Huber, Adam M.; Feldman, Brian M.; Hansen, Paul; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Apaz, Maria T; Bowyer, Suzanne; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce E.; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Stringer, Elizabeth; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wallace, Carol; Miller, Frederick W.; Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Apaz, Maria T; Avcin, Tadej; Becker, Mara; Beresford, Michael W.; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Dvergsten, Jeffrey; Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Feldman, Brian M.; Leme Ferriani, Virginia Paes; Flato, Berit; Gerloni, Valeria; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Hinze, Claas; Hoeltzel, Mark; Huber, Adam M.; Ibarra, Maria; Ilowite, Norman T; Imundo, Lisa; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Kingsbury, Daniel; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Martini, Alberto; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maguiness, Sheilagh; Maillard, Susan; Mathiesen, Pernille; McCann, Liza J.; Nielsen, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Rabinovich, Egla; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Rider, Lisa G.; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael; Byun Robinson, Angela; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Sallum, Adriana; Sanner, Helga; Schmeling, Heinrike; Selcen, Duygu; Shaham, Bracha; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Spencer, Charles H.; Sundel, Robert; Tardieu, Marc; Thatayatikom, Akaluck; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wahezi, Dawn; Wallace, Carol; Zulian, Francesco; analysis, Conjoint; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Huber, Adam M.; Imundo, Lisa; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maillard, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Shaham, Bracha; Sundel, Robert; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Dastmalchi, Maryam; de Visser, Marianne; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James; Mammen, Andrew; Oddis, Chester V.; Ytterberg, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods: We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  11. Sialylated Autoantigen-Reactive IgG Antibodies Attenuate Disease Development in Autoimmune Mouse Models of Lupus Nephritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannic C. Bartsch

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pro- and anti-inflammatory effector functions of IgG antibodies (Abs depend on their subclass and Fc glycosylation pattern. Accumulation of non-galactosylated (agalactosylated; G0 IgG Abs in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients reflects severity of the diseases. In contrast, sialylated IgG Abs are responsible for anti-inflammatory effects of the intravenous immunoglobulin (pooled human serum IgG from healthy donors, administered in high doses (2 g/kg to treat autoimmune patients. However, whether low amounts of sialylated autoantigen-reactive IgG Abs can also inhibit autoimmune diseases is hardly investigated. Here, we explore whether sialylated autoantigen-reactive IgG Abs can inhibit autoimmune pathology in different mouse models. We found that sialylated IgG auto-Abs fail to induce inflammation and lupus nephritis in a B cell receptor (BCR transgenic lupus model, but instead are associated with lower frequencies of pathogenic Th1, Th17 and B cell responses. In accordance, the transfer of small amounts of immune complexes containing sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to attenuate the development of nephritis. We further showed that administration of sialylated collagen type II (Col II-specific IgG Abs attenuated the disease symptoms in a model of Col II-induced arthritis and reduced pathogenic Th17 cell and autoantigen-specific IgG Ab responses. We conclude that sialylated autoantigen-specific IgG Abs may represent a promising tool for treating pathogenic T and B cell immune responses in autoimmune diseases.

  12. Peritendinous calcinosis of calcaneus tendon associated with dermatomyositis: correlation between conventional radiograph, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and gross surgical pathology; Calcinose peritendinea do tendao calcaneo associada a dermatomiosite: correlacao entre radiografia convencional, ultra-sonografia, ressonancia magnetica e macroscopia cirurgica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Gomide, Lidyane Marques de Paula; Lemes, Marcella Stival [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiana, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Costa, Edegmar Nunes; Rocha, Valney Luiz da [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Ortopedia; Machado, Marcio Martins; Santos Junior, Rubens Carneiro dos; Barros, Nestor de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Sernik, Renato Antonio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia; Nunes, Rodrigo Alvarenga [Universidade do Vale do Sapucai (UNIVAS), Pouso Alegre, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Albieri, Alexandre Daher [Hospital de Acidentados de Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    Interstitial calcinosis is an uncommon condition in which there is either localized or widely disseminated deposition of calcium in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, muscles, and tendons. Calcinosis is often associated with collagen diseases, scleroderma and dermatomyositis. The authors report a case of interstitial calcinosis associated with dermatomyositis studied with conventional radiograph, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and correlate the imaging findings with the results of surgical pathology gross examination. (author)

  13. Comparison of the Utility and Validity of Three Scoring Tools to Measure Skin Involvement in Patients With Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Almeida, Beverley; Deakin, Claire; Arnold, Katie; Gallot, Natacha; de Iorio, Maria; Nistala, Kiran; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Armon, Kate; Ellis‐Gage, Joe; Roper, Holly; Briggs, Vanja; Watts, Joanna; McCann, Liza; Roberts, Ian; Baildam, Eileen; Hanna, Louise; Lloyd, Olivia; Riley, Phil; McGovern, Ann; Ryder, Clive; Scott, Janis; Thomas, Beverley; Southwood, Taunton; Al‐Abadi, Eslam; Wyatt, Sue; Jackson, Gillian; Amin, Tania; Wood, Mark; VanRooyen, Vanessa; Burton, Deborah; Davidson, Joyce; Gardner‐Medwin, Janet; Martin, Neil; Ferguson, Sue; Waxman, Liz; Browne, Michael; Friswell, Mark; Foster, Helen; Swift, Alison; Jandial, Sharmila; Stevenson, Vicky; Wade, Debbie; Sen, Ethan; Smith, Eve; Qiao, Lisa; Watson, Stuart; Venning, Helen; Satyapal, Rangaraj; Stretton, Elizabeth; Jordan, Mary; Mosley, Ellen; Frost, Anna; Crate, Lindsay; Warrier, Kishore; Wedderburn, Lucy; Pilkington, Clarissa; Hasson, Nathan; Nistala, Kiran; Maillard, Sue; Halkon, Elizabeth; Brown, Virginia; Juggins, Audrey; Smith, Sally; Lunt, Sian; Enayat, Elli; Varsani, Hemlata; Kassoumeri, Laura; Beard, Laura; Arnold, Katie; Glackin, Yvonne; Simou, Stephanie; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Almeida, Beverley; Murray, Kevin; Ioannou, John; Suffield, Linda; Al‐Obaidi, Muthana; Lee, Helen; Leach, Sam; Smith, Helen; Wilkinson, Nick; Inness, Emma; Kendall, Eunice; Mayers, David; Clinch, Jacqui; Pluess‐Hall, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the abbreviated Cutaneous Assessment Tool (CAT), Disease Activity Score (DAS), and Myositis Intention to Treat Activity Index (MITAX) and correlate them with the physician's 10‐cm skin visual analog scale (VAS) in order to define which tool best assesses skin disease in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis. Methods A total of 71 patients recruited to the UK Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort and Biomarker Study were included and assessed for skin disease using the CAT, DAS, MITAX, and skin VAS. The Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS), manual muscle testing of 8 groups (MMT8), muscle enzymes, inflammatory markers, and physician's global VAS were recorded. Relationships were evaluated using Spearman's correlations and predictors with linear regression. Interrater reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Results All 3 tools showed correlation with the physician's global VAS and skin VAS, with DAS skin showing the strongest correlation with skin VAS. DAS skin and CAT activity were inversely correlated with CMAS and MMT8, but these correlations were moderate. No correlations were found between the skin tools and inflammatory markers or muscle enzymes. DAS skin and CAT were the quickest to complete (mean ± SD 0.68 ± 0.1 minutes and 0.63 ± 0.1 minutes, respectively). Conclusion The 3 skin tools were quick and easy to use. The DAS skin correlated best with the skin VAS. The addition of CAT in a bivariate model containing the physician's global VAS was a statistically significant estimator of skin VAS score. We propose that there is scope for a new skin tool to be devised and tested, which takes into account the strengths of the 3 existing tools. PMID:26881696

  14. SP140L, an Evolutionarily Recent Member of the SP100 Family, Is an Autoantigen in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Saare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SP100 family members comprise a set of closely related genes on chromosome 2q37.1. The widely expressed SP100 and the leukocyte-specific proteins SP110 and SP140 have been associated with transcriptional regulation and various human diseases. Here, we have characterized the SP100 family member SP140L. The genome sequence analysis showed the formation of SP140L gene through rearrangements of the two neighboring genes, SP100 and SP140, during the evolution of higher primates. The SP140L expression is interferon-inducible with high transcript levels in B cells and other peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Subcellularly, SP140L colocalizes with SP100 and SP140 in nuclear structures that are devoid of SP110, PML, or p300 proteins. Similarly to SP100 and SP140 protein, we detected serum autoantibodies to SP140L in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis using luciferase immunoprecipitation system and immunoblotting assays. In conclusion, our results show that SP140L is phylogenetically recent member of SP100 proteins and acts as an autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis patients.

  15. Autoantigen La promotes efficient RNAi, antiviral response, and transposon silencing by facilitating multiple-turnover RISC catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Tan, Huiling; Tian, Hui; Liang, Chunyang; Chen, She; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-11-04

    The effector of RNA interference (RNAi) is the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). C3PO promotes the activation of RISC by degrading the Argonaute2 (Ago2)-nicked passenger strand of duplex siRNA. Active RISC is a multiple-turnover enzyme that uses the guide strand of siRNA to direct the Ago2-mediated sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNA. How this effector step of RNAi is regulated is currently unknown. Here, we used the human Ago2 minimal RISC system to purify Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (SSB)/autoantigen La as an activator of the RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage activity. Our reconstitution studies showed that La could promote multiple-turnover RISC catalysis by facilitating the release of cleaved mRNA from RISC. Moreover, we demonstrated that La was required for efficient RNAi, antiviral defense, and transposon silencing in vivo. Taken together, the findings of C3PO and La reveal a general concept that regulatory factors are required to remove Ago2-cleaved products to assemble or restore active RISC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  17. MRI assessment of the thigh musculature in dermatomyositis and healthy subjects using diffusion tensor imaging, intravoxel incoherent motion and dynamic DTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, E E; Baete, S H; Luo, T; Patel, K; Wang, D; Rossi, I; Duarte, A; Bruno, M; Mossa, D; Femia, A; Ramachandran, S; Stoffel, D; Babb, J S; Franks, A; Bencardino, J

    2018-06-04

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy involving severe debilitation in need of diagnostics. We evaluated the proximal lower extremity musculature with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and dynamic DTI in DM patients and controls and compared with standard clinical workup.  METHODS: In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study with written informed consent, anatomical, Dixon fat/water and diffusion imaging were collected in bilateral thigh MRI of 22 controls and 27 DM patients in a 3T scanner. Compartments were scored on T1/T2 scales. Single voxel dynamic DTI metrics in quadriceps before and after 3-min leg exercise were measured. Spearman rank correlation and mixed model analysis of variance/covariance (ANOVA/ANCOVA) were used to correlate with T1 and T2 scores and to compare patients with controls. DM patients showed significantly lower pseudo-diffusion and volume in quadriceps than controls. All subjects showed significant correlation between T1 score and signal-weighted fat fraction; tissue diffusion and pseudo-diffusion varied significantly with T1 and T2 score in patients. Radial and mean diffusion exercise response in patients was significantly higher than controls. Static and dynamic diffusion imaging metrics show correlation with conventional imaging scores, reveal spatial heterogeneity, and provide means to differentiate dermatomyositis patients from controls. • Diffusion imaging shows regional differences between thigh muscles of dermatomyositis patients and controls. • Signal-weighted fat fraction and diffusion metrics correlate with T1/T2 scores of disease severity. • Dermatomyositis patients show significantly higher radial diffusion exercise response than controls.

  18. Application of WRF - SWAT OpenMI 2.0 based models integration for real time hydrological modelling and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaets, Andrey; Gonchukov, Leonid

    2014-05-01

    Intake of deterministic distributed hydrological models into operational water management requires intensive collection and inputting of spatial distributed climatic information in a timely manner that is both time consuming and laborious. The lead time of the data pre-processing stage could be essentially reduced by coupling of hydrological and numerical weather prediction models. This is especially important for the regions such as the South of the Russian Far East where its geographical position combined with a monsoon climate affected by typhoons and extreme heavy rains caused rapid rising of the mountain rivers water level and led to the flash flooding and enormous damage. The objective of this study is development of end-to-end workflow that executes, in a loosely coupled mode, an integrated modeling system comprised of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) atmospheric model and Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT 2012) hydrological model using OpenMI 2.0 and web-service technologies. Migration SWAT into OpenMI compliant involves reorganization of the model into a separate initialization, performing timestep and finalization functions that can be accessed from outside. To save SWAT normal behavior, the source code was separated from OpenMI-specific implementation into the static library. Modified code was assembled into dynamic library and wrapped into C# class implemented the OpenMI ILinkableComponent interface. Development of WRF OpenMI-compliant component based on the idea of the wrapping web-service clients into a linkable component and seamlessly access to output netCDF files without actual models connection. The weather state variables (precipitation, wind, solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity) are processed by automatic input selection algorithm to single out the most relevant values used by SWAT model to yield climatic data at the subbasin scale. Spatial interpolation between the WRF regular grid and SWAT subbasins centroid (which are

  19. A novel expression platform for the production of diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase (hGAD65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Denis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65 is a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, having much potential as an important marker for the prediction and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, and for the development of novel antigen-specific therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, recombinant production of hGAD65 using conventional bacterial or mammalian cell culture-based expression systems or nuclear transformed plants is limited by low yield and low efficiency. Chloroplast transformation of the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may offer a potential solution. Results A DNA cassette encoding full-length hGAD65, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast rbcL promoter and 5'- and 3'-UTRs, was constructed and introduced into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by particle bombardment. Integration of hGAD65 DNA into the algal chloroplast genome was confirmed by PCR. Transcriptional expression of hGAD65 was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Immunoblotting verified the expression and accumulation of the recombinant protein. The antigenicity of algal-derived hGAD65 was demonstrated with its immunoreactivity to diabetic sera by ELISA and by its ability to induce proliferation of spleen cells from NOD mice. Recombinant hGAD65 accumulated in transgenic algae, accounts for approximately 0.25–0.3% of its total soluble protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the potential value of C. reinhardtii chloroplasts as a novel platform for rapid mass production of immunologically active hGAD65. This demonstration opens the future possibility for using algal chloroplasts as novel bioreactors for the production of many other biologically active mammalian therapeutic proteins.

  20. Application of indirect immunofluorescent test with an improved HEp-2 substrate tranfected with human Ro60/SSA autoantigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Liangjing; Chen Shunle; Gu Yueying; Shen Nan; Bao Chunde; Wang Yuan; Xue Feng; Ye Peng; Yu Chongzhao

    2006-01-01

    To develop an improved substrate for indirect immunofluorescent test (IIF) to detect anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies, the human 60-kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens (Ro60) cDNAs were obtained from placental cDNA library using PCR and were cloned into the mammalian expression vectorpEGFP-C1. Then the recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEp-2 cells. We con- firmed the overexpression, localization and antigenicity of fusion proteins in transfected cells by means of fluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and IIF. HEp-2 and HEp-Ro60 was analyzed by IIF using a panel of 10 precipitinpositive anti-Ro human sera simultaneously. Stable expression of Ro60-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion proteins maintained ten more generations. And Ro60-GFP kept the antigenicity of Ro and had its own characteristic immunofluorescent pattern in HEp-Ro60 cells. The transfectants dramatically increased the sensitivity of IIF testing (a mean increase of 6.7-fold in endpoint titer, P<0.01). Eight (8/10) positive an- ti-Ro sera showed characteristic immunofluorescent pattern on HEp-Ro60, including two sera which were antinuclear antibodies (ANA) negative on untransfected HEp-2. IIF-ANA in all healthy sera were negative on HEp-Ro60. As a kind of new substrate of IIF, the Ro60 transfectants can be used to detect anti-Ro antibodies. In addition, transfected HEp-2 cells kept the immunofluorescent property of HEp-2 cells in IIF-ANA tests and could be employed as substrate for the routine IIF-ANA detection. The method improved the sensitivity of IIF-ANA. (authors)

  1. Clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas, and autoantigen transcripts in their tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Anette S. B.; Kärner, Jaanika; Owe, Jone F.; Oftedal, Bergithe E.V.; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Erichsen, Martina M.; Kämpe, Olle; Meager, Anthony; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Willcox, Nick; Husebye, Eystein S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS-I), caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, and myasthenia gravis (MG) with thymoma, show intriguing but unexplained parallels. They include uncommon manifestations like autoimmune adrenal insufficiency (AI), hypoparathyroidism (HP), and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) plus autoantibodies neutralizing IL-17, IL-22 and type I interferons. Thymopoiesis in the absence of AIRE is implicated in both syndromes. To test whether these parallels extend further, we screened 247 patients with MG and/or thymoma for clinical features and organ-specific autoantibodies characteristic of APS-I patients, and assayed 26 thymoma samples for transcripts for AIRE and 16 peripheral tissue-specific autoantigens (TSAgs) by quantitative PCR. We found APS-I-typical autoantibodies and clinical manifestations, including CMC, AI and asplenia, respectively in 49/121 (40%) and 10/121 (8%) thymoma patients, but clinical features seldom co-occurred with the corresponding autoantibodies. Both were rare in other MG subgroups (N=126). In 38 APS-I patients, by contrast, we observed neither autoantibodies against muscle antigens nor any neuromuscular disorders. Whereas relative transcript levels for AIRE and 7 of 16 TSAgs showed the expected under-expression in thymomas, levels were increased for 4 of the 5 TSAgs most frequently targeted by these patients’ autoAbs. Hence the clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas are not explained purely by deficient TSAg transcription in these aberrant AIRE-deficient tumors. We therefore propose additional explanations for the unusual autoimmune biases they provoke. Thymoma patients should be monitored for potentially life-threatening APS-I manifestations such as AI and HP. PMID:25230752

  2. Clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas and autoantigen transcripts in their tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Anette S B; Kärner, Jaanika; Owe, Jone F; Oftedal, Bergithe E V; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Erichsen, Martina M; Kämpe, Olle; Meager, Anthony; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Willcox, Nick; Husebye, Eystein S

    2014-10-15

    Patients with the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS-I), caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, and myasthenia gravis (MG) with thymoma, show intriguing but unexplained parallels. They include uncommon manifestations like autoimmune adrenal insufficiency (AI), hypoparathyroidism, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis plus autoantibodies neutralizing IL-17, IL-22, and type I IFNs. Thymopoiesis in the absence of AIRE is implicated in both syndromes. To test whether these parallels extend further, we screened 247 patients with MG, thymoma, or both for clinical features and organ-specific autoantibodies characteristic of APS-I patients, and we assayed 26 thymoma samples for transcripts for AIRE and 16 peripheral tissue-specific autoantigens (TSAgs) by quantitative PCR. We found APS-I-typical autoantibodies and clinical manifestations, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, AI, and asplenia, respectively, in 49 of 121 (40%) and 10 of 121 (8%) thymoma patients, but clinical features seldom occurred together with the corresponding autoantibodies. Both were rare in other MG subgroups (n = 126). In 38 patients with APS-I, by contrast, we observed neither autoantibodies against muscle Ags nor any neuromuscular disorders. Whereas relative transcript levels for AIRE and 7 of 16 TSAgs showed the expected underexpression in thymomas, levels were increased for four of the five TSAgs most frequently targeted by these patients' autoantibodies. Therefore, the clinical and serologic parallels to APS-I in patients with thymomas are not explained purely by deficient TSAg transcription in these aberrant AIRE-deficient tumors. We therefore propose additional explanations for the unusual autoimmune biases they provoke. Thymoma patients should be monitored for potentially life-threatening APS-I manifestations such as AI and hypoparathyroidism. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

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    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Insulin release from pancreatic islet β cells should be tightly controlled to avoid hypoglycemia and insulin resistance. The cortical actin cytoskeleton is a gate for regulated exocytosis of insulin secretory granules (SGs by restricting their mobility and access to the plasma membrane. Prior studies suggest that SGs interact with F-actin through their transmembrane cargo islet cell autoantigen 512 (Ica512 (also known as islet antigen 2/Ptprn. Here we investigated how Ica512 modulates SG trafficking and exocytosis. Methods: Transcriptomic changes in Ica512−/− mouse islets were analyzed. Imaging as well as biophysical and biochemical methods were used to validate if and how the Ica512-regulated gene villin modulates insulin secretion in mouse islets and insulinoma cells. Results: The F-actin modifier villin was consistently downregulated in Ica512−/− mouse islets and in Ica512-depleted insulinoma cells. Villin was enriched at the cell cortex of β cells and dispersed villin−/− islet cells were less round and less deformable. Basal mobility of SGs in villin-depleted cells was enhanced. Moreover, in cells depleted either of villin or Ica512 F-actin cages restraining cortical SGs were enlarged, basal secretion was increased while glucose-stimulated insulin release was blunted. The latter changes were reverted by overexpressing villin in Ica512-depleted cells, but not vice versa. Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion. Keywords: F-actin, Granules, Ica512, Insulin, Secretion, Villin

  4. Fatores de risco associados à calcinose na dermatomiosite juvenil Risk factors associated with calcinosis of juvenile dermatomyositis

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    Adriana M. E. Sallum

    2008-02-01

    calcinosis in children and adolescents with juvenile dermatomyositis. METHODS: A review was carried out of the medical records of 54 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis. Data were collected on demographic characteristics, clinical features: muscle strength (stages I to V of the Medical Research Council scale, pulmonary involvement (restrictive pulmonary disease with presence or absence of anti-Jo1 antibodies, gastrointestinal problems (gastroesophageal reflux and/or heart disease (pericarditis and/or myocarditis; laboratory tests: elevated muscle enzyme levels in serum (creatine phosphokinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and/or lactate dehydrogenase; and on the treatments given: corticoid therapy in isolation or associated with hydroxychloroquine and/or immunosuppressants. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on presence or absence of calcinosis and data were evaluated by both univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Calcinosis was identified in 23 (43% patients, and in six (26% patients it had emerged prior to diagnosis while in 17 (74% it was post diagnosis. The univariate analysis revealed that cardiac (p = 0.01 and pulmonary (p = 0.02 involvement and the need for one or more immunosuppressor (methotrexate, cyclosporine A and/or pulse therapy with intravenous cyclophosphamide to treat juvenile dermatomyositis (p = 0.03 were all associated with an increased incidence of calcinosis. The multivariate analysis then demonstrated that only cardiac involvement (OR = 15.56; 95%CI 1.59-152.2 and the use of one or more immunosuppressor (OR = 4.01; 95%CI 1.08-14.87 were independently associated with the presence of calcinosis. CONCLUSIONS: Calcinosis was a frequent development among these juvenile dermatomyositis cases, generally emerging as the disease progressed. Calcinosis was associated with the more severe cases that also had cardiac involvement and where immunosuppressors had to be included in the treatment.

  5. Wong-Type Dermatomyositis Showing Porokeratosis-Like Changes (Columnar Dyskeratosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Nicole Umanoff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wong-type dermatomyositis (DM exhibits simultaneous pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP features. Case Report: A 50-year-old woman presented with a heliotrope rash, Gottron's papules, and a poikilodermic, erythematous rash in shawl distribution without evidence of muscle weakness. Despite topical corticosteroids, the eruption progressed 9 months later to include generalized hyperkeratotic follicular papules, islands of sparing, and atrophic macules with a collarette of scale suggestive of porokeratosis. Mild dysphonia was the only sign of muscle weakness. Serology showed positive ANA. Histopathology revealed interface dermatitis with dermal mucin and melanophages, irregular psoriasiform hyperplasia, alternating mounds of para- and orthokeratosis, and tiers of dyskeratotic cells (columnar dyskeratosis. Systemic corticosteroid therapy was not tolerated; acitretin diminished the hyperkeratosis. While hyperpigmentation persisted, no progression of cutaneous or muscular symptoms has occurred after 22 months of follow-up and cessation of the therapy. Overall, her course did not differ from the natural history documented in the literature review of Wong-type DM. The most similar case also exhibited pseudocornoid lamella changes. Conclusion: Wong-type DM is a clinicopathologic DM-PRP hybrid that can also exhibit porokeratosis-like features best described as columnar dyskeratosis. Recognizing these types of lesions in DM is warranted in order to make an accurate assessment of their prognostic significance.

  6. Efficacy and safety of creatine supplementation in juvenile dermatomyositis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Marina Yazigi; Hayashi, Ana Paula; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Roschel, Hamilton; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Otaduy, Maria Concepción; De Sã Pinto, Ana Lucia; Silva, Clovis Artur; Sallum, Adriana Maluf Elias; Pereira, Rosa Maria R; Gualano, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that creatine supplementation is safe and effective for treating idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, but no pediatric study has been conducted to date. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of creatine supplementation in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) patients. In this study, JDM patients received placebo or creatine supplementation (0.1 g/kg/day) in a randomized, crossover, double-blind design. Subjects were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. The primary outcome was muscle function. Secondary outcomes included body composition, aerobic conditioning, health-related quality of life, and muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) content. Safety was assessed by laboratory parameters and kidney function measurements. Creatine supplementation did not affect muscle function, intramuscular PCr content, or any other secondary outcome. Kidney function was not affected, and no side effects were reported. Twelve weeks of creatine supplementation in JDM patients were well-tolerated and free of adverse effects, but treatment did not affect muscle function, intramuscular PCr, or any other parameter. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. High-resolution CT findings of interstitial pneumonia in patients with dermatomyositis. Comparison between classic and amyopathic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Wataru

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of interstitial pneumonia associated with dermatomyositis (DM) based on disease form, classic (CDM) vs. amyopathic (ADM) form, and clinical presentation, acute or subacute vs. chronic presentation. HRCT findings of 18 patients (CDM 9, ADM 9) were reviewed retrospectively. HRCT was interpreted by two experienced, board-certified radiologists. Difference in the interpretation was settled by consensus. Frequency of the HRCT findings compared between CDM and ADM, and between acute or subacute and chronic presentation. The most frequent finding was bronchovascular bundle irregularity (77%), followed by ground-glass attenuation (72%), subpleural curvilinear shadow (72%) and parenchymal band (72%). Honeycombing was not noted in any case. Linear opacities were significantly more frequent, and bronchiectasis was significantly less frequent in ADM than in CDM (p<0.05). Bronchiectasis was more common in chronic than in acute/subacute presentation, but there was no statistically significant difference. HRCT findings of interstitial pneumonia associated with DM varied between CDM and ADM. Honeycombing was not noted in any case. Linear opacities were significantly more frequent, and bronchiectasis was significantly less frequent in ADM than in CDM. The findings on HRCT were not different between acute or subacute and chronic presentation. (author)

  8. Structural Basis for Recognition and Sequestration of UUUOH 3 ' Temini of Nascent RNA Polymerase III Transcripts by La, a Rheumatic Disease Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova,M.; Yuan, Y.; Phan, A.; Malinina, L.; Ilin, S.; Teplov, A.; Patel, D.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein La was identified as an autoantigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren's syndrome. La binds to and protects the UUUOH 3' terminii of nascent RNA polymerase III transcripts from exonuclease digestion. We report the 1.85 Angstroms crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human La, consisting of La and RRM1 motifs, bound to r(U1-G2-C3-U4-G5-U6-U7-U8-U9OH). The U7-U8-U9OH 3' end, in a splayed-apart orientation, is sequestered within a basic and aromatic amino acid-lined cleft between the La and RRM1 motifs. The specificity-determining U8 residue bridges both motifs, in part through unprecedented targeting of the {beta} sheet edge, rather than the anticipated face, of the RRM1 motif. Our structural observations, supported by mutation studies of both La and RNA components, illustrate the principles behind RNA sequestration by a rheumatic disease autoantigen, whereby the UUUOH 3' ends of nascent RNA transcripts are protected during downstream processing and maturation events.

  9. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes secrete higher levels of pro- & anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to those with type-1 diabetes mellitus following in vitro stimulation with β-cell autoantigens

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    Darshan Badal

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: There are differences in the portfolio of cytokine secretion in diabetic subjects with varying rates of β-cell destruction as LADA subjects secrete higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on exposure to β-cell autoantigens, thus highlighting another distinguishing feature in the pathophysiology of the two forms of autoimmune diabetes.

  10. Medical resource utilization in dermatomyositis/polymyositis patients treated with repository corticotropin injection, intravenous immunoglobulin, and/or rituximab

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    Knight T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tyler Knight,1 T Christopher Bond,1 Breanna Popelar,2 Li Wang,3 John W Niewoehner,4 Kathryn Anastassopoulos,1 Michael Philbin4 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Xcenda, LLC, Palm Harbor, FL, 3STATinMED Research, Ann Arbor, MI, 4Mallinckrodt, LLC, Hazelwood, MO, USA Background: Dermatomyositis and polymyositis (DM/PM are rare, incurable inflammatory diseases that cause progressive muscle weakness and can be associated with increased medical resource use (MRU. When corticosteroid treatment is unsuccessful, patients may receive intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, rituximab, or repository corticotropin injection (RCI. This study compared real-world, non-medication MRU between patients treated with RCI and those treated with IVIg and/or rituximab for DM/PM.Methods: Claims of DM/PM patients were analyzed from the combination of three commercial health insurance databases in the United States from July 2009 to June 2014. Patients treated with RCI were propensity score matched to those treated with IVIg, rituximab, and both (IVIg+rituximab based on demographics, prior clinical characteristics, and prior MRU. Per-patient per-month (PPPM MRU and costs were compared using Poisson regression and generalized linear modeling, respectively.Results: One-hundred thirty-two RCI, 1,150 IVIg, and 562 rituximab patients had an average age of 52.6, 46.6, and 51.7 years, respectively, and roughly two-thirds were female. After matching, there were no significant differences in demographics or prior clinical characteristics. RCI patients had fewer PPPM hospitalizations (0.09 vs 0.17; P=0.049, shorter length of stay (LOS; 3.24 days vs 4.55 days; P=0.004, PPPM hospital outpatient department (HOPD visits (0.60 vs 1.39; P<0.001, and PPPM physician office visits (2.01 vs 2.33; P=0.035 than IVIg. RCI had fewer PPPM HOPD visits (0.56 vs 0.92; P<0.001 than rituximab. Patients treated with RCI had shorter LOS (2.18 days vs 5.15; P<0.001 and less PPPM HOPD

  11. Formation of stable and metastable phases in reciprocal systems PbSe + MI2 = MSe + PbI2 (M = Hg, Mn, Sn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odin, I.N.; Grin'ko, V.V.; Kozlovskij, V.F.; Safronov, E.V.; Gapanovich, M.V.

    2004-01-01

    Using data of differential thermal, X-ray phase and microstructural analyses, phase diagrams of reciprocal systems PbSe + MI 2 = MSe + PbI 2 (M=Hg (1), Mn (2), Sn (3)) were constructed. It was ascertained that the HgSe-PbI 2 diagonal in system 1 is stable. Transformations leading to crystallization of metastable ternary compound formed in the system PbSe-PbI 2 and metastable polytypes of lead iodide in systems 1 and 2 in the range of temperatures from 620 to 685 K were studied. New intermediate metastable phases in systems 1, 2 and 3 were prepared by melt quenching. Crystal lattice parameters of the phases crystallizing in the CdCl 2 structural type were defined [ru

  12. Assessment of Microvascular Abnormalities by Nailfold Capillaroscopy in Juvenile Dermatomyositis After Medium- to Long-Term Followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Zoltan; Witczak, Birgit N; Flatø, Berit; Koller, Akos; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sanner, Helga

    2018-05-01

    In juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), microvascular abnormalities, measured by nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC), are common early in the disease course. We aimed to compare the presence of NFC abnormalities in patients with medium- to long-term juvenile DM with that of controls, and to explore associations between NFC abnormalities and disease activity and other disease characteristics. Fifty-eight juvenile DM patients with a median disease duration of 16.8 (range 2-38) years were clinically examined and compared with matched controls. By NFC, we assessed nailfold capillary density (NCD), giant capillaries, scleroderma, and neovascular pattern (defined as scleroderma active or late pattern). NFC was analyzed with researchers blinded to patient/control identity and disease characteristics. We measured disease activity and damage by validated tools, and patients were categorized as having active or inactive disease according to the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation criteria. Compared to controls, patients had decreased NCD (mean ± SD 6.4 ± 2.1/mm versus 7.6 ± 0.8/mm; P = 0.001) and showed more abnormality in all other NFC parameters; 36% of patients versus 4% of controls had NCD <6/mm (P < 0.001). Giant capillaries, scleroderma, and neovascular pattern were found in 9%, 84%, and 41% of patients, respectively. Patients with active disease (n = 30) presented more frequently with neovascular pattern than patients with inactive disease (n = 28) (P = 0.041). Decreased NCD and neovascular pattern were associated with higher levels of disease activity and impaired muscle function. After medium- to long-term followup, juvenile DM patients had decreased NCD and, often, neovascular pattern; both were associated with higher levels of disease activity and impaired muscle function. This suggests that NFC can be a biomarker for disease activity in longstanding juvenile DM too. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Analysis of sexual function of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis through self-administered questionnaires: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Henrique Carlos de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: To date, there are no descriptions in the literature on gynecologic and sexual function evaluation in female patients with dermatomyositis (DM and polymyositis (PM. Objective: To assess sexual function in female patients with DM/PM. Patients and methods: This is a monocentric, cross-sectional study in which 23 patients (16 DM and 7 PM, with ages between 18 and 40 years, were compared to 23 healthy women of the same age group. Characteristics on sexual function were obtained by applying the questionnaires Female Sexual Quotient (FSQ and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI validated for the Brazilian Portuguese language. Results: The mean age of patients was comparable to controls (32.7 ± 5.3 vs. 31.7 ± 6.7 years, as well as the distribution of ethnicity and socioeconomic class. As for gynecological characteristics, patients and healthy controls did not differ with respect to age at menarche and percentages of dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, premenstrual syndrome, pain at mid-cycle, mucocervical secretion, and vaginal discharge. The FSQ score, as well as all domains of the FSFI questionnaire (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm and satisfaction, were significantly decreased in patients vs. controls, with 60.9% of patients showing some degree of sexual dysfunction. Conclusions: This was the first study to identify sexual dysfunction in patients with DM/PM. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is essential for patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, in order to provide prevention and care for their sexual life, providing a better quality of life, both for patients and their partners.

  14. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J; Giannini, Edward H; Gare, Boel Andersson; Martini, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patient's rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the "gold standard measure," chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa values >0.8 were multiplied by the face validity score to select the top definitions. The top definition of improvement was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second-highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength (definition P1 selected by the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies group). The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. We propose a provisional data-driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in juvenile DM. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Regulatory function of a novel population of mouse autoantigen-specific Foxp3 regulatory T cells depends on IFN-gamma, NO, and contact with target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyndi Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both naturally arising Foxp3(+ and antigen-induced Foxp3(- regulatory T cells (Treg play a critical role in regulating immune responses, as well as in preventing autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. It is known that antigen-specific Treg are more potent than polyclonal Treg in suppressing pathogenic immune responses that cause autoimmunity and inflammation. However, difficulty in identifying and isolating a sufficient number of antigen-specific Treg has limited their use in research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their regulatory function and their potential role in therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a novel class II MHC tetramer, we have isolated a population of CD4(+ Foxp3(- T cells specific for the autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase p286-300 peptide (NR286 T cells from diabetes-resistant non-obese resistant (NOR mice. These Foxp3(- NR286 T cells functioned as Treg that were able to suppress target T cell proliferation in vitro and inhibit type 1 diabetes in animals. Unexpected results from mechanistic studies in vitro showed that their regulatory function was dependent on not only IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, but also on cell contact with target cells. In addition, separating NR286 Treg from target T cells in transwell assays abolished both production of NO and suppression of target T cells, regardless of whether IFN-gamma was produced in cell cultures. Therefore, production of NO, not IFN-gamma, was cell contact dependent, suggesting that NO may function downstream of IFN-gamma in mediating regulatory function of NR286 Treg. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies identified a unique population of autoantigen-specific Foxp3(- Treg that can exert their regulatory function dependent on not only IFN-gamma and NO but also cell contact with target cells.

  16. Dermatomiositis: a propósito de 3 casos interesantes Dermatomyositis: with regard to 3 interesting cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zianna Almanza Liranza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los casos de 3 pacientes atendidos en el Hospital Pediátrico «Juan Manuel Márquez», 2 de las cuales presentaron como primeras manifestaciones debilidad en los miembros inferiores y artritis que dificultaba la marcha de forma progresiva. El tercer paciente presentaba lesiones escamosas en la piel, hipopigmentadas en la cara y los miembros, acompañadas de astenia y artritis de las rodillas. Se realizaron estudios para concluir el diagnóstico, incluida la biopsia de músculo. Se aplicaron los criterios para confirmar el diagnóstico de dermatomiositis y se excluyeron otras enfermedades según el cuadro clínico y los exámenes complementarios realizados. A los 2 primeros pacientes se les indicó tratamiento inmunomodulador con prednisona y metotrexato, y al tercer paciente se le indicó prednisona y azathioprina. Se observó una buena respuesta al tratamiento y control de la enfermedad. El primer paciente falleció a los 4 meses de tratamiento a causa de complicaciones (vasculitis intestinal y sepsis asociada al tratamiento quirúrgico. Los restantes pacientes se siguen actualmente por consulta.Authors present three patients seen in the "Juan Manuel Márquez" Children Hospital where two of them had as first manifestations weakness in lower extremities and arthritis provoking a progressive difficulty to walk. The third patient had skin squamous lesions with hypopigmentation in the case and limbs as well as asthenia and knee arthritis. To made the diagnosis studies were conducted including thigh biopsy Criteria were applied to confirm diagnosis of dermatomyositis with exclusion of other diseases according to clinical picture and complementary examinations performed. In the two first patients a imunomodulation treatment was prescribed including Prednisone and Methotrexate, and the other patient received Prednisone and Azathioprine. There was a good response to treatment and a disease control. The first patient dye at 4 months of

  17. Analysis of Published Criteria for Clinically Inactive Disease in a Large Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort Shows That Skin Disease Is Underestimated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Beverley; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Arnold, Katie; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Armon, Kate; Briggs, Vanja; Ellis‐Gage, Joe; Roper, Holly; Watts, Joanna; Baildam, Eileen; Hanna, Louise; Lloyd, Olivia; McCann, Liza; Roberts, Ian; McGovern, Ann; Riley, Phil; Al‐Abadi, Eslam; Ryder, Clive; Scott, Janis; Southwood, Taunton; Thomas, Beverley; Amin, Tania; Burton, Deborah; Jackson, Gillian; Van Rooyen, Vanessa; Wood, Mark; Wyatt, Sue; Browne, Michael; Davidson, Joyce; Ferguson, Sue; Gardner‐Medwin, Janet; Martin, Neil; Waxman, Liz; Foster, Helen; Friswell, Mark; Jandial, Sharmila; Qiao, Lisa; Sen, Ethan; Smith, Eve; Stevenson, Vicky; Swift, Alison; Wade, Debbie; Watson, Stuart; Crate, Lindsay; Frost, Anna; Jordan, Mary; Mosley, Ellen; Satyapal, Rangaraj; Stretton, Elizabeth; Venning, Helen; Warrier, Kishore; Almeida, Beverley; Arnold, Katie; Beard, Laura; Brown, Virginia; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Enayat, Elli; Glackin, Yvonne; Halkon, Elizabeth; Hasson, Nathan; Juggins, Audrey; Kassoumeri, Laura; Lunt, Sian; Maillard, Sue; Nistala, Kiran; Pilkington, Clarissa; Simou, Stephanie; Smith, Sally; Varsani, Hemlata; Wedderburn, Lucy; Murray, Kevin; Ioannou, John; Suffield, Linda; Al‐Obaidi, Muthana; Leach, Sam; Lee, Helen; Smith, Helen; Inness, Emma; Kendall, Eunice; Mayers, David; Wilkinson, Nick; Clinch, Jacqui; Pluess‐Hall, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) recently published criteria for classification of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) as having clinically inactive disease. The criteria require that at least 3 of 4 conditions be met, i.e., creatine kinase level ≤150 units/liter, Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score ≥48, Manual Muscle Testing in 8 muscles score ≥78, and physician's global assessment of overall disease activity (PGA) ≤0.2. The present study was undertaken to test these criteria in a UK cohort of patients with juvenile DM. Methods We assessed 1,114 patient visits for the 4 items in the PRINTO criteria for clinically inactive disease. Each visit was analyzed to determine whether skin disease was present. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) for juvenile DM was determined in 59 patients. Results At 307 of the 1,114 visits, clinically inactive disease was achieved based on the 3 muscle criteria (but with a PGA of >0.2); rash was present at 65.8% of these visits and nailfold capillary abnormalities at 35.2%. When PGA ≤0.2 was one of the 3 criteria that were met, the frequency of skin signs was significantly lower (rash in 23.1% and nailfold capillary abnormalities in 8.7%). If PGA was considered an essential criterion for clinically inactive disease (P‐CID), patients with active skin disease were less likely to be categorized as having clinically inactive disease (a median DAS skin score of 0 [of a possible maximum of 9] in visits where the PGA was ≤0.2, versus a median DAS skin score of 4 in patients meeting the 3 muscle criteria [with a PGA of >0.2]; P < 0.001). Use of the P‐CID led to improvements in the positive predictive value and the positive likelihood ratio (85.4% and 11.0, respectively, compared to 72.9% and 5.1 with the current criteria). Conclusion There was a high frequency of skin disease among patients with juvenile DM who did not meet the PGA criterion for inactive disease but met

  18. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... acid decarboxylase. We have identified two autoantigenic forms of this protein in rat pancreatic beta-cells, a Mr 65,000 (GAD65) hydrophilic and soluble form of pI 6.9-7.1 and a Mr 64,000 (GAD64) component of pI 6.7. GAD64 is more abundant than GAD65 and has three distinct forms with regard to cellular...

  19. A Case of New-Onset Dermatomyositis in the Second Trimester of Pregnancy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Tayfun Akalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM, a subtype of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs, is characterized by skin rash, proximal muscle weakness, and inflammatory infiltrates in the muscle tissue. The peak incidence of the disease is at the age of 50–60 years, and only 14% of the patients with IIMs are estimated to present during reproductive years. Because of the limited pregnancy experience in patients with IIMs, little is known regarding the effects of DM on pregnancy or vice versa. We herein report a 40-year-old woman who developed DM in the second trimester of her pregnancy and did not respond to treatment with methylprednisolone. Her pregnancy was terminated at the 32nd week of gestation, due to preeclampsia and fetal distress. She delivered a healthy baby and improved rapidly after delivery. We have searched PubMed for relevant articles and reviewed previously published cases.

  20. Dermatomiosite e polimiosite: da imunopatologia à imunoterapia (imunobiológicos Dermatomyositis and polymyositis: from immunopathology to immunotherapy (immunobiologics

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    Samuel Katsuyuki Shinjo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As miopatias inflamatórias idiopáticas (MII, das quais fazem parte a dermatomiosite (DM e a polimiosite (PM, são doenças sistêmicas crônicas associadas a alta morbidade e incapacidade funcional. O tratamento atual baseia-se na corticoterapia e no uso de imunossupressores, porém uma parcela considerável dos pacientes é refratária à terapia tradicional. Isso tem levado à tentativa de uso de imunobiológicos nesses pacientes, tendo por fundamento a fisiopatogênese das MII. Do ponto de vista imunopatológico, há diferenças entre PM e DM: a primeira está mais relacionada à imunidade celular, enquanto na segunda o papel humoral parece mais importante. Em ambas, porém, são descritas concentrações elevadas de interleucinas pró-inflamatórias (TNF, IL-1, IL-6 e aumento da expressão de moléculas relacionadas à coestimulação dos linfócitos T - nessas condições, parece racional o uso da terapia biológica. Considerando os imunobiológicos disponíveis, são escassos os dados de trabalhos abertos na literatura, compostos principalmente por séries e relatos de casos. Os bloqueadores do TNF apresentam resultados conflitantes sem evidência de boa resposta ao tratamento. A terapia anti-CD20 possui os resultados mais promissores. É extremamente escassa a informação sobre o bloqueio da coestimulação do linfócito T e a terapia anti- IL-6, que impede qualquer consideração. Dessa maneira, o uso de imunobiológicos em MII ainda permanece como fronteira a ser explorada. A terapia biológica pode ter papel relevante no tratamento das MII refratárias à terapia convencional; no entanto, novos estudos prospectivos com base em parâmetros objetivos de resposta ao tratamento são necessários. Até o momento, a terapia anti-CD20 parece ser a mais promissora no tratamento das MII refratárias.Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM, which include dermatomyositis (DM and polymyositis (PM, are chronic systemic diseases associated with

  1. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  2. The orthologue of Sjögren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

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    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  3. Persistent association of nailfold capillaroscopy changes and skin involvement over thirty-six months with duration of untreated disease in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis.

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    Christen-Zaech, Stéphanie; Seshadri, Roopa; Sundberg, Joyce; Paller, Amy S; Pachman, Lauren M

    2008-02-01

    To determine the association of changes on nailfold capillaroscopy with clinical findings and genotype in children with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), in order to identify potential differences in disease course over 36 months. At diagnosis of juvenile DM in 61 children prior to the initiation of treatment, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) -308 allele and DQA1*0501 status was determined, juvenile DM Disease Activity Scores (DAS) were obtained, and nailfold capillaroscopy was performed. The disease course was monitored for 36 months. Variations within and between patients were assessed by regression analysis. At diagnosis, shorter duration of untreated disease (P = 0.05) and a lower juvenile DM skin DAS (P = 0.035) were associated with a unicyclic disease course. Over 36 months, end-row loop (ERL) regeneration was associated with lower skin DAS (P nailfold capillaroscopy changes. The correlation of nailfold capillaroscopy results with cutaneous but not with musculoskeletal signs of juvenile DM over a 36-month period suggests that the cutaneous and muscle vasculopathies have different pathophysiologic mechanisms. These findings indicate that efforts to identify the optimal treatment of cutaneous features in juvenile DM require greater attention.

  4. Osteoporosis grave con aplastamientos vertebrales en dermatomiositis juvenil: Efecto del tratamiento con alendronato oral Severe osteoporosis with vertebral crushes in juvenile dermatomyositis: Effect of oral alendronate therapy

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    Cristina Tau

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Los glucocorticoides son usados comúnmente para el tratamiento de enfermedades inflamatorias, autoinmunes, enfermedades malignas, y en la prevención de rechazo de órganos trasplantados. Un efecto secundario frecuente del tratamiento prolongado es la pérdida de masa ósea que se produce por varios mecanismos y es causa de osteoporosis y fracturas vertebrales. El tratamiento con disfosfonatos ha sido propuesto para esta situación. Presentamos un caso clínico de osteoporosis grave en una niña con dermatomiositis juvenil, que respondió favorablemente al tratamiento con disfosfonatos orales.Glucocorticoids are used for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, cancer, and in prevention of organ rejects. A frequent secondary effect of longterm treatment with corticoids is the loss of bone mass, caused by several mechanisms: decrease in the intestinal calcium absorption, increase of the renal calcium excretion at the distal renal tubule, suppressive effect on the osteoblast and also in apoptosis of osteoclasts, inhibition in local production of IGF I (Insulin-like growth factor and IGFBPs (binding IGF I proteins necessary for bone metabolism, and decrease on osteocalcin production. Longterm treatment with corticoids is associated with osteoporosis and vertebral fractures. To improve this condition, treatment with bisphosphonates has been proposed. We present here a clinical case of a girl with dermatomyositis and severe osteoporosis with vertebral crushes, who responded well to oral bisphophonate treatment.

  5. Pneumomediastino espontâneo associado a lesões laríngeas e úlceras traqueais na dermatomiosite Spontaneous pneumomediastinum associated with laryngeal lesions and tracheal ulcer in dermatomyositis

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    Ascedio Jose Rodrigues

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo descreve uma paciente de 41 anos de idade com dermatomiosite, doença pulmonar intersticial e vasculopatia cutânea que desenvolveu pneumomediastino. Durante exame de broncoscopia foram encontradas lesões pálidas na laringe, que se estendiam para a árvore traqueobrônquica, e úlceras profundas na parede membranácea da traqueia. O exame histopatológico revelou presença de processo inflamatório secundário à vasculite, mas sem sinais de infecção. Lesões nas vias aéreas superiores e inferiores em paciente com dermatomiosite são raríssimas. A associação de dermatomiosite com úlceras profundas de mucosa e pneumomediastino não está bem esclarecida, mas a broncoscopia é um exame que deve ser utilizado para aperfeiçoar a avaliação.We described a 41-year-old woman with dermatomyositis, interstitial lung disease, and cutaneous vasculopathy who developed a pneumomediastinum. The routine bronchoscopy investigation found pale lesions in the larynx, that extended to the tracheobronchial tree, and deep ulcers in the membranous wall of the trachea. The histopathology examination revealed an inflammatory process that was diagnosed secondary to the vasculitis, but no infections. Superior and inferior airway lesions in the same patient with dermatomyositis is a very rare condition. The association of dermatomyositis with deep mucosal ulcers and pneumomediastinum is not clear, but a bronchoscopic examination should be used to improve evaluation.

  6. Functional and morphological evaluation of hand microcirculation with nailfold capillaroscopy and laser Doppler imaging in Raynaud's and Sjögren's syndrome and poly/dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, N; Csiki, Z; Szanto, A; Danko, K; Szodoray, P; Zeher, M

    2008-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy is widely used in autoimmune patients to determine capillary morphology. Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) is a relatively new method for measuring the microcirculation of cutaneous perfusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the capillary morphology and microcirculation among patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and poly/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) with these two non-invasive methods and to detect secondary Raynaud's syndrome (SRS) in these autoimmune diseases. Thirty patients with primary SS, 30 patients with PM/DM, 30 patients with primary Raynaud's syndrome (PRS), and 30 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Nailfold capillaroscopy and LDI were performed on each patient. A comprehensive analysis was performed among the patients and healthy individuals. Among SS patients avascularity and among PM/DM patients avascularity and capillary morphology changes were most often detected by capillaroscopy. With LDI the mean steady-state cutaneous perfusion was 1.25 perfusion units (PU) in region of interest 1 (ROI1), 1.22 in ROI2, and 1.49 at the fingertips in PRS patients; the corresponding values were 1.2, 1.03, and 1.48 PU in SS, 0.91, 0.76, and 1.19 PU in PM/DM, and 1.79, 1.62, and 2.2 PU in the controls. The differences were significant between each autoimmune group compared to the control group (pnailfold capillaroscopy, abnormalities in capillary morphology can be detected, and by using LDI, the reduced blood flow in the capillaries can be detected. These investigations can be useful in the detection of SRS, or in distinguishing whether the reduced blood flow is due to primary/systemic autoimmune diseases.

  7. Study of microRNAs (miRNAs) that are predicted to target the autoantigens Ro/SSA and La/SSB in primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourzi, V C; Kapsogeorgou, E K; Kyriakidis, N C; Tzioufas, A G

    2015-01-01

    The elevated tissue expression of Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens appears to be crucial for the generation and perpetuation of autoimmune humoral responses against these autoantigens in Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). The mechanisms that govern their expression are not known. miRNAs, the post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, might be implicated. We have identified previously the miRNAs let7b, miR16, miR181a, miR200b-3p, miR200b-5p, miR223 and miR483-5p that are predicted to target Ro/SSA [Ro52/tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21), Ro60/TROVE domain family, member 2 (TROVE2)] and La/SSB mRNAs. To study possible associations with autoantigen mRNA expression and disease features, their expression was investigated in minor salivary gland (MSG) tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and long-term cultured non-neoplastic salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC) from 29 SS patients (20 of 29 positive for autoantibodies to Ro/SSA and La/SSB) and 24 sicca-complaining controls. The levels of miR16 were up-regulated in MSGs, miR200b-3p in SGECs and miR223 and miR483-5p in PBMCs of SS patients compared to sicca-complaining controls. The MSG levels of let7b, miR16, miR181a, miR223 and miR483-5p were correlated positively with Ro52/TRIM21-mRNA. miR181a and miR200b-3p were correlated negatively with Ro52/TRIM21 and Ro60/TROVE2 mRNAs in SGECs, respectively, whereas let7b, miR200b-5p and miR223 associated with La/SSB-mRNA. In PBMCs, let7b, miR16, miR181a and miR483-5p were correlated with Ro52/TRIM21, whereas let7b, miR16 and miR181a were also associated with La/SSB-mRNA expression. Significantly lower miR200b-5p levels were expressed in SS patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma compared to those without. Our findings indicate that miR16, miR200b-3p, miR223 and miR483-5p are deregulated in SS, but the exact role of this deregulation in disease pathogenesis and autoantigen expression needs to be elucidated. PMID:26201309

  8. HLA-DRB1 Alleles as Genetic Risk Factors for the Development of Anti-MDA5 Antibodies in Patients with Dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyong; Wang, Yan; Kuwana, Masataka; Xu, Xue; Hu, Wei; Feng, Xuebing; Wang, Hong; Kimura, Akinori; Sun, Lingyun

    2017-09-01

    Patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) who express anti-melanoma differentiation associated protein 5 (anti-MDA5) antibodies frequently present with interstitial lung disease (ILD). The aim of this study was to investigate the association of HLA-DRB1 with anti-MDA5 expression in PM/DM. The frequency of DRB1 alleles was compared among 70 patients with PM, 104 patients with DM, and 400 healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. Frequencies of DRB1*04:01 [17.0% vs 1.3%, corrected p value (p c ) = 3.8 × 10 -8 , OR 16.2, 95% CI 6.6-39.7] and *12:02 (42.6% vs 19.3%, p c = 0.008, OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7-5.7) were significantly higher in anti-MDA5-positive patients with PM/DM compared with the controls. The frequencies of DRB1*04:01 (p = 5.2 × 10 -6 , OR 17.1, 95% CI 5.3-54.9) and *12:02 (p = 3.8 × 10 -4 , OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7-5.7) in anti-MDA5-positive patients with DM-ILD were higher than in the controls, whereas the frequencies of DRB1*04:01 and *12:02 did not differ between the anti-MDA5-negative patients with DM-ILD and controls. No difference in the frequency of DRB1 alleles, other than *04:01, carrying the "shared epitope" (SE), i.e., *01:01, *01:02, *04:05, and *10:01, was observed between the controls and patients with DM stratified by the presence of anti-MDA5 and ILD. DRB1*04:01 and *12:02 confer susceptibility to anti-MDA5 antibody production in DM, which cannot be explained by the SE hypothesis.

  9. Dermatomiosite recém-diagnosticada em idosos como preditiva de malignidade Newly diagnosed dermatomyositis in the elderly as predictor of malignancy

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    Fernando Henrique Carlos de Souza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os sintomas da dermatomiosite (DM podem ser um indício da existência de um câncer oculto. Melhorar a detecção precoce é essencial, porém não há estudos avaliando em curto prazo os fatores preditivos para a doença. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo, monocêntrico, incluindo pacientes com DM definida (pelo menos quatro dos cinco critérios de Bohan e Peter, 1975, no período entre 1991 e 2011. A presença de malignidade foi limitada a um período de até 12 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. RESULTADOS: Houve 12 casos de neoplasias em 139 pacientes (pele, trato gastrintestinal, próstata, tireoide, mama, pulmão e trato geniturinário. Os pacientes com neoplasia tiveram maior média de idade que os controles (56,8 ± 15,7 vs. 40,3 ± 13,1 anos, respectivamente, P = 0,004; odds ratio 1,09; intervalo de confiança de 95%: 1,04-1,14. Não foram observadas diferenças estatísticas em relação a gênero, etnia, frequência de sintomas constitucionais, envolvimento de órgãos e sistemas e/ou alterações laboratoriais. CONCLUSÃO: Na DM recém-diagnosticada, a idade tardia ao diagnóstico foi um fator preditivo de malignidade.OBJECTIVE: Dermatomyositis (DM symptoms may be a clue to the existence of a hidden cancer. Enhancing early detection is essential, but there are no studies evaluating short-term predictive factors in this disease. METHODS: This is a singlecenter retrospective study, including patients diagnosed with DM meeting at least four of the five Bohan and Peter's criteria (1975, from 1991 to 2011. This study assessed malignancies occurring in up to 12 months after the diagnosis of DM. RESULTS: Neoplasm was found in 12 out of 139 patients (skin, gastrointestinal tract, prostate, thyroid, breast, lungs, and genitourinary tract. Patients with neoplasm had a higher mean age than controls (56.8 ± 15.7 vs. 40.3 ± 13.1 years, respectively, P = 0.004, odds ratio 1.09; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.14. No statistical

  10. Dermatomyositis masquerading as pulmonary embolism

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    Mroz RM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 61-year-old Caucasian was admitted to Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland for progressive muscle weakness and weight loss. Eighteen months prior to admission, the patient had been diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. At that point he was started on Enoxaparin QD. Past medical history was unremarkable. In the interim, the patient developed fever, myalgia and progressive dyspnea. Physical examination on admission revealed a rash on his upper torso and back, and the extensor surfaces of all four extremities. Laboratory values included CPK 8229, MB fraction 219, LDH 981. Chest X-ray and CT scan revealed bilateral patchy consolidations and ground-glass opacities. EMG was consistent with myositis. The patient was started on solumedrol 40 mg i.v., b.i.d., and then switched to prednisone 40 mg b.i.d. His symptoms and muscle strength improved remarkably. The patient was discharged with prednisone with an outpatient follow up.

  11. Ida-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of mammalian diabetes autoantigen IA-2, potentially acts as a common modulator between Parkinson's disease and Diabetes: role of Daf-2/Daf-16 insulin like signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Soobiya; Haque, Rizwanul; Jadiya, Pooja; Shamsuzzama; Kumar, Lalit; Nazir, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    The lack of cure to age associated Parkinson's disease (PD) has been challenging the efforts of researchers as well as health care providers. Recent evidences suggest that diabetic patients tend to show a higher future risk for PD advocating a strong correlation between PD and Diabetes, thus making it intriguing to decipher common genetic cues behind these ailments. We carried out studies on ida-1, the C. elegans orthologue of mammalian type-1 diabetes auto-antigen IA-2 towards achieving its functional workup vis-à-vis various associated endpoints of PD and Diabetes. Employing transgenic C. elegans strain expressing "human" alpha synuclein (NL5901) under normal and increased glucose concentrations, we studied aggregation of alpha synuclein, content of dopamine, expression of dopamine transporter, content of reactive oxygen species, locomotor activity, nuclear translocation of FOXO transcription factor Daf-16, and quantification of Daf2/Daf-16 mRNA. Our findings indicate that ida-1 affords protection in the studied disease conditions as absence of ida-1 resulted in higher alpha-synuclein aggregation under conditions that mimic the blood glucose levels of diabetic patients. We also observed reduced dopamine content, decreased motility, defective Daf-16 translocation and reduced expression of Daf-2 and Daf-16. Our studies establish important function of ida-1 as a modulator in Daf-2/Daf-16 insulin like signalling pathway thus possibly being a common link between PD and Diabetes.

  12. Dermatomiosite em adulto: experiência de um centro terciário brasileiro Adult dermatomyositis: experience of a brazilian tertiary care center

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    Fernando Henrique Carlos de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Relatamos os resultados de um estudo de coorte retrospectivo envolvendo 139 pacientes com dermatomiosite, conduzido de 1991 a 2011. MÉTODOS: Todos os pacientes preenchiam pelo menos quatro dos cinco critérios de Bohan and Peter (1975. RESULTADOS: A média de idade dos pacientes no início da doença foi de 41,7 ± 14,1 anos, e a duração da doença foi de 7,2 ± 5,2 anos. A amostragem constitui-se de 90,2% de indivíduos brancos, 79,9% do gênero feminino. Sintomas constitucionais foram detectados em menos da metade dos casos. Envolvimentos cutâneo e articular ocorreram em 95,7% e 41,7% dos pacientes, respectivamente. Em 48,2% dos pacientes foram apresentadas pneumopatia incipiente, opacidades em "vidro fosco" e/ou fibrose pulmonar. Todos os pacientes receberam prednisona (1 mg/kg/dia e 51,1% receberam também metilprednisolona intravenosa (1 g/dia por três dias. Vários imunossupressores foram usados como poupadores de corticosteroide de acordo com tolerância, efeitos colaterais e/ou refratariedade. Houve recidiva de doença (clínica e/ou laboratorial em 53,2% dos casos; 76,3% permaneceram em remissão no momento do estudo. A taxa de infecção grave foi de 35,3%, com o predomínio de herpes zoster. Houve 15 (10,8% casos de câncer, dos quais 12 foram confirmados em um período de um ano após o diagnóstico da doença. Houve ainda 16 óbitos (11,5% cujas causas principais foram sepse/choque séptico (27,5%, pneumopatia atribuída à doença (31,3%, neoplasias (31,3% e eventos cardiovasculares (12,5%. CONCLUSÕES: No presente trabalho, os dados clínico-laboratoriais foram semelhantes aos de outros grupos populacionais descritos na literatura, com diferenças mínimas quanto à frequência e às características das manifestações extramusculares.OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a retrospective cohort involving 139 patients with dermatomyositis, conducted from 1991 to 2011. METHODS: All patients met at least four of the

  13. Content of Diabetes-Associated Autoantibodies against Islet Autoantigens (IA-2A, GADA, IAA and the Level of Different Cytokines in Children and Adolescents on the Pre-Clinical and Early Clinical Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Development

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    V.V. Popova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the data on the immunological mechanisms of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM on the preclinical and early clinical stages of disease formation on the basis of studying the features of T1DM pathogenesis, monitoring the process of autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β-cells by determining the content of diabetes-associated auto-antibodies (the incidence and titers dynamics, the study of the characteristics of cytokine secretion on the pre-clinical stage of T1DM development in children and adolescents. Introduction of new approaches to pre-clinical diagnosis of T1DM allowed determine the group of marker-positive children with burdened heredity and predictable risk of disease development. The study involved 450 healthy normoglycemic children and adolescents aged from 7 to 15 years old. It was revealed that 94 (26.7 % of 366 children with burdened hereditary by at least two-fold determination of DAAb had an increased DAAb titer, mainly GADA and IA-2A, the clinical debut of T1DM manifested in 49 (52.1 % of them from 6 months to 12 years (30.9 ± 3.2 months. T1DM developed in the same period in a child, that was 0.8 % of the 272 (73.3 % DAAb-negative children. There was determined a formula of combined incidence and values of simultaneously elevated DAAb titers to islet autoantigens, namely IA-2A + GADA, which are predictor of the duration of T1DM pre-clinical stage and debut occurrence. It has been also established a disturbance of cytokine production (increased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-6 and FNO-α, IL-8 and IL-16 while reduced concentration of IL-4 in blood plasma as a key factor in the T1DM pathogenesis that causes the debut occurrence, and aggressiveness of its course.

  14. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analysed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute per cent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (p=0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (p<0.006). The response criteria for juvenile DM consisted of a conjoint analysis-based model using a continuous improvement score based on absolute per cent change in core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria for minimal, moderate, and major clinical response in adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute per cent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (p<0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute per cent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  16. Increased Fas and Bcl-2 Expression on Peripheral Blood T and B Lymphocytes from Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, but not from Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadete L. Liphaus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Defective regulation of apoptosis may play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Fas and Bcl-2 proteins are involved in the control of apoptosis. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Fas antigen and Bcl-2 protein on peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes from patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Thirty-eight patients with JSLE, 19 patients with JRA, 10 patients with JDM and 25 healthy controls entered the study. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were stained for lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and for Fas and Bcl-2 molecules. Expressions were measured by three-color flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test. Percentages of freshly isolated T lymphocytes positively stained for Fas protein from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls, patients with JRA and patients with JDM. Percentages of B lymphocytes positive for Fas from JSLE patients were higher than healthy controls and JRA patients. In addition, Fas expression on T cells from patients with JRA was increased compared to JDM patients. Otherwise, Fas expression on T and B cells from JRA and JDM patients were similar to healthy controls. MFI of Bcl-2 positive T lymphocytes from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls and JRA patients. MFI of Bcl-2 protein on B lymphocytes from JSLE patients was similar to healthy controls and patients with JRA and JDM. Bcl-2 expression did not differ between JRA and JDM patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, increased expression of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins observed in circulating T and B lymphocytes from patients with JSLE, but not from patients with JRA and JDM, suggests that abnormalities of apoptosis may be related to the pathogenesis of JSLE and probably are not a result of chronic inflammation.

  17. Design of the muscles in motion study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of an individually tailored home-based exercise training program for children and adolescents with juvenile dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habers Esther A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is a rare, often chronic, systemic autoimmune disease of childhood, characterized by inflammation of the microvasculature of the skeletal muscle and skin. Prominent clinical features include significant exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Despite pharmacological improvements, these clinical features continue to affect patients with JDM, even when the disease is in remission. Exercise training is increasingly utilized as a non-pharmacological intervention in the clinical management of (adult patients with chronic inflammatory conditions; however no randomized controlled trials (RCT have been performed in JDM. In the current study, the efficacy and feasibility of an exercise training program in patients with JDM will be examined. Methods/design Subjects (n = 30 will include 8–18 year olds diagnosed with JDM. The intervention consists of an individually tailored 12-weeks home-based exercise training program in which interval training on a treadmill is alternated with strength training during each session. The program is based on previous literature and designed with a defined frequency, intensity, time, and type of exercise (FITT principles. Primary outcome measures include aerobic exercise capacity, isometric muscle strength, and perception of fatigue. The study methodology has been conceived according to the standards of the CONSORT guidelines. The current study will be a multi-center (4 Dutch University Medical Centers RCT, with the control group also entering the training arm directly after completion of the initial protocol. Randomization is stratified according to age and gender. Discussion The current study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of an individually tailored 12-week home-based exercise training program in youth with JDM. Trial registration Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands: 11–336

  18. Novel autoantigens immunogenic in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Bernhard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory inflammatory condition with autoimmune features including IgG autoantibodies. In this study we analyze the complexity of the autoantibody response and reveal the nature of the antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies in COPD patients. Methods An array of 1827 gridded immunogenic peptide clones was established and screened with 17 sera of COPD patients and 60 healthy controls. Protein arrays were evaluated both by visual inspection and a recently developed computer aided image analysis technique. By this computer aided image analysis technique we computed the intensity values for each peptide clone and each serum and calculated the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC for each clone and the separation COPD sera versus control sera. Results By visual evaluation we detected 381 peptide clones that reacted with autoantibodies of COPD patients including 17 clones that reacted with more than 60% of the COPD sera and seven clones that reacted with more than 90% of the COPD sera. The comparison of COPD sera and controls by the automated image analysis system identified 212 peptide clones with informative AUC values. By in silico sequence analysis we found an enrichment of sequence motives previously associated with immunogenicity. Conclusion The identification of a rather complex humoral immune response in COPD patients supports the idea of COPD as a disease with strong autoimmune features. The identification of novel immunogenic antigens is a first step towards a better understanding of the autoimmune component of COPD.

  19. Dermatomiosite vesiculobolhosa como manifestação paraneoplásica de tumores sincrônicos de próstata e língua: relato de caso Paraneoplastic vesiculobullous dermatomyositis with synchronic prostate and tongue tumors: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Renaux Caratta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A dermatomiosite é uma miopatia inflamatória que cursa com manifestações cutâneas. No adulto acima de 50 anos, pode estar associada a neoplasias malignas, comportando-se como um grande sinalizador de malignidade. OBJETIVO: Demonstrar essa associação com aspectos peculiares: dermatomiosite de apresentação atípica paralela a dois tumores sincrônicos, em geral, não relacionados àquela. RELATO DO CASO: Descrevemos o caso de um paciente do gênero masculino de 72 anos, que desenvolveu dermatomiosite, inicialmente apenas com quadro cutâneo clássico, evoluindo com lesões vesiculobolhosas, e, meses após, com miopatia. Após extensa investigação, foi localizado um adenocarcinoma de próstata. Houve remissão da doença após tratamento do câncer e administração de glicocorticoide. Durante a retirada gradual do glicocorticoide, ocorreu reativação da dermatomiosite, sendo reiniciadas investigações, que revelaram a presença de carcinoma escamoso de língua. Tratada esta neoplasia, houve remissão completa, mesmo após a retirada total do corticoide. CONCLUSÃO: Trata-se de um caso raro por envolver as formas menos usuais de apresentação da dermatomiosite, tanto com relação ao quadro cutaneomuscular, quanto à sua associação a tumores de próstata e língua (tumores nunca antes relatados juntos. Este caso demonstra a importância da investigação minuciosa em busca de neoplasias na abordagem desses pacientes.Dermatomyositis is an inflammatory myopathy with skin manifestations. In the adult over the age of 50 years, it can be associated with malignant neoplasias, being, thus, a signal of malignancy. OBJECTIVE: To show the association of dermatomyositis of atypical presentation with two synchronous tumors, usually not related to that. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 72-year-old male, who developed dermatomyositis, initially with only classic skin findings, which progressed to vesiculobullous lesions, and, months later, to

  20. Myositis in mixed connective tissue disease: a unique syndrome characterized by immunohistopathologic elements of both polymyositis and dermatomyositis Miosite na doença mista do tecido conectivo: achados imunopatológicos de polimiosite e dermatomiosite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angela A.G. Vianna

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the inflammatory cells, the expression pattern of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, membrane attack complex (C5b-9, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC antigens in muscle biopsy of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD. METHOD: We studied 14 patients with MCTD, and compared to 8 polimyositis (PM patients, 5 dermatomyositis (DM and 4 dystrophies. Inflammatory cells were examined for CD4+, CD8+, memory and naïve T cells, natural killer cells, and macrophages. Expression of MHC-I and -II, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and C5b -9 were characterized on muscle fibers and vessels. RESULTS: Morphological analysis displayed a pattern of PM. Immunohistochemical study revealed a decreased number of capillaries, predominance of CD4+ and B cells in perivascular regions and predominance of CD8+ and CD45RO+ in endomysial regions. The expression of MHC-I on vessels and on degenerated muscle fibers, MHC-II expression on vessels and perifascicular muscle fibers, and the expression of ICAM-1 / VCAM-1 on endothelial cells indicated both vascular and cellular-immune mediated processes causing the muscular lesion. CONCLUSION:Our findings revealed a mixed mechanism in MCTD, both vascular involvement as DM, and cell-mediated like PM.OBJETIVO: Caracterizar as células do infiltrado inflamatório, o padrão de expressão das moléculas de adesão (ICAM-1 e VCAM-1, complexo de ataque à membrana (C5b-9 e antígenos de histocompatibilidade maior (MHC em biópsias musculares de patientes com doença mista do tecido conectivo (DMTC. MÉTODO: Foram estudados14 pacientes com DMTC e comparadas com 8 pacientes com polimiosite (PM, 5 com dermatomiosite (DM e 4 com distrofias. As células inflamatórias foram caracterizadas como CD4+, CD8+, células T de memória (CD45RO+ e virgens, células "natural killer" e macrófagos. As expressões de MHC-I e -II, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 e C5b-9 foram caracterizadas em fibras musculares e vasos. RESULTADOS:A análise morfol

  1. 2016 ACR-EULAR adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis and juvenile dermatomyositis response criteria-methodological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Erman, Brian; Bayat, Nastaran; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Rockette, Howard; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Hansen, Paul; Oddis, Chester V.; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; Fiorentino, David; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Reed, Ann M.; Wook Song, Yeong; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Martini, Alberto; van der Net, Janjaap; Maillard, Susan; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to describe the methodology used to develop new response criteria for adult DM/PM and JDM. Methods: Patient profiles from prospective natural history data and clinical trials were rated by myositis specialists to develop consensus gold-standard ratings of minimal,

  2. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not

  3. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death, which further augments DAB4 binding to produce a tumor-lethal 'genotoxic chain reaction'. Clinically, this approach may be useful as consolidation treatment after a drug-induced cell death among (small-volume metastatic deposits, the commonest cause of cancer death. This article is part II of a two-part series providing proof-of-concept for the diagnostic and therapeutic use of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB.

  4. Familial canine dermatomyositis: clinical, electrodiagnostic, and genetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haupt, K.H.; Prieur, D.J.; Moore, M.P.; Hargis, A.M.; Hegreberg, G.A.; Gavin, P.R.; Johnson, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Three Collies with a skin disorder, 6 progeny from a breeding of 2 of the Collies (incross litter), and the 4 progeny from the breeding of an affected Collie male and a normal Labrador Retriever female (outcross litter) were examined. By 7 to 11 weeks of age, all 6 dogs in the incross litter developed a qualitatively similar, but variably severe, dermatitis of the ears, face, lips, tip of the tail, and over bony prominences of limbs. Later, myopathic signs characterized by bilaterally symmetrical skeletal muscle atrophy of the head, neck, trunk, and extremities; facial palsy; decreased jaw tone; stiff gait; and hyperreflexia were observed in the dogs more severely affected by the dermatitis. Of the 4 dogs in the outcross litter, 3 had similar, but milder, clinical manifestations of the dermatitis and myopathy. Cutaneous lesions consisted of intraepidermal and subepidermal vesicles or pustules with intradermal infiltration by leukocytes. Muscle lesions included myositis; myofiber degeneration, regeneration, and atrophy; and fibrosis. A generalized myopathy in the severely affected dogs was indicated by abnormal readings on needle electromyograms and normal motor nerve conduction velocities. Spontaneous needle electromyogram abnormalities were fibrillation potentials, positive sharp waves, and bizarre high-frequency discharges. Retrospective and prospective genetic analyses disclosed a definite familial tendency and indicated the condition has an autosomal dominant component

  5. An adolescent Nigerian girl presenting with juvenile dermatomyositis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 12 year old girl presented with proximal myopathy, skin rash, elevated muscle enzymes and typical muscle histology. The diagnosis of JDM was delayed despite her having accessed several health facilities. Response to steroids was incomplete as she already had disabilities (muscle wasting with inability to walk) before ...

  6. Dermatomyositis with renal involvement in a Nigerian girl | Ocheke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: Findings at admission included a chronically ill girl who was mildly pale and had generalised oedema. There were multiple areas of hypopigmented macules on the face, arms, right elbow and the shoulder. Her total urine output in the first 24 hours of admission was 0.9ml/kg/hr, had a th systolic and diastolic blood ...

  7. [New insights of myositis-specific and -associated autoantibodies in juvenile and adult type myositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Váncsa, Andrea; Dankó, Katalin

    2016-07-01

    Myositis, which means inflammation of the muscles, is a general term used for inflammatory myopathies. Myositis is a rare idiopathic autoimmune disease. It is believed that environmental factors such as virus, bacteria, parasites, direct injuries, drugs side effect can trigger the immune system of genetically susceptible individuals to act against muscle tissues. There are several types of myositis with the same systemic symptoms such as muscle weakness, fatigue, muscle pain and inflammation. These include dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis, inclusion-body myositis, polymyositis, orbital myositis and myositis ossificans. Juvenile and adult dermatomyositis are chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness and typical skin symptoms. The aim of the authors was to compare the symptoms, laboratory and serological findings and disease course in children and adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. Early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment improve the mortality of these patients. Myositis-specific autoantibodies have predictive and prognostic values regarding the associated overlap disease, response to treatment and disease course. The authors intend to lighten the clinical and pathogenetic significance of the new target autoantigens. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1179-1184.

  8. [Autoantibody profile in myositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2014-07-01

    Patients suffering from muscular symptoms or with an increase of creatine kinase levels may present a myopathy. In such situations, clinicians have to confirm the existence of a myopathy and determine if it is an acquired or a genetic muscular disease. In the presence of an acquired myopathy after having ruled out an infectious, a toxic agent or an endocrine cause, physicians must identify which type of idiopathic myopathy the patient is presenting: either a myositis including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis, or an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Histopathology examination of a muscle biopsy is determinant but detection of autoantibody is now also crucial. The myositis-specific antibodies and myositis-associated antibodies lead to a serologic approach complementary to the histological classification, because strong associations of myositis-specific antibodies with clinical features and survival have been documented. The presence of anti-synthetase antibodies is associated with an original histopathologic pattern between polymyositis and dermatomyositis, and defines a syndrome where interstitial lung disease drives the prognosis. Anti-MDA-5 antibody are specifically associated with dermatomyositis, and define a skin-lung syndrome with a frequent severe disease course. Anti-TIF1-γ is also associated with dermatomyositis but its presence is frequently predictive of a cancer association whereas anti-MI2 is associated with the classical dermatomyositis. Two specific antibodies, anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR, are observed in patients with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies and may be very useful to distinguish acquired myopathies from dystrophic muscular diseases in case of a slow onset and to allow the initiation of effective therapy. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Side effects of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Lupus erythematosus induced by Atorvastatin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydzik, Piotr; Szpak, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the case of 56 years old woman admitted to the Toxicology Department because of skin lesions, joint and muscle pain and elevated activity of transaminases and creatine phosfokinase as well in biochemical analysis. The symptoms occurred after 6 days of the Atorvastatin therapy. The clinical picture indicated side effects of the hipolipemic therapy, but the presence of the skin lesions suggested drug induced collagenosis (lupus erythrematosus, dermatomyositis). Immunological studies confirmed association with antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-Mi-2 autoantibodies in the serum. Immunosuppressive therapy was ordered with clinical and biochemical improvement.

  10. Immunochemical and autoantigenic properties of the globular domain of basement membrane collagen (type IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Mark, H; Oberbäumer, I; Timpl, R; Kemler, R; Wick, G

    1985-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the globular domain NC1 of collagen IV from human placenta and a mouse tumor react with conformational antigenic determinants present on the NC1 hexamers and also with the three major subunits obtained after dissociation. The antibodies recognized unique structures within basement membranes and showed a broad tissue reactivity but only limited species cross-reactivity. Using these antibodies, it was possible to detect small amounts of collagen IV antigens from cell cultures and in serum. Monoclonal rat antibodies against mouse NC1 revealed a similar reaction potential. Autoantibodies could be produced in mice against mouse NC1 which react with kidney and lung basement membranes in a pathological manner, mimicking Goodpasture syndrome.

  11. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    ribonucleoproteins. The clinical spectrum of patients with these autoantibodies includes arthritis, psoriasis, myositis, and scleroderma. None of 59 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 19 with polymyositis, 33 with scleroderma, and 10 with psoriatic arthritis had similar antibodies. High-resolution protein...

  12. Glutamate decarboxylase-derived IDDM autoantigens displayed on self-assembled protein nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyoung; Ahn, Ji-Young; Sim, Sang Jun; Lee, Jeewon

    2005-01-01

    The recombinant ferritin heavy chain (FTN-H) formed self-assembled spherical nanoparticles with the size comparable to native one. We tried to express the GAD65 COOH-terminal fragments, i.e., 448-585 (GAD65 448-585 ), 487-585 (GAD65 487-585 ), and 512-585 (GAD65 512-585 ) amino acid fragments, using FTN-H as N-terminus fusion expression partner in Escherichia coli. All of recombinant fusion proteins (FTN-H::GAD65 448-585 , FTN-H::GAD65 487-585 , and FTN-H::GAD65 512-585 ) also formed spherical nanoparticles due probably to the self-assembly function of the fused ferritin heavy chain. The antigenic epitopes within GAD65 448-585 , GAD65 487-585 , and GAD65 512-585 against insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) marker (autoantibodies against GAD65) were localized at the surface of the spherical protein nanoparticles so that anti-GAD65 Ab could recognize them. Protein nanoparticles like FTN-H seem to provide distinct advantages over other inorganic nanoparticles (e.g., Au, Ag, CdSe, etc.) in that through the bacterial synthesis, the active capture probes can be located at the nanoparticle surface with constant orientation/conformation via covalent cross-linking without complex chemistry. Also it is possible for the protein nanoparticles to have uniform particle size, which is rarely achieved in the chemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. Thus, the recombinant ferritin particles can be used as a three-dimensional (spherical) and nanometer-scale probe structure that is a key component in ultra-sensitive protein chip for detecting protein-small molecule interactions and protein-protein interactions

  13. Antibodies to autoantigen targets in myasthenia and their value in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Dedaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a classic autoimmune disease, which clinical manifestations in the form of weakness and abnormal muscle fatigue, due to the damaging effect of polyclonal antibodies to different structures of the neuromuscular synapse and muscles. The study of autoimmune substrate with myasthenia is routine in many clinics dealing with the problems of neuromuscular pathology, and the identification of high concentration of serum antibodies to a number of antigenic structures is the gold standard in diagnosis.Determination of serum antibodies to various autoimmune targets is an important tool in clinical practice. The majority of patients shows the high concentration of antibodies to AchR that gives the opportunity to use it as an important diagnostic criterion. The specificity of changes in the concentration of AchR-antibodies due to pathogenetic treatment allows to objectify the suppression of autoimmune aggression and evaluate the reliability of remission. However, the absence of AchR-antibodies when there are clear clinical and electromyography signs of myasthenia gravis suggests an autoimmune attack against a number of other targets, the most studied of which is the MuSK. On the contrary, patients with myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma, almost always have a higher level of AchR-antibodies. The presence of thymoma is accompanied by the generation of antibodies to titin and RyR, which is also observed in persons with late-onset myasthenia without thymoma. High concentration of antibodies to these structures can be interpreted as a reliable sign of thymoma in patients younger than 60 years.

  14. Catalase and alpha-enolase : two novel granulocyte autoantigens in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C; Zhao, MH; Horst, G; Lockwood, CM; Kleibeuker, JH; Limburg, PC; Nelis, GF; Kallenberg, CGM

    1998-01-01

    In IBD, the target antigens of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) have not been fully identified, which limits the analysis of the diagnostic significance as well as of the possible pathophysiological role of these antibodies. In this study, we identify the target antigens of ANCA in

  15. Catalase and alpha-enolase: two novel granulocyte autoantigens in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Zhao, M.H.; Lockwood, C.M.; Kleibeuker, Jan; Limburg, Piet; Nelis, G.F.; Kallenberg, Cees; Horst, G.

    1998-01-01

    In IBD, the target antigens of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) have not been fully identified, which limits the analysis of the diagnostic significance as well as of the possible pathophysiological role of these antibodies. In this study, we identify the target antigens of ANCA in

  16. Identification, characterization and application of autoantigens in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H-J. Aanstoot (Henk-Jan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractType 1 diabetes mellitus or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus is a disease characterized by the selective destruction of insulin producing B-cells in the islets of Langerhans. The exact cause of this destruction is unknown, but is mediated by cells of the immune system. The immune

  17. Use of autoantigen-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes to arrest autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes.To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes.A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides.We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion.We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes constitutes a promising strategy for autoimmune diseases.

  18. Multi-level infrastructure of interconnected testbeds of large-scale wireless sensor networks (MI2T-WSN)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abu-Mahfouz, Adnan M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available are still required for further testing before the real implementation. In this paper we propose a multi-level infrastructure of interconnected testbeds of large- scale WSNs. This testbed consists of 1000 sensor motes that will be distributed into four...

  19. MI (2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one) contained in detergents is not detectable in machine washed textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Maja A; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Aberer, Werner

    2018-01-01

    hazard as a strong contact allergen, the risk depends on exposure. Regarding the risk of exposure levels for the consumer to MI in clothes it can be stated that the use of MI in laundry detergents is safe for the consumer if these products are used according to the instructions in the normal household......Background: European legislation has banned the preservative methylisothiazolinone (MI) from inclusion in leave-on cosmetics. However, the risk for allergic reactions depends on exposure. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of MI in laundry detergents for household machine washing....... Methods: Different formulations of laundry detergents with commercial MI levels, up to one thousand ppm were used and three different types of clothes were washed in a normal household machine setting one time and 10 times. The level of MI was measured by HPLC. Results: While MI could be retrieved...

  20. Dermatomyositis and calcific myonecrosis in the leg: ultrasound as an aid in management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batz, Richard; Sofka, Carolyn M.; Adler, Ronald S.; Mintz, Douglas N.; DiCarlo, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Calcific myonecrosis, often reported in the setting of prior trauma or compartment syndrome, has traditionally been treated with surgical debridement; however, these cases are often complicated by poor wound closure and poor healing. Serial percutaneous aspirations, instead, have been proposed as an alternative treatment option. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the use of ultrasound guidance in the aspiration of calcific myonecrosis as an aid in management. (orig.)

  1. Pulmonary function and autoantibodies in a long-term follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Pernille Raasthøj; Buchvald, Frederik Fouirnaies; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    outcome, and (iii) identify possible associations between pulmonary impairment and myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs).Methods. Fifty-one JDM patients performed conventional spirometry in a cross-sectional follow-up study. The scores of the Myositis Damage Index (MDI), Myositis Damage by visual...... analogue scale (MYODAM-VAS) and physician's global damage assessment were used to estimate JDM outcome. ANAs, MSAs and myositis-associated autoantibodies were analysed in all patients.Results. Forty-two patients (82%) (mean follow-up time 14.3 years) had normal lung function. Four patients (8%) were...

  2. Cardiac Abnormalities in Adult Patients With Polymyositis or Dermatomyositis as Assessed by Noninvasive Modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L P; Simonsen, J A; Diederichsen, A C

    2016-01-01

    age (P = 0.001), disease duration (P = 0.004), presence of myositis-specific or -associated autoantibodies (P = 0.05), and high cardiac (99m) Tc-PYP uptake (P = 0.006). In multivariate analysis of the pooled data for patients and HCs, a diagnosis of PM/DM (P .... CONCLUSION: Patients with PM or DM had an increased prevalence of cardiac abnormalities compared to HCs. LVDD was a common occurrence in PM/DM patients and correlated to disease duration. In addition, the association of LVDD with myositis-specific or -associated autoantibodies and high cardiac (99m) Tc...

  3. Muscle ischaemia associated with NXP2 autoantibodies: a severe subtype of juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerate, Jessie; De Antonio, Marie; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Barnerias, Christine; Bodemer, Christine; Isapof, Arnaud; Quartier, Pierre; Melki, Isabelle; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Bassez, Guillaume; Desguerre, Isabelle; Gherardi, Romain K; Authier, François-Jérôme; Gitiaux, Cyril

    2018-05-01

    Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are increasingly used to delineate distinct subgroups of JDM. The aim of our study was to explore without a priori hypotheses whether MSAs are associated with distinct clinical-pathological changes and severity in a monocentric JDM cohort. Clinical, biological and histological findings from 23 JDM patients were assessed. Twenty-six histopathological parameters were subjected to multivariate analysis. Autoantibodies included anti-NXP2 (9/23), anti-TIF1γ (4/23), anti-MDA5 (2/23), no MSAs (8/23). Multivariate analysis yielded two histopathological clusters. Cluster 1 (n = 11) showed a more severe and ischaemic pattern than cluster 2 (n = 12) assessed by: total score severity ⩾ 20 (100.0% vs 25.0%); visual analogic score ⩾6 (100.0% vs 25.0%); the vascular domain score >1 (100.0% vs 41.7%); microinfarcts (100% vs 58.3%); ischaemic myofibrillary loss (focal punched-out vacuoles) (90.9 vs 25%); and obvious capillary loss (81.8% vs 16.7). Compared with cluster 2, patients in cluster 1 had strikingly more often anti-NXP2 antibodies (7/11 vs 2/12), more pronounced muscle weakness, more gastrointestinal involvement and required more aggressive treatment. Furthermore, patients with anti-NXP2 antibodies, mostly assigned in the first cluster, also displayed more severe muscular disease, requiring more aggressive treatment and having a lower remission rate during the follow-up period. Marked muscle ischaemic involvement and the presence of anti-NXP2 autoantibodies are associated with more severe forms of JDM.

  4. Dermatomyositis as the first manifestation of small cell carcinoma: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Ahumada Piña

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La dermatomiositis es una miopatía inflamatoria autoinmune, asociada a manifestaciones dermatológicas. Su vinculación con neoplasias está ampliamente reportada, siendo más común en el cáncer pulmonar, especialmente en carcinoma de células pequeñas probablemente por su origen en precursores de células neuroendocrinas, así como también en cáncer de mama y ovario. La baja frecuencia de dermatomiositis dificulta la sospecha de las lesiones subyacentes entre las posibilidades diagnósticas de las enfermedades sistémicas con manifestaciones cutáneas. Por ello siempre se debe considerar la alta probabilidad de una neoplasia, con reportes de hasta 75% en la población oriental y cerca de 40% en general. En este artículo se presenta un caso poco frecuente de dermatomiositis con lesiones de distribución en chal, como debut sintomático de un carcinoma pulmonar de células pequeñas.

  5. Myositis-specific and myositis-associated autoantibodies in Indian patients with inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Puja; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Misra, Ramnath

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to study the prevalence and clinical associations of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) and myositis-associated autoantibodies (MAAs) in a large cohort of Indian patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis (IIM). Clinical details and serum samples were collected from patients with IIM (satisfying Bohan and Peter Criteria, 1975) and CTD-associated myositis. Sera were analysed for antibodies against SRP, Mi2, Jo1, PL7, PL12, EJ, OJ, Ro52, Ku, Pm-Scl 75 and PM-Scl 100, using immunoblot assay. The cohort comprised 124 patients with IIM (M:F = 1:3.6). Fifty-five of them had dermatomyositis (DM), 22 had juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), 25 had polymyositis (PM) and 22 had connective tissue disease-associated myositis (CTD myositis). Mean disease duration was 10.9 months. ANA was positive in 84 (68.9 %), and MSAs in 61 (49.2 %) patients. Among MSAs, autoantibodies to Mi2, synthetase (Jo1, PL7, PL12, EJ) and SRP were present in 26 (20.9 %), 29 (23.4 %) and 6 (4.8 %) patients, respectively. Prevalence of MAAs was as follows: antibodies to Ro52 in 45 (36.3 %), Ku and PM-Scl 75 in 13 (10.5 %) and PM-Scl 100 in 5 (4 %) patients. Anti-Mi2 antibodies were positively associated with DM (21/55, 38.2 %; p < 0.0001) and pharyngeal weakness (13/34, 38.2 %; p = 0.004) and negatively associated with ILD (0/28; p = 0.001). ILD and mechanics' hands were significantly more in patients with anti-synthetase antibodies (16/28, 57 % and 14/22, 63.6 %; p < 0.0001). Four of six patients with anti-SRP antibody showed poor response to multiple drugs. Higher prevalence of anti-Mi2 is probably related to higher proportion of patients with DM. Absence of ILD in patients with anti-Mi2 antibody suggests that it may protect against ILD. In Indian population also, anti-synthetase antibodies are associated with ILD, and anti-SRP antibodies with poor response to treatment.

  6. Rare myositis-specific autoantibody associations among Hungarian patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoki, L; Nagy-Vincze, M; Griger, Z; Betteridge, Z; Szöllősi, L; Jobanputra, R; Dankó, K

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are systemic, chronic autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical, proximal muscle weakness. Homogeneous groups present with similar symptoms. The response to therapy and prognosis could be facilitated by myositis-specific autoantibodies, and in this way, give rise to immunoserological classification. The myositis-specific autoantibodies are directed against specific proteins found in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus of the cells. To date, literature suggests the rarity of the co-existence of two myositis-specific autoantibodies. In this study the authors highlight rare associations of myositis-specific autoantibodies. Three hundred and thirty-seven Hungarian patients with polymyositis or dermatomyositis were studied. Their clinical findings were noted retrospectively. Specific blood tests identified six patients with the rare co-existence of myositis-specific autoantibodies, anti-Jo-1 and anti-SRP, anti-Jo-1 and anti-Mi-2, anti-Mi-2 and anti-PL-12, anti-Mi-2 and anti-SRP, and anti-SRP and anti-PL-7, respectively. This case review aims to identify the clinical importance of these rare associations and their place within the immunoserological classification.

  7. Silenced B-Cell Receptor Response To Autoantigen In A Poor-Prognostic Subset Of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Ann-Charlotte; Evaldsson, Chamilly; Pedersen, Lone Bredo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells express auto/xeno antigen-reactive antibodies that bind to self-epitopes and resemble natural IgM antibodies in their repertoire. One of the antigenic structures recognized is oxidation-induced malonedialdehyde that is present on low-density lipoprotein......-cell receptor unresponsiveness to cognate self-antigen on its own in poor-prognostic subset #1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indicating that these cells proliferate by other mechanisms that may override B-cell receptor silencing brought about in a context of self-tolerance/anergy. These novel findings have...

  8. The Effect of Diabetes-Associated Autoantigens on Cell Processes in Human PBMCs and Their Relevance to Autoimmune Diabetes Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Včeláková, J.; Blatný, R.; Halbhuber, Z.; Kolář, Michal; Neuwirth, Aleš; Petruželková, L.; Ulmannová, T.; Koloušková, S.; Sumnik, Z.; Pithová, P.; Krivjanská, M.; Filipp, Dominik; Štechová, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, May (2013), s. 589451 ISSN 2314-6745 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06019 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : type 1 diabetes * autoimmune disease * Th17 * TGF-beta Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Analysis of antibody responses against Coxsackie virus B4 protein 2C and the diabetes autoantigen GAD65.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, G.R.; Batstra, M.R.; Aanstoot, H.J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Galama, J.M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Certain viral infections, especially those caused by coxsackie B viruses and related enteroviruses, have been associated with the development of type I diabetes. The sequence homology

  10. Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling Reduces IgA1 Autoantigen Production in IgA Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Yamada

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: Our results revealed that IL-6−induced aberrant activation of STAT3-mediated overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1. STAT3 signaling pathway may thus represent a new target for disease-specific therapy of IgA nephropathy.

  11. B-CELL EPITOPE ON THE U1 SNRNP-C AUTOANTIGEN CONTAINS A SEQUENCE SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE HERPES-SIMPLEX VIRUS PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MISAKI, Y; YAMAMOTO, K; YANAGI, K; MIURA, H; ICHIJO, H; KATO, T; MATO, T; WELLINGWESTER, S; NISHIOKA, K; ITO, K

    The mechanism of autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases is not well understood. In the present study we performed the B cell epitope mapping of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-C, one of the target molecules of anti-nRNP autoantibody to investigate how B cells respond to the

  12. The autoantigen Ro52 is an E3 ligase resident in the cytoplasm but enters the nucleus upon cellular exposure to nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, Alexander; Oke, Vilija; Elfving, Ase; Nyberg, Filippa; Covacu, Ruxandra; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Patients with the systemic autoimmune diseases Sjoegrens's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus often have autoantibodies against the intracellular protein Ro52. Ro52 is an E3 ligase dependent on the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes UBE2D1 and UBE2E1. While Ro52 and UBE2D1 are cytoplasmic proteins, UBE2E1 is localized to the nucleus. Here, we investigate how domains of human Ro52 regulate its intracellular localization. By expressing fluorescently labeled Ro52 and Ro52 mutants in HeLa cells, an intact coiled-coil domain was found to be necessary for the cytoplasmic localization of Ro52. The amino acids 381-470 of the B30.2 region were essential for translocation into the nucleus. Furthermore, after exposure of HeLa cells to the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), Ro52 translocated to the nucleus. A nuclear localization of Ro52 in inflamed tissue expressing inducible NO synthetase (iNOS) from cutaneous lupus patients was observed by immunohistochemistry and verified in NO-treated cultures of patient-derived primary keratinocytes. Our results show that the localization of Ro52 is regulated by endogenous sequences, and that nuclear translocation is induced by an inflammatory mediator. This suggests that Ro52 has both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates, and that Ro52 mediates ubiquitination through UBE2D1 in the cytoplasm and through UBE2E1 in the nucleus

  13. Co-purification of arrestin like proteins with alpha-enolase from bovine myocardial tissues and the possible role in heart diseases as an autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirshahi, M., E-mail: massoud.mirshahi@inserm.fr; Le Marchand, S.

    2015-05-08

    Aim: Previously, we reported that visual arrestin co-purified with glycolytic enzymes. The aim of this study was to analyze the co-purification of arrestin like proteins (ALP) in bovine cardiac tissues with enolases. Methods: The soluble extract of bovine myocardial tissues from different regions such as left and right atriums and ventricles of the bovine heart (n = 3) was analyzed by ACA-34 gel filtration, immuno-affinity column, SDS-PAGE, ELISA, western blot and a sandwich immune assay for quantification of ALP and sequence analysis. Results: We observed that; 1) The cardiac muscle contained a 50 kDa ALP at a concentration of 751 pg/mg of soluble protein extract, 2) ALP purified, by immunoaffinity, contained alpha-enolase of 48 kDa confirmed by protein sequence analysis; 3) Cardiomyocyte cells exposed to anti arrestin and anti enolase monoclonal antibodies showed decreased proliferation in vitro, 4) High level of autoantibodies were detected by ELISA (3.57% for arrestin and 9.12% for α-enolase) in serum of patients with infarcted heart disease. Conclusion: We suggest a possible interaction between ALP and alpha-enolases yielding a complex that may be involved in the induction of cardiac autoimmune diseases. - Highlights: • We examine a possible interaction between arrestin like protein and alpha-enolases in cardiomyocyte. • We demonstrated the effect of antibodies against arrestin and enolase on cardiomyocyte cell proliferation. • We suggest that this proteins complex may be involved in the induction of cardiac autoimmune diseases.

  14. Metabolism of vertebrate amino sugars with N-glycolyl groups: mechanisms underlying gastrointestinal incorporation of the non-human sialic acid xeno-autoantigen N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Kalyan; Gregg, Christopher J; Chow, Renee; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2012-08-17

    Although N-acetyl groups are common in nature, N-glycolyl groups are rare. Mammals express two major sialic acids, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Although humans cannot produce Neu5Gc, it is detected in the epithelial lining of hollow organs, endothelial lining of the vasculature, fetal tissues, and carcinomas. This unexpected expression is hypothesized to result via metabolic incorporation of Neu5Gc from mammalian foods. This accumulation has relevance for diseases associated with such nutrients, via interaction with Neu5Gc-specific antibodies. Little is known about how ingested sialic acids in general and Neu5Gc in particular are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the gastrointestinal and systemic fate of Neu5Gc-containing glycoproteins (Neu5Gc-glycoproteins) or free Neu5Gc in the Neu5Gc-free Cmah(-/-) mouse model. Ingested free Neu5Gc showed rapid absorption into the circulation and urinary excretion. In contrast, ingestion of Neu5Gc-glycoproteins led to Neu5Gc incorporation into the small intestinal wall, appearance in circulation at a steady-state level for several hours, and metabolic incorporation into multiple peripheral tissue glycoproteins and glycolipids, thus conclusively proving that Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated from food. Feeding Neu5Gc-glycoproteins but not free Neu5Gc mimics the human condition, causing tissue incorporation into human-like sites in Cmah(-/-) fetal and adult tissues, as well as developing tumors. Thus, glycoproteins containing glycosidically linked Neu5Gc are the likely dietary source for human tissue accumulation, and not the free monosaccharide. This human-like model can be used to elucidate specific mechanisms of Neu5Gc delivery from the gut to tissues, as well as general mechanisms of metabolism of ingested sialic acids.

  15. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IA-2 is a major target of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. IA-2 responsive T cells recognize determinants within regions represented by amino acids 787–817 and 841–869 of the molecule. Epitopes for IA-2 autoantibodies are largely conformational and not well defined. In this study, we used peptide......, and aromatic residues and amino acids contributing to the epitope investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of each of amino acids Asn858, Glu836, and Trp799 reduced 96/3 Ab binding by >45%. Mutations of these residues also inhibited binding of serum autoantibodies from IA-2 Ab-positive type 1...... phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  16. Intermediate monocytes in ANCA vasculitis: increased surface expression of ANCA autoantigens and IL-1β secretion in response to anti-MPO antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Eóin C

    2015-01-01

    ANCA vasculitis encompasses several autoimmune conditions characterised by destruction of small vessels, inflammation of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis. Most patients harbour autoantibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3). Clinical and experimental data suggest that pathogenesis is driven by ANCA-mediated activation of neutrophils and monocytes. We investigated a potential role for distinct monocyte subsets. We found that the relative proportion of intermediate monocytes is increased in patients versus control individuals, and both MPO and PR3 are preferentially expressed on these cells. We demonstrate that MPO and PR3 are expressed independently of each other on monocytes and that PR3 is not associated with CD177. MPO expression correlates with that of Fc receptor CD16 on intermediate monocytes. Monocyte subsets respond differently to antibodies directed against MPO and PR3, with anti-MPO but not anti-PR3 leading to increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production. In concordance with the observed higher surface expression of MPO on intermediate monocytes, this subset produces the highest quantity of IL-1β in response to anti-MPO stimulation. These data suggest that monocytes, specifically, the intermediate subset, may play a role in ANCA vasculitis, and also indicate that substantial differences exist between the effect of anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies on these cells.

  17. Immune response against the coiled coil domain of Sjögren's syndrome associated autoantigen Ro52 induces salivary gland dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Magdalena; Bagavant, Harini; Biswas, Indranil; Ballard, Abigail; Deshmukh, Umesh S

    2018-01-31

    The structural domains of Ro52, termed the RING, B-box, coiled coil (CC) and B30.2/SPRY are targets of anti-Ro52 in multiple autoimmune disorders. In Sjögren's syndrome patients, the presence of anti-Ro52 is associated with higher disease severity, and in mice, they induce salivary gland hypofunction. This study was undertaken to investigate whether immune responses against different domains of Ro52, influences salivary gland disease in mice. Female NZM2758 mice were immunised with Ro52 domains expressed as recombinant fusion proteins with maltose binding protein (MBP) [MBP-RING-B-box, MBP-CC, MBP-CC(ΔC19), MBP-B30.2/SPRY]. Sera from immunised mice were studied for IgG antibodies to Ro52 by immunoprecipitation, and to salivary gland cells by immunofluorescence. Pilocarpine-induced saliva production was measured to evaluate salivary gland function. Submandibular glands were investigated by histopathology for inflammation and by immune-histochemistry for IgG deposition. Mice immunised with different Ro52-domains had comparable reactivity to Ro52 and to salivary gland cells. However, only mice immunised with the CC domain and its C-terminal truncated version CC(ΔC19) showed a significant drop in saliva production. None of the mice developed severe salivary gland inflammation. The salivary gland hypofunction significantly correlated with increased intra-lobar IgG deposits in the submandibular salivary glands. Our data demonstrate that epitope specificity of anti-Ro52 antibodies plays a critical role in the induction of glandular dysfunction. Clearly, screening Sjögren's syndrome patients for relative levels of Ro52 domain specific antibodies will be more informative for associating anti-Ro52 with clinical measures of the disorder.

  18. Paediatric autoimmune encephalopathies: clinical features, laboratory investigations and outcomes in patients with or without antibodies to known central nervous system autoantigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Wright, Sukhvir; Waters, Patrick; Agrawal, Shakti; Carr, Lucinda; Cross, Helen; De Sousa, Carlos; DeVile, Catherine; Fallon, Penny; Gupta, Rajat; Hedderly, Tammy; Hughes, Elaine; Kerr, Tim; Lascelles, Karine; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Philip, Sunny; Pohl, Keith; Prabahkar, Prab; Smith, Martin; Williams, Ruth; Clarke, Antonia; Hemingway, Cheryl; Wassmer, Evangeline; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical and investigative features of children with a clinical diagnosis of probable autoimmune encephalopathy, both with and without antibodies to central nervous system antigens. Method Patients with encephalopathy plus one or more of neuropsychiatric symptoms, seizures, movement disorder or cognitive dysfunction, were identified from 111 paediatric serum samples referred from five tertiary paediatric neurology centres to Oxford for antibody testing in 2007–2010. A blinded clinical review panel identified 48 patients with a diagnosis of probable autoimmune encephalitis whose features are described. All samples were tested/retested for antibodies to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), VGKC-complex, LGI1, CASPR2 and contactin-2, GlyR, D1R, D2R, AMPAR, GABA(B)R and glutamic acid decarboxylase. Results Seizures (83%), behavioural change (63%), confusion (50%), movement disorder (38%) and hallucinations (25%) were common. 52% required intensive care support for seizure control or profound encephalopathy. An acute infective organism (15%) or abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (32%), EEG (70%) or MRI (37%) abnormalities were found. One 14-year-old girl had an ovarian teratoma. Serum antibodies were detected in 21/48 (44%) patients: NMDAR 13/48 (27%), VGKC-complex 7/48(15%) and GlyR 1/48(2%). Antibody negative patients shared similar clinical features to those who had specific antibodies detected. 18/34 patients (52%) who received immunotherapy made a complete recovery compared to 4/14 (28%) who were not treated; reductions in modified Rankin Scale for children scores were more common following immunotherapies. Antibody status did not appear to influence the treatment effect. Conclusions Our study outlines the common clinical and paraclinical features of children and adolescents with probable autoimmune encephalopathies. These patients, irrespective of positivity for the known antibody targets, appeared to benefit from immunotherapies and further antibody targets may be defined in the future. PMID:23175854

  19. In vivo targeting of dead tumor cells in a murine tumor model using a monoclonal antibody specific for the La autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ejeh, Fares; Darby, Jocelyn M; Pensa, Katherine; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D; Brown, Michael P

    2007-09-15

    To investigate the potential of the La-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3B9 as an in vivo tumor-targeting agent. The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line was used for in vitro studies and the EL4 model in which apoptosis was induced with cyclophosphamide and etoposide was used for in vivo studies. In vitro studies compared 3B9 binding in the EL4 cell with that in its counterpart primary cell type of the thymocyte. For in vivo studies, 3B9 was intrinsically or extrinsically labeled with carbon-14 or 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N''''-tetraacetic acid-indium-111, respectively, and biodistribution of the radiotracers was investigated in EL4 tumor-bearing mice, which were treated or not with chemotherapy. La-specific 3B9 mAb bound EL4 cells rather than thymocytes, and binding was detergent resistant. 3B9 binding to dead EL4 cells in vitro was specific, rapid, and saturable. Significantly, more 3B9 bound dead EL4 tumor explant cells after host mice were treated with chemotherapy, which suggested that DNA damage induced 3B9 binding. Tumor binding of 3B9 in vivo was antigen specific and increased significantly after chemotherapy. Tumor accumulation of 3B9 peaked at approximately 50% of the injected dose per gram of tumor 72 h after chemotherapy and correlated with increased tumor cell death. Tumor/organ ratios of 3B9 biodistribution, which included the tumor/blood ratio, exceeded unity 48 or more hours after chemotherapy. La-specific mAb selectively targeted dead tumor cells in vivo, and targeting was augmented by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This novel cell death radioligand may be useful both for radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy.

  20. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  1. Increased Expression of the NOD-like Receptor Family, Pyrin Domain Containing 3 Inflammasome in Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis is a Potential Contributor to Their Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that the NLRP3 inflammasome is implicated in the pathogenesis of DM/PM. High NLRP3 expression led to elevated levels of IL-1β and IL-18 and could be one of the factors promoting disease progress.

  2. [What's new in internal medecine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachiet, M; Rybojad, M; Bouaziz, J-D

    2016-12-01

    Answering the question « what's new in internal medecine in 2016? » is very challenging. We used 3 methods of article selection to reduce the selection bias: 3 authors, a systematic review of the articles discussed in the weekly bibliographic meeting of our unit (Dermatology department, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris, France) and a selection of the best articles by several internal medecine practitioners in Paris. Eleven « hot topics » were analyzed: i/lowering cholesterol level but not blood blessure has a significant impact on cardiovascular morbi-mortality in cardiovascular intermediate risk patients; ii/the « treat to treat target » is efficient in psoriatic arthritis; iii/ a genotype/ phenotype correlation favors the separation of ileal Crohn's disease, colonic Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis; iv/ tocilizumab treatment (anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody ) is very efficient in giant cell arteritis and slightly efficient in systemic sclerosis; v/ combination therapy using methotrexate plus steroids compared with steroids alone becomes the « gold standard » treatment for juvenile dermatomyositis; vi/ dupilumab treatment (antibody blocking IL-4 and IL-13 receptors) is not only efficient in atopic dermatitis but also in asthma; vii/ think of eosinophilic oesophagitis in a patient with atopic dermatitis and dypshagia or food impaction; viii/ genetic A2 protein dysfunction induces NF-kB hyperactivation and an autoinflammatory disorder with features similar to Behcet's disease; ix/ no new biotherapies have shown high efficacy in systemic lupus erythematosus; x/ nanoparticles loaded with autoantigens induce Tregs and Bregs and may be a promising therapeutic option to treat auto-immune disease in the future; xi/ ipilimumab treatment (anti-CTLA4 antibody, immune checkpoint inhibitor) may induce complete remission in acute myeloid leukemia patients relapsing after haematological stem cell transplantation. Year 2016 is full of great discoveries in internal medicine

  3. Contribution of dot-blot assay to the diagnosis and management of myositis: a three-year practice at a university hospital centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Clothilde; Vignaud, Guillaume; Liozon, Eric; Magy, Laurent; Gallouedec, Gael; Ly, Kim; Bezanahary, Holly; Cypierre, Anne; Lapébie, François-Xavier; Palat, Sylvain; Gondran, Guillaume; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Fauchais, Anne-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are heterogeneous autoimmune diseases with wide clinical spectrum that may lead to delayed diagnosis. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of IIM-specific dot-blot assay on diagnostic process of patients presenting with muscular or systemic symptoms evocating of IIM. We collected all the prescriptions of an IIM specific dot-blot assay (8 autoantigens including Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, SRP, Mi-2, Ku, PM/Scl and Scl-70) over a 38-month period. 316 myositis dot-blot assays (MSD) were performed in 274 patients (156 women, mean age 53±10.6 years) referring for muscular and/or systemic symptoms suggesting IIM. The timing of dot prescription through the diagnostic process was highly variable: without (35%), concomitantly (16%) or after electromyographic studies (35%). Fifty-nine patients (22%) had IIM according to Bohan and Peter's criteria. Among them, 29 (49%) had positive dot (8 Jo-1, 6 PM-Scl, 5 PL-12, 5 SRP, 2 Mi-2, 2 PL-7 and 1 Ku). Various other diagnoses were performed including 35 autoimmune disease or granulomatosis (12%), 19 inflammatory rheumatic disease (7%), 16 non inflammatory muscular disorders (6%), 10 drug-induced myalgia (4%), 11 infectious myositis (4%). Except 11 borderline SRP results and one transient PM-Scl, MSD was positive only in one case of IIM. Dot allowed clinicians to correct diagnosis in 4 cases and improved the diagnosis of IIM subtypes in 4 cases. This study reflects the interest of myositis dot in the rapid diagnosis process of patients with non-specific muscular symptoms leading to various diagnoses including IIM.

  4. Diagnostic performance of a commercial immunoblot assay for myositis antibody testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundell, Chris; Rojana-Udomsart, Arada; Mastaglia, Frank; Hollingsworth, Peter; McLean-Tooke, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a population based reference range for a commercial immunoblot assay detecting myositis specific autoantibodies (MSAs) and myositis associated autoantibodies (MAAs), and to assess the diagnostic performance of this reference range against the manufacturer's recommended ranges in a myositis patient cohort. A total of 124 patients from a myositis cohort and 197 healthy controls were serologically assessed using a commercial immunoblot containing eleven autoantigens (Jo-1, EJ, OJ, PL7, PL12, Mi-2, SRP, Ku, PMScl75, PMScl100 and Ro52) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Use of the manufacturer's reference ranges resulted in detection of MSAs in 19.4% of myositis patients and 9.1% of controls; MAAs were detected in 41.1% of myositis patients and 14.2% of controls. Reference values derived from the healthy control population resulted in significant differences in cut-off values for some autoantibodies, particularly Ro52 and PMScl75. Use of local reference ranges reduced detection of MSAs to 16.9% of myositis patients and 3% of healthy controls, with MAAs 23.4% of patients and 2% of healthy controls. Application of population based reference ranges resulted in significant differences in detection of MSAs and MAAs compared to the manufacturer's recommended ranges. Cut-off levels should be assessed to ensure suitability for the population tested. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding the 80-kDa subunit protein of the human autoantigen Ku (p70/p80) recognized by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimori, Tsuneyo; Ohosone, Yasuo; Hama, Nobuaki; Suwa, Akira; Akizuki, Masashi; Homma, Mitsuo; Griffith, A.J.; Hardin, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Anti-Ku (p70/p80) autoantibodies in patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome recognize a 70-kDa/80-kDa protein heterodimer which binds to terminal regions of double-stranded DNA. In the present study, the authors isolated full-length cDNAs that encode the 80-kDa Ku subunit. Initial screening of a human spleen cDNA library with anti-Ku antibodies yielded a cDNA of 1.0 kilobase (kb) (termed K71) encoding a portion of the 80-kDa Ku polypeptide (identification based on immunological criteria). In RNA blots, this cDNA hybridized with two mRNAs of 3.4 and 2.6 kb. In vitro transcription and translation experiments produced an immunoprecipitable polypeptide which comigrated with the 80-kDa Ku subunit. The Ku80-6 cDNA proved to be 3304 nucleotides in length, with an additional poly(A) tail, closely approximating the size of the larger mRNA. It contains a single long open reading frame encoding 732 amino acids. The putative polypeptide has a high content of acidic amino acids and a region with periodic repeat of leucine in every seventh position which may form the leucine zipper structure. In genomic DNA blots, probes derived from the opposite ends of cDNA Ku80-6 hybridized with several nonoverlapping restriction fragments from human leukocyte DNA, indicating that the gene encoding the 80-kDa Ku polypeptide is divided into several exons by intervening sequences

  6. Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by a slipped disk in the spine) Stroke MUSCLE DISEASES Becker muscular dystrophy Dermatomyositis Muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) Myotonic dystrophy POISONING Botulism Poisoning ( insecticides , nerve gas) ...

  7. Yellow Fever Vaccine in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Systemic Lupus; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Inflammatory Myopathy; Systemic Sclerosis; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Takayasu Arteritis; Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis; Sjogren's Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis

  8. The clinical phenotype associated with myositis-specific and associated autoantibodies: a meta-analysis revisiting the so-called antisynthetase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Jean-Christophe; Fabien, Nicole; Reynaud, Quitterie; Durieu, Isabelle; Durupt, Stéphane; Dutertre, Marine; Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    To describe the clinical spectrum associated with aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase (ARS) autoantibodies in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis defined according to Peter and Bohan's criteria. Cohort studies were selected from MEDLINE and Embase up to August 2013. Two investigators independently extracted data on study design, patient characteristics, and clinical features (interstitial lung disease [ILD], fever, mechanic's hands [MH], Raynaud's phenomenon [RPh], arthralgia, sclerodactyly, cancer and dermatomyositis-specific rash) according to the presence of myositis-specific (anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase [ARS], anti-signal recognition particle [anti-SRP] and anti-Mi2) and myositis-associated (anti-PM/Scl, anti-U1-RNP and anti-Ku) autoantibodies. 27 studies (3487 patients) were included in the meta-analysis. Arthralgia (75%, CI 67-81) and ILD (69%, CI 63-74) were the most prevalent clinical signs associated with anti-ARS autoantibodies. Anti-Mi2 and anti-SRP autoantibodies were associated with few extramuscular signs. ARS autoantibodies were identified in 13% of patients with cancer-associated myositis (5-25). Patients with non-anti-Jo1 ARS had greater odds of presenting fever (RR 0.63, CI 0.52-0.90) and ILD (RR 0.87, CI 0.81-0.93) compared to those with anti-Jo1 autoantibodies. The frequencies of myositis (RR 1.60, CI 1.38-1.85), arthralgia (RR 1.52, CI 1.32-1.76) and MH (RR 1.47, CI 1.11-1.94) were almost 50% higher in patients with anti-Jo1 compared to non-anti-Jo1 ARS autoantibodies. Patients with anti-PM/Scl differed from those with anti-ARS autoantibodies by a greater prevalence of RPh (RR 0.70, CI 0.53-0.94) and sclerodactyly (RR 0.47, CI 0.25-0.89). ILD was less frequent in patients with anti-U1-RNP autoantibodies (RR 3.35, CI 1.07-10.43). No difference was observed between anti-ARS and myositis-associated autoantibodies for other outcomes. The presence of anti-ARS autoantibodies delimits a heterogeneous subset of patients with a high

  9. A Comprehensive Overview on Myositis-Specific Antibodies: New and Old Biomarkers in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Minoru; Tanaka, Shin; Ceribelli, Angela; Calise, S. John; Chan, Edward K. L.

    2018-01-01

    Autoantibodies specific for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs)) are clinically useful biomarkers to help the diagnosis of polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM). Many of these are also associated with a unique clinical subset of PM/DM, making them useful in predicting and monitoring certain clinical manifestations. Classic MSAs known for over 30 years include antibodies to Jo-1 (histidyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase) and other aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARS), anti-Mi-2, and anti-signal recognition particle (SRP). Anti-Jo-1 is the first autoantibodies to ARS detected in 15–25 % of patients. In addition to anti-Jo-1, antibodies to seven other aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARS) have been reported with prevalence, usually 1–5 % or lower. Patients with any antiARS antibodies are associated with anti-synthetase syndrome characterized by myositis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), arthritis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and others. Several recent studies suggested heterogeneity in clinical features among different anti-ARS antibody-positive patients and anti-ARS may also be found in idiopathic ILD without myositis. Anti-Mi-2 is a classic marker for DM and associated with good response to steroid treatment and good prognosis. Anti-SRP is specific for PM and associated with treatment-resistant myopathy histologically characterized as necrotizing myopathy. In addition to classic MSAs, several new autoantibodies with strong clinical significance have been described in DM. Antibodies to transcription intermediary factor 1γ/α (TIF1γ/α, p155/140) are frequently found in DM associated with malignancy while anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5; CADM140) are associated with clinically amyopathic DM (CADM) complicated by rapidly progressive ILD. Also, anti-MJ/nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP-2) and anti-small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO-1) activating enzyme (SAE) are recognized as new DM-specific autoantibodies. Addition of

  10. Testing for myositis specific autoantibodies: Comparison between line blot and immunoprecipitation assays in 57 myositis sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzana, Ilaria; Fredi, Micaela; Ceribelli, Angela; Mordenti, Cristina; Ferrari, Fabio; Carabellese, Nice; Tincani, Angela; Satoh, Minoru; Franceschini, Franco

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the performance of a line blot assay for the identification of autoantibodies in sera of patients affected by myositis, compared with immunoprecipitation (IP) as gold standard. 66 sera of patients with myositis (23 polymyositis, 8 anti-synthetase syndromes, 29 dermatomyositis and 6 overlap syndromes) were tested by commercial LB (Euroimmun, Lubeck, Germany); 57 sera were analyzed also by IP of K562 cell extract radiolabeled with (35)S-methionine. Inter-rater agreement was calculated with Cohen's k coefficient. Myositis-specific antibodies (MSA) were detected in 36/57 sera (63%) by IP and in 39/66 sera (59%) by LB. The most frequent MSA found by LB were anti-Jo1 and anti-Mi2 found in 15% (10/66) of sera, followed by anti-NXP2 and anti-SRP detected in 106% (7/66) of sera. Anti-TIF1gamma and anti-MDA5 were found in 6 (9%) and 5 sera (7.6%), respectively. A good agreement between methods was found only for anti-TIF1γ, anti-MDA5 and anti-NXP-2 antibodies, while a moderate agreement was estimated for anti-Mi2 and anti-EJ. By contrast, a high discordance rate for the detection of anti-Jo1 antibodies was evident (k: 0.3). Multiple positivity for MSA were found in 11/66 (17%) by LB and 0/57 by IP (p: 0001). Comparing the clinical features of these 11 sera, we found total discrepancies between assays in 3 sera (27.3%), a relative discrepancy due to the occurrence of one discordant autoantibody (not confirmed by IP) in 5 cases (45.5%) and a total discrepancy between LB and IP results, but with a relative concordance with clinical features were found in other 3 sera (27.3%). The semiquantitative results do not support the interpretation of the data. The use of LB assay allowed the detection of new MSA, such as anti-MDA5, anti-MJ and anti-TIF1gamma antibodies, previously not found with routine methods. However, the high prevalence of multiple positivities and the high discondant rate of anti-Jo1 antibodies could create some misinterpretation of the results from the

  11. Diagnostic Utility of Auto-Antibodies in Inflammatory Muscle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are four main groups of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM): polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) and sporadic inclusion body myositis; based on clinical presentation and muscle pathology. Nevertheless, important phenotypical differences (either muscular and/or extra-muscular manifestations) within a group persist. In recent years, the titration of different myositis-specific (or associated) auto-antibodies as a diagnostic tool has increased. This is an important step forward since it may facilitate, at a viable cost, the differential diagnosis between IIM and other myopathies. We have now routine access to assays for the detection of different antibodies. For example, IMNM are related to the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR. PM is associated with anti-synthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, OJ, and EJ) and DM with anti-Mi-2, anti-SAE, anti-TIF-1-γ and anti-NXP2 (both associated with cancer) or anti-MDA5 antibodies (associated with interstitial lung disease). Today, over 30 myositis specific and associated antibodies have been characterised, and all groups of myositis may present one of those auto-antibodies. Most of them allow identification of homogenous patient groups, more precisely than the classical international classifications of myositis. This implies that classification criteria could be modified accordingly, since these auto-antibodies delineate groups of patients suffering from myositis with consistent clinical phenotype (muscular and extra-muscular manifestations), common prognostic (cancer association, presence of interstitial lung disease, mortality and risk of relapse) and treatment responses. Nevertheless, since numerous auto-antibodies have been recently characterised, the exact prevalence of myositis specific antibodies remains to be documented, and research of new auto-antibodies in the remaining seronegative group is still needed.

  12. Oxidative Addition Reactions of I2 with [HIr4(CO10-n(PPh3 n(m-PPh2] (n = 1 and 2 and Crystal and Molecular Structure of [HIr4(m-I2(CO7 (PPh3(m-PPh2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Dario

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of the cluster compounds [HIr4(CO10-n(PPh3 n(mu-PPh2] [n = 0, (1; 1, (2 and 2, (3] with I2 have been investigated. Compound 1 does not react, however, the presence of PPh3 in place of CO ligand(s activates the cluster. Both compounds 2 and 3 react with I2 under mild conditions to give [HIr4(mu-I2(CO7(PPh3(mu-PPh 2] (4, as the result of oxidative addition of I2 and dissociation of two CO ligands, or one CO and one PPh3 ligands, respectively. The molecular structure of 4, determined by an X-ray diffraction study, exhibits a butterfly arrangement of iridium atoms with the wings spanned by a mu-PPh2 ligand, the hinge bridged by a mu-H ligand, two hinge to wing tip edges bridged by iodine atoms and all metal atoms bearing two CO ligands, with the exception of one of the hinge atoms that contains a CO and a PPh3 ligands. This cluster exhibits the shortest average Irfraction three-quartersIr bond length [2.698(2 Å] observed so far for a derivative of 1 and this is in accord with the relatively high average oxidation state of its metal atoms (+1 for a carbonyl cluster compound.

  13. Targeting of tolerogenic dendritic cells towards heat-shock proteins: a novel therapeutic strategy for autoimmune diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Manon A A; Spiering, Rachel; Broere, Femke; van Laar, Jacob M; Isaacs, John D; van Eden, Willem; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2018-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDCs) are a promising therapeutic tool to restore immune tolerance in autoimmune diseases. The rationale of using tolDCs is that they can specifically target the pathogenic T-cell response while leaving other, protective, T-cell responses intact. Several ways of generating therapeutic tolDCs have been described, but whether these tolDCs should be loaded with autoantigen(s), and if so, with which autoantigen(s), remains unclear. Autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, are not commonly defined by a single, universal, autoantigen. A possible solution is to use surrogate autoantigens for loading of tolDCs. We propose that heat-shock proteins may be a relevant surrogate antigen, as they are evolutionarily conserved between species, ubiquitously expressed in inflamed tissues and have been shown to induce regulatory T cells, ameliorating disease in various arthritis mouse models. In this review, we provide an overview on how immune tolerance may be restored by tolDCs, the problem of selecting relevant autoantigens for loading of tolDCs, and why heat-shock proteins could be used as surrogate autoantigens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 3286 ... ... of Intra oral fibroma mimicking pyogenic granuloma, Abstract PDF ... obesity and related risk factors among women of the central market ... of dermatomyositis revealed during pregnancy with good outcome, Abstract PDF.

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 23, No 1 (2016), Multiple cystic lung disease in an adolescent boy, Abstract PDF ... Vol 14, No 1 (2013), Multisegmental tubercular spinal epidural abscess ... in paraneoplastic dermatomyositis associated with breast cancer, Abstract PDF.

  16. Tubuloreticular structures in different types of myositis: implications for pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, Irene M.; Hoogendijk, Jessica E.; Veldman, Henk; Ramkema, Marja; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; de Visser, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In dermatomyositis (DM) there is strong histopathological evidence of a microvascular pathogenesis, including endothelial microtubular inclusions. In nonspecific myositis, perimysial and perivascular infiltrates in the muscle biopsy similar to DM are found. Microtubular inclusions in endothelial

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Anti-Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination in Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE); Dermatomyositis (DM); DMixed Connective Tissue Disease; Systemic Vasculitis; Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); Sjögren's Syndrome; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile SLE; Juvenile DM

  18. Genetics Home Reference: idiopathic inflammatory myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stumble while walking and find it difficult to grasp items. As in dermatomyositis and polymyositis, swallowing can ... and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Most cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy are sporadic, ...

  19. Tubuloreticular structures in different types of myositis: Implications for pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, I.M.; Hoogendijk, J.E.; Veldman, H.; Ramkema, M; Weerman, M.A.V.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Visser, M.

    2008-01-01

    In dermatomyositis (DM) there is strong histopathological evidence of a microvascular pathogenesis, including endothelial microtubular inclusions. In nonspecific myositis, perimysial and perivascular infiltrates in the muscle biopsy similar to DM are found. Microtubular inclusions in endothelial

  20. Cardiac abnormalities assessed by non-invasive techniques in patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2015-01-01

    inflammatory myopathies (IIM) by means of non-invasive techniques. METHODS: Fourteen patients with IIM (8 polymyositis, 4 dermatomyositis, 2 cancer-associated dermatomyositis) and 14 gender- and age- matched healthy control subjects were investigated. Participant assessments included a cardiac questionnaire...... in 8 (57%) of the patients compared to none of the controls (pgroup (p=0.01). Two patients had systolic dysfunction, and one diastolic dysfunction...

  1. Neurological and Neurosurgical Conditions Associated with Aviation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    dermatomyositis, "myasthenic syndrome" 5. Remote effects; dementia, cerebellar degeneration, myelopathy, ganglioradiculitis, polyneuropathy , dermatomyositis...patients in the "severe" and "very severe" brain injury categories. Physical therapy and rehabilitation should be started early. The therapy must be...immobilization with cast or brace, flexion exercises and bedrest, can alleviate the immediate symptoms of pain or radiculitis but generally has no

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101105 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101105 J033025D11 At2g39090.1 tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein low similarity to prediabe...tic NOD sera-reactive autoantigen [Mus musculus] GI:6670773, anaphase-promoting com

  3. RENAL VASCULITIS IN 2012 Reclassification and the introduction of biologicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2012 saw the classification of the systemic vasculitides revised. Genetic studies showed that granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) are different diseases with aberrant immune responses to different autoantigens. B-cell depletion with rituximab also acquired a

  4. Characteristics of Prevotella intermedia-specific CD4+ T cell clones from peripheral blood of a chronic adult periodontitis patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, A.; Reinhardus, C.; Abraham-Inpijn, L.; Snijders, A.; Kievits, F.

    1998-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic destructive inflammatory disease associated with periodontopathic bacteria. In addition, autoantigens such as collagen and heat shock proteins (hsp) have been suggested to play a role. Established periodontal lesions are characterized by dense infiltrations of immune cells

  5. Pituitary autoantibodies in endocrine disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bensing, Sophie

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune endocrine disorders are characterised by the development of autoantibodies to specific autoantigens in the target organs. Lymphocytic hypophysitis (LyH) is a disease characterised by inflammation of the pituitary gland, often resulting in hypopituitarism. The aetiology of LyH is considered to be autoimmune. However, only a few pituitary autoantigens have so far been identified. Reliable autoantibody markers are requested in the diagnostic procedure of LyH to avoid...

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies HLA 8.1 ancestral haplotype alleles as major genetic risk factors for myositis phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, F W; Chen, W; O'Hanlon, T P; Cooper, R G; Vencovsky, J; Rider, L G; Danko, K; Wedderburn, L R; Lundberg, I E; Pachman, L M; Reed, A M; Ytterberg, S R; Padyukov, L; Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Radstake, T R; Isenberg, D A; Chinoy, H; Ollier, W E R; Scheet, P; Peng, B; Lee, A; Byun, J; Lamb, J A; Gregersen, P K; Amos, C I

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis, 473 juvenile dermatomyositis, 532 polymyositis and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (Pmyositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1 comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations.

  7. Detection of Legionella bozemanae, a New Cause of Septic Arthritis, by PCR Followed by Specific Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Knudsen, John Bonde; Uldum, Søren Anker

    2012-01-01

    Legionella bozemanae is a rare isolate in clinical specimens. We describe a case of joint infection due to L. bozemanae in an immunocompromised patient with dermatomyositis. Without the use of PCR screening or culture on specialized medium, the organism would not have been detected.......Legionella bozemanae is a rare isolate in clinical specimens. We describe a case of joint infection due to L. bozemanae in an immunocompromised patient with dermatomyositis. Without the use of PCR screening or culture on specialized medium, the organism would not have been detected....

  8. Muscle Metabolic Responses During Dynamic In-Magnet Exercise Testing : A Pilot Study in Children with an Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Marco; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; Schmitz, Joep P. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Takken, Tim; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    Rationale and Objectives: The clinical utility of supine in-magnet bicycling in combination with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31 MRS) to evaluate quadriceps muscle metabolism was examined in four children with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) in remission and healthy age- and

  9. Nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, Daniela Gerent Petry; Len, Cláudio Arnaldo; Hilário, Maria Odete Esteves; Terreri, Maria Teresa Ramos Ascensão

    2012-10-01

    To assess nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, scleroderma and mixed connective tissue disease) and relate it to clinical and laboratory findings and disease activity. Cross-sectional study assessing 147 patients by use of nailfold capillaroscopy as follows: 60 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis; 30 with systemic lupus erythematosus; 30 with juvenile dermatomyositis; 20 with localized scleroderma; four with systemic sclerosis; and three with mixed connective tissue disease. Clinical and laboratory tests and nailfold capillaroscopy were performed in all patients. The nailfold capillaroscopy was performed with an optical microscope (at 10- and 16-time magnifications) by the same observer. Most patients (76.2%) had normal nailfold capillaroscopy. The major changes in nailfold capillaroscopy, characterizing the scleroderma pattern, were observed in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma and mixed connective tissue disease. There was no association between nailfold capillaroscopy and disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and localized scleroderma. Disease activity and capillaroscopy were associated in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis. Nailfold capillaroscopy is a useful method to diagnose autoimmune rheumatic diseases and monitor disease activity.

  10. Long-term follow-up of 62 patients with myositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vlekkert, Janneke; Hoogendijk, Jessica E.; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate disease-related mortality and the course of the disease including functional outcome and quality of life. We did a follow-up study on a large prospective cohort of 62 patients with subacute-onset idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) (dermatomyositis (n = 24),

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000243 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000243 ... Diseased HPS0174 HPS0174 ... 皮膚筋炎 M339 Dermatopolymyositis 613825 ... ... ... -- -- ... Yes No intractable disease-specific iPSC derived from Dermatomyositis (DM). 皮膚筋炎患者由来iPS細胞株。|

  12. Overview of the radiology of connective tissue disorders in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, R.; King, S

    2000-02-01

    This review article describes the imaging finding of the connective tissue disorders in children. The radiological features of the following conditions are described; the spondyloarthropathics, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, scleroderma, the vasculitides, Kawasaki disease, synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO), and focal myositis. The features on several integrated imaging techniques are described.

  13. Pulmonary dystrophic Calcinosis associated to systemic sclerosis: Report of the first case in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Patarroyo, Paul; Rojas, Adriana; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The association of pulmonary calcinosis with systemic sclerosis has not been described in the medical literature. There are two type of lung calcification: dystrophic and metastatic; in the collagen vascular diseases the most frequent is the dystrophic calcinosis, seen mainly in dermatomyositis and scleroderma. We describe the first case of dystrophic calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis

  14. Clinical radiodiagnosis of collagen diseases. Klinicheskaya rentgenodiagnostika kollagenozov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spasskaya, P A; Bartusevichene, A S

    1988-01-01

    General information about collagen diseases, short history of their theory development are presented; classification is discussed. Pathomorphology of connective tissue and vessels in these diseases is described. Clinicoroentgenologic diagnosis of internal organ and locomotor system injuries in systemic lupus erythemotosus, in sclerodermia systematica, in dermatomyositis in combination with morphological and clinicolabaratory data is analysed in detail. 166 refs.; 85 figs.

  15. Overview of the radiology of connective tissue disorders in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, R.; King, S.

    2000-01-01

    This review article describes the imaging finding of the connective tissue disorders in children. The radiological features of the following conditions are described; the spondyloarthropathics, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, scleroderma, the vasculitides, Kawasaki disease, synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO), and focal myositis. The features on several integrated imaging techniques are described

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    Administrator

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... Abstract. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been implicated as a trigger for various autoimmune diseases, one of which is ... presented to us with muscle, skin, and systemic manifestations of dermatomyositis. Our aim is to .... patient's CD4 cell count was 168/µl) and worsening of symptoms ...

  17. Association between autoantibodies to the Arginine variant of the Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) and stimulated C-peptide levels in Danish children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise M; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Delli, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) was recently identified as a common autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and inclusion of ZnT8 autoantibodies (ZnT8Ab) was found to increase the diagnostic specificity of T1D.......The zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) was recently identified as a common autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and inclusion of ZnT8 autoantibodies (ZnT8Ab) was found to increase the diagnostic specificity of T1D....

  18. Radiometallating antibodies and biologically active peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Roberts, J.C.; Lewis, D.; Newmyer, S.L.; Schulte, L.D.; Burns, T.P.; Mixon, P.L.; Jeffery, A.L.; Schreyer, S.A.; Cole, D.A.; Figard, S.D.; Lennon, V.A.; Hayashi, M.; Lavallee, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N-benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have on functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies, and we have also developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides. The autoantigenic peptides, fragments of the acetylcholine receptor, are under investigation for myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules and the radiometallation chemistry will be discussed

  19. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...... biopsies from 35 patients with lupus nephritis by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Five samples of normal kidney tissue served as control specimens. We did not observe apoptotic glomerular cells in any...... cells constitute a quantitatively important source of auto-antibody-inducing nuclear auto-antigens in human lupus nephritis....

  20. Analysis of Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Insulitis in NOD Mice: Adoptive Transfer Experiments of Insulitis in ILI and NOD Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Moritaka; Nishimura, Masahiko; Koide, Yukio; Takato, O.Yoshida

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to study the pathophysiological events in the development of insulitis in NOD mice, we have developed ILI- and NOD-nu/nu mice. ILI mice are a nondiabetic inbred strain but are derived from the same Jcl:ICR mouse as NOD mice and share the same H-2 allotype with NOD mice. Splenocytes and CD4+ cells from diabetic NOD mice appeared to transfer insulitis to ILI-nu/nu mice, suggesting that ILI mice already express autoantigen(s) responsible for insulitis. But reciprocal thymic grafts f...

  1. Wireless sensor network testbed: A gateway for future solutions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abu-Mahfouz, Adnan M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available .kashan.co.za] ACCESSIBILITY One of the main objectives of MI2T-WSN is to develop a real-time system that operates and analyses the environment continuously, and is able to rapidly detect and report abnormal variations. MI2T- WSN should identify end-users? needs...

  2. Localization of MHC class II/human cartilage glycoprotein-39 complexes in synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients using complex-specific monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Peter G. A.; Baeten, Dominique; Rovers, Eric; Veys, Eric M.; Rijnders, Antonius W. M.; Meijerink, Jan; de Keyser, Filip; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) was identified as a candidate autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To further investigate the relevance of this Ag in RA, we have generated a set of five mAbs to a combination epitope of complexes of HC gp-39(263-275) and the RA-associated DR alpha beta

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105677 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105677 001-201-B01 At2g39090.1 tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein low similarity to prediab...etic NOD sera-reactive autoantigen [Mus musculus] GI:6670773, anaphase-promoting co

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119376 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119376 001-132-A09 At2g39090.1 tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein low similarity to prediab...etic NOD sera-reactive autoantigen [Mus musculus] GI:6670773, anaphase-promoting co

  5. Gclust Server: 97794 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 97794 CEL_B0244.2_25143920 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(171) 767 ida-1: related to Islet cell Diabete...ida-1: related to Islet cell Diabetes Autoantigen family member (ida-1) Number of Sequences 1 Homologs 1 Clu

  6. Divergent frequencies of IGF-I receptor-expressing blood lymphocytes in monozygotic twin pairs discordant for Graves' disease: evidence for a phenotypic signature ascribable to nongenetic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Raymond S; Brix, Thomas H; Hwang, Catherine J

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune process of the thyroid and orbital connective tissues. The fraction of T and B cells expressing IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) is increased in GD. It is a potentially important autoantigen in GD. Susceptibility to GD arises from both genetic and acquired...

  7. Leiomodins: larger members of the tropomodulin (Tmod) gene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, C. A.; Fritz-Six, K. L.; Almenar-Queralt, A.; Fowler, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The 64-kDa autoantigen D1 or 1D, first identified as a potential autoantigen in Graves' disease, is similar to the tropomodulin (Tmod) family of actin filament pointed end-capping proteins. A novel gene with significant similarity to the 64-kDa human autoantigen D1 has been cloned from both humans and mice, and the genomic sequences of both genes have been identified. These genes form a subfamily closely related to the Tmods and are here named the Leiomodins (Lmods). Both Lmod genes display a conserved intron-exon structure, as do three Tmod genes, but the intron-exon structure of the Lmods and the Tmods is divergent. mRNA expression analysis indicates that the gene formerly known as the 64-kDa autoantigen D1 is most highly expressed in a variety of human tissues that contain smooth muscle, earning it the name smooth muscle Leiomodin (SM-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD1). Transcripts encoding the novel Lmod gene are present exclusively in fetal and adult heart and adult skeletal muscle, and it is here named cardiac Leiomodin (C-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD2). Human C-Lmod is located near the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy locus CMH6 on human chromosome 7q3, potentially implicating it in this disease. Our data demonstrate that the Lmods are evolutionarily related and display tissue-specific patterns of expression distinct from, but overlapping with, the expression of Tmod isoforms. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Antigen Loading (e.g., Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65) of Tolerogenic DCs (toIDCs) Reduces Their Capacity to Prevent Diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetes (NOD)-Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Model of Adoptive Cotransfer of Diabetes As Well As in NOD Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Funda, David P.; Goliáš, Jaroslav; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Kozáková, Hana; Špíšek, R.; Palová-Jelínková, L.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 9, FEB 16 (2018), č. článku 290. ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-24487S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : type 1 diabetes * cell therapy * autoantigen Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 6.429, year: 2016

  9. Substitution of Pichia pastoris-derived recombinant proteins with mannose containing O- and N-linked glycans decreases specificity of diagnostic tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, Erica; Lerouge, Patrice; de Heer, Pleuni G.; Séveno, Martial; Coquet, Laurent; Modderman, Piet W.; Faye, Loïc; Aalberse, Rob C.; van Ree, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Background: Recombinant proteins from Pichia pastoris need to be fully evaluated before used as diagnostic tools. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether glycosylation by P. pastoris interferes with the specificity of diagnostic tests. Methods: An autoantigen involved in

  10. Disease: H00082 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0:397-409 (2004) DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2265.2004.01978.x ... PMID:12734493 (gene, env_factor, marker, autoantigen) ... AUTHORS ... Ai J, Leonha...rdt JM, Heymann WR. ... TITLE ... Autoimmune thyroid diseases: etiology, pathogenesis

  11. Protein microarray analysis as a tool for monitoring cellular autoreactivity in type 1 diabetes patients and their relatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrábelová, Z.; Koloušková, S.; Böhmová, K.; Faresjo, M. K.; Sumnik, Z.; Pechová, M.; Kverka, Miloslav; Chudoba, D.; Zacharovová, K.; Stadlerová, G.; Pithová, P.; Hladíková, M.; Štechová, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2007), s. 252-260 ISSN 1399-543X Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NR8127 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : autoantigen * autoreactive t cells * cytokine Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.314, year: 2007

  12. Natural antibodies related to metabolic and mammary health in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegsel, van A.T.M.; Hostens, M.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Lammers, A.; Kemp, B.; Opsomer, G.; Parmentier, H.K.

    2012-01-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are defined as antibodies that circulate in normal healthy individuals under the absence of deliberate antigenic stimulation. Two types of NAb are distinguished: NAb towards exogenous antigens and NAb towards autoantigens (N(A)Ab). The objectives of the current study were

  13. Molecular mimicry between Helicobacter pylori antigens and H+, K+ --adenosine triphosphatase in human gastric autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amedei, Amedeo; Bergman, Mathijs P.; Appelmelk, Ben J.; Azzurri, Annalisa; Benagiano, Marisa; Tamburini, Carlo; van der Zee, Ruurd; Telford, John L.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; D'Elios, Mario M.; del Prete, Gianfranco

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric atrophy develop through similar mechanisms involving the proton pump H+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase as autoantigen. Here, we report that H. pylori-infected patients with gastric autoimmunity harbor in vivo-activated gastric CD4+ T cells

  14. A NEW ELISA FOR THE DETECTION OF ANTI-HEPARAN SULFATE REACTIVITY, USING PHOTOBIOTINYLATED ANTIGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HYLKEMA, MN; KRAMERS, C; VANDERWAL, TJ; VANBRUGGEN, MCJ; SWAAK, AJG; BERDEN, JHM; SMEENK, RJT; Hylkema, Machteld

    1994-01-01

    Autoantibodies reacting with a great variety of autoantigens are characteristic for the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although reactivity with heparan sulfate (HS) in sera of patients with SLE is found in association with the occurrence of nephritis, the aetiological

  15. In vitro T lymphocyte responses to proteinase 3 (PR3) and linear peptides of PR3 in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Geld, YM; Huitema, MG; Franssen, CFM; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM; van der Zee, R.

    2000-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunity is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of WG. In previous studies a minority of WG patients as well as some healthy controls showed in vitro proliferation of their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to PR3, the main autoantigen in WG. The relevant

  16. Hypersensitivity Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Asgari, Nasrin; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen

    2015-01-01

    of pathology in neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease where activated neutrophils infiltrate, unlike in MS. The most widely used model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is an autoantigen-immunized disease that can be transferred to naive animals...

  17. Antiplectin autoantibodies in subepidermal blistering diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsrogge, J. J. A.; de Jong, M. C. J. M.; Kloosterhuis, G. J.; Vermeer, M. H.; Koster, J.; Sonnenberg, A.; Jonkman, M. F.; Pas, H. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemidesmosomal proteins may become targets of autoimmunity in subepidermal blistering diseases. Well-known recognized autoantigens are the intracellular plaque protein BP230, the transmembrane BP180 and its shed ecto-domain LAD-1. Objectives To establish the prevalence of autoimmunity

  18. Dendritic cells and veiled accessory macrophages : hormonal influences and autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Canning (Martha)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImmune responses to thyroid specific autoantigens form the basis of autoimmune thyroid disease pathogenesis. Two polar forms of autoimmune reactivity of the thyroid gland exist in this disease spectrum: a catabolic form characterized by gradual inflammatory destruction of thyroid

  19. Thyroid Autoantibodies Display both “Original Antigenic Sin” and Epitope Spreading

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan, Sandra M.; Rapoport, Basil

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for original antigenic sin in spontaneous thyroid autoimmunity is revealed by autoantibody interactions with immunodominant regions on thyroid autoantigens, thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) A-subunit. In contrast, antibodies induced by immunization of rabbits or mice recognize diverse epitopes. Recognition of immunodominant regions persists despite fluctuations in autoantibody levels following treatment or over time. The enhancement of...

  20. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...

  1. Thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a key enzyme in the formation of thyroid hormones and a major autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Titers of TPO antibodies also correlate with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration in euthyroid subjects, and they are frequently present in euthyroid subjects

  2. Immunogenetic mechanisms for the coexistence of organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridkis-Hareli, Masha

    2008-02-15

    Organ-specific autoimmune diseases affect particular targets in the body, whereas systemic diseases engage multiple organs. Both types of autoimmune diseases may coexist in the same patient, either sequentially or concurrently, sustained by the presence of autoantibodies directed against the corresponding autoantigens. Multiple factors, including those of immunological, genetic, endocrine and environmental origin, contribute to the above condition. Due to association of certain autoimmune disorders with HLA alleles, it has been intriguing to examine the immunogenetic basis for autoantigen presentation leading to the production of two or more autoantibodies, each distinctive of an organ-specific or systemic disease. This communication offers the explanation for shared autoimmunity as illustrated by organ-specific blistering diseases and the connective tissue disorders of systemic nature. Several hypothetical mechanisms implicating HLA determinants, autoantigenic peptides, T cells, and B cells have been proposed to elucidate the process by which two autoimmune diseases are induced in the same individual. One of these scenarios, based on the assumption that the patient carries two disease-susceptible HLA genes, arises when a single T cell epitope of each autoantigen recognizes its HLA protein, leading to the generation of two types of autoreactive B cells, which produce autoantibodies. Another mechanism functioning whilst an epitope derived from either autoantigen binds each of the HLA determinants, resulting in the induction of both diseases by cross-presentation. Finally, two discrete epitopes originating from the same autoantigen may interact with each of the HLA specificities, eliciting the production of both types of autoantibodies. Despite the lack of immediate or unequivocal experimental evidence supporting the present hypothesis, several approaches may secure a better understanding of shared autoimmunity. Among these are animal models expressing the transgenes

  3. Thyroid Autoantibodies Display both “Original Antigenic Sin” and Epitope Spreading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. McLachlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for original antigenic sin in spontaneous thyroid autoimmunity is revealed by autoantibody interactions with immunodominant regions on thyroid autoantigens, thyroglobulin (Tg, thyroid peroxidase (TPO, and the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR A-subunit. In contrast, antibodies induced by immunization of rabbits or mice recognize diverse epitopes. Recognition of immunodominant regions persists despite fluctuations in autoantibody levels following treatment or over time. The enhancement of spontaneously arising pathogenic TSHR antibodies in transgenic human thyrotropin receptor/NOD.H2h4 mice by injecting a non-pathogenic form of TSHR A-subunit protein also provides evidence for original antigenic sin. From other studies, antigen presentation by B cells, not dendritic cells, is likely responsible for original antigenic sin. Recognition of restricted epitopes on the large glycosylated thyroid autoantigens (60-kDa A-subunit, 100-kDa TPO, and 600-kDa Tg facilitates exploring the amino acid locations in the immunodominant regions. Epitope spreading has also been revealed by autoantibodies in thyroid autoimmunity. In humans, and in mice that spontaneously develop autoimmunity to all three thyroid autoantigens, autoantibodies develop first to Tg and later to TPO and the TSHR A-subunit. The pattern of intermolecular epitope spreading is related in part to the thyroidal content of Tg, TPO and TSHR A-subunit and to the molecular sizes of these proteins. Importantly, the epitope spreading pattern provides a rationale for future antigen-specific manipulation to block the development of all thyroid autoantibodies by inducing tolerance to Tg, first in the autoantigen cascade. Because of its abundance, Tg may be the autoantigen of choice to explore antigen-specific treatment, preventing the development of pathogenic TSHR antibodies.

  4. [Nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Daniela G; Terreri, Maria T; Len, Cláudio A; Hilário, Maria O

    2008-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy is a simple, noninvasive and inexpensive method which allows a functional and morphological study of the capillary network through direct visualization of the distal row of periungueal capillaries of the fingers. This method has been used as a diagnostic auxiliary in diseases such as scleroderma, dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease. It has also been used to differentiate between active and non active diseases, especially dermatomyositis, and to distinguish between primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Most reports of nailfold capillaroscopy are qualitative and semi-quantitative. Manuscripts describing quantitative methods (video-capillaroscopy) are scarce, particularly in childhood. The authors did a literature review based on Medline, Lilacs and Pubmed data using the keywords: nailfold capillaroscopy, colagenosis, Raynaud, children and adolescents.

  5. Dynamic Optical Coherence Tomography Capillaroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Hans Christian; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina Alette

    2016-01-01

    loops. OBJECTIVE To explore the potential for OCT capillaroscopy of the nailfolds using D-OCT. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In this case series study of 4 participants, the nailfolds in 2 patients with systemic sclerosis, 1 patient with dermatomyositis, and a healthy volunteer were scanned using D...... of distinct dermo-epidermal junction and more compact dermis with loss of adnexal structures. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Compared with conventional capillaroscopy, D-OCT offers second-to-none information on nailfold capillary morphology, overall skin architecture, as well as quantitative data on vascular......IMPORTANCE Vasculopathy characterized by functional and structural abnormalities of the microcirculation plays an important role in systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis. Although there are several advantages in using capillaroscopy, the method does not offer insight on the skin architecture, flow...

  6. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurveen Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisynthetase (AS syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis.

  7. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  8. Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolova, Anna; Chen, Jennifer K; Chung, Lorinda

    2017-01-01

    Synopsis Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified based on the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into four categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune mediated necrotizing myopathy. The term “scleroderma” refers to fibrosis of the skin. Localized scleroderma (morphea) is skin-limited, while systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with vascular and internal organ involvement. Although there is a paucity of randomized clinical trials, treatment with systemic corticosteroids (CS) is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extra-cutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS, however high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. CS monotherapy is neither recommended for the cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis nor scleroderma. While CS can be effective first line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering. PMID:26611554

  9. Distrofia muscular progressiva: alguns aspectos do diagnõstico diferencial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvio Saraiva

    1960-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors call attention to some clinical entities which are less known and more difficult to recognize and with which differential diagnosis of progressive muscular dystrophy should be made (infantile spinal muscular atrophy, amyotonia congenita, congenital acute anterior poliomyelitis, anthro-griposis multiplex, von Gierke's disease, central core disease, chronical polymyositis and dermatomyositis, thyrotoxic myopathy and menopausal dys- trophy. The importance of muscle biopsy in the differential diagnosis is emphasized.

  10. A Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus-Like Eruption Induced by Hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Daniel A; Mosser-Goldfarb, Joy L

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a medication with many well-described cutaneous side effects, notably the dermatomyositis-like eruption known as hydroxyurea dermopathy. Although systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported with hydroxyurea use, cutaneous lupus has not. We report a novel case of chronic cutaneous lupus induced by hydroxyurea and propose that this is a side effect that is distinct from hydroxyurea dermopathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis: unreliable MRI findings in the preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Arzu E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Borthne, Arne

    2000-12-01

    The authors present two cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF), one case of dermatomyositis and one case of posttraumatic muscle injury, which have similar magnetic resonance imaging findings in terms of skin, subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fasciae and muscle involvement. These cases highlight the need for cautious interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, for they are nonspecific and the preoperative decision should be based mostly on the evolution of the clinical status.

  12. Cardiac involvement in adult and juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, TThomas W; Diederichsen, L. P.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) include the main subgroups polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), inclusion body myositis (IBM) and juvenile DM ( JDM). The mentioned subgroups are characterised by inflammation of skeletal muscles leading to muscle weakness and other organs can also...... that statins might worsen muscle symptoms mimicking myositis relapse. On the basis of recent studies, we recommend a low threshold for cardiac workup and follow-up in patients with IIM. © 2016 Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited....

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Gazeley, David J.; Cronin, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are rare disorders with the unifying feature of proximal muscle weakness. These diseases include polymyositis(PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM) as the most common. The diagnosis is based on the finding of weakness on exam, elevated muscles enzymes, characteristic histopathology of muscle biopsies, electromyography abnormalities and rash in DM. Myositis-specific antibodies have been helpful in defining subsets of patients ...

  14. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and ly...

  15. Validation of the Actiheart Activity Monitor for Measurement of Activity Energy Expenditure in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The purpose of this study was to develop an activity energy expenditure (AEE) prediction equation for the Actiheart activity monitor (AH) for use in children with chronic disease. Methods: 63 children, aged 8-18 years with different types of chronic disease (Juvenile Arthritis, Hemophilia, Dermatomyositis, neuromuscular disease, Cystic Fibrosis or Congenital Heart Disease) participated in an activity testing session which consisted of a resting protocol, ...

  16. Lateral rectus myositis mimicking an abducens nerve palsy in a pregnant woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinda, Abd-Rahim; Shatriah, Ismail; Azhany, Yaakub; Nik-Ahmad-Zuky, Nik-Lah; Yunus, Rohaizan

    2014-01-01

    Myositis is a rare unknown inflammatory disorder of the skeletal muscle tissue. Generalized inflammatory myopathies, polymyositis, and dermatomyositis have been reported during pregnancy. Isolated orbital myositis in pregnancy has not been previously described in the literature. The authors report a case of left isolated orbital myositis in a primigravida at 38 weeks gestation affecting the patient's left lateral rectus muscle. MRI of the orbit was consistent with the diagnosis. She showed remarkable clinical improvement with oral corticosteroids therapy.

  17. Linear morphea with secondary mucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandpur Sujay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mucin deposition in the skin is a common feature of lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. In scleroderma, it occurs uncommonly or in small amount. We describe a 7-year-old boy with progressive, linear, bound-down plaques involving the thighs, lower abdomen and back with no systemic involvement. Histopathology showed features of scleroderma with abundant mucin deposition in the reticular dermis. This report highlights excessive mucin deposition in lesions of morphea.

  18. Flagellate dermatitis following consumption of shiitake mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Voon Loo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Japanese dermatologists were the first to describe the very characteristic flagellate dermatitis following consumption of under-cooked or raw shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes. These similar eruptions were also reported in patients treated with bleomycin, in dermatomyositis and adult onset Still’s disease. We report a case where a 40 year old chinese female developed flagellate dermatitis following ingestion of a bun containing shiitake mushroom.

  19. The Immune Response and the Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myositis: a Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceribelli, Angela; De Santis, Maria; Isailovic, Natasa; Gershwin, M Eric; Selmi, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic inflammatory myositis (IIMs, including polymyositis and dermatomyositis) remains largely enigmatic, despite advances in the study of the role played by innate immunity, adaptive immunity, genetic predisposition, and environmental factors in an orchestrated response. Several factors are involved in the inflammatory state that characterizes the different forms of IIMs which share features and mechanisms but are clearly different with respect to the involved sites and characteristics of the inflammation. Cellular and non-cellular mechanisms of both the immune and non-immune systems have been identified as key regulators of inflammation in polymyositis/dermatomyositis, particularly at different stages of disease, leading to the fibrotic state that characterizes the end stage. Among these, a special role is played by an interferon signature and complement cascade with different mechanisms in polymyositis and dermatomyositis; these differences can be identified also histologically in muscle biopsies. Numerous cellular components of the adaptive and innate immune response are present in the site of tissue inflammation, and the complexity of idiopathic inflammatory myositis is further supported by the involvement of non-immune mechanisms such as hypoxia and autophagy. The aim of this comprehensive review is to describe the major pathogenic mechanisms involved in the onset of idiopathic inflammatory myositis and to report on the major working hypothesis with therapeutic implications.

  20. Increased risk of comorbid rheumatic disorders in vitiligo patients: A nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chong Won; Eun, Sung Hye; Choi, Kwang Hyun; Bae, Jung Min

    2017-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common acquired depigmentation disorder. Previous studies have shown that vitiligo is associated with a variety of autoimmune disorders. However, a large-scale epidemiological study focused on comorbid rheumatic disorders has not been undertaken. To clarify the associations between vitiligo and various rheumatic disorders, we performed a cross-sectional study using data from the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. Between 2009 and 2013, totals of 86 210 patients with vitiligo and 172 420 age- and sex-matched controls without vitiligo were enrolled in this study. Vitiligo patients were found to be at increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis, but no significant association was found between vitiligo and dermatomyositis/polymyositis, Behçet's disease or ankylosing spondylitis. Subgroup analysis showed an increased risk of dermatomyositis/polymyositis in male and ankylosing spondylitis in female vitiligo patients. The risks of dermatomyositis/polymyositis or ankylosing spondylitis were higher in young vitiligo patients. Our study confirms a significant association between vitiligo and rheumatic disorders. Differences in comorbid rheumatic disorders by age group and sex suggest the need for patient-specific approaches. Careful consideration of rheumatic disorders is required for the proper management of comorbidities in vitiligo patients. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiseo, Bruno Camargo; Cocuzza, Marcello; Bonfa, Eloisa; Srougi, Miguel; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy.

  2. Inflammatory etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podolska MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Malgorzata J Podolska, Mona HC Biermann, Christian Maueröder, Jonas Hahn, Martin Herrmann Department of Internal Medicine 3, Institute for Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: The immune system struggles every day between responding to foreign antigens and tolerating self-antigens to delicately maintain tissue homeostasis. If self-tolerance is broken, the development of autoimmunity can be the consequence, as it is in the case of the chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. SLE is considered to be a multifactorial disease comprising various processes and cell types that act abnormally and in a harmful way. Oxidative stress, infections, or, in general, tissue injury are accompanied by massive cellular demise. Several processes such as apoptosis, necrosis, or NETosis (formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps [NETs] may occur alone or in combination. If clearance of dead cells is insufficient, cellular debris may accumulate and trigger inflammation and leakage of cytoplasmic and nuclear autoantigens like ribonucleoproteins, DNA, or histones. Inadequate removal of cellular remnants in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs may result in the presentation of autoantigens by follicular dendritic cells to autoreactive B cells that had been generated by chance during the process of somatic hypermutation (loss of peripheral tolerance. The improper exposure of nuclear autoantigens in this delicate location is consequently prone to break self-tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. Indeed, the germline variants of autoantibodies often do not show autoreactivity. The subsequent production of autoantibodies plays a critical role in the development of the complex immunological disorder fostering SLE. Immune complexes composed of cell-derived autoantigens and autoantibodies are formed and get deposited in various tissues, such as the

  3. MALT1 Inhibition Is Efficacious in Both Naïve and Ibrutinib-Resistant Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Nakhle S; Wong, Deanna H; Tanios, Georges; Iyer, Jessica R; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia; Dadashian, Eman L; Liu, Delong; Fontan, Lorena; Flemington, Erik K; Nichols, Cydney M; Underbayev, Chingiz; Safah, Hana; Melnick, Ari; Wiestner, Adrian; Herman, Sarah E M

    2017-12-15

    The clinical efficacy displayed by ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been challenged by the frequent emergence of resistant clones. The ibrutinib target, Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), is essential for B-cell receptor signaling, and most resistant cases carry mutations in BTK or PLCG2 , a downstream effector target of BTK. Recent findings show that MI-2, a small molecule inhibitor of the para-caspase MALT1, is effective in preclinical models of another type of BCR pathway-dependent lymphoma. We therefore studied the activity of MI-2 against CLL and ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Treatment of CLL cells in vitro with MI-2 inhibited MALT1 proteolytic activity reduced BCR and NF-κB signaling, inhibited nuclear translocation of RelB and p50, and decreased Bcl-xL levels. MI-2 selectively induced dose and time-dependent apoptosis in CLL cells, sparing normal B lymphocytes. Furthermore, MI-2 abrogated survival signals provided by stromal cells and BCR cross-linking and was effective against CLL cells harboring features associated with poor outcomes, including 17p deletion and unmutated IGHV Notably, MI-2 was effective against CLL cells collected from patients harboring mutations conferring resistance to ibrutinib. Overall, our findings provide a preclinical rationale for the clinical development of MALT1 inhibitors in CLL, in particular for ibrutinib-resistant forms of this disease. Cancer Res; 77(24); 7038-48. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Activation of autoreactive B cells by endogenous TLR7 and TLR3 RNA ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nathaniel M; Moody, Krishna-Sulayman; Debatis, Michelle; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2012-11-16

    The key step in the activation of autoreactive B cells is the internalization of nucleic acid containing ligands and delivery of these ligands to the Toll-like Receptor (TLR) containing endolysosomal compartment. Ribonucleoproteins represent a large fraction of autoantigens in systemic autoimmune diseases. Here we demonstrate that many uridine-rich mammalian RNA sequences associated with common autoantigens effectively activate autoreactive B cells. Priming with type I IFN increased the magnitude of activation, and the range of which RNAs were stimulatory. A subset of RNAs that contain a high degree of self-complementarity also activated B cells through TLR3. For the RNA sequences that activated predominantly through TLR7, the activation is proportional to uridine-content, and more precisely defined by the frequency of specific uridine-containing motifs. These results identify parameters that define specific mammalian RNAs as ligands for TLRs.

  6. Ultraviolet light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis: a potential mechanism for the induction of skin lesions and autoantibody production in LE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciola-Rosen, L; Rosen, A

    1997-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototype systemic autoimmune disease which is characterized clinically by pleiotropy and periodicity. The immune features which accompany the characteristic flares of the disease have strongly suggested that the autoimmune response is driven by self antigen, and is T cell-dependent. These features have prompted the search for potential initiating process(es) which induce the release of self-antigens in a form which causes T cell tolerance to those self molecules to be broken. We review here several recent observations which implicate apoptotic cells as an important potential source of clustered and concentrated autoantigens in SLE, and present our current model whereby the novel autoantigen fragments generated in apoptotic surface blebs initiate and drive the autoimmune response in this disease.

  7. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function...... of patients with RA, and the cells are assumed to play a role in joint destruction in that disorder. Therefore, we examined whether neutrophils are a source of YKL-40. YKL-40 was found to colocalize and comobilize with lactoferrin (the most abundant protein of specific granules) but not with gelatinase...... YKL-40 at the myelocyte-metamyelocyte stage, the stage of maturation at which other specific granule proteins are formed. Assuming that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in RA by inducing T cell-mediated autoimmune response, YKL-40 released from neutrophils in the inflamed joint could be essential...

  8. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  9. Nonelectrophoretic bidirectional transfer of a single SDS-PAGE gel with multiple antigens to obtain 12 immunoblots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Protein blotting is an invaluable technique in immunology to detect and characterize proteins of low abundance. Proteins resolved on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels are normally transferred electrophoretically to adsorbent membranes such as nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene diflouride membranes. Here, we describe the nonelectrophroretic transfer of the Ro 60 (or SSA) autoantigen, 220- and 240-kD spectrin antigens, and prestained molecular weight standards from SDS polyacrylamide gels to obtain up to 12 immunoblots from a single gel and multiple sera.

  10. Relationship between ZnT8Ab, the SLC30A8 gene and disease progression in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lotte B; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Pörksen, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies against the newly established autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, zinc transporter 8, ZnT8, are presented as two types, ZnT8RAb and ZnT8WAb. The rs13266634 variant of the SLC30A8 gene has recently been found to determine the type of ZnT8Ab. The aim of this study was to explore the impact...

  11. Progress in the biological function of alpha-enolase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-enolase (ENO1, also known as 2-phospho-D-glycerate hydrolase, is a metalloenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 2-phosphoglyceric acid to phosphoenolpyruvic acid in the glycolytic pathway. It is a multifunctional glycolytic enzyme involved in cellular stress, bacterial and fungal infections, autoantigen activities, the occurrence and metastasis of cancer, parasitic infections, and the growth, development and reproduction of organisms. This article mainly reviews the basic characteristics and biological functions of ENO1.

  12. Two different cytochrome P450 enzymes are the adrenal antigens in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Winqvist, O; Gustafsson, J; Rorsman, F; Karlsson, F A; Kämpe, O

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I) and idiopathic Addison's disease are both disorders with adrenal insufficiency but with differences in genetic background, clinical presentation, and extent of extraadrenal manifestations. In this study the major adrenal autoantigen identified with sera from patients with APS I was characterized by analyses using indirect immunofluorescence, Western blots of adrenal subcellular fractions and of recombinant proteins, immunoprecipitations of [35S...

  13. European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines for the diagnosis of coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, S; Koletzko, S; Korponay-Szabó, I R

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria for coeliac disease (CD) from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) were published in 1990. Since then, the autoantigen in CD, tissue transglutaminase, has been identified; the perception of CD has changed from that of a rather...... uncommon enteropathy to a common multiorgan disease strongly dependent on the haplotypes human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8; and CD-specific antibody tests have improved....

  14. Prohibitin Is Involved in Patients with IgG4 Related Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwu Du

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is a chronic systemic disease involved in many organs and tissues. As only limited autoantigens have been found since the beginning of this century, the aim of this study was to reveal new candidate autoantigens of IgG4-RD.Multiple cell lines including HT-29, EA.hy926, HEK 293 and HepG2 were used to test the binding ability of circulating autoantibodies from IgG4-RD sera. The amino-acid sequence was then analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem (MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. After the cloning and expression of recombinant putative autoantigen in a bacterial expression system, the corresponding immuno assay was set up and utilized to observe the prevalence of serum autoantibodies in a large set of confirmed clinical samples.One positive autoantigen was identified as prohibitin. ELISA analysis showed that a majority of patients with IgG4-RD have antibodies against prohibitin. Anti-prohibitin antibodies were present in the sera of patients with definite autoimmune pancreatitis (25/34; 73.5%, Mikulicz's disease (8/15; 53.3%, retroperitoneal fibrosis (6/11; 54.5%, other probable IgG4-RD (26/29; 89.7% and Sjögren's syndrome (4/30; 13.3% but not in apparently healthy donors (1/70; 1.4%.An association between prohibitin and patients with some IgG4-RD was observed, although the results were quite heterogeneous among different individuals within autoimmune pancreatitis, Mikulicz's disease and retroperitoneal fibrosis.

  15. The Emerging Importance of Non-HLA Autoantibodies in Kidney Transplant Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinal, Héloise; Dieudé, Mélanie; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies that are specific to organ donor HLA have been involved in the majority of cases of antibody-mediated rejection in solid organ transplant recipients. However, recent data show that production of non-HLA autoantibodies can occur before transplant in the form of natural autoantibodies. In contrast to HLAs, which are constitutively expressed on the cell surface of the allograft endothelium, autoantigens are usually cryptic. Tissue damage associated with ischemia-reperfusion, vascular ...

  16. Association of immune response to endothelial cell growth factor with early disseminated and late manifestations of Lyme disease but not posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kevin S; Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Contribution of defective PS recognition and efferocytosis to chronic inflammation and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Gititu Kimani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells results in elimination of auto-antigens and provides a strong anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive signal to prevent autoimmunity. While professional and non-professional phagocytes utilize a wide array of surface receptors to recognize apoptotic cells, recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS on apoptotic cells by PS receptors on phagocytes is emblematic signal for efferocytosis in metazoans. PS-dependent efferocytosis is associated with production of anti-inflammatory factors such as IL-10 and TGF-β that function, in part, to maintain tolerance to auto-antigens. In contrast, when apoptotic cells fail to be recognized and processed for degradation, auto-antigens persist, which can trigger immune activation leading to autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Despite the fact that genetic mouse models clearly demonstrate that loss of PS receptors can lead to age-dependent autoimmune diseases reminiscent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, link between PS and defective clearance in chronic inflammation and human autoimmunity is not well delineated. In this hypothesis and theory, we review emerging questions developing in the field that may be of relevance to SLE and human autoimmunity.

  18. Cell death in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2017-12-01

    Nephritis is one of the most severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). One key characteristic of lupus nephritis (LN) is the deposition of immune complexes containing nucleic acids and/or proteins binding to nucleic acids and autoantibodies recognizing these molecules. A variety of cell death processes are implicated in the generation and externalization of modified nuclear autoantigens and in the development of LN. Among these processes, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis, NETosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy have been proposed to play roles in tissue damage and immune dysregulation. Cell death occurs in healthy individuals during conditions of homeostasis yet autoimmunity does not develop, at least in part, because of rapid clearance of dying cells. In SLE, accelerated cell death combined with a clearance deficiency may lead to the accumulation and externalization of nuclear autoantigens and to autoantibody production. In addition, specific types of cell death may modify autoantigens and alter their immunogenicity. These modified molecules may then become novel targets of the immune system and promote autoimmune responses in predisposed hosts. In this review, we examine various cell death pathways and discuss how enhanced cell death, impaired clearance, and post-translational modifications of proteins could contribute to the development of lupus nephritis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. TAM receptor knockout mice are susceptible to retinal autoimmune induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Li, Qiutang; Ke, Yan; Lu, Qingjun; Han, Lixia; Kaplan, Henry J; Shao, Hui; Lu, Qingxian

    2011-06-16

    TAM receptors are expressed mainly by dendritic cells and macrophages in the immune system, and mice lacking TAM receptors develop systemic autoimmune diseases because of inefficient negative control of the cytokine signaling in those cells. This study aims to test the susceptibility of the TAM triple knockout (tko) mice to the retina-specific autoantigen to develop experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). TAM tko mice that were or were not immunized with interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) peptides were evaluated for retinal infiltration of the macrophages and CD3(+) T cells by immunohistochemistry, spontaneous activation of CD4(+) T cells, and memory T cells by flow cytometry and proliferation of IRBP-specific CD4(+) T cells by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assay. Ocular inflammation induced by IRBP peptide immunization and specific T cell transfer were observed clinically by funduscopy and confirmed by histology. Tko mice were found to have less naive, but more activated, memory T cells, among which were exhibited high sensitivity to ocular IRBP autoantigens. Immunization with a low dose of IRBP and adoptive transfer of small numbers of IRBP-specific T cells from immunized tko mice caused the infiltration of lymphocytes, including CD3(+) T cells, into the tko retina. Mice without TAM receptor spontaneously develop IRBP-specific CD4(+) T cells and are more susceptible to retinal autoantigen immunization. This TAM knockout mouse line provides an animal model with which to study the role of antigen-presenting cells in the development of T cell-mediated uveitis.

  20. 60 kD Ro and nRNP A frequently initiate human lupus autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latisha D Heinlen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a clinically heterogeneous, humoral autoimmune disorder. The unifying feature among SLE patients is the production of large quantities of autoantibodies. Serum samples from 129 patients collected before the onset of SLE and while in the United States military were evaluated for early pre-clinical serologic events. The first available positive serum sample frequently already contained multiple autoantibody specificities (65%. However, in 34 SLE patients the earliest pre-clinical serum sample positive for any detectable common autoantibody bound only a single autoantigen, most commonly 60 kD Ro (29%, nRNP A (24%, anti-phospholipids (18% or rheumatoid factor (15%. We identified several recurrent patterns of autoantibody onset using these pre-diagnostic samples. In the serum samples available, anti-nRNP A appeared before or simultaneously with anti-nRNP 70 K in 96% of the patients who had both autoantibodies at diagnosis. Anti-60 kD Ro antibodies appeared before or simultaneously with anti-La (98% or anti-52 kD Ro (95%. The autoantibody response in SLE patients begins simply, often binding a single specific autoantigen years before disease onset, followed by epitope spreading to additional autoantigenic specificities that are accrued in recurring patterns.

  1. Endemic pemphigus over a century: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abréu-Vélez, Ana María; Roselino, Ana Maria; Howard, Michael S; Reason, Iara J de Messias

    2010-03-01

    Endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) is an autoimmune disease, classically occurring in a restricted geographic area. Foci of EPF have been described in several Central and South American countries, often affecting young people and Amerindians, with some female predilection. Although most American EPF cases have been documented in Brazil, cases have been reported in Peru, Paraguay, El Salvador and Venezuela. An additional variant of EPF has been described in El Bagre, Colombia, (El Bagre-EPF) affecting older men and a few post-menopausal females. Finally, one additional type of EPF has been described in nomadic tribes affecting females of child bearing age in Tunisia, Africa. The main aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about autoantigens, and immunologic and genetic studies in EPF. We utilized a retrospective review of the literature, aiming to compile and compare the multiple geographic foci of EPF. The primary autoantigens in EPF are still considered to be desmogleins in the case of the Tunisian and all American cases, in contradistinction to plakins and desmogleins in El Bagre-EPF. Although several autoantigens are been suggested, their biochemical nature needs further elucidation. Current knowledge still supports the concept that an antibody mediated immune response represents the principal pathophysiology in all variants of EPF. A strong genetic susceptibility appears to contribute to disease development in several people affected by these diseases; however, no specific genes have been confirmed at present. We conclude that further investigation is necessary to define these disorders immunologically and genetically.

  2. Toll-like receptor 3 stimulation promotes Ro52/TRIM21 synthesis and nuclear redistribution in salivary gland epithelial cells, partially via type I interferon pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakidis, N C; Kapsogeorgou, E K; Gourzi, V C; Konsta, O D; Baltatzis, G E; Tzioufas, A G

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulated expression of Ro52/tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21), Ro60/TROVE domain family, member 2 (TROVE2) and lupus LA protein/Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (La/SSB) autoantigens has been described in the salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC) of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). SGECs, the key regulators of autoimmune SS responses, express high levels of surface functional Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, whereas Ro52/TRIM21 negatively regulates TLR-3-mediated inflammation. Herein, we investigated the effect of TLR-3-signalling on the expression of Ro52/TRIM21, as well as Ro60/TROVE2 and La/SSB autoantigens, by SGECs. The effect of TLR-3 or TLR-4 stimulation on autoantigen expression was evaluated by polyI:C or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, respectively, of SGEC lines (10 from SS patients, 12 from non-SS controls) or HeLa cells, followed by analysis of mRNA and protein expression. PolyI:C, but not LPS, resulted in a two-step induction of Ro52/TRIM21 mRNA expression by SGECs, a 12-fold increment at 6 h followed by a 2·5-fold increment at 24–48 h, whereas it induced a late two-fold up-regulation of Ro60/TROVE2 and La/SSB mRNAs at 48 h. Although protein expression levels were not affected significantly, the late up-regulation of Ro52/TRIM21 mRNA was accompanied by protein redistribution, from nucleolar-like pattern to multiple coarse dots spanning throughout the nucleus. These late phenomena were mediated significantly by interferon (IFN)-β production, as attested by cognate secretion and specific inhibition experiments and associated with IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 degradation. TLR-3-signalling had similar effects on SGECs obtained from SS patients and controls, whereas it did not affect the expression of these autoantigens in HeLa cells. TLR-3 signalling regulates the expression of autoantigens by SGECs, implicating innate immunity pathways in their over-expression in inflamed tissues and possibly in their exposure to the immune

  3. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients show a characteristic necrotizing perifascicular myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescam-Mancini, Lénaig; Allenbach, Yves; Hervier, Baptiste; Devilliers, Hervé; Mariampillay, Kuberaka; Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Gherardi, Romain; Mezin, Paulette; Preusse, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Benveniste, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies can be classified as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, sporadic inclusion body myositis or non-specific myositis. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients are assigned to either polymyositis or dermatomyositis suggesting overlapping pathological features. We aimed to determine if anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive myopathy has a specific morphological phenotype. In a series of 53 muscle biopsies of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, relevant descriptive criteria defining a characteristic morphological pattern were identified. They were tested in a second series of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients and compared to 63 biopsies from patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. In anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, necrotic fibres, which strongly clustered in perifascicular regions, were frequently observed. Sarcolemmal complement deposition was detected specifically in perifascicular areas. Inflammation was mainly located in the perimysium and around vessels in 90.6%. Perimysial fragmentation was observed in 90% of cases. Major histocompatibility complex class I staining was diffusely positive, with a perifascicular reinforcement. Multivariate analysis showed that criteria defining perifascicular pathology: perifascicular necrosis, atrophy, and perimysial fragmentation allow the distinction of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, among patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients displayed perifascicular necrosis, whereas dermatomyositis patients exhibited perifascicular atrophy. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Clinical characteristics of patients with anti-TIF1-γ antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Masiak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Inflammatory myopathies are a group of idiopathic, heterogeneous systemic diseases affecting predominantly skeletal muscles, though they can also involve the skin and internal organs. The association between cancer and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, particularly dermatomyositis, which is termed cancer-associated myositis (CAM, has been reported in the medical literature. A newly described autoantibody to a 155-kDa nuclear protein, identified as transcription intermediary factor 1-gamma (TIF1-γ, has proven useful for cancer screening in patients with dermatomyositis. Material and methods: Based on our database of laboratory results, between November 2014 and January 2016, we found 80 patients with a positive autoimmune inflammatory myopathy immunoblot profile. Results : Eleven of 80 patients revealed the presence of anti-TIF1-γ antibodies: 8 women and 3 men with average age 54.2 years. Dermatomyositis (DM was diagnosed in 6 cases, polymyositis in 1 case, myositis limited to ocular muscles and rhabdomyolysis in 1 case each, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease in 2 cases. Neoplasm was found in 4 cases. All of those patients had DM. The average time between DM and diagnosis of neoplasm was 7.5 months (from 1 to 18 months. Conclusions : The association between cancer and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, particularly DM, is well known, and cancer screening should be obligatory in such patients. So far there is no consensus as to the method or frequency with which patients with an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy should be tested to rule out neoplasm. Detection of anti-TIF1-γ antibodies in patients with DM gives the clinicians the very important suggestion of CAM. It seems reasonable that these patients should have more detailed and often repeated differential diagnostics.

  5. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Camargo Tiseo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. Materials and Methods A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. Results A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Conclusions Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy.

  6. Problems with sampling desert tortoises: A simulation analysis based on field data

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    Freilich, J.E.; Camp, R.J.; Duda, J.J.; Karl, A.E.

    2005-01-01

    The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) was listed as a U.S. threatened species in 1990 based largely on population declines inferred from mark-recapture surveys of 2.59-km2 (1-mi2) plots. Since then, several census methods have been proposed and tested, but all methods still pose logistical or statistical difficulties. We conducted computer simulations using actual tortoise location data from 2 1-mi2 plot surveys in southern California, USA, to identify strengths and weaknesses of current sampling strategies. We considered tortoise population estimates based on these plots as "truth" and then tested various sampling methods based on sampling smaller plots or transect lines passing through the mile squares. Data were analyzed using Schnabel's mark-recapture estimate and program CAPTURE. Experimental subsampling with replacement of the 1-mi2 data using 1-km2 and 0.25-km2 plot boundaries produced data sets of smaller plot sizes, which we compared to estimates from the 1-mi 2 plots. We also tested distance sampling by saturating a 1-mi 2 site with computer simulated transect lines, once again evaluating bias in density estimates. Subsampling estimates from 1-km2 plots did not differ significantly from the estimates derived at 1-mi2. The 0.25-km2 subsamples significantly overestimated population sizes, chiefly because too few recaptures were made. Distance sampling simulations were biased 80% of the time and had high coefficient of variation to density ratios. Furthermore, a prospective power analysis suggested limited ability to detect population declines as high as 50%. We concluded that poor performance and bias of both sampling procedures was driven by insufficient sample size, suggesting that all efforts must be directed to increasing numbers found in order to produce reliable results. Our results suggest that present methods may not be capable of accurately estimating desert tortoise populations.

  7. Nailfold capillaroscopy in juvenile rheumatic diseases: known measures, patterns and indications.

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    Gerhold, K; Becker, M O

    2014-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy has become an established method in adults for the evaluation of structural abnormalities of the microcirculation associated with rheumatic disease. It is a cornerstone for the diagnostic work-up of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and the early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis. However, this non-invasive examination may also be valuable in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases. Based on the scarce data available, this review focuses on capillaroscopic findings in healthy children and adolescents as well as in children with juvenile systemic sclerosis, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and Raynaud's phenomenon. In addition, it outlines the potential benefits and limitations of nailfold capillaroscopy for routine care in paediatric rheumatology.

  8. Outcome and prognostic factors in a French cohort of patients with myositis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Julie; Freynet, Olivia; Nunes, Hilario; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Miyara, Makoto; Dhote, Robin; Valeyre, Dominique; Naccache, Jean-Marc

    2016-12-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common form of extramuscular involvement in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis and is associated with poor prognosis. This study was designed to describe the long-term outcome of myositis-associated ILD. This retrospective observational study was conducted in 48 consecutive patients. Two groups defined according to outcome were compared to determine prognostic factors: a "severe" group (vital capacity [VC] myositis-associated ILD had severe initial PFT results but a low mortality rate. Independent prognostic factors at presentation were initial VC and myopathic changes on electromyography. This study highlights the need for studies focusing on the correlation between muscle and lung pathogenic mechanisms.

  9. Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma.

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    Postolova, Anna; Chen, Jennifer K; Chung, Lorinda

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified by the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into 4 categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Systemic corticosteroid (CS) treatment is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extracutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS; however, high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. Although CS can be effective first-line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Inclusion body myositis.

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    Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders that share many similarities. In addition to sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM), these include dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. IBM is the most common IIM after age 50 years. Muscle histopathology shows endomysial inflammatory exudates surrounding and invading nonnecrotic muscle fibers often accompanied by rimmed vacuoles and protein deposits. It is likely that IBM is has a prominent degenerative component. This article reviews the evolution of knowledge in IBM, with emphasis on recent developments in the field, and discusses ongoing clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. El embarazo no exacerba la dermatomiositis

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    Alfredo Berrocal

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available We report four pregnancies in three dermatomyositis female patients who had their disease under control from beginning, during the course of their pregnancies, and the Postpartum period. Two females were off steroids and one received prednisone and azathioprine until week 16th of pregnancy when azathioprine was taken off, remaining only on prednisone, Neither case had a disease relapse. All babies were alive and full term newbornes, they also were adequate for gestational age and none had congenital malformations. ( Rev Med Hered 1999; 10: 125-128 .

  12. Psychiatric adverse effects of chloroquine

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Bogaczewicz; Tomasz Sobów

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine is a prototype antimalarial drug, widely used in several branches of medicine. Antimalarial drugs are used in the treatment of various dermatological, immunological, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Examples of off-labelled indications for chloroquine analogues use include dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis, polymorphous light eruption, disseminated granuloma annulare and porfiria cutanea tarda. There is a relatively small number of adverse effects related to chloroquine anal...

  13. Prospective risk of rheumatologic disease associated with occupational exposure in a cohort of male construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Paul D; Järvholm, Bengt; Torén, Kjell

    2015-10-01

    The association between occupational exposure and autoimmune disease is well recognized for silica, and suspected for other inhalants. We used a large cohort to estimate the risks of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis associated with silica and other occupational exposures. We analyzed data for male Swedish construction industry employees. Exposure was defined by a job-exposure matrix for silica and for other inorganic dusts; those with other job-exposure matrix exposures but not to either of the 2 inorganic dust categories were excluded. National hospital treatment data were linked for International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) Revision-coded diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis (seronegative and positive), systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis. The 2 occupational exposures were tested as independent predictors of prospective hospital-based treatment for these diagnoses using age-adjusted Poisson multivariable regression analyses to calculate relative risk (RR). We analyzed hospital-based treatment data (1997 through 2010) for 240,983 men aged 30 to 84 years. There were 713 incident cases of rheumatoid arthritis (467 seropositive, 195 seronegative, 51 not classified) and 128 cases combined for systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis. Adjusted for smoking and age, the 2 occupational exposures (silica and other inorganic dusts) were each associated with increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis combined: RR 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-1.64) and RR 1.31 (95% CI, 1.11-1.53), respectively. Among ever smokers, both silica and other inorganic dust exposure were associated with increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RRs 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11-1.68 and 1.42; 95% CI, 1.17-1.73, respectively), while among never smokers, neither exposure was associated with statistically

  14. MICRO-STRUCTURAL INVESTIGATION OF SOME ARTIFACTS DISCOVERED AT POROLISSUM

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    MUNTEANU Mihai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available the paper presents the investigation of two fragments of roman bronze artefacts, discovered during archaeological works performed at Porolissum, an important military and economical point on the northern limes of Dacia Province. One of the analyzed fragments (Mi1 was taken from a consistent fragment of a Roman bronze statue, while the second (Mi2 was among a lot of small metal pieces, discovered in the same investigated area. Using highly sophisticated micro-structural analysing techniques – X-Ray diffraction, the paper investigates the possibility that the Mi2 fragment may have belonged to the same statue from which the sample Mi1 was taken

  15. Aeromagnetic map of the Sandia Mountain Wilderness, Bernalillo and Sandoval counties, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, D.C.; Cordell, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    During 1981 and 1982 the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mimes conducted field investigations to evaluate the mineral resource potential of the Sandia Mountain Wilderness, Bernalillo and Sandoval Counties, New Mexico. This report and map represent only the results of the aeromagnetic compilation from previous publications (U.S. geological Survey, 1975a,b,c). The wilderness encompasses 61 mi2 (37,232 acres) within the Cibola National Forest, but the map area is about 145 mi2 and includes areas adjacent to the wilderness boundary.

  16. IL-5 promotes induction of antigen-specific CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells that suppress autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Giang T; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J; Carter, Nicole M; Verma, Nirupama D; Plain, Karren M; Boyd, Rochelle; Robinson, Catherine M; Nomura, Masaru; Killingsworth, Murray; Hall, Bruce M

    2012-05-10

    Immune responses to foreign and self-Ags can be controlled by regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD4 and IL-2Rα chain (CD25). Defects in Tregs lead to autoimmunity, whereas induction of Ag-specific CD4+CD25+ Tregs restores tolerance. Ag-specific CD4+CD25+ FOXP3+Tregs activated by the T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine, IL-4, and specific alloantigen promote allograft tolerance. These Tregs expressed the specific IL-5Rα and in the presence of IL-5 proliferate to specific but not third-party Ag. These findings suggest that recombinant IL-5 (rIL-5) therapy may promote Ag-specific Tregs to mediate tolerance. This study showed normal CD4+CD25+ Tregs cultured with IL-4 and an autoantigen expressed Il-5rα. Treatment of experimental autoimmune neuritis with rIL-5 markedly reduced clinical paralysis, weight loss, demyelination, and infiltration of CD4+ (Th1 and Th17) CD8+ T cells and macrophages in nerves. Clinical improvement was associated with expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs that expressed Il-5rα and proliferated only to specific autoantigen that was enhanced by rIL-5. Depletion of CD25+ Tregs or blocking of IL-4 abolished the benefits of rIL-5. Thus, rIL-5 promoted Ag-specific Tregs, activated by autoantigen and IL-4, to control autoimmunity. These findings may explain how Th2 responses, especially to parasitic infestation, induce immune tolerance. rIL-5 therapy may be able to induce Ag-specific tolerance in autoimmunity.

  17. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

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    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  18. Rapid induction of autoantibodies during ARDS and septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meduri G Umberto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the induction of humoral responses directed against human autoantigens during acute inflammation. We utilized a highly sensitive antibody profiling technology to study autoantibodies in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and severe sepsis, conditions characterized by intensive immune activation leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Methods Using Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS, a cohort of control, ARDS and sepsis patients were tested for antibodies to a panel of autoantigens. Autoantibody titers greater than the mean plus 3 SD of the 24 control samples were used to identify seropositive samples. Available longitudinal samples from different seropositive ARDS and sepsis patient samples, starting from within the first two days after admission to the intensive care, were then analyzed for changes in autoantibody over time. Results From screening patient plasma, 57% of ARDS and 46% of septic patients without ARDS demonstrated at least one statistically significant elevated autoantibody compared to the controls. Frequent high titer antibodies were detected against a spectrum of autoantigens including potassium channel regulator, gastric ATPase, glutamic decarboxylase-65 and several cytokines. Analysis of serial samples revealed that several seropositive patients had low autoantibodies at early time points that often rose precipitously and peaked between days 7-14. Further, the use of therapeutic doses of corticosteroids did not diminish the rise in autoantibody titers. In some cases, the patient autoantibody titers remained elevated through the last serum sample collected. Conclusion The rapid induction of autoantibodies in ARDS and severe sepsis suggests that ongoing systemic inflammation and associated tissue destruction mediate the break in tolerance against these self proteins.

  19. Expression of Toll-like receptors and their detection of nuclear self-antigen leading to immune activation in JSLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Angela; Thorbinson, Colin; Beresford, Michael W

    2012-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) essential in the functioning of the immune system have been implicated in the development of autoimmunity. TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 are capable of recognizing nucleic autoantigens typical of SLE. Their expression correlates positively with disease activity in adult-onset SLE. This study aimed to determine the role of TLRs in JSLE and whether apoptotic neutrophils are a source of nuclear autoantigen being detected through TLR3, 7, 8 and 9, leading to an inflammatory response. TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 mRNA and protein expression were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in JSLE patients compared with JIA and non-inflammatory controls. Activation of the TLRs by JSLE serum-induced apoptotic neutrophils was detected by measuring IFN-α mRNA and protein expression, and confirmed using myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) inhibitors. JSLE patients have increased TLR3, 8 and 9 mRNA and protein expression compared with controls (P < 0.05). Incubation of PBMCs with apoptotic neutrophils demonstrated a dose-response relationship for IFN-α mRNA expression. Inhibition of TLR signalling by blocking MyD88 and TRIF signalling decreased IFN-α mRNA expression in PBMCs incubated with apoptotic neutrophils (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated significantly increased TLR expression in JSLE compared with controls. Our data indicate that apoptotic neutrophils trigger TLR activation through their presentation of autoantigens. The role of TLRs in this inflammatory response was demonstrated by a dose-response relationship to apoptotic neutrophil concentration and confirmed by a decrease in IFN-α production after inhibition of TLR signalling.

  20. Immuno-chemistry of hydroxyl radical modified GAD-65: A possible role in experimental and human diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinuddin; Ansari, Nadeem A; Shahab, Uzma; Habeeb, Safia; Ahmad, Saheem

    2015-10-01

    The repertoire of known auto-antigens is limited to a very small proportion of all human proteins, and the reason why only some proteins become auto-antigens is unclear. The 65 kDa isoform of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-65) is a major auto-antigen in type I diabetes, and in various neurological diseases. Most patients with type I diabetes (70-80%) have auto-antibodies against GAD-65, which often appear years before clinical onset of the autoimmune diabetes. Thus, the aim of the study is to focus on the immunogenicity of GAD65 and its reactive oxygen species (ROS) conformer in STZ-induced diabetic rats and on human diabetic patients. In the present study, GAD-65 was modified by hydroxyl radical following Fenton's reaction. The modifications in the structure of the GAD-65 are supported by UV-vis and fluorescence spectral studies. Immunogenicity of both native and hydroxyl radical modified GAD-65 (ROS-GAD-65) was studied in experimental rabbits and was confirmed by inducing type I diabetes in experimental male albino rats using streptozotocin (45 mg/kg). We found that ROS-GAD-65 was a better immunogen as compared to the native GAD-65. A considerable high binding to ROS-GAD-65 was observed as compared to native GAD-65 in both the serum antibodies from diabetes animal models and as well as in the serum samples of type I diabetes. Hydrogen peroxide under the exposure of UV light produces hydroxyl radical (·OH) which is most potent oxidant, and could cause protein damage (GAD-65) to the extent of generating neo-epitopes on the molecule, thus making it immunogenic. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. The involvement of galectin-3 in skin injury in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Meng, Z; Han, Y; Cao, C; Tan, G; Wang, L

    2018-04-01

    Objective Our previous research suggested that anti-galectin-3 antibody was highly associated with the development of lupus skin lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study we aimed to investigate the involvement of galectin-3 in SLE skin damage. Methods The study consisted of 49 patients with SLE, 16 with dermatomyositis and 11 with systemic scleroderma and 20 healthy controls. Galectin-3 was examined by ELISA and immunohistochemical staining in serum and skin, respectively. Results Serum galectin-3 was significantly higher in patients with SLE than in those with dermatomyositis ( P  0.05). As for subtypes of skin lesions in SLE, galectin-3 expression was lower in chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus than in acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus ( P = 0.0439). Conclusion Serum galectin-3 is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of lupus skin damage, but can be a potential biomarker for the measurement of SLE disease activity. Galectin-3 is greatly reduced in patients with lupus lesions compared with healthy controls, which may contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the skin.

  2. Inflammatory myopathies in childhood: correlation between nailfold capillaroscopy findings and clinical and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascif, Ana K S; Terreri, Maria T R A; Len, Cláudio A; Andrade, Luis E C; Hilário, Maria O E

    2006-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy is an important tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with rheumatic diseases, in particular dermatomyositis and scleroderma. A relationship has been observed in adults between improved capillaroscopic findings and reduced disease activity. Our aim was to correlate disease activity (clinical and laboratory data) and nailfold capillaroscopy findings in 18 patients with inflammatory myopathies. This prospective study included 13 juvenile dermatomyositis patients (Bohan and Peter criteria) (mean age of 8.8 years) and five patients with overlap syndrome (mean age of 15.7 years). We evaluated disease activity (skin abnormalities and muscle weakness, muscle enzymes and acute phase reactants) and its correlation with nailfold capillaroscopy findings (dilatation of isolated loops, dropout of surrounding vessels and giant capillary loops). We used a microscope with special light and magnification of 10 to 16X. Eighteen patients underwent a total of 26 capillaroscopic examinations, seven of them on two or more occasions (13 were performed during the active disease phase and 13 during remission). Twelve of the 13 examinations performed during the active phase exhibited scleroderma pattern and 8 of the 13 examinations performed during remission were normal. Therefore, in 20 of the 26 examinations clinical and laboratory data and nailfold capillaroscopy findings correlated (p = 0.01). Nailfold capillaroscopy is a non-invasive examination that offers satisfactory correlation with disease activity and could be a useful tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of inflammatory myopathies.

  3. A patient case highlighting the myriad of cutaneous adverse effects of prolonged use of hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Brett; Ryser, Ted; Neill, John; Aires, Daniel; Rajpara, Anand

    2017-11-15

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite primarily used to treat myeloproliferative disorders, and chronic treatment is associated with many cutaneous adverse effects ranging in severity from ichthyosis to aggressive nonmelanoma skin cancer. We report a 67-year-oldman with a history of polycythemia vera who was referred for management of progressively worsening dorsal hand lesions. The patient presented withhyperpigmentation, ichthyosis, plantar keratoderma, dermatomyositis-like eruptions, two squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratoses. The adversereactions observed were acknowledged to be related to chronic hydroxyurea use. The patient underwent Mohs excision of the squamous cell carcinomas and thehydroxyurea was promptly discontinued; subsequent cutaneous improvement of the dermatomyositislike lesions ensued. Another clinically suspicious aggressive squamous cell carcinoma was suspected and the patient was referred to the plastic surgery department for complete excision because of the size of the lesion. The patient remains on periodic dermatology follow up. We report a case that exemplifies the cutaneous adverse effects of chronic hydroxyurea therapy. Although many cases improve after drug discontinuation, strict photoprotection and ongoing surveillance are indicated given the recently proposed premalignant potential of dermatomyositis-like eruptions and the aggressive nature of hydroxyurea-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  4. The Co-Existence of Myasthenia Gravis in Patients with Myositis: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Julie J.; Corse, Andrea M.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Myositis and myasthenia gravis (MG) are both autoimmune disorders presenting with muscle weakness. Rarely, they occur simultaneously in the same patient. Since the management of myasthenia gravis differs from that of myositis, it is important to recognize when patients have both diseases. We reviewed the cases of 6 patients with both myositis and MG to identify clinical features that suggest the possibility of co-existing MG in myositis patients. Methods We identified 6 patients with dermatomyositis or polymyositis and MG. We reviewed their medical records to assess their clinical presentations, laboratory findings, and electrophysiological features. Results All 6 patients had definite dermatomyositis or polymyositis by the criteria of Bohan and Peter as well as electrophysiologic and/or serologic confirmation of MG. Among overlap patients, 5/6 (83%) had bulbar weakness, 2/6 (33%) had ptosis, and 1/6 (17%) had diplopia. Fatigable weakness was noted by 5/6 (83%) patients. Treatment with pyridostigmine improved symptoms in 5/6 (83%). High dose steroids were associated with worsening weakness in 2/6 (33%) patients. Conclusions Prominent bulbar symptoms, ptosis, diplopia, and fatigable weakness should suggest the possibility of MG in patients with myositis. A suspicion of MG may be confirmed through appropriate electrophysiologic and laboratory testing. In those with myositis-MG overlap, high dose steroids may exacerbate symptoms and pryidostigmine may play an important therapeutic role. PMID:24412588

  5. Biomarkers in rheumatic diseases: how can they facilitate diagnosis and assessment of disease activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandra; Assassi, Shervin

    2015-11-26

    Serological and proteomic biomarkers can help clinicians diagnose rheumatic diseases earlier and assess disease activity more accurately. These markers have been incorporated into the recently revised classification criteria of several diseases to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment. Furthermore, they also facilitate more accurate subclassification and more focused monitoring for the detection of certain disease manifestations, such as lung and renal involvement. These biomarkers can also make the assessment of disease activity and treatment response more reliable. Simultaneously, several new serological and proteomic biomarkers have become available in the routine clinical setting--for example, a protein biomarker panel for rheumatoid arthritis and a myositis antibody panel for dermatomyositis and polymyositis. This review will focus on commercially available antibody and proteomic biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and axial spondyloarthritis (including ankylosing spondylitis). It will discuss how these markers can facilitate early diagnosis as well as more accurate subclassification and assessment of disease activity in the clinical setting. The ultimate goal of current and future biomarkers in rheumatic diseases is to enable early detection of these diseases and their clinical manifestations, and to provide effective monitoring and treatment regimens that are tailored to each patient's needs and prognosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  6. Elevated risk of venous thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michał Nowak, Katarzyna Królak-Nowak, Aleksandra Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Jakub Fichna, Marcin Włodarczyk Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a multifactorial disease manifesting as either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Its prevalence makes VTE a significant issue for both the individual – as a negative factor influencing the quality of life and prognosis – and the society due to economic burden. VTE is the third most common vascular disorder in Western countries, after myocardial infarction and stroke, making it a major cause of in-hospital mortality, responsible for 5%–10% of hospital deaths. Despite many studies conducted, only 50%–60% provoking factors have been identified, while the remaining 40%–50% have been classified as idiopathic or unprovoked. Chronic inflammatory disorders, with their underlying prothrombotic state, reveal an increased risk of VTE (six to eight times compared with the general population. Among the inflammatory disorders, we can identify inflammatory myopathies – a group of rare, chronic diseases featuring weakness and inflammation of muscles with periods of exacerbation and remission; their main classes are polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The objective of this review is to emphasize the need of VTE prophylaxis in individuals with inflammatory myopathies in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates among those patients and improve their quality of life and prognosis. Keywords: deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, inflammation, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, prothrombotic state

  7. High frequency of association of rheumatic/autoimmune diseases and untreated male hypogonadism with severe testicular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Balderas, F Javier; Tapia-Serrano, Rosario; Fonseca, M Eugenia; Arellano, Jorge; Beltran, Arturo; Yañez, Patricia; Camargo-Coronel, Adolfo; Fraga, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Our goal in the present work was to determine whether male patients with untreated hypogonadism have an increased risk of developing rheumatic/autoimmune disease (RAD), and, if so, whether there is a relation to the type of hypogonadism. We carried out neuroendocrine, genetic, and rheumatologic investigations in 13 such patients and 10 healthy male 46,XY normogonadic control subjects. Age and body mass index were similar in the two groups. Nine of the 13 patients had hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (five of whom had Klinefelter's syndrome [karyotype 47,XXY]) and 4 of the 13 had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (46,XY). Of these last four, two had Kallmann's syndrome and two had idiopathic cryptorchidism. Eight (61%) of the 13 patients studied had RADs unrelated to the etiology of their hypogonadism. Of these, four had ankylosing spondylitis and histocompatibility B27 antigen, two had systemic lupus erythematosus (in one case associated with antiphospholipids), one had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and one had juvenile dermatomyositis. In comparison with the low frequencies of RADs in the general population (about 0.83%, including systemic lupus erythematosus, 0.03%; dermatomyositis, 0.04%; juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, 0.03%; ankylosing spondylitis, 0.01%; rheumatoid arthritis, 0.62%; and other RAD, 0.1%), there were surprisingly high frequencies of such disorders in this small group of patients with untreated hypogonadism (P hypogonadism and was associated with marked gonadal failure with very low testosterone levels. PMID:11714390

  8. Elevated expression of the IGF2 mRNA binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2/IMP2) is linked to short survival and metastasis in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Barghash, Ahmad; Golob-Schwarzl, Nicole; Helms, Volkhard; Haybaeck, Johannes; Kessler, Sonja M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) represents the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths and develops in Barret's esophagus affected tissues. The IGF2 mRNA binding protein IMP2/IGF2BP2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in hepatocellular carcinoma. Aim of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic role of IMP2 in EAC. Human EAC and Barret's esophagus tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, particularly in tumors of increased size and in metastatic tissues. Molec...

  9. Treatment of renal manifestations of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesic, Kresimir; Ljubanovic, Danica; Horvatic, Ivica

    2013-01-01

    Vasculitis is a clinicopathological entity characterized by inflammation and necrosis of blood vessels. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Two major autoantigens for ANCA are myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which are proteins in the primary granules of neutrophils and in the lysosomes of monocytes. They are expressed in mature neutrophils of patients with ANCA, while absent in healthy subjects. The kidney is the most commonly affected vital organ in ANCA-associated vasculitis, and patient outcomes are largely determined by the severity of renal disease at diagnosis and by its response to treatment.

  10. Structural insight into the function of myelin basic protein as a ligand for integrin αMβ2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapulionis, Romualdas; Oliveira, Cristiano; Gjelstrup, Mikkel Carstensen

    2008-01-01

    protein (MBP), a major autoantigen in MS, is a potent and specific ligand for the integrin αMβ2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) expressed mainly on phagocytic cells. MBP undergoes a dramatic conformational change when liberated from the lipid-rich environment of the myelin sheath. The MS drug glatiramer acetate......Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease where phagocytic cells infiltrate the nerve tissue and act as terminal agents in destruction of the myelin sheath. However, the mechanism that triggers the ability of these cells to recognize myelin remains obscure. We show that myelin basic...

  11. Polymeric Gene Delivery for Diabetic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wan Kim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Several polymers were used to delivery genes to diabetic animals. Polyaminobutyl glycolic acid was utilized to deliver IL-10 plasmid DNA to prevent autoimmune insulitis of non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse. Polyethylene glycol grafted polylysine was combined with antisense glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD MRNA to represent GAD autoantigene expression. GLP1 and TSTA (SP-EX4 were delivered by bioreducible polymer to stop diabetic progression. Fas siRNA delivery was carried out to treat diabetic NOD mice animal.

  12. No Contribution of GAD-65 and IA-2 Autoantibodies around Time of Diagnosis to the Increasing Incidence of Juvenile Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen U.; Pipper, Christian B.; Mortensen, Henrik B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. A new perspective on autoantibodies as pivotal players in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has recently emerged. Our key objective was to examine whether increased levels of autoantibodies against the β-cell autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (isoform 65) (GADA) and insulinoma...... associated antigen-2A (IA-2A) mirrored the 3.4% annual increase in incidence of T1D. Methods. From the Danish Childhood Diabetes Register, we randomly selected 500 patients and 500 siblings for GADA and IA-2A analysis (1997 through 2005). Blood samples were taken within three months after onset. A robust log...

  13. The master two-dimensional gel database of human AMA cell proteins: towards linking protein and genome sequence and mapping information (update 1991)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Leffers, H; Rasmussen, H H

    1991-01-01

    autoantigens" and "cDNAs". For convenience we have included an alphabetical list of all known proteins recorded in this database. In the long run, the main goal of this database is to link protein and DNA sequencing and mapping information (Human Genome Program) and to provide an integrated picture......The master two-dimensional gel database of human AMA cells currently lists 3801 cellular and secreted proteins, of which 371 cellular polypeptides (306 IEF; 65 NEPHGE) were added to the master images during the last 10 months. These include: (i) very basic and acidic proteins that do not focus...

  14. Citrullination: the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ferraccioli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation and pannus formation, which can lead to severe destruction of cartilage and bone. Several self proteins have been suggested to be disease-driving autoantigens. Moreover the presence of autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins in sera of patients with RA enhances the strength of this hypothesis. Proteins are encoded by a limited number of genes in our genome. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, glycosylation and citrullination can increase the morphological and the functional diversity of the proteome.

  15. V(D)J recombination process and the Pre-B to immature B-cells transition are altered in Fanca ?/? mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thuy Vy; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Firlej, Virginie; Rosselli, Filippo; Aoufouchi, Sa?d

    2016-01-01

    B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) must generate a functional B-cell receptor and overcome the negative selection induced by reactivity with autoantigens. Two rounds of DNA recombination are required for the production of functional immunoglobulin heavy (Ig-HCs) and light (LCs) chains necessary for the continuation of B-lymphocyte development in the BM. Both rounds depend on the joint action of recombination activating gene-1 (RAG-1) and RAG-2 endonucleases with the DNA non-homologous end-...

  16. Non-MHC Antigenic Targets of the Humoral Immune Response in Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing body of data supporting a role for non-HLA antibodies in acute and chronic rejection of solid organ transplants. While many of these non-HLA antigens remain poorly defined, the principle antigenic targets are expressed on cells of the allograft including endothelium and epithelium. These non-HLA antigens are classified as either alloantigens, such as the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) or MICB, or tissue-specific autoantigens such as vim...

  17. Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and liver cytosol antibody type 1 concentrations in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Muratori, P; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol antibody type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). 
Aims—Since LKM1 and LC1 react against two distinct liver specific autoantigens (cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6) and a 58 kDa cytosolic polypeptide respectively), the aim was to see whether LKM1 and LC1 concentrations correlate with liver disease activity. 
Patients—Twenty one patients with type 2 AIH were studied. 
Methods—A...

  18. Functional delineation of three groups of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyer, L.A.; Logie, C.; Bonte, E; Becker, P.B.; Wade, P.A.; Wolff, A.P.; Wu, C.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Peterson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes antagonize the inhibitory effects of chromatin. We compare six different remodeling complexes: ySWI/SNF, yRSC, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2, dCHRAC, and dNURF. We find that each complex uses similar amounts of ATP to remodel nucleosomal arrays at nearly identical rates.

  19. 78 FR 61621 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Threatened Status for the Western...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ..., Paraguay, Uruguay, eastern Bolivia, and northern Argentina (Ehrlich et al. 1992, pp. 129-130; AOU 1998, p... avian taxonomist and Fish and Wildlife Service employee at the National Museum of Natural History... Argentina, spending 5 months from late November through late April moving around an area 1,243 mi (2,000 km...

  20. 78 FR 35851 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... area is 995 km\\2\\ (384 mi\\2\\). The receiver layout and seismic survey data will be acquired using the... desirable acoustic environment; and Cease feeding or social interaction. For example, at the Guerreo Negro... similar to those in humans and other terrestrial mammals (Southall et al. 2007). Based on data from...

  1. Technical basis for high-level waste repository land control requirements for Palo Duro Basin, Paradox Basin, and Richton Dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.P.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-02-01

    Three sites, the Palo Duro Basin in Texas, the Paradox Basin in Utah, and the Richton Dome in Mississippi, are being investigated by the US Department of Energy for high-level radioactive-waste disposal in mined, deep geologic repositories in salt. This report delineates the use of regulatory, engineering, and performance assessment information to establish the technical basis for controlled area requirements. Based on the size of the controlled area determined, plus that of the geologic repository operations area, recommendations of possible land control or ownership area requirements for each locale are provided. On a technical basis, the following minimum land control or ownership requirements are recommended, assuming repository operations area of 2240 ac (907 ha), or 3.5 mi 2 (9.1 km 2 ): Palo Duro Basin - 4060 ac (1643 ha), or 6.3 mi 2 (16.4 km 2 ); Paradox Basin - 4060 ac (1643 ha), or 6.3 mi 2 (16.4 km 2 ); and Richton Dome - 5000 ac (2024 ha), or 7.8 mi 2 (20.2 km 2 ). Of the factors used to determine the technically based recommendations, one was found to dominate each locale. For the Palo Duro and Paradox Basins, the dominant factor was the need to limit potential radionuclide release by ground-water flow to the accessible environment. For the Richton Dome, the dominant factor was the need to limit the potential effects of solution mining on dome and repository integrity

  2. Emerald ash borer life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Toby R. Petrice; Houping Liu

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was discovered in southeastern Michigan and nearby Ontario in June of 2002. EAB was identified as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in approximately 2,500 mi2, and...

  3. De Novo Mutations in CHD4, an ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeler Gene, Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome with Distinctive Dysmorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, Karin; Terhal, Paulien A; Cohen, Lior; Bruccoleri, Michael; Irving, Melita; Martinez, Ariel F; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Machol, Keren; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Pengfei; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Beuten, Joke; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Haude, Katrina; Fong, Chin-To; Enns, Gregory M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fan, Judith; Gotway, Garrett; Ghorbani, Mohammad; van Gassen, Koen; Monroe, Glen R; van Haaften, Gijs; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Campeau, Philippe M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Also known as Mi2β, CHD4 is an integral subunit of a well-characterized histone deacetylase complex. Here we

  4. Phosphorylation of linker histones regulates ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, P.J.; Carruthers, L.M.; Logie, C.; Hill, D.A.; Solomon, M.J.; Wade, P.A.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Hansen, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Members of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes play key roles in the regulation of transcription, development, DNA repair and cell cycle control. We find that the remodeling activities of the ySWI/SNF, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2 and xACF complexes are nearly abolished by incorporation of

  5. Experiment list: SRX099380 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .7,8.5,497 GSM803108: Mi2beta Ikaros knockout chromatin source_name=mouse Ik knockout DP thymocytes || genet...ic background=C57BL/6 x129S4/SvJae || genotype=Ikaros knockout || cell type=DP thymocytes || chip antibody=h

  6. Mine and prospect map of the Vermilion Cliffs-Paria Canyon Instant Study Area and adjacent wilderness areas, Coconino County, Arizona, and Kane County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Vermilion Cliffs-Paria Canyon Instant Study Area and adjacent wilderness areas are mostly in Coconino County Ariz., but extend into Kane County, Utah. The area studied in this report encompasses about 560 mi2 (1,450 km2). The study area includes the established Paria Canyon Primitive and Vermilion Cliffs Natural Areas between U.S. Highways 89 and 89A.

  7. Hydrology, phosphorus, and suspended solids in five agricultural streams in the Lower Fox River and Green Bay Watersheds, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, David J.; Robertson, Dale M.; Baumgart, Paul D.; Fermanich, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay to characterize water quality in agricultural streams in the Fox/Wolf watershed in northeastern Wisconsin and provide information to assist in the calibration of a watershed model for the area. Streamflow, phosphorus, and suspended solids data were collected between October 1, 2003, and September 30, 2006, in five streams, including Apple Creek, Ashwaubenon Creek, Baird Creek, Duck Creek, and the East River. During this study, total annual precipitation was close to the 30-year normal of 29.12 inches. The 3-year mean streamflow was highest in the East River (113 ft3/s), followed by Duck Creek (58.2 ft3/s), Apple Creek (26.9 ft3/s), Baird Creek (12.8 ft3/s), and Ashwaubenon Creek (9.1 ft3/s). On a yield basis, during these three years, the East River had the highest flow (0.78 ft3/s/mi2), followed by Baird Creek (0.61 ft3/s/mi2), Apple Creek (0.59 ft3/s/mi2), Duck Creek (0.54 ft3/s/mi2), and Ashwaubenon Creek (0.46 ft3/s/mi2). The overall median total suspended solids (TSS) concentration was highest in Baird Creek (73.5 mg/L), followed by Apple and Ashwaubenon Creeks (65 mg/L), East River (40 mg/L), and Duck Creek (30 mg/L). The median total phosphorus (TP) concentration was highest in Ashwaubenon Creek (0.60 mg/L), followed by Baird Creek (0.47 mg/L), Apple Creek (0.37 mg/L), East River (0.26 mg/L), and Duck Creek (0.22 mg/L).

  8. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in fractured-rock aquifers of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces, Bedford County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kurt J.; White, Bradley A.; Yager, Richard M.; Harlow, George E.

    2015-09-11

    An annual groundwater budget was computed as part of a hydrogeologic characterization and monitoring effort of fractured-rock aquifers in Bedford County, Virginia, a growing 764-square-mile (mi2) rural area between the cities of Roanoke and Lynchburg, Virginia. Data collection in Bedford County began in the 1930s when continuous stream gages were installed on Goose Creek and Big Otter River, the two major tributaries of the Roanoke River within the county. Between 2006 and 2014, an additional 2 stream gages, 3 groundwater monitoring wells, and 12 partial-record stream gages were operated. Hydrograph separation methods were used to compute base-flow recharge rates from the continuous data collected from the continuous stream gages. Mean annual base-flow recharge ranged from 8.3 inches per year (in/yr) for the period 1931–2012 at Goose Creek near Huddleston (drainage area 188 mi2) to 9.3 in/yr for the period 1938–2012 at Big Otter River near Evington (drainage area 315 mi2). Mean annual base-flow recharge was estimated to be 6.5 in/yr for the period 2007–2012 at Goose Creek at Route 747 near Bunker Hill (drainage area 125 mi2) and 8.9 in/yr for the period 2007–2012 at Big Otter River at Route 221 near Bedford (drainage area 114 mi2). Base-flow recharge computed from the partial-record data ranged from 5.0 in/yr in the headwaters of Goose Creek to 10.5 in/yr in the headwaters of Big Otter River.

  9. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  10. PM1-Alpha ELISA: the assay of choice for the detection of anti-PM/Scl autoantibodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Michael; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2009-03-01

    A characteristic serological feature of patients suffering from the overlap polymyositis and scleroderma (PM/Scl) syndrome are antibodies to the human counterpart of the yeast exosome referred to as the PM/Scl complex. Historically, the detection of anti-PM/Scl antibodies was laborious and relied largely on indirect immunofluorescence and immunodiffusion techniques. In 1992 the major autoantigen PM/Scl-100 was identified and cloned. Subsequently, the major epitopes were mapped and one of these, termed PM1-Alpha, became the antigen for a novel ELISA exhibiting high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of anti-PM/Scl antibodies. Comparative studies with other methods using other PM/Scl autoantigens have shown that the PM1-Alpha ELISA has higher sensitivity and specificity than assays that employed recombinant PM/Scl-75c and PM/Scl-100. Anti-PM1-Alpha antibodies were identified in 55.0% of sera from PM/Scl overlap syndrome patients, but were also seen in 7.9% of SSc and in 7.5% of PM patients. The frequency in other systemic autoimmune diseases and in infectious diseases was significant lower. In summary, the data derived from individual studies suggest that PM1-Alpha may become the "gold standard" for the detection of anti-PM/Scl antibodies.

  11. Obesity-Associated Autoantibody Production Requires AIM to Retain the Immunoglobulin M Immune Complex on Follicular Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Arai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural immunoglobulin M (IgM is reactive to autoantigens and is believed to be important for autoimmunity. Blood pentameric IgM loaded with antigens forms a large immune complex (IC that contains various elements, including apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM. Here we demonstrate that this IgM-AIM association contributes to autoantibody production under obese conditions. In mice fed a high-fat diet, natural IgM increased through B cell TLR4 stimulation. AIM associated with IgM and protected AIM from renal excretion, increasing blood AIM levels along with the obesity-induced IgM augmentation. Meanwhile, the AIM association inhibited IgM binding to the Fcα/μ receptor on splenic follicular dendritic cells, thereby protecting the IgM IC from Fcα/μ receptor-mediated internalization. This supported IgM-dependent autoantigen presentation to B cells, stimulating IgG autoantibody production. Accordingly, in obese AIM-deficient (AIM−/− mice, the increase of multiple IgG autoantibodies observed in obese wild-type mice was abrogated. Thus, the AIM-IgM association plays a critical role in the obesity-associated autoimmune process.

  12. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases: from bread baking to autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Maurizio; Perricone, Roberto; Blank, Miri; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is best known as the baker's and brewer's yeast, but its residual traces are also frequent excipients in some vaccines. Although anti-S. cerevisiae autoantibodies (ASCAs) are considered specific for Crohn's disease, a growing number of studies have detected high levels of ASCAs in patients affected with autoimmune diseases as compared with healthy controls, including antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Commensal microorganisms such as Saccharomyces are required for nutrition, proper development of Peyer's aggregated lymphoid tissue, and tissue healing. However, even the commensal nonclassically pathogenic microbiota can trigger autoimmunity when fine regulation of immune tolerance does not work properly. For our purposes, the protein database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) was consulted, comparing Saccharomyces mannan to several molecules with a pathogenetic role in autoimmune diseases. Thanks to the NCBI bioinformation technology tool, several overlaps in molecular structures (50-100 %) were identified when yeast mannan, and the most common autoantigens were compared. The autoantigen U2 snRNP B″ was found to conserve a superfamily protein domain that shares 83 % of the S. cerevisiae mannan sequence. Furthermore, ASCAs may be present years before the diagnosis of some associated autoimmune diseases as they were retrospectively found in the preserved blood samples of soldiers who became affected by Crohn's disease years later. Our results strongly suggest that ASCAs' role in clinical practice should be better addressed in order to evaluate their predictive or prognostic relevance.

  13. The cathelicidin protein CRAMP is a potential atherosclerosis self-antigen in ApoE(-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Mihailovic

    Full Text Available Auto-immunity is believed to contribute to inflammation in atherosclerosis. The antimicrobial peptide LL-37, a fragment of the cathelicidin protein precursor hCAP18, was previously identified as an autoantigen in psoriasis. Given the reported link between psoriasis and coronary artery disease, the biological relevance of the autoantigen to atherosclerosis was tested in vitro using a truncated (t form of the mouse homolog of hCAP18, CRAMP, on splenocytes from athero-prone ApoE(-/- mice. Stimulation with tCRAMP resulted in increased CD8+ T cells with Central Memory and Effector Memory phenotypes in ApoE(-/- mice, differentially activated by feeding with normal chow or high fat diet. Immunization of ApoE(-/- with different doses of the shortened peptide (Cramp resulted in differential outcomes with a lower dose reducing atherosclerosis whereas a higher dose exacerbating the disease with increased neutrophil infiltration of the atherosclerotic plaques. Low dose Cramp immunization also resulted in increased splenic CD8+ T cell degranulation and reduced CD11b+CD11c+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs, whereas high dose increased CD11b+CD11c+ cDCs. Our results identified CRAMP, the mouse homolog of hCAP-18, as a potential self-antigen involved in the immune response to atherosclerosis in the ApoE(-/- mouse model.

  14. Role of immune system in type 1 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2014-09-01

    The immune system is the body's natural defense system against invading pathogens. It protects the body from infection and works to communicate an individual's well-being through a complex network of interconnected cells and cytokines. This system is an associated host defense. An uncontrolled immune system has the potential to trigger negative complications in the host. Type 1 diabetes results from the destruction of pancreatic β-cells by a β-cell-specific autoimmune process. Examples of β-cell autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, tyrosine phosphatase, and insulinoma antigen. There are many autoimmune diseases, but type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the well-characterized autoimmune diseases. The mechanisms involved in the β-cell destruction are still not clear; it is generally believed that β-cell autoantigens, macrophages, dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and T lymphocytes are involved in the β-cell-specific autoimmune process. It is necessary to determine what exact factors are causing the immune system to become unregulated in such a manner as to promote an autoimmune response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M.; Duance, V.; Maini, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis

  16. Pathogenetic and Clinical Aspects of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody-Associated Vasculitides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lamprecht

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA targeting proteinase 3 (PR3 and myeloperoxidase expressed by innate immune cells (neutrophils and monocytes are salient diagnostic and pathogenic features of small vessel vasculitis, comprising granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic GPA. Genetic studies suggest that ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV constitute separate diseases, which share common immunological and pathological features, but are otherwise heterogeneous. The successful therapeutic use of anti-CD20 antibodies emphasizes the prominent role of ANCA and possibly other autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of AAV. However, to elucidate causal effects in AAV, a better understanding of the complex interplay leading to the emergence of B lymphocytes that produce pathogenic ANCA remains a challenge. Different scenarios seem possible; e.g., the break of tolerance induced by a shift from non-pathogenic toward pathogenic autoantigen epitopes in inflamed tissue. This review gives a brief overview on current knowledge about genetic and epigenetic factors, barrier dysfunction and chronic non-resolving inflammation, necro-inflammatory auto-amplification of cellular death and inflammation, altered autoantigen presentation, alternative complement pathway activation, alterations within peripheral and inflamed tissue-residing T- and B-cell populations, ectopic lymphoid tissue neoformation, the characterization of PR3-specific T-cells, properties of ANCA, links between autoimmune disease and infection-triggered pathology, and animal models in AAV.

  17. The Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune complex GN that develops as a frequent complication of SLE. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis involves a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. The extrarenal etiology of systemic lupus is based on multiple combinations of genetic variants that compromise those mechanisms normally assuring immune tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. This loss of tolerance becomes clinically detectable by the presence of antinuclear antibodies. In addition, nucleic acids released from netting or apoptotic neutrophils activate innate and adaptive immunity via viral nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors. Therefore, many clinical manifestations of systemic lupus resemble those of viral infection. In lupus, endogenous nuclear particles trigger IFN-α signaling just like viral particles during viral infection. As such, dendritic cells, T helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells all contribute to the aberrant polyclonal autoimmunity. The intrarenal etiology of lupus nephritis involves antibody binding to multiple intrarenal autoantigens rather than the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local antibody production add to intrarenal complement activation as renal immunopathology progresses. Here we provide an update on the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to lupus nephritis and provide the rationale for the latest and novel treatment strategies. PMID:23929771

  18. Proteoglycan Aggrecan Conducting T Cell Activation and Apoptosis in a Murine Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hanyecz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disease and its targeting of the joints indicates the presence of a candidate autoantigen(s in synovial joints. Patients with RA show immune responses in their peripheral blood to proteoglycan (PG aggrecan. One of the most relevant animal models of RA appears to be proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PGIA, and CD4+ T cells seem to play a crucial role in the initiation of the disease. In this review, the role of various T cell epitopes of aggrecan in the induction of autoreactive T cell activation and arthritis is discussed. We pay special attention to two critically important arthritogenic epitopes, 5/4E8 and P135H, found in the G1 and G3 domains of PG aggrecan, respectively, in the induction of autoimmune arthritis. Finally, results obtained with the recently developed PG-specific TCR transgenic mice system showed that altered T cell apoptosis, the balance of activation, and apoptosis of autoreactive T cells are critical factors in the development of autoimmunity.

  19. Autoimmunity due to molecular mimicry as a cause of neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael C; Lee, Sang Min; Kalume, Franck; Morcos, Yvette; Dohan, F Curtis; Hasty, Karen A; Callaway, Joseph C; Zunt, Joseph; Desiderio, Dominic; Stuart, John M

    2002-05-01

    One hypothesis that couples infection with autoimmune disease is molecular mimicry. Molecular mimicry is characterized by an immune response to an environmental agent that cross-reacts with a host antigen, resulting in disease. This hypothesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, lupus and multiple sclerosis (MS). There is limited direct evidence linking causative agents with pathogenic immune reactions in these diseases. Our study establishes a clear link between viral infection, autoimmunity and neurological disease in humans. As a model for molecular mimicry, we studied patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a disease that can be indistinguishable from MS (refs. 5,6,7). HAM/TSP patients develop antibodies to neurons. We hypothesized these antibodies would identify a central nervous system (CNS) autoantigen. Immunoglobulin G isolated from HAM/TSP patients identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein-A1 (hnRNP-A1) as the autoantigen. Antibodies to hnRNP-A1 cross-reacted with HTLV-1-tax, the immune response to which is associated with HAM/TSP (refs. 5,9). Immunoglobulin G specifically stained human Betz cells, whose axons are preferentially damaged. Infusion of autoantibodies in brain sections inhibited neuronal firing, indicative of their pathogenic nature. These data demonstrate the importance of molecular mimicry between an infecting agent and hnRNP-A1 in autoimmune disease of the CNS.

  20. The Emerging Importance of Non-HLA Autoantibodies in Kidney Transplant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Héloise; Dieudé, Mélanie; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2017-02-01

    Antibodies that are specific to organ donor HLA have been involved in the majority of cases of antibody-mediated rejection in solid organ transplant recipients. However, recent data show that production of non-HLA autoantibodies can occur before transplant in the form of natural autoantibodies. In contrast to HLAs, which are constitutively expressed on the cell surface of the allograft endothelium, autoantigens are usually cryptic. Tissue damage associated with ischemia-reperfusion, vascular injury, and/or rejection creates permissive conditions for the expression of cryptic autoantigens, allowing these autoantibodies to bind antigenic targets and further enhance vascular inflammation and renal dysfunction. Antiperlecan/LG3 antibodies and antiangiotensin II type 1 receptor antibodies have been found before transplant in patients with de novo transplants and portend negative long-term outcome in patients with renal transplants. Here, we review mounting evidence suggesting an important role for autoantibodies to cryptic antigens as novel accelerators of kidney dysfunction and acute or chronic allograft rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Viral Impact in Autoimmune Diseases: Expanding the “X Chromosome–Nucleolus Nexus” Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley H.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are suspected of significant roles in autoimmune diseases but the mechanisms are unclear. We get some insight by considering demands a virus places on host cells. Viruses not only require production of their own proteins, RNA and/or DNA, but also production of additional cellular machinery, such as ribosomes, to handle the increased demands. Since the nucleolus is a major site of RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly, nucleoli are targeted by viruses, directly when viral RNA and proteins enter the nucleolus and indirectly when viruses induce increased expression of cellular polyamine genes. Polyamines are at high levels in nucleoli to assist in RNA folding. The size and activity of nucleoli increase directly with increases in polyamines. Nucleolar expansion due to abnormal increases in polyamines could disrupt nearby chromatin, such as the inactive X chromosome, leading to expression of previously sequestered DNA. Sudden expression of a large concentration of Alu elements from the disrupted inactive X can compete with RNA transcripts containing intronic Alu sequences that normally maintain nucleolar structural integrity. Such disruption of nucleolar activity can lead to misfolded RNAs, misassembled ribonucleoprotein complexes, and fragmentation of the nucleolus. Many autoantigens in lupus are, at least transiently, components of the nucleolus. Considering these effects of viruses, the “X chromosome–nucleolus nexus” hypothesis, which proposed disruption of the inactive X by the nucleolus during stress, is now expanded here to propose subsequent disruption of the nucleolus by previously sequestered Alu elements, which can fragment the nucleolus, leading to generation of autoantigens. PMID:29234321

  2. The value of the Widal test in the diagnosis of Prolonged Septicemic Salmonellosis

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    José Roberto Lambertucci

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Twenty patients with prolonged septicemic salmonellosis (Group 1 and 20 with schistosomiasis mansoni (Group 2 were selected for this study. In both groups, the Widal test was done using antigens of the sample Ty 901 (S. typhi. The test was also applied in 6 group 1 patients with antigens prepared from salmonellae isolated from these patients (autoantigens. Titres over 1:200 were considered significant. Ten group 1 patients (50% were positive for antigen "H" and 5 (25% were positive for antigen "O". Three patients with negative "H" and "O" reactions became positive with high titres when using autoantigens. Two other cases maintained the same positive titres and one case showed a fourfold increase in titres when the test was done 'with antigens of the Salmonella isolated. The Widal test was positive in most patients infected with group D Salmonellae. Considering titres above 1:200, all cases were negative in Group 2. The authors conclude that the Widal test has low positivity in prolonged septicemic salmonellosis. The test may be valuable in the diagnosis of this disease when using S. paratyphi "A" and "B" antigens and a mixture of Salmonella antigens taken from other groups.

  3. [Antibodies and physiopathogeny of autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Leiva, Jorge; Ríos-Vaca, Aurelio; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by periportal hepatitis, increased serum globulins and the presence of certain antibodies. The disorder can be classified in three types. Type 1 AIH is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle autoantibodies (SMA) in up to 70-80% of patients. ANA and SMA can be the only antibodies present in 13 and 33% of cases respectively. Type 2 AIH is defined by the presence of liver and kidney antimicrosomal antibodies (LKM1). Type 2 AIH is the only form of the disease in which the autoantigen has been identified: cytochrome mono-oxygenase (P-450 IID6) CYP2D6. In type 3 AIH the presence of anti-SLA/LP (soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas) targets a cytosolic protein involved in the incorporation of selenocysteine into peptidic chains. The pathophysiology of AIH is complex and involves genetic predisposition, previous exposure to antigens (autoantigens), presence of triggering factors and defects in immunoregulation. In spite of the advances in the understanding of AIH, the role of autoantibodies in the pathophysiology of this disease has not been fully established and their presence does not clearly distinguish any prognostic groups. Further investigations will help in the diagnosis of this disorder, the comprehension of its origins and the establishment of new forms of treatment.

  4. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens.

  5. Clinical usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT in collagen disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Kazuki; Zen, Kan [Asahi Univ., Gifu (Japan). Murakami Memorial Hospital; Sugihara, Hiroki (and others)

    2000-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT for detecting cardiac involvement in patients with collagen disease. We studied 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 8 with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 6 with polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and 3 with allergic granulomatosis and angiitis (AGA). A 111 MBq of {sup 123}I-BMIPP was intravenously injected at rest, and SPECT images were obtained at 15 min after the injection. Seven of 12 SLE, 6 of 8 PSS, 3 of 6 PM/DM and all 3 AGA patients showed an abnormal tracer uptake. The left ventricular ejection fraction was inversely correlated with a BMIPP abnormality. The regional wall motion abnormality was reduced in regions with reduced tracer uptake. These findings suggest that {sup 123}I-BMIPP imaging could be useful for assessment of cardiac involvement in patients with collagen disease. (author)

  6. Facts and controversies in mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Barrio, Julia; Valor, Lara; López-Longo, F Javier

    2018-01-12

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease (SARD) characterised by the combination of clinical manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc) and polymyositis-dermatomyositis, in the presence of elevated titers of anti-U1-RNP antibodies. Main symptoms of the disease are polyarthritis, hand oedema, Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, myositis and oesophageal hypomobility. Although widely discussed, most authors today accept MCTD as an independent entity. Others, however, suggest that these patients may belong to subgroups or early stages of certain definite connective diseases, such as SLE or SSc, or are, in fact, SARD overlap syndromes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of myositis: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, P-O; Schmidt, J

    2014-03-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing myopathy (NM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM) are four distinct subtypes of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies - in short myositis. Recent studies have shed some light on the unique pathogenesis of each entity. Some of the clinical features are distinct, but muscle biopsy is indispensable for making a reliable diagnosis. The use of magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles and detection of myositis-specific autoantibodies have become useful additions to our diagnostic repertoire. Only few controlled trials are available to substantiate current treatment approaches for myositis and hopes are high that novel modalities will become available within the next few years. In this review we provide an up-to-date overview of the pathogenesis and diagnostic approach of myositis. We aim to present a guide towards therapeutic and general management. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  8. New insights into the benefits of exercise for muscle health in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemo Munters, Li; Alexanderson, Helene; Crofford, Leslie J; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-07-01

    With recommended treatment, a majority with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) develop muscle impairment and poor health. Beneficial effects of exercise have been reported on muscle performance, aerobic capacity and health in chronic polymyositis and dermatomyositis and to some extent in active disease and inclusion body myositis (IBM). Importantly, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate that improved health and decreased clinical disease activity could be mediated through increased aerobic capacity. Recently, reports seeking mechanisms underlying effects of exercise in skeletal muscle indicate increased aerobic capacity (i.e. increased mitochondrial capacity and capillary density, reduced lactate levels), activation of genes in aerobic phenotype and muscle growth programs, and down regulation in genes related to inflammation. Altogether, exercise contributes to both systemic and within-muscle adaptations demonstrating that exercise is fundamental to improve muscle performance and health in IIM. There is a need for RCTs to study effects of exercise in active disease and IBM.

  9. Imaging of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We review the imaging appearance of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck. Bilateral sialadenitis and dacryoadenitis are seen in Sjögren’s syndrome; ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint with sclerosis of the crico-arytenoid joint are reported in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus panniculitis with atypical infection are reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Relapsing polychondritis shows subglottic stenosis, prominent ear and saddle nose; progressive systemic sclerosis shows osteolysis of the mandible, fibrosis of the masseter muscle with calcinosis of the subcutaneous tissue and dermatomyositis/polymyositis shows condylar erosions and autoimmune thyroiditis. Vascular thrombosis is reported in antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome; cervical lymphadenopathy is seen in adult-onset Still’s disease, and neuropathy with thyroiditis reported in mixed connective tissue disorder. Imaging is important to detect associated malignancy with connective tissue disorders. Correlation of the imaging findings with demographic data and clinical findings are important for the diagnosis of connective tissue disorders. PMID:26988082

  10. Severe respiratory failure as a presenting feature of an interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius; Castagneto, Corrado; Nicolini, Antonello

    2016-07-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) is defined as a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by the association of an interstitial lung disease (ILD) with or without inflammatory myositis with the presence of anti-aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase antibodies. ILD is one of the major extra-muscular manifestations of polymyositis and dermatomyositis. We report a case of a patient with dyspnea, cough, and intermittent fever as well as ILD associated ASS in the absence of muscular involvement. This patient was admitted to the emergency department with severe respiratory failure requiring non-invasive ventilation. Our patient's case demonstrates that the diagnosis of ASS may not be obvious. However, its diagnosis leads to appropriate and potentially life-saving treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Capilaroscopia periungueal em crianças e adolescentes com doenças reumáticas Nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gerent Petry Piotto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a capilaroscopia periungueal de crianças e adolescentes com doenças reumáticas autoimunes (artrite idiopática juvenil, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, dermatomiosite juvenil, esclerodermia e doença mista do tecido conjuntivo e relacioná-la com comprometimentos clínico e laboratorial e atividade de doença. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal no qual foram avaliados 147 pacientes por meio de capilaroscopia periungueal: 60 com artrite idiopática juvenil, 30 com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, 30 com dermatomiosite juvenil, 20 com esclerodermia localizada, quatro com esclerodermia sistêmica e três com doença mista do tecido conjuntivo. Exames clínico, laboratorial e de capilaroscopia periungueal foram realizados em todos os pacientes. A capilaroscopia periungueal foi realizada com microscópio óptico com aumentos de 10 e 16 vezes pelo mesmo observador. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos pacientes avaliados (76,2% apresentou capilaroscopia periungueal normal. As maiores alterações na capilaroscopia periungueal foram observadas nos pacientes com dermatomiosite juvenil, esclerodermia sistêmica e doença mista do tecido conjuntivo, e caracterizaram o padrão escleroderma. Não houve associação entre capilaroscopia periungueal e atividade de doença nos pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e esclerodermia localizada. Houve associação entre atividade da doença e alterações capilaroscópicas nos pacientes com dermatomiosite juvenil. CONCLUSÃO: A capilaroscopia periungueal é um método útil para o diagnóstico das doenças reumáticas autoimunes e para o acompanhamento de atividade de doença.OBJECTIVE: To assess nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, scleroderma and mixed connective tissue disease and relate it to clinical and laboratory findings and disease

  12. Retropharyngeal abscess after radiation therapy and cis-platinum, 5-fluorouracil treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with collagen disease. Report of two patients and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mitsuharu

    1996-01-01

    Collagen disease are frequently associated with malignant tumors. Recently, radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy has been recommended for improving the efficacy of treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Two patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma complicated by collagen diseases (dermatomyositis in one, and Sjoegren's syndrome with mixed connective tissue disease in the other) were given radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy consisting of cis-platinum and 5-fluorouracil. Following this combination therapy, both patients developed retropharyngeal abscess and ulceration of the mucosal membrane on the posterior wall of the oropharynx; there was no tumor cell involvement. Because these injuries were more severe than would have been expected from radiotherapy alone, It is recommended that special attention be paid to combination therapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma complicated by collagen disease. (author)

  13. Detection of interferon alpha protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Decalf, Jérémie; Bondet, Vincent; Hunt, David; Rice, Gillian I; Werneke, Scott; McGlasson, Sarah L; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Barnerias, Christine; Bellon, Nathalia; Belot, Alexandre; Bodemer, Christine; Briggs, Tracy A; Desguerre, Isabelle; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Hully, Marie; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Melki, Isabelle; Meyts, Isabelle; Musset, Lucile; Pelzer, Nadine; Quartier, Pierre; Terwindt, Gisela M; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wiseman, Stewart; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Rose, Yoann; Neven, Bénédicte; Hertel, Christina; Hayday, Adrian; Albert, Matthew L; Rozenberg, Flore; Crow, Yanick J; Duffy, Darragh

    2017-05-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are essential mediators of antiviral responses. These cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), diabetes mellitus, and dermatomyositis, as well as monogenic type I interferonopathies. Despite a fundamental role in health and disease, the direct quantification of type I IFNs has been challenging. Using single-molecule array (Simoa) digital ELISA technology, we recorded attomolar concentrations of IFNα in healthy donors, viral infection, and complex and monogenic interferonopathies. IFNα protein correlated well with functional activity and IFN-stimulated gene expression. High circulating IFNα levels were associated with increased clinical severity in SLE patients, and a study of the cellular source of IFNα protein indicated disease-specific mechanisms. Measurement of IFNα attomolar concentrations by digital ELISA will enhance our understanding of IFN biology and potentially improve the diagnosis and stratification of pathologies associated with IFN dysregulation. © 2017 Rodero et al.

  14. Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia As The Initial Presenting Manifestation of SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Mampilly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia (COP, also called idiopathic Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organising Pneumonia( BOOP, is a distinct entity among the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias defined histopathologically by intraalveolar buds of granulation tissue. The etiology includes idiopathic, infectious, drug induced radiation induced and connective tissue diseases. Organising pneumonia occurs particularly in patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis where it may be the presenting manifestation, and rarely in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and other connective tissue diseases. We describe a 30 yr old lady who initially presented with respiratory symptoms, not responding to antibiotics. She was subsequently diagnosed as SLE and HRCT thorax showed consolidation involving both lung fields. A percutaneous lung biopsy revealed features of Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia.

  15. Dermatologic symptoms associated with gastrointestinal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Młynarczyk-Bonikowska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tumors are among the most common neoplastic causes of death worldwide. Presence of characteristic skin lesions can allow faster diagnosis and therapy and this way can increase the probability of a cure. In the paper we present the most important paraneoplastic syndromes that can coexist with gastrointestinal malignancy including colon, gastric, esophagus and pancreatic cancers. We take into account genetic syndromes such as Cowden syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome (FAMMM (melanoma/pancreatic cancer, Clarke Howel-Evans, Peutz-Jeghers, Muir-Torre, Gardner syndromes and acquired syndromes such as acantosis nigricans maligna, tripe palms, Leser-Trelat, Bazex, hypertrichosis languinosa, erythema gyratum repens , carcinoid and glucagonoma syndrome. We also include cutaneous metastases and coexistence of neoplasia in some cases of dermatomyositis.

  16. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent KURT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM are a heterogeneous group of disease with complex clinical features. It has been sub-classified as: (1 Dermatomyositis, (2 Polymyositis, and (3 Inclusion body myositis (IBM. Nowadays, there are some studies in literature suggest necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy should also be added to this group of disease. There is a debate in the diagnosis of IIMs and up until now, about 12 criteria systems have been proposed. Some of the criteria systems have been used widely such as Griggs et al.'s proposal for IBM. Clinical findings, autoantibodies, enzymes, electrophysiological, and muscle biopsy findings are diagnostic tools. Because of diseases' complexity, none of the findings are diagnostic alone. In this study, we discussed the diagnostic criteria of IMMs and described detailed morphological features. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2016; 4(2.000: 41-45

  17. Skin cancer risk in autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostaki, D; Antonini, A; Peris, K; Fargnoli, M C

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous malignancies have been significantly associated with autoimmune connective tissue diseases (ACTDs). This review focuses on the current state of knowledge on skin cancer risk in the most prevalent ACTDs in dermatology including lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, dermatomyositis and Sjögren syndrome. Potential pathogenetic mechanisms for the association between ACTDs and malignancy involve disease-related impairment of immune system, sustained cutaneous inflammation, drug-associated immune suppression and increased susceptibility to acquired viral infections. An additional causal role might be played by environmental factors such as UV exposure and smoking. The occurrence of skin cancer can have a profound impact on the already compromised quality of life of ACTD patients. Therefore, effective screening and monitoring strategies are essential for ACTD patients as early detection and prompt therapeutic intervention can reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  18. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  19. Imaging findings in systemic childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Adam Z; Gittler, Julia K; Nakrani, Radhika N; Alis, Jonathan; Blumfield, Einat; Levin, Terry L

    Many childhood diseases often present with skin abnormalities with which radiologists are largely unfamiliar. Knowledge of associated dermatologic manifestations may aid the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and recommending targeted imaging of affected organs. We review the imaging findings in childhood diseases associated with dermatologic manifestations. Diseases include dermatologic findings which herald underlying malignancy (Neuroblastoma, leukemia/lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis),are associated with risk of malignancy (Epidermolysis Bullosa, basal cell nevus syndrome, Cowden's syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis),or indicate a systemic inflammatory/immune disorder (Kawasaki's disease, Henoch Schonlein Purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, dermatomyositis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura). Familiarity with pertinent findings in childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations in childhood diseases aids the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and guiding imaging workup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The emerging role of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, P L; Vellet, A D; Romano, C; Levin, M F; Harth, M F; Bell, D A [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1994-08-01

    The current applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were reviewed, with special emphasis on rheumatoid practice. MRI was found to be the most powerful tool currently available for detecting avascular necrosis at a stage when the condition might still be reversible, especially for hip cases. MRI can also be used to visualize abnormal synovial tissue, effusion, and loose bodies and debris within the joint. Tendonitis and tendosynovitis are other applications for MRI because of the sensitivity of MRI to changes in free water content. Interest has recently increased in the use of MRI in the assessment of neuromuscular disorders, for example dermatomyositis. The fact that MRI is non-invasive makes it particularly suitable for the assessment of a large variety of other immunologic and musculoskeletal conditions. 5 figs., 44 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Cerebrovascular Accidents In Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several types of stroke in myopathies are described: ischemic, metabolic, or cryptogenic. Ischemic stroke may be categorized as cardioembolic, angiopathic, hemodynamic, or thrombophilic. Cardiac involvement in the form of atrial fibrillation/flutter, dilated cardiomyopathy, or non-compaction Cardioembolic could ensue in stroke. Angiopathic stroke occurs provided that there is atherosclerosis or mitochondrial disorders. Thrombophilic stroke may happen in polymyositis or dermatomyositis along with anti-phospholipid syndrome. Metabolic stroke usually manifests as stroke-like episode and is a distinct feature of various mitochondrial disorders, principally MELAS syndrome. The clinical manifestations are as a result of a vasogenic edema, demonstrating as hyperintensity on T2, DWI, and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. Differentiation between ischemic and metabolic stroke is essential in terms of diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. In conclusion, ischemic stroke attributable to cardioembolism, arteriopathy, or thrombophilia are occasional events in myopathies, but metabolic stroke is a frequent feature of mitochondrial disorders.

  2. Stepwise approach to myopathy in systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasvinder

    2011-01-01

    Muscle diseases can constitute a large variety of both acquired and hereditary disorders. Myopathies in systemic disease results from several different disease processes including endocrine, inflammatory, paraneoplastic, infectious, drug- and toxin-induced, critical illness myopathy, metabolic, and myopathies with other systemic disorders. Patients with systemic myopathies often present acutely or sub acutely. On the other hand, familial myopathies or dystrophies generally present in a chronic fashion with exceptions of metabolic myopathies where symptoms on occasion can be precipitated acutely. Most of the inflammatory myopathies can have a chance association with malignant lesions; the incidence appears to be specifically increased only in patients with dermatomyositis. In dealing with myopathies associated with systemic illnesses, the focus will be on the acquired causes. Management is beyond the scope of this chapter. Prognosis is based upon the underlying cause and, most of the time, carries a good prognosis. In order to approach a patient with suspected myopathy from systemic disease, a stepwise approach is utilized.

  3. Estimated suspended-sediment loads and yields in the French and Brandywine Creek Basins, Chester County, Pennsylvania, water years 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Olson, Leif E.

    2011-01-01

    highest peak discharges generally carried the highest SSLs. For all stations, the greatest SSLs occurred during the late winter in February and March during the 2008 water year. During the 2009 water year, the greatest SSLs occurred during December and August. For French Creek near Phoenixville, the estimated annual SSL was 3,500 tons, and the estimated yield was 59.1 tons per square mile (ton/mi2) for the 2008 water year. For the 2009 water year, the annual SSL was 4,390 tons, and the yield was 74.3 ton/mi2. For West Branch Brandywine Creek near Honey Brook, the estimated annual SSL was 4,580 tons, and the estimated yield was 245 ton/mi2 for the 2008 water year. For the 2009 water year, the annual SSL was 2,300 tons, and the yield was 123 ton/mi2. For West Branch Brandywine Creek at Modena, the estimated annual SSL was 7,480 tons, and the estimated yield was 136 ton/mi2 for the 2008 water year. For the 2009 water year, the annual SSL was 4,930 tons, and the yield was 90 ton/mi2. For East Branch Brandywine Creek below Downingtown, the estimated annual SSL was 8,900 tons, and the estimated yield was 100 ton/mi2 for the 2008 water year. For the 2009 water year, the annual SSL was 7,590 tons, and the yield was 84 ton/mi2.

  4. Satellite Images and Aerial Photographs of the Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the eastern coastline of Louisiana on August 29, 2005; Hurricane Rita made landfall on the western coastline of Louisiana on September 24, 2005. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery acquired before and after the landfalls of Katrina and Rita and classified to identify land and water demonstrated that water area increased by 217 mi2 (562 km2) in coastal Louisiana as a result of the storms. Approximately 82 mi2 (212 km2) of new water areas were in areas primarily impacted by Hurricane Katrina (Mississippi River Delta basin, Breton Sound basin, Pontchartrain basin, and Pearl River basin), whereas 99 mi2 (256 km2) were in areas primarily impacted by Hurricane Rita (Calcasieu/Sabine basin, Mermentau basin, Teche/Vermilion basin, Atchafalaya basin, and Terrebonne basin). Barataria basin contained new water areas caused by both hurricanes, resulting in some 18 mi2 (46.6 km2) of new water areas. The fresh marsh and intermediate marsh communities' land areas decreased by 122 mi2 (316 km2) and 90 mi2 (233.1 km2), respectively, and the brackish marsh and saline marsh communities' land areas decreased by 33 mi2 (85.5 km2) and 28 mi2 (72.5 km2), respectively. These new water areas represent land losses caused by direct removal of wetlands. They also indicate transitory changes in water area caused by remnant flooding, removal of aquatic vegetation, scouring of marsh vegetation, and water-level variation attributed to normal tidal and meteorological variation between satellite images. Permanent losses cannot be estimated until several growing seasons have passed and the transitory impacts of the hurricanes are minimized. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary information on water area changes in coastal Louisiana acquired shortly after the landfalls of both hurricanes (detectable with Landsat TM imagery) and to serve as a regional baseline for monitoring posthurricane wetland recovery. The land

  5. Equations for estimating Clark Unit-hydrograph parameters for small rural watersheds in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Timothy D.; Melching, Charles S.; Kocher, Kyle E.

    2000-01-01

    Equations for estimating the time of concentration (TC) and storage coefficient (R) of the Clark unit-hydrograph method were developed for small rural watersheds [0.02-2.3 square miles (mi2)] in Illinois. The equations will provide State and local engineers and planners with more accurate methods to estimate the TC and R for use in simulating discharge hydrographs on small rural watersheds when designing stormwater-management facilities and other hydraulic structures, determining flood-plain boundaries, and assessing the safety of structures in rivers. The rainfall and runoff data from gaged small rural watersheds (0.02-2.3 mi2) with insignificant amounts of impervious land cover in Illinois were used to develop the equations.

  6. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2006 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2006. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 42 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2006. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.60 to 26 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,500,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2006; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 15,000 to 100,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 22,000 to 180,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 24.6 milligrams per liter

  7. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2003 (October 1, 2002, to September 30, 2003). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2003 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2003. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 31 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2003. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.44 to 20 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,200,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2003; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 10,000 to 61,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 100,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 21.3 milligrams per liter

  8. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island’s largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2005). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2005 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2005. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 30 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2005. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.42 to 19 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,300,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,000,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2005; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 13,000 to 77,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 19,000 to 130,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 25.3 milligrams per

  9. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2004 (October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2004 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2004. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 27 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2004. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.42 to 19 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,700,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2004; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 12,000 to 61,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 17,000 to 100,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 24.8 milligrams per liter

  10. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2012 (October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2012 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the PWSB were summarized by using values of central tendency and used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2012. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 26 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2012. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.40 to about 17 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2012; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 8,700 to 51,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 14,000 to 87,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected

  11. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2013-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2011 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2011. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 37 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2011. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.5 to about 21 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kg (kilograms) of sodium and 2,600,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2011; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 9,800 to 53,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 90,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were

  12. Whole-body MRI for full assessment and characterization of diffuse inflammatory myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Saleh Elessawy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a highly valuable tool for full assessment of the extent of bilateral symmetrical diffuse inflammatory myopathy, owing to its high sensitivity in the detection of edema which correlates with, and sometimes precedes, clinical findings. Purpose To evaluate the use of whole-body (WB-MRI in characterization and full assessment of the extent and distribution of diffuse inflammatory myopathy. Material and Methods A prospective study on 15 patients presenting with clinical evidence of inflammatory myopathy. It included 4 boys/men and 11 girls/women (age range, 6–44 years; mean age, 25.5 years. 1.5 T WB-MRI was performed and the distribution and extent of disease severity was assessed according to muscle edema on STIR images. Results Four cases of dermatomyositis showed lower limb disease predilection with edema in gluteal, thigh, and calf muscles. The same finding was seen in one case with recurrent polymyositis and three cases with overlap myositis with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Bilateral upper and lower limb myositis was demonstrated in three cases of polymyositis and one case of overlap myositis with scleroderma. Bilateral edema involving all scanned muscle groups was detected in three cases of polymyositis with paraneoplastic syndrome, SLE, and severe active dermatomyositis (including the neck muscles. Conclusion WB-MRI is the diagnostic modality of choice for cases of inflammatory myopathy. It accurately detects the most severely affected muscles candidate for biopsy and provides a reliable baseline study for follow-up of disease progression as well as response to treatment.

  13. Patients' Experience of Myositis and Further Validation of a Myositis-specific Patient Reported Outcome Measure - Establishing Core Domains and Expanding Patient Input on Clinical Assessment in Myositis. Report from OMERACT 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Basharat, Pari; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Sarver, Catherine; Björn, Anita; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Wook Song, Yeong; Bingham, Clifton O; Alexanderson, Helene

    2015-12-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) myositis working group was established to examine patient-reported outcomes (PRO) as well as to validate patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) in myositis. Qualitative studies using focus group interviews and cognitive debriefing of the myositis-specific Myositis Activities Profile (MAP) were used to explore the experience of adults living with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). Preliminary results underscore the importance of patient input in the development of PROM to ensure content validity. Results from multicenter focus groups indicate the range of symptoms experienced including pain, fatigue, and impaired cognitive function, which are not currently assessed in myositis. Preliminary cognitive debriefing of the MAP indicated that while content was deemed relevant and important, several activities were not included; and that questionnaire construction and wording may benefit from revision. A research agenda was developed to continue work toward optimizing PRO assessment in myositis with 2 work streams. The first would continue to conduct and analyze focus groups until saturation in the thematic analysis was achieved to develop a framework that encompassed the patient-relevant aspects of myositis. The second would continue cognitive debriefing of the MAP to identify potential areas for revision. There was agreement that further work would be needed for inclusion body myositis and juvenile dermatomyositis, and that the inclusion of additional contributors such as caregivers and individuals from the pharmaceutical/regulatory spheres would be desirable. The currently used PROM do not assess symptoms or the effects of disease that are most important to patients; this emphasizes the necessity of patient involvement. Our work provides concrete examples for PRO identification.

  14. Autophagy, inflammation and innate immunity in inflammatory myopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cappelletti

    Full Text Available Autophagy has a large range of physiological functions and its dysregulation contributes to several human disorders, including autoinflammatory/autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory myopathies (IIMs. In order to better understand the pathogenetic mechanisms of these muscular disorders, we sought to define the role of autophagic processes and their relation with the innate immune system in the three main subtypes of IIM, specifically sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM, polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. We found that although the mRNA transcript levels of the autophagy-related genes BECN1, ATG5 and FBXO32 were similar in IIM and controls, autophagy activation in all IIM subgroups was suggested by immunoblotting results and confirmed by immunofluorescence. TLR4 and TLR3, two potent inducers of autophagy, were highly increased in IIM, with TLR4 transcripts significantly more expressed in PM and DM than in JDM, sIBM and controls, and TLR3 transcripts highly up-regulated in all IIM subgroups compared to controls. Co-localization between autophagic marker, LC3, and TLR4 and TLR3 was observed not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM muscle tissues. Furthermore, a highly association with the autophagic processes was observed in all IIM subgroups also for some TLR4 ligands, endogenous and bacterial HSP60, other than the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1. These findings indicate that autophagic processes are active not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM, probably in response to an exogenous or endogenous 'danger signal'. However, autophagic activation and regulation, and also interaction with the innate immune system, differ in each type of IIM. Better understanding of these differences may lead to new therapies for the different IIM types.

  15. Identification of a novel myositis-associated antibody directed against cortactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Horrillo, Moisés; Martínez, Maria Angeles; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Grau-Junyent, Josep M; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel; Juarez, Candido

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a novel myositis-associated autoantibody (anti-cortactin antibody) and assess related clinical and immunological manifestations and its clinical significance. Adult patients with myositis (dermatomyositis, polymyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, and inclusion body myositis), as well as patients with other autoimmune diseases and non-inflammatory myopathies were analyzed for the presence of anti-cortactin antibody using in-house developed ELISA and immunoblotting techniques with a commercial source of purified cortactin. The cut-off for positive status was determined in a group of healthy volunteers. Antibody against cortactin was positive in 7/34 (20%) polymyositis patients, 9/117 (7.6%) dermatomyositis, 2/7 (26%) immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, and none of the 4 patients with inclusion body myositis. The antibody also tested positive in 3/101 patients with other autoimmune diseases (2 systemic sclerosis and 1 systemic lupus erythematosus), and in 1/29 patients with non-inflammatory myopathy. No relevant association with specific clinical features was found in patients with these antibodies. Anti-cortactin antibody was more frequently positive in patients with polymyositis and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy than in the remaining myositis patients, and was the only myositis autoantibody found in sera of 3 patients from these groups. Our data indicate that cortactin is a novel target antigen in patients with autoimmune diseases, especially patients with polymyositis or immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Anti-cortactin can be considered a new myositis-associated antibody. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel assessment tools to evaluate clinical and laboratory responses in a subset of patients enrolled in the Rituximab in Myositis trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Yip, Adrienne L; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Volochayev, Rita; Shrader, Joseph A; Turner, Maria L; Kong, Heidi H; Jain, Minal S; Jansen, Anna V; Oddis, Chester V; Fleisher, Thomas A; Miller, Frederick W

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess changes in myositis core set measures and ancillary clinical and laboratory data from the National Institutes of Health's subset of patients enrolled in the Rituximab in Myositis trial. Eighteen patients (5 dermatomyositis, 8 polymyositis, 5 juvenile dermatomyositis) completed more in-depth testing of muscle strength and cutaneous assessments, patient-reported outcomes, and laboratory tests before and after administration of rituximab. Percentage change in individual measures and in the definitions of improvement (DOIs) and standardized response means were examined over 44 weeks. Core set activity measures improved by 18-70% from weeks 0-44 and were sensitive to change. Fifteen patients met the DOI at week 44, 9 patients met a DOI 50% response, and 4 met a DOI 70% response. Muscle strength and function measures were more sensitive to change than cutaneous assessments. Constitutional, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary systems improved 44-70%. Patient-reported outcomes improved up to 28%. CD20+ B cells were depleted in the periphery, but B cell depletion was not associated with clinical improvement at week 16. This subset of patients had high rates of clinical response to rituximab, similar to patients in the overall trial. Most measures were responsive, and muscle strength had a greater degree of change than cutaneous assessments. Several novel assessment tools, including measures of strength and function, extra-muscular organ activity, fatigue, and health-related quality of life, are promising for use in future myositis trials. Further study of B cell-depleting therapies in myositis, particularly in treatment-naïve patients, is warranted.

  17. Pigmentation abnormalities in systemic scleroderma examined by using a colorimeter (Choromo Meter CR-200).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, M; Kachi, H; Matubara, K; Mori, S; Kitajima, Y

    1996-03-01

    Cutaneous colors of the dorsum of the hands (A), the distal forearms (B; 5 cm from the wrists), the proximal forearm (C; proximal 1/3 from the elbow) and sternal skin region (D) in patients with systemic scleroderma (73 cases; M:F = 16:57) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or dermatomyositis (27 cases; M:F = 7:20) and healthy controls (HC) (36 cases; M:F = 8:28) was characterized by a XYZ colorimetric system (CIE, 1931) using a colorimeter (Choromo Meter CR-200, Minolta Camera Co. Ltd., Osaka). The index Y, which means color value shows a lower value in male HC and in patients with systemic scleroderma, especially in the more severe type with hyperpigmentation (score 5-6; the system proposed by Ishikawa) than that of female HC. The values of indices x and y, which relate to reddish (erythema with hyperpigmentation) and greenish color (pale), respectively, were higher in the exposed portion of the severe type of systemic scleroderma with hyperpigmentation, especially male and older patients, and in unexposed portions of the female group without hyperpigmentation. Histopathologically, there was prominent pigmentation in the upper dermis of the forearm in the severe type of systemic scleroderma, so that melanin quantity may be closely related to the decrease in index Y. There was no statistical significance in the value of indices Y, x and y between HC, SLE and dermatomyositis. This method may contribute not only to diagnosis of systemic scleroderma and differentiation from other collagen diseases, but also studies of clinical follow-up and effects of medication.

  18. The spectrum of muscle histopathologic findings in 42 weak scleroderma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Julie J.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Corse, Andrea M.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Shah, Ami A.; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if distinct muscle pathological features exist in scleroderma subjects with weakness. Methods This retrospective study included weak scleroderma subjects with muscle biopsies available for review. Biopsies were systematically assessed for individual pathologic features including inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and acute neurogenic atrophy. Based on the aggregate individual features, biopsies were assigned a histopathologic category of polymyositis, dermatomyositis, necrotizing myopathy, non-specific myositis, “acute denervation”, “fibrosis only”, or “other”. Clinical data analyzed included autoantibody profiles, scleroderma subtype and disease duration, Medsger muscle severity scores, creatine kinase (CK), electromyography (EMG), and muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results 42 subjects (79% female and 64% diffuse scleroderma) were included in this study. Necrosis (67%), inflammation (48%), acute neurogenic atrophy (48%), and fibrosis (33%) were the most prevalent pathologic features. The presence of fibrosis was strongly associated with anti-PM-Scl antibodies. Histopathologic categories included non-specific myositis (36%), necrotizing myopathy (21%), dermatomyositis (7%), “acute denervation” (7%), “fibrosis only” (7%), and polymyositis (5%). Disease duration of scleroderma at the time of muscle biopsy was shorter in polymyositis than other histopathologic categories. Patients with anti-PM-Scl and Scl-70 antibodies also had a shorter disease duration than those with other auto-antibody profiles. Conclusion Non-specific myositis and necrotizing myopathy were the most common histopathologic categories in weak scleroderma subjects. Surprisingly, nearly half of the subjects studied had histological evidence of acute motor denervation (acute neurogenic atrophy); this has not been previously reported. Taken together, these observations suggest that a variety of pathologic mechanisms may underlie the development of

  19. Conduits to care: call lights and patients’ perceptions of communication

    OpenAIRE

    Montie,Mary; Shuman,Clayton; Galinato,Jose; Patak,Lance; Anderson,Christine A; Titler,Marita

    2017-01-01

    Mary Montie,1 Clayton Shuman,1 Jose Galinato,1 Lance Patak,2 Christine A Anderson,1 Marita G Titler1 1Department of Systems, Populations, and Leadership, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA, USA Background: Call light systems remain the primary means of hospitalized patients to initiate communication with their health care providers. Although there is vast amounts of liter...

  20. Hydrogeological and Groundwater Flow Model for C, K, L, and P Reactor Areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi 2 surrounding the C, K. L. and P reactor areas has been developed. The Reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department

  1. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of 9-hydroxophenalenone based alkaline earth and zinc complexes.The reaction of 9-hydroxophenalenone (HO,O-PLY (1)) with one equivalent of KN(SiMe3)2 and MI2 in THF yields heteroleptic complexes [(O,O-PLY)M(THF)]I [M= Mg (2), Ca (3), Sr (4), Ba (5); n = 1-4], ...

  2. Using the Theory of Mind Inventory to Detect a Broad Range of Theory of Mind Challenges in Children with Hearing Loss: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Tiffany L.; Allen, Lyndsey; Schefer, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    Traditional child-performance measures of theory of mind (ToM) are associated with several limitations. The Theory of Mind Inventory-2 (ToMI-2) is a new broadband caregiver-informant measure designed to tap children's ToM competence. The purposes of this pilot study were to (1) gather preliminary data to explore the scope of the ToM challenges…

  3. Economic Analysis of Cyber Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    calculate the estimates are proprietary; therefore, no one outside the company can evaluate the assumptions and methodologies. Furthermore, Mi2g has a...and Miller proposed using a more mathematical approach. The theories they proposed were based on the assumption that markets operate efficiently, so...Other researchers (Ross, 1978; Ryan, 1982) modified this basic idea and created the capital asset pricing model ( CAPM ), in which investments are made

  4. In silico ordinary differential equation/partial differential equation hemodialysis model estimates methadone removal during dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Linares, Oscar A; Schiesser, William E; Fudin, Jeffrey; Pham, Thien C; Bettinger, Jeffrey J; Mathew, Roy O; Daly, Annemarie L

    2015-01-01

    Oscar A Linares,1 William E Schiesser,2 Jeffrey Fudin,3–6 Thien C Pham,6 Jeffrey J Bettinger,6 Roy O Mathew,6 Annemarie L Daly7 1Translational Genomic Medicine Lab, Plymouth Pharmacokinetic Modeling Study Group, Plymouth, MI, 2Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, 3University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Storrs, CT, 4Western New England College of Pharmacy, Springfield, MA, 5Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany...

  5. Initial process of updating the core of a network

    OpenAIRE

    TORTAJADA RODRÍGUEZ, MARCOS

    2013-01-01

    This report concerns my internship in the MI2S between the months of March and July of 2013, being employed by the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique. The CNRS is the most important public organization for scientific research, its aim is to coordinate the activities of the laboratories to make the scientific research more efficient. As a part of my course of Computer Networks and Telecommunications specializing in Wireless Networks and Security (a French professional bac...

  6. A Theory of Diagnostic Inference: Contract Final Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    and I-bLications ftlated to this Contract ........ 19 1caml.igmnts and Scientific I&VOuMM1.......................... 21 M&i 2 This report esunarizes our... Comunications Sciences Division Naval Training Equipment Center Code 7500 Orlando, FL 32813 Naval Research Laboratory Washington, D. C. 20375 Dr. Gary...Dr. A. L. Slafkosky Scientific Advisor Commander Commandant of the Marine Corps Naval Electronics Systems Co-and C6de RD-1 Human Factors Engineering

  7. Numerical optimization of targeted delivery of charged nanoparticles to the ostiomeatal complex for treatment of rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yuan,Jiayao; Si,Xiuhua; Hasbany,James

    2015-01-01

    Jinxiang Xi,1 Jiayao Eddie Yuan,1 Xiuhua April Si,2 James Hasbany1 1School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, California Baptist University, Riverside, CA, USA Background: Despite the prevalence of rhinosinusitis that affects 10%–15% of the population, current inhalation therapy shows limited efficacy. Standard devices deliver <5% of the drugs to the sinuses due to the complexity of nose stru...

  8. Breaking tolerance in transgenic mice expressing the human TSH receptor A-subunit: thyroiditis, epitope spreading and adjuvant as a 'double edged sword'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Sandra M; Aliesky, Holly A; Chen, Chun-Rong; Chong, Gao; Rapoport, Basil

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic mice with the human thyrotropin-receptor (TSHR) A-subunit targeted to the thyroid are tolerant of the transgene. In transgenics that express low A-subunit levels (Lo-expressors), regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion using anti-CD25 before immunization with adenovirus encoding the A-subunit (A-sub-Ad) breaks tolerance, inducing extensive thyroid lymphocytic infiltration, thyroid damage and antibody spreading to other thyroid proteins. In contrast, no thyroiditis develops in Hi-expressor transgenics or wild-type mice. Our present goal was to determine if thyroiditis could be induced in Hi-expressor transgenics using a more potent immunization protocol: Treg depletion, priming with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) + A-subunit protein and further Treg depletions before two boosts with A-sub-Ad. As controls, anti-CD25 treated Hi- and Lo-expressors and wild-type mice were primed with CFA+ mouse thyroglobulin (Tg) or CFA alone before A-sub-Ad boosting. Thyroiditis developed after CFA+A-subunit protein or Tg and A-sub-Ad boosting in Lo-expressor transgenics but Hi- expressors (and wild-type mice) were resistant to thyroiditis induction. Importantly, in Lo-expressors, thyroiditis was associated with the development of antibodies to the mouse TSHR downstream of the A-subunit. Unexpectedly, we observed that the effect of bacterial products on the immune system is a "double-edged sword". On the one hand, priming with CFA (mycobacteria emulsified in oil) plus A-subunit protein broke tolerance to the A-subunit in Hi-expressor transgenics leading to high TSHR antibody levels. On the other hand, prior treatment with CFA in the absence of A-subunit protein inhibited responses to subsequent immunization with A-sub-Ad. Consequently, adjuvant activity arising in vivo after bacterial infections combined with a protein autoantigen can break self-tolerance but in the absence of the autoantigen, adjuvant activity can inhibit the induction of immunity to autoantigens (like the

  9. Breaking Tolerance in Transgenic Mice Expressing the Human TSH Receptor A-Subunit: Thyroiditis, Epitope Spreading and Adjuvant as a ‘Double Edged Sword’

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Sandra M.; Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; Chong, Gao; Rapoport, Basil

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic mice with the human thyrotropin-receptor (TSHR) A-subunit targeted to the thyroid are tolerant of the transgene. In transgenics that express low A-subunit levels (Lo-expressors), regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion using anti-CD25 before immunization with adenovirus encoding the A-subunit (A-sub-Ad) breaks tolerance, inducing extensive thyroid lymphocytic infiltration, thyroid damage and antibody spreading to other thyroid proteins. In contrast, no thyroiditis develops in Hi-expressor transgenics or wild-type mice. Our present goal was to determine if thyroiditis could be induced in Hi-expressor transgenics using a more potent immunization protocol: Treg depletion, priming with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) + A-subunit protein and further Treg depletions before two boosts with A-sub-Ad. As controls, anti-CD25 treated Hi- and Lo-expressors and wild-type mice were primed with CFA+ mouse thyroglobulin (Tg) or CFA alone before A-sub-Ad boosting. Thyroiditis developed after CFA+A-subunit protein or Tg and A-sub-Ad boosting in Lo-expressor transgenics but Hi- expressors (and wild-type mice) were resistant to thyroiditis induction. Importantly, in Lo-expressors, thyroiditis was associated with the development of antibodies to the mouse TSHR downstream of the A-subunit. Unexpectedly, we observed that the effect of bacterial products on the immune system is a “double-edged sword”. On the one hand, priming with CFA (mycobacteria emulsified in oil) plus A-subunit protein broke tolerance to the A-subunit in Hi-expressor transgenics leading to high TSHR antibody levels. On the other hand, prior treatment with CFA in the absence of A-subunit protein inhibited responses to subsequent immunization with A-sub-Ad. Consequently, adjuvant activity arising in vivo after bacterial infections combined with a protein autoantigen can break self-tolerance but in the absence of the autoantigen, adjuvant activity can inhibit the induction of immunity to autoantigens (like the

  10. Goodpasture's autoimmune disease - A collagen IV disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedchenko, Vadim; Richard Kitching, A; Hudson, Billy G

    2018-05-12

    Goodpasture's (GP) disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the deposition of pathogenic autoantibodies in basement membranes of kidney and lung eliciting rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage. The principal autoantigen is the α345 network of collagen IV, which expression is restricted to target tissues. Recent discoveries include a key role of chloride and bromide for network assembly, a novel posttranslational modification of the antigen, a sulfilimine bond that crosslinks the antigen, and the mechanistic role of HLA in genetic susceptibility and resistance to GP disease. These advances provide further insights into molecular mechanisms of initiation and progression of GP disease and serve as a basis for developing of novel diagnostic tools and therapies for treatment of Goodpasture's disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. [Allergy and autoimmunity: Molecular diagnostics, therapy, and presumable pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefieva, A S; Smoldovskaya, O V; Tikhonov, A A; Rubina, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Allergic and autoimmune diseases represent immunopathological reactions of an organism to antigens. Despite that the allergy is a result of exaggerated immune response to foreign antigens (allergens) and autoimmune diseases are characterized by the pathological response to internal antigens (autoantigens), the underlying mechanisms of these diseases are probably common. Thus, both types of diseases represent variations in the hypersensitivity reaction. A large percentage of both the adult and pediatric population is in need of early diagnostics of these pathologies of the immune system. Considering the diversity of antibodies produced in allergic and autoimmune disease and the difficulties accompanying clinical diagnosing, molecular diagnostics of these pathological processes should be carried out in several stages, including screening and confirmatory studies. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular diagnostics and therapy of allergic and autoimmune diseases and discuss the basic similarities and differences in the mechanisms of their development.

  12. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-06-13

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes.

  13. Relationship between ZnT8Ab, the SLC30A8 gene and disease progression in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L. B.; Vaziri-Sani, F.; Porksen, S.

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies against the newly established autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, zinc transporter 8, ZnT8, are presented as two types, ZnT8RAb and ZnT8WAb. The rs13266634 variant of the SLC30A8 gene has recently been found to determine the type of ZnT8Ab. The aim of this study was to explore the impact......8 gene is associated with preserved beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes patients. The genetic determination of the rs13266634 variant on the ZnT8Ab specificity is sustained the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in a pediatric cohort....

  14. Non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Steffen; Murray, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    used double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) for the diagnosis of NCGS, and none in children. Innate immune reactivity to amylase trypsin inhibitors has been suggested as the pathogenic principle in NCGS, but confirmatory evidence is lacking. Also, further clinical studies including...... transglutaminase 2, characteristic histological abnormalities of the small intestine, and an almost obligatory genetic haplotype (HLA-DQ2 or DQ8). The diagnosis of NCGS is based largely on the clinical suspicion of hyper-reactivity to gluten and the absence of the characteristics of CD. Few published studies have......Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) has been introduced recently as a potentially common disease on the basis of studies of patients with claimed reactivity to gluten but without the characteristics of celiac disease (CD). CD is characterized by antibody reactivity toward the autoantigen...

  15. Peptides Against Autoimmune Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Alexey; Lomakin, Yakov; Gabibov, Alexander; Belogurov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a nearly perfect defensive system polished by a hundred million years of evolution. Unique flexibility and adaptivity have created a virtually impenetrable barrier to numerous exogenous pathogens that are assaulting us every moment. Unfortunately, triggers that remain mostly enigmatic will sometimes persuade the immune system to retarget against self-antigens. This civil war remains underway, showing no mercy and taking no captives, eventually leading to irreversible pathological changes in the human body. Research that has emerged during the last two decades has given us hope that we may have a chance to overcome autoimmune diseases using a variety of techniques to "reset" the immune system. In this report, we summarize recent advances in utilizing short polypeptides - mostly fragments of autoantigens - in the treatment of autoimmune neurodegeneration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Reduced expression of TRIM21/Ro52 predicts poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with and without rheumatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauner, S; Zhou, W; Backlin, C

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TRIM21 (also known as Ro52) is an autoantigen in rheumatic disease and is predominantly expressed in leucocytes. Overexpression is associated with decreased proliferation, and the TRIM21 gene maps to a tumour suppressor locus. We therefore investigated the expression of TRIM21...... in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and its potential usefulness as a prognostic biomarker. MATERIALS AND METHODS: TRIM21 expression levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in lymphoma biopsies from three cohorts of patients with DLBCL: 42 patients with rheumatic disease treated...... with a cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisone (CHOP)-like regimen, 76 CHOP-treated and 196 rituximab-CHOP-treated nonrheumatic patients. Expression was correlated with clinical and biomedical parameters. TRIM21 expression was assessed in relation to lymphocyte proliferation by quantitative PCR...

  17. Efficacy and safety of omalizumab in patients with chronic urticaria who exhibit IgE against thyroperoxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, Marcus; Altrichter, Sabine; Bieber, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A subgroup of patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CU) exhibits IgE antibodies directed against autoantigens, such as thyroperoxidase (TPO). We conducted this study to investigate whether such patients with CU with IgE against TPO benefit from treatment with omalizumab......, a humanized anti-IgE mAb licensed for the treatment of severe persistent allergic (IgE-mediated) asthma. OBJECTIVES: We sought to assess the efficacy of omalizumab treatment in patients with CU with IgE autoantibodies against TPO. METHODS: In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled study patients with CU (male/female, 18-70 years of age) with IgE autoantibodies against TPO who had persistent symptoms (wheals and pruritus) despite standard antihistamine therapy were randomized to receive either omalizumab (75-375 mg, dose determined by using the approved asthma dosing table...

  18. Chronic inflammation, immune response, and infection in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Shi, G-P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly of macrop......Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly...... matrix metalloproteases and cysteine proteases for aortic matrix remodeling. The lymphocyte activation may be mediated by microorganisms as well as autoantigens generated from vascular structural proteins, perhaps through molecular mimicry. As in autoimmune diseases, the risk of AAA is increased...

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12802-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cobacter cetorum strain MIT-0... 38 0.23 AF237484_1( AF237484 |pid:none) Dirofilaria immitis intermed...87 ( O97594 ) RecName: Full=Structural maintenance of chromosomes pro... 36 0.87 U00680_1( U00680 |pid:none) Brugia malayi intermed...1305( CP000879 |pid:none) Petrotoga mobilis SJ95, complet... 38 0.30 (Q9BZF9) RecName: Full=Uveal autoantigen with coiled...ns BAC clone RP11-764E7 from 2, complet... 34 0.79 6 ( FK620261 ) 454GmaGlobSeed354893 Soybean Seed...ditis elegans clone Y71H2X, *** SEQUENCI... 38 4.5 7 ( AC146972 ) Medicago truncatula clone mth2-128d9, compl

  20. [Systemic lupus erythematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukác, J; Rovenský, J; Lukácová, O; Kozáková, D

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) is chronic autoimmune disease, characteristic by production of autoantibodies against different autoantigens. Etiopathogenesis in not precise determinated, but genetic, immunologic, hormonal factors or influence of environment are assumed. It manifests by various symptoms and it can affect whichever organ or system in the body. Clinical manifestation are due chronic inflammation in the tissues, which is caused first of all by deposit of immunocomplex and by cytotoxic damage. At the last decades the mortality of patients with SLE is markly lower and their live is prolong. In spite of this diagnostic, to follow up and therapy of this disease is complicated and it requires the colaboration of more branches of medicine.

  1. Activity-regulating structural changes and autoantibody epitopes in transglutaminase 2 assessed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Mysling, Simon; Hnida, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    The multifunctional enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is the target of autoantibodies in the gluten-sensitive enteropathy celiac disease. In addition, the enzyme is responsible for deamidation of gluten peptides, which are subsequently targeted by T cells. To understand the regulation of TG2 activity...... and the enzyme's role as an autoantigen in celiac disease, we have addressed structural properties of TG2 in solution by using hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that Ca(2+) binding, which is necessary for TG2 activity, induces structural changes in the catalytic core...... domain of the enzyme. Cysteine oxidation was found to abolish these changes, suggesting a mechanism whereby disulfide bond formation inactivates the enzyme. Further, by using TG2-specific human monoclonal antibodies generated from intestinal plasma cells of celiac disease patients, we observed...

  2. Glycosylation of type II collagen is of major importance for T cell tolerance and pathology in collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Bockermann, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Type II collagen (CII) is a candidate cartilage-specific autoantigen, which can become post-translationally modified by hydroxylation and glycosylation. T cell recognition of CII is essential for the development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and also occurs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA......). The common denominator of murine CIA and human RA is the presentation of an immunodominant CII-derived glycosylated peptide on murine Aq and human DR4 molecules, respectively. To investigate the importance of T cell recognition of glycosylated CII in CIA development after immunization with heterologous CII......, we treated neonatal mice with different heterologous CII-peptides (non-modified, hydroxylated and galactosylated). Treatment with the galactosylated peptide (galactose at position 264) was superior in protecting mice from CIA. Protection was accompanied by a reduced antibody response to CII...

  3. Thyroid dysfunction: an autoimmune aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al-Jameil, Noura; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Al-Rashid, May; Tabassum, Hajera

    2015-01-01

    Auto immune thyroid disease (AITD) is the common organ specific autoimmune disorder, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Grave's disease (GD) are its well-known sequelae. It occurs due to loss of tolerance to autoantigens thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) which leads to the infiltration of the gland. T cells in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (cAIT) induce apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells and cause destruction of the gland. Presences of TPO antibodies are common in HT and GD, while Tg has been reported as an independent predictor of thyroid malignancy. Cytokines are small proteins play an important role in autoimmunity, by stimulating B and T cells. Various cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, TNF-α and IFN-γ are found in thyroid follicular cells which enhance inflammatory response with nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins.

  4. Update on Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Michael; James Shapiro, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation has progressed considerably over the past 12 years, and >750 patients with type 1 diabetes have received islet transplants internationally over this time. Many countries are beginning to accept the transition from research to accepted and funded clinical care, especially for patients with brittle control that cannot be stabilized by more conventional means. Major challenges remain, including the need for more than one donor, and the requirement for potent, chronic immunosuppression. Combining immunological tolerance both to allo- and autoantigens, and a limitless expandable source of stem cell- or xenograft-derived insulin-secreting cells represent remaining hurdles in moving this effective treatment to a potential cure for all those with type 1 or 2 diabetes. PMID:22762022

  5. Analysis artefacts of the INS-IGF2 fusion transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Frogne, Thomas; Rescan, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background: In gene expression analysis, overlapping genes, splice variants, and fusion transcripts are potential sources of data analysis artefacts, depending on how the observed intensity is assigned to one, or more genes. We here exemplify this by an in-depth analysis of the INS-IGF2 fusion...... transcript, which has recently been reported to be among the highest expressed transcripts in human pancreatic beta cells and its protein indicated as a novel autoantigen in Type 1 Diabetes. Results: Through RNA sequencing and variant specific qPCR analyses we demonstrate that the true abundance of INS-IGF2...... is >20,000 fold lower than INS in human beta cells, and we suggest an explanation to the nature of the artefacts which have previously led to overestimation of the gene expression level in selected studies. We reinvestigated the previous reported findings of detection of INS-IGF2 using antibodies both...

  6. Binding of /sup 125/I alpha-bungarotoxin to the thymus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, F.; Kondo, K.; Tsubaki, T.

    1978-01-01

    Alpha-bungarotoxin is known to bind with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of skeletal muscle. Binding of iodine 125-labeled alpha bungarotoxin to the murine thymus, muscle, and liver was estimated. The toxin was bound to the muscle. The thymus was also capable of binding a considerable amount of the toxin, and the binding was obviously blocked by tubocurarine chloride. Binding to the liver, an organ containing no nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was very slight. These results may indicate the presence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the thymus, which could have implications in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Degenerating myoid cells and their receptors may represent autoantigens that induce an immunological cross-reaction with the receptors of skeletal muscles, giving rise to myasthenia gravis.

  7. Binding of 125I alpha-bungarotoxin to the thymus of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, F.; Kondo, K.; Tsubaki, T.

    1978-01-01

    Alpha-bungarotoxin is known to bind with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of skeletal muscle. Binding of iodine 125-labeled alpha bungarotoxin to the murine thymus, muscle, and liver was estimated. The toxin was bound to the muscle. The thymus was also capable of binding a considerable amount of the toxin, and the binding was obviously blocked by tubocurarine chloride. Binding to the liver, an organ containing no nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was very slight. These results may indicate the presence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the thymus, which could have implications in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Degenerating myoid cells and their receptors may represent autoantigens that induce an immunological cross-reaction with the receptors of skeletal muscles, giving rise to myasthenia gravis

  8. Etiology and pathogenesis of antisperm antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farhad Shahsavar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antisperm antibodies (ASA occur in men and women and may significantly impair fertility. In this case, the testis is an immunologically privileged site where germ cell antigens are protected from autoimmune attack. However, due to disruption of the blood-testis barrier occurring from testicular injury, or as a consequence of trauma to the epididymis or vas deferens many testicular proteins get autoantigenic during immunological challenges resulting in the formation of ASA in the blood serum, seminal plasma or located on the sperm membrane. ASA have also been reported to be associated with inflammation, cryptorchidism, varicocele and surgical intervention in the genital organs. ASA may interfere with different sperm functions, which are essential for the fertilization process.This review article will help to increase our understanding of the specific mechanisms that elicit the autoimmune response to sperm and of the pathogenesis of ASA that leads to an antibody-mediated infertility.

  9. Selective enrichment of Th1 CD45RBlow CD4+ T cells in autoimmune infiltrates in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renno, T; Zeine, R; Girard, J M

    1994-01-01

    The cytokine effector status of CD4+ T cells from lymph nodes (LN) and the central nervous system (CNS) of SJL/J mice immunized with autoantigen in adjuvant for the induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was compared. CD4+ T cells were FACS sorted based on the levels...... in the sorted populations. CD45RBlow cells constituted a minority of CD4+ cells in the LN and expressed elevated levels of IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-4 mRNA, whereas the CD45RBlow CD4+ population did not express detectable message for these cytokines under linear PCR conditions. By contrast to the LN, CD4+ cells...... of expression of the activation marker CD45RB. Low levels of expression of this surface marker are induced by antigen recognition and are associated with 'effector' T cell function. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyze the expression of different T cell cytokine genes...

  10. Dysregulation of Cell Death and Its Epigenetic Mechanisms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijing Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a systemic autoimmune disease involving multiple organs and tissues, which is characterized by the presence of excessive anti-nuclear autoantibodies. The pathogenesis of SLE has been intensively studied but remains far from clear. Increasing evidence has shown that the genetic susceptibilities and environmental factors-induced abnormalities in immune cells, dysregulation of apoptosis, and defects in the clearance of apoptotic materials contribute to the development of SLE. As the main source of auto-antigens, aberrant cell death may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of SLE. In this review, we summarize up-to-date research progress on different levels of cell death—including increasing rate of apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and defects in clearance of dying cells—and discuss the possible underlying mechanisms, especially epigenetic modifications, which may provide new insight in the potential development of therapeutic strategies for SLE.

  11. The self-antigen, thyroglobulin, induces antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells from healthy donors to proliferate and promote production of the regulatory cytokine, interleukin-10, by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Kim Hostein; Galdiers, Marcel P; Hedegaard, Chris Juul

    2010-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (TG), as autoantigen, induces in vitro proliferation of T and B cells from normal individuals, but the cytokine production differs from that in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, we investigate whether normal T cells responding to TG are naive, or have previously....... Whereas TT induced pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-2 (IL-2)/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)/IL-4/IL-5], TG evoked persistent release of the regulatory IL-10. Some donors, however, also responded with late IFN-gamma production, suggesting that the regulation by IL-10 could be overridden. Although...... monocytes were prime producers of IL-10 in the early TG response, a few IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells, primarily with CD45RO(+) memory phenotype, were also detected. Furthermore, T-cell depletion from the mononuclear cell preparation abrogated monocyte IL-10 production. Our findings indicate active...

  12. Lactococcus lactis As a Versatile Vehicle for Tolerogenic Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Dana P.; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2018-01-01

    Genetically modified Lactococcus lactis bacteria have been engineered as a tool to deliver bioactive proteins to mucosal tissues as a means to exert both local and systemic effects. They have an excellent safety profile, the result of years of human consumption in the food industry, as well as a lack of toxicity and immunogenicity. Also, containment strategies have been developed to promote further application as clinical protein-based therapeutics. Here, we review technological advancements made to enhanced the potential of L. lactis as live biofactories and discuss some examples of tolerogenic immunotherapies mediated by mucosal drug delivery via L. lactis. Additionally, we highlight their use to induce mucosal tolerance by targeted autoantigen delivery to the intestine as an approach to reverse autoimmune type 1 diabetes. PMID:29387056

  13. PERAN HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS (HSP DALAM PATOGENESIS PENYAKIT OTOIMUN DI DALAM RONGGA MULUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Proteins (HSP are highly conserved immunoreactive group of proteins found in microorganisms and animal/human tissue. In addition to heat, other stressful conditiions also induce stressed proteins, especially anorexia, heavy metal ion, exposure to H2O2 and infection by DNA or RNA viruses. Recent studies suggest the involvement of HSPs as autoantigens in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Bechet's syndrome, recurrent oral uclers, oral lichen planus and other. The HSPs 60 - 65 KDa might be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as Bechet's syndrome, recurrent oral ulcers, and oral lichen planus. This paper will discuss the immunopathogenesis mechanism of those diseases induced by HSPs.

  14. Restoration of X-ray resistance and V(D)J recombination in mutant cells by Ku cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smider, V.; Rathmell, W.K.; Chu, G.; Lieber, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Three genetic complementation groups of rodent cells are defective for both repair of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks and V(D)J recombination. Cells from one group lack a DNA end-binding activity that is biochemically and antigenically similar to the Ku autoantigen. Transfection of complementary DNA (cDNA) that encoded the 86-kilodalton subunit of Ku rescued these mutant cells for DNA end-binding activity, x-ray resistance, and V(D)J recombination activity. These results establish a role for Ku in DNA repair and recombination. Furthermore, as a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase, Ku may initiate a signaling pathway induced by DNA damage

  15. Toll-like receptor activation in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Georg; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis is complex but no longer enigmatic. Much progress has been made to on the polygenetic origin of lupus in identifying gene variants that permit the loss of tolerance against nuclear autoantigens. Along the same line in about 50% of lupus patients additional genetic weaknesses promote immune complex glomerulonephritis and filtration barrier dysfunction. Here we briefly summarize the pathogenesis of SLE with a focus on loss of tolerance and the role of toll-like receptors in the "pseudo"-antiviral immunity concept of systemic lupus. In addition, we discuss the local role of Toll-like receptors in intrarenal inflammation and kidney remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of MHC class I H-2 Kb/Db-restricted immunogenic peptides derived from retinal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Bai, Fang; Pries, Mette

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify H-2 Kb/Db-binding immunogenic peptides derived from retinal proteins. METHODS: Computer-based prediction was used to identify potentially H-2 Kb/Db-binding peptides derived from the interphotoreceptor retinol-binding protein (IRBP), soluble retinal antigen (S...... on day 21 after immunization with IRBP or IRBP and the immunogenic peptides. RESULTS: All the 21 predicted peptides were found to upregulate expression of H-2 Kb/Db on RMA-S cells. Five peptides, the two IRBP-derived peptides IRBP89-96 and IRBP(101-108), and the three PEDF-derived peptides, PEDF389....... The immunogenic peptides alone did not induce inflammation in the eyes, but they could enhance severity of uveitis induced by IRBP. CONCLUSIONS: Five of 21 H-2 Kb/Db-binding retinal protein-derived peptides were found to be immunogenic, suggesting that these peptides could function as autoantigenic epitopes...

  17. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  18. Estimation of sediment inflows to Lake Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 2009-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tuscaloosa, evaluated the concentrations, loads, and yields of suspended sediment in the tributaries to Lake Tuscaloosa in west-central Alabama, from October 1, 2008, to January 31, 2012. The collection and analysis of these data will facilitate the comparison with historical data, serve as a baseline for future sediment-collection efforts, and help to identify areas of concern. Lake Tuscaloosa, at the reservoir dam, receives runoff from a drainage area of 423 square miles (mi2). Basinwide in 2006, forested land was the primary land cover (68 percent). Comparison of historical imagery with the National Land Cover Database (2001 and 2006) indicated that the greatest temporal land-use change was timber harvest. The land cover in 2006 was indicative of this change, with shrub/scrub land (12 percent) being the secondary land use in the basin. Agricultural land use (10 percent) was represented predominantly by hay and pasture or grasslands. Urban land use was minimal, accounting for 4 percent of the entire basin. The remaining 6 percent of the basin has a land use of open water or wetlands. Storm and monthly suspended-sediment samples were collected from seven tributaries to Lake Tuscaloosa: North River, Turkey Creek, Binion Creek, Pole Bridge Creek, Tierce Creek, Carroll Creek, and Brush Creek. Suspended-sediment concentrations and streamflow measurements were statistically analyzed to estimate annual suspended-sediment loads and yields from each of these contributing watersheds. Estimated annual suspended-sediment yields in 2009 were 360, 540, and 840 tons per square mile (tons/mi2) at the North River, Turkey Creek, and Carroll Creek streamflow-gaging stations, respectively. Estimated annual suspended-sediment yields in 2010 were 120 and 86 tons/mi2 at the Binion Creek and Pole Bridge Creek streamflow-gaging stations, respectively. Estimated annual suspended-sediment yields in 2011 were 190 and 300 tons/mi2

  19. Crossreactive autoantibodies directed against cutaneous and joint antigens are present in psoriatic arthritis.

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    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by erosions and new bone formation. Diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and there are no biomarkers available. Moreover in PsA autoantibodies have not been described so far. Indeed an autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Aim of the study was to investigate the possible presence of autoantibodies typically associated with PsA.We used pooled IgG immunoglobulins derived from 30 patients with PsA to screen a random peptide library in order to identify disease relevant autoantigen peptides.Among the selected peptides, one was recognised by nearly all the patients' sera. The identified peptide (PsA peptide: TNRRGRGSPGAL shows sequence similarities with skin autoantigens, such as fibrillin 3, a constituent of actin microfibrils, desmocollin 3, a constituent of the desmosomes and keratin 78, a component of epithelial cytoskeleton. Interestingly the PsA peptide shares homology with the nebulin-related anchoring protein (N-RAP, a protein localized in the enthesis (point of insertion of a tendon or ligament to the bone, which represents the first affected site during early PsA. Antibodies affinity purified against the PsA peptide recognize fibrillin, desmocollin, keratin and N-RAP. Moreover antibodies directed against the PsA peptide are detectable in 85% of PsA patients. Such antibodies are not present in healthy donors and are present in 13/100 patients with seroposive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In seronegative RA these antibodies are detectable only in 3/100 patients.Our results indicate that PsA is characterized by the presence of serum autoantibodies crossreacting with an epitope shared by skin and joint antigens.

  20. The implications of autoantibodies to a single islet antigen in relatives with normal glucose tolerance: development of other autoantibodies and progression to type 1 diabetes.

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    Bingley, Polly J; Boulware, David C; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2016-03-01

    Autoantibodies directed at single islet autoantigens are associated with lower overall risk of type 1 diabetes than multiple autoantibodies, but individuals with one autoantibody may progress to higher risk categories. We examined the characteristics of this progression in relatives followed prospectively in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention. The study population comprised 983 relatives who were single autoantibody positive with normal baseline glucose tolerance (median age 16.2 years). Samples were screened for antibodies to GAD, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2) and insulin, and all positive samples tested for antibodies to zinc transporter 8 and islet cell antibodies. Antibodies to at least one additional islet autoantigen appeared in 118 of 983 relatives (overall 5 year risk 22%, 95% CI [17.9, 26.1]). At baseline, antibodies to GAD alone (68%) were more frequent than antibodies to insulin (26%) or IA-2 (6%), but all were associated with a similar risk of developing additional autoantibodies. Risk was associated with younger age (p = 0.002) and HLA class II genotype, but was similar in high and intermediate genetic risk groups (p = 0.65). Relatives who became multiple autoantibody positive during the follow-up had increased risk of developing diabetes comparable with the risk in relatives with multiple autoantibodies at study entry. Progression of islet autoimmunity in single autoantibody positive relatives in late childhood/adult life is associated with a predominance of autoantibodies to GAD and a distinct HLA risk profile. This heterogeneity in type 1 diabetes autoimmunity has potentially important implications for disease prevention.

  1. Autoantibody response against NALP5/MATER in primary ovarian insufficiency and in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozzetti, Annalisa; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Morelli, Silvia; Minarelli, Viviana; Hallgren, Åsa; Giordano, Roberta; De Bellis, Annamaria; Perniola, Roberto; Kämpe, Olle; Falorni, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 (NALP5)/maternal antigen that embryo requires (MATER) is an autoantigen in hypoparathyroidism associated with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) but is also expressed in the ovary. Mater is an autoantigen in experimental autoimmune oophoritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the frequency of NALP5/MATER autoantibodies (NALP5/MATER-Ab) in women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) and in patients with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) and to evaluate whether inhibin chains are a target for autoantibodies in POI. Autoantibodies against NALP5/MATER and inhibin chains-α and -βA were determined by radiobinding assays in 172 patients with AAD without clinical signs of gonadal insufficiency, 41 women with both AAD and autoimmune POI [steroidogenic cell autoimmune POI (SCA-POI)], 119 women with idiopathic POI, 19 patients with APS1, and 211 healthy control subjects. NALP5/MATER-Ab were detected in 11 of 19 (58%) sera from APS1 patients, 12 of 172 (7%) AAD sera, 5 of 41 (12%) SCA-POI sera, 0 of 119 idiopathic POI sera and 1 of 211 healthy control sera (P < .001). None of 160 POI sera, including 41 sera from women with SCA-POI and 119 women with idiopathic POI, and none of 211 healthy control sera were positive for inhibin chain-α/βA autoantibodies. NALP5/MATER-Ab are associated with hypoparathyroidism in APS1 but are present also in patients with AAD and in women with SCA-POI without hypoparathyroidism. Inhibin chains do not appear to be likely candidate targets of autoantibodies in human POI.

  2. Cellular islet autoimmunity associates with clinical outcome of islet cell transplantation.

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    Volkert A L Huurman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation can cure type 1 diabetes (T1D, but only a minority of recipients remains insulin-independent in the following years. We tested the hypothesis that allograft rejection and recurrent autoimmunity contribute to this progressive loss of islet allograft function.Twenty-one T1D patients received cultured islet cell grafts prepared from multiple donors and transplanted under anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG induction and tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (MMF maintenance immunosuppression. Immunity against auto- and alloantigens was measured before and during one year after transplantation. Cellular auto- and alloreactivity was assessed by lymphocyte stimulation tests against autoantigens and cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor assays, respectively. Humoral reactivity was measured by auto- and alloantibodies. Clinical outcome parameters--including time until insulin independence, insulin independence at one year, and C-peptide levels over one year--remained blinded until their correlation with immunological parameters. All patients showed significant improvement of metabolic control and 13 out of 21 became insulin-independent. Multivariate analyses showed that presence of cellular autoimmunity before and after transplantation is associated with delayed insulin-independence (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively and lower circulating C-peptide levels during the first year after transplantation (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02, respectively. Seven out of eight patients without pre-existent T-cell autoreactivity became insulin-independent, versus none of the four patients reactive to both islet autoantigens GAD and IA-2 before transplantation. Autoantibody levels and cellular alloreactivity had no significant association with outcome.In this cohort study, cellular islet-specific autoimmunity associates with clinical outcome of islet cell transplantation under ATG-tacrolimus-MMF immunosuppression. Tailored immunotherapy targeting cellular

  3. Exercise training attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by peripheral immunomodulation rather than direct neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Ofira; Fainstein, Nina; Touloumi, Olga; Lagoudaki, Roza; Hanya, Ester; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Katz, Abram; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2018-01-01

    Conflicting results exist on the effects of exercise training (ET) on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), nor is it known how exercise impacts on disease progression. We examined whether ET ameliorates the development of EAE by modulating the systemic immune system or exerting direct neuroprotective effects on the CNS. Healthy mice were subjected to 6weeks of motorized treadmill running. The Proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced transfer EAE model in mice was utilized. To assess effects of ET on systemic autoimmunity, lymph-node (LN)-T cells from trained- vs. sedentary donor mice were transferred to naïve recipients. To assess direct neuroprotective effects of ET, PLP-reactive LN-T cells were transferred into recipient mice that were trained prior to EAE transfer or to sedentary mice. EAE severity was assessed in vivo and the characteristics of encephalitogenic LN-T cells derived from PLP-immunized mice were evaluated in vitro. LN-T cells obtained from trained mice induced an attenuated clinical and pathological EAE in recipient mice vs. cells derived from sedentary animals. Training inhibited the activation, proliferation and cytokine gene expression of PLP-reactive T cells in response to CNS-derived autoantigen, but strongly enhanced their proliferation in response to Concanavalin A, a non-specific stimulus. However, there was no difference in EAE severity when autoreactive encephalitogenic T cells were transferred to trained vs. sedentary recipient mice. ET inhibits immune system responses to an auto-antigen to attenuate EAE, rather than generally suppressing the immune system, but does not induce a direct neuro-protective effect against EAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In Silico Perspectives on the Prediction of the PLP's Epitopes involved in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Zahra; Ataei, Mitra; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Ahangari, Ghasem; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Sanati, Mohammad Hosein

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The main cause of the MS is yet to be revealed, but the most probable theory is based on the molecular mimicry that concludes some infections in the activation of T cells against brain auto-antigens that initiate the disease cascade. The Purpose of this research is the prediction of the auto-antigen potency of the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) in multiple sclerosis. As there wasn't any tertiary structure of PLP available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and in order to characterize the structural properties of the protein, we modeled this protein using prediction servers. Meta prediction method, as a new perspective in silico , was performed to fi nd PLPs epitopes. For this purpose, several T cell epitope prediction web servers were used to predict PLPs epitopes against Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA). The overlap regions, as were predicted by most web servers were selected as immunogenic epitopes and were subjected to the BLASTP against microorganisms. Three common regions, AA 58-74 , AA 161-177 , and AA 238-254 were detected as immunodominant regions through meta-prediction. Investigating peptides with more than 50% similarity to that of candidate epitope AA 58-74 in bacteria showed a similar peptide in bacteria (mainly consistent with that of clostridium and mycobacterium) and spike protein of Alphacoronavirus 1, Canine coronavirus, and Feline coronavirus. These results suggest that cross reaction of the immune system to PLP may have originated from a bacteria or viral infection, and therefore molecular mimicry might have an important role in the progression of MS. Through reliable and accurate prediction of the consensus epitopes, it is not necessary to synthesize all PLP fragments and examine their immunogenicity experimentally ( in vitro ). In this study, the best encephalitogenic antigens were predicted based on bioinformatics tools that may provide reliable

  5. Microbiota epitope similarity either dampens or enhances the immunogenicity of disease-associated antigenic epitopes.

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    Sebastian Carrasco Pro

    Full Text Available The microbiome influences adaptive immunity and molecular mimicry influences T cell reactivity. Here, we evaluated whether the sequence similarity of various antigens to the microbiota dampens or increases immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. Sets of epitopes and control sequences derived from 38 antigenic categories (infectious pathogens, allergens, autoantigens were retrieved from the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB. Their similarity to microbiome sequences was calculated using the BLOSUM62 matrix. We found that sequence similarity was associated with either dampened (tolerogenic; e.g. most allergens or increased (inflammatory; e.g. Dengue and West Nile viruses likelihood of a peptide being immunogenic as a function of epitope source category. Ten-fold cross-validation and validation using sets of manually curated epitopes and non-epitopes derived from allergens were used to confirm these initial observations. Furthermore, the genus from which the microbiome homologous sequences were derived influenced whether a tolerogenic versus inflammatory modulatory effect was observed, with Fusobacterium most associated with inflammatory influences and Bacteroides most associated with tolerogenic influences. We validated these effects using PBMCs stimulated with various sets of microbiome peptides. "Tolerogenic" microbiome peptides elicited IL-10 production, "inflammatory" peptides elicited mixed IL-10/IFNγ production, while microbiome epitopes homologous to self were completely unreactive for both cytokines. We also tested the sequence similarity of cockroach epitopes to specific microbiome sequences derived from households of cockroach allergic individuals and non-allergic controls. Microbiomes from cockroach allergic households were less likely to contain sequences homologous to previously defined cockroach allergens. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that microbiome sequences may contribute to the tolerization of T cells for allergen

  6. Adaptive immunity in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The histological lesion of interface hepatitis, with its dense portal cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and plasma cells, was the first to suggest an autoaggressive cellular immune attack in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Immunohistochemical studies, focused on the phenotype of inflammatory cells infiltrating the liver parenchyma, have shown a predominance of alphabeta-T cells. Amongst these cells, the majority have been CD4 helper/inducers, while a sizeable minority have consisted of CD8 cytotoxic/suppressors. Lymphocytes on non-T cell lineage included natural killer cells, monocytes/macrophages and B lymphocytes. For autoimmunity to arise, the self-antigenic peptide, embraced by an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule, must be presented to an uncommitted T helper (T(H)0) lymphocyte by professional antigen-presenting cells. Once activated and according to the presence in the milieu of interleukin 12 (IL-12) or IL-4, T(H)0 lymphocytes can differentiate into T(H)1 cells, which are pivotal to macrophage activation; enhance HLA class I expression, rendering liver cells vulnerable to CD8 T-cell attack; and induce HLA class II expression on hepatocytes; or they can differentiate into T(H)2 cells, which produce IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, cytokines favouring autoantibody production by B lymphocytes. Autoantigen recognition is tightly controlled by regulatory mechanisms, such as those exerted by CD4+CD25(high) regulatory T cells. Numerical and functional regulatory T cell impairment characterises AIH and permits the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. Advances in the study of autoreactive T cells stem mostly from AIH type 2, where the main autoantigen, cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6), is known to enable characterisation of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Proteomic definition of a desmoglein linear determinant common to Pemphigus vulgaris and Pemphigus foliaceous

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    Sinha Animesh A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of autoimmune diseases have been clinically and pathologically characterized. In contrast, target antigens have been identified only in a few cases and, in these few cases, the knowledge of the exact epitopic antigenic sequence is still lacking. Thus the major objective of current work in the autoimmunity field is the identification of the epitopic sequences that are related to autoimmune reactions. Our labs propose that autoantigen peptide epitopes able to evoke humoral (autoimmune response are defined by the sequence similarity to the host proteome. The underlying scientific rationale is that antigen peptides acquire immunoreactivity in the context of their proteomic similarity level. Sequences uniquely owned by a protein will have high potential to evoke an immune reaction, whereas motifs with high proteomic redundancy should be immunogenically silenced by the tolerance phenomenon. The relationship between sequence redundancy and peptide immunoreactivity has been successfully validated in a number of experimental models. Here the hypothesis has been applied to pemphigus diseases and the corresponding desmoglein autoantigens. Methods Desmoglein 3 sequence similarity analysis to the human proteome followed by dot-blot/NMR immunoassays were carried out to identify and validate possible epitopic sequences. Results Computational analysis led to identifying a linear immunodominant desmoglein-3 epitope highly reactive with the sera from Pemphigus vulgaris as well as Pemphigus foliaceous. The epitopic peptide corresponded to the amino acid REWVKFAKPCRE sequence, was located in the extreme N-terminal region (residues 49 to 60, and had low redundancy to the human proteome. Sequence alignment showed that human desmoglein 1 and 3 share the REW-KFAK–RE sequence as a common motif with 75% residue identity. Conclusion This study 1 validates sequence redundancy to autoproteome as a main factor in shaping desmoglein peptide

  8. Molecular and clinical diversity in paraneoplastic immunity to Ma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, M R; Eichen, J G; Wade, D F; Posner, J B; Dalmau, J

    2001-09-01

    Antibodies to Ma1 and Ma2 proteins identify a paraneoplastic disorder that affects the limbic system, brain stem, and cerebellum. Preliminary studies suggested the existence of other Ma proteins and different patterns of immune response associated with distinct neurologic symptoms and cancers. In this study, our aim was to isolate the full-length sequence of Ma2 and new family members, identify the major autoantigen of the disorder, and extend the dinical-immunological analysis to 29 patients. Sera from selected patients were used to probe a brainstem cDNA library and isolate the entire Ma2 gene and a new family member, Ma3. Ma3 mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in brain, testis, and several systemic tissues. The variable cellular expression of Ma proteins and analysis of protein motifs suggest that these proteins play roles in the biogenesis of mRNA. Immunoblot studies identify Ma2 as the major autoantigen with unique epitopes recognized by all patients' sera. Eighteen patients had antibodies limited to Ma2: they developed limbic, hypothalamic, and brainstem encephalitis, and 78% had germ-cell tumors of the testis. Eleven patients had antibodies to Ma2 and additional antibodies to Ma1 and/or Ma3; they usually developed additional cerebellar symptoms and more intense brainstem dysfunction, and 82% of these patients had tumors other than germ-cell neoplasms. Overall, 17 of 24 patients (71%) with brain magnetic resonance imaging studies had abnormalities within or outside the temporal lobes, some as contrast-enhancing nodular lesions. A remarkable finding of immunity to Ma proteins is that neurologic symptoms may improve or resolve. This improvement segregated to a group of patients with antibodies limited to Ma2.

  9. Chronic malaria revealed by a new fluorescence pattern on the antinuclear autoantibodies test.

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    Benjamin Hommel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clinical forms of malaria such as chronic carriage, gestational malaria or hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly may follow a cryptic evolution with afebrile chronic fatigue sometimes accompanied by anemia and/or splenomegaly. Conventional parasitological tests are often negative or not performed, and severe complications may occur. Extensive explorations of these conditions often include the search for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA. METHODS: We analysed fluorescence patterns in the ANA test in patients with either chronic cryptic or acute symptomatic malaria, then conducted a one-year prospective study at a single hospital on all available sera drawn for ANA detections. We then identified autoantibodies differentially expressed in malaria patients and in controls using human protein microarray. RESULTS: We uncovered and defined a new, malaria-related, nucleo-cytoplasmic ANA pattern displaying the specific association of a nuclear speckled pattern with diffuse cytoplasmic perinuclearly-enhanced fluorescence. In the one-year prospective analysis, 79% of sera displaying this new nucleo-cytoplasmic fluorescence were from patients with malaria. This specific pattern, not seen in other parasitic diseases, allowed a timely reorientation of the diagnosis toward malaria. To assess if the autoantibody immune response was due to autoreactivity or molecular mimicry we isolated 42 autoantigens, targets of malarial autoantibodies. BLAST analysis indicated that 23 of recognized autoantigens were homologous to plasmodial proteins suggesting autoimmune responses directly driven by the plasmodial infection. CONCLUSION: In patients with malaria in whom parasitological tests have not been performed recognition of this new, malaria-related fluorescence pattern on the ANA test is highly suggestive of the diagnosis and triggers immediate, easy confirmation and adapted therapy.

  10. Toward the Clonotype Analysis of Alopecia Areata-Specific, Intralesional Human CD8+ T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Marta; Uchida, Youhei; Paus, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an organ-restricted autoimmune disease that mainly affects the hair follicle (HF). Several findings support a key primary effector role of CD8+ T cells in the disease pathogenesis. Autoreactive CD8+ T cells are not only present in the characteristic peribulbar inflammatory cell infiltrate of lesional AA HFs but are also found to be infiltrating in lesional HF epithelium where they are thought to recognize major histocompatibility complex class I-presented (auto-)antigens. However, the latter still remain unidentified. Therefore, one key aim in AA research is to identify the clonotypes of autoaggressive, intralesional CD8+ T cells. Therapeutically, this is important (a) so that these lymphocytes can be selectively eliminated or inhibited, (b) to identify the-as yet elusive-key (auto-)antigens in AA, and/or (c) to induce peripheral tolerance against the latter. Therefore, we have recently embarked on a National Alopecia Areata Foundation-supported project that attempts to isolate disease-specific, intralesional CD8+ T cells from AA skin in order to determine their TCR clonotype, using two complementary strategies. The first method is based on the enzymatic skin digestion from lesional AA skin, followed by either MACS technology and single-cell picking or FACS cell sorting, while the second method on laser microdissection. The identification of disease-specific TCRs can serve as a basis for specific AA immunotherapy along the lines sketched above and may possibly also provide prognostic biomarkers. If successful, this research strategy promises to permit, at long last, the causal therapy of AA.

  11. Cellular Signaling and Production of Galactose-Deficient IgA1 in IgA Nephropathy, an Autoimmune Disease

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    Colin Reily

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin A (IgA nephropathy (IgAN, the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis, is characterized by IgA1-containing immunodeposits in the glomeruli. IgAN is a chronic disease, with up to 40% of patients progressing to end-stage renal disease, with no disease-specific treatment. Multiple studies of the origin of the glomerular immunodeposits have linked elevated circulating levels of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (galactose-deficient in some O-glycans; Gd-IgA1 with formation of nephritogenic Gd-IgA1-containing immune complexes. Gd-IgA1 is recognized as an autoantigen in susceptible individuals by anti-glycan autoantibodies, resulting in immune complexes that may ultimately deposit in the kidney and induce glomerular injury. Genetic studies have revealed that an elevated level of Gd-IgA1 in the circulation of IgAN patients is a hereditable trait. Moreover, recent genome-wide association studies have identified several immunity-related loci that associated with IgAN. Production of Gd-IgA1 by IgA1-secreting cells of IgAN patients has been attributed to abnormal expression and activity of several key glycosyltransferases. Substantial evidence is emerging that abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells is related to the production of Gd-IgA1. As Gd-IgA1 is the key autoantigen in IgAN, understanding the genetic, biochemical, and environmental aspects of the abnormal signaling in IgA1-producing cells will provide insight into possible targets for future disease-specific therapy.

  12. A genomic point mutation in the extracellular domain of the thyrotropin receptor in patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy

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    Bahn, R.S.; Dutton, C.M.; Heufelder, A.E.; Sarkar, G. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)]|[Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich (Germany)

    1994-02-01

    Orbital and pretibial fibroblasts are targets of autoimmune attack in Graves` ophthalmopathy (GO) and pretibial dermopathy (PTD). The fibroblast autoantigen involved in these peripheral manifestations of Graves` disease and the reason for the association of GO and PTD with hyperthyroidism are unknown. RNA encoding the full-length extracellular domain of the TSH receptor has been demonstrated in orbital and dermal fibroblasts from patients with GO and normal subjects, suggesting a possible antigenic link between fibroblasts and thyrocytes. RNA was isolated from cultured orbital, pretibial, and abdominal fibroblasts obtained from patients with severe GO (n = 22) and normal subjects (n = 5). RNA was reverse transcribed, and the resulting cDNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers spanning overlapping regions of the entire extracellular domain of the TSH receptor. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an A for C substitution in the first position of codon 52 in 2 of the patients, both of whom had GO, PTD, and acropachy. Genomic DNA isolated from the 2 affected patients, and not from an additional 12 normal subjects, revealed the codon 52 mutation by direct sequencing and AciI restriction enzyme digestions. In conclusion, the authors have demonstrated the presence of a genomic point mutation, leading to a threonine for proline amino acid shift in the predicted peptide, in the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor in two patients with severe GO, PTD, acropachy, and high thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin levels. RNA encoding this mutant product was demonstrated in the fibroblasts of these patients. They suggest that the TSH receptor may be an important fibroblast autoantigen in GO and PTD, and that this mutant form of the receptor may have unique immunogenic properties. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A murine model of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis: Xenoimmunization with human antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Vitozzi, Susana; Alvarez, Fernando

    2004-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by an immune-mediated injury of the hepatic parenchyma of unknown pathogenesis. Type 2 AIH is identified by the presence of anti-liver-kidney microsomes type 1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) autoantibodies. The current study shows that a murine model of AIH can be generated by DNA immunization against type 2 AIH self-antigens (P450 2D6 and formiminotransferase-cyclodeaminase). A pCMV plasmid containing the N-terminal region of mouse CTLA-4 and the antigenic region of human CYP2D6 (672-1,377 bp) and human formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD; 1,232-1,668 bp) was used for DNA immunization of C57BL/6 female mice. Immunized mice showed elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), with peaks at 4 and 7 months postinjection. Periportal, portal, and intralobular liver inflammatory infiltrates were observed at histology. Mainly CD4+ lymphocytes, but also CD8+ and B lymphocytes, were found in the liver. Cytotoxic-specific T cells were found in both the liver and spleen of these animals. Mice developed anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 antibodies of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) subclass, against specific mouse autoantigens. The ALT levels correlated with both the presence of anti-LKM1/anti-LC1 antibodies and the presence of liver necroinflammation. In conclusion, in mice, DNA immunization against human autoantigens breaks tolerance and induces an autoimmune liver disease. Molecular mimicry between foreign and self-antigens explains the liver injury. This model of AIH resembles human type 2 AIH and will be helpful for the study of its pathogenesis.

  14. Diabetes-associated dry eye syndrome in a new humanized transgenic model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Elagin, Raya B; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) are at high risk of developing lacrimal gland dysfunction. We have developed a new model of human T1D using double-transgenic mice carrying HLA-DQ8 diabetes-susceptibility haplotype instead of mouse MHC-class II and expressing the human beta cell autoantigen Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in pancreatic beta cells. We report here the development of dry eye syndrome (DES) after diabetes induction in our humanized transgenic model. Double-transgenic mice were immunized with DNA encoding human GAD65, either naked or in adenoviral vectors, to induce T1D. Mice monitored for development of diabetes developed lacrimal gland dysfunction. Animals developed lacrimal gland disease (classically associated with diabetes in Non Obese Diabetic [NOD] mice and with T1D in humans) as they developed glucose intolerance and diabetes. Animals manifested obvious clinical signs of dry eye syndrome (DES), from corneal erosions to severe keratitis. Histological studies of peri-bulbar areas revealed lymphocytic infiltration of glandular structures. Indeed, infiltrative lesions were observed in lacrimal/Harderian glands within weeks following development of glucose intolerance. Lesions ranged from focal lymphocytic infiltration to complete acinar destruction. We observed a correlation between the severity of the pancreatic infiltration and the severity of the ocular disease. Our results demonstrate development of DES in association with antigen-specific insulitis and diabetes following immunization with clinically relevant human autoantigen concomitantly expressed in pancreatic beta cells of diabetes-susceptible mice. As in the NOD mouse model and as in human T1D, our animals developed diabetes-associated DES. This specific finding stresses the relevance of our model for studying these human diseases. We believe our model will facilitate studies to prevent/treat diabetes-associated DES as well as human diabetes.

  15. Multivalent Soluble Antigen Arrays Exhibit High Avidity Binding and Modulation of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Signaling to Drive Efficacy against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Pickens, Chad J; Leon, Martin; Berkland, Cory

    2017-06-12

    A pressing need exists for antigen-specific immunotherapies (ASIT) that induce selective tolerance in autoimmune disease while avoiding deleterious global immunosuppression. Multivalent soluble antigen arrays (SAgA PLP:LABL ), consisting of a hyaluronic acid (HA) linear polymer backbone cografted with multiple copies of autoantigen (PLP) and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) peptides, are designed to induce tolerance to a specific multiple sclerosis (MS) autoantigen. Previous studies established that hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , employing a degradable linker to codeliver PLP and LABL, was therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in vivo and exhibited antigen-specific binding with B cells, targeted the B cell receptor (BCR), and dampened BCR-mediated signaling in vitro. Our results pointed to sustained BCR engagement as the SAgA PLP:LABL therapeutic mechanism, so we developed a new version of the SAgA molecule using nonhydrolyzable conjugation chemistry, hypothesizing it would enhance and maintain the molecule's action at the cell surface to improve efficacy. "Click SAgA" (cSAgA PLP:LABL ) uses hydrolytically stable covalent conjugation chemistry (Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC)) rather than a hydrolyzable oxime bond to attach PLP and LABL to HA. We explored cSAgA PLP:LABL B cell engagement and modulation of BCR-mediated signaling in vitro through flow cytometry binding and calcium flux signaling assays. Indeed, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited higher avidity B cell binding and greater dampening of BCR-mediated signaling than hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL . Furthermore, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited significantly enhanced in vivo efficacy compared to hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , achieving equivalent efficacy at one-quarter of the dose. These results indicate that nonhydrolyzable conjugation increased the avidity of cSAgA PLP:LABL to drive in vivo efficacy through modulated BCR-mediated signaling.

  16. Autoimmune Subepidermal Bullous Diseases of the Skin and Mucosae: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber, Kyle T; Murrell, Dedee F; Schmidt, Enno; Joly, Pascal; Borradori, Luca

    2018-02-01

    Autoimmune subepidermal blistering diseases of the skin and mucosae constitute a large group of sometimes devastating diseases, encompassing bullous pemphigoid, gestational pemphigoid, mucous membrane pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and anti-p200 pemphigoid. Their clinical presentation is polymorphic. These autoimmune blistering diseases are associated with autoantibodies that target distinct components of the basement membrane zone of stratified epithelia. These autoantigens represent structural proteins important for maintenance of dermo-epidermal integrity. Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucosae. Although the disease typically presents with a generalized blistering eruption associated with itch, atypical variants with either localized bullous lesions or "non-bullous" presentations are observed in approximately 20% of patients. A peculiar form of BP typically associated with pregnancy is pemphigoid gestationis. In anti-p200 pemphigoid, patients present with tense blisters on erythematosus or normal skin resembling BP, with a predilection for acral surfaces. These patients have antibodies targeting the 200-kDa basement membrane protein. Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare autoimmune blistering disease associated with autoantibodies against type VII collagen that can have several phenotypes including a classical form mimicking dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, an inflammatory presentation mimicking BP, or mucous membrane pemphigoid-like lesions. Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is the term agreed upon by international consensus for an autoimmune blistering disorder, which affects one or more mucous membrane and may involve the skin. The condition involves a number of different autoantigens in the basement membrane zone. It may result in severe complications from scarring, such as blindness and strictures. Diagnosis of these diseases relies on direct immunofluorescence microscopy studies

  17. Geographic information system (GIS)-based maps of Appalachian basin oil and gas fields: Chapter C.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Robert T.; Kinney, Scott A.; Suitt, Stephen E.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Trippi, Michael H.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the more recent maps of Appalachian basin oil and gas fields (and the adjoining Black Warrior basin) is the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) compilation by Mast and others (1998) (see Trippi and others, this volume, chap. I.1). This map is part of a larger oil and gas field map for the conterminous United States that was derived by Mast and others (1998) from the Well History Control System (WHCS) database of Petroleum Information, Inc. (now IHS Energy Group). Rather than constructing the map from the approximately 500,000 proprietary wells in the Appalachian and Black Warrior part of the WHCS database, Mast and others (1998) subdivided the region into a grid of 1-mi2 (square mile) cells and allocated an appropriate type of hydrocarbon production (oil production, gas production, oil and gas production, or explored but no production) to each cell. Each 1-mi2 cell contains from 0 to 5 or more exploratory and (or) development wells. For example, if the wells in the 1-mi2 cell consisted of three oil wells, one gas well, and one dry well, then the cell would be characterized on the map as an area of oil and gas production. The map by Mast and others (1998) accurately shows the distribution and types of hydrocarbon accumulation in the Appalachian and Black Warrior basins, but it does not show the names of individual fields. To determine the locality and name of individual oil and gas fields, one must refer to State oil and gas maps (for example, Harper and others, 1982), which are generally published at scales of 1:250,000 or 1:500,000 (see References Cited), and (or) published journal articles.

  18. A new approach for geochemical surveys of large areas for uranium resource potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, J.W.; Butz, T.R.; Cagle, G.W.; Kane, V.E.; Nichols, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Grand Junction, Colorado office of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is conducting the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to evaluate the uranium resources in the United States and Alaska. The program is designed to identify favorable areas for uranium exploration, to assess the supply of domestic resources, and to improve exploration technology. The Nuclear Division of the Union Carbide Corporation has been assigned the responsibility of conducting a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment survey of the mid-continental states in the United States. This survey covers approximately 2,500,000 km 2 (1,000,000 mi 2 ) and includes the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa. The uranium potential of sandstones, Precambrian conglomerates, veins, granites, and phosphorites is being assessed utliizing a three-part program consisting of pilot surveys in each geological province and two phases of reconnaissance sampling of drainage basins. Samples of stream sediment, stream water, groundwater, algae, and vegetation are analyzed for uranium and some 20 additional elements. Data resulting from this program is released to private industry by ERDA as it becomes available. Analysis of results from a typical three-part survey are given. For distinctive geological regions, the pilot survey will: (1) define characteristic concentration background levels of the elements of interest, (2) identify potential uranium pathfinder elements, (3) determine relationship between stream, stream sediment and botanical samples, (4) identify any necessary modification to field sampling techniques, and (5) determine necessary sensitivities required for chemical analysis. The first reconnaissance phase average sample spacing of one station per 250 km 2 (100 mi 2 ) drainage basin is shown to delineate general boundaries of uranium provinces, and the second

  19. Dermatomiosite como primeira manifestação de uma neoplasia pulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Castro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A dermatomiosite (DM é uma doença rara, caracterizada por fraqueza muscular proximal associada a exantema cutâneo típico. A biopsia muscular apresenta lesões inflamatórias compatíveis com miosite, estando associada a um aumento de risco de neoplasia, frequentemente considerada como síndrome paraneoplásico. Os autores apresentam um caso de um homem de 63 anos, com quadro de fraqueza muscular proximal progressiva e exantema cutâneo com 2 meses de evolução. A biopsia cutânea e muscular foram compatíveis com DM. A tomografia tórax mostrou imagem nodular paracardíaca esquerda e a biopsia brônquica confirmou diagnóstico de carcinoma pulmão pequenas células. Este caso clínico pretende realçar a importância da realização do estudo diagnóstico exaustivo em doentes com DM, visto que esta patologia surge frequentemente como síndrome paraneoplásico. Abstract: Dermatomyositis (DM is a rare disease characterised by proximal muscle weakness and a typical cutaneous rash. The muscle biopsy shows inflammatory lesions consistent with myositis, being related to an increased risk of cancer, often considered as a paraneoplastic syndrome. The authors present a case of a 63-year-old man, with progressive proximal muscle weakness and cutaneous rash, appearing in two months. The muscle and skin biopsies were consistent with DM. Chest tomography showed a nodular image in the lingular region and bronchy biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. This clinical case intends to enhance the importance of a thorough diagnostic study in patients with DM, as it is often a paraneoplastic syndrome. Palavras-chave: Dermatomiosite, Síndrome paraneoplásico, Neoplasias pulmonares, Keywords: Dermatomyositis, Paraneoplastic syndrome, Lung neoplasms

  20. Infrared spectra of the gaseous iodides of chromium, iron and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Booij, A.S.

    1991-11-01

    The infrared spectra of the vapours over chromium, iron and nickel di-iodide have been studied by high-temperature infrared spectroscopy. The gaseous molecules CrI 2 , FeI 2 and NiI 2 were all identified and the interpretation of the spectra is in agreement with a linear structure. Additional strong absorption bands in the spectra of the vapour phase above liquid CrI 2 and FeI 2 were assigned to dimeric (MI 2 ) 2 molecules. Valence force constants and thermodynamic quantities have been calculated. (author). 41 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  1. Haiti's progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured

    OpenAIRE

    Koski-Karell V; Farmer PE; Isaac B; Campa EM; Viaud L; Namphy PC; Ternier R; Ivers LC

    2016-01-01

    Victoria Koski-Karell,1,2 Paul E Farmer,2–4 Benito Isaac,5 Elizabeth M Campa,5 Loune Viaud,5 Paul C Namphy,6 Ralph Ternier,5 Louise C Ivers2–4 1Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, and University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Partners In Health, 3Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 5Zanmi Lasante, Cange, 6Di...

  2. Haiti’s progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured

    OpenAIRE

    Koski-Karell, Victoria; Farmer, Paul E; Isaac, Benito; Campa, Elizabeth M; Viaud, Loune; Namphy, Paul C; Ternier, Ralph; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Victoria Koski-Karell,1,2 Paul E Farmer,2–4 Benito Isaac,5 Elizabeth M Campa,5 Loune Viaud,5 Paul C Namphy,6 Ralph Ternier,5 Louise C Ivers2–4 1Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, and University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Partners In Health, 3Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 5Zanmi Lasante...

  3. The Alaskan mineral resource assessment program; background information to accompany folio of geologic and mineral resource maps of the Ambler River Quadrangle, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Charles F.; Tailleur, I.L.; Albert, N.R.; Ellersieck, Inyo; Grybeck, Donald; Hackett, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Ambler River quadrangle, consisting of 14,290 km2 (5,520 mi2) in northwest Alaska, was investigated by an interdisciplinary research team for the purpose of assessing the mineral resource potential of the quadrangle. This report provides background information for a folio of maps on the geology, reconnaissance geochemistry, aeromagnetics, Landsat imagery, and mineral resource evaluation of the quadrangle. A summary of the geologic history, radiometric dates, and fossil localities and a comprehensive bibliography are also included. The quadrangle contains jade reserves, now being mined, and potentially significant resources of copper, zinc, lead, and silver.

  4. National Water-Quality Assessment Program, western Lake Michigan drainages: Summaries of liaison committee meeting, Green Bay, Wisconsin, March 28-29, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    The Western Lake Michigan Drainages (WMIC) study unit, under investigation since 1991, drains 20,000 square miles (mi2) in eastern Wisconsin and Upper Michigan (fig. 1). The major water-quality issues in the WMIC study unit are: (1) nonpoint-source contamination of surface and ground water by agricultural chemicals, (2) contamination in bottom sediments of rivers and harbors by toxic substances, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), other synthetic organic compounds, and trace elements, (3) nutrient enrichment of rivers and lakes resulting from nonpoint- and point-source discharges, and (4) acidification and mercury contamination of lakes in poorly buffered watersheds in the northwestern part of the study unit.

  5. Copper Mountain, Wyoming, intermediate-grade uranium resource assessment project. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madson, M.E.; Ludlam, J.R.; Fukui, L.M.

    1982-11-01

    Intermediate-grade uranium resources were delineated and estimated for Eocene and Precambrian host rock environments in the 39.64 mi 2 Copper Mountain, Wyoming, assessment area. Geologic reconnaissance and geochemical, geophysical, petrologic, borehole, and structural data were interpreted and used to develop a genetic model for uranium mineralization in these environments. Development of a structural scoring system and application of computer graphics in a high-confidence control area established the basis for estimations of uranium resources in the total assessment area. 8 figures, 5 tables

  6. Water sediment, and nutrient budgets, and bathymetric survey of Old and New Gillespie Lakes, Macoupin County, Illinois, May 1996-April 1997; with a discussion of lake-management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary P.

    1999-01-01

    The Gillespie Lakes system serves as a drinking water source for the town of Gillespie, Illinois, and is a major recreational focus for the area. As part of an investigation of a concern that the lakes are being adversely affected by excessive sediment and nutrient in flows, this report presents hydrologic, sediment, and nutrient budgets for Old Gillespie Lake and New Gillespie Lake, calculated by the U.S. Geological Survey with data collected during May 1996-April 1997 in cooperation with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and the city of Gillespie, Illinois. Bathymetric data also were collected in the two lakes to produce maps of the lake bed elevations. The influx of sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen into Old Gillespie Lake during the study period was 4,063, 6.02, and 52.3 tons, respectively. Old Gillespie Lake retained 92 percent of the inflowing sediment (which agrees with theoretical calculations of trapping efficiency for Old Gillespie Lake), 84 percent of the inflowing phosphorus, and 87 percent of the inflowing nitrogen. The influx of sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen into New Gillespie Lake during the study period was 4,792, 7.56, and 64.3 tons, respectively. Old Gillespie Lake retained 95 percent of the inflowing sediment (which agrees with theoretical calculations of trapping efficiency for New Gillespie Lake), 82 percent of the inflowing phosphorus, and 81 percent of the inflowing nitrogen. The loads per area of phosphorus and nitrogen to the Gillespie Lakes were 1.06 tons/mi2 and 9.26 tons/mi2, respectively. For row crops of corn and soybeans, the literature reports ranges of loads per area of phosphorus of 0.15 to 1.43 tons/mi2 and of nitrogen of 0.86 to 11.43 tons/mi2. Therefore, loads to the Gillespie Lakes are relatively high for the given cropping practices, and application of best management practices may substantially reduce the per area loads of these nutrients. Considering these loads and retention of sediment and nutrients, a

  7. Westinghouse Hanford Company risk management strategy for retired surplus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.E.; Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Egge, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes an approach that facilitates management of personnel safety and environmental release risk from retired, surplus Westinghouse Hanford Company-managed facilities during the predemolition time frame. These facilities are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km 2 (570-mi 2 ) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The production reactors are located in the 100 Area and the chemical separation facilities are located in the 200 Area. This paper also includes a description of the risk evaluation process, shows applicable results, and includes a description of comparison costs for different risk reduction options

  8. Investigation of transferred hyperfine interactions from 129I and 119Sn by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The hyperfine parameters at 129 I have been measured in the series of compounds CrI 3 , CsCrI 3 , MI 2 (M=V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cd) and NR 4 FeI 4 (R=ethyl, butyl). They have been interpreted in terms of the charge and spin densities in the ligand valence orbitals. Information about the spin polarization mechanisms as well as about the local magnetic and crystallographic structural arrangements have been furthermore deduced. The 119 Sn hyperfine data in the series of RESn 3 intermetallics have provided information about the magnetic structure and the spin polarization mechanisms [fr

  9. Turbulent Combustion Study of Scramjet Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The filtered Navier-Stokes equation are solved on the left grid. The wall shear stress are estimated from algebraic relation or by solving thin...when we know e and V , we solve the non- linear equation of e = H(T )+ RT M for the temperature of T , then P is calculated by P = RT/(MV ). The...the elementary gas model: µi = 2.6693 · 10−5 √ MiT δ2i Ω (2,2) ij . (2.37) ki = µi ( cp,i + 5 4 R Mi ) . (2.38) Here Mi is the molecular mass of

  10. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckbach, Sabine [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Unversity Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: sabine.weckbach@umm.de

    2009-06-15

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  11. Antimyosin scintigraphy in patients with acquired and hereditary muscular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loefberg, M.; Liewendahl, K.; Savolainen, S.; Nikkinen, P.; Lamminen, A.; Tiula, E.; Somer, H.

    1994-01-01

    Scintigraphy with indium-111 labelled antimyosin has an established role in the evaluation of cardiac muscle damage. This antibody has been shown to cross-react with myosin in skeletal muscle. We therefore studied the usefulness of this method for the detection of skeletal muscle lesions in rhabdomyolysis, myositis and hereditary muscular dystrophies. All nine patients with rhabdomyolysis had focal uptake of antimyosin antibody which correlated with the clinical findings of soft tissue damage. However, a number of symptomless lesions were also detected by immunoscintigraphy. In rhabdomyolysis the target to non-target uptake ratios varied from 1.3 to 7.6. Diffuse uptake of antibody in skeletal muscle was observed in all three patients with polymyositis-dermatomyositis and in 12 out of 13 patients with muscular dystrophies. In myositis the intensity of antibody accumulation correlated reasonably well with the magnitude of oedema detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most patients with Becker type or non-X-chromosomal muscular dystrophies showed slight or moderate uptake of antibody, mainly in the lower extremities. In these patients more antibody accumulated in the calves than in the thighs, whereas the findings on MRI were more prominent in the thighs than in the calves, presumably because of the better preserved muscle bulk in the calves. We conclude that antimyosin scintigraphy can be used for the detection of muscle lesions not only in acquired muscle diseases but also in hereditary muscular disorders, and that immunoscintigraphy provides information on muscle disease activity not obtainable with MRI. (orig.)

  12. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick; Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  13. 111indium-antimyosin immunoscintigraphy in suspected myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.; Schuemichen, C.; Joseph, A.; Moser, E.; Zeiher, A.

    1991-01-01

    111 Indium-monoclonal antimyosin scans were carried out in 21 patients with suspected myocarditis, confirmed by reduced ejection volume, pericardial effusion and clinical follow up in 12 patients. Coronary heart disease was excluded angiographically in all cases. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial 111 In-antimyosin accumulation 48 hours after injection showed a pathological uptake in 10/12 patients with increased heart/lung ratios (Q 48 >1,58). Ratios were also elevated in 2 patients with cardiomyopathy, 2 suffering from vasculitis and 1 with dermatomyositis. Four patients without proven cardiac disease had normal ratios (Q 48 ≤1,58). Examination after 24 hours was of limited value, depending on the residual blood pool activity. Visual analysis of the scans showed a high interobserver variation despite a positive correlation with quantitative analysis (48 h p.i.: r=0,72; p 111 In-antimyosin scan as a screening method prior to myocardial biopsy. However, scintigraphy cannot definitely elucidate the cause of myocardial damage. Therefore, myocardial biopsy is still recommended after positive antimyosin scans. (orig.) [de

  14. [Imported histoplasmosis in Navarra: presentation of four cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascués, Ana; Rodríguez, Irene; Repáraz, Jesús; Salvo, Soledad; Gil-Setas, Alberto; Martínez Peñuela, José María

    2011-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection caused by the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum. Its incidence in Spain has increased in recent years, mainly due to the increased presence of immigrants from Latin America and increased travel to the continent for tourism and cooperation. Our aim was to review the clinical characteristics of cases of histoplasmosis diagnosed in our hospital during the last six years. We diagnosed 4 cases from 4 patients from South America, 3 of whom were HIV positive and 1 diagnosed with dermatomyositis was treated with immunosuppressive drugs. The laboratory diagnosis was carried out by histological and microbiological study, by culture and specific PCR directly on the sample. As it is an imported infection there needs to be a high level of suspicion and a detailed history taken to get a diagnosis. This infection requires a differential diagnosis between febrile syndrome in immunosuppressed patients, both HIV positive and immunosuppressive therapy, which originate from endemic areas, or who have a history of staying in them. Copyright © 2010 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. A Report of Two Cases of Solid Facial Edema in Acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn-Régnier, Sarah; Mangana, Joanna; Kerl, Katrin; Kamarachev, Jivko; French, Lars E; Cozzio, Antonio; Navarini, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    Solid facial edema (SFE) is a rare complication of acne vulgaris. To examine the clinical features of acne patients with solid facial edema, and to give an overview on the outcome of previous topical and systemic treatments in the cases so far published. We report two cases from Switzerland, both young men with initially papulopustular acne resistant to topical retinoids. Both cases responded to oral isotretinoin, in one case combined with oral steroids. Our cases show a strikingly similar clinical appearance to the cases described by Connelly and Winkelmann in 1985 (Connelly MG, Winkelmann RK. Solid facial edema as a complication of acne vulgaris. Arch Dermatol. 1985;121(1):87), as well as to cases of Morbihan's disease that occurs as a rare complication of rosacea. Even 30 years after, the cause of the edema remains unknown. In two of the original four cases, a potential triggering factor was identified such as facial trauma or insect bites; however, our two patients did not report such occurrencies. The rare cases of solid facial edema in both acne and rosacea might hold the key to understanding the specific inflammatory pattern that creates both persisting inflammation and disturbed fluid homeostasis which can occur as a slightly different presentation in dermatomyositis, angioedema, Heerfordt's syndrome and other conditions.

  16. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin and its signifance for diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiessling, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    A commercial test kit for radioimmunologic proof of myoglobin in serum was tested with regard to its specificty, sensitivity, precision, reproducibility, recovery and use in the diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal diseases. In the serum of 164 healthy control persons (age: 2-79 years) the individual myoglobin concentrations ranged from 4 to 60 ng/ml. Among 300 patients with muscular diseases extreme myoglobinaemia in acute rhabdomyolysis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis and different progressive muscular dystrophies could be detected. Slightly increased myoglobin concentrations could be proved in a number of patient with amyotrophic lateral sklerosis, neural muscular atrophy and in all cases of spinal muscular atrophy of the Kugelberg-Welander type. Confirmed DMD patients exhibited in about 80% of the cases hypermyoglobinaemia, and about 11% of 43 possible DMD patients showed an increase in myoglobin. Taking acute rhabdomyolysis and myositis as an example, it was found that myoglobin correlates well with the clinical course of these diseases and permits safe inferences as to the efficiency of the therapy chosen. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin and its signifance for diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal diseases. Der radioimmunologische Myoglobinnachweis im Serum und seine Bedeutung bei der Diagnostik und Therapie von Skelettmuskelerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    A commercial test kit for radioimmunologic proof of myoglobin in serum was tested with regard to its specificty, sensitivity, precision, reproducibility, recovery and use in the diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal diseases. In the serum of 164 healthy control persons (age: 2-79 years) the individual myoglobin concentrations ranged from 4 to 60 ng/ml. Among 300 patients with muscular diseases extreme myoglobinaemia in acute rhabdomyolysis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis and different progressive muscular dystrophies could be detected. Slightly increased myoglobin concentrations could be proved in a number of patient with amyotrophic lateral sklerosis, neural muscular atrophy and in all cases of spinal muscular atrophy of the Kugelberg-Welander type. Confirmed DMD patients exhibited in about 80% of the cases hypermyoglobinaemia, and about 11% of 43 possible DMD patients showed an increase in myoglobin. Taking acute rhabdomyolysis and myositis as an example, it was found that myoglobin correlates well with the clinical course of these diseases and permits safe inferences as to the efficiency of the therapy chosen.

  18. [Pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The connective tissue diseases are a variable group of autoimmune mediated disorders characterized by multiorgan damage. Pulmonary complications are common, usually occur after the onset of joint symptoms, but can also be initially presenting complaint. The respiratory system may be involved in all its component: airways, vessels, parenchyma, pleura and respiratory muscles. Lung involvement is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in the connective tissue diseases. Clinical course is highly variable - can range from mild to rapidly progressive, some processes are reversible, while others are irreversible. Thus, the identification of reversible disease , and separately progressive disease, are important clinical issues. The frequency, clinical presentation, prognosis and responce to therapy are different, depending on the pattern of involvement as well as on specyfic diagnostic method used to identify it. High- resolution computed tompography plays an important role in identifying patients with respiratory involvement. Pulmonary function tests are a sensitive tool detecting interstitial lung disease. In this article, pulmonary lung involvement accompanying most frequently apperaing connective tissue diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, Sjögrens syndrome and mixed connective tissue disaese are reviewed.

  19. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Accidental hydroxychloroquine overdose resulting in neurotoxic vestibulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansky, Peter B; Werth, Victoria P

    2017-04-12

    Hydroxychloroquine is an oral antimalarial medication commonly used off-label for a variety of rheumatological conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and dermatomyositis. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with acute onset headache, bilateral tinnitus, and left-sided facial numbness and tingling in the setting of accidentally overdosing on hydroxychloroquine. By the next morning, the patient began to experience worsening in the tingling sensation and it eventually spread to her left arm, thigh and distal extremities. The patient also complained of new onset blurring of her peripheral vision and feeling 'off balance.' Despite a complete neurological and ophthalmological work-up with unremarkable imaging and blood work, the patient has had no improvement in her tinnitus, left-sided paresthesias, visual disturbance or ataxia. This is a unique case of hydroxychloroquine overdose resulting in permanent neurotoxic vestibulopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.