WorldWideScience

Sample records for dermatology cardiology ophthalmology

  1. Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Fahey, Tom; Schroeder, Knut

    2004-01-01

    This article describes recent developments in cardiology and cardiovascular disease that are likely to be relevant to primary healthcare professionals and their patients. The following subject areas are covered: Primary prevention: recent developments in pharmacological interventions, drug interactions, and drugs that are likely to cause harm; cardiovascular risk estimation and shared decision making with patients; and new developments in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.Second...

  2. Dermatology Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Welcome Calendar of Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm ... of Trustees Contact Us Ethics Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Foundation Levels of Giving ...

  3. Dermatology Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Welcome Calendar of Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm ... of Trustees Contact Us Ethics Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Foundation Levels of Giving ...

  4. Nordic research in ophthalmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Zetterström, Charlotta; Ehlers, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Ophthalmology, eye research, cornea, catarcat, paediatric ophthalmology, glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, ophthalmic oncology......Ophthalmology, eye research, cornea, catarcat, paediatric ophthalmology, glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, ophthalmic oncology...

  5. Dermatology case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mota

    2017-07-01

    In the present case, the patient was referred to the dermatology department due to an atypical lesion with an uncommon location, revealing the importance of a whole body examination in patients with this disease.

  6. Dermatology case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Moreira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, with advances in the understanding of the disease, general improvement in health standards and nutrition, scurvy is now rarely encountered. Dermatologic signs may be the only manifestation and are often misdiagnosed. Awareness of manifestations and prompt diagnosis are essential because, with appropriate vitamin replacement, scurvy is readily treated. We report the case of an adolescent whose diagnosis of scurvy was based on the recognition of dietary risk factors, the presence of dermatologic manifestations and the rapid resolution of skin lesions when vitamin C supplements were initiated.

  7. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashore, T.M.; Shaffer, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The birth of nuclear cardiology has generally been attributed to a 1927 experiment during which a radium salt was injected in one arm vein and the circulation time calculated by recording the arrival of the radioactivity in the opposite arm. This simple experiment lead to the radiocardiogram in the late 1940s that was used to measure left ventricular function and, later, cardiac output. This chapter provides a brief overview of nuclear cardiology. Methodology is presented when it is important for the understanding of test results. The use of these studies in the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular disease is emphasized

  8. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syndrome, fasciitis necrotising, angioedema/urticaria, meningococcemia, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  9. Cardiology Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Education of medical students in cardiology requires access to patients having a variety of different forms of heart disease. But bringing together student, instructor and patient is a difficult and expensive process that does not benefit the patient. An alternate approach is substitution of a lifelike mannequin capable of simulating many conditions of heart disease. The mannequin pictured below, together with a related information display, is an advanced medical training system whose development benefited from NASA visual display technology and consultative input from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The mannequin system represents more than 10 years of development effort by Dr. Michael S. Gordon, professor of cardiology at the University of Miami (Florida) School of Medicine.

  10. Nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, A

    1993-12-31

    Today, nuclear medicine techniques are routinely used in cardiological practice. They include procedures for the atraumatic investigation of different physiological processes in the various structures included in the central circulation: pericardium, myocardium, myocardial adrenergic innervation, cardiac chambers and valves, coronary microcirculation, and great vessels. Beside these in-Vivo procedures, they also comprise of in-Vitro methods for the detection and measurement in blood of various biological molecules of significance in the management of cardiac diseases. A common feature in this collection of in-Vivo and in-Vitro techniques is their ability to provide helpful clinical information for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiac diseases. Their simplicity and safety for the patient allow their repeated use in the follow up of the progress of disease and in the assessment of the efficacy of the therapeutic measures 15 figs, 14 tabs

  11. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuaron, A.

    1992-01-01

    Today, nuclear medicine techniques are routinely used in cardiological practice. They include procedures for the atraumatic investigation of different physiological processes in the various structures included in the central circulation: pericardium, myocardium, myocardial adrenergic innervation, cardiac chambers and valves, coronary microcirculation, and great vessels. Beside these in-Vivo procedures, they also comprise of in-Vitro methods for the detection and measurement in blood of various biological molecules of significance in the management of cardiac diseases. A common feature in this collection of in-Vivo and in-Vitro techniques is their ability to provide helpful clinical information for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiac diseases. Their simplicity and safety for the patient allow their repeated use in the follow up of the progress of disease and in the assessment of the efficacy of the therapeutic measures

  12. Aerospace dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  13. Aerospace Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  14. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  15. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with two topics in nuclear cardiology. In the first, left ventricular wall motion assessment using Fourier transform of local left ventricular time-activity curves in gated blood pool studies is evaluated. In the second, the interpretation of myocardial perfusion scintigrams is assessed which are obtained with thallium-201 or with another radiopharmaceutical with different physical, but identical biological properties. In all these investigations data acquisition and analysis by computer played an essential role. In chapter 1 the desirable properties of a nuclear medicine computer system are given and the computer system used for this work is described. Wall motion analysis of the left ventricle using Fourier transform of local time-activity curves in the left ventricular region in gated blood pool studies is described in chapter 2. In chapter 3 detection of non-perfused lesions in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with thallium-201 is described. Detection of partly perfused lesions and the influence of scatter and photon energy on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is described in chapter 4. (Auth.)

  16. Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology / Jan-Jun 2014 / Vol 1 | Issue 1. I. Nigerian Journal of ... Inquiries about advertising should be sent to Medknow. Publications ... reproduce articles/information from this journal, please ... BUSINESS EDITOR.

  17. Cardiology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2014, there were certain remarkable trials that have changed the practice of cardiology and beyond that these tried to explained some long awaited unanswered questions. Like SIMPLICITY HTN-3 trial clearly explained the uselessness of renal denervation therapy in systemic hypertension. PARADIGM-HF trial provided positive data that may be useful to enrich the basket of medical treatment with a new drug LCZ 696 after a long time. Another important meta-analysis in heart failure questioned the status of beta blockers as standard therapy to improve prognosis in patients with concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation . In myocardial infraction , CvLPRIT trial supported the concept of complete revascularization at the time of primary PCI and TASTE trials failed to show expected benefit of thrombus aspiration in acute MI. FFR got more strength from FAME 2 trial. Another important question that was addressed in SECURITY trial was optimal duration of DAPT after second generation DES implantation. One year follow-up results of ABSORB II suggested that bioresorbable scaffolds are currently facing problem of stent thrombosis that might be taken care in near future with improvement in strut technology. Successful use of "Heart in a box" machine provided a major thrust for cardiac transplantation. SEARCH-AF evaluated the efficacy of a novel mobile health technology in the real world to screen for atrial fibrillation (now called as life style disease. A Meta-analysis provided a more comprehensive picture of the new oral anticoagulants as a therapeutic option in atrial fibrillation. Positive results for trans catheter pm-VSD closure in paediatric population were also demonstrated by a randomized controlled trial. Role of corticosteroids in tubercular pericarditis also got the answer in a trial published in 2014.

  18. Consumer Empowerment in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Heather E.; Busse, Kristine L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Health care consumers increasingly confront and collaborate with their medical providers. We describe consumer success in other medical fields and in dermatology, especially dermatologic disease advocacy and improving dermatologist-patient interactions. PMID:19254661

  19. Dermatology on Snapchat

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ravi R; Yazd, N Kuseh Kalani; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    Launched in 2011, Snapchat is one of the newest social media platforms with over 158 million active daily users. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Snapchat. We searched for Snapchat accounts for the top ten most popular dermatology journals, professional dermatological organizations, and dermatology-related patient advocate groups on social media. None of the above-mentioned entities were found on Snapchat. Plastic surgeons were found to primarily utilize ...

  20. Dermatology on instagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-15

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact.

  1. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lasers in Ophthalmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    In recent years,lasers have entered every fieldof medicine and especially so in ophthalmol-ogy.The scientific basis of lasers in ophthal-mology is based on three mechanisms:1.Photothermal effectLasers:argon,krypton,dye and diodeA thermal effect is generated when laserenergy is absorbed by pigment leading to in-creased vibration and therefore heat content.A

  3. Thalidomide in dermatology: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thalidomide in relation to dermatology is well- known and enough data is available in the literature about various aspects of thalidomide. Despite being an interesting and useful drug for many dermatoses, it is associated with many health hazards including the birth defects, phocomelia. We hereby present a comprehensive review about thalidomide and its application in dermatology.

  4. Dermatology on Snapchat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi R; Yazd, N Kuseh Kalani; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-07-15

    Launched in 2011, Snapchat is one of the newest social media platforms with over 158 million active daily users. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Snapchat. We searched for Snapchat accounts for the top ten most popular dermatology journals, professional dermatological organizations, and dermatology-related patient advocate groups on social media. None of the above-mentioned entities were found on Snapchat. Plastic surgeons were found to primarily utilize the application, although one prominent dermatologist was also found. It was theorized that the brevity of the "snaps" was a contributing factor for dermatological organizations to not use the application. However, Snapchat in the right practice setting may be useful for dermatologists, not only to educate followers, but also as a marketing tool to Millennials.

  5. Pediatric nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Hannon, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology methods have had less impact upon pediatric cardiology than upon adult cardiology. Most pediatric heart disease results from congenital malformations of the heart and great vessels, which is usually discovered in infancy, and is most often treated definitively in infancy or early childhood. Unfortunately, nuclear medicine techniques are limited in their spatial resolution - structures that overlie each other are separated with difficulty. As a result, nuclear cardiology is usually of limited value in the anatomic characterization of the congenital heart abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been useful in the detection and quantification of the pathophysiologic consequences of many congenital cardiac malformations. The authors review application of nuclear medicine in pediatric cardiology, and attempt to assess each in terms of its clinical utility

  6. Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kipp W; Torres Soto, Jessica; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Shameer, Khader; Miotto, Riccardo; Ali, Mohsin; Ashley, Euan; Dudley, Joel T

    2018-06-12

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning are poised to influence nearly every aspect of the human condition, and cardiology is not an exception to this trend. This paper provides a guide for clinicians on relevant aspects of artificial intelligence and machine learning, reviews selected applications of these methods in cardiology to date, and identifies how cardiovascular medicine could incorporate artificial intelligence in the future. In particular, the paper first reviews predictive modeling concepts relevant to cardiology such as feature selection and frequent pitfalls such as improper dichotomization. Second, it discusses common algorithms used in supervised learning and reviews selected applications in cardiology and related disciplines. Third, it describes the advent of deep learning and related methods collectively called unsupervised learning, provides contextual examples both in general medicine and in cardiovascular medicine, and then explains how these methods could be applied to enable precision cardiology and improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dermatology on pinterest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsitt, Jacob; Mattis, Daiva; Hernandez, Melia; Kollipara, Ramya; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-01-15

    Pinterest is a social media internet service utilized by individuals, organizations, and businesses to collect and share ideas related to projects or interests. The literature related to dermatology-related content on Pinterest is scarce. This study aims to investigate the presence of dermatology related content available on Pinterest. Investigators searched five terms related to dermatology in the "pins" and "boards" search categories of pinterest. The first 20 results were evaluated for content and assigned to a content group of "advocacy," "informative," or "home remedies." Boards were also categorized as being posted by an MD or professional society versus others. The top ten dermatology journals were also searched for under the boards category. Informative pins were the most common (49%) followed by advocacy (37%) and home remedies (14%). Informative boards were the most common (53%) followed by home remedies (31%) and advocacy (16%).We identified that only 24% of boards were created by either M.D.s or advocacy organizations. The top ten dermatology journals identified by prior studies had little presence, with only one board posted by JAMA Dermatology. Our study contributes to a growing body of data that dermatology organizations are relatively absent from new social media sites, and Pinterest represents a potential outlet for targeted intervention in high-risk groups for skin disease.

  8. Vitamin E in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abid Keen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology.

  9. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  10. Dermatology in Doximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-02-17

    Doximity, currently the largest online social networking service for United States (US) health care professionals and medical students, provides a wide variety of content to a large audience. In fact, its database includes 1,078,305 physicians in the US. It is therefore important to evaluate this content from time to time. Our objective is to analyze both the residency rankings and news content presented in Doximity, with respect to dermatology. The study compared the residency rankings created by Doximity to another dermatology residency ranking system that used a different algorithm. In terms of dermatology content, seven dermatology-related search terms were entered into the Doximity search query and data was collected on the first 20 "relevant" articles. Our study evaluated a total of 140 articles. The search term "skin cancer" yielded the most articles totaling 6,001. Informative articles were the most common type of article for each content item searched except for "dermatology", yielding research articles as the most common content type (70%). The search term "melanoma awareness" had the largest number of shares (19,032). In comparing dermatology residency rankings on Doximity with another ranking system that accounted for scholarly achievement, there was 50% overlap. In conclusion, it is vital to evaluate content on social media websites that are utilized by US medical students and health care professionals. We hope this information presented provides an up-to-date analysis on the quality of one particular social media platform.

  11. Fibrin glue in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Suturing is a time consuming task in ophthalmology and suture induced irritation and redness are frequent problems. Postoperative wound infection and corneal graft rejection are examples of possible suture related complications. To prevent these complications, ophthalmic surgeons are switching to sutureless surgery. A number of recent developments have established tissue adhesives like cyanoacrylate glue and fibrin glue as attractive alternatives to sutures. A possible and promising new application for tissue adhesives is to provide a platform for tissue engineering. Currently, tissue glue is being used for conjunctival closure following pterygium and strabismus surgery, forniceal reconstruction surgery, amniotic membrane transplantation, lamellar corneal grafting, closure of corneal perforations and descematoceles, management of conjunctival wound leaks after trabeculectomy, lid surgery, adnexal surgery and as a hemostat to minimise bleeding. The purpose of this review is to discuss the currently available information on fibrin glue.

  12. Neuro-ophthalmology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Konrad P; Straumann, Dominik

    2014-07-01

    This review summarizes the most relevant articles from the field of neuro-ophthalmology published in the Journal of Neurology from January 2012 to July 2013. With the advent of video-oculography, several articles describe new applications for eye movement recordings as a diagnostic tool for a wide range of disorders. In myasthenia gravis, anti-Kv1.4 and anti-Lrp4 have been characterized as promising novel autoantibodies for the diagnosis of hitherto 'seronegative' myasthenia gravis. Several articles address new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to neuromyelitis optica, which further sharpen its profile as a distinct entity. Additionally, 4-aminopyridine has become a standard therapeutic for patients with cerebellar downbeat nystagmus. Finally, revised diagnostic criteria have been proposed for chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy based on a careful literature review over the last decade.

  13. Mobile applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ann Chang; Endly, Dawnielle C; Henley, Jill; Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Moreau, Jacqueline F; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    With advancements in mobile technology, cellular phone-based mobile applications (apps) may be used in the practice and delivery of dermatologic care. To identify and categorize the variety of current mobile apps available in dermatology for patients and providers. Dermatology-related search terms were queried in the online app stores of the most commonly used mobile platforms developed by Apple, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, and Windows. Applications were assigned to categories based on description. Popularity, price, and reviews were recorded and target audiences were determined through websites offering online mobile apps. Number, type, and price of mobile apps in dermatology. A total of 229 dermatology-related apps were identified in the following categories: general dermatology reference (61 [26.6%]), self-surveillance/diagnosis (41 [17.9%]), disease guide (39 [17.0%]), educational aid (20 [8.7%]), sunscreen/UV recommendation (19 [8.3%]), calculator (12 [5.2%]), teledermatology (8 [3.5%]), conference (6 [2.6%]), journal (6 [2.6%]), photograph storage/sharing (5 [2.2%]), dermoscopy (2 [0.9%]), pathology (2 [0.9%]), and other (8 [3.5%]). The most reviewed apps included Ultraviolet ~ UV Index (355 reviews), VisualDx (306), SPF (128), iSore (61), and SpotMole (50). There were 209 unique apps, with 17 apps existing on more than 1 operating system. More than half of the apps were offered free of charge (117 [51.1%]). Paid apps (112 [48.9%]) ranged from $0.99 to $139.99 (median, $2.99). Target audiences included patient (117 [51.1%]), health care provider (94 [41.0%]), and both (18 [7.9%]). The widespread variety and popularity of mobile apps demonstrate a great potential to expand the practice and delivery of dermatologic care.

  14. Probiotics in dermatologic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa; Marquez-Barba, María Fernanda; Sriram, Krishnan

    2016-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that beneficially affect the host when administered in adequate amounts. They have an excellent safety profile. Probiotics have been used as immunomodulators in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to summarize the available evidence concerning the use of different strains of probiotics in dermatology practice. We conducted a literature review of English and Spanish publications listed in standard databases (PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar, Medline, and EBSCO), between 1994 and 2015 using the words "probiotics" and "dermatology." We found ∼70 studies containing these criteria and selected 42 in which probiotics were used for dermatologic purposes. We found enough evidence to recommend the use of probiotics in specific conditions in dermatology practice, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. Further well-designed, large population based trials are needed to validate the use of probiotics in dermatology practice, including innovative therapies to rebuild skin barrier defects, protection against microbial colonization, and restoration of immunologic balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuro-ophthalmology | Bekibele | Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 23, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunomodulatory medication that is efficacious and approved for atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis in cats; it has also been used to successfully manage a variety of immune-mediated dermatoses in dogs and cats. This article reviews the use of cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology including its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, side effects, and relevant clinical updates. Dermatologic indications including atopic/allergic dermatitis, perianal fistulas, sebaceous adenitis, and other immune-mediated skin diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear cardiology in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, R.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the most active branches of nuclear medicine and plays important role in diagnosis in treatment of CAD patients. Few nuclear cardiology surveys were published in the literature, mostly from developed countries. A nuclear cardiology survey in Iran and analysis of the findings in comparison with other countries may lead to better decision making and improve practice in our country. A questionnaire was sent by mail or e-mail to all nuclear medicine centers in Iran asking for details of nuclear cardiology practice. Also ownership of the centers, number of gamma cameras and number of cardiac studies in each week were recorded. Some centers were studied using telephone interview. From 79 nuclear medicine centers in Iran, 55 centers (69.6%) filled the questionnaire including 28 centers in Tehran and 27 centers in other cities. There was 69 Gamma cameras in these centers, 62.3% with SPECT capability. It is estimated that we may have 100 gamma cameras in Iran. This study showed that about 68287 cardiac studies were done in Iran each year with Myocardial perfusion scan accounting for about 99 2% of the studies. Considering population of the country nuclear cardiology activity will be about 1.05 study/1000/year. Regarding radiotracers used, about 13.5% of studies were done with T I-201, with some centers using only Tc- 99 m-M I B I

  19. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Welcome Calendar of Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm ... of Trustees Contact Us Ethics Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Foundation Levels of Giving ...

  20. Dyslipidemia in Dermatological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Chetana; Shenoy, Manjunath Mala; Rao, Gururaja K.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are one of the common metabolic disorders. A link between dermatological disorders like psoriasis and dyslipidemia has been established in the recent past. Many dermatological disorders could have a systemic inflammatory component which explains such association. Chronic inflammatory dermatological disorders could also have other metabolic imbalances that may contribute to dyslipidemia. Presence of such abnormal metabolism may justify routine screening of these disorders for associated dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities and early treatment of such comorbidities to improve quality of life. Some of the drugs used by dermatologists such as retinoids are also likely to be a cause of dyslipidemia. Hence, it is imperative that the dermatologists obtain scientific knowledge on the underlying mechanisms involved in dyslipidemia and understand when to intervene with therapies. A systematic review of the English language literature was done by using Google Scholar and PubMed. In this review, attempts are made to list the dermatological disorders associated with dyslipidemia; to simplify the understanding of underlying mechanisms; and to give a brief idea about the interventions. PMID:26713286

  1. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  2. Pediatric dermatology training survey of United States dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Mazza, Joni M; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Variability exists in pediatric dermatology education for dermatology residents. We sought to formally assess the pediatric dermatology curriculum and experience in a dermatology residency program. Three unique surveys were developed for dermatology residents, residency program directors, and pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors. The surveys consisted of questions pertaining to residency program characteristics. Sixty-three graduating third-year residents, 51 residency program directors, and 18 pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors responded. Residents in programs with one or more full-time pediatric dermatologist were more likely to feel very competent treating children and were more likely to be somewhat or extremely satisfied with their pediatric curriculums than residents in programs with no full-time pediatric dermatologist (50.0% vs 5.9%, p = 0.002, and 85.3% vs 52.9%, p dermatology fellowships were much more likely to report being extremely satisfied than residents in programs without a pediatric dermatology fellowship (83.3% vs 21.2%; p dermatology residency programs to continue to strengthen their pediatric dermatology curriculums, especially through the recruitment of full-time pediatric dermatologists. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tropical dermatology: marine and aquatic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Vidal; Lupi, Omar; Lonza, Juan Pedro; Tyring, Stephen K

    2009-11-01

    Dermatoses caused by marine organisms are frequently seen in dermatology clinics worldwide. Cutaneous injuries after exposure to marine environments include bacterial and fungal infections and lesions caused by aquatic plants and protists. Some of these diseases are well known by dermatologists, such as Vibrio vulnificus septicemia and erysipeloid, but others are uncommon, such as envenomation caused by ingestion or contact with certain dinoflagellates or cyanobacteria, which are associated with rashes that can begin within minutes after exposure. Many marine/aquatic invertebrates, such as sponges, cnidarians, echinoderms, crustaceans, and mollusks, are associated with different kinds of dermatologic lesions that can vary from irritant or allergic contact dermatitis to physical trauma and envenomations. These cutaneous lesions may result in mild local reactions or can be associated with severe systemic reactions. Invertebrate animals, such as cnidarians, sea urchins, and worms, and aquatic vertebrates, such as venomous fishes and stingrays, are commonly associated with skin lesions in many countries, where they can constitute occupational dermatoses among fishermen and scuba divers, but they can also be observed among persons who contact these animals in kitchens or beaches. The presence of unusual lesions, a recent travel history, and/or a report of contact with an aquatic environment (including ownership of a marine or freshwater aquarium) should alert the dermatologist to the etiology of the cutaneous problems. After completing this learning activity, participants should be able to recognize the cutaneous manifestations of marine/aquatic infections, bites, stings, and wounds, etc., treat the cutaneous manifestations of marine/aquatic injuries, and help prevent marine/aquatic injuries.

  4. Neuro-ophthalmology as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitze, Arielle; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Lam, Peter; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    This essay was written to discuss the reasoning behind the personal decisions made by 2 current neuro-ophthalmology fellows to pursue neuro-ophthalmology as a career. It is meant to enlighten the reader about what role neuro-ophthalmologists play in clinical practice, what makes neuro-ophthalmology unique to all other sub-specialties, and how this contributes to making neuro-ophthalmology not only one of the most medically interesting, yet rewarding sub-specialties in ophthalmology.

  5. [Cardiology update in 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabus, Vincent; Tran, Van Nam; Regamey, Julien; Pascale, Patrizio; Monney, Pierre; Hullin, Roger; Vogt, Pierre

    2017-01-11

    In 2016 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published new guidelines. These documents update the knowledge in various fields such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia. Of course it is impossible to summarize these guidelines in detail. Nevertheless, we decided to highlight the major modifications, and to emphasize some key points that are especially useful for the primary care physician.

  6. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  7. [LED lights in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, C; Pelletier-Aouizerate, M; Cartier, H

    2017-04-01

    The use in dermatology of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) continues to be surrounded by controversy. This is due mainly to poor knowledge of the physicochemical phases of a wide range of devices that are difficult to compare to one another, and also to divergences between irrefutable published evidence either at the level of in vitro studies or at the cellular level, and discordant clinical results in a variety of different indications: rejuvenation, acne, wound healing, leg ulcers, and cutaneous inflammatory or autoimmune processes. Therapeutic LEDs can emit wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet, through visible light, to the near infrared (247-1300 nm), but only certain bands have so far demonstrated any real value. We feel certain that if this article remains factual, then readers will have a different, or at least more nuanced, opinion concerning the use of such LED devices in dermatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Homeopathy in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Alternative methods are commonly used in patients with dermatologic diseases, with homeopathy being one of the most common. Homeopathy was developed by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) and is based on the law of similars and the law of infinitesimals. It is a regulatory therapy where high dilutions of particular compounds are thought to induce a counterreaction in the organism. In dermatology, homeopathy is often used in atopic dermatitis, other forms of eczema, psoriasis, and many other conditions. To date, however, there is no convincing evidence for a therapeutic effect. There are only a few controlled trials, most of them with negative results. The few studies with positive results have not been reproduced. Acceptance by the patient seems largely based on counseling and emotional care rather than on objective responses to the homeopathic drugs.

  9. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  10. Hepatitis C in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonunsanga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C is a serious public health problem all over the world. It is caused by a single stranded RNA virus. Most acute infections are subclinical, but in 75% of individuals, infection leads to a chronic hepatitis, which in some cases can progress to cirrhosis and occasionally development of hepatoma. It has wide range of dermatological manifestations. This review article deals with the overview of epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, management and prevention.

  11. Esthetic and cosmetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto; Berger, Uwe; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy

    2008-01-01

    The field of esthetic and cosmetic dermatology has gained remarkable interest all over the world. The major advantage of recent years is the high scientific levels of the most significant new developments in techniques and pharmacotherapy and other nonsurgical approaches. The present paper reviews selected fields of interest under this view. Sexual hormones are involved in the aging process of men and women. Skin function, in particular the epidermal barrier, is affected by a loss of endocrine activity. Hormone replacement therapy has only recently been introduced in treatment of aging males. This is an area of gender-medicine in dermatology with a strong well-aging attempt. Botulinum toxin therapy for hyperfunctional lines has become not only well-established but evidence-based medicine on its highest level. Recent advantages were gained in objective evaluation and monitoring the effect. Digital imaging techniques with various facets have been introduced to assess the achievements of treatment in the most objective way. This may become an example for other techniques as peeling, laser therapy, or radiofrequency in esthetic and cosmetic dermatology. Botulinum toxin has become a valuable tool for brow lifts. Details of the technique are discussed. Cellulite is a strongly female gender-related condition. During the past decades numerous treatments had been recommended but only recently a more critical scientific approach led to improvements in therapy of this common and disfiguring condition. Three major approaches are developed: (a) skin loosing with techniques such as subcision, (b) skin tightening with radiofrequency and other approaches, and (c) improving circulation in blood and lymphatic microvasculature using both physical treatments and pharmacotherapy. The last two chapters are devoted to body sculpturing by lipotransfer and lipolysis. Lipotransfer for facial or body sculpturing has a history of about 100 years. Nevertheless, recently the role of adult stem

  12. Ophthalmologic complications of systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klig, Jean E

    2008-02-01

    The human eye, as an organ, can offer critical clues to the presence of systemic disease. This article discusses the various ophthalmologic manifestations of systemic disease that can be evident on examination by an emergency department provider, as well as some findings that can be discerned with specialty consultation. The following topics are reviewed with respect to potential ocular signs and complications: syphilis, herpes zoster, Lyme disease, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, Reiter's syndrome, Kawasaki's disease, temporal arteritis, endocarditis, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Indications for emergent ophthalmologic consultation are also emphasized.

  13. Neuro-ophthalmology | Bekibele | Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transactions of the Ophthalmological Society of Nigeria: Proceedings of the annual OSN Conference, Jos, Nigeria, August 25–28, 2015. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers ...

  14. [Cardiology update in 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Patrizio; Regamey, Julien; Iglesias, Juan F; Gabus, Vincent; Clair, Mathieu; Yerly, Patrick; Hullin, Roger; Müller, Olivier; Eeckhout, Éric; Vogt, Pierre

    2016-01-13

    The present review provides a selected choice of clinical trials and therapeutic advances in the field of cardiology in 2015. A new treatment option in heart failure will become available this year in Switzerland. In interventional cardiology, new trials have been published on the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy, the new stents with bioresorbable scaffold and the long-term results of TAVR in patients who are not surgical candidates or at high surgical risk. RegardingAF the BRIDGE trial provides new evidences to guide the management of patients during warfarin interruption for surgery. Recent publications are changing the paradigm of AF treatment by showing a major impact of the management of cardiometabolic risk factors. Finally, refined criteria for ECG interpretation in athletes have been recently proposed to reduce the burden of false-positive screening.

  15. Nuclear cardiology: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    A review of recent developments and future directions in nuclear cardiology is presented. Myocardial perfusion imaging is discussed with special emphasis on thallium-201 methods. Infarct-avid imaging is also discussed with emphasis on technetium-99m labelled in diagnosis, and emission computed tomography is briefly reviewed. In addition, new biologically based radiotracers such as indium-111-labeled blood cells, gallium-67 citrate, and new positron- and gamma-emittng radiotracers are reviewed

  16. Computers in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The present abstract book contains the abstracts of 90 lectures and 29 posters presented at the conference. They are dealing with the following themes: Echocardiography, databases, ECG interpretation, wall motion, arrhythmia processing systems, electrophysiological models, ECG-mapping, intensive care and hemodynamic monitoring, digital subtraction angiography, clinical electrophysiology, mechanical properties of the cardiovascular system, coronary artery measurements, arrythmia analysis, arrhytmia monitoring techniques, ECG waveform recognition and nuclear cardiology. (MG)

  17. Diversity in the dermatology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jorge A; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-12-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, and minorities are projected to represent the majority of our population in the near future. Unfortunately, health disparities still exist for these groups, and inequalities have also become evident in the field of dermatology. There is currently a lack of diversity within the dermatology workforce. Potential solutions to these health care disparities include increasing cultural competence for all physicians and improving diversity in the dermatology workforce. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  18. OCT in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, John; Welzel, Julia

    OCT is increasingly interesting for non-invasive skin imaging in Dermatology. Due to its resolution and imaging depth, OCT is already routinely established for diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, whereas for pigmented lesions, the resolution is still not high enough. OCT has also a high value for monitoring of treatment effects, for example to control healing after non-surgical topical treatment of basal cell carcinomas. In summary, there are several indications for applications of OCT to image skin diseases, and its importance will grow in the future due to further technical developments like speckle variance OCT.

  19. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  20. Dermatological laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerk, N.J.; Austad, J.; Helland, S.; Thune, P.; Volden, G.; Falk, E.

    1991-01-01

    The article reviews the different lasers used in dermatology. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of naevus flammeus (''portwine stain'') where lasers are the treatment of choice. Argon laser and pulsed dye laser are the main lasers used in vascular skin diseases, and the article focuses on these two types. Copper-vapour laser, neodymium-YAG laser and CO 2 laser are also presented. Information is provided about the availability of laser technology in the different health regions in Norway. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Obesity and dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Noah S

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of dermatoses. It affects cutaneous sensation, temperature regulation, foot shape, and vasculature. Acanthosis nigricans is the most common dermatological manifestation of obesity. Skin tags are more commonly associated with diabetes than with obesity. Obesity increases the incidence of cutaneous infections that include: candidiasis, intertigo, candida folliculitis, furunculosis, erythrasma, tinea cruris, and folliculitis. Less common infections include cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and gas gangrene. Leg ulcerations, lymphedema, plantar hyperkeratosis, and striae are more common with obesity. Hormonal abnormalities and genetic syndromes (Prader-Willi) are related to obesity and its dermatoses; however, cellulite is not related to obesity.

  2. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  3. Impact of a dermatology wiki website on dermatology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Boyers, Lindsay N; Ellis, Lixia Z; Brice, Sylvia; Chen, David L; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-01-15

    The Dermatology Education Wiki (dermwiki) website serves as a resource platform for medical students and residents. The readily accessible interface provides dermatology articles, survival guides, didactic lectures, and links to faculty talks as well as research opportunities. To assess medical student and resident satisfaction with the dermwiki website. Fourth-year medical students taking a dermatology elective were provided with a temporary password to access relevant dermwiki information. A satisfaction survey was created to assess whether medical students found the website helpful. Second- and third-year dermatology residents were also surveyed to compare satisfaction scores prior to and after the introduction of the dermwiki website. End-of-rotation medical student exam scores were tabulated and compared to the average scores from years prior to the development of the dermwiki website. Medical students rated the dermatology elective with the dermwiki website higher than rotations without a wiki (8.12 vs 7.31). Students planning to go into dermatology were more satisfied with the dermwiki website, reported accessing the website more frequently (11 times vs 9.5 times), and reported more time spent studying (12.2 hours vs 6.7 hours) than students not going into dermatology. End-of-rotation medical student exam scores did not differ from those prior to the development of the demwiki website. Ten second- and third-year dermatology residents unanimously stated that they were more satisfied with the program after the institution of the dermwiki website. Overall, addition of the dermwiki website to the dermatology elective curriculum has improved medical student and resident satisfaction scores. The improvement is greater among students planning to enter the field of dermatology. This study serves as a model for the incorporation of internet-based interactive tools to transform and supplement the learning environment.

  4. Artificial intelligence in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srishti Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence (AI provides machines with the ability to learn and respond the way humans do and is also referred to as machine learning. The step to building an AI system is to provide the data to learn from so that it can map relations between inputs and outputs and set up parameters such as “weights”/decision boundaries to predict responses for inputs in the future. Then, the model is tested on a second data set. This article outlines the promise this analytic approach has in medicine and cardiology.

  5. Nuclear Cardiology: An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Nahhas, Adil

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Cardiology has maintained a prominent position in the assessment of CAD and has become the end-point in Clinical Trials for the following reasons: Non-invasive assessment of CAD, Assessment of presence, localisation and severity, Widely available, feasible and reproducible, Visualisation of blood flow and pumping. The main areas of cardiology that are amenable to assessment with nuclear cardiology include: Stable and unstable CAD, Acute and post MI, Cardiomyopathy, Valvular disease and shunts, Cardiotoxicity, Aneurysms, Transplants The application of nuclear cardiology in these conditions will help in the management of patients by providing information relating to: Diagnosis and prognosis, Risk stratification, Medical Vs surgical treatment, Haemodynamic significance, Efficiency of management The main application in practical terms is in the assessment of CAD at variable stages: Before, during and after an incident: Before Incident: -Enhancing diagnosis and prognosis in patients with CAD, Providing functional data for changes on angiography. During Incident: -Assessing criteria for admission and further tests. After Incident: -Identifying hibernating myocardium, - Risk stratification. Risk Stratification highlights the outcome following nonfatal MI as the patients may be split into 2 categories: Low-risk group -Comprise 50-66% of patients, -Can be managed with medical treatment High-risk group, -Comprise (34-50%), -Prone to future complications within 3 months (Death, reinfarction, CCF and unstable angina). Viability: Is a spectrum of overlapping clinical states following an incident. Assessment is increasingly requested for evaluation of revascularisation vs cardiac transplant as the outcome will improve regional and global function, CCF symptoms and improve quality of life and survival Why assess viability? Persistent LVD have bad prognosis with EF 50% 10-year survival of 90% LVD due to viable tissue have worse prognosis than scars with annual

  6. Diagnostic procedures in cardiology: A clinician's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.V.; Lewis, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 papers. Some of the titles are: Cardiovascular radiology; Nuclear cardiology; echocardiography; The use and conduct of exercise tests; Lipid studies in cardiology; and The practice of cardiology in an era of high technology

  7. Splash Safety During Dermatologic Procedures Among US Dermatology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korta, Dorota Z; Chapman, Lance W; Lee, Patrick K; Linden, Kenneth G

    2017-07-01

    Dermatologists are at potential risk of acquiring infections from contamination of the mucous membranes by blood and body fluids. However, there are little data on splash safety during procedural dermatology. To determine dermatology resident perceptions about splash risk during dermatologic procedures and to quantify the rate of protective equipment use. An anonymous on-line survey was sent to 108 United States ACGME-approved dermatology residency programs assessing frequency of facial protection during dermatologic procedures, personal history of splash injury, and, if applicable, reasons for not always wearing facial protection. A total of 153 dermatology residents responded. Rates of facial protection varied by procedure, with the highest rates during surgery and the lowest during local anesthetic injection. Over 54% of respondents reported suffering facial splash while not wearing facial protection during a procedure. In contrast, 88.9% of respondents correctly answered that there is a small risk of acquiring infection from mucosal splash. Residency program recommendations for facial protection seem to vary by procedure. The authors' results demonstrate that although facial splash is a common injury, facial protection rates and protective recommendations vary significantly by procedure. These data support the recommendation for enhanced facial protection guidelines during procedural dermatology.

  8. Nanotechnology in Dermatology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, João Roberto; Antônio, Carlos Roberto; Cardeal, Izabela Lídia Soares; Ballavenuto, Julia Maria Avelino; Oliveira, João Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community and general public have been exposed to a series of achievements attributed to a new area of knowledge: Nanotechnology. Both abroad and in Brazil, funding agencies have launched programs aimed at encouraging this type of research. Indeed, for many who come into contact with this subject it will be clear the key role that chemical knowledge will play in the evolution of this subject. And even more, will see that it is a science in which the basic structure is formed by distilling different areas of inter-and multidisciplinary knowledge along the lines of new paradigms. In this article, we attempt to clarify the foundations of nanotechnology, and demonstrate their contribution to new advances in dermatology as well as medicine in general. Nanotechnology is clearly the future. PMID:24626657

  9. Morgellons in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation".

  10. Coal tar in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Van Der Valk, P.G.M.; Van Houtum, J.L.M.; Van De Kerkhof, P.C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Dermatology

    2007-07-01

    Coal tar is one of the oldest treatments for psoriasis and eczema. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antipruritic and antimitotic effects. The short-term side effects are folliculitis, irritation and contact allergy. Coal tar contains carcinogens. The carcinogenicity of coal tar has been shown in animal studies and studies in occupational settings. There is no clear evidence of an increased risk of skin tumors or internal tumors. Until now, most studies have been fairly small and they did not investigate the risk of coal tar alone, but the risk of coal tar combined with other therapies. New, well-designed, epidemiological studies are necessary to assess the risk of skin tumors and other malignancies after dermatological use of coal tar.

  11. Garlic in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Pazyar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. fam. Alliaceae is one of the best-researched, best-selling herbal remedies and is also commonly used for treating various health problems. Garlic is widely known for its biological properties and plays an important role as an antioxidant. The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize all dermatologic-oriented in vitro and in-vivo experiments and clinical trials on garlic preparations. Extensive literatures search was carried out and twenty three studies were included. The results suggest that oral administration of garlic is effective on immunologic properties, cutaneous microcirculation, protection against UVB and cancer treatment. Additionally, topical application of garlic extract can potentially be effective on psoriasis, alopecia areata, keloid scar, wound healing, cutaneous corn, viral and fungal infection, leishmaniasis, skin aging and rejuvenation. Clinical effectiveness of oral and topical garlic extract is not sufficiently and meticulously explored as so far.

  12. Nuclear cardiology - its current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has been an exciting new field of nuclear medicine. Few examples of the dynamism and excitement of nuclear medicine demonstrate this field's vitality in the way that nuclear cardiology does. Recent new developments in radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation have established this field as an extremely useful clinical tool and provide a new dimension to the evaluation of a cardiac patient, more so being nonivasive in nature. An attempt has been made to focus the attention on some of the recent advances in nuclear cardiology with a special reference to its clinical application in the field of cardiology. Nuclear cardiology is the most important field of nuclear medicine which has shown most promising results and has opened a new horizon in the field of diagnostic noninvasive cardiac technique. Now it has come of age in concept, instrument development and clinical application. It is very rapidly growing into a subspeciality. (author)

  13. Radioisotope evaluation in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo V, Teresa; Gonzalez E, Patricio; Canessa G, Jose

    2002-01-01

    The current applications of nuclear cardiology techniques are reviewed. Coronary artery disease is the most important and prevalent cardiovascular problem in most developed countries and also in Chile. Different approaches can be employed for its diagnosis and prognosis, as well as for risk stratification and preoperative evaluation. Myocardial infarction assessment and ischemia recognition with radionuclide perfusion images are also reviewed, including new protocols applying functional parameters addition. Viability detection after myocardial infarction or in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy are discussed. Stress protocols with the use of exercise or pharmacological action for ischemia production, the diagnostic value of perfusion SPECT and the use of Thallium-201, Tc-99m-Sestamibi and metabolic images with Fluorine18-Fluordeoxyglucose are also mentioned (au)

  14. Nuclear medicine in cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torizuka, K.; Ishii, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Tamaki, N. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1981-02-01

    Nuclear medicine in cardiology was reviewed. Electrocardiogram is obtained from the ..gamma..-ray measurement of a tracer by a single detector, which enables a bedsidemonitoring. Resolution and sensitivity are high and nuclear stethoscope with a computer is applicable for a background treatment. Myocardium is imaged by /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy. Relative difference of the perfusion indicates the ischemia which gaives roughly the size and portion of myocardial infarction. For transient ischemia stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SMPI) is also used. sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate provides a clear image for myocardial infarction. Angiocardiogram is obtained repeatedly, by a single administration, using an equilibrium method. An attempt of three-dimensional display by 7 pin hole collimator and positron CT are also discussed.

  15. An Aid to Neuro-Ophthalmology

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Muhammad Shoaib AkramDepartment of Ophthalmology, King Fahad Military Hospital, Khamis Mushyat, Saudi ArabiaNeuro-ophthalmology is a very interesting field. Localizing a lesion in various pathways can be challenging, particularly for beginners. One needs a solid foundation of the neuro-anatomy of visual pathways to enhance understanding. The author aims to provide medical students and residents with the basic concepts of neuro-ophthalmology. This text attempts to simplify the complex problems...

  16. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müzeyyen Gönül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.”

  17. Topical immunomodulators in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandpur Sujay

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Topical immunomodulators are agents that regulate the local immune response of the skin. They are now emerging as the therapy of choice for several immune-mediated dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis, contact allergic dermatitis, alopecia areata, psoriasis, vitiligo, connective tissue disorders such as morphea and lupus erythematosus, disorders of keratinization and several benign and malignant skin tumours, because of their comparable efficacy, ease of application and greater safety than their systemic counterparts. They can be used on a domiciliary basis for longer periods without aggressive monitoring. In this article, we have discussed the mechanism of action, common indications and side-effects of the commonly used topical immunomodulators, excluding topical steroids. Moreover, newer agents, which are still in the experimental stages, have also been described. A MEDLINE search was undertaken using the key words "topical immunomodulators, dermatology" and related articles were also searched. In addition, a manual search for many Indian articles, which are not indexed, was also carried out. Wherever possible, the full article was reviewed. If the full article could not be traced, the abstract was used.

  18. Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center Global Ophthalmology Guide Eye ... and Planned Giving Ophthalmic Business Council Orbital Gala Orbital Gala Overview Why Attend ...

  19. Tests for malingering in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ihsan Incesu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulation can be defined as malingering, or sometimes functional visual loss (FVL. It manifests as either simulating an ophthalmic disease (positive simulation, or denial of ophthalmic disease (negative simulation. Conscious behavior and compensation or indemnity claims are prominent features of simulation. Since some authors suggest that this is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, even conversion is included in this context. In today’s world, every ophthalmologist can face with simulation of ophthalmic disease or disorder. In case of simulation suspect, the physician’s responsibility is to prove the simulation considering the disease/disorder first, and simulation as an exclusion. In simulation examinations, the physician should be firm and smart to select appropriate test(s to convince not only the subject, but also the judge in case of indemnity or compensation trials. Almost all ophthalmic sensory and motor functions including visual acuity, visual field, color vision and night vision can be the subject of simulation. Examiner must be skillful in selecting the most appropriate test. Apart from those in the literature, we included all kinds of simulation in ophthalmology. In addition, simulation examination techniques, such as, use of optical coherence tomography, frequency doubling perimetry (FDP, and modified polarization tests were also included. In this review, we made a thorough literature search, and added our experiences to give the readers up-to-date information on malingering or simulation in ophthalmology.

  20. Radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Ruth, C.; Samanek, M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology is discussed for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial function and perfusion, regional lung perfusion and ventilation, and for measuring central and peripheral hemodynamics. (H.W.). 16 refs

  1. History of pediatric cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Saxena

    2015-01-01

    In India, the discipline of cardiology started in the late 1950s and at that time pediatric cardiology was practiced as a part of cardiology specialty. This article traces the history of pediatric cardiology in India. Dr. S. Padmawati and Dr. Kamala Vytilingam underwent training in pediatric cardiology at international centers in the early 1950s and early 1960s. Dr. N. Gopinath successfully closed a ventricular septal defect using a pump oxygenator at Christian Medical College, Vellore. Open ...

  2. Cardiology update 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the latter half of 2016, the important trials were ATMOSPHERE, INOVATE-HF, and IMPEDANCE-HF. The inclusion of angiotensin receptor–neprilysin inhibitor (valsartan/sacubitril and sinoatrial node modulator (ivabradine in the guidelines was a significant change. HOPE-3 was a major trial in 2016 expanding the dimension of statin use. ixCELL-DCM trial evaluated stem cells in dilated cardiomyopathy. Mobile-health and medication event monitoring system technology showed increasing use of technology in both prevention and treatment in cardiology. RIDDLE-non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI studied the immediate versus delayed intervention in NSTEMI. In STEMI, DANAMI 3-DEFER trial evaluated the concept of immediate stent implantation or deferred stent implantation 48 h after the index procedure with standard primary percutaneous coronary intervention. EARLY-BAMI tested intravenous metoprolol in acute STEMI with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The utility of “Chest Pain Choice” tool demonstrated shared decision-making between physician and patients in the context of chest pain. Risk factors profile and demographic and angiographic features of aorto-ostial atherosclerotic coronary artery disease are evaluated extensively. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement results in comparison to surgery and its association with volume, and in-hospital outcomes are also analyzed. The VANISH trial addressed a very critical issue in post-MI ICMP. Factors associated with erosion related to Amplatzer septal occluder in atrial septal defect closure are described in detail.

  3. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... syndrome (0.6%) and Ushers syndrome (0.6%). Refractive error was the most common (7.9%). Conclusion: Since these deaf students use their sight to compensate for the deafness, routine ophthalmologic examination should be carried out on them so that ophthalmologic abnormalities are detected early and treatment ...

  4. The application of laser plasma in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yujiang; Luo Le; Sun Yabing

    2000-01-01

    The production and development of laser plasma are introduced, and the contribution of laser biomedicine and laser plasma technology to ophthalmology is analyzed. The latest three progresses (laser photocoagulation, photo-refractive keratotomy and laser iridectomy) of laser plasma applications in ophthalmology are presented

  5. Ophthalmology research protocol, Hiroshima - Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R J; Fujino, Tadashi; Nefzger, M D

    1964-05-21

    Several large ophthalmic studies have been made at ABCC. However, all preceded the final identification and definition of the Master Sample which unifies the three present major research studies, and T57D estimates were not available. For these reasons it seemed highly desirable to undertake another ophthalmic study which would both relate to the present program and utilize available dose information. Consequently, in 1962 a consultant in ophthalmology, Dr. P.J. Leinfelder visited ABCC to acquaint himself with the ABCC program and facilities, and he prepared the broad plan for this study. The present document describes the detailed working program which developed from this initial plan. For the period 1963 to 1964, investigation will be directed towards detection and evaluation of the following possible late effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: lens opacities; accelerated aging; and decreased acuity. 43 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  6. Antihypertensives in dermatology Part I - Uses of antihypertensives in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. S. Ranugha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a global health problem. Antihypertensives are the mainstay of treatment for hypertension. Some of them were accidentally found to be useful in alopecias and infantile hemangiomas and have now become standard treatment for these conditions as well. Antihypertensives are also being studied for other dermatological indications, where they have shown promising efficacy. This review focuses on the dermatological indications for antihypertensives, discussing the drugs that have been tried, as well as their efficacy, dosage, duration of therapy, and adverse effects.

  7. Towards the use of OCT angiography in clinical dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a popular imaging technique used in ophthalmology, and on the way to become clinically viable alternative in dermatology due to its capability of acquiring histopathology level images of in vivo tissue, noninvasively. In this study, we demonstrate the capabilities of OCT-based angiography (OMAG) in detecting high-resolution, volumetric structural and microvascular features of in vivo human skin with various conditions using a swept source OCT system that operates on a central wavelength of 1310 nm with an A-line rate of 100 kHz. OMAG images provide detailed in vivo visualization of microvasculature of abnormal human skin conditions from face, chest and belly. Moreover, the progress of wound healing on human skin from arm is monitored during longitudinal wound healing process. The presented results promise the clinical use of OCT angiography in treatment of prevalent cutaneous diseases within human skin, in vivo.

  8. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  9. Ginseng in Dermatology: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouri-Rad, Sarvenaz; Sabouri-Rad, Sara; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Ginseng has gained fame as one of the most popular herbs originating from Eastern countries. Among different species which are known as ginseng, Panax ginseng C. A. Mey. (Korean or Asian ginseng) is the most frequently used one. Ginsenosides have been proposed to account for most of the biological activities of ginseng. The widely appreciated health-promoting effect of ginseng pertains to the beneficial effects of this plant against immune, cardiovascular and sexual diseases and cancer. In addition, there are some new aspects of the pharmacological activity of this plant which justify its use in dermatologic diseases. In dermatology, ginseng has been investigated mechanistically for its therapeutic effects in photoaging, wound and injury, skin cancer, dermatitis, hair loss, alopecia and cold hypersensitivity. Here, we reviewed experimental and clinical studies exploring the therapeutic efficacy of ginseng and ginsenosides in the field of dermatology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Novelty detection in dermatological images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel

    2003-01-01

    The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased. The det......The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased...

  11. Nose: Applied aspects in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dammaningala Venkataramaiah Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents.

  12. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Yim, Elizabeth; Keri, Jonette E

    2014-10-01

    The rapid increase in the medical use of probiotics and prebiotics in recent years has confirmed their excellent safety profile. As immune modulators, they have been used in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. We review the literature regarding the use of probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. Probiotics and prebiotics appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants, but their role in atopic dermatitis treatment is controversial. Their role in acne, wound healing, and photoprotection is promising, but larger trials are needed before a final recommendation can be made. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of laser in dermatology | Eldin | Sudanese Journal of Dermatology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New clinical indications are continually being proposed, some of which have been confirmed and others still in trial stage. In dermatology lasers are used in removal of benign skin lesion (moles, warts), scar resurfacing, treatment of vascular lesions and pigmented lesions (tattoos, freckles) and hair removal. In this paper we ...

  15. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W

    2015-01-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis...

  16. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, H.; Petersen, C. Leth; Kjaer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is an essential part of functional, non-invasive, cardiac imaging. Significant advances have been made in nuclear cardiology since planar (201)thallium ((201)TI) scintigraphy was introduced for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) perfusion nearly 40 years ago. The use...... of nuclear cardiology has been steadily increasing over the last 20 years with important steps being the introduction of (99m)technetium- ((99m)Tc)-labelled perfusion radiotracers, the change from only planar to now much more single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography...... (PET), electrocardiogram gating of nuclear perfusion imaging, and finally introducing nuclear hybrid imaging using either SPECT or PET together with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The indications have extended from nearly only coronary artery diseases to several non...

  17. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    photographs. Make sure that each table is cited in the text. Avoid too many tables. Identify statistical measures such as standard deviation, standard error of the mean and data statistical significance, if possible. 3. Manuscripts to Sudanese Journal of Dermatology should not be under simultaneous consideration by another ...

  18. Dermatology on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyers, Lindsay N; Quest, Tyler; Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-06-15

    YouTube, reaches upwards of six billion users on a monthly basis and is a unique source of information distribution and communication. Although the influence of YouTube on personal health decision-making is well established, this study assessed the type of content and viewership on a broad scope of dermatology related content on YouTube. Select terms (i.e. dermatology, sun protection, skin cancer, skin cancer awareness, and skin conditions) were searched on YouTube. Overall, the results included 100 videos with over 47 million viewers. Advocacy was the most prevalent content type at 24% of the total search results. These 100 videos were "shared" a total of 101,173 times and have driven 6,325 subscriptions to distinct YouTube user pages. Of the total videos, 35% were uploaded by or featured an MD/DO/PhD in dermatology or other specialty/field, 2% FNP/PA, 1% RN, and 62% other. As one of the most trafficked global sites on the Internet, YouTube is a valuable resource for dermatologists, physicians in other specialties, and the general public to share their dermatology-related content and gain subscribers. However, challenges of accessing and determining evidence-based data remain an issue.

  19. Refining the Eye: Dermatology and Visual Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Corinne; Huang, Jennifer T.; Buzney, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and Harvard Medical School began a partnership focused on building visual literacy skills for dermatology residents in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency Program. "Refining the Eye: Art and Dermatology", a four session workshop, took place in the museum's galleries and utilized the Visual…

  20. Present state of nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.; Moser, E.

    1994-01-01

    Unlike other techniques, nuclear cardiologic imaging enables evaluation of cardiac function employing radioactive tracers. This procedure can be used to assess myocardial blood flow, metabolism, viability, cardiac innervation and receptor status. Therefore, this noninvasive imaging modality can be regarded as supplementary to the screening methods in cardiology and also to angiography. General clinical use was not possible until the rapid development of nuclear medicine in the fifties began. With increasing wide-spread of positron emission tomography more detailed information on metabolic tissue characterization can be expected and will be of enormous relevance in clinical decision making and in selecting patients for interventions. (orig.) [de

  1. General Information | Bekibele | Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Caring for academic ophthalmology in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Zdravko; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2004-06-01

    Like any other area of academic medicine in Croatia, academic ophthalmology has always been limited by or has depended on the factors outside the profession itself: during the communist regime, it was mostly political and ideological correctness of academic ophthalmologists, and today during the social and economic transition, it is the lack of finances, planning, and sophisticated technology. The four university eye clinics, which are the pillars of academic ophthalmology in Croatia, provide health care to most difficult cases, educate students, residents, and specialists, and do research. On the other hand, they lack equipment, room, and financial recognition. This ever growing imbalance between requirements imposed on academic ophthalmology today and its possibilities make it less and less attractive, especially in comparison with private practice. The possible solution lies in increasing the independence of ophthalmology from pharmaceutical industry and politics, especially in research and financial aspects.

  3. Current trends in Nuclear Cardiology. Cuban scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peix González, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    The study concludes with the following recommendations. Nuclear Cardiology extend to the entire country. Conduct cost-effectiveness studies comparing different imaging techniques in cardiology. Develop metabolic studies and coronary flow by PET. Introducing the study of adrenergic innervation. Develop hybrid imaging in cardiology. Establish committees of experts to analyze the value of different imaging techniques in Cardiology According to our possibilities and resources, toward implementation of a medicine individualized for our patients

  4. Dermatology hospital fellowships: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Natalie Z; Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    The question of what makes a successful dermatology hospitalist has risen to the forefront due to the rapidly increasing number of these providers. Inpatient dermatology fellowships have formed as a direct consequence. Though mostly in their infancy, these programs have primary or secondary goals to train providers in the dermatologic care of the hospitalized patient. This article presents a brief synopsis of the history of traditional hospitalist fellowships and extrapolates these findings to existing hospitalist dermatology fellowships. As more of these programs arise, these fellowships are poised to revolutionize dermatologic inpatient care from a systems perspective. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  5. The clinical neuro-ophthalmology of vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashii, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    To diagnose a patient with a failing visual system, it is necessary to localize the site of the lesion in the system, and identify the etiology that has produced it. Physicians do not see diseases but just their manifestations. Clinical neuro-ophthalmology provides the basic principles on how to progress from manifestations to the diseases they indicate. The Frank B. Walsh Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (the Walsh Society) that originated in 1969 in the United States has been the center of clinical neuro-ophthalmology case studies throughout the world. In Japan, the Ronald M. Burde Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology Study Group (the RMB Society) was organized in 2001 to establish and promote a clinicopathologic conference in the style of the Walsh Society. On this occasion, Prof. Burde was invited to the Annual Japanese Ophthalmological Society meeting. Based on some illustrative cases presented at the annual meetings of the RMB society, this review was carried out to present the current knowledge of clinical neuro-ophthalmology. (author)

  6. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  7. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  8. Quantitative Nuclear Cardiology: How objective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, J.C.W.; Raval, U.; Soman, P.; Lahiri, A.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study was to establish the accuracy required from the operator in indicating the centre and axis the left ventricle, and in placing regions of interest (ROIs), whilst using the MYO TOMO and MYO QUANT software to analyze tomographic data from nuclear cardiology

  9. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine

  10. Mobile apps in cardiology: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-07-24

    Cardiovascular diseases are the deadliest diseases worldwide, with 17.3 million deaths in 2008 alone. Among them, heart-related deaths are of the utmost relevance; a fact easily proven by the 7.25 million deaths caused by ischemic heart disease alone in that year. The latest advances in smartphones and mHealth have been used in the creation of thousands of medical apps related to cardiology, which can help to reduce these mortality rates. The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then classify the results to see what is available and what is missing, focusing particularly on commercial apps. Two reviews have been developed. One is a literature review of mobile systems and applications, retrieved from several databases and systems such as Scopus, PubMed, IEEE Xplore, and Web of Knowledge. The other is a review of mobile apps in the leading app stores, Google play for Android and Apple's App Store for iOS. Search queries up to May 2013 located 406 papers and 710 apps related to cardiology and heart disease. The most researched section in the literature associated with cardiology is related to mobile heart (and vital signs) monitoring systems and the methods involved in the classification of heart signs in order to detect abnormal functions. Other systems with a significant number of papers are mobile cardiac rehabilitation systems, blood pressure measurement, and systems for the detection of heart failure. The majority of apps for cardiology are heart monitors and medical calculators. Other categories with a high number of apps are those for ECG education and interpretation, cardiology news and journals, blood pressure tracking, heart rate monitoring using an external device, and CPR instruction. There are very few guides on cardiac rehabilitation and apps for the management of the cardiac condition, and there were no

  11. Orange fiber laser for ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, M.; Kojima, K.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-02-01

    For the light source of photocoagulators for ophthalmology, orange laser is more suitable than green laser because of low scattering loss by the crystalline lens, and low absorption by xanthophylls in the retina. We developed two orange fiber lasers (580 nm and 590 nm) to investigate the effect depending on the difference in the range of orange. The 580nm laser is composed of a 1160 nm fiber laser and a Periodically Polled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) crystal for second harmonic generation. The 1160 nm fiber laser beam is focused into the MgO-doped PPLN crystal whose length is 30 mm with 3-pass configuration. Continuous-wave 1.3 W output power of 580 nm was obtained with 5.8 W input power of 1160nm for the first time. The conversion efficiency was 22%. The band width of the second harmonic was 0.006 nm (FWHM). The 590 nm laser is almost the same as 580 nm laser source. In this case we used a Raman shift fiber to generate 1180 nm, and the output power of 590 nm was 1.4 W. We developed an evaluation model of photocoagulator system using these two laser sources. A 700 mW coagulation output power was obtained with this orange fiber laser photocoagulator system. This is enough power for the eye surgery. We have the prospect of the maintenance-free, long-life system that is completely air-cooled. We are planning to evaluate this photocoagulator system in order to investigate the difference between the two wavelengths at the field test.

  12. Review of patient registries in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Gabriella; Hill, Dane; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-10-01

    Patient registries are datasets containing information on patients with a particular disease or patients who are undergoing a specific treatment. Our objective was to search for and catalog the types of registries being used in dermatology and investigate their characteristics and uses. We searched Google, the Registry of Patient Registries, Orphanet, and ClinicalTrials.gov to compile a list of dermatology disease registries. We also conducted a literature review on the uses of dermatology registries using PubMed. We identified 48 dermatology patient registries, with 23 distinct diseases represented. We also identified 11 registries used for postmarketing surveillance of skin disease. Our search was limited to registries in English. Registries are commonly used for the study of rare dermatologic diseases and for postsurveillance monitoring of systemic therapies in more common dermatologic diseases, such as psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  14. Understanding the cost of dermatologic care: A survey study of dermatology providers, residents, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Aaron J; Mann, Julianne A; Carlberg, Valerie M; Kimball, Alexa B; Musty, Michael J; Simpson, Eric L

    2017-04-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology recommends dermatologists understand the costs of dermatologic care. This study sought to measure dermatology providers' understanding of the cost of dermatologic care and how those costs are communicated to patients. We also aimed to understand the perspectives of patients and dermatological trainees on how cost information enters into the care they receive or provide. Surveys were systematically developed and distributed to 3 study populations: dermatology providers, residents, and patients. Response rates were over 95% in all 3 populations. Dermatology providers and residents consistently underestimated the costs of commonly recommended dermatologic medications but accurately predicted the cost of common dermatologic procedures. Dermatology patients preferred to know the cost of procedures and medications, even when covered by insurance. In this population, the costs of dermatologic medications frequently interfered with patients' ability to properly adhere to prescribed regimens. The surveyed population was limited to the northwestern United States and findings may not be generalizable. Cost estimations were based on average reimbursement rates, which vary by insurer. Improving dermatology providers' awareness and communication of the costs of dermatologic care might enhance medical decision-making, improve adherence and outcomes, and potentially reduce overall health care expenditures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diversity in Dermatology Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Abby S; Enos, Clinton W

    2017-10-01

    Given the change in our population to one that is more racially and ethnically diverse, the topic of diversity in dermatology residency programs has gained attention. In a field that has become highly competitive, diversity is lagging behind. What are the reasons for this? The existing diversity among medical school matriculants is reflective of the applicant pool, and although modest, there has been an increase in applications and acceptances from minority populations. However, these proportions do not carry through to the population applying to dermatology residency. Making sense of this and planning how to recruit a more diverse applicant pool will improve the quality and cultural competency of future dermatologists. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Applications of Nanotechnology in Dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintended nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature sugge...

  17. How to Practice Sports Cardiology: A Cardiology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E

    2015-07-01

    The rigorous cardiovascular (CV) demands of sport, combined with training-related cardiac adaptations, render the athlete a truly unique CV patient and sports cardiology a truly unique discipline. Cardiologists are advised to adopt a systematic approach to the CV evaluation of athletes, taking into consideration the individual sports culture, sports-specific CV demands, CV adaptations and their appearance on cardiac testing, any existing or potential interaction of the heart with the internal and external sports environment, short- and long-term CV risks, and potential effect of performance-enhancing agents and antidoping regulations. This article outlines the systematic approach, provides a detailed example, and outlines contemporary sports cardiology core competencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Equipment standards for interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, A.; Gallagher, A.; Walsh, C.; Malone, J.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional radiology has seen rapid growth in cardiology and represents an alternative to hazardous surgery. Recently there has been a substantial growth in the number of procedures being performed and interventional cardiology (IC) procedures are the most common interventional procedures in Europe. Advances in imaging technology have facilitated the development of increasingly complex radiological IC equipment. Currently, the technology is developing at a rate ahead of supporting research, equipment standards and a regulatory framework. International standards play a key role in the design, manufacture and performance of radiological IC equipment. A survey of 12 IC systems (15 imaging chains) was conducted in Irish hospitals. The aim of the study was to assess the imbalance between rapidly advancing technology and existing standards and to propose recommendations for new IC equipment standards. The results demonstrate the need for definitive equipment requirements and standardisation in the design, manufacture, acceptance and maintenance of IC equipment. (authors)

  19. History of Cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga a...

  20. Radiation safety among cardiology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Candice; Vasaiwala, Samip; Haque, Faizul; Pratap, Kiran; Vidovich, Mladen I

    2010-07-01

    Cardiology fellows can be exposed to high radiation levels during procedures. Proper radiation training and implementation of safety procedures is of critical importance in lowering physician health risks associated with radiation exposure. Participants were cardiology fellows in the United States (n = 2,545) who were contacted by e-mail to complete an anonymous survey regarding the knowledge and practice of radiation protection during catheterization laboratory procedures. An on-line survey engine, SurveyMonkey, was used to distribute and collect the results of the 10-question survey. The response rate was 10.5%. Of the 267 respondents, 82% had undergone formal radiation safety training. Only 58% of the fellows were aware of their hospital's pregnancy radiation policy and 60% knew how to contact the hospital's radiation safety officer. Although 52% of the fellows always wore a dosimeter, 81% did not know their level of radiation exposure in the previous year and only 74% of fellows knew the safe levels of radiation exposure. The fellows who had received formal training were more likely to be aware of their pregnancy policy, to know the contact information of their radiation safety officer, to be aware of the safe levels of radiation exposure, to use dosimeters and RadPad consistently, and to know their own level of radiation exposure in the previous year. In conclusion, cardiology fellows have not been adequately educated about radiation safety. A concerted effort directed at physician safety in the workplace from the regulatory committees overseeing cardiology fellowships should be encouraged. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. History of Cardiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. History of Cardiology in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Kanti Das

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena.

  3. Nonhuman primate dermatology: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joseph A.; Didier, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In general, veterinary dermatologists do not have extensive clinical experience of nonhuman primate (NHP) dermatoses. The bulk of the published literature does not provide an organized evidence-based approach to the NHP dermatologic case. The veterinary dermatologist is left to extract information from both human and veterinary dermatology, an approach that can be problematic as it forces the clinician to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions based on two very disparate bodies of literature. A more cohesive approach to NHP dermatology – without relying on assumptions that NHP pathology most commonly behaves similarly to other veterinary and human disease – is required. This review of the dermatology of NHP species includes discussions of primary dermatoses, as well as diseases where dermatologic signs represent a significant secondary component, provides a first step towards encouraging the veterinary community to study and report the dermatologic diseases of nonhuman primates. PMID:19490576

  4. Dermatology training and practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaratnam, Deshan F; Murrell, Dédée F

    2014-10-01

    Dermatology is a relatively young discipline in Australia compared to other specialities within the medical fraternity. From its humble beginnings, the profession has evolved significantly over the decades and is now represented by the Australasian College of Dermatologists which is charged with training the next generation of dermatologists and advocating for and advancing the profession. The authors reviewed and describe the history of dermatology training and practice in Australia. Despite the progress in education, there are only 415 dermatologists serving a population of 23.3 million (1 per 58 000) and yet it has the highest incidence and prevalence of skin cancer in the world. The scope of clinical practice is wide in Australia, with clinicians well versed in medical and procedural dermatology. It is hoped that Australian dermatology will continue to bolster the dermatology profession globally. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. The State of Ethnic Dermatology in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, Boluwaji; Miller-Monthrope, Yvette

    Approximately 30% of Canadians will be members of a visible minority by 2031. When dermatology became an independent medical discipline in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, most residents of Canada and the United States were of Northern European descent. Morphology and descriptions of dermatoses are based on patients with light skin. Skin of colour dermatology refers to a unique field in dermatology dedicated to the diagnosis and management of disorders that are more prevalent in patients with moderately to richly pigmented skin. Important differences in the presentation of common dermatoses such as seborrheic dermatitis and acne exist in patients with darker skin types. The effect of traditional treatments for common and uncommon dermatoses is also an important consideration in managing patients with skin of colour. Such treatments may result in adverse effects such as postinflammatory hyperpigmentation or keloid scarring at a higher rate. Most respondents from a 2013 UK study of dermatology residents and consultants agreed that individuals with 'ethnic skin' had specific and unique dermatological problems. The Royal College of Physician and Surgeons of Canada's Objectives of Training in Dermatology states that residents must demonstrate the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes for effective patient-centred care and service to a diverse population. Future steps include creating a national society of dermatologists interested in clinical and academic aspects of ethnic dermatology. As well, presentations on skin of colour dermatology could be encouraged at major Canadian dermatology meetings.

  6. History of pediatric cardiology in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the discipline of cardiology started in the late 1950s and at that time pediatric cardiology was practiced as a part of cardiology specialty. This article traces the history of pediatric cardiology in India. Dr. S. Padmawati and Dr. Kamala Vytilingam underwent training in pediatric cardiology at international centers in the early 1950s and early 1960s. Dr. N. Gopinath successfully closed a ventricular septal defect using a pump oxygenator at Christian Medical College, Vellore. Open heart surgery program kicked off in the 1960s with the tireless efforts of many other surgeons. Dr. Rajendra Tandon, trained for 2 years at Boston Children Hospital under Dr. Alexander Nadas, joined the Department of Cardiology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in 1963. This and many other stories are described.

  7. Big Data for cardiology: novel discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor

    2016-03-21

    Big Data promises to change cardiology through a massive increase in the data gathered and analysed; but its impact goes beyond improving incrementally existing methods. The potential of comprehensive data sets for scientific discovery is examined, and its impact on the scientific method generally and cardiology in particular is posited, together with likely consequences for research and practice. Big Data in cardiology changes how new insights are being discovered. For it to flourish, significant modifications in the methods, structures, and institutions of the profession are necessary. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Advance of nuclear cardiology in clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongcheng

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has make a little bit progress in the past year. Both nuclear cardiology and other cardiac imaging have its own advantage and disadvantage in the diagnostic of coronary artery disease. And the relationship of them is complementary but not instead of each other. Nuclear cardiology provides a one-stop shop for diagnosis, risk stratification, and management of coronary artery disease. Nuclear cardiology plays a very important role in the diagnostic of coronary artery disease in early stage in the special group of people. (authors)

  9. Applications of Nanotechnology in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintended nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease, out weigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three different therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology. PMID:22217738

  10. Dermatological changes of amputation stump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological changes of stumps of 174 amputees are presented. The commonest dermatological change recorded at the site of amputation stump was hyperpigmentation in 46 (26.4% followed by callosities in 32 (18.3%, scaling in 29 (16.7%, cutaneous atrophy in 20 (11.5%, lichenification in 19(10.9%, traumatic ulcer and bacterial infections in 18 (10.3% each, hypertrophic scar in 14 (8.1%, hypopigmentation and corns in 13 (7.4% each, verrucous hypertrophy of stump in 12 (6.9%, dermatophytic infection in 5(2.9%, stump oedema and phantom limb in 4 (2.3% each, intertriginous dermatitis in 3( 1.7%, allergic contact dermatitis (resin and frictional eczema in 2(1.1% each. Epidermoid cyst, keloid formation, anaesthesia, gangrene and cutaneous horn were recorded in 1 (0.6% each. Atrophy (epidermal and derma, anaesthesia, alopecia and elephantiasis of the stump have not been documented in the literature earlier.

  11. Metformin in dermatology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, D; Kurban, M; Abbas, O

    2013-11-01

    For several decades, metformin has been used as an oral hypoglycaemic agent, where it is the first line of treatment in overweight and obese type 2 diabetic patients. This is because it decreases the hepatic glucose output and acts as an insulin sensitizer by increasing the glucose utilization by muscles and adipocytes. As a result of the improvement in glycaemic control, serum insulin concentrations decline slightly, thus improving hyperinsulinaemia and its signs. In addition, it has been shown that metformin has platelet anti-aggregating and antioxidant effects. These pharmacological properties have allowed metformin to be effective in non-diabetic situations including cutaneous conditions. This is an evidence-based review on the use of metformin in the treatment of skin disorders such as hirsutism, acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, acanthosis nigricans, psoriasis, skin cancer, among others. In addition, cutaneous side-effects such as leukocytoclastic vasculitis, bullous pemphigoid, psoriasiform drug eruption, lichen planus and acute alopecia have been associated with metformin use and are discussed in the article. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Applications of nanotechnology in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLouise, Lisa A

    2012-03-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintentional nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease outweigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology.

  13. General ophthalmology | Bekibele | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transactions of the Ophthalmological Society of Nigeria: Proceedings of the annual OSN Conference, Jos, Nigeria, August 25–28, 2015. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers ...

  14. General ophthalmology | Bekibele | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proceedings from the Ophthalmological Society of Nigeria Conference, 2014. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  15. Cryotherapy in ophthalmology. Kryotherapie in der Augenheilkunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, M. (Medizinische Akademie Dresden (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    Ophthalmology is the only medical field in which all of the six known therapeutic applications of low temperature are used. The most important indications are discussed with reference to the corresponding device technology developed at the Department of Cryomedicine of the Dresden Academy of Medicine. (orig.)

  16. Acquisition and retrieval of ophthalmology academic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses how to search and access ophthalmology information based on specialized websites and resources by introducing the database, search engines, electronic journals, electronic books and so on. Hope to help ophthalmic practitioners to carry out scientific research and clinical practice.

  17. Trends in impact factors of ophthalmology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainer, Igor; Mimouni, Francis; Blumenthal, Eytan Z; Mimouni, Michael

    2016-09-01

    To test whether there is an association between the growth in the number of ophthalmic journals in the past years and their mean and maximum impact factor (IF) as a common sign of scientific proliferation. Using data from the 2013 Journal Citation Report database a study of the major clinical medical fields was conducted to assess the correlation between the number of journals and maximum IF in a given field in the year 2013. In the field of ophthalmology, we examined the correlation between year, number of journals, mean IF and maximum IF in the field of ophthalmology throughout the years 2000-2013. In the major medical fields, a positive correlation was found between the number of journals and the maximum IF (quadratic R2 = 0.71, Pjournals and mean IF (R2 = 0.84, Pjournals and maximum IF (R2 = 0.71, Pjournals in the field of ophthalmology. In the future, the formation of additional ophthalmology journals is likely to further increase the IFs of existing journals.

  18. Competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The establishment of a credible, defensible and acceptable “formal competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for undergraduate medical and dental students” is fundamental to program recognition, monitoring and evaluation. The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZ-CHS) has ...

  19. Preface [to: Practical Pediatric Dermatology: Controversies in Diagnosis and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Oranje (Arnold); N. Al-Mutairi (Nawaf); T. Shwayder (Tor)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractPediatric dermatology is a young field that combines dermatologic and pediatric skills and expertises. Knowledge of dermatology and pediatrics is necessary for optimal care of children with skin diseases. A multidisciplinary approach in which there is cooperation between

  20. Psychological symptoms and quality of life of dermatology outpatients and hospitalized dermatology patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R.; Zachariae, C.; Ibsen, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare psychological symptoms and health-related quality of life of dermatology patients and healthy controls. The sample consisted of 333 consecutively recruited patients from four dermatology outpatient clinics, 172 hospitalized dermatological patients from...... two university hospitals and 293 matched healthy controls. All patients and controls completed Beck's Depression Inventory, the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. Hospitalized patients were more distressed than outpatients and healthy controls and reported greater...... of dermatology patients, especially among patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis....

  1. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using 18 FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  2. Nonsteroidal Topical Immunomodulators in Allergology and Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Jovanović

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to review currently available literature data concerning pathomechanisms of action, indications, treatment efficacy, as well as side effects of nonsteroidal immunomodulators used in dermatology, primarily for the treatment of allergic dermatoses. MEDLINE search was undertaken using the key words “Topical Immunomodulators, Dermatology and Allergy”. Full articles, and nothing but full articles, were used.

  3. Pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: perspectives from academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiglow, Brittany G; Resneck, Jack S; Lucky, Anne W; Sidbury, Robert; Yan, Albert C; Resnick, Steven D; Antaya, Richard J

    2008-12-01

    The pediatric dermatology workforce has not been systematically evaluated since recent changes in board certification requirements. To quantify and characterize the workforce of academic pediatric dermatologists and examine issues related to training, hiring, and retention. Dermatology chairpersons and residency directors in the United States and Canada completed a 30-question survey. Eighty of 132 programs (61%) responded to the survey. More than two thirds of programs (56/80) employed a pediatric dermatologist, and 34 programs were recruiting a pediatric dermatologist. The number of residents that pursue careers in pediatric dermatology is significantly associated with the number of pediatric dermatologists on faculty at their institution. Self-reported data, which may have been reflected by recall bias, and 61% response rate. At a majority of academic centers, the current pool of pediatric dermatology faculty is neither adequate to meet academic nor clinical demands. Methods to increase exposure to pediatric dermatology among medical students and residents must be sought.

  4. Cosmetic dermatologic surgical training in US dermatology residency programs: identifying and overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Bruce; Williams, Erin; Stratman, Erik J

    2014-02-01

    The public and other medical specialties expect dermatologists who offer cosmetic dermatology services to provide competent care. There are numerous barriers to achieving cosmetic dermatology competency during residency. Many dermatology residents enter the workforce planning to provide cosmetic services. If a training gap exists, this may adversely affect patient safety. To identify resources available for hands-on cosmetic dermatology training in US dermatology residency training programs and to assess program director (PD) attitudes toward cosmetic dermatology training during residency and strategies, including discounted pricing, used by training programs to overcome barriers related to resident-performed cosmetic dermatology procedures. An online survey in academic dermatology practices among PDs of US dermatology residency programs. Frequency of cosmetic dermatology devices and injectables used for dermatology resident hands-on cosmetic dermatology training, categorizing PD attitudes toward cosmetic dermatology training during residency and describing residency-related discounted pricing models. Responses from PDs were received from 53 of 114 (46%) US dermatology residency programs. All but 3 programs (94%) offered hands-on cosmetic dermatology training using botulinum toxin, and 47 of 53 (89%) provided training with hyaluronic acid fillers. Pulsed dye lasers represented the most common laser use experienced by residents (41 of 52 [79%]), followed by Q-switched Nd:YAG (30 of 52 [58%]). Discounted procedures were offered by 32 of 53 (60%) programs, with botulinum toxin (30 of 32 [94%]) and fillers (27 of 32 [84%]) most prevalent and with vascular lasers (17 of 32 [53%]) and hair removal lasers (12 of 32 [38%]) less common. Various discounting methods were used. Only 20 of 53 (38%) PDs believed that cosmetic dermatology should be a necessary aspect of residency training; 14 of 52 (27%) PDs thought that residents should not be required to perform any cosmetic

  5. Patient doses in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Francisco Diaz, J.; Sanchez, A.; Tort, I.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first cause of death in Spain. The most usual procedures in interventional cardiology are coronariography and PTCA. The first is a diagnostic technique, and the second one is interventional. Our goal has been to study procedures made during the first six months in the Interventional Cardiology Unit of the Juan Ramon Jimenez Hospital (Huelva-Spain), taking into account radiation protection issues. We have studied 178 patients; 145 of them underwent coronariography, and 33 of the patients had PTCA too. Every case was analyzed taking into account technical and dosimetric parameters. We show parameters values gathered: Diagnostic techniques (valvular and non-valvular patients), and interventional techniques (coronariography and PTCA in different or in the same intervention). Higher doses were obtained with valvular patients, although the number of frames was similar. Attending to therapeutic procedures, the highest values were gotten with the 'double' interventions. Interventional procedures exceed in 60% doses gotten in diagnostic studies: this is because of the number of series and number of frames per series. Similar values obtained by other authors have been gotten. (author)

  6. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  7. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  8. [Quality assurance in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülker, H

    2009-10-01

    Quality assurance in clinical studies aiming at approval of pharmaceutical products is submitted to strict rules, controls and auditing regulations. Comparative instruments to ensure quality in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are not available in interventional cardiology, likewise in other fields of cardiovascular medicine. Quality assurance simply consists of "quality registers" with basic data not externally controlled. Based on the experiences of clinical studies and their long history of standardization it is assumed that these data may be severely flawed thus being inappropriate to set standards for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The precondition for quality assurance are quality data. In invasive coronary angiography and intervention medical indications, the decision making process interventional versus surgical revascularization, technical performance and after - care are essential aspects affecting quality of diagnostics and therapy. Quality data are externally controlled data. To collect quality data an appropriate infrastructure is a necessary precondition which is not existent. For an appropriate infrastructure investments have to be done both to build up as well as to sustain the necessary preconditions. As long as there are no infrastructure and no investments there will be no "quality data". There exist simply registers of data which are not proved to be a basis for significant assurance and enhancement in quality in interventional coronary cardiology. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  9. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative evaluation of dermatological antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, C S; Leitch, A E; Tidman, M J

    2015-12-01

    Topical antiseptics are frequently used in dermatological management, yet evidence for the efficacy of traditional generic formulations is often largely anecdotal. We tested the in vitro bactericidal activity of four commonly used topical antiseptics against Staphylococcus aureus, using a modified version of the European Standard EN 1276, a quantitative suspension test for evaluation of the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants and antiseptics. To meet the standard for antiseptic effectiveness of EN 1276, at least a 5 log10 reduction in bacterial count within 5 minutes of exposure is required. While 1% benzalkonium chloride and 6% hydrogen peroxide both achieved a 5 log10 reduction in S. aureus count, neither 2% aqueous eosin nor 1 : 10 000 potassium permanganate showed significant bactericidal activity compared with control at exposure periods of up to 1 h. Aqueous eosin and potassium permanganate may have desirable astringent properties, but these results suggest they lack effective antiseptic activity, at least against S. aureus. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. History of phototherapy in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönigsmann, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Over many centuries, treatment with sunlight or "heliotherapy" was used in the treatment of skin diseases. More than 3500 years ago, ancient Egyptian and Indian healers used the ingestion of plant extracts or seeds in addition to sunlight for treating "leucoderma". Modern phototherapy began with Nobel Prize winner Niels Finsen who developed a "chemical rays" lamp with which he treated patients with skin tuberculosis. However, it took several decades until phototherapy was introduced anew into the dermatological armamentarium. It was the development of photochemotherapy (PUVA) in 1974 that marked the beginning of a huge upsurge in photodermatology. The subsequent development of high intensity UV sources with defined spectra facilitated an optimized therapy for psoriasis and led to an expansion of indications for photo(chemo)therapy also in combination with topical and systemic agents. The introduction of extracorporeal photopheresis in 1987 for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and of topical photodynamic therapy widely expanded the therapeutic possibilities in dermato-oncology.

  12. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  13. Dermatology education on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Conventional dermatology teaching favours a didactic, factual approach, rather than a problem-solving approach. A Web-based education system that uses a problem-solving approach offers many advantages. Several international Websites now provide continuing education to specialist dermatologists. These are all 'discretionary' Websites, that is, they are visited by choice; 'obligatory' educational Websites are those tied to a university medical faculty or postgraduate college and which host either online tasks that must be completed or unique examinable material. An interactive education Website, named Dermconsult, has been established unofficially for fellows of the Australasian College of Dermatologists and registrars in training. However, a successful Website will require backing from certifying organizations. Continuing medical education will need to be compulsory for potential users if an educational Website is to be successful.

  14. Dermatology in the new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jayakar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatology in the new millennium will have to focus on the demands, hopes, and satisfaction of those who look at themselves as having skin liaments. Governments may modify this by declaring some unperceived needs as important and therefore fundable and others as unimportant. Hopefully there should be equity, the women will be equal to men, and poor countries equal to the rich. The importance of skin to the individual will not diminish and hopefully will be better recognized by funding agencies. The costs of treating skin diseases will always be an issue, and the case for treating skin diseases will have to be made in the competitive world of much life threatening disease. Dermatologists may themselves opt out of treating conditions which governance deems important. An example would be all breaks in surface continuity of the skin which other professions might wish to take over as leg ulcers, the diabetic foot ulcer, the pressure sore, or burns.

  15. [Telemedicine in dermatological practice: teledermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Judit; Forczek, Erzsébet; Bari, Ferenc

    2016-03-06

    Technological advances in the fields of information and telecommunication technologies have affected the health care system in the last decades, and lead to the emergence of a new discipline: telemedicine. The appearance and rise of internet and smart phones induced a rapid progression in telemedicine. Several new applications and mobile devices are published every hour even for medical purposes. Parallel to these changes in the technical fields, medical literature about telemedicine has grown rapidly. Due to its visual nature, dermatology is ideally suited to benefit from this new technology and teledermatology became one of the most dynamically evolving fields of telemedicine by now. Teledermatology is not routinely practiced in Hungary yet, however, it promises the health care system to become better, cheaper and faster, but we have to take notice on the experience and problems faced in teledermatologic applications so far, summarized in this review.

  16. [Citation analysis of originals in Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lian

    2002-09-01

    To evaluate the academic level and the popularity of Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology. According to the information of Chinese science and technology papers and citation database (CSTPC), I statistically analyzed the amount and distribution of the originals in Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology cited by the journals included by CSTPC. The originals of Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology were high-qualified and influential, and their authors were all over the country. With the unique style and character, Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology is the main medical core periodical and one of the most important information resources in the field of ophthalmology in China.

  17. [Organizational ethics: a study in ophthalmologic clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Maria Aparecida; Scarpi, Marinho Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Research on the field of organizational ethics to investigate to which extent ophthalmologic clinics, inserted in the competitive atmosphere, in the condition of organizations in search of survival, subordinate ethics to competitiveness in the managerial praxis, that is, in the administrative sphere. Kohlberg is taken as theoretical reference, approaching the theme of ethical subordination to competitiveness. The instrument to evaluate moral behaviors of organizations, elaborated by Licht, is applied. The quantitative method is used, adopting analytic instruments, such as Q of Yule and non parametric tests, when dealing with the data of 41 ophthalmologic clinics. The results of the research seem to indicate that administrators of ophthalmologic clinics of greater performance subordinate ethical principles to competitiveness, seeking to assure the survival of the company and, when confronted with the instrument to evaluate their moral behavior, proposed by Kohlberg, have a significantly smaller presence in the postconventional stage than administrators of ophthalmologic clinics with a smaller performance. One may affirm, according to non parametric tests, at the level of significance of 0.05, that the levels of moral development of the two groups differ significantly. The obtained results are according to the literature, especially concerning the "paradox of the ethical subordination and competitiveness". They also suggest that the warrant of the survival of the company tends to reduce the perception of the groups in power regarding the problems that happen in the community, and that a reduction of the ethical values subordinated to competition occurs, and such reduction provokes growing feelings of economical disputes in the social sphere.

  18. Intracranial Aneurysms of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Newman, Nancy J; Barrow, Daniel L; Biousse, Valérie

    2017-12-01

    Intracranial saccular aneurysms are acquired lesions that often present with neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques, endovascular treatments, and neurocritical care have improved the optimal management of symptomatic unruptured aneurysms, but whether the chosen treatment has an impact on neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes remains debated. A review of the literature focused on neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and treatment of intracranial aneurysms with specific relevance to neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. Cavernous sinus aneurysms were not included in this review. Surgical clipping vs endovascular coiling for aneurysms causing third nerve palsies was compared in 13 retrospective studies representing 447 patients. Complete recovery was achieved in 78% of surgical patients compared with 44% of patients treated with endovascular coiling. However, the complication rate, hospital costs, and days spent in intensive care were reported as higher in surgically treated patients. Retrospective reviews of surgical clipping and endovascular coiling for all ocular motor nerve palsies (third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves) revealed similar results of complete resolution in 76% and 49%, respectively. Improvement in visual deficits related to aneurysmal compression of the anterior visual pathways was also better among patients treated with clipping than with coiling. The time to treatment from onset of visual symptoms was a predictive factor of visual recovery in several studies. Few reports have specifically assessed the improvement of visual deficits after treatment with flow diverters. Decisions regarding the choice of therapy for intracranial aneurysms causing neuro-ophthalmologic signs ideally should be made at high-volume centers with access to both surgical and endovascular treatments. The status of the patient, location of the aneurysm, and experience of the treating physicians

  19. [Ophthalmological symptoms of measles and their treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végh, Mihály; Hári-Kovács, András; Roth, Hans-Walter; Facskó, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Measles, caused by the Morbilli virus, is a highly (about 95 %) contagious disease affecting primarily children, but without proper immunisation, adults can also be infected. The leading symptoms of the disease are high fever that presents after an incubation period of 9-10 days and the red rash that begins several days after the fever starts. Beyond specific generalized symptoms, measles may have ocular symptoms. The most commonly occurring conjunctivitis, the so-called "red eye symptom", is not characteristic only for measles infection, however, by taking the generalized symptoms it can suggest the diagnosis at the beginning of the disease. Conjunctivitis of varying severity is noticed in the half of the cases without using ophthalmological instrumentation. Using ophthalmological instrumentation, the mild forms of conjunctivitis can be diagnosed, by meticulous ophthalmological examination, further eye diseases can be discovered. The viral conjunctivitis can progress to keratitis and bacterial superinfection can occur. If the infection presents in childhood it can affect the posterior segment. The fight against measles is very effective in Hungary since the vaccination has been introduced, and the lack of vaccination is also the primary cause of the risk to the disease. In the diagnosis, symptomatic treatment of the disease and the curbing of possible mass infections, the practicing physician (general practitioner) has a key role. The correct care of the infected patient in Hungary is provided by a methodological letter, professional information and legal guides. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(39): 1523-1527.

  20. Crowdsourcing: an overview and applications to ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyang; Mudie, Lucy; Brady, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Crowdsourcing involves the use of the collective intelligence of online communities to produce solutions and outcomes for defined objectives. The use of crowdsourcing is growing in many scientific areas. Crowdsourcing in ophthalmology has been used in basic science and clinical research; however, it also shows promise as a method with wide-ranging applications. This review presents current findings on the use of crowdsourcing in ophthalmology and potential applications in the future. Crowdsourcing has been used to distinguish normal retinal images from images with diabetic retinopathy; the collective intelligence of the crowd was able to correctly classify 81% of 230 images (19 unique) for US$1.10/eye in 20 min. Crowdsourcing has also been used to distinguish normal optic discs from abnormal ones with reasonable sensitivity (83-88%), but low specificity (35-43%). Another study used crowdsourcing for quick and reliable manual segmentation of optical coherence tomography images. Outside of ophthalmology, crowdsourcing has been used for text and image interpretation, language translation, and data analysis. Crowdsourcing has the potential for rapid and economical data processing. Among other applications, it could be used in research settings to provide the 'ground-truth' data, and in the clinical settings to relieve the burden of image processing on experts.

  1. Therapeutic application of lasers in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misiuk-Hojlo, M.; Krzyzanowska-Berkowska, P.; Hill-Bator, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lasers have found application in diverse branches of medicine. In ophthalmology, laser technology has various therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The purpose of this article is to review the major therapeutic applications of lasers in different eye disorders. The effects of lasers on biological tissues and different laser techniques as well as the indications for laser therapy in various parts of the eye are discussed. Lasers are used to treat glaucoma and many vascular disorders of the retina. Laser treatment may be useful in preventing the development of neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy, BRVO, or CRVO. Laser techniques are also available for the treatment of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and some malignant and benign intraocular tumors and in retina abnormalities which predispose to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Corneal laser surgery is the most frequently applied laser procedure in ophthalmology. PRK, LASIK, and LASEK are used to correct errors in vision such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Laser photocoagulation is also helpful in cataract surgery. Nowadays, lasers have become so universal that it is difficult to imagine ophthalmology without them. We are still witnessing rapid advances in the development of laser techniques, especially in plastic surgery, cataract extraction, and ocular imaging. (authors)

  2. History and development of ophthalmology in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Hou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Western medicine was first introduced to Taiwan by medical missionaries in the mid-19th century. Modernization of medicine was systematically transplanted to Taiwan in the Japanese colonial period, and ophthalmology was established third among hospital departments, following internal medicine and surgery. Dr Hidetaka Yamaguchi, an ophthalmologist, was the first head of the Taihoku Hospital, later known as National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH; Taipei, Taiwan. Ophthalmologists during the colonial period conducted studies on tropical and infectious eye diseases. After World War II, ophthalmologists at NTUH played an important role in medical education, residency training, studies, and teaching. Dr Yan-Fei Yang established the Taiwan Ophthalmological Society in 1960 and instituted its official journal in 1962. Dr Ho-Ming Lin established the Department of Ophthalmology at the Tri-Service General Hospital in the 1950s and the Veterans General Hospital in the 1960s. Taiwan ophthalmologists eradicated trachoma by 1971. Cataract surgery and penetrating keratoplasty were initially performed in the 1960s. Currently, there are about 1600 ophthalmologists in Taiwan conducting an estimated 120,000 cataract surgeries and 600 corneal transplantations annually. Many subspecialty societies have been established recently that serve to educate Taiwanese ophthalmologists and to connect with international ophthalmic societies. Taiwan ophthalmologists continue to contribute to the advancement of ophthalmic knowledge globally.

  3. Funding models for outreach ophthalmology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Angus W; Mulholland, Will; Taylor, Hugh R

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to describe funding models used and compare the effects of funding models for remuneration on clinical activity and cost-effectiveness in outreach eye services in Australia. Cross-sectional case study based in remote outreach ophthalmology services in Australia. Key stake-holders from eye services in nine outreach regions participated in the study. Semistructured interviews were conducted to perform a qualitative assessment of outreach eye services' funding mechanisms. Records of clinical activity were used to statistically compare funding models. Workforce availability (supply of ophthalmologists), costs of services, clinical activity (surgery and clinic consultation rates) and waiting times. The supply of ophthalmologists (full-time equivalence) to all remote regions was below the national average (up to 19 times lower). Cataract surgery rates were also below national averages (up to 10 times lower). Fee-for-service funding significantly increased clinical activity. There were also trends to shorter waiting times and lower costs per attendance. For outreach ophthalmology services, the funding model used for clinician reimbursement may influence the efficiency and costs of the services. Fee-for-service funding models, safety-net funding options or differential funding/incentives need further exploration to ensure isolated disadvantaged areas prone to poor patient attendance are not neglected. In order for outreach eye health services to be sustainable, remuneration rates need to be comparable to those for urban practice. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  4. Attachment Styles of Dermatological Patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabó, Csanád; Altmayer, Anita; Lien, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Attachment styles of dermatological outpatients and satisfaction with their dermatologists were investigated within the framework of a multicentre study conducted in 13 European countries, organized by the European Society for Dermatology and Psychiatry. Attachment style was assessed with the Adult......, and experienced similar rates of anxiety in relationships as did the controls. Participants who had secure attachment styles reported stressful life events during the last 6 months significantly less often than those who had insecure attachment styles. Patients with secure attachment styles tended to be more...... satisfied with their dermatologist than did insecure patients. These results suggest that secure attachment of dermatological outpatients may be a protective factor in the management of stress....

  5. [Cardiology: is the smartphone era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandoli, Giulia Elena; D'Ascenzi, Flavio; Cameli, Matteo; Mondillo, Sergio

    2017-12-01

    The worldwide spread of smartphones has radically changed the habits of human life, allowing a 24/7 connection with other people. These changes have involved also Medicine with smartphones being able to simplify the clinical practice of physicians. The development of new external devices that can be connected to smartphones has further increased their use with mobile phones converted in portable electrocardiogram or echocardiogram machines. This extraordinary technological improvement seems to be partly in conflict with the classical tools available for the cardiologist, such as the "old" stethoscope that in 2016 had its 200th anniversary. This article focuses on the smartphone as a new tool available for the physicians, describing the most important potential uses and reporting an analysis of pros and cons of the smart-cardiology.

  6. Feedback of final year ophthalmology postgraduates about their residency ophthalmology training in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduate students on the subject of their residency training. A similar survey conducted 7 years ago published in IJO had concluded that the residency program was not up to expectations in many centers. Our study aimed to see if ophthalmology training and student perceptions differed since then. Materials and Methods: For our study, we added a few questions to the same questionnaire used in the article "which is the best method to learn ophthalmology? Resident doctors′ perspective of ophthalmology training" published in IJO, Vol. 56 (5. Results: Forty-nine students (62.02% returned completed forms. Most students desired an orientation program on entering residency, and wished to undergo diagnostic training initially. Case-presentation with demonstration and Wet-lab learning were most preferred. There was a big difference between the number of surgeries students actually performed and the number they felt would have been ideal. Conclusion: On the whole, the students still felt the need for improved training across all aspects of ophthalmology.

  7. Career Preferences and Perceptions of Cardiology Among US Internal Medicine Trainees: Factors Influencing Cardiology Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Rzeszut, Anne K; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Duvernoy, Claire S; Lewis, Sandra J; Walsh, Mary Norine; Gillam, Linda

    2018-05-30

    Few data exist on internal medicine trainees' selection of cardiology training, although this is important for meeting future cardiology workforce needs. To discover trainees' professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology, and their relationship to trainees' career choice. We surveyed trainees to discover their professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology and the influence of those perceptions and preferences on the trainees' career choices. Participants rated 38 professional development needs and 19 perceptions of cardiology. Data collection took place from February 2009, through January 2010. Data analysis was conducted from May 2017 to December 2017. Multivariable models were used to determine the association of demographics and survey responses with prospective career choice. A total of 4850 trainees were contacted, and 1123 trainees (of whom 625 [55.7%] were men) in 198 residency programs completed surveys (23.1% response; mean [SD] age, 29.4 [3.5] years). Principal component analysis of survey responses resulted in 8-factor and 6-factor models. Professional development preferences in descending order of significance were stable hours, family friendliness, female friendliness, the availability of positive role models, financial benefits, professional challenges, patient focus, and the opportunity to have a stimulating career. The top perceptions of cardiology in descending order of significance were adverse job conditions, interference with family life, and a lack of diversity. Women and future noncardiologists valued work-life balance more highly and had more negative perceptions of cardiology than men or future cardiologists, who emphasized the professional advantages available in cardiology. Professional development factors and cardiology perceptions were strongly associated with a decision to pursue or avoid a career in cardiology in both men and women. Alignment of cardiology culture with trainees' preferences

  8. Procedural aspects of the organization of the comprehensive European Board of Ophthalmology Diploma examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny G.P. Mathysen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive European Board of Ophthalmology Diploma (EBOD examination is one of 38 European medical specialty examinations. This review aims at disclosing the specific procedures and content of the EBOD examination. It is a descriptive study summarizing the present organization of the EBOD examination. It is the 3rd largest European postgraduate medical assessment after anaesthesiology and cardiology. The master language is English for the Part 1 written test (knowledge test with 52 modified type X multiple-choice questions (in the past the written test was also available in French and German. Ophthalmology training of minimum 4 years in a full or associated European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS member state is a prerequisite. Problem-solving skills are tested in the Part 2 oral assessment, which is a viva of 4 subjects conducted in English with support for native language whenever feasible. The comprehensive EBOD examination is one of the leading examinations organized by UEMS European Boards or Specialist Sections from the point of number of examinees, item banking, and item contents.

  9. Ophthalmology resident surgical competency: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binenbaum, Gil; Volpe, Nicholas J

    2006-07-01

    To describe the prevalence, management, and career outcomes of ophthalmology residents who struggle with surgical competency and to explore related educational issues. Fourteen-question written survey. Fifty-eight program directors at Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited, United States ophthalmology residency programs, representing a total of 2179 resident graduates, between 1991 and 2000. Study participants completed a mailed, anonymous survey whose format combined multiple choice and free comment questions. Number of surgically challenged residents, types of problems identified, types of remediation, final departmental decision at the end of residency, known career outcomes, and residency program use of microsurgical skills laboratories and applicant screening tests. One hundred ninety-nine residents (9% overall; 10% mean per program) were labeled as having trouble mastering surgical skills. All of the programs except 2 had encountered such residents. The most frequently cited problems were poor hand-eye coordination (24%) and poor intraoperative judgment (22%). Most programs were supportive and used educational rather than punitive measures, the most common being extra practice-laboratory time (32%), scheduling cases with the best teaching surgeon (23%), and counseling (21%). Nearly one third (31%) of residents were believed to have overcome their difficulties before graduation. Other residents were encouraged to pursue medical ophthalmology (22%) or to obtain further surgical training through a fellowship (21%) or a supervised practice setting (12%); these residents were granted a departmental statement of satisfactory completion of residency for Board eligibility. Twelve percent were asked to leave residency. Of reported career outcomes, 92% of residents were practicing ophthalmology, 65% as surgical and 27% as medical ophthalmologists. Ninety-eight percent of residency programs had microsurgical practice facilities, 64% had a formal

  10. Factors affecting academic leadership in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn J; Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-02-01

    Although prior studies have examined methods by which to recruit and retain academic dermatologists, few have examined factors that are important for developing academic leaders in dermatology. This study sought to examine characteristics of dermatology residency programs that affect the odds of producing department or division chairs/chiefs and program directors (PDs). Data regarding program size, faculty, grants, alumni residency program attended, lectures, and publications for all accredited US dermatology residency programs were collected. Of the 103 programs examined, 46% had graduated at least 1 chair/chief, and 53% had graduated at least 1 PD. Results emphasize that faculty guidance and research may represent modifiable factors by which a dermatology residency program can increase its graduation of academic leaders.

  11. Social Media Use in Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2016-01-01

    Social media is predicted to become increasingly important in dermatology because of its potential to serve as a platform for public health campaigns, aid in participant recruitment for clinical trials, increase public engagement in health care, and facilitate scientific discourse. No study of social media use in pediatric dermatology has been performed, so we analyzed the use of the seven leading social media platforms in pediatric dermatology, with a focus on patient advocacy groups, professional societies, research journals, and research institutions. We observed that 89% of patient advocacy groups, 100% of professional societies, 62.5% of research journals, and 0% of academic pediatric dermatology departments maintained one or more social media accounts. Our observations suggest that all stakeholder groups, and in particular members of the research community, have the potential to further their engagement, connections, and communications through social media. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  13. Regional Dermatology Training Centre in Moshi, Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    because, in many parts of the world, there ... Annual prizes are awarded for the student achieving the highest mark in the overall assessment ... 31 No. 7. Dermatology in Tanzania prize). A second training programme (MMed) provides 4-year.

  14. [The lymphocyte transformation test in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, K; Braun-Falco, O

    1976-03-01

    At first, immunologie and methodic basies of the lymphocyte transformation test are discussed. Then the results gained by this test in several dermatologic diseases are summarized. Finally, practice of the lymphocyte transformation test is critically reviewed.

  15. Measuring impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps section on training in US dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kristina M; Stratman, Erik J

    2013-07-01

    JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries are intended to aid in the interpretation of the literature to make it more practical and applicable to daily patient care. Practice Gaps commentaries have had an impact on physician clinical practice and dermatology residency curricula. To assess the impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries on dermatology residency training programs in the United States, including journal club discussions and local quality improvement activities. A web-based questionnaire of 17 questions was sent via e-mail to US dermatology residency program directors (PDs) in February 2012. Program director report of incorporating Practice Gaps themes and discussions into resident journal club activities, clinical practice, quality improvement activities, or research projects in the residency programs, as a result of a Practice Gaps commentary. Of the 114 surveys distributed to US dermatology residency PDs, 48 were completed (42% response rate). Sixty percent of PDs reported familiarity with the Practice Gaps section of JAMA Dermatology, and 56% discuss these commentaries during resident journal club activities. Quality improvement and research projects have been initiated as a result of Practice Gaps commentaries. Practice Gaps commentaries are discussed during most dermatology residency journal club activities. Practice Gaps have had an impact on physician practice and dermatology residency curricula and can serve as a tool for enhanced continuing medical education and quality improvement initiatives.

  16. Zoning and workstation analysis in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrange, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    As interventional cardiology can induce high doses not only for patients but also for the personnel, the delimitation of regulated areas (or zoning) and workstation analysis (dosimetry) are very important in terms of radioprotection. This paper briefly recalls methods and tools for the different steps to perform zoning and workstation analysis. It outlines the peculiarities of interventional cardiology, presents methods and tools adapted to interventional cardiology, and then discusses the same issues but for workstation analysis. It also outlines specific problems which can be met, and their possible adapted solutions

  17. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents...... treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance....

  18. Diagnostic significance of ultrasound in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanović Slobodan; Poljački Mirjana N.; Roš Tatjana

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Utilization of 20 MHz ultrasound probes provided application of ultrasound in dermatology - dermatosonography. As a diagnostic tool, ultrasound was first registered in the early fifties of the past century. Great progress of dermatosonography occurred in the mid-nineties with introduction of the first 20 MHz scanner. Methods of ultrasonography in dermatology Several methods of ultrasonography have been developed: method A, method B, scanning C method and Doppler ultrasound. They ...

  19. Florence (Italy Department of Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Campolmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 laser has been used extensively in dermatological surgery over the past 30 years and is now recognised as the gold standard for soft tissue vaporization. Considering that the continuous wave CO2 laser delivery system and the newer “superpulsed” and scanned CO2 systems have progressively changed our practice and patient satisfaction, a long range documentation can be useful. Our experience has demonstrated that the use of CO2 laser involves a reduced healing time, an infrequent need for anaesthesia, reduced thermal damage, less bleeding, less inflammation, the possibility of intra-operative histologic and/or cytologic examination, and easy access to anatomically difficult areas. Immediate side effects have been pain, erythema, edema, typically see with older methods, using higher power. The percentage of after-treatment keloids and hypertrophic scars observed was very low (~1% especially upon the usage of lower parameters. The recurrence of viral lesions (condylomas and warts have been not more frequent than those due to other techniques. Tumor recurrence is minor compared with radiotherapy or surgery. This method is a valid alternative to surgery and/or diathermocoagulation for microsurgery of soft tissues. Our results are at times not consistent with those published in the literature, stressing the concept that multicentric studies that harmonization methodology and the patient selection are vital.

  20. Dermatologic Diseases in Silk Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 112 workers of a silk facory near Bangalore, for dermatologic diseases revealed (1 a characteristic wearing off of the medial halves of the distal free edges of the finger nail plates in 10 of the 15 cocoonsorters, (2 maceration of the palms in 58 workers of the boiling and reeling section, and (3 pitted keratolysis of the palms, in 42 workers, also from the boiling and reeling section. There was no clinical evidence of contact dermatitis, and patch tests with the silk thread from the cocoons in 25 workers showed a very mild reaction in 2 workers and a doubtful reaction in another two. In addition, one worker from the skeining section had crisscross superficial fissures on the finger tips caused by friction, two workers had paronychia ′of the fingers and four workers had dermatophytFNx01t fingers webs. As in the previous survey, these workers also had a high incidence of ichthyosis (92 workers and hyperketatosis of the palms (62 workers and soles (110 workers.

  1. Smart phones and apps application in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Önder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones are a device that is more than just a phone and more than a personel digital assistant.Nowadays a phone is as a powerful handheld computer,camera,video recorder,media player,GPS receiver,MP3 player,radio and as well as a communication tool. Smartphones (mobile phones with advanced computing capability are rapidly gaining new use with the advent of dowloadable applications known as ‘Apps’. There are a lot of medical apps avaliable.Dermatology themed smartphone apps were provided as reference materials,illustrated databases of common skin conditions for accessing online versions of popular dermatology textbook and journals;dermatology based questionnairs; including disease severity scoring calculators and /or providing automated photo analysers for skin lesions / as an electronic dermoscopy. Most of the apps applications are free of charge and can be easily dowloaded to smartphones. Furthermore the possibility to send and save both text and images by this technology seems perfectly tailored to dermatology.Recently electronic teaching and learning via smartphones are becoming very popular for medical students aswell. However there is relatively little research on medical uses and potential roles of them in dermatology.This article summarizes the curent trends in the ‘smartphone market’ and takes a glance at some dermatology apps ‘which are currently available.

  2. Experiences with E-learning in Ophthalmology

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Dutt Bandhu; Swati Raje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: E-learning is the use of internet for the purpose of education. E-learning in medical education is at a nascent stage in our country. The present study was carried out with the purpose of introducing e-learning to third year medical students in the subject of Ophthalmology and taking feedback on their attitude towards the new methodology of teaching and evaluating. Materials and Methods: E-learning was introduced to the seventh semester students of MBBS in the subject of Ophthal...

  3. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Transradial access: lessons learned from cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Brian M; Sur, Samir; Shah, Sumedh Subodh; Marlow, Megan M; Cohen, Mauricio G; Peterson, Eric C

    2018-05-01

    Innovations in interventional cardiology historically predate those in neuro-intervention. As such, studying trends in interventional cardiology can be useful in exploring avenues to optimise neuro-interventional techniques. One such cardiology innovation has been the steady conversion of arterial puncture sites from transfemoral access (TFA) to transradial access (TRA), a paradigm shift supported by safety benefits for patients. While neuro-intervention has unique anatomical challenges, the access itself is identical. As such, examining the extensive cardiology literature on the radial approach has the potential to offer valuable lessons for the neuro-interventionalist audience who may be unfamiliar with this body of work. Therefore, we present here a report, particularly for neuro-interventionalists, regarding the best practices for TRA by reviewing the relevant cardiology literature. We focused our review on the data most relevant to our audience, namely that surrounding the access itself. By reviewing the cardiology literature on metrics such as safety profiles, cost and patient satisfaction differences between TFA and TRA, as well as examining the technical nuances of the procedure and post-procedural care, we hope to give physicians treating complex cerebrovascular disease a broader data-driven understanding of TRA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, H.

    1985-01-01

    During the last years, since short physical mean life radionuclides have started to be used, radionuclide scanning has been experienced with remarkable culmination. There are detector devices, which jointly with computation equipments, allow to obtain multiple images per second as properly rapid gammagraphic series, in order to obtain whole hemodynamic data or to generate functional images no representing an anatomical structure but reporting about cardiac dynamics at regional level. In these techniques, employed in Nuclear Cardiology, the following radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are used: radiolabeled albumin 99m Tc red blood cells, 113m In-transferrin, very short physical mean life radionuclides, such as 195m Au, 178 Ta, 191 Ir. In addition, 113 Xe for coronary flow measurements; radiolabeled microspheres and macroparticles for angiogammagraphy; 129 Cs, 43 K, 81 Rb, 82 Rb and 201 Ti, the most largerly used, for myocardial gammagraphy. It is pointed out that fatty acids are the newest, basically if are radioiodate, and some 99m Tc labeled long chain hydrocarbons. It is expressed that 99m Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate has been used for myocardial infarction. Working on the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, basically fatty acids and 99m Tc chelating agents, for the improvement of these techniques is carried out. (author)

  6. [Nuclear cardiology with new radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunko, H

    1994-08-01

    In the field of nuclear cardiology, 99mTc labeled myocardial perfusion agents such as MIBI, Tetrofosmin and Teboroxime, 111In-antimyosin for imaging of myocardial necrosis, 123I-betamethyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) for imaging of myocardial fatty acid metabolism and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for imaging of myocardial adrenergic function are introduced recently in Japan. Improved image quality and simultaneous evaluation of myocardial perfusion, function and wall motion can be obtained with use of 99mTc labeled myocardial perfusion agents. 111In-antimyosin enables specific imaging of myocardial necrosis which leads to the use for wide variety of heart diseases. Discrepancy of the myocardial perfusion and metabolism in case of stunned myocardium or cardiomyopathy can be evaluated by 123I-BMIPP in conjunction with perfusion agent. Recently wide variety of diseases which may have cardiac adrenergic abnormality are targeted for 123I-MIBG imaging. These new radiopharmaceuticals are expected to be powerful tool for evaluation of the pathophysiology including severity and prognosis and evaluation of the etiology of the various heart diseases.

  7. Dermatology on Reddit: elucidating trends in dermatologic communications on the world wide web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntinx-Krieg, Talayesa; Caravaglio, Joseph; Domozych, Renee; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-07-15

    Platforms of social media, including the website Reddit, have become increasingly popular sites for users to communicate medical information. A study investigating dermatology content on Reddit has not been performed in the current literature. The purpose of this study is to enumerate the dermatology subreddits, quantify subscribers, and characterize posts to estimate the presence of dermatology-related content on Reddit. A Reddit search of the fourteen most common skin diseases globally was performed. Additionally, the terms "dermatology", and "skin" were searched in order to identify more subreddits relevant to the field. Dermatology-related subreddits that had ≥1000 subscribers were evaluated for content and categorized for analysis. We identified 38 subreddits related to dermatology with subscriber numbers ranging from 52 to 209,973. For 17 of the 38 subreddits that were further analyzed, most posts fell under the category of "seeking health/cosmetic advice." Reddit serves as a communication stage for individuals to discuss, engage, and connect on dermatologic topics. Furthermore, the platform offers an opportunity for medical professionals to distribute evidence-based information concerning dermatologic conditions.

  8. Dermatology Medical Education: A Multicenter Survey Study of the Undergraduate Perspective of the Dermatology Clinical Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Parastoo; Millsop, Jillian W; Johnson, Mary Ann N; Takahashi, Stefani R; Peng, David H; Badger, Joanna; Bahr, Brooks A; Shinkai, Kanade; Li, Chin-Shang; Fazel, Nasim

    2017-12-15

    Limited data are available regarding the undergraduate dermatology clinical clerkship curriculum in the United States. Our primaryaim is to assess medical students' perspectives of the dermatology clinical clerkship. A multicenter survey study was conducted, which included four California dermatology academic programs. A 17-item questionnaire was designed to investigate medical student perception with regard tothe overall educational value of the various teaching aspects of the dermatology clinical clerkship. A total of 152 medical student surveys were completed. Over half of the medical students felt proficient in diagnosing the most commondermatologic conditions. Eighty-seven percent of medical students were very satisfied with the dermatology clerkship. Ninety-one percent of students felt the length of the clerkship was appropriate. The vast majority of medical students reported a high level of proficiency in the treatment and diagnosis of common skin disorders. In contrast, our findings suggest that medical students may not begaining sufficient hands-on experience in conducting certain dermatologic procedures following the dermatology clerkship. Overall, medical studentperception of the dermatology clinical clerkship was mostly positive.

  9. Dermatological face of Syrian civil war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime İnci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The frequency and variety of dermatological diseases significantly changed after 2011 in the regions where the Syrian refugees migrated because of the civil war in Syria where is bordered by our country. To reveal these changing, the demographic and dermatological data of the Syrian refugees were retrospectively examined in faculty of medicine, department of dermatology of our city where a significant amount of Syrian refugees have been living. Materials and Methods: A total of 326 refugees immigrated to our city and have been living in tent cities, and applied to our department between September 2012-July 2014 were included to our study. Age, gender, dermatological and laboratory findings were retrospectively examined. Skin diseases were examined in 16 groups according to the their frequency. The patients were divided into 4 age groups as 0-20, 21-40, 41-60 and, 61 and over; three most common diseases for each age group were analyzed. Results: Of 326 patients, 126 (38.7% were males, 200 (61.3% were females and the difference was significant in term of gender. The age range of the patients was 0 to 77 years, and the mean age was 21.6±10.5. The majority of patients were in 0-20 age group. Dermatological infectious diseases were the most frequent diseases group and cutaneous leishmaniasis was the most diagnosed dermatological disease among patients. Conclusion: Preventive health care services should be performed to prevent dermatological infectious diseases which are commonly seen in Syrian refugees, especially cutaneous leishmaniasis which is already endemic in our country, and limitations to reach physicians of these patients should be amended.

  10. Ophthalmologic identification of cerebral malaria in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrosa, Catarina Areias

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the clinical presentation of malarial retinopathy in an adult, emphasizing the importance of this diagnosis for the clinical suspicion and prognosis of cerebral malaria. Methods: A 39-year-old caucasian man presented with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, acidemia and acute renal failure, developing severe encephalopathy. The diagnosis of malaria was done and after systemic stabilization, the patient noticed a central scotoma in the left eye. Ophthalmological examination revealed retinal features of malarial retinopathy. Results: At one-month follow-up, the patient had improved his systemic condition and the left eye scotoma had disappeared. Visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes and on examination almost all lesions had regressed. Conclusion: Malarial retinopathy is a diagnostic factor and a prognosis indicator of severe infection, usually with brain involvement. The knowledge of the ophthalmological features associated with severe malaria, which is more frequent in children but can also occur in adults, becomes imperative in order to reduce the risk of neurologic sequelae and associated mortality.

  11. Robotic-assisted surgery in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Smet, Marc D; Naus, Gerrit J L; Faridpooya, Koorosh; Mura, Marco

    2018-05-01

    Provide an overview of the current landscape of robotics in ophthalmology, including the pros and cons of system designs, the clinical development path, and the likely future direction of the field. Robots designed for eye surgery should meet certain basic requirements. Three designs are currently being developed: smart surgical tools such as the steady hand, comanipulation devices and telemanipulators using either a fixed or virtual remote center of motion. Successful human intraocular surgery is being performed using the Preceyes surgical system. Another telemanipulation robot, the da Vinci Surgical System, has been used to perform a pterygium repair in humans and was successful in ex-vivo corneal surgery despite its nonophthalmic design. Apart from Preceyes' BV research platform, none of the currently eye-specific systems has reached a commercial stage. Systems are likely to evolve from robotic assistance during specific procedural steps to semiautonomous surgery, as smart sensors are introduced to enhance the basic functionalities of robotic systems. Robotics is still in its infancy in ophthalmology but is rapidly reaching a stage wherein it will be introduced into everyday ophthalmic practice. It will most likely be introduced first for demanding vitreo-retinal procedures, followed by anterior segment applications.

  12. Dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, A-M; Sinisalo, H; Eilertsen, G; Åhrén, E; Meyer, I

    2018-04-01

    The art of producing and acquiring dermatological wax models, moulages, flourished all over Europe in the beginning of the twentieth century, whereas very little is known about the existence of moulage collections in the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to elucidate the presence, the origin, the production place, the use and the condition of dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries. In each Nordic country, an extensive survey was undertaken during spring 2016. Dermatological departments, museums with medical collections, persons assumed to have specific information about wax moulages as well as secondary sources were contacted and interviewed. Several hitherto undescribed collections have survived in each country, most, however, damaged and in disrepair. One Danish and part of a Finnish collection have been restored. Only few moulages are exhibited and some have been photographed and digitalized. Denmark and Sweden have had a local moulage production. Responses to the survey indicate that the result covers all collections of dermatological moulages in the Nordic countries, though some moulages may remain in private collections unknown to the authors, or uncatalogued in museums. Moulages are medical gems from bygone days before modern technology facilitated new means of communication. Restoration and appropriate storing should be considered for at least selected items from the Nordic collections. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. Dermatology in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intensive care unit (ICU represents a special environment for patients. We analyzed patients in the ICU/ high care unit (HCU with respect to dermatology counselling and skin problems.Setting: Academic Teaching Hospital over a 10 month period.Methods: The total number of patients of the ICU was 1,208 with a mean stay of 4.1 days. In the HCU the mean stay was 16 days. Diagnosis leading to admission were analyzed. All files of dermatological counselling were evaluated in detail.Results: Fifty-five patients with dermatologic problems were identified: 19 women and 26 males. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years of life (mean ± standard deviation: 67.2 ± 17.4 years. The total number of consultations were 85. The range of repeated dermatological consultation ranged from two to ten. The major reasons were skin and soft tissue infections, adverse drug reactions, chronic wounds including pressure sores and skin irritation or dermatitis. Pre-existing skin conditions may complicate the treatment and care during ICU/HCU stay.Conclusion: A tight collaboration between of the medical staff of ICU/HCU and dermatology department will ensure a rapid diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions in the ICU, without increasing the costs significantly. Interdisciplinary education of nursing staff contributes to improved skin care in the ICU/HCU and helps to prevent acute skin failure.

  14. Nuclear cardiology for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of nuclear medicine in developing countries must be oriented to the local needs for clinical practice, the health care of large populations and the demands for research with sometimes extremely limited resources. To help define the locally differing needs, it is stressed that nuclear medicine provides the unique opportunity to observe the body at the molecular level of organization and thus makes the body biochemically transparent. Depending on the particular diagnostic demands, complex imaging with gamma scintigraphy or emission tomography may be the only method to choose in some instances, but for others it may be an unnecessary luxury. Nuclear cardiology, with the purpose of non-invasively assessing cardiac function, myocardial perfusion and myocardial metabolism, is a particular challenge in both respects for developing countries. Given such requirements, single-probe devices with multipurpose application are less expensive than gamma cameras and promise advanced diagnostic uses. In one examination, left ventricular function, global cardio-pulmonary circulation and the general circulatory adaptation to exercise can be investigated by non-gated simultaneous blood pool measurements over four lung regions, the heart and the liver. In addition, such devices have the advantages of compactness, robustness and electronic stability. Despite enormous difficulties regarding funding, infrastructure, equipment and maintenance, developing countries should be encouraged to participate in the evolution of nuclear medicine by responding and adapting to defined needs and perhaps by maintaining at least one national centre of excellence with capacities for research and training. Funds are best secured by providing an indispensable service in co-operation with the various clinical disciplines. (author)

  15. Dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, A M.; Sinisalo, H.; Eilertsen, G.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The art of producing and acquiring dermatological wax models, moulages, flourished all over Europe in the beginning of the twentieth century, whereas very little is known about the existence of moulage collections in the Nordic countries. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to elucidate...... the presence, the origin, the production place, the use and the condition of dermatological moulage collections in the Nordic countries. METHODS: In each Nordic country, an extensive survey was undertaken during spring 2016. Dermatological departments, museums with medical collections, persons assumed to have...... specific information about wax moulages as well as secondary sources were contacted and interviewed. RESULTS: Several hitherto undescribed collections have survived in each country, most however damaged and in disrepair. One Danish and part of a Finnish collection have been restored. Only few moulages...

  16. Serendipity and its role in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Coondoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents.

  17. Serendipity and its role in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents.

  18. Innovative uses for zinc in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yoon Soo; Hill, Nikki D; Bibi, Yuval; Dreiher, Jacob; Cohen, Arnon D

    2010-07-01

    Severe zinc deficiency states, such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, are associated with a variety of skin manifestations, such as perioral, acral, and perineal dermatitis. These syndromes can be reversed with systemic zinc repletion. In addition to skin pathologies that are clearly zinc-dependent, many dermatologic conditions (eg, dandruff, acne, and diaper rash) have been associated and treated with zinc. Success rates for treatment with zinc vary greatly depending on the disease, mode of administration, and precise zinc preparation used. With the exception of systemic zinc deficiency states, there is little evidence that convincingly demonstrates the efficacy of zinc as a reliable first-line treatment for most dermatologic conditions. However, zinc may be considered as an adjunctive treatment modality. Further research is needed to establish the indications for zinc treatment in dermatology, optimal mode of zinc delivery, and best type of zinc compound to be used. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Basic research in ophthalmology in Germany and its international context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlötzer-Schrehardt, U; Cursiefen, C

    2017-09-01

    Experimental basic research provides the foundations for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases and the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for ophthalmological diseases. The objective of this contribution is to provide an overview of the international interconnection of basic research in ophthalmology in Germany. The international context of ophthalmological research conducted in Germany is presented by means of personal experiences and data published by the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG), the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the European Union (EU). Due to the lack of organized databases this article lays no claim to completeness. Basic research in ophthalmology in Germany is mainly conducted in university eye departments and is mainly related to the etiology, pathophysiology and therapy development for various ophthalmic diseases. It is primarily funded by the DFG, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the EU plays an increasingly important role. Thus, ophthalmological research is integrated into numerous European research networks and beyond that into many international interconnections and relationships. In Germany, both clinical and basic research in ophthalmology is integrated into many international networks and is only functionally viable in an international context; however, given the increasing impact of ophthalmological research in Asian countries, future strategies require a continued focus on career development, research infrastructure, working environment and international cooperation.

  20. Nuclear cardiology in Cuba present and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peix González, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Heart Diseases represent the first cause of death worldwide (WHO, 2011); 80% of these deaths in developing countries (WHO, 2011); Coronary Heart Disease is responsible of 69% of all cardiovascular deaths. In Cuba, National programs have been developed to control the most important associated coronary risk factors; Research projects have been also carried out as part of the Ministry of Public Health’s program on non-transmissible chronic diseases; Strengthening of Nuclear Cardiology in Cuba, as well as its adequate integration in a diagnosis algorithm, focusing on improving the quality of medical care, in accordance with the principles of evidence-based medicine. Recommendations: Extend Nuclear Cardiology throughout the country; Conduct cost-effectiveness studies comparing different imaging techniques in cardiology; Develop coronary flow and metabolic studies with PET; Introducing studying adrenergic innervation; Develop hybrid imaging in cardiology; Set up committees of experts to analyze the value of different imaging techniques in cardiology in accordance with the possibilities and resources of Cuba, aimed at the implementation of a medicine individualized for patients. (author)

  1. Self-Inflicted Lesions in Dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas-Aragones, Lucía; Consoli, Silla M; Consoli, Sylvie G

    2017-01-01

    The classification of self-inflicted skin lesions proposed by the European Society for Dermatology and Psychiatry (ESDaP) group generated questions with regard to specific treatments that could be recommended for such cases. The therapeutic guidelines in the current paper integrate new psychother......The classification of self-inflicted skin lesions proposed by the European Society for Dermatology and Psychiatry (ESDaP) group generated questions with regard to specific treatments that could be recommended for such cases. The therapeutic guidelines in the current paper integrate new...

  2. Possibilities of modern photography in dermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galkina E.M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

     

     

    The purpose of the article was to research necessary conditions for creating high — quality images which allow to display all features of pathological process on skin more complete and authentically. That is also an integral part of modern dermatology. The usage of photographic documentation is necessary to improve students’ training, for doctor’s practical activities using the experience of the clinic, creating medical literature, and it is a unique and valuable contribution to diagnostics of dermatological diseases.

  3. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  4. Dermatologic care of the transgender patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Ginsberg, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Given the complexities of the transitioning process, transgender individuals may face unique dermatologic needs in addition to routine care. Exogenous hormones affect hair and sebum production, gender-confirming surgeries often require dermatologic pre- and postoperative interventions, and postoperative anatomy may show unique presentations of routine skin conditions. Aesthetic techniques that are often used for rejuvenation may have a role in facial feminization and masculinization and unfortunately are too frequently performed by nonmedical personnel with negative consequences. Ultimately, physicians should strive to make their office a more accommodating environment for transgender individuals.

  5. Low-level therapy in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankov, O. P.

    1999-07-01

    Extremely slow introduction of low-level laser therapy into the practice of ophthalmologists is restricted by the lack of good methodological recommendation and modern equipment adopted to the needs of ophthalmology. The most perspective is considered to be further improvement of the methods and the elaboration of the medical equipment, working in several wave bands, combined with magnetotherapy and working with the use of various modes of the modulation of the intensity of the luminous flux. It may be asserted that unlike the mode of continuous radiation, in some cases, the effectiveness of the treatment increases when the modulated light with the frequency of one to a few tens HZ is used. Moreover, the methods are being elaborated, when the modulation frequency of laser light and the biorhythms of man physiologic parameters are synchronized. Very perspective seems the computerization of the treatment process with the simultaneous electrophysiological control of the condition of visual functions.

  6. Application of OCT angiography in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ping Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTAis a new technology of angiography in recent years. In addition to the advantages of traditional OCT, it can observe blood flow in different retinal and choroidal segmentation slab. By using the pseudo-color, abnormal vascular structure can be distinguished from normal vascular structure of the retina. Dye injection is not needed with OCTA, which is different from fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAand indocyanine green angiography(ICGA. OCTA provides more and more accurate blood flow information. However, like other biometric technology, OCTA has its limitations and shortcomings. This review will analyze and summarize the operating principle of OCTA, its application in ophthalmology, as well as its advantages and limitations.

  7. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [What's new in dermatological treatments?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L

    2010-12-01

    demonstrating significant efficacy on the main criterion, but it did show a tendency to reduce the score used. This trial suffered from a weakness both in methodology and statistical power, thus precluding any conclusion. The rarity of therapeutic trials on drug eruptions warrants their mention. A French phase II study gives a glimpse of a trend toward efficacy in terms of survival in the treatment of toxic epidermal necrolysis with cyclosporine. As for infectious dermatosis and sexually transmitted infections, a French multicenter study has shown significantly higher efficacy with ivermectin than with malathion in treating pediculosis without increasing the side effects. Today, however, this systemic treatment cannot be a first-line treatment outside of certain specific situations. A large cohort study (somewhat unsatisfactory in its methodology) has not demonstrated the teratogenicity of antiherpes treatments in 830,000 infants. In prevention of HIV transmission, no microbicidal gel had shown efficacy to date. This has now been accomplished in South Africa with a 1% tenofovir gel. The results of a preliminary trial on therapeutic vaccination against HPV16 proposed to women who are carriers of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia opens the way for wide vaccine therapy of cutaneous virus-induced neoplasia. In conclusion, several articles analyzing the dermatology literature provide an opportunity to reflect on the quality of such articles, Boutron's being absolutely in-dis-pen-sa-ble! Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Experiences with E-learning in Ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Dutt Bandhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: E-learning is the use of internet for the purpose of education. E-learning in medical education is at a nascent stage in our country. The present study was carried out with the purpose of introducing e-learning to third year medical students in the subject of Ophthalmology and taking feedback on their attitude towards the new methodology of teaching and evaluating. Materials and Methods: E-learning was introduced to the seventh semester students of MBBS in the subject of Ophthalmology. The topics were converted to web friendly format and used for teaching and evaluating. Feedback was taken from the students on completion of the term on their attitudes towards e-learning and their views on the scope of e-learning in medical education. Results: All the students agreed on the usefulness of e-learning in medical education. Eleven students (27.5% found the medium of e-learning to be interesting, 15 (37.5% considered it to be easy and accessible, 10 (25% found it to be fast and easy, 4 (10% considered it to be a medium which can give updated information. Twenty-three (57.5% students considered that e-learning should be a medium of instruction in all the subjects, 15 (37.5% students considered its usefulness in clinical subjects only. Twenty-eight students (70% desired that e-learning should be used to provide important notes, questions, MCQs on all topics. Conclusions: E-learning is well accepted as a medium of instruction by medical students.

  10. International medical graduates and the cardiology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostis, John B; Ahmad, Busharat

    2004-09-15

    Recent publications have expressed the view that there is a shortage of cardiologists and it is growing worse. Both an increasing demand and a diminishing supply of cardiologists have been projected. An increase in the number of international medical graduates (IMGs) who enter cardiology practice has been proposed as a remedy for a projected shortage. The IMGs have to overcome challenges including clinical practice, language proficiency, and cultural differences before they are incorporated into the fabric of U.S. cardiology. With hard work, perseverance, excellence,compassionate care and support and mentoring, many have contributed to scientific and clinical cardiology in the U.S. Whether in the absence of a present crisis the projected shortage of cardiologists necessitates change in U.S. immigration policy is an open question.

  11. Hippocrates, cardiology, Confucius and the Yellow Emperor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T O

    2001-12-01

    Although Hippocrates (460-c.375 BC) has been traditionally recognized as the Father of Medicine, the fact that he was seminal in the development of cardiology is much less well known. Evidence is presented to support the notion that Hippocrates could also be considered the Father of Cardiology. Hippocrates also had many of the teachings and practices in common with Confucius (c.551-c.479 BC) and the Yellow Emperor of China (2695-2589 BC). Whereas Confucius was not a physician, the Yellow Emperor was an ancient Chinese physician whose Huang Di Neijing, the Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Medicine, is the oldest known treatise of medicine in existence.

  12. Evaluation of patient satisfaction in pediatric dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sarah; Miller, Jonathan; Burrows, James F; Bertha, Ben Khallouq; Rosen, Paul

    2017-11-01

    There remains a lack of investigation into which factors patients and families value the most in their experience at pediatric dermatology clinics. Most of the current literature on quality improvement in dermatology does not encompass the pediatric population. To determine the drivers that are most predictive of a positive patient experience, we observed the indirect relationship between several factors of the patient experience and their role in patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction surveys were distributed after their visits to patients at four pediatric dermatology clinics in one children's academic health system. Data were collected and organized into the top 30 survey variables with which patients expressed satisfaction on a 5-point Likert scale. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients (r) for each variable with regard to "likelihood of your recommending our practice to others" were calculated. A total of 516 families completed patient satisfaction surveys. Analyses of top box scores showed that the strongest predictors of patient satisfaction were the likelihood of recommending care provider (r = .77, P = dermatology. Identifying such variables that shape patients' assessments of their experience can guide future quality improvement plans in the specialty. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Instruments to assess stigmatization in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2017-11-03

    Stigmatization is the assignment of negative perceptions to an individual because of a perceived difference from the population at large. Skin conditions are frequently the reason of social rejection with a consequent negative influence on the personal and social life of patients. The aim of the current study was to review the available instruments that can be successfully utilized to measure the stigmatization level among dermatological patients. We performed our search on PubMed up to November 2016 and utilized combinations of key phrases containing such words as stigmatization, skin, dermatology, names of various skin conditions (psoriasis, vitiligo, acne, etc.), measurement. The search found a considerable number of articles - 548. After filtering them through a precise selection process, 58 articles remained. We concentrated only on the methodological aspects to assess stigmatization in various dermatoses. The review ascertained that there exist numerous instruments in the form of questionnaires. They were utilized in various researches in order to assess the stigmatization level in patients with skin problems. We divided them into two main groups: dermatology specific instruments (6 questionnaires) and dermatosis/disease specific ones (8 questionnaires). It is recommended to use dermatology-specific instruments to compare the stigmatization level in various skin conditions. They can be utilized as well as a first line tools to study the feeling of stigmatization in specific skin diseases; however, where it is possible, they should be supplemented with the disease-specific instrument for deeper analysis of both qualities of life and stigmatization.

  14. Self-inflicted lesions in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gieler, Uwe; Consoli, Sylvie G; Tomás-Aragones, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    The terminology, classification, diagnosis and treatment of self-inflicted dermatological lesions are subjects of open debate. The present study is the result of various meetings of a task force of dermatologists, psychiatrists and psychologists, all active in the field of psychodermatology, aimed...

  15. Etanercept An Overview of Dermatologic Adverse Events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluse, Lidian L. A.; Dowlatshahi, Emmilia A.; Limpens, C. E. Jacqueline M.; de Rie, Menno A.; Bos, Jan D.; Spuls, Phyllis I.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a comprehensive overview of dermatologic adverse events of etanercept described in the literature (including all study types, case reports, and surveys) and to present information on the occurrence, severity, treatment, and course of these adverse events. Data Sources: MEDLINE

  16. The incidence of skin cancer in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geer, van der S.; Siemerink, M.; Reijers, H.A.; Verhaegh, M.E.J.M.; Ostertag, J.U.; Neumann, H.A.M.; Krekels, G.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background It is known that the incidence of skin cancer is rising rapidly worldwide, but no reliable figures on multiple nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are available. Aim To determine the actual incidence of skin cancer in dermatology practice and to estimate how this relates to the first primary

  17. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  18. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  19. Acute coronary syndrome patients admitted to a cardiology vs non-cardiology service: variations in treatment & outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Deirdre E; Southern, Danielle A; Norris, Colleen M; O'Neill, Blair J; Curran, Helen J; Graham, Michelle M

    2017-05-16

    Specialized cardiology services have contributed to reduced mortality in acute coronary syndromes (ACS).  We sought to evaluate the outcomes of ACS patients admitted to non-cardiology services in Southern Alberta. Retrospective chart review performed on all troponin-positive patients in the Calgary Health Region identified those diagnosed with ACS by their attending team. Patients admitted to non-cardiology and cardiology services were compared, using linked data from the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease (APPROACH) registry and the Strategic Clinical Network for Cardiovascular Health and Stroke. From January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, 2105 ACS patients were identified, with 1636 (77.7%) admitted to cardiology and 469 (22.3%) to non-cardiology services. Patients admitted to non-cardiology services were older, had more comorbidities, and rarely received cardiology consultation (5.1%). Cardiac catheterization was underutilized (5.1% vs 86.4% in cardiology patients (p cardiology vs. cardiology services (49.1% vs. 11.0% respectively at 4-years, p cardiology services. These patients had worse outcomes, despite adjustment for baseline risk factor differences. Although many patients were appropriately admitted to non-cardiology services, the low use of investigations and secondary prevention medications may contribute to poorer patient outcome. Further research is required to identify process of care strategies to improve outcomes and lessen the burden of illness for patients and the health care system.

  20. The Reporting of Observational Research Studies in Dermatology Journals A Literature-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langan, Sinead; Schmitt, Jochen; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Svensson, Ake; von Elm, Erik; Williams, Hywel

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting in observational studies in dermatology. Data Sources: Five dermatology journals-the Archives of Dermatology, the British Journal of Dermatology, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and Acta

  1. The practice of paediatric cardiology in Nigeria: A Review | Chinawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The practice of Paediatric cardiology in Nigeria is at its early phase and it is being choked in an environment overwhelmed with economic, ethnic and political issues. Paediatric cardiology covers a broad area of medicine. This includes diagnosis, medical treatment, interventional cardiology, prenatal diagnosis ...

  2. Literature systematic review on the ophthalmological side effects of interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Interferons alpha and beta have been used worldwide for a few decades, altering the natural history of several severe diseases including hepatitis C, cancer and immune-mediated conditions such as multiple sclerosis. The adverse events profile of interferons is well established, but only isolated reports of ophthalmological complications of interferon therapy have been published. The objective of this study was to carry out a literature systematic review on the subject, bringing to light the need for careful ophthalmological monitoring of patients undergoing interferon treatment. Nearly 500 cases of ophthalmological complications related to interferon have been reported. The most frequent findings were soft exudates, hemorrhages and retina ischemia.

  3. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  4. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  5. Modernizing dermatology interest groups in medical school: Certificate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jordan V; Korta, Dorota Z; Keller, Matthew

    2017-11-15

    This commentary addresses the increasingly competitive nature of applying to dermatology residency programs and how both interest groups in medical schools and their dermatology departments can help to better prepare applicants. As previous literature argued that dermatology has been underemphasized in medical school curricula, we propose five fundamental options that interest groups can implement in order to offer increased exposure to our field in medical training. Furthermore, with therecent trend of many schools conferring certificates in various specialized concentrations, we also discuss interest groups pioneering certificate-grantingprograms in dermatology competency. The pros and cons of having a recognized certificate program in dermatology are presented.

  6. Nuclear cardiology in Iran in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: few nuclear cardiology surveys, were published in the literature, mostly from developed countries. the aim of this study is to perform a nuclear cardiology survey in iran. This may lead to better decision making and programming. Methods and materials: a questionnaire was sent by mail or e- mail to all nuclear medicine centers in iran asking for details of nuclear cardiology practice in year 2002. Also ownership of the center were studied using telephone interviews. Results: from 79 nuclear medicine centers in Iran, 55 centers (69.6%) filled the questionnaire including 28 centers in Tehran and 27 centers in other cities. Among them, 27 centers were private clinics. There was 69 gamma cameras in these centers, 62.3 % with SPECT capabilities. it is estimated that we may have 100 gamma cameras in Iran. About 85.5 % of centers perform cardiac studies routinely. Tc-99m-MIBI is used in more than 85.7% of the studies and some centers do not use Tl-201. Pharmacological stress with infusion of Dipyridamole is used in 56.7% of the studies and treadmill is the main type of physical exercise (40.2%). SPECT technique was used in 93% of studies including 2.5% of gated SPECT. About 64.3% of centers used two day protocol for imaging.Our study showed that about 65594 cardiac studies were done in Iran each year with myocardial perfusion scan accounting for about 99.2% of the studies. Considering population of the country(about 65 millions) nuclear cardiology activity will be about 1.01 study/1000/year. For viability assessment, Tl-201 with rest redistribution technique is used in 10.7 % of cases while re-injection is used in 29.8% of cases and TNG augmented Tc-99m-MIBI injection at rest in 59.5%. Discussion: Activity of nuclear cardiology is about 15 studies/1000 population/year is USA and 2.2 studies/1000/year in Europe. Although it is not uniformly practiced in different countries of Europe, however the numbers indicate that nuclear cardiology is under utilized in Iran ( less

  7. The 2017 Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology & Cardiac Surgery: week in review - ambulatory pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani

    2017-12-01

    The Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology was held in Barcelona in July, 2017. The central philosophy of the congress was "bridging together" all major specialties in the field. This article summarises the highlights of the meeting as it relates to ambulatory paediatric cardiology. There is a now a more unified approach to children with CHD, including assessment of neuro-developmental outcomes. The new World Heart Foundation criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever remain controversial.

  8. An invention of thermo-responsive polymer surface, yielding cell sheet based regenerative therapies in cardiology and ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Invention: In vitro cell culture methodologies provide a conducive environment for the cells taken out of their native environment to grow and proliferate in a non-physiological environment, the culture dish. Research experiments have been focusing on various criteria for assessing how far it is possible to recapitulate the native extra-cellular environment in vitro. Scaffolds, culture media, growth factors and cell surface modified culture dishes are some of the components that provide a conducive environment for in vitro cell culture. Cells that are grown in culture dishes using conventional methodologies are usually detached using enzymatic treatment with Trypsin, Collagenase etc [1], to be transplanted when it comes to a clinical or experimental application. Such enzymes used in separating the cells may have some damaging effects to the cell membranes which might impair the cell function [1]. However, cells if can be grown as a monolayer and be harvested as a contiguous cell sheet, it is considered suitable for transplantation in certain specific applications. In addition to that, if enzymatic digestion which has some detrimental effects on the detached cells could be avoided, that is an added advantage. The work by Prof. Okano and team from the Tokyo Women's Medical University, Japan, on thermo-responsive polymer surfaces has yielded a solution which has both the advantages viz., detachability of cells grown as a monolayer in the form of a cell sheet, that too without the use of enzymes. Their research into biomaterials for more than two decades has yielded a thermo-responsive polymer, the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm [1] coated culture dish for cell sheet engineering. In their technology, PIPAAm is polymerized and grafted to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS dishes. Cells have been found to grow confluent on PIPAAm-TCPS at 37 °C. Once confluent as a monolayer, by merely reducing the temperature of the PIPAAm-TCPS to 20 °C, it can be easily detached as a single contiguous cell sheet. The alteration of the surface from a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic state with the lowering of the temperature from 37 °C to 20 °C enables this easy separation which is the unique feature of this technology [2]. Different kinds of cells have been shown to adhere to, spread over the PIPAAm gel modified TCPS (PIPAAm-TCPS and grow as cell sheets without any change in their respective phenotypes [2]. Inter-Disciplinary-Interaction: I, based on the Invention: Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death in the world. In 2010, 29.6% of all deaths worldwide were caused by cardiovascular diseases [3]. Conventional medical strategies for the treatment of heart failure resulting from myocardial infarction do not attempt to correct the underlying cause (i.e. loss of viable myocardial tissue, thereby raising the need for strategies aimed at myocardial regeneration and repair. At the other end of the spectrum, cardiac transplantation provides radical therapy, however, the donor organ shortage and strict eligibility criteria, mandate alternative treatments when a substantial portion of the myocardium has been destroyed. In this context, cellular cardiomyoplasty using cells and stem cells have been emerging as a possible means of regenerating damaged myocardium by preventing myocardial necrosis and promoting angiogenesis and myogenesis. Different kinds of cells and stem cells have been employed for treating heart failure. For instance, a team led by Prof. Cherian has employed granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF induced peripheral blood derived CD34+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs or iliac crest bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs in treating 104 patients suffering from ischemic/dilated cardiomyopathy (autologus EPCs: 19 patients including allogenic paternal EPCs for one patient, autologus MNCs: 90 patients at Frontier Lifeline Hospital in Chennai, India. A clinical trial was registered (CTRI/2009/091/000590 after standardizing the procedures for collection of autologous bone marrow cells in January 2010. Out of the 104 patients, 68 patients met the inclusion criteria for the trial follow up. Of the total, 45 patients could not be followed up in spite of the team’s best efforts to trace them. Only 23 patients (34% were available for follow up. Amongst those, 19 patients (82.6% were alive at the end of the first year and 10 out of the 19 patients (52.6% had at least a 5% increase in the Ejection Fraction post therapy and had significant improvement in the functional status. The procedure was safe in all the other patients which were similar to the results of other studies reported so far. Though the results of this clinical trial infer that stem cells are not an alternative to heart transplantation they offer a 'dynamic cellular support' for regenerating functional and viable myocardium. As a step further in identifying definitive cell based therapy approaches to treat heart failure, cell sheet therapy was advocated by Prof. Sawa’s team. In Prof. Sawa’s Institute, longitudinal research team was launched in the late 1990s to develop new treatments for advanced cardiac disease by an array of basic experimental studies of surgical and regenerative approaches. As a result, placement of autologous or allogeneic stem/progenitor cell-sheets over the cardiac surface via surgical approach was proven to be the most safe and efficacious treatment for advanced cardiac failure. To grow the skeletal myoblasts as a sheet for clinical transplantation, Prof. Sawa’s team employed the thermo-responsive polymer dish developed by Prof. Okano’s team which enabled the in vitro growth of the skeletal myoblasts as patches and their easy separation for application over the ischemic/infarcted area of the heart after thorough validation in animal experiments [4]. A clinical study was, therefore, launched in 2006, wherein autologous skeletal myoblast cell-sheets were directly placed on the cardiac surface under general anaesthesia [5] for more than 30 patients with an ejection fraction below 35%. In this study, the cell-sheets were successfully placed without any procedure-related mortalities or morbidities, demonstrating the feasibility and safety of this treatment and importantly, majority of the patients have shown recovery of cardiac function and physical symptoms to date, indicating that this single treatment yields sustained functional recovery in patients having advanced cardiac failure [5]. This autologous skeletal myoblast sheet therapy to treat heart failure was conditionally approved as a cellular product in Japan on 2nd September 2015 [6]. Inter-Disciplinary-Interaction: II, based on the Invention: While cardiac diseases are the leading cause of death throughout the world, it is disheartening to note that there are 180 million people in the world with severe visual disability [7]. Corneal diseases follow cataract in being the second leading cause of blindness in these people [7]. The cornea is a five layered structure consisting of the Epithelial layer, Bowman’s membrane, Stroma, Descemet’s membrane and the Endothelium. Standalone corneal epithelial damage along with total damage of all the five layers of the cornea are considered to be contributing to 50% of the corneal blindness, as one half of the corneal transplantation indications to treat corneal blindness has been attributed to standalone corneal endothelial diseases [8]. In the case of corneal epithelium, limbus is the portion that harbours stem cells which repair the corneal epithelium. Cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET is used for the management of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD [9]. While biological scaffolds like human amniotic membrane have been used to culture and transplant the limbal stem cells, synthetic scaffolds like the thermo-reversible gelation polymer (TGP offers potential advantages over biological scaffolds [10]. The TGP based limbal stem cell transplantation has been demonstrated successfully in animal model of limbal stem cell deficiency [10]. While the above is suitable for unilateral LSCD, in the case of bilateral total LSCD, corneal stem cell allograft transplantation [9] or cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET are the treatments of choice available at the moment. In the COMET procedure, autologous oral mucosa is cultured and transplanted to the affected corneas. There are no risks of immune-mediated rejection and in the absence of autoimmune disease, immunosuppression is not required. While the epithelial sheets from the autologous mucosa are cultured, use of thermo-responsive culture dishes have enabled a carrier-free epithelial cell sheet transplantation as the cell sheets after in vitro culture can be detached by merely lowering the temperature of the thermo-responsive culture dishes [11]. These oral mucosal epithelial sheets have been transplanted in patients with corneal epithelial diseases with positive outcome [11]. Perspectives: The thermo-responsive polymer dish based technological capability of being able to grow cells as a sheet which can be transplanted without any carrier onto the surface of an organ or a tissue that requires a support for regeneration has enabled two novel clinical applications: Myocardial regeneration using skeletal myoblast patches which has become an approved cellular therapy [6]. A solution to bilateral corneal limbal stem cell deficiency by transplantation of autologous oral mucosal epithelial sheet [11]. In both the applications, transplantation of cells as a monolayer-sheet instead of dispersed cells has been proven to be advantageous. In cornea the entire surface can be uniformly covered if a cell sheet is used rather than transplantation of clumps of cells logically and the mechanism of the regeneration has been shown to be the replacement of the damaged corneal epithelial cells with the transplanted cells [12]. In case of myocardial regeneration over an area of ischemic or infarcted myocardium, transplantation of a cell sheet not only anatomically covers the surface area of the affected portion but on the other hand, transplantation of dispersed cells alone even when accomplished, retaining them to a certain period until the regeneration of the diseased myocardium may require an additional scaffold to support those cells in place. Such retention scaffolds for dispersed cells become absolutely redundant with this cell-sheet development. Conclusion: Cell sheet engineering technology, developed by a biomaterial scientist has led to successful clinical applications in treating patients with end stage heart-failure and blindness due to corneal epithelial damage as reported by a number of institutes. Their further propagation, after necessary validations, has a potential of providing a solution to multitude of patients suffering from such illnesses. Inter-disciplinary interactions within and across various domains of science as reported here are essential to bring novel solutions in regenerative medicine which is the result of a teamwork among physicians, clinical scientists, cell biologists, biomaterial experts, chemists and physicists. References Yamada, N., Okano, T., Sakai, H., Karikusa, F., Sawasaki, Y. and Sakurai, Y.Thermo-responsive polymeric surfaces; control of attachment and detachment of cultured cells. Makromol. Chem. Rapid Commun. 1990; 11: 571–576. Tang Z, Akiyama Y, Okano T. Temperature-Responsive Polymer Modified Surface for Cell Sheet Engineering. Polymers 2012, 4, 1478-1498. Nichols M, Townsend N, Scarborough P, Rayner M. Cardiovascular disease in Europe 2014: epidemiological update. Eur Heart J. 2014;35(42:2929. Hata H, Matsumiya G, Miyagawa S, Kondoh H, Kawaguchi N, Matsuura N, Shimizu T, Okano T, Matsuda H, Sawa Y. Grafted skeletal myoblast sheets attenuate myocardial remodeling in pacing-induced canine heart failure model. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2006;132(4:918-24. Sawa Y, Yoshikawa Y, Toda K, Fukushima S, Yamazaki K, Ono M, Sakata Y, Hagiwara N, Kinugawa K, Miyagawa S. Safety and Efficacy of Autologous Skeletal Myoblast Sheets (TCD-51073 for the Treatment of Severe Chronic Heart Failure Due to Ischemic Heart Disease. Circ J. 2015;79(5:991-9. Press Release. Terumo's Autologous Skeletal Myoblast Sheets Are the First to Be Approved as a Cellular or Tissue-based Products in Japan by a Council of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. http://www.terumo.com/about/pressrelease/2015/20150902.html Whitcher JP, Srinivasan M, Upadhyay MP. Corneal blindness: a global perspective. Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(3:214-21. Epub 2003 Jul 7. Terry MA. Deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK: pursuing the ideal goals of endothelial replacement. Eye (Lond. 2003 Nov;17(8:982-8. Ramírez BE, Sánchez A, Herreras JM, Fernández I, García-Sancho J, Nieto-Miguel T, Calonge M. Stem Cell Therapy for Corneal Epithelium Regeneration following Good Manufacturing and Clinical Procedures. Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:408495. Sitalakshmi G, Sudha B, Madhavan HN, Vinay S, Krishnakumar S, Mori Y, Yoshioka H, Abraham S. Ex vivo cultivation of corneal limbal epithelial cells in a thermoreversible polymer (Mebiol Gel and their transplantation in rabbits: an animal model. Tissue Eng Part A. 2009;15(2:407-15. Nishida K, Yamato M, Hayashida Y, Watanabe K, Yamamoto K, Adachi E, Nagai S, Kikuchi A, Maeda N, Watanabe H, Okano T, Tano Y. Corneal reconstruction with tissue-engineered cell sheets composed of autologous oral mucosal epithelium. N Engl J Med. 2004;351(12:1187-96. Burman S, Sangwan V. Cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation for ocular surface reconstruction. Clin Ophthalmol. 2008;2(3:489-502. About IIDIAS: The Inventions- Inter-Disciplinary Interactions and Solutions (IIDIAS is an academic session, which is conducted as a part of the one-day International stem cell meet ‘NCRM NICHE’ organized every year in October by the Nichi-In Centre for Regenerative Medicine (NCRM,an Indo-Japan academic Institute based in Chennai, India. In the IIDIAS session, inter-disciplinary interactive research work that are based on the inventions/discoveries in regenerative medicine are presented by relevant experts followed by an interactive session in which the futuristic directions of the accomplishments are discussed. The IIDIAS session 2015 was based on an invention of thermo-responsive polymer cell culture surfaces that has led to successful cell sheet therapy to treat cardiac and corneal diseases.

  9. Growth of mobile applications in dermatology - 2017 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaten, Hania K; St Claire, Chelsea; Schlager, Emma; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2018-02-15

    More than 80% of households in the US have a smartphone. Growth of mobile applications (apps) has grown in parallel with access to smartphones. Mobile health apps are used in medical fields, including dermatology. These apps allow patients to access information regarding dermatology conditions as well as access physicians via teledermatology. To analyze changes in number of dermatology mobile apps since 2014 and discuss benefits and drawbacks of mobile application growth to dermatology. Apple, Android, and Windows were queried for dermatology-related apps. The apps were categorized by purpose and compared to previously published data to assess growth and change in dermatology apps. A total of 526 dermatology mobile apps were found corresponding to an 80.8% growth in dermatology apps since 2014. The market share of teledermatology increased from 11.0% in 2014 to 20.1% in 2017. Dermatology apps continue to grow at a comparable pace to general app growth. Teledermatology apps experienced significant growth from 2014 to 2017. This growth has allowed time-efficient and cost-effective access to dermatologists, especially in rural areas. The growth of dermatology apps targeting patients allows for patient autonomy but also can result in access to inaccurate information regarding dermatology conditions.

  10. Refining dermatology journal impact factors using PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellavalle, Robert P; Schilling, Lisa M; Rodriguez, Marko A; Van de Sompel, Herbert; Bollen, Johan

    2007-07-01

    Thomson Institute for Scientific Information's journal impact factor, the most common measure of journal status, is based on crude citation counts that do not account for the quality of the journals where the citations originate. This study examines how accounting for citation origin affects the impact factor ranking of dermatology journals. The 2003 impact factors of dermatology journals were adjusted by a weighted PageRank algorithm that assigned greater weight to citations originating in more frequently cited journals. Adjusting for citation origin moved the rank of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology higher than that of the Archives of Dermatology (third to second) but did not affect the ranking of the highest impact dermatology journal, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The dermatology journals most positively affected by adjusting for citation origin were Contact Dermatitis (moving from 22nd to 7th in rankings) and Burns (21st to 10th). Dermatology journals most negatively affected were Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery (5th to 14th), the Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery (19th to 27th), and the Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings (26th to 34th). Current measures of dermatology journal status do not incorporate survey data from dermatologists regarding which journals dermatologists esteem most. Adjusting for citation origin provides a more refined measure of journal status and changes relative dermatology journal rankings.

  11. [Hypercoagulable workup in ophthalmology. When and what].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Negrete, F J; Casas-Lleras, P; Pérez-López, M; Rebolleda, G

    2009-07-01

    Most ophthalmologic disorders secondary to hypercoagulabe state are due to the confluence of congenital and adquired factors. A systematic workup is mandatory. Most of congenital coagulation disorders cause venous trombosis and are inherited autosomal dominantly. In order of frequency these are factor V Leiden mutation (activated protein C resistance), G20210A mutation of the prothrombin gen and protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III deficiencies. Sickle cell anemia can determine arerial and venous thrombosis. In relation with arterial occlusion, the markers most frequently involved are homcysteine fasting levels and the markers of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Both of them can also determine venous thrombosis. Several acquired factors can lead to hypoercoagulable state, especially hyperhomocysteinemia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hepatic disease, alcohol and tobacco intake, oral contraceptives, immobilization, surgeries and malignancies. In central venous occlusion is only necessary to rule out hyperhomocysteinemia and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in young patients without known risk factors. In central artery occlusion, hypercoagulable workup is only recommended for patients less than 50 years-old with unknown emboli source. In this cases protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III deficiencies, homocystein, sickle cell disease and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome will ruled out. In non arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy hypercoagulable work up is not necessary. In amaurosis fugax without known emboli source, it is recommended to rule out etiologies of arterial occlusion, especially antithrombin III deficiencies, homocystein, sickle cell disease and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

  12. Danish Ophthalmology - from start to 1865.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, Mogens

    2016-03-01

    This short paper mentioned the medical treatment using the 'holy' springs, the first 'eye doctor' in Denmark, the first picture of spectacles which was found in Viborg Cathedral of the high priest before he performs circumcisio praeputii on Jesus Christ, further cataract reclination in Denmark from around year zero and cataract extraction in 1667 in Denmark on a goose by Francisco Borri and on humans by the Danish Georg Heuermann in 1755. Epidemic military eye diseases in 1807, 1856 and 1865 are also described in this study. From 1856, a new ophthalmological period started in Denmark with the first eye hospital (lazaret only for eye diseases), and in 1864, patients with eye diseases were transported from the few beds in the surgical departments in the municipal hospital to the first civil eye department in Denmark, the eye hospital Sct. Annae in Copenhagen. The new scientific period started with Jacob Christian Bentz (ophthalmia granulosa, joint editor of the Danish Medical Journal) and Heinrich Lehmann. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Lasers in ophthalmology: achievements and new directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstocea, Benone D.; Apostol, Silvia; Gafencu, Otilia L.

    1995-03-01

    The main characteristics of the laser radiations are: directivity, monochromaticity and spatially and temporally coherence. Using the aggregation state as a criterion for classification, we describe solid, liquid and gaseous active media. Concerning the methods used to realize the population inversion, we also describe: optically, electrically and high energy particles pumped lasers. Depending on the laser media and the mode of excitation, a laser may operate in multiple ways: the continuous-wave operation, the long-pulsed operation, the Q-switched mode of operation and the mode-locked operation. The interaction of laser radiations with the living matter is based upon four main effects: the thermal, mechanical, electrical and biological effect. The main field of therapeutical use of lasers are: the management of lid tumors and intraocular tumors, dacryocystorhinostomy, the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, thromboembolic retinal syndromes, inflammatory choriretinal disease, chorioroetinal degenerations, retinal angimatosis, retinal breaks and retinal detachment, corneal diseases, glaucoma, lens diseases. Laser has also nontherapeutical applications in diagnosis and prognosis of ophthalmologic diseases.

  14. The frequency of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology and cosmetic dermatology clinics: a study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogruk Kacar, S; Ozuguz, P; Bagcioglu, E; Coskun, K S; Uzel Tas, H; Polat, S; Karaca, S

    2014-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing and impairing preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in appearance. There are few reports on the prevalence of BDD in the Turkish population. To investigate the frequency of BDD in dermatology settings, and to compare the results from cosmetic dermatology with those from general dermatology settings. This cross-sectional study recruited 400 patients from cosmetic dermatology (CD) (n = 200) and general dermatology (GD) clinics (n = 200). A mini-survey was used to collect demographic and clinical characteristics, and the dermatology version of a brief self-report BDD screening questionnaire was administered. A five-point Likert scale was used for objective scoring of the stated concern, which was performed by dermatologists, and patients who scored ≥ 3 were excluded from the study. In total, 318 patients (151 in the CD group and 167 in the GD group) completed the study, and of these, 20 were diagnosed with BDD. The CD group had a higher rate of BDD (8.6%) than the GD group (4.2%) but this was not significant (P = 0.082). The major concern focused on body and weight (40.0%), followed by acne (25.0%). The number of cosmetic procedures in dermatology practices is increasing Therefore, it is becoming more important to recognize patients with BDD. Although the rates of BDD found in the present study are in agreement with the literature data, population-based differences still exist between this study and previous studies. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Skin manifestations in sulfur mustard exposed victims with ophthalmologic complications: Association between early and late phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Hejazi, MD

    dermatologic complications decades later in patients with severe ophthalmologic complications from sulfur mustard exposure. Keywords: Skin manifestations, Ophthalmologic complications, Sulfur mustard

  16. COMPUTER LEARNING SIMULATOR WITH VIRTUAL REALITY FOR OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria V. Gribova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A toolset of a medical computer learning simulator for ophthalmology with virtual reality and its implementation are considered in the paper. The simulator is oriented for professional skills training for students of medical universities. 

  17. Dermatology and HIV/AIDS in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS have greatly complicated dermatologic disease and the required care in most regions of Africa. Opportunistic infections, ectoparasites, Kaposi sarcoma, and skin manifestations of systemic infections are exceedingly common in patients with HIV/AIDS. Dermatologists have contributed significantly to our knowledge base about HIV/AIDS and have played an important educational role regarding the clinical manifestations historically. Because of the increased burden of skin disease in Africa due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic we must redouble our efforts to provide dermatology education to care providers in Africa. We review the burden of skin disease in Africa, how it relates to HIV/AIDS and global infectious disease, current educational strategies in Africa to address this need, and suggest potential solutions to move these efforts forward.

  18. 308nm Excimer Laser in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehraban, Shadi

    2014-01-01

    308nm xenon-chloride excimer laser, a novel mode of phototherapy, is an ultraviolet B radiation system consisting of a noble gas and halide. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the literature and summarize all the experiments, clinical trials and case reports on 308-nm excimer laser in dermatological disorders. 308-nm excimer laser has currently a verified efficacy in treating skin conditions such as vitiligo, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, alopecia areata, allergic rhinitis, folliculitis, granuloma annulare, lichen planus, mycosis fungoides, palmoplantar pustulosis, pityriasis alba, CD30+ lympho proliferative disorder, leukoderma, prurigo nodularis, localized scleroderma and genital lichen sclerosus. Although the 308-nm excimer laser appears to act as a promising treatment modality in dermatology, further large-scale studies should be undertaken in order to fully affirm its safety profile considering the potential risk, however minimal, of malignancy, it may impose. PMID:25606333

  19. Dermatological treatment during pregnancy and lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilianna Kulczycka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Since wellbeing and health have become fashionable and widespread polypragmasia is popular, adverse drug reactions are a particularly important medical problem. Pregnant women as well as breast-feeding mothers need very particular care from the physician. Treatment during pregnancy or lactation is a more complicated issue not only because it concerns at least two persons, but also because of the many anatomical and functional differences between the adult and fetus or newborn organism. The safety aspects of dermatological treatment during pregnancy and lactation are presented. Both topical and systemic treatment, mainly for bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic dermatoses and acne, alopecia, psoriasis, and autoimmunological processes, are discussed. Moreover, the most recent methods of dermatological treatment are mentioned taking into consideration their safety during pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, the traditional drug classification made by the United States Food and Drug Administration as well as the most modern division, which is under construction, are presented.

  20. HIV testing in dermatology - a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Gavin A; Holme, S A

    2018-05-01

    Forty percent of individuals have late-stage HIV at the time of diagnosis, resulting in increased morbidity. Identifying key diseases which may indicate HIV infection can prompt clinicians to trigger testing, which may result in more timely diagnosis. The British HIV Association has published guidelines on such indicator diseases in dermatology. We audited the practice of HIV testing in UK dermatologists and General Practitioners (GPs) and compared results with the national guidelines. This audit showed that HIV testing in key indicator diseases remains below the standard set out by the national guidelines, and that GPs with special interest in dermatology have a lower likelihood for testing, and lower confidence when compared to consultants, registrars and associate specialists. Large proportions of respondents believed further training in HIV testing would be beneficial.

  1. Electronic medical records in dermatology: Practical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliyadan Feroze

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic medical records (EMRs can be of great use in dermatological data recording. Unfortunately, not many studies have been carried out in this specific area. Aims: We attempt to evaluate the use of an EMR system in dermatology, comparing it with a conventional paper-based system. Methods: Two hundred patient records of patients attending the dermatology outpatient department were studied over a 3-month period. Half the reports were entered in the conventional paper-based format while the other half was entered in an EMR system. The time taken for each consultation was recorded and the same was carried out for the first subsequent follow-up visit. Results: The average time taken for the completion of the EMR-based consultation for new cases was 19.15 min (range, 10-30 min; standard deviation, 6.47. The paper-based consultation had an average time of 15.70 min (range, 5-25 min; standard deviation, 6.78. The P-value (T-test was used was 0.002, which was significant. The average time taken for consultations and entering progress notes in the follow-up cases was slightly less than 10 min (9.7 for EMR while it was slightly more than 10 min (10.3 for the paper format. The difference was not statistically significant. The doctors involved also mentioned what they felt were the advantages and disadvantages of the system along with suggestions for improvement. Conclusion: The use of an EMR system in dermatology (or for that matter in any specialty may overawe most users at the beginning, but once a comfort level is established, EMR is likely to outscore conventional paper recording systems. More time-motion-case studies are required to ascertain the optimal usage of EMR systems.

  2. Clinical trials in Brazilian journals of ophthalmology: where we are.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti; Leal, Franz Schubert; Gonçalves, Fauze Abdulmassih; Amorim, Fernando Henrique Ramos; Felix, João Paulo Fernandes; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite

    2013-01-01

    To compare clinical trials published in Brazilian journals of ophthalmology and in foreign journals of ophthalmology with respect to the number of citations and the quality of reporting [by applying the Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement writing standards]. The sample of this systematic review comprised the two Brazilian journals of ophthalmology indexed at Science Citation Index Expanded and six of the foreign journals of ophthalmology with highest Impact Factor® according ISI. All clinical trials (CTs) published from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Brazilians journals and a 1:1 randomized sample of the foreign journals were included. The primary outcome was the number of citations through the end of 2011. Subgroup analysis included language. The secondary outcome included likelihood of citation (cited at least once versus no citation), and presence or absence of CONSORT statement indicators. The citation counts were statistically significantly higher (Pjournals of ophthalmology still are low when compared with the foreign journals of ophthalmology with highest Impact Factor®.

  3. [Trauma and psychological distress in dermatological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, M; Schröter, S; Friederich, H-C; Tagay, S

    2015-12-01

    Although seldom diagnosed, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has a high prevalence in primary and tertiary care. In a consecutive cross-sectional study, the prevalence of traumatic experiences and the severity of post-traumatic symptoms as well as specific characteristics of traumatized patients in the context of the dermatological treatment were examined. Standardized questionnaires for assessing general psychopathology (Brief Symptom Inventory, BSI), coping with dermatological diseases (Adjustment to Chronic Skin Diseases Questionnaire, MHF) and diagnosis of trauma (Essen Trauma-Inventory, ETI) were used in 221 patients with different skin diseases. In total, 85.1 % of the patients reported at least one potentially traumatic event in their lives, whereby psychometrically in 8.6 % of the cases the diagnostic criteria for a PTSD were met. Patients with suspected PTSD were more impacted by psychopathology, had more problems in coping with their skin diseases and attributed mental stress as having a greater influence on their skin disease than nontraumatized patients or traumatized patients without suspected PTSD. In addition, cumulative traumatization also leads to increased trauma symptomatology and greater difficulties in coping with skin diseases. The results emphasize the impact of a comorbid PTSD on a patient's ability to cope with skin diseases and underline the need for the inclusion of the differential diagnosis PTSD in dermatological treatment settings.

  4. Recent Advances In Topical Therapy In Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Thappa Devinder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available With changing times various newer topical agents are introduced in the field of dermatology. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are immunisuppressants, which are effective topically and are tried in the management of atopic dermatitis as well as other disorders including allergic contact dermatitis, atrophic lichen planus, pyoderma gangrenosum. Imiquimod, an immune response modifier, is presently in use for genital warts but has potentials as anti- tumour agent and in various other dermatological conditions when used topically. Tazarotene is a newer addition to the list of topical reginoids, which is effective in psoriasis and has better effect in combination with calcipotriene, phototherapy and topical costicosteroids. Tazarotene and adapelene are also effective in inflammatory acne. Calcipotriol, a vitamin D analogue has been introduced as a topical agent in the treatment of psoriasis. Steroid components are also developed recently which will be devoid of the side effects but having adequate anti-inflammatory effect. Topical photodynamic therapy has also a wide range of use in dermatology. Newer topical agents including cidofovir, capsaicin, topical sensitizers, topical antifungal agents for onychomycosis are also of use in clinical practice. Other promising developments include skin substitutes and growth factors for wound care.

  5. Patient perspectives on medical photography in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Marie C; Wu, Timothy; Haimovic, Adele; Kaplan, Rachel; Sanchez, Miguel; Cohen, David; Leger, Elizabeth A; Stein, Jennifer A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical photography enhances medical care, research, and teaching. Empirical data are needed to guide best practices regarding dermatologic photography. To investigate patient opinion about clinical photography and identify demographic factors that influence these opinions. Four hundred patients representing a broad range of ages, self-identified ethnic/racial groups, and socioeconomic levels were recruited from 4 dermatology settings in New York City. Patients were administered a survey about perceptions of photography, willingness to allow photographs to be used in a variety of settings, preferences for photographer and photographic equipment, and methods of consent. Eighty-eight percent of patients agreed that photography enhanced their quality of care. Most patients would allow their photographs to be used for medical, teaching, and research purposes with significantly more acceptance when patients were not identifiable. Patients preferred photographs taken by a physician rather than a nurse or student, photographers of the same gender, clinic-owned cameras to personal cameras or cell phones, and written consent to verbal consent. There were significant racial/ethnicity and age-related variations in responses, with white and older patients being more permissive than other groups. We use the results of this study to recommend best practices for photography in dermatology.

  6. Psychological symptoms and quality of life of dermatology outpatients and hospitalized dermatology patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Zachariae, Claus; Ibsen, Hans Henning

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare psychological symptoms and health-related quality of life of dermatology patients and healthy controls. The sample consisted of 333 consecutively recruited patients from four dermatology outpatient clinics, 172 hospitalized dermatological patients from...... impairment of disease-related quality of life than outpatients. More hospitalized patients had suicidal thoughts and were characterized as having severe to moderate depression compared with outpatients and controls. Female patients and younger patients were generally more distressed than male patients...... and older patients, and patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis were more distressed than patients with urticaria and eczemas. Disease-related impairment of quality of life was the main predictor of psychological symptoms, when controlling for diagnosis, age, gender, disease duration and disease...

  7. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86...... were included and screened for mental disorder with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) psychosis screening, the Clock Drawing Test, and the WHO-5 Well-being Index. The cardiologists were asked to rate the severity of somatic...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...

  8. Radiation monitoring in interventional cardiology: a requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, T.; Uruchurtu, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing of procedures using fluoroscopy in interventional cardiology procedures may increase medical and patients to levels of radiation that manifest in unintended outcomes. Such outcomes may include skin injury and cancer. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and they receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Mexico does not have a formal policy for monitoring and recording the radiation dose delivered in hemodynamic establishments. Deterministic risk management can be improved by monitoring the radiation delivered from X-ray devices. The objective of this paper is to provide cardiologist, techniques, nurses, and all medical staff an information on DR levels, about X-ray risks and a simple a reliable method to control cumulative dose.

  9. Use of smartphone technology in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang H; Silva, Jennifer N A

    2016-05-01

    Smartphone-based technologies along with broadband connectivity are changing the way modern cardiology is practiced. The ever broadening connectivity and increasing capabilities of smartphone-based technologies can better monitor, diagnose, and prevent cardiovascular diseases. Researchers can leverage the ubiquitous use of smartphone-based technologies and their constant stream of biometric data to establish large community-based clinical research studies. Patient engagement is enhanced with constant and on-demand access to physicians, daily self-monitoring, and expanding social networks. On the other hand, the exponential growth of smartphone-based technologies invariably disrupts the traditional healthcare model and leaves a vacuum in the infrastructure, medico-legal apparatus, and reimbursement systems that need to be addressed. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion of the various applications utilizing smartphone-based technologies in cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating the benefits of nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisey, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of nuclear cardiology in the context of health care evaluation and resource utilisation. Nuclear cardiology procedures are used to detect disease, to define the extent of disease, to predict the outcome of therapy and to monitor the response to treatment. The evaluation of effectiveness will depend on the role for which the tests are being used. The evaluation of diagnostic tests most commonly follows the five level Fineberg classification. I) Technical capacity; II) diagnostic accuracy; III) diagnostic impact; IV) therapeutic impact; V) patient outcome. Tests may succeed or fail at each of these hierarchical levels. In addition to the clinical impact which is evaluated, the appropriate use of health care resources has to be considered , i.e. the cost effectiveness of the investigation. For this the costs of diagnosis and treatment in the resources used, together with the direct cost on the patient and patient carers needs to be considered. In addition to these direct costs to the community and to the patient and the carers the secondary downstream costs and opportunity costs have to be taken into account. The common methods for assessing the costs and benefits include cost minimization, cost effectiveness, cost utility, and cost benefit studies. The advantage and appropriate use of these methods are reviewed. There are seven clinical methods for evaluating diagnostics tests in nuclear cardiology which are: I) Case reports; II) consensus studies; III) databases; IV) management impact studies; V)modeling techniques; VI) management impact studies; VII) randomized control trial. Each of these has a role with advantages and disadvantages which are reviewed. It is no long sufficient to investigate the usefulness of a diagnostic test used in nuclear cardiology in isolation but it as to be within the context of the health care system and the resource used

  11. A history of cardiology in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbow, C E

    2004-06-01

    The history of cardiology in Jamaica is conveniently considered in decades beginning in the 1950s. The decade of the 1950s was characterized by early descriptions of the pattern of cardiac disease in adults and children in Jamaica, the establishment of a cardiac clinic at the University Hospital of the West Indies and early cardiac surgical landmarks. Extensive preparatory experimental work in the canine laboratory with respect to cardiopulmonary bypass in the early to mid-1960s culminated in the successful completion of the first open heart surgical procedure in April, 1968. Cardiac catheterization was also increasingly developed in the decade of the 1960s. A highlight of the decade of the 1970s was the establishment of the Heart Foundation of Jamaica which began contributing greatly to preventive cardiology in Jamaica by providing a variety of programmes of prevention. In the decade of the 1980s, non-invasive cardiac diagnostic facilities in Jamaica were considerably enhanced by the introduction and development of echocardiography, treadmill exercise testing and ambulatory electrocardiography. In addition, the very important National Rheumatic Fever prevention programme was established. The cardiac catheterization laboratory was re-opened in the 1990s, thus allowing the performance of coronary arteriography in Jamaica for the first time, and interventional cardiology procedures soon followed. The Jamaica Foundation for Cardiac disease was also established in this decade. The vision for the new millennium of "A heart healthy Jamaica in the 21st century" is achievable, but will require appropriate emphasis on expanded preventive and curative cardiology programmes.

  12. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Women in interventional cardiology: The French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautrin, E; Marlière, S; Bellemain-Appaix, A; Gilard, M; Manzo-Silberman, S

    2016-12-01

    Exploring the discrepancy in sex-ratio among interventional cardiologists by analysing the population of the female interventionalist. Despite an increase number of women who graduate from medical school in France during the last generation today, women represent only 24% of all cardiologists and 3% are interventional cardiologists. To face this international gender-based issue of interventional cardiology, committees were established in US (WIN) and recently within the EAPCI: the Women EAPCI chaired by Drs Mehilli and Mauri. In France, the Intervention'Elles committee emerged in order to participate in this concern. As a first initiative, the Intervention'Elles group launched an e-survey to obtain information on the population of French female interventional cardiologists, focused on demography, work patterns, maternity and radiation exposure. Mean age is 40 years old (±7,4), 68% are working in large volume center, 28% have also structural interventional activity. Only 40% have left arm coverage. Despite 80% of French female interventional cardiologists wear personal dosimeters only 45% of them have a dosimetry feedback. Interestingly, even if 54% of women have children (mean: 1.9±1) 28% of them report that childbearing had interfered with their career plan. This questionnaire identifies for the first time the women population in interventional cardiology in France and highlights some of the issues encountered in more detail. This first descriptive step would help to develop strategies for attaining gender equality in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Behavioral cardiology: current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan

    2014-07-08

    Growing epidemiological evidence identifies key domains relevant to behavioral cardiology, including health behaviors, emotions, mental mindsets, stress management, social connectedness, and a sense of purpose. Each of these domains exists along a continuum, ranging from positive factors that promote health, to negative factors, which are pathophysiological. To date, there has been relatively little translation of this growing knowledge base into cardiology practice. Four initiatives are proposed to meet this challenge: 1) promulgating greater awareness of the potency of psychosocial risks factors; 2) overcoming a current "artificial divide" between conventional and psychosocial risk factors; 3) developing novel cost-effective interventions using Internet and mobile health applications, group-based counseling, and development of tiered-care behavioral management; and 4) in recognition that "one size does not fit all" with respect to behavioral interventions, developing specialists who can counsel patients in multidisciplinary fashion and use evidence-based approaches for promoting patient motivation and execution of health goals. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Data Sharing and Cardiology: Platforms and Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Pranammya; Ross, Joseph S; Ritchie, Jessica D; Desai, Nihar R; Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-12-19

    Sharing deidentified patient-level research data presents immense opportunities to all stakeholders involved in cardiology research and practice. Sharing data encourages the use of existing data for knowledge generation to improve practice, while also allowing for validation of disseminated research. In this review, we discuss key initiatives and platforms that have helped to accelerate progress toward greater sharing of data. These efforts are being prompted by government, universities, philanthropic sponsors of research, major industry players, and collaborations among some of these entities. As data sharing becomes a more common expectation, policy changes will be required to encourage and assist data generators with the process of sharing the data they create. Patients also will need access to their own data and to be empowered to share those data with researchers. Although medicine still lags behind other fields in achieving data sharing's full potential, cardiology research has the potential to lead the way. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Online learning in a dermatology clerkship: piloting the new American Academy of Dermatology Medical Student Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Sarah D; Dybbro, Eric; Boscardin, Christy K; Shinkai, Kanade; Berger, Timothy G

    2013-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that both current and future primary care providers have insufficient education and training in dermatology. To address the limitations and wide variability in medical student dermatology instruction, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) created a standardized, online curriculum for both dermatology learners and educators. We sought to determine the impact of the integration of the AAD online curriculum into a 2-week introductory dermatology clerkship for fourth-year medical students. In addition to their clinical duties, we assigned 18 online modules at a rate of 1 to 3 per day. We evaluated knowledge acquisition using a 50-item, multiple-choice pretest and posttest. Postmodule and end-of-course questionnaires contained both closed and open-ended items soliciting students' perceptions about usability and satisfaction. All 51 participants significantly improved in their dermatology knowledge (P dermatology clerkship. Without a control group who did not experience the online curriculum, we are unable to isolate the specific impact of the online modules on students' learning. This study demonstrates the successful integration of this educational resource into a 2-week, university-based dermatology clerkship. Students' perceptions regarding usability and satisfaction were overwhelmingly positive, suggesting that the online curriculum is highly acceptable to learners. Widespread use of this curriculum may be a significant advancement in standardized dermatology learning for medical students. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic collaboration in dermatology resident training through social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Natalie M; McGuire, April L; Carroll, Bryan T

    2017-04-01

    The use of online educational resources and professional social networking sites is increasing. The field of dermatology is currently under-utilizing online social networking as a means of professional collaboration and sharing of training materials. In this study, we sought to assess the current structure of and satisfaction with dermatology resident education and gauge interest for a professional social networking site for educational collaboration. Two surveys-one for residents and one for faculty-were electronically distributed via the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery and Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserves. The surveys confirmed that there is interest among dermatology residents and faculty in a dermatology professional networking site with the goal to enhance educational collaboration.

  18. Standardized methods for photography in procedural dermatology using simple equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexsel, Doris; Hexsel, Camile L; Dal'Forno, Taciana; Schilling de Souza, Juliana; Silva, Aline F; Siega, Carolina

    2017-04-01

    Photography is an important tool in dermatology. Reproducing the settings of before photos after interventions allows more accurate evaluation of treatment outcomes. In this article, we describe standardized methods and tips to obtain photographs, both for clinical practice and research procedural dermatology, using common equipment. Standards for the studio, cameras, photographer, patients, and framing are presented in this article. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. The impact of dermatology in premier medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheterpal, Meenal K; Ellis, Charles N

    2011-01-01

    In the past 15 years, research in dermatology has significantly increased. Dermatology-related contributions in premier medical journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) are the representation of our field in the medical world. To analyze this representation, incidence of dermatology-related contributions in NEJM and JAMA during 3 separate years (during a 15-year period) was calculated.

  20. Ten-year publication trends in dermatology in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Shujun; Mauro, Jacqueline A; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2014-10-01

    China has been experiencing huge changes in all aspects, including dermatologic research, since its reform in 1978. However, it is not known how the economic and intellectual development has influenced the publication trends in the field of dermatology, which could mirror the scientific development in other medical disciplines. In the present study, we analyzed publication trends from dermatology departments in mainland China from 2002 to 2011. All publication data were obtained from www.pubmed.com. Only papers published from dermatology departments in mainland China were used for analysis. The number of publications increased 10-fold over this 10-year period. A total of 1231 articles were published in English in 251 journals between 2002 and 2011. A total of 129 journals published only one paper from dermatology departments in mainland China. Over 60% of articles were original research, and 21.7% were case reports. Among these 251 journals, foremost was the Journal of Clinical Experimental Dermatology, which published 5.9% of all papers from mainland China; 2.7% of papers were published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The number of publications positively correlated with the changes in gross domestic product per capita during the study period. These results suggest that the number of publications in the dermatology field has increased markedly in mainland China over the last 10 years. This dramatic increase in publications could be attributed, at least partially, to the significant improvement in economic conditions in mainland China. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Breaking bad news: A communication competency for ophthalmology training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Cebulla, Colleen M; Jain, Shelly Gupta; Pfeil, Sheryl A; Benes, Susan C; Robbins, Shira L

    As the ophthalmology accreditation system undergoes major changes, training programs must evaluate residents in the 6 core competencies, including appropriately communicating bad news. Although the literature is replete with recommendations for breaking bad news across various non-ophthalmology specialties, no formal training programs exist for ophthalmology. There are many valuable lessons to be learned from our colleagues regarding this important skill. We examine the historic basis for breaking bad news, explore current recommendations among other specialties, and then evaluate a pilot study in breaking bad news for ophthalmology residents. The results of this study are limited by a small number of residents at a single academic center. Future studies from multiple training programs should be conducted to further evaluate the need and efficacy of formal communication skills training in this area, as well as the generalizability of our pilot training program. If validated, this work could serve as a template for future ophthalmology resident training and evaluation in this core competency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of applications of microneedling in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iriarte C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Iriarte,1 Olabola Awosika,2 Monica Rengifo-Pardo,1,2 Alison Ehrlich1,2 1George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, The George Washington Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Microneedling (MN is a novel therapeutic modality in dermatology. Through physical trauma from needle penetration, MN induces a wound healing cascade with minimal damage to the epidermis. This allows for enhancement in the absorption of mainstay topical therapies across the thick stratum corneum. MN has become increasingly utilized over the last several years as it is a relatively simple procedure that is cost-effective, well tolerated, and offers both cosmetic and therapeutic benefits. The ability to treat localized areas of disease has led to numerous studies gauging its potential in focal diseases of inflammation, dyschromia, and photodamage. This review discusses the principles and evidence behind the expanding applications of MN. It has shown promising results as an adjuvant therapy for enhanced drug delivery in the treatment of atrophic scars, alopecia, actinic keratoses, and disorders of pigmentation such as melasma. The efficacy in treatment of vitiligo remains limited. Overall, the procedure has few adverse sequelae compared to other therapies, is highly efficacious, and is a viable resurfacing option for skin of color. Future research is needed to determine the frequency, interval, and specific device settings that foster optimal results. Additionally, large controlled trials are needed to shed light on the utility of MN as an evidence-based regimen for the treatment of various dermatologic conditions. Keywords: microneedling, scars, acne, alopecia, hyperpigmentation, actinic keratosis

  3. Google searches help with diagnosis in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Montassar; Feroz, Kaliyadan

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have tried to assess the usefulness of Google search as a diagnostic aid. The results were discordant and have led to controversies. To investigate how often Google search is helpful to reach correct diagnoses in dermatology. Two fifth-year students (A and B) and one demonstrator (C) have participated as investigators in this paper. Twenty-five diagnostic dermatological cases were selected from all the clinical cases published in the Web only images in clinical medicine from March 2005 to November 2009. The main outcome measure of our paper was to compare the number of correct diagnoses provided by the investigators without, and with Google search. Investigator A gave correct diagnoses in 9/25 (36%) cases without Google search, his diagnostic success after Google search was 18/25 (72%). Investigator B results were 11/25 (44%) correct diagnoses without Google search, and 19/25 (76%) after this search. For investigator C, the results were 12/25 (48%) without Google search, and 18/25 (72%) after the use of this tool. Thus, the total correct diagnoses provided by the three investigators were 32 (42.6%) without Google search, and 55 (73.3%) when using this facility. The difference was statistically significant between the total number of correct diagnoses given by the three investigators without, and with Google search (p = 0.0002). In the light of our paper, Google search appears to be an interesting diagnostic aid in dermatology. However, we emphasize that diagnosis is primarily an art based on clinical skills and experience.

  4. Infectious Disease Practice Gaps in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Shelby; Quest, Tyler L; Wanat, Karolyn A

    2016-07-01

    The article highlights different educational and practice gaps in infectious diseases as they pertain to dermatology. These gaps include the use of antibiotics in relation to atopic dermatitis and acne vulgaris, treatment of skin and soft tissue infection, and diagnosis and treatment of onychomycosis. In addition, practice gaps related to use of imiquimod for molluscum contagiosum, risk of infections related to immunosuppressive medications and rates of vaccination, and the use of bedside diagnostics for diagnosing common infections were discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incorporating social media into dermatologic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Lauren N; Rana, Jasmine; Burgin, Susan

    2017-10-15

    In the current digital age, medical education has slowly evolved from the largely lecture-based teaching style of the past to incorporate more interactive pedagogical techniques, including use of social media. Already used readily by millennial trainees and clinicians, social media can also be used in innovative ways to teach trainees and facilitate continuing education among practicing clinicians. In this commentary, we discuss many learning benefits of social media and review potential pitfalls of employing social media in both trainee and physician dermatological education.

  6. Precise Multi-Spectral Dermatological Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, David Delgado; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    In this work, an integrated imaging system to obtain accurate and reproducible multi-spectral dermatological images is proposed. The system is made up of an integrating sphere, light emitting diodes and a generic monochromatic camera. The system can collect up to 10 different spectral bands....... These spectral bands vary from ultraviolet to near infrared. The welldefined and diffuse illumination of the optically closed scene aims to avoid shadows and specular reflections. Furthermore, the system has been developed to guarantee the reproducibility of the collected images. This allows for comparative...

  7. Why is the center of evidence - based dermatology relevant to Indian dermatology ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Hywel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN, and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs. The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knoweldge only has value if it is shared and used.

  8. Training residents/fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Emory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric cardiology fellowship is a very busy time, with new responsibilities, new knowledge, new technology and fast pace. Above and beyond the science and art of pediatric cardiology, we emphasize that our cardiology fellows are in the middle of the "people business", with additional roles and responsibilities as they serve their patients and communities. This manuscript provides insight into these opportunities for our pediatric cardiac professionals.

  9. Ophthalmologic Findings in Patients with Neuro-metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narjes; Golnik, Karl; Shahriari, Mansoor; Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Jabbehdari, Sayena

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to present the ophthalmic manifestations of neuro-metabolic disorders. Patients who were diagnosed with neuro-metabolic disorders in the Neurology Department of Mofid Pediatric Hospital in Tehran, Iran, between 2004 and 2014 were included in this study. Disorders were confirmed using clinical findings, neuroimaging, laboratory data, and genomic analyses. All enrolled patients were assessed for ophthalmological abnormalities. A total of 213 patients with 34 different neuro-metabolic disorders were included. Ophthalmological abnormalities were observed in 33.5% of patients. Abnormal findings in the anterior segment included Kayser-Fleischer rings, congenital or secondary cataracts, and lens dislocation into the anterior chamber. Posterior segment (i.e., retina, vitreous body, and optic nerve) evaluation revealed retinitis pigmentosa, cherry-red spots, and optic atrophy. In addition, strabismus, nystagmus, and lack of fixation were noted during external examination. Ophthalmological examination and assessment is essential in patients that may exhibit neuro-metabolic disorders.

  10. Psychosocial risk factors and personality disorders in outpatient cardiology setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Suárez-Bagnasco

    2015-01-01

    Psychological risk factors and personality disorders comorbidities are more frequent than psychological risk factors only or personality disorders only in outpatient cardiology setting without cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Patient Dose Considerations in Interventional Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rafajlovic, S.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional cardiology procedures are classified as high-dose procedures, owing to increased risk for radiation skin injuries and stochastic effects, such as cancer. European MED Directive 97/43 requires special consideration and dose evaluation for this kind of procedures . Dose received by a patient, in general, depends on the radiological equipment, examination protocol, the way it is implemented, the patient's body weight and nature of disease. Long-term fluoroscopy of certain parts of the body, a significant body mass, high-value dose intensity, continuous rather than pulsed fluoroscopy, small focus-skin distance and repeated procedure on the same patient, are among the factors that can lead to radiation skin injuries. A particular challenge is the fact that the radiation damage of the skin is difficult to detect and connect to the previously conducted cardiologic procedures. The fact that such injuries do not have immediate manifestation is very often reason that many of them remain undetected. The purpose of this work is to assess the level of radiation dose to patients in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and to investigate possibility for setting of a practical trigger value if dose quantities exceed certain levels in terms of dose descriptors available at display of interventional cardiology unit. Two dedicated interventional cardiology units in a large teaching cardiac centre (Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia) were included in the survey. Both rooms (D and F) were equipped with X-ray units of the identical model: Siemens Axiom Artis (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with the flat panel detector and integrated ionization chamber to measure air kerma-area product (P K A) and air kerma in international reference point (K I RP). Patient doses were assessed in terms of P K A, K I RP and maximum-skin dose (MSD). P K A and K I RP were assessed using a built-in, in situ calibrated dosimeters, while MSD was estimated using radiochromic films

  12. Discriminative power of visual attributes in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, Ioannis; Visser, Margaretha; Jonkman, Marcel; Petkov, Nicolai

    2013-02-01

    Visual characteristics such as color and shape of skin lesions play an important role in the diagnostic process. In this contribution, we quantify the discriminative power of such attributes using an information theoretical approach. We estimate the probability of occurrence of each attribute as a function of the skin diseases. We use the distribution of this probability across the studied diseases and its entropy to define the discriminative power of the attribute. The discriminative power has a maximum value for attributes that occur (or do not occur) for only one disease and a minimum value for those which are equally likely to be observed among all diseases. Verrucous surface, red and brown colors, and the presence of more than 10 lesions are among the most informative attributes. A ranking of attributes is also carried out and used together with a naive Bayesian classifier, yielding results that confirm the soundness of the proposed method. proposed measure is proven to be a reliable way of assessing the discriminative power of dermatological attributes, and it also helps generate a condensed dermatological lexicon. Therefore, it can be of added value to the manual or computer-aided diagnostic process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Jojoba in dermatology: a succinct review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyar, N; Yaghoobi, R; Ghassemi, M R; Kazerouni, A; Rafeie, E; Jamshydian, N

    2013-12-01

    Phytomedicine has been successfully used in dermatology horizon for thousands of years. Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is a long-lived, drought resistant, perennial plant with interesting economic value as it is processed for liquid wax production. The jojoba plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. The liquid wax is an important substrate for a variety of industrial applications and is used in skin treatment preparations. The oil from the jojoba plant is the main biological source of wax esters and has a multitude of potential applications. The review of literatures suggest that jojoba has anti-inflammatory effect and it can be used on a variety of skin conditions including skin infections, skin aging, as well as wound healing. Moreover, jojoba has been shown to play a role in cosmetics formulas such as sunscreens and moisturizers and also enhances the absorption of topical drugs. The intention of the review is to summarize the data regarding the uses of jojoba in dermatology for readers and researchers.

  14. Biosimilars in Dermatology - theory becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Sascha; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Augustin, Matthias; Ralph von Kiedrowski; Enk, Alexander; Strömer, Klaus; Schön, Michael P; Radtke, Marc A

    2018-02-01

    Biosimilars are biological medicines that are analogues of a specific reference product. Biosimilars of the tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors infliximab and etanercept are already approved and available for dermatological indications. Regulatory agencies require in-depth analysis of physicochemical and functional properties of these highly complex molecules as well as clinical data on their similarity regarding efficacy and safety in at least one clinical trial in a sensitive and homogeneous population. Thus, it must be shown that biosimilars are essentially the same as the originator product if they are to be licensed in regulated drug markets. As a consequence, these data are extrapolated from one molecule (the originator) to another (biosimilar) resulting in an approval that includes the same indications as the originator product. While extrapolation is well accepted and regulated, clear recommendations regarding the interchangeability of originators and biosimilars as well as data on multiple consecutive switching are missing. Current scientific knowledge does not argue against the use of biosimilars for dermatological indications, but sequential switching of biosimilars should be considered carefully. To increase confidence and enhance evidence for biosimilars, accurate documentation of the specific products given to each patient is essential and should preferably be included in patient registries. © 2018 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen's disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance.

  16. 3D Printing: Print the future of ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiulan

    2014-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) printer is a new technology that creates physical objects from digital files. Recent technological advances in 3D printing have resulted in increased use of this technology in the medical field, where it is beginning to revolutionize medical and surgical possibilities. It is already providing medicine with powerful tools that facilitate education, surgical planning, and organ transplantation research. A good understanding of this technology will be beneficial to ophthalmologists. The potential applications of 3D printing in ophthalmology, both current and future, are explored in this article. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  17. Introduction to metabolomics and its applications in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Z; Begley, P; Mullard, G; Hollywood, K A; Bishop, P N

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the study of endogenous and exogenous metabolites in biological systems, which aims to provide comparative semi-quantitative information about all metabolites in the system. Metabolomics is an emerging and potentially powerful tool in ophthalmology research. It is therefore important for health professionals and researchers involved in the speciality to understand the basic principles of metabolomics experiments. This article provides an overview of the experimental workflow and examples of its use in ophthalmology research from the study of disease metabolism and pathogenesis to identification of biomarkers. PMID:26987591

  18. Application of smart phone on interactive teaching methods in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Smart phones as a symbol of the mobile Internet appears in college classroom, which is not only a challenge, but also a great opportunities of education information. This paper applied smart phones as the carrier of the "Internet" into ophthalmology classroom. Smart phones has a lot of features, such as rich teaching resources, diverse learning methods, flexible learning time, collating and recording capabilities and the timely, comprehensive and accurate teaching feedback so on, and could be used in case teaching and interactive teaching. The implementation of smart phones into ophthalmology classroom could inspire the learning enthusiasm of the students, enhance the quality of teaching, eventually improve teaching effects.

  19. Clinical cardiology consultation at non-cardiology departments: stepchild of patient care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, D.A.; Symersky, T.; Ottervanger, J.P.; Ramdat Misier, A.R.; Boer, M.J. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although patient care in cardiology departments may be of high quality, patients with cardiac disease in other departments tend to receive less attention from cardiologists. Driven by the shorter duration of admission nowadays and the fact that consultations are often performed in

  20. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  1. 10 Year Publication Trends in Dermatology in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Shujun; Mauro, Jacqueline A; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background China has been experiencing huge changes in all aspects including dermatologic research since its reform in 1978. However, how the economic and intellectual development has influenced the publication trends in the field of dermatology, which could mirror the scientific development in other medical disciplines, is unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the publication trends from departments of dermatology in mainland China from 2002 to 2011. Materials and Methods All publication data were obtained from www.pubmed.com. Only papers published from dermatology departments of mainland China were used for analysis. Results The number of publications increased 10-fold over this 10 year period. A total 1,231 of articles were published in English in 251 journals between 2002 and 2011. A total of 129 journals published only one paper from dermatology departments of mainland China. Over 60% of articles were original research and 21.7% were case reports. Among these 251 journals, foremost was the Journal of Clinical Experimental Dermatology, which published 5.9% of all papers from mainland China. 2.7% papers were published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The number of publications positively correlated with the changes in gross domestic product per capita during the study period. Conclusions These results suggest that the number of publications in the dermatology field has increased markedly in mainland China over the last 10 years. This dramatic increase in publications could be, at least partially, attributed to the significant improvement in economic conditions in mainland China. PMID:23968296

  2. Layout and flow of dermatology clinics: principles from operations management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jordan V

    2018-04-15

    Dermatology is a medical specialty that experiences high patient demand and long patient wait times. Dermatology clinics should look for ways to improve efficiency through the incorporation of principles from operations management. Addressing the layout and flow of a clinic can lead to operational efficiency. An ideal layout may lead to increased patient volume, satisfaction, and retention.

  3. Editorial: Sudanese journal of dermatology: steps forward | Shamad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudanese Journal of Dermatology is improving itself continuously. This paper is highlighting the African Journal OnLine (AJOL) project and its website. This journal has been launch on the AJOL website in May 2005. Also, since May 2005 Sudanese Journal of Dermatology has been recorded in the ISSN (International ...

  4. Ethical and deontological dominants in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Panko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article the ethical and deontological dominants as scientific and practical strategy that prevents the medical errors, and humanization doctor-patient relationship through a formation of culture of communication are presented. Ophthalmology as a branch of practical and scientific medicine requires special relationship between doctor and patient, and because of this it also requires particular ethical and deontological interpretation. Formal signs of ethics laws concerning ophthalmic practice aren’t worth anything in case of unskilled diagnosis and treatment. Possibility of errors on the part of the doctor-ophthalmologist while aiding a patient is of a special importance. In planed and in urgent cases irreparable flaws are not excluded. Consideration should be given, in particular, to the errors in the initial examination, insufficient amount of additional methods of examination, overdiagnosis, errors in determining the treatment strategy (conservative or surgical and others. Identification and analysis of the errors in order to prevent them is the ethical imperative in medical practice and effective way to improve clinical medicine. The author of the article describes the causes of errors, indicating that they are objective and subjective. The first are related to the change of views on the treatment of a certain disease. The complex of therapeutic measures, that was considered the most rational until recently, can be proven as wrong from the perspective of the latest achievements of science. Mistakes made by doctors in their communication with patients as a result of not following the basic deontological principles are also included here. In addition, the classification of medical errors on deontological, diagnostic, therapeutic is made and their essence is analyzed in the article. The violation of the principles of appropriate behavior of the doctor in treating the patient, that is not following the ethics of medical practice by the

  5. Radiological protection in interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Leyton, F.A.; Farias, E.; Silva, A.M.; Vano, E.; Oyarzun, C.; Gamarra, J.; Ortiz, P.

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, an expert mission was assigned to Chile, under the regional project named 'International BBS in Medical Practices Radiation Protection and Quality Assurance In Interventional Radiology' (ARCAL XLIX). The objective of the mission was to evaluate the level of radiation protection (RP) and safety in interventional cardiology ( IC ) installations. A team of local cardiologists, medical physicists and technologists was created for this purpose and during one week, several cardiology laboratories were evaluated and some basic quality controls (QC) were carried out. A basic pilot training course in radiation protection was imparted at the Hospital of the University of Chile in Santiago de Chile and some of the key objectives for a future national quality assurance programme were presented during the national congress of IC. In addition, a national survey on radiation protection aspects was circulated and its results evaluated. These activities enabled the local team to become familiar with the methodology of assessment of the level of protection and the organization of a programme, which was illustrated with the examples of similar European programmes. As result of these actions, several proposals were made to both the local authorities and the IAEA. The most important were: a) to initiate a basic QC programme, b) to organize a training in RP for cardiologists in order to formalize their accreditation, c) to improve personal occupational dosimetry, d) to initiate a programme of patient dosimetry, e) to optimize the technical and clinical protocols, f) to create a national registry of incidents with skin injuries. (author)

  6. Speculative Considerations about Some Cardiology Enigmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Schmidt, Andre; Arcêncio, Livia; Marin-Neto, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Enigmas often lead to hypotheses and speculations. For this reason, especially for the sake of the reader's motivation, we opted for the plain discussion of some cardiology enigmas. The present text was aimed to discuss speculatively some cardiology enigmas. Text was freely designed in the context of coronary artery and heart valve diseases. The results were presented as the combination enigma/hypothesis. 1) The absence of arteriosclerosis in intramyocardial coronary arteries/ endothelium-myocardial interaction (crosstalk); 2) The unique and always confirmed superior evolution of the internal thoracic artery as coronary graft/ higher NO basal release 3) The prophylactic left internal thoracic artery graft in mildlystenosed coronary lesions/need of more accurate functional imaging techniques; 4) The high incidence of perioperative atrial fibrillation in patients with coronary artery disease/atrial ischemia associated to left circumflex coronary lesions; 5) The handling of disease-free saphenous vein grafts at the time of reoperation/biological serendipity with graft vein segments; 6) The possible aortic stenosis protection against coronary artery disease/ endothelium-myocardium interaction (crosstalk) improving NO release. The discussed topics associated with their respective speculative hypothesis remain as enigmas, but would become motivations for investigations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Recent advances in pediatric interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    During the last 10 years, there have been major technological achievements in pediatric interventional cardiology. In addition, there have been several advances in cardiac imaging, especially in 3-dimensional imaging of echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and cineangiography. Therefore, more types of congenital heart diseases can be treated in the cardiac catheter laboratory today than ever before. Furthermore, lesions previously considered resistant to interventional therapies can now be managed with high success rates. The hybrid approach has enabled the overcoming of limitations inherent to percutaneous access, expanding the application of endovascular therapies as adjunct to surgical interventions to improve patient outcomes and minimize invasiveness. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has become a successful alternative therapy. However, most of the current recommendations about pediatric cardiac interventions (including class I recommendations) refer to off-label use of devices, because it is difficult to study the safety and efficacy of catheterization and transcatheter therapy in pediatric cardiac patients. This difficulty arises from the challenge of identifying a control population and the relatively small number of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Nevertheless, the pediatric interventional cardiology community has continued to develop less invasive solutions for congenital heart defects to minimize the need for open heart surgery and optimize overall outcomes. In this review, various interventional procedures in patients with congenital heart disease are explored.

  8. The use of MR in cardiological diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Hans-Joergen

    2004-01-01

    Image diagnostics is playing an important role in cardiology, and magnetic resonance tomography (MR) is one of many methods used in examinations of the heart. Based on studies of the literature and his own experience the author surveys the potential of MR in today's and tomorrow's diagnostics of heart diseases. Among the image diagnostic methods MR is the one that can give the most extensive information about the heart's anatomy and function. In a non-invasive way and without the use of ionizing radiation, MR can represent the anatomy in selectable planes, visualize and quantify the heart's pumping function and functioning of the cardiac valves, and give detailed information about the regional contractility, blood flow and viability of myocard. MR is capable of giving important and to some extent unique contributions to heart diseases, both congenital and contracted heart disease. Because of failing availability and competence MR is still little used in cardiological diagnostics, but the method undoubtedly has the potential to play a very important role in the future

  9. Cardiological aspects of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Jakub; Gawlik, Iwona; Dębski, Grzegorz; Popiołek, Lech; Marchewka, Wojciech; Hydzik, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cardiological manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Background/introduction: Carbon monoxide intoxication is one of the most important toxicological causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early clinical manifestation of CO poisoning is cardiotoxicity. We enrolled 75 patients (34 males and 41 females, mean age 37.6 ± 17.7 y/o) hospitalized due to CO poisoning. Laboratory tests including troponin I, blood pressure measurements, HR and electrocardiograms (ECG) were collected. Pach's scale scoring and grading system was used to establish severity of poisoning. Grade of poisoning is positively correlated with troponin I levels and systolic blood pressure. Moreover, troponin levels are significantly correlated with exposition time, lactates and are higher in tachycardiac, hypertensive and positive ECG subpopulations. COHb levels are indicative of exposure but do not correlate with grade of poisoning. The main cause of CO poisoning were bathroom heaters - 83%, only 11% of examined intoxicated population were equipped with CO detectors. Complex cardiological screening covering troponin levels, ECG, blood pressure and heart rate measurements as well as complete blood count with particular attention to platelet parameters should be performed in each case where CO intoxication is suspected. More emphasis on education on CO poisoning is needed.

  10. Experience of a year of adult hospital dermatology consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storan, Eoin R; McEvoy, Marian T; Wetter, David A; El-Azhary, Rokea A; Camilleri, Michael J; Bridges, Alina G; Davis, Mark D P

    2015-10-01

    Dermatology consultations are frequently requested by inpatient hospital services. As inpatient dermatology services in the USA decline, dermatology hospital consultations are becoming increasingly important. We aim to describe the spectrum of skin diseases encountered and the health care subspecialties requesting dermatology hospital consultations. We performed a retrospective chart review of adult patient (age: ≥18 years) dermatology hospital consultations from January 1 to December 31, 2010. We examined patient demographic characteristics, consultation requesting services, and consultation diagnoses. Among dermatology services, 614 patients had 674 separate inpatient dermatology consultations during 2010. Of these patients, 55.9% were male (mean age: 59 years). In total, 205 consultations (30.4%) were requested by the internal medicine subspecialty, 137 (20.3%) by the hematology and oncology subspecialty, and 93 (13.8%) by the surgical subspecialty. The most common conditions seen by the hospital dermatology consulting service were skin infections (n = 125, 18.5%), dermatitis (n = 120, 17.8%), drug eruptions (n = 87, 12.9%), chronic wounds and ulcers (n = 55, 8.1%), cutaneous neoplasms (n = 39, 5.8%), graft-versus-host disease (n = 37, 5.5%), ecchymosis, purpura simplex or petechia (n = 26, 3.8%), intertrigo (n = 21, 3.1%), and urticaria (n = 20, 3.0%). The majority of consultations conducted by the dermatology hospital consulting service were for the management of common skin diseases, such as cutaneous infections, dermatitis, and drug eruptions. Most consultations were requested by the departments of internal medicine, hematology and oncology, and surgical services. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Significance of head CT in neuro-ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Yuichiro; Masuyama, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Yasuko; Fujimoto, Toshiro.

    1979-01-01

    It is important to perform CT purposefully in patients with some neuro-ophthalmological disorders. Using Hitachi CT-H250 with the finer matrix of 256 x 256 and a section thickness of 5 mm and 10 mm, we performed head CT in 98 patients with various kinds of neuro-ophthalmological disorders in these 30 months. Neuro-ophthalmological findings in these patients were visual disturbance, visual field defects (hemianopsia, quandrantanopsia, enlargement of the blind spot, central scotoma), papilledema, optic nerve atrophy, difficulties in ocular movements, and others. In 44 (44.9%) of these 98 patients, abnormal findings were displayed in the head CT, characterizing intracranial tumors, intracranial infarction, aneurysms in intracranial vessels, arterio-venous malformation, enlargement of the ventricle or the cistern. In some cases the head CT was the decisive procedure in ensuring a correct diagnosis. We presented findings in the head CT in several interesting cases. We recognized the necessity of the head CT in patients with neuro-ophthalmological disorders. (author)

  12. What is new in recommendations on ophthalmological screening in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... complication-toxic retinopathy. The present recommendations warn against making premature decision on medicine withdrawal, especially in the light of the most recent studies on their beneficial systemic influence. This paper systematizes the information on ophthalmological screening in chloroquine derivatives users.

  13. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace; Fang, Christina H; Lopez, Santiago A; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Langer, Paul D; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether scholarly impact of academic ophthalmologists, as measured using the h-index, is affected by fellowship training status and to further characterize differences in productivity among the various subspecialties and by departmental rank. A descriptive and correlational design was used. In total, 1440 academic ophthalmologists from 99 ophthalmology training programs were analyzed. The h-index data were obtained from the Scopus database. Faculty members were classified by academic rank and grouped into 10 categories based on fellowship training: anterior segment, corneal and external disease, glaucoma, uveitis and ocular immunology, vitreoretinal disease, ophthalmic plastic surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, ophthalmic pathology, and "other." A one-way analysis of variance or Student t test using Microsoft Excel and "R" statistical software were used for comparison of continuous variables, with significance set at p productivity, as measured using the h-index, than non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists in this study (p productivity compared with those in other ophthalmology subspecialties (p productivity with increasing academic rank from Assistant Professor to Professor (p productivity between fellowship-trained and non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists existed individually only at the level of Assistant Professor (p productivity increases with departmental academic rank from Assistant Professor to Professor. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ophthalmology programs at ABCC. A brief review and preliminary plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S C; Jablon, S

    1961-07-19

    A proposal is made for a continuing ophthalmology program for exposed and control subjects at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. This program is based on a fixed population selected from the PE-86 and the ME-200 Adult Health Study samples. 27 references, 4 tables.

  15. Teaching and Assessing Systems-based Competency in Ophthalmology Residency Training Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Boldt, H. Culver; Olson, Richard; Abramoff, Michael; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has mandated that residency programs, including ophthalmology, teach and assess specific competencies, including systems-based learning. We review the pertinent literature on systems-based learning for ophthalmology and recommend

  16. Knowledge discovery in cardiology: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, I; Idri, A; Fernandez-Aleman, J L

    2017-01-01

    Data mining (DM) provides the methodology and technology needed to transform huge amounts of data into useful information for decision making. It is a powerful process employed to extract knowledge and discover new patterns embedded in large data sets. Data mining has been increasingly used in medicine, particularly in cardiology. In fact, DM applications can greatly benefit all those involved in cardiology, such as patients, cardiologists and nurses. The purpose of this paper is to review papers concerning the application of DM techniques in cardiology so as to summarize and analyze evidence regarding: (1) the DM techniques most frequently used in cardiology; (2) the performance of DM models in cardiology; (3) comparisons of the performance of different DM models in cardiology. We performed a systematic literature review of empirical studies on the application of DM techniques in cardiology published in the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2015. A total of 149 articles published between 2000 and 2015 were selected, studied and analyzed according to the following criteria: DM techniques and performance of the approaches developed. The results obtained showed that a significant number of the studies selected used classification and prediction techniques when developing DM models. Neural networks, decision trees and support vector machines were identified as being the techniques most frequently employed when developing DM models in cardiology. Moreover, neural networks and support vector machines achieved the highest accuracy rates and were proved to be more efficient than other techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens Peter; B. Andersen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  18. [The origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology and of Czech cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widimský, J

    2013-06-01

    The paper presents the origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology on the one hand, and the origins of Czech cardiology on the other. The Czech Society of Cardiology is the third oldest in the world (after the American and German Societies). It was founded in 1929 by Prof. Libenský. As early as in 1933, the Society organised the first international congress of cardiologists in Prague, which was attended by 200 doctors, out of which 50 were from abroad. The most participants came from France and Poland. Other participants came from England, Argentina, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Romania, Spain and Switzerland. The worldwide importance of this congress is apparent from the fact that both the World Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology (EKS) were founded after World War II in the years 1950 and 1952, i.e. almost 20 years after the first international congress of cardiology in Prague. In 1964, the Fourth Congress of European Society of Cardiology was held in Prague with the participation of 1,500 specialists from 31 countries and chaired by Prof. Pavel Lukl, the later president of EKS (1964- 1968). The paper also presents the work of our specialists in WHO and the history of the international journal Cor et Vasa issued by the Avicenum publishing house in Prague in English and Russian in the years 1958- 1992. An important role in the development of our cardiology was played by certain departments and clinics. In 1951, the Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ÚCHOK) was founded in PrahaKrč, thanks to the initiative of MU Dr. František Kriegl, the Deputy Minister of Health. Its first director was Klement Weber, who published, as early as in 1929, a monograph on arrhythmias -  50 years earlier than arrhythmias started to be at the centre of attention of cardiologists. Klement Weber was one of the doctors of President T. G. Masaryk during his serious disease towards the end of his life. Jan Brod was the deputy of Klement Weber in the

  19. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. [Establishment of diagnosis and treatment patterns of holistic integrated medicine for neuro-ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling

    2014-12-01

    Neuro-ophthalmology, as an interdisciplinary, covers at least three disciplines- ophthalmology, neurology and neurosurgery. With limited knowledge in each discipline, doctors often make misdiagnoses for neuro-ophthalmology diseases. Therefore, it is imperative to abandon the distinction between disciplines and combine all the knowledge to diagnose and treat patients in patterns of holistic integrated medicine in order to effectively improve the diagnosis and treatment of neuro-ophthalmology.

  1. Development of Quality Metrics in Ambulatory Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani; Gurvitz, Michelle; Marelli, Ariane; Anderson, Jeffrey; Baker-Smith, Carissa; Diab, Karim A; Edwards, Thomas C; Hougen, Tom; Jedeikin, Roy; Johnson, Jonathan N; Karpawich, Peter; Lai, Wyman; Lu, Jimmy C; Mitchell, Stephanie; Newburger, Jane W; Penny, Daniel J; Portman, Michael A; Satou, Gary; Teitel, David; Villafane, Juan; Williams, Roberta; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-02-07

    The American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section had attempted to create quality metrics (QM) for ambulatory pediatric practice, but limited evidence made the process difficult. The ACPC sought to develop QMs for ambulatory pediatric cardiology practice. Five areas of interest were identified, and QMs were developed in a 2-step review process. In the first step, an expert panel, using the modified RAND-UCLA methodology, rated each QM for feasibility and validity. The second step sought input from ACPC Section members; final approval was by a vote of the ACPC Council. Work groups proposed a total of 44 QMs. Thirty-one metrics passed the RAND process and, after the open comment period, the ACPC council approved 18 metrics. The project resulted in successful development of QMs in ambulatory pediatric cardiology for a range of ambulatory domains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding the pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: mentoring matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admani, Shehla; Caufield, Maura; Kim, Silvia S; Siegfried, Elaine C; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2014-02-01

    To target pediatric dermatologists directly in order to evaluate their current demographics and the most important motivating factors that influenced their career choice. Pediatric dermatology is one of the pediatric subspecialties with an inadequate supply to meet current patient needs. A survey was designed to evaluate the training pathway, employment status, participation in teaching, and clinical practice characteristics of pediatric dermatologists. The survey was administered to attendants of the 2010 Society for Pediatric Dermatology annual meeting. Any remaining board certified pediatric dermatologists who had not previously responded were queried via Survey Monkey. There was a 71% response rate. The majority chose a career in pediatric dermatology early, often prior to starting a dermatology residency. The vast majority of respondents noted mentorship as the most important influence on their decision to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology. The most common obstacles cited by respondents were financial hardship and resistance of some dermatology programs to accept applicants previously trained in pediatrics. Our survey provides evidence to support the importance of early exposure to the field and, most importantly, to committed pediatric dermatologists who can serve as mentors. This information may be helpful in approaching solutions to the workforce shortage in the field of pediatric dermatology. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Trends in dermatology publications over the past 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni, Daniel; Pavlovsky, Lev; Akerman, Lehavit; David, Michael; Mimouni, Francis B

    2010-01-01

    There is a continually increasing amount of medical literature, which makes the challenge of keeping up to date in the field of dermatology increasingly difficult. To test the hypothesis that the total number and the number in various categories of publications in pediatric and adult dermatology have increased over time in a linear fashion. We evaluated all MEDLINE articles from 1 January 1993 to 31 December 2007. We limited the search to 'skin' AND 'diseases' OR 'dermatology' for adults and children. We used regression analysis to determine the effect of the year of publication on the number of publications of each type. MEDLINE reported 17, 925 publications in adult dermatology and 9011 publications in pediatric dermatology during the evaluation period. There was a significant linear increase in the number of publications over the study period in both categories. There was a steady and similar increase over time in both pediatric and adult dermatology in total publications, randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, case reports, and letters to the editor, while there were too few meta-analyses, editorials, and clinical guidelines to make meaningful analyses of trends. The fields of pediatric and adult dermatology have had a significant yearly increase in studies providing a high level of scientific evidence with a much slower rise in the number of articles providing a lower level of evidence.

  4. Application of Contrast Echocardiography in Invasive Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrast echocardiography by rendering better imaging of the borders of cardiac chambers is a useful tool for evaluating cardiac function, mass, myocardial vascularization, microvascular structure (small vessel vasculature and viability. Contrast was first started to be used for patients with suboptimal image quality. It can be used in detecting defects in myocardial blood supply in patients with chest pain and determining the success of interventionalprocedures. It can also be of help in demonstrating myocardial viability after reperfusion treatment in patients who had myocardial infarction. It is expected to be used more widely in invasive cardiology for decision making, guiding and determining the success of the procedures. Advances in imaging techniques , development of contrast materials for evaluation of left system, contrast echocardiography may become a routine clinical practice.

  5. Magnetic resonance. Gamma Rays in cardiology laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, M.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years Cardiologists have shown an increasing interest on the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for assessing cardiovascular diseases. The first generation of MRI equipment dedicated to cardiology is now available. The MRI Laboratory of Clinical Physiology Institute in Pisa has joined a multi-centric international project for the development of prototype of this dedicated machine and is currently involved in several subprojects such as the study of myocardial perfusion and the assessment of congenital heart diseases. An interdisciplinary group (cardiologists, software and hardware engineers, biologists, etc.) is full time involved in the development of new analysis algorithms, etc. The new concept of installing a MRI machine within clinical cardiovascular department has started to induce fruitful cooperations either in the research field or in the clinical setting [it

  6. Radioiodinated fatty acids for cardiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machulla, H.-J.; Knust, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The development of fatty acids labelled with iodine-123 is reviewed. The variety of methods for producing 123 I and introducing radioiodine into the molecule is discussed and the important points of the biochemical background are recalled with the aim of finding a broad application for 123 I-labelled fatty acids. The results of the pharmacokinetic studies and biochemical analysis are presented as they prove that both 17- 123 I-heptadecanoic acid (IHA) and 15-(rho- 123 I-phenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) exhibit analogous behaviour to that of the naturally occurring fatty acids. Clinical applications demonstrated two fields of importance: (i) applications solely for imaging the heart and (ii) assessment of myocardial turnover rates of fatty acids for functional diagnosis. Moreover, very recent studies show that the provision of information about prognosis of myocardial diseases and the applied cardiological therapy appear to be possible. (author)

  7. Task Shifting in Dermatology: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Danielle N; Langan, Sinéad M; Freeman, Esther E

    2017-11-01

    Can task shifting be used to improve the delivery of dermatologic care in resource-poor settings worldwide? Task shifting is a means of redistributing available resources, whereby highly trained individuals train an available workforce to provide necessary care in low-resource settings. Limited evidence exists for task shifting in dermatology; however, studies from psychiatry demonstrate its efficacy. In the field of dermatology there is a need for high-quality evidence including randomized clinical trials to validate the implementation of task shifting in low-resource settings globally.

  8. Platelet-rich plasma in dermatology: Boon or a bane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshdeep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent spurt in application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. However, the details regarding use of PRP in various dermatological indications ranging from hair restoration to chronic ulcers are dispersed in literature, herein we have tried to focus all under one heading. Overall, PRP seems to be a promising therapeutic modality but the level of evidence as of now, from the available published data is low. This review will also stimulate readers to carry out well designed, larger population based trials, so as to validate its use in dermatology practice.

  9. Assessment of online patient education materials from major ophthalmologic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace; Fang, Christina H; Agarwal, Nitin; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Langer, Paul D

    2015-04-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet to supplement finding medical information, which can be complex and requires a high level of reading comprehension. Online ophthalmologic materials from major ophthalmologic associations should be written at an appropriate reading level. To assess ophthalmologic online patient education materials (PEMs) on ophthalmologic association websites and to determine whether they are above the reading level recommended by the American Medical Association and National Institutes of Health. Descriptive and correlational design. Patient education materials from major ophthalmology websites were downloaded from June 1, 2014, through June 30, 2014, and assessed for level of readability using 10 scales. The Flesch Reading Ease test, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook test, Coleman-Liau Index, Gunning Fog Index, New Fog Count, New Dale-Chall Readability Formula, FORCAST scale, Raygor Readability Estimate Graph, and Fry Readability Graph were used. Text from each article was pasted into Microsoft Word and analyzed using the software Readability Studio professional edition version 2012.1 for Windows. Flesch Reading Ease score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook grade, Coleman-Liau Index score, Gunning Fog Index score, New Fog Count, New Dale-Chall Readability Formula score, FORCAST score, Raygor Readability Estimate Graph score, and Fry Readability Graph score. Three hundred thirty-nine online PEMs were assessed. The mean Flesch Reading Ease score was 40.7 (range, 17.0-51.0), which correlates with a difficult level of reading. The mean readability grade levels ranged as follows: 10.4 to 12.6 for the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level; 12.9 to 17.7 for the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook test; 11.4 to 15.8 for the Coleman-Liau Index; 12.4 to 18.7 for the Gunning Fog Index; 8.2 to 16.0 for the New Fog Count; 11.2 to 16.0 for the New Dale-Chall Readability Formula; 10.9 to 12.5 for the FORCAST scale; 11

  10. [To strengthen the education on basic knowledge and skills of neuro-ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-jun; Wang, Ning-li

    2011-12-01

    Basic knowledge and skills are cornerstone of the diagnosis and treatment of neuro-ophthalmology diseases in ophthalmology practice. Due to the interdisciplinary features of neuro-ophthalmology, neuro-anatomy, neuro-physiology related to eyes, neuro-image and neuro-electrodiagnosis, these should be included in the education for the ophthalmologist. Special attention should be paid to training on capability of logically thinking in neuro-ophthalmology. Multiple ways can be used for the education of ophthalmologists and neurologists for the enhancement of basic knowledge and skills of neuro-ophthalmology in China.

  11. Evaluation of cardiology consultations sought from the anaesthesia clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minai, F.N.; Kamal, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the criteria for cardiology referrals and to assess the perioperative relevance of the cardiology advice given in patients evaluated for non-cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: A review of case files of 70 patients, scheduled for non-cardiac surgery, who were referred for cardiology consultations from the Anaesthesia Clinic at AKUH during the study period. The clinical criteria for seeking cardiology advice, the cardiology advice given, its influence on patient management, as well as number of adverse cardiac events in the perioperative period were documented. Results: A history of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and ECG abnormalities were the major criteria for seeking opinion on cardiac status. Cardiology advice frequently resulted in the ordering of extensive cardiac investigations. Among the patients identified for further tests by the cardiologists, 75% had no evidence of ischemic heart disease or myocardial dysfunction; none of them were monitored invasively intraoperatively or had adverse cardiac events in the perioperative period requiring intensive care or prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion: No definite criteria or pattern for referrals was identified. Most of the referrals did not fall within the AHA guidelines. Cardiology advice given had very little influence on the perioperative management. (author)

  12. Pediatric dermatology training during residency: a survey of the 2014 graduating residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Alaleh; Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Friedman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of pediatric dermatology is considered a core competency of dermatology training and should be expected of all practicing dermatologists. While the numbers of both pediatric dermatology fellowships and board certified pediatric dermatologists in the workforce have increased over the years, recent reports suggest that there is a gap in pediatric dermatology education during dermatology residency. The goal of this study is to assess the current state of pediatric education during residency, as well as the clinical experience, satisfaction and expectations of graduating dermatology residents. A 31-question self-report survey was distributed electronically to 294 third-year dermatology residents with questions pertaining to demographics, didactic education, resident experience in pediatric dermatology training, satisfaction with pediatric training and future plans. One hundred and twenty-three residents responded (41.8% response rate) representing approximately 29.1% of the total number of graduating residents. 69 (56.1%) residents reported academic time specifically devoted to pediatric dermatology, the majority (79.7%) of which was led by pediatric dermatologists. 82% of residents reported dedicated pediatric dermatology clinics at their program. 86.8% of respondents felt that their training in pediatric dermatology will allow them to confidently see pediatric dermatology patients in practice. This survey highlights a promising state of pediatric dermatology training among current graduating dermatology residents. The majority of current graduating dermatology residents are satisfied with their pediatric dermatology education, feel confident treating pediatric patients, and plan to see pediatric patients in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Teaching of ophthalmology in undergraduate curricula: a survey of Australasian and Asian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jennifer C; Sherwin, Trevor; McGhee, Charles N J

    2007-01-01

    Despite established international guidelines on preferred teaching components for ophthalmology in undergraduate curricula, with increasingly less specialty-based undergraduate teaching within curricula, teaching of core ophthalmology knowledge and skills may become marginalized. This survey aims to evaluate the current state of undergraduate ophthalmology teaching in Australasia and proximate Asian medical schools. A questionnaire was developed to determine the content and extent of ophthalmology teaching in the undergraduate medical curriculum. The questionnaire was sent to 25 medical schools throughout Australasia and Asia. Nineteen of the 25 questionnaires were returned (76% response rate). Ophthalmology teaching programmes ranged from 2 to 20 days: five (26%) medical schools having one ophthalmology attachment; six schools (32%) two attachments; and the remainder three or more. Only seven of the schools taught all 13 ophthalmology topics recommended in current curriculum guidelines. Ocular examination (100%), lens and cataract (95%) and ocular manifestations of systemic disease (95%) were the most commonly taught topics, with intraocular tumours only covered by 10 schools (53%). Students in 14 schools (74%) attended ophthalmology operating theatre, but only two schools (11%) offered attendance at optometry clinics. Ten schools (53%) required a pass in ophthalmology to complete the academic year. Ophthalmology may increasingly be a small, or even absent, component of undergraduate medical curricula. Despite established international ophthalmology curriculum guidelines, this survey highlights significant lack of uniformity in their implementation.

  14. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors’ early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Methods Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974–2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. Results One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort) to 4.2% (2005 cohort) but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort). Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort). The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors’ ‘domestic circumstances’ were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while ‘enthusiasm/commitment’, ‘financial prospects’, ‘experiences of the job so far’ and ‘a particular teacher/department’ were important. Conclusions Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The correspondence between early

  15. Models for joint ophthalmology-optometry patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John J; Kim, Christine M

    2011-07-01

    American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) presented a joint position paper in February 2000 declaring that they do not support routine comanagement of patients with the optometrists. American Optometric Association and American Academy of Optometry quickly responded in support of AAO and ASCRS. All four entities did not preclude legitimate and proper comanagement arrangements. Since that time, the pattern of practice has changed, requiring us to rethink our positions. This paper is written to provide a possible model for the ophthalmology-optometry practice management in ophthalmic surgeries including refractive surgery. Since the publication of the Joint Position Paper, the concept of comanagement has faded and a new model of integrated management has evolved. This has occurred as the changes in the employment pattern of the ophthalmic practice have incorporated optometrists into its fold. This evolution allowed ophthalmic and optometric community to co-exist and thrive to provide better patient care.

  16. [Essential aspects of ophthalmological expert assessment in private accident insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, F

    2014-06-01

    Commissions for an expert assessment place basically high demands on commissioned eye specialists because this activity differs from the normal routine field of work. In addition to assessing objective symptoms and subjective symptomatics in a special analytical manner, eye specialists are expected to have knowledge of basic legal terminology, such as proximate cause, evidence and evidential value. Only under these prerequisites can an ophthalmologist fulfill the function of an expert with a high level of quality and adequately adjust the special medical ophthalmological expertise to the requirements of the predominantly legally based clients commissioning the report and oriented to the appropriate valid legal norms. Particularly common difficulties associated with making an ophthalmological expert report for private accident insurance, e.g. determination of the reduction in functional quality, consideration of partial causality and assessment of diplopia are discussed.

  17. [Teleconsultation network for ophthalmology--experiences and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlmann, G; Walther, H D; Liesenfeld, B; Kaatz, H; Kluthe, S; Fabian, E; Klaas, D; Schnarr, K D; Neubauer, L; Obermaier, M; Wegner, A; Mertz, M; Mann, G

    1998-02-01

    Telemedical services for ophthalmology are developed within the OPHTEL project, which has been funded by the European Union and by the Bavarian government in the Bavaria-online initiative. Seven private ophthalmologists, one university eye clinic, one clinical Diabetes center and an informatics research institute are connected within a teleconsultation network. Asynchronous (based on Internet E-Mail) and synchronous (based on ISDN-mediated videoconferencing tools) types of teleconsultations are realized. 86 teleconsultations (62 asynchronous, 23 synchronous) took place within the first 10 months. Complex and rare eye diseases as well as interdisciplinary questions (ophthalmology--diabetology) are the main area of medical communication interest. Legal and security problems are discussed. Telemedical services must be understood as a complete process of medical care on the basis of modern communication technologies, which influences also the management of this process.

  18. A Concentrated Teaching Exercise for Introducing Clinical Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binford, Robert T.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    At Cornell University Medical College one 3-hour session in dermatology is required during the second year. A teaching exercise has been developed that combines a lecture, laboratory exercises, and presentations of patients. (Author)

  19. Review Article: Health anaesthesia in general dermatological practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudanese Journal of Dermatology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (2005) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Biomechanics in dermatology: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Haber, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Biomechanics is increasingly being recognized as an important research area in dermatology. To highlight only a few examples, biomechanics has contributed to the development of novel topical therapies for aesthetic and medical purposes, enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of plantar melanoma, and provided insight into the epidemiology of psoriatic disease. This article summarizes the findings from recent studies to demonstrate the important role that biomechanics may have in dermatologic disease and therapy and places these biomechanical findings in a clinical context for the practicing physician. In addition, areas for future biomechanics research and development in dermatology are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dermatology nursing in a rural area - the Overberg experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nurse short course at Groote Schuur. Hospital. On completion of the course. I returned ... nursing service at primary healthcare level ... to provide adequate dermatology care at .... Healthcare workers can motivate better adherence to treatment.

  2. Prevalence of dermatological lesions in hospitalized children at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and impetigo (P=0.016) were associated with low socioeconomic classes, while the presence of BCG scar (50.0%) was associated with the high socioeconomic class. Conclusions: This study shows that dermatologic lesions are common in ...

  3. The Inscription of Dermatological Disease on the Self- Concept

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    dermatological conditions, and as such to promote necessary change in the therapeutic domain. Introduction ... treated as merely skin-deep. ... processing of self-relevant information. ..... behaviour, reducing distance between the person and.

  4. Imaging findings in systemic childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Adam Z; Gittler, Julia K; Nakrani, Radhika N; Alis, Jonathan; Blumfield, Einat; Levin, Terry L

    Many childhood diseases often present with skin abnormalities with which radiologists are largely unfamiliar. Knowledge of associated dermatologic manifestations may aid the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and recommending targeted imaging of affected organs. We review the imaging findings in childhood diseases associated with dermatologic manifestations. Diseases include dermatologic findings which herald underlying malignancy (Neuroblastoma, leukemia/lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis),are associated with risk of malignancy (Epidermolysis Bullosa, basal cell nevus syndrome, Cowden's syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis),or indicate a systemic inflammatory/immune disorder (Kawasaki's disease, Henoch Schonlein Purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, dermatomyositis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura). Familiarity with pertinent findings in childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations in childhood diseases aids the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and guiding imaging workup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Optical coherence tomography--a new imaging method in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svorenova, I; Strmen, P; Olah, Z

    2010-01-01

    An improvement of examination methods in ophthalmology, technical digitalisation and knowledge of validity of examinations in various diseases contributes to early diagnostics, thereby leading to an opportunity for early treatment of eye disorders. Standard introduction of the so-called optical coherence tomography into the ophthamological clinical practice facilitated new options for a detailed analysis of pathological processes in the particular layers of the retina (Fig. 2, Ref. 5). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  6. Novel use of smart tablet computer for ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Tian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To identify and categorize ophthalmology-relevant apps for the iPad tablet computer as a source for ophthalmic practices on the Apple's App Store.METHODS: The Apple's App Store was searched for ophthalmology-relevant apps from January 2013 to August 2013. Eligible apps were identified and downloaded into the iPad tablet computers, and then categorized according to the apps' initial contents and our using experiences. Methods about how to use the iPad's built-in functions of instant video call(FaceTime®and automatic data storage technology(iCloud®were also described together with the apps. Other operating systems of Microsoft's Window Phone and Google's Android were also searched for ophthalmology-relevant apps.RESULTS: The keywords for searching on the Apple's App Store were “ophthalmology” and “eye”. And we could found 111 eligible apps with the former keyword, and 452 ones with the latter one. The integrated uses of the iPad tablet computer were then categorized into five aspects. Based on our clinical practice, we finally summarized the advantages and disadvantages of the iPad tablet computer for ophthalmic practices. However, ophthalmology-relevant apps were found to be very limited in number on the other two platforms.CONCLUSION: The integrated use of self built-in apps and third-party apps can facilitate our clinical work in examination, telemedicine, reference, disease education and literature searching. More studies are needed to verify its validation and reliability in the professional fields, especially eye examinations.

  7. Clinical safety and professional liability claims in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz-Güerri, F; Gómez-Durán, E L; Martínez-Palmer, A; Castilla Céspedes, M; Arimany-Manso, J

    2017-11-01

    Patient safety is an international public health priority. Ophthalmology scientific societies and organisations have intensified their efforts in this field. As a tool to learn from errors, these efforts have been linked to the management of medical professional liability insurance through the analysis of claims. A review is performed on the improvements in patient safety, as well as professional liability issues in Ophthalmology. There is a high frequency of claims and risk of economic reparation of damage in the event of a claim in Ophthalmology. Special complaints, such as wrong surgery or lack of information, have a high risk of financial compensation and need strong efforts to prevent these potentially avoidable events. Studies focused on pathologies or specific procedures provide information of special interest to sub-specialists. The specialist in Ophthalmology, like any other doctor, is subject to the current legal provisions and appropriate mandatory training in the medical-legal aspects of health care is essential. Professionals must be aware of the fundamental aspects of medical professional liability, as well as specific aspects, such as defensive medicine and clinical safety. The understanding of these medical-legal aspects in the routine clinical practice can help to pave the way towards a satisfactory and safe professional career, and help in increasing patient safety. The aim of this review is to contribute to this training, for the benefit of professionals and patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Toward computer-assisted diagnosis and telemedicine in ophthalmology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marrugo, A.; Millán, M. S.; Cristóbal, G.; Gabarda, S.; Šorel, Michal; Šroubek, Filip

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 6 (2012), s. 1-3 ISSN 1818-2259 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : computer-aided diagnosis * medical and retinal image * deconvolution * telemedicine Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZOI/sorel-toward computer-assisted diagnosis and telemedicine in ophthalmology.pdf

  9. [International relationships in ophthalmology in the German Democratic Republic (GDR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, M

    2017-09-01

    International relationships in ophthalmology in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) were directed by the government and predominantly promoted relationships to socialist countries in Eastern Europe. The lack of freedom of travel, restrictions of import for scientific journals and general prevention of contacts by the State security service led to a stagnation in daily practice and in research, mainly from 1961 until 1989.

  10. Evaluation of the educational climate for specialty trainees in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, J M R; Passi, V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology specialty trainees (STs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are few in number and will join a thinly spread national consultant body. It is of paramount importance to deliver training programmes of the highest quality for these doctors, central to which is the establishment and maintenance of an educational climate conducive to learning. To conduct a pilot study to evaluate the educational climate for dermatology STs in one UK deanery (West Midlands). Secondary analysis of published data was performed, from the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey, and the Job Evaluation Survey Tool (JEST) administered by the West Midlands deanery. A modified online version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) was circulated among dermatology STs. The GMC's survey data show that UK dermatology STs rated their training highly in comparison with undifferentiated UK postgraduate trainees. West Midlands dermatology STs (n = 22) scored very similarly to UK dermatology STs. The JEST gave broadly encouraging results, with 21/22 (95%) happy to recommend their posts to colleagues. The modified PHEEM yielded a global mean score of 96.5/152, attracting the descriptor 'more positive than negative but room for improvement'. Despite inherent methodological limitations, the GMC, JEST and modified PHEEM surveys have revealed useful comparative triangulated data which allows the conclusion that West Midlands dermatology STs seem to be training in a favourable educational climate. This represents an important facet of the quality assurance process for medical education, and allows insight into areas which may require improvement. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Dermatological manifestations in patients with HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Sahily De la Paz Peña; Leonides Rojas Barly; Reynaldo Hugo Remond Vázquez; Maira Lozano Lavernia

    2015-01-01

    In view of the frequency of the dermatological manifestations in patients who suffer from AIDS/HIV, and with the objective of describing their behaviour, a descriptive,observational, and cross sectional investigation was carried out in the cases of the AIDS provincial consultation at Ernesto Guevara General Teaching Hospital of Las Tunas from January, 2007 to June, 2008. The information was obtained from the survey, the dermatological examination, and the clinical charts. The sample was made ...

  12. Body dysmorphic disorder in the dermatology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior. Although other organs can be involved-for example, the shape of the nose or a portion of an ear- the skin, hair, and nails are most commonly involved, while the patient constantly seeks reassurance about appearance from friends and family. There is a broad spectrum of severity in body dysmorphic disorder, ranging from obsessional worry to frank delusion, and the psychiatric comorbidities-anxiety, depression, and personality disorder-are prominent parts of the picture. Unfortunately, the psychiatric comorbidities and the negative impact on every aspect of the patient's life may not be recognized by dermatologists and other non-psychiatric physicians, so that effective treatment is often not instituted or appropriate referrals made. This paper describes the incidence, possible etiologies, and clinical picture of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology patients and discusses interpersonal approaches that may permit appropriate treatment or referral to take place. Specific treatments and prognosis are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Anti-TNF alpha in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahe, E; Descamps, V

    2002-12-01

    The discovery of the major role of TNF alpha in the physiopathology of certain inflammatory diseases and notably in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease has led to the development of anti-TNF alpha drugs. These new therapeutic arms issued from bio-technology have rapidly demonstrated their efficacy in the treatment of these two diseases. The anti-TNF alpha arsenal is currently dominated by etanercept, a fusion protein composed of a soluble TNF alpha receptor, and infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody. However, new molecules will soon enrich this arsenal. TNF alpha is a major cytokine of inflammatory diseases of the skin. Many dermatological diseases will probably benefit from these new treatments. Two studies have already demonstrated their interest in cutaneous and articular psoriasis. Encouraging sporadic results suggest other potential indications (Behcet's disease, bullous dermatitis, neutrophilic dermatitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, systemic vascularitis,.). These promising new treatments, although expensive, and with yet unknown long term side effects, justify rigorous assessment of their efficacy and tolerance in each indication. Here again the dermatologist has a major role to play in post-marketing pharmacovigilance.

  14. Telemedicine in dermatology during external operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, J J

    2017-11-01

    Telemedicine makes it possible to refer clinical, laboratory, and radiological questions to distant experts, sometimes in real time. This study examines a selection of internet messages sent by physicians carrying out overseas missions or assigned to remote locations and analyzes the interest but also the limitations of teleconsultations in dermatology. The effectiveness of the response depended on the quality of the message, including correct symptom descriptions, thorough history-taking, and the definition of the attached images, as well as the field experience of the specialists receiving the message. Feedback is also of fundamental importance in improving remote expert assessment. The main problem is that conclusive diagnosis is often prevented by the lack of equipment and follow-up available in the field, i.e., inability to perform confirmatory testing or obtain sufficient follow-up information to evaluate the outcome of trial treatments. Training of doctors and nurses in the French Army Medical Service in telemedicine and in clearer better structured messages can contribute to the effectiveness of this mode of communication.

  15. Biologics in dermatology: An integrated review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra N Sehgal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of biologics in dermatologic treatment armentarium has added refreshing dimensions, for it is a major breakthrough. Several agents are now available for use. It is therefore imperative to succinctly comprehend their pharmacokinetics for their apt use. A concerted endeavor has been made to delve on this subject. The major groups of biologics have been covered and include: Drugs acting against TNF-α, Alefacept, Ustekinumab, Rituximab, IVIG and Omalizumab. The relevant pharmacokinetic characteristics have been detailed. Their respective label (approved and off-label (unapproved indications have been defined, highlighting their dosage protocol, availability and mode of administration. The evidence level of each indication has also been discussed to apprise the clinician of their current and prospective uses. Individual anti-TNF drugs are not identical in their actions and often one is superior to the other in a particular disease. Hence, the section on anti-TNF agents mentions the literature on each drug separately, and not as a group. The limitations for their use have also been clearly brought out.

  16. [Nickel levels in female dermatological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegler, U; Twardella, D; Fedorov, M; Darsow, U; Schaller, K-H; Habernegg, R; Behrendt, H; Fromme, H

    2009-07-01

    Nickel levels in urine were determined among 163 female dermatological patients aged 18 to 46 years. Data on life-style factors were collected in parallel via a questionnaire. Urinary nickel excretion was in the normal range of the German female population (0.2-46.1 microg Ni/g creatinine). The 95th percentile (3.9 microg Ni/l urine) exceeded the German reference value (3.0 microg Ni/l urine). In the multivariate regression analyses we found a statistically significant increase of ln-transformed nickel levels with increase in age and in women using dietary supplements. The following variables were not associated with Nickel urine levels: suffering from nickel eczema, smoking, drinking stagnated water, eating foods with high nickel contents and using nickel-containing kitchen utensils as, for example, an electric kettle with an open heater coil. We conclude that personal urinary levels should be assessed with simultaneous consideration of habits and life-style factors. A German national survery would be useful. Those patients who experience the exacerbation of their eczema in cases of oral provocation, for example, by a high nickel diet should be aware of potential sources of nickel, such as supplements.

  17. Photosensitizers and radiosensitizers in dermatology and oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, V.

    1979-01-01

    Two therapeutic modalities are currently of great interest, namely photo- and radiosensitization. Whereas photosensitizers only function in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light, radiosensitizers act only in combination with ionizing radiation. Because of the small UV penetration, up to a maximum of 0,5 mm, photosensitization can take place only at the surface of the body, i.e. the skin. Photosensitizers are applied in dermatology in order to optimize and improve the UV therapy of certain diseases (mainly psoriasis, mycosis fungoides and vitiligo). Radiosensitizers lead to an increase in sensitivity of the hypoxic and therefore radioresistant parts of tumours against X- and gamma-radiation. With sufficient concentration within the tumour, they can act where the radiation can reach, even in the deeper parts of the body. They represent a modern and useful aid to radiation oncology. Because of neurotoxic effects, however, their practical use is limited. A short review of the history, mechanisms of action, application and side-effects of these photo- and radiosensitizers is presented

  18. Retention of Mohs surgeons in academic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shali; Mina, Mary Alice; Brown, Marc D; Zwald, Fiona O

    2015-08-01

    Retention of academic Mohs surgeons is important for the growth of this specialty and teaching of residents and students. To examine factors that influence retention of Mohs surgeons in academics and to better understand reasons for their departure. A survey was electronically distributed to academic Mohs surgeons in the American College of Mohs Surgery, asking them to rate the importance of several variables on their decision to remain in academia. Private practice Mohs surgeons who had left academics were also surveyed. Two hundred thirty-six dermatologic surgeons completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent work full time in academics, and approximately 7% work part time. The top reasons for practicing in the academic setting are intellectual stimulation, teaching opportunities, and collaboration with other university physicians and researchers. Seventy-one percent of respondents reported they would stay in academics, 7% indicated they would not, and 22% were unsure. Unfair compensation, inadequate support staff, poor leadership, increased bureaucracy, and decreased autonomy were top reasons that may compel a Mohs surgeon to leave. Opportunities for intellectual stimulation, collaboration, and teaching remain the main draw for academic Mohs surgeons. A supportive environment, strong leadership, and establishing fair compensation are imperative in ensuring their stay.

  19. Photosensitizers and radiosensitizers in dermatology and oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckner, V [Stellenbosch University, Parowvallei (South Africa). Departments of Medical Physics and Radiology

    1979-09-22

    Two therapeutic modalities are currently of great interest, namely photo- and radiosensitization. Whereas photosensitizers only function in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light, radiosensitizers act only in combination with ionizing radiation. Because of the small UV penetration, up to a maximum of 0,5 mm, photosensitization can take place only at the surface of the body, i.e. the skin. Photosensitizers are applied in dermatology in order to optimize and improve the UV therapy of certain diseases (mainly psoriasis, mycosis fungoides and vitiligo). Radiosensitizers lead to an increase in sensitivity of the hypoxic and therefore radioresistant parts of tumours against X- and gamma-radiation. With sufficient concentration within the tumour, they can act where the radiation can reach, even in the deeper parts of the body. They represent a modern and useful aid to radiation oncology. Because of neurotoxic effects, however, their practical use is limited. A short review of the history, mechanisms of action, application and side-effects of these photo- and radiosensitizers is presented.

  20. The human resource crisis in neuro-ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Larry P

    2008-09-01

    Neuro-ophthalmology is facing a serious human resource issue. Few are entering the subspecialty, which is perceived as being poorly compensated compared with other subspecialties of ophthalmology. The low compensation comes from the fact that 1) non-procedural encounters remain undervalued, 2) efforts that benefit other medical specialists are not counted, and 3) the relatively low expenses of neuro-ophthalmologists are not factored into compensation formulas. Mission-based budgeting, which forces academic departments to be financially accountable without the expectation of fiscal relief from medical schools or practice plans, has exacerbated the compensation issue. Solutions must come from within neuro-ophthalmology, academic departments, medical schools, and medical practice plans. They include 1) providing educational resources so that neuro-ophthalmologists need not spend so much time teaching the basics, 2) factoring into compensation the impact of neuro-ophthalmologists in teaching and on revenue generation by procedure-based specialists, 3) improving the efficiency of neuro-ophthalmologists in their consultative practices by providing ample clerical support and other measures, 4) providing contractual salary compensation by departments such as neurosurgery to recognize the contributions made by neuro-ophthalmologists, and 5) reorganizing the academic clinical effort as multidisciplinary rather than departmental.

  1. Use of Nitrous Oxide in Dermatology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotzman, Erica A; Sandoval, Laura F; Crane, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    Many dermatologic procedures are painful and can be distressing to patients. To determine whether nitrous oxide has been used in dermatology and whether literature supports its use in terms of providing analgesia and anxiety associated with dermatologic procedures. A search of PubMed and Cochrane databases was conducted through July 15, 2016, to identify studies involving nitrous oxide use in dermatology. Eight studies were identified and reviewed. The use of nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture resulted in a significant reduction in pain when used for photodynamic therapy, botulinum toxin therapy for hyperhidrosis of both the palms and axilla, aesthetic procedures involving various laser procedures, and in the treatment of bed sores and leg ulcers. However, pain scores were higher when nitrous oxide/oxygen was used in the debridement of chronic ulcers when compared with the use of topical anesthesia. In addition, nitrous oxide has been reported effective at reducing pain in hair transplants, dermabrasion, excision and repairs, and pediatric procedures. Current literature provides some evidence that nitrous oxide, used alone or as adjunct anesthesia, is effective at providing analgesia for many dermatologic procedures. Nitrous oxide has many potential applications in dermatology; however, further evidence from randomized controlled trials is needed.

  2. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists). ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. Aesthetic dermatology and emotional well-being questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, M Covadonga; Martínez-González, Raquel-Amaya; Guerra-Tapia, Aurora

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been a great development of esthetic dermatology as a subspecialty of dermatology. It is important to know to which extent the general population regard this branch of medical surgical specialty as being of interest and contributing to emotional well-being. To analyze the technical features of a questionnaire which has been designed to reflect such perception of the general population about esthetic dermatology and its contribution to emotional well-being. Production and psychometric analysis of a self-filled in questionnaire in relation to esthetic dermatology and emotional well-being (DEBIE). This questionnaire is made of 57 items and has been applied to a sample of 770 people within the general population. The drawing-up process of the questionnaire is described to provide content validity. Items analysis was carried out together with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to assess the structure and construct validity of the tool. The extent of internal consistency (reliability) and concurrent validity has also been verified. DEBIE questionnaire (Spanish acronym for Aesthetic Dermatology and Emotional Well-being) revolves around six factors explaining 53.91% of the variance; there is a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach's α 0.90) and reasonable criterion validity. DEBIE questionnaire brings together adequate psychometric properties that can be applied to assess the perception that the general population have in relation to esthetic dermatology and its contribution to their emotional well-being. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Integrating cardiology for nuclear medicine physicians. A guide to nuclear medicine physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movahed, Assad; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Buscombe, John R.; Hall, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is no longer a medical discipline residing solely in nuclear medicine. This is the first book to recognize this fact by integrating in-depth information from both the clinical cardiology and nuclear cardiology literature, and acknowledging cardiovascular medicine as the fundamental knowledge base needed for the practice of nuclear cardiology. The book is designed to increase the practitioner's knowledge of cardiovascular medicine, thereby enhancing the quality of interpretations through improved accuracy and clinical relevance.The text is divided into four sections covering all major topics in cardiology and nuclear cardiology: -Basic Sciences and Cardiovascular Diseases; -Conventional Diagnostic Modalities; -Nuclear Cardiology; -Management of Cardiovascular Diseases. (orig.)

  5. Start from scratch: the prospect of nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The future is always hard to forecast but the prospect of nuclear cardiology has never been more unobtainable than these days. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the major nuclear medicine studies for decades, but the annual number of MPS is stagnant or steadily decreasing in Korea and other countries. The challenge from coronary computed tomography (CCT) and the concern of radiation exposure of MPS were the main reasons for the stalemate of nuclear cardiology. Compared to the rapid technological progress of CCT, enabling greater image resolution in conjunction with lower radiation exposure to the patients, development of new radiopharmaceuticals or scintillation imaging techniques has been at a relatively slow pace. Therefore, the future of nuclear cardiology is really dependent on the application of the genuine nuclear medicine principle to patient's management. The review for current update of nuclear cardiology will ensue in the next issue of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  6. Differences in dermatology training abroad: A comparative analysis of dermatology training in the United States and in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jhorar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dermatology residency training is not standardized internationally, and each country dictates how training is conducted within its own borders. This article highlights the types of variability in training that can occur from country to country by comparing dermatology residency training programs in the United States and India. This article specifically analyzes the differences that pertain to application and selection, residency program structure, and post-residency opportunities.

  7. Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Cardiology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Munes; Alahdab, Fares; Alsaied, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Participating in a scholarly activity is one of the training requirements for cardiology fellows. However, it can be very challenging to complete a research project during such a busy period of clinical training. To help the cardiology fellows in choosing and starting off a research project, a light has been shed on the process of conducting a systematic review, and the importance of this research activity, as well as its limitations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cardiac transplantation: 15 years experience Cardiology Institute of Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceruti, B; Chiesa, P.; Tambasco, J.; Anzibar, R.; Gutierrez, C.; Barboza, S.; Manfredi, A.; Leone, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cardiac transplant is the treatment of choice for the cardiac insufficiency when there is not another therapeutic alternative that prolongs the life expectancy. On December 1996 The Cardiology Institute of child begin the program of Cardiac Insufficiency and Transplants of the Institute of Pediatric Cardiology, achieving the first cardiac transplant in a 14-year-old child in Uruguay. Three years later they put in practice the program of cardiac transplant in adults

  9. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists

  10. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists.

  11. Static and dynamic scintigraphy in radioisotope cardiology diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.; Zolna, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Pasyk, S.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the applications of scintigraphy in cardiac diagnosis is given. The principle of operation of the gamma-camera and of the scintigraphic system, the handling of data and the so-called gated scintigraphy are discussed. Characteristics of some radioisotopes applied in nuclear cardiology are given. The most frequent clinical states are discussed in which isotope diagnostics may be useful. Attention is drawn to the advantages of nuclear cardiology methods over conventional diagnostics. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Patients Visiting the Dermatology Emergency Unit of a University Dermatology Hospital in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Robabeh; Matinfar, Amin; Sasani, Pardis; Salehi, Anahita; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam

    2017-11-01

    Published studies on dermatological emergencies are limited in the literature. To our knowledge, no study has previously explored this subject in Iran. Our aim was to ascertain the characteristics of patients visiting the dermatologic emergency (DE) unit of a university skin hospital in Tehran, Iran. We studied the files of all the patients seen in the DE unit over a 3-month period, collecting data on age, sex, referral mode, duration of consultation, status (true emergency or non-emergency), and diagnosis. A total of 2539 patients were evaluated; 53% of them were female. Infection and infestation (41.9%), urticaria (16.7%), and dermatitis (13.2%) were the most prevalent entities. Almost 1% of the patients were referred by another physician and psoriasis was their most frequent diagnosis. Almost 2.6% of the patients were hospitalized; psoriasis was once again the most frequent cause. The hospitalization rate was significantly higher in referred patients (Pdermatologic disorders. This data could also help in tailoring the educational curriculum for medical students more appropriately in order to increase their knowledge of the most prevalent skin disorders.

  13. Electrocardiographic interpretation skills of cardiology residents: are they competent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Matthew; Davies, Edward G; Dorian, Paul; Yu, Eric H C

    2014-12-01

    Achieving competency at electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation among cardiology subspecialty residents has traditionally focused on interpreting a target number of ECGs during training. However, there is little evidence to support this approach. Further, there are no data documenting the competency of ECG interpretation skills among cardiology residents, who become de facto the gold standard in their practice communities. We tested 29 Cardiology residents from all 3 years in a large training program using a set of 20 ECGs collected from a community cardiology practice over a 1-month period. Residents interpreted half of the ECGs using a standard analytic framework, and half using their own approach. Residents were scored on the number of correct and incorrect diagnoses listed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 58%. Of 6 potentially life-threatening diagnoses, residents missed 36% (123 of 348) including hyperkalemia (81%), long QT (52%), complete heart block (35%), and ventricular tachycardia (19%). Residents provided additional inappropriate diagnoses on 238 ECGs (41%). Diagnostic accuracy was similar between ECGs interpreted using an analytic framework vs ECGs interpreted without an analytic framework (59% vs 58%; F(1,1333) = 0.26; P = 0.61). Cardiology resident proficiency at ECG interpretation is suboptimal. Despite the use of an analytic framework, there remain significant deficiencies in ECG interpretation among Cardiology residents. A more systematic method of addressing these important learning gaps is urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological stress agents in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Treadmill test combined with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is a commonly used technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However there are a group of patients who may not be able to undergo treadmill tests. Patients with underlying conditions like neuromuscular disease, musculoskeletal disorder, heart failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on renal dialysis would find it difficult to perform exercise on a treadmill or bicycle ergometer. These conditions prevent them from performing adequate exercise. Such patients would benefit from pharmacological stress procedures combined with MPS. Nuclear medicine departments use various pharmacological agents while performing stress tests on cardiac patients. The most commonly used pharmacological agents for cardiac stress are coronary vasodilators and catecholamines. In addition to these agents, adjuvant use of nitrates and atropine is also a common practice in nuclear cardiology. This review addresses various physiological and pharmacological properties of the commonly used pharmacological stress agents in MPS and critically analyses their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their safety and efficacy. (author)

  15. Interventional Cardiology for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Damien

    2018-05-01

    Congenital heart interventions are now replacing surgical palliation and correction in an evolving number of congenital heart defects. Right ventricular outflow tract and ductus arteriosus stenting have demonstrated favorable outcomes compared to surgical systemic to pulmonary artery shunting, and it is likely surgical pulmonary valve replacement will become an uncommon procedure within the next decade, mirroring current practices in the treatment of atrial septal defects. Challenges remain, including the lack of device design focused on smaller infants and the inevitable consequences of somatic growth. Increasing parental and physician expectancy has inevitably lead to higher risk interventions on smaller infants and appreciation of the consequences of these interventions on departmental outcome data needs to be considered. Registry data evaluating congenital heart interventions remain less robust than surgical registries, leading to a lack of insight into the longer-term consequences of our interventions. Increasing collaboration with surgical colleagues has not been met with necessary development of dedicated equipment for hybrid interventions aimed at minimizing the longer-term consequences of scar to the heart. Therefore, great challenges remain to ensure children and adults with congenital heart disease continue to benefit from an exponential growth in minimally invasive interventions and technology. This can only be achieved through a concerted collaborative approach from physicians, industry, academia and regulatory bodies supporting great innovators to continue the philosophy of thinking beyond the limits that has been the foundation of our specialty for the past 50 years. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  16. New devices and technology in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobis, Jonathan Marvin; Abudayyeh, Islam

    2015-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements made in the tools and techniques used since the advent of percutaneous coronary intervention. What was primarily developed as a treatment of coronary artery disease is now used to address a variety of structural heart disease problems. The outcomes have been remarkably successful with relatively low complication rates that rival the results of open-heart surgery. This article will review some of the new devices available for management of structural cardiac conditions including congenital defects and acquired valvular abnormalities. Transcatheter treatment offers advantages over surgical intervention in recovery time, improved patient satisfaction, lower procedural risk, and avoidance of cardio-pulmonary bypass especially in high-risk patients. We will discuss different medical conditions and introduce the devices used to treat these conditions. Each device or technique has benefits and risks, and familiarity with the devices along with patient selection will best optimize the outcome. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Toward a personal health society in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayn, Jocelyne; Rubel, Paul

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new generation of health services that has emerged due to the development of advanced information and communication technology (ICT) solutions, like the Enhanced Personal, Intelligent, and Mobile system for Early Detection and Interpretation of Cardiac Syndromes (EPI-MEDICS). It is a personal self-care system that allows any citizen to self-record high-quality ECGs on demand with a smart portable device, which is endowed with powerful ICT capabilities: self-adaptive embedded intelligence, mobile health record management support on SmartMedia card, embedded Web server, and wireless communication. The EPI-MEDICS solution design also provides ambient, intelligent, and pervasive computing services offering any citizen a ubiquitous, reliable, and efficient management of his/her own cardiac status. A multicentric evaluation performed in Europe with a series of device prototypes and the performance assessment of the original methods of signal synthesis that were designed to guarantee a high interoperability level of the recorded data within the clinical practice, as well as of the decision-support methodologies that were developed for an early detection of life-threatening myocardial ischemia and arrhythmia, at home or anywhere, demonstrate the pertinence of going toward a personal health society in cardiology, which still yields the highest mortality rate in industrialized countries.

  18. Filter's importance in nuclear cardiology imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Maria C. de; Lima, Ana L.S.; Santos, Joyra A. dos; Megueriam, Berdj A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine is a medical speciality which employs tomography procedures for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. One of the most commonly used apparatus is the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). To perform exams, a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical must be given to the patient. Then, a gamma camera is placed in convenient positions to perform the photon counting, which is used to reconstruct a full 3 dimensional distribution of the radionuclide inside the body or organ. This reconstruction provides a 3-dimensional image in spatial coordinates, of the body or organ under study, allowing the physician to give the diagnostic. Image reconstruction is usually worked in the frequency domain, due to a great simplification introduced by the Fourier decomposition of image spectra. After the reconstruction, an inverse Fourier transform must be applied to trace back the image into spatial coordinates. To optimize this reconstruction procedure, digital filters are used to remove undesirable components of frequency, which can 'shadow' relevant physical signatures of diseases. Unfortunately, the efficiency of the applied filter is strongly dependent on its own mathematical parameters. In this work we demonstrate how filters interfere on image quality in cardiology examinations with SPECT, concerning perfusion and myocardial viability and the importance of the medical physicist in the choice of the right filters avoiding some serious problems that could occur in the inadequate processing of an image damaging the medical diagnosis. (author)

  19. Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Joseph C.; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the basics of cardiovascular gene therapy, the results of recent human clinical trials, and the rapid progress in imaging techniques in cardiology. Improved understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of coronary heart disease has made gene therapy a potential new alternative for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have established the proof-of-principle that gene transfer to the cardiovascular system can achieve therapeutic effects. First human clinical trials provided initial evidence of feasibility and safety of cardiovascular gene therapy. However, phase II/III clinical trials have so far been rather disappointing and one of the major problems in cardiovascular gene therapy has been the inability to verify gene expression in the target tissue. New imaging techniques could significantly contribute to the development of better gene therapeutic approaches. Although the exact choice of imaging modality will depend on the biological question asked, further improvement in image resolution and detection sensitivity will be needed for all modalities as we move from imaging of organs and tissues to imaging of cells and genes. (orig.)

  20. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  1. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education.

  2. Neuro-ophthalmological conditions: Study of the clinical care pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat, I; Challe, G; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B; Touitou, V

    2017-06-01

    Neuro-ophthalmologic conditions require specialized multidisciplinary management, both medical and surgical, for patients affected by visual loss due to nervous system disease. The primary goal of this study is to define the specificity of neuro-ophthalmology within the realm of visual health. The secondary goal is to review clinical care pathways by studying the organization of management, in terms of accessibility to care and personalization of the care pathway. A field study was carried out from February to June 2015, within the ophthalmology service of the Pitié-Salpêtrière University Medical Center in Paris. A 30-minute interview with the patient before or after his or her neuro-ophthalmology consultation was performed, to describe the clinical care pathway. The medical records of interviewed patients were also analyzed. Seventeen care pathways (10 women and 7 men) were reviewed. The mean age at appearance of visual involvement was 44.5 years (±8.4 years). If we exclude 3 patients over 66 years and retired, 35.71% were active, 35.71% were disabled, and 28.57% were on sick leave. Ten patients (58.82%) met the criteria for admission to long-term care. The first step had been carried out by local private practitioners. The first physician seen was the general medicine physician (59%), then the private ophthalmologist on an emergency basis (17%). On average, patients went through 8 steps during their care pathway (from 6 to 10 steps) and 14 medical departments were involved. The study showed collaboration with the other services of the University Hospital Department of Vision and Disabilities (notably with the Fondation Rothschild, the Quinze-Vingts National Ophthalmology Hospital, and the Fondation Sainte-Marie). In addition to rehabilitation services, health care professionals participating in the outpatient care of the patients included an orthoptist (11.7%), a psychologist (11.7%), and an optician specializing in low vision for visual aids. Finally

  3. Analysis of online patient education materials in pediatric ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ann M; John, Elizabeth S; Hansberry, David R; Thomas, Prashant J; Guo, Suqin

    2015-10-01

    Patients increasingly consult online resources for healthcare information. The American Medical Association (AMA) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommend that online education resources be written between a 3rd- and 7th-grade level. This study assesses whether online health information abides by these guidelines. Ten pediatric ophthalmology conditions were entered into a commonly used search engine, Google.com, and analyzed using 10 validated readability scales. Scientific articles and articles written on patient forums were excluded. The 10 conditions--amblyopia, cataract, conjunctivitis, corneal abrasion, nystagmus, retinoblastoma, retinopathy of prematurity, strabismus, stye, and glaucoma--were also searched and analyzed separately from widely used websites, including Wikipedia and WebMD, as well as those of professional societies, including the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) and the American Optometric Association (AOA). The majority of articles were written above recommended guidelines. All scales showed that the 100 articles were written at a mean grade-level of 11.75 ± 2.72. Only 12% of articles were written below a 9th-grade level and only 3% met recommended criteria. The articles accrued separately from Wikipedia, WebMD, AAPOS, and AOA also had average grade levels above the recommended guidelines. The readability of online patient education material exceeds NIH and AMA guidelines. This disparity can adversely affect caregiver comprehension of such resources and contribute to poor decision making. Pediatric ophthalmology online articles are generally written at a level too high for average caregiver comprehension. Revision of articles can increase satisfaction, improve outcomes, and facilitate the patient-ophthalmologist relationship. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. E-learning program for medical students in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiana Silveira; Souza, Murilo Barreto; Filho, Roberto Silveira Silva; de Medeiros, Luciana Molina; Criado, Paulo Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop an e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning). Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning) had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0±0.8) than those who only participated in classes (7.75±1.8, p dermatology. PMID:21655756

  5. Comorbidity of depressive and dermatologic disorders - therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaković, Pavo; Petek, Anamarija; Koić, Oliver; Radanović-Grgurić, Ljiljana; Degmecić, Dunja

    2009-09-01

    Depressive disorders are more common in the population affected with dermatologic disorders. Comorbidity of depression and dermatologic disorders is around 30%. The correlation between depressive and dermatologic disorders still remains unclear. In psychodermatology three disorders are described: a) psychophysiological disorders (both disorders induced and maintained by stressors), b) secondary psychiatric disorders (mental disorder as a result of skin leasions and treatment) and c) primary psychiatric disorders (skin alterations as a result of mental disorders and treatment). In depression and dermatology disorders in which certain precipitating factors are required thereby causing alteration of the patient's immunological identity causing a combination of hereditary features and ones acquired through adaptation occur to cause the disorder to develop. The cytokines are vital in the regulation of the immunology response and are also mediators of non-infective inflammatory processes leading to recurrent hormonal secretion affecting the function of the vegetative and central nervous system leading to so called "sickness behaviour", marked by loss of appetite, anhedonia, anxiety, decrease of concentration and interest along with other changes which generate a picture of depressive disorder. Treatment of depressive and dermatologic disorders is complex and requires an integral therapeutic approach encompassing all aspects of both disorders and their comorbidity. Therefore therapeutic success lies in a team approach to the patient under the auspice of consultative-liason psychiatry by setting the frame for efficient collaboration and bridging the gap between the mental and the physical in everyday clinical practice.

  6. Uses and complications of mitomycin C in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearza, Ali A; Aslanides, Ioannis M

    2007-01-01

    Mitomycin C is a chemotherapeutic agent that acts by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Its use and application in ophthalmology has been increasing in recent years because of its modulatory effects on wound healing. Current applications include pterygium surgery, glaucoma surgery, corneal refractive surgery, cicatricial eye disease, conjunctival neoplasia and allergic eye disease. Although it has been used successfully in these conditions, it has also been associated with significant complications. This article reviews the current trends and uses of mitomycin C in the eye and its reported complications.

  7. [Platforms are needed for innovative basic research in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-qiang

    2012-07-01

    Basic research poses the cornerstone of technical innovation in all lines including medical sciences. Currently, there are shortages of professional scientists as well as technical supporting teams and facilities in the field of basic research of ophthalmology and visual science in China. Evaluation system and personnel policies are not supportive for innovative but high-risk-of-failure research projects. Discussion of reasons and possible solutions are given here to address these problems, aiming at promoting buildup of platforms hosting novel and important basic research in eye science in this country.

  8. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYMERIC FILMS USED IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Emanuel STAVARACHE

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to characterize the surface properties of (polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA foils used in ophathalmological applications. Thus, the morphology, chemical composition and surface energy of these PMMA foils are analyzed, by specific measurements, at the interface with different test liquids of interest in ophthalmology, i.e. distilled H2 O, physiological serum and ophthalmic solution of ReNu Multiplus, used for contact lens cleaning, hydration and disinfection. Also, a solution of Nostamine, known as a drug used in eye irritation and conjunctival inflammation, was tested.

  9. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  10. Occupational dose measurement in interventional cardiology, dosimetry comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.M.A.

    2008-05-01

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart disease. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Therefore workers in interventional cardiology are expected to receive high doses. This study overviews the status of occupational exposure at the three cardiology centers at three different hospitals in Khartoum compared with that received by workers at other medical practices (radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology) in the Institute of Nuclear and Technology (INMO) at El Gezira. The TLD Harshaw 6600 reader was used in the assessment of effective dose for Hp (10). Two TLDs were used by each worker at the three cardiology centres, one worn under a protective apron and the other worn outside and above the apron as specified by the ICRP. Each worker at the other sections was facilitated with one dosimeter to be worn on the chest. The annual doses received by 14 cardiologists, 13 nurses and 9 technologists at the three cardiology centres were in the range: (0.84-4.77), (0.15-2.08), (0.32-1.10) mSv respectively. In the INMO the annual doses received by 7 doctors, 5 nurses and 14 technologists were in the range: (0.12-0.51), (0.11-0.65), (0.03-1.39) mSv respectively. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. The study also indicated that doses received by workers in interventional cardiology, in particular the cardiologists are high compared to that received at the other medical sections.(Author)

  11. Some Nigerian plants of dermatologic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajose, Frances O A

    2007-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 80% of the world's population uses medicinal plants in the treatment of diseases and, in African countries, this rate is much higher. In recent years, however, medicinal plants have represented a primary health source for the pharmaceutical industry. No less than 400 compounds derived from plants are currently used in the preparation of drugs, such as vincristine and vinblastine used in the treatment of cancer. Nigerians still depend largely on crude herbal remedies or traditional medicine. They also use wild plants for cosmetics and perfumery. Some of these herbal remedies have been observed to be effective in certain skin diseases. The data were obtained from history questionnaires completed by patients at the Dermatology Clinic, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria, and from oral interviews with vendors and prescribers of herbal preparations at major markets at Lagos and Ijebu-Ode in south-west Nigeria, between July 2004 and July 2006. Photographs of plants were taken at private residences at Lagos, Ibadan, and Ijebu-Ode in south-west Nigeria. A literature search was conducted on 38 of the plants. The data are presented in tabular form. Sixty-five per cent of patients had applied some form of herbal remedy before attending our clinic. The reasons for consultation included relapses, unsustained relief, incomplete resolution, and post inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Lesions for which herbs were successfully applied included infantile eczema and seborrhoiec dermatitis, atopic eczema, impetigo, impetiginized eczema, tinea capitis, scabies, erythema multiforme, leg ulcers, localized vitiligo, and sexually transmitted diseases. Partial relief was achieved in dermatophytoses, ichthyosis, leprosy, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Some forms of alopecia, onychomycosis, and vitiligo, as well as allergic dermatoses, were not improved by herbal medicines. The preparation of the

  12. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    in keratinocytes. The role of acetylcholine and the role of DMAE as a modulator of acetylcholine-mediated functions in the skin remain to be elucidated.Thus, the benefits of DMAE in dermatology include a potential anti-inflammatory effect and a documented increase in skin firmness with possible improvement in underlying facial muscle tone. Studies are needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of DMAE compared with other skin-care regimens (e.g., topical antioxidant creams, alpha-hydroxy acids).

  13. [The significance of dermatologic management in computer-assisted occupational dermatology consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoski, J; Borelli, S

    1989-01-15

    At our occupational outpatient clinic, 230 patients were treated for about 15 months. With the help of a standardized questionary, we registered all the data regarding the relevant substances the patients contacted during their work as well as their various jobs since they left school. The patients were repeatedly seen and trained in procedures of skin care and skin protection. If required, we took steps to find new jobs for them within their employing company; this was done in cooperation with the trade cooperative association according to the dermatological insurance consultanship. If these proceedings did not work out, the patient had to change his profession altogether. All data were computerized. As an example for this computer-based documentation we present the data of barbers.

  14. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  15. Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Description and Evaluation of a Novel Intensive Training Program for Pediatric Cardiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2016-06-01

    The transition from residency to subspecialty fellowship in a procedurally driven field such as pediatric cardiology is challenging for trainees. We describe and assess the educational value of a pediatric cardiology "boot camp" educational tool designed to help prepare trainees for cardiology fellowship. A two-day intensive training program was provided for pediatric cardiology fellows in July 2015 at a large fellowship training program. Hands-on experiences and simulations were provided in: anatomy, auscultation, echocardiography, catheterization, cardiovascular intensive care (CVICU), electrophysiology (EP), heart failure, and cardiac surgery. Knowledge-based exams as well as surveys were completed by each participant pre-training and post-training. Pre- and post-exam results were compared via paired t tests, and survey results were compared via Wilcoxon rank sum. A total of eight participants were included. After boot camp, there was a significant improvement between pre- and post-exam scores (PRE 54 ± 9 % vs. POST 85 ± 8 %; p ≤ 0.001). On pre-training survey, the most common concerns about starting fellowship included: CVICU emergencies, technical aspects of the catheterization/EP labs, using temporary and permanent pacemakers/implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), and ECG interpretation. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, there was a statistically significant improvement in the participants comfort level in 33 of 36 (92 %) areas of assessment. All participants (8/8, 100 %) strongly agreed that the boot camp was a valuable learning experience and helped to alleviate anxieties about the start of fellowship. A pediatric cardiology boot camp experience at the start of cardiology fellowship can provide a strong foundation and serve as an educational springboard for pediatric cardiology fellows.

  16. Comparison of nuclear cardiology in the United States and Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.; Giubbini, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Cardiology is a widely available and a widely accepted tool for diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease both in the US and in Europe. Although the most common indications for nuclear studies are similar in the US and Europe, different social and economical environments may affect the practice of Nuclear Cardiology. The aim of this paper is to identify key issues and to provide some information on the similarities and differences which characterize the practice of Nuclear Cardiology in the US and Europe. This paper takes into account the training requirements, the relationships between different professional societies, the accessibility, the choice of imaging protocols, tracers and stressors, the impact of managed care and the role of cardiologists, nuclear physicians and technologists in nuclear labs. The economical differences which may affect the field of high technology, imply a wide range of variability concerning the availability of nuclear cardiology studies in different countries (1:1/10). Moreover the legislation which regulates the practice of nuclear medicine may differ from country. Thus in our opinion there are several important factors both in the US and Europe limiting the development of nuclear cardiology independently of its intrinsic clinical value

  17. Psychiatric morbidity in dermatology patients: Frequency and results of consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Muammer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatological patients quite commonly depict psychiatric morbidity. PURPOSES: To study the psychiatric morbidity among skin patients of our clinic. METHODS: In the present study, the patients who were treated in the Dermatology Clinic of Inonu University Medical Faculty were evaluated retrospectively. The age, gender, marital status, habits, dermatological and systemic diseases, previously used drugs, current therapy and psychiatric diagnosis of each patient were recorded. FINDINGS: Of 636 patients involved in the study, 15.3% had psychopathological problems, which were depression (32.0%, adjustment difficulty (15.5%, anxiety (13.4%, psychosomatic disorders (10.3%, obsessive-compulsive disorder and conversion (5.1%, dysthymic disorder (4.1%, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (2.1%, panic attack (1.0%, premenstrual syndrome, schizophrenia, somatization disorder, insomnia, alcohol dependency, bipolar affective disorder, mental retardation, agoraphobia, social phobia and dementia. The dermatological diseases defined for the patients with psychopathology diagnosis were chronic urticaria (25.8%; psoriasis (15.5%; alopecia areata, totalis and iniversalis (11.3%; acute urticaria, neurodermatitis and Behcet′s disease (5.1%; atopic dermatitis and drug eruptions (4.1%; pemphigus (3.1%; angioedema, contact dermatitis and generalized pruritus (2.1%; folliculitis and the others (1.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric morbidity has an affect on the course of dermatological diseases. When required, psychiatric consultation should be sought by dermatology clinics and patients should be followed with the cooperation of dermatologists and psychiatrists. LIMITATION: The indoor-based study had not included any control group and any domicillary patient.

  18. Review of Dermatology Associations and Their Functions on Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Gizlent

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Associations are the most important constituents of occupational organizations. The objective of this study was to determine dermatology associations and to investigate their structures and functions. Material and Method: Dermatology associations were reached through the internet via a search engine (www.google.com by entering the keywords “international, Asian, European, African, and the other nationalities and races” and “dermatology, cutaneous, skin, nail, hair, skin biology, cosmetic, laser, photobiology, dermoscopy, teledermatology, dermatoallergy, dermatoimmunology, sexually transmitted disease, dermatovenerology, dermatooncology, dermatosurgery, dermatologic imaging, dermatopathology, physchodermatology” and “foundation, association, society, organization”. The associations were classified into four groups according to the entities on the particular website and publication language. Associations were searched on the “International League of Dermatology Societies (ILDS” website in order to investigate membership status. Furthermore, we investigated history, aim, administrative structure, revenue sources, the number of members, membership requirements and benefits, training activities, periodicals, scientific working groups and social activities. Results: One hundred ninety-four associations worldwide have been determined. The countries with a significant number of associations were the United States of America - 22, Turkey - 14, Italy - 11 and England - 9. Fifty-three associations worldwide were international and 141 were national. The countries with a higher number of international associations were the United States of America - 12 and Germany - 5. There were 72 associations with an english website, 17 with a website in both english and local language, 53 with a website in only local language, 52 without a website. From Turkey, only one association had a website in english, but none of them were

  19. Social networking sites: emerging and essential tools for communication in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Endly, Dawnielle; Tamai, Jennifer M; Henley, Jill; Brewer, Ann Chang; Dunn, Jeffrey H; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    The use of social media by dermatology journals and professional and patient-centered dermatology organizations remains largely unknown and, to our knowledge, has yet to be fully evaluated. To evaluate and quantify the extent of involvement of dermatology journals, professional dermatology organizations, and dermatology-related patient advocate groups on social networking sites. We obtained an archived list of 102 current dermatology journals from SCImago on the World Wide Web and used the list to investigate Facebook, Twitter, and individual journal websites for the presence of social media accounts. We identified professional and patient-centered dermatology organization activity on social networks through queries of predetermined search terms on Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. The activity of each entity was documented by recording the following metrics of popularity: the numbers of Facebook "likes," Twitter "followers," and LinkedIn "members." The numbers of Facebook likes, Twitter followers, and LinkedIn members corresponding to each dermatology journal and each professional and patient-related dermatology organization. On July 17, 2012, of the 102 dermatology journals ranked by SCImago, 12.7% were present on Facebook and 13.7% on Twitter. We identified popular dermatology journals based on Facebook likes and Twitter followers, led by the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and Dermatology Times, respectively. Popular professional dermatology organizations included dermRounds Dermatology Network (11 251 likes on Facebook and 2900 followers on Twitter). The most popular dermatology patient-centered organizations were the Skin Cancer Foundation (20 119 likes on Facebook), DermaTalk (21 542 followers on Twitter), and the National Psoriasis Foundation (200 members on LinkedIn). Patient-centered and professional dermatology organizations use social networking sites; however, academic journals tend to lag behind significantly. Although some

  20. Leadership in Ophthalmology: The Role of Physician-MBAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S; Tsai, James C

    2018-04-01

    As American health care evolves, an increasing number of doctors are pursuing MBAs. However, relatively little is known about how business training translates into their future careers. This study characterizes ophthalmologists who have completed MBAs and identifies opportunities for physician leadership in the field. Cross-sectional study. We identified 120 ophthalmologists who hold MBAs. We searched each individual's online profiles to collect information on demographics, training, and professional activities. Physician-MBAs in ophthalmology are 80% male; 80% are fellowship trained; and 28% are in primarily nonclinical roles and 55% participate in significant nonclinical activity. Hospital administration is most common (31%), followed by pharmaceutical administration (7%) and consulting (5%). Older ophthalmologist-MBAs were more likely to work in nonclinical roles, with 79% of those who completed residency before 2000 engaged in significant nonclinical activity compared to 30% of those who completed residency after 2000. The most common employers of physician-MBAs in ophthalmology are academic medical centers (43%), large group practices (30%), and private practices (13%). The majority of ophthalmologist-MBAs work in primarily clinical roles, although a sizable proportion hold nonclinical positions. Moving forward, we anticipate an increased role for physician leaders in health care administration, policy, and entrepreneurship. While formal management training is not necessary for these roles, a growing number of physicians have sought out MBAs to support their nonclinical interests. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Microbiological and pharmacokinetic studies on flomoxef in ophthalmologic field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooishi, M; Sakaue, F; Oomomo, A; Tazawa, H

    1989-05-01

    Microbiological and pharmacokinetic studies were carried out on flomoxef (FMOX, 6315-S), a new oxacephem parenteral antibiotic, in the ophthalmologic field. The results obtained are summarized as follows. FMOX has a broad antimicrobial activity spectrum against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The MIC distribution against Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical cases was less than or equal to 0.20 - greater than or equal to 100 micrograms/ml with the peak value of 0.39 micrograms/ml. Concentrations of FMOX in aqueous humor and ocular tissues were determined after intravenous injection of 50 mg/kg to rabbits. FMOX showed a peak level of 2.2 micrograms/ml in the aqueous humor at 1/2 hour after administration with the ratio to serum level of 3.4%. Levels of FMOX in external and internal ocular tissues were 12.7 - 76.5 micrograms/g, less than 0.8 - 34.4 micrograms/g (ml) at 1/2 hour after administration, respectively. From these results, we concluded that FMOX may be expected to be a useful and valuable agent against infections in the ophthalmologic field.

  2. The gamma knife in ophthalmology. Part One--Uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wygledowska-Promieńska, Dorota; Jurys, Małgorzata; Wilczyński, Tomasz; Drzyzga, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    The Gamma Knife was designed by Lars Leksell in the early 1950's. It gave rise to a new discipline of medicine--stereotactic radiosurgery. Primarily dedicated to neurosurgery, the Gamma Knife has become an alternative, widely used surgery technique. According to Elekta's statistics, approximately 60,000 people are treated with Leksell Gamma Knife every year and it is the most extensively studied stereotactic radiosurgery system in the world. The Leksell Gamma Knife can also be used in ophthalmology. The gamma ray beam concentration enables effective treatment of uveal melanoma, choroidal hemangioma, orbital tumors or even choroidal neovascularization. The virtue of Leksell Gamma Knife is its extreme precision, non-invasiveness and the possibility of outpatient treatment, which significantly reduces costs and diminishes post-operative complications. Innovative solutions shorten a single session to a minimum, which is very comfortable and safe for both staff and patients. Advantages and possible side effects of gamma knife radiosurgery are well-documented in the professional literature. The objective of this review is to present the recognized applications of Leksell Gamma Knife in ophthalmology.

  3. Finlay y la oftalmología Finlay and ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Lisset Arredondo Torres

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica acerca de la personalidad y la obra del científico camagüeyano Carlos Juan Finlay Barré, para ampliar y profundizar los conocimientos de médicos generales y oftalmólogos. En síntesis, se describe la vida de quien realizó trascendentales contribuciones a la medicina universal. Como sus descubrimientos sobre la fiebre amarilla irradian un conocimiento científico tan elevado, es necesario escudriñar sus aportes a la oftalmología. Se destacan algunos de los aportes más relevantes y de forma precisa se hace referencia a varios estudios realizados por él, así como la descripción de su técnica para la cirugía de catarata.A bibliographical revision on Carlos Juan Finlay Barré’s life and work was carried out to widen and deepen knowledge on general medicine and ophthalmology. In short, the life of man who made significant contributions to universal medicine is herein described. As his discoveries about the yellow fever have provided prominent scientific knowledge, so it is necessary to examine his contributions to ophthalmology. Some of his more relevant contributions and studies are also pointed out, as well as the description of his technique for cataract surgery.

  4. Ophthalmological evolution in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Rodriguez, Maria Teresa; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Julio Cesar; Alavez Martin, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at analyzing the ophthalmological evolution in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine. 100 patients (88 females and 12 males) from the thyroid department of the National Institute of Endocrinology with clinical and biochemical diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and with a mean age of 40 + - 10 years old, were studied. These patients underwent a treatment with radioactive iodine at a dose of 80 m Ci/g of thyroid tissue. A bilateral ophthalmometry was performed to each patient before the treatment and 12 months after it. Mean ophthalmometry of the right eye was 14.51 + - 2.86 mm before the treatment and 13.92 + - 2.83 mm after the treatment, whereas for the left eye it was 14.98 + - 2.91 mm and 14.27 + - 2.83 mm , respectively. Taking into account the results of the ophthalmometry, we concluded that the use of radioactive iodine in the treatment of hyperthyroid patients had no negative results on the ophthalmological evolution of the studied patients

  5. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances*

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology. PMID:24626675

  6. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology.

  7. What to Expect from the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P.; Orr, Nicole M.; Dodson, John A.; Rich, Michael W.; Wenger, Nanette K.; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary; Maurer, Mathew S.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. While some assume a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, and thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  8. Practice gaps in patient safety among dermatology residents and their teachers: a survey study of dermatology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swary, Jillian Havey; Stratman, Erik J

    2014-07-01

    Curriculum and role modeling adjustments are necessary to address patient safety gaps occurring during dermatology residency. To identify the source of clinical practices among dermatology residents that affect patient safety and determine the best approach for overcoming gaps in knowledge and practice patterns that contribute to these practices. A survey-based study, performed at a national medical dermatology meeting in Itasca, Illinois, in 2012, included 142 dermatology residents from 44 residency programs in the United States and Canada. Self-reported rates of dermatology residents committing errors, identifying local systems errors, and identifying poor patient safety role modeling. Of surveyed dermatology residents, 45.2% have failed to report needle-stick injuries incurred during procedures, 82.8% reported cutting and pasting a previous author's patient history information into a medical record without confirming its validity, 96.7% reported right-left body part mislabeling during examination or biopsy, and 29.4% reported not incorporating clinical photographs of lesions sampled for biopsy in the medical record at their institution. Residents variably perform a purposeful pause ("time-out") when indicated to confirm patient, procedure, and site before biopsy, with 20.0% always doing so. In addition, 59.7% of residents work with at least 1 attending physician who intimidates the residents, reducing the likelihood of reporting safety issues they witness. Finally, 78.3% have witnessed attending physicians purposefully disregarding required safety steps. Our data reinforce the need for modified curricula, systems, and teacher development to reduce injuries, improve communication with patients and between physicians, residents, and other members of the health care team, and create an environment free of intimidation.

  9. Accurate diagnosis of CHD by Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Hannah C; Massey, Hannah; Yates, Robert W M; Kelsall, A Wilfred

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology assess children with a full history, examination, and often perform an echocardiogram. A minority are then referred to an outreach clinic run jointly with a visiting paediatric cardiologist. The accuracy of the echocardiography diagnosis made by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology is unknown. Materials and methods We conducted a retrospective review of clinic letters for children seen in the outreach clinic for the first time between March, 2004 and March, 2011. Children with CHD diagnosed antenatally or elsewhere were excluded. We recorded the echocardiography diagnosis made by the paediatric cardiologist and previously by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology. The Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology referred 317/3145 (10%) children seen in the local cardiac clinics to the outreach clinic over this period, and among them 296 were eligible for inclusion. Their median age was 1.5 years (range 1 month-15.1 years). For 244 (82%) children, there was complete diagnostic agreement between the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology and the paediatric cardiologist. For 29 (10%) children, the main diagnosis was identical with additional findings made by the paediatric cardiologist. The abnormality had resolved in 17 (6%) cases by the time of clinic attendance. In six (2%) patients, the paediatric cardiologist made a different diagnosis. In total, 138 (47%) patients underwent a surgical or catheter intervention. Discussion Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology can make accurate diagnoses of CHD in children referred to their clinics. This can allow effective triage of children attending the outreach clinic, making best use of limited specialist resources.

  10. The Iowa ophthalmology wet laboratory curriculum for teaching and assessing cataract surgical competency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Johnson, A. Tim; Boldt, H. Culver; Abramoff, Michael; Olson, Richard; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To describe an ophthalmology wet laboratory (OWL) curriculum for residents in training. Methods Systematic literature review and selection of best practices for use in the OWL learning plan from a single academic ophthalmology program. Results A pretest and posttest of cognitive

  11. Trends in dermatology practices and the implications for the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Alison; Kostecki, James; Olkaba, Helen

    2017-10-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) practice profile surveys have been conducted for more than a decade to gauge trends in our workforce supply and demand. To update the trends and current workforce issues for the field of dermatology. The AAD Practice Profile Survey is sent by both e-mail and postal mail to a random sample of practicing dermatologists who are AAD members. Shifts are noted in the primary practice setting; fewer dermatologists are in solo practice and more are in group practices than in previous years. Teledermatology use trended upward from 7% to 11% between 2012 and 2014. The implementation of electronic health records increased from 51% in 2011 to 70% in 2014. There is potential for response bias and inaccurate self-reporting. Survey responses collected may not be representative of all geographic areas. The demand for dermatology services remains strong. Shifts in the practice setting may be related to increases in overhead costs that are partially associated with the implementation of technology-based medical records. Integration of electronic health records and utilization of telemedicine are increasing. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  13. Emerging applications of eye-tracking technology in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kevin K; Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Pokharel, Manusheela; Grossman, Douglas

    2018-04-06

    Eye-tracking technology has been used within a multitude of disciplines to provide data linking eye movements to visual processing of various stimuli (i.e., x-rays, situational positioning, printed information, and warnings). Despite the benefits provided by eye-tracking in allowing for the identification and quantification of visual attention, the discipline of dermatology has yet to see broad application of the technology. Notwithstanding dermatologists' heavy reliance upon visual patterns and cues to discriminate between benign and atypical nevi, literature that applies eye-tracking to the study of dermatology is sparse; and literature specific to patient-initiated behaviors, such as skin self-examination (SSE), is largely non-existent. The current article provides a review of eye-tracking research in various medical fields, culminating in a discussion of current applications and advantages of eye-tracking for dermatology research. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dermatological malignancies at a University teaching Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malignant melanoma was the most common dermatological malignancy (67.5%) followed by Kaposi's sarcoma (10.4%), Squamous cell carcinoma (8.4%) and Basal cell carcinoma(7.8%). The lower limbs were the most frequent site accounting for 55.8%. Wide local excision was the most common surgical procedure ...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to...

  16. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  17. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  18. Ocular changes induced by drugs commonly used in dermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Patryn, Eliza; Czajor, Karolina; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The use of many drugs in dermatologic diseases may cause ocular side effects. Some may regress after discontinuation of the therapy, but others persist or progress even after the cessation of treatment. This review presents four groups of commonly prescribed drugs-antimalarial medicines,

  19. Dermatology nursing in the community: The Mitchell's Plain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Financial support came from. Rotary International and the pharmaceutical industry. e course was given international recognition for dermatology, with the inclusion of a leprosy module. Since its inception, we have trained 157 nurses from. South Africa, Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho,. Malawi, Niger, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe and.

  20. Telemedicine in dermatology: Evaluation of secondary and tertiary teledermatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The field of dermatology was one of the first adaptors of telemedicine, dating back to 1995, and has one of the highest scientific output in the field of telemedicine. The research described in this thesis expanded on this scientific knowledge base by answering the following research questions: 1.

  1. Introduction: "The Napkin Area and its Dermatoses" symposium proceedings, World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, September 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrelo, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Dr Antonio Torrelo, President of the 12(th) World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, introduces the supplement as providing an opportunity for readers to access the lectures and related presentations delivered at the World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology held September 25-27, 2013, in Madrid. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  2. What Influences Medical Students to Apply or Not to Apply for Dermatology Residency Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Medical students apply for dermatology residency program acceptance and, after completing training, become eligible to take the American Board of Dermatology examination. Some recent dermatologist practice trends concern dermatology leaders in academia. Changing the workforce trends may begin with changing the workforce. Academic dermatology…

  3. Evaluating Industry Payments Among Dermatology Clinical Practice Guidelines Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checketts, Jake X; Sims, Matthew Thomas; Vassar, Matt

    2017-12-01

    It is well documented that financial conflicts of interest influence medical research and clinical practice. Prior to the Open Payments provisions of the Affordable Care Act, financial ties became apparent only through self-disclosure. The nature of financial interests has not been studied among physicians who develop dermatology clinical practice guidelines. To evaluate payments received by physicians who author dermatology clinical practice guidelines, compare disclosure statements for accuracy, determine whether pharmaceutical companies from which the authors received payments manufactured products related to the guidelines, and examine the extent to which the American Academy of Dermatology enforced their Administrative Regulations for guideline development. Three American Academy of Dermatology guidelines published from 2013 to 2016 were retrieved. Double data extraction was used to record financial payments received by 49 guideline authors using the Open Payments database. Payments received by the authors from the date of the initial literature search to the date of publication were used to evaluate disclosure statement accuracy, detail the companies providing payments, and evaluate Administrative Regulations enforcement. This study is applicable to clinical practice guideline panels drafting recommendations, physicians using clinical practice guidelines to inform patient care, and those establishing policies for guideline development. Our main outcomes are the monetary values and types of payments received by physicians who author dermatology guidelines and the accuracy of disclosure statements. Data were collected from the Open Payments database and analyzed descriptively. Of the 49 authors evaluated, 40 received at least 1 reported industry payment, 31 accepted more than $1000, 25 accepted more than $10 000, and 18 accepted more than $50 000. Financial payments amounted to a mean of $157 177 per author. The total reimbursement among the 49 authors

  4. Medical students perception of undergraduate ophthalmology training in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Nnewi Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyekwe, L O; Nwosu, S N N

    2006-12-01

    To determine the perception and aspiration of medical students towards ophthalmology. Information for the study was obtained through forced-choice questionnaire set to 102 medical students in 2000/2001 graduating class in Nnamdi Azikiwe University. One hundred questionnaires were completed. As a specialty of choice ophthalmology ranked fourth {16.0%} as a first choice; second {21.0%} as a second choice and first {26.0%} as a third choice. Ninety-five of respondents found ophthalmology training useful. This cohort of medical students considered ophthalmic training in this institution essential and adequate. Undergraduate ophthalmic course should ensure an understanding of the basic principles of ophthalmology and should be designed to motivate the interest and confidence of the medical students in the specialty. Training period should be at least 4 weeks. With appropriate training ophthalmology can attract reasonable interest as a choice for specification.

  5. LASER CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (LCS AND ITS CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karganov Mikhail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS is based on the analysis of the spectrum of quasielastic light scatter during coherent monochromatic laser irradiation of micro-particles in biological fluids (blood serum, urine, oropharyngeal washout fluid, tear fluid etc.. Spectrum provides information on dynamic processes in the analyzed system: translation motion of scattering particles and their orientation and conformation dynamics. Special procedures of cluster analysis make it possible to find out to which linkage group a particular spectrum belongs. LCS allows evaluation of sub-fractional composition of biological fluids in a wide range of molecular sizes (from 1 to 10,000 nm, which determines principal novelty of this approach in ophthalmology.

  6. Amniotic membrane allografts: development and clinical utility in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzuti A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Allison Rizzuti,1,2 Adam Goldenberg,1 Douglas R Lazzaro1,2 1SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 2Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA Abstract: Amniotic membrane, the innermost layer of the placenta, is a tissue that promotes epithelialization, while decreasing inflammation, neovascularization, and scarring. It is used in the surgical management of a wide variety of ophthalmic conditions where it functions as a graft or patch in ocular surface reconstruction. The development of new preservation techniques, as well as a sutureless amniotic membrane, has allowed for easier, in-office placement, without the disadvantages of an operating room procedure. The purpose of this review is to describe the historical development of amniotic membrane in ophthalmology and to describe its current clinical applications, particularly focusing on recent advances. Keywords: ocular surface, cornea, stem cells, prokera, allograft, patch, transplantation

  7. Neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-otology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Daniel R; Zee, David S

    2015-12-01

    This review summarizes topical papers from the fields of neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-otology published from August 2013 to February 2015. The main findings are: (1) diagnostic criteria for pseudotumor cerebri have been updated, and the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial evaluated the efficacy of acetazolamide in patients with mild vision loss, (2) categorization of vestibular disorders through history and ocular motor examination is particularly important in the acute vestibular syndrome, where timely distinction between a central or peripheral localization is essential, (3) the newly described "sagging eye syndrome" provides a mechanical explanation for an isolated esodeviation that increases at distance in the aging population and (4) eye movement recordings better define how cerebellar dysfunction and/or sixth nerve palsy may play a role in other patients with esodeviations that increase at distance.

  8. Nuclear cardiology core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Kitsiou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Evaluation of Dermatology Practice Online Reviews: Lessons From Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-02-01

    Patient satisfaction is an increasingly important component of health care quality measures. Online reviews of physicians represent a promising platform for capturing patient perspectives of care. To identify qualitative themes associated with patient reviews of dermatologic care on consumer reporting websites. A qualitative analysis was conducted of patient-generated reviews of dermatology practices on 2 consumer review platforms. Yelp is an online consumer portal for users to review their experience with local businesses; ZocDoc is an online patient-scheduling portal that provides opportunity for patients to write reviews of physician practices. A total of 518 reviews from 45 dermatology practices on Yelp and 4921 reviews from 45 dermatology providers on ZocDoc were collected from 3 geographically diverse cities: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Washington. The study was conducted from January 15 to July 15, 2015. Reviews were separated into high-scoring and low-scoring groups. An inductive qualitative method was used to code and identify key themes associated with positive and negative patient experiences. Analysis was completed upon reaching thematic saturation. Reported as mean (95% CI), the overall Yelp score for the 45 selected practices was 3.46 of 5 stars (3.17-3.75) and overall ZocDoc score for the 45 selected practices was 4.72 of 5 stars (4.47-4.80). The proportion of individual reviews giving a score of 5.0 was significantly higher on ZocDoc (3986 [81.0%]) than on Yelp (229 [44.2%]) (P dermatology providers. Online consumer review websites are designed to facilitate instantaneous and public communication among patients. These platforms provide elaborate and timely data for dermatologists to garner insight into their patients' experiences. The themes identified in this study are consistent with past satisfaction studies and may aid dermatologists in optimizing the patient care experience.

  10. Nurse prescriber-patient consultations: a case study in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtenay, Molly; Carey, Nicola; Stenner, Karen

    2009-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring the content and processes in consultations between nurse prescribers and patients with dermatological conditions. Communication skills, consultation time, information and follow-up are central to the treatment and management of patients with dermatological conditions. The contribution nurses make to the care of these patients has great potential. A multiple case study was conducted with 10 practice settings across England in which nurses prescribed medicines for patients with dermatological conditions. Data were collected between June 2006 and September 2007 using semi-structured interviews (n = 40), patient questionnaires (n = 165/200) and videotaped observations of nurse consultations (n = 40). Data analysis included thematic analysis, descriptive statistics, chi-square and non-parametric tests. Nurses believed that their holistic approach to assessment, combined with their prescribing knowledge, improved prescribing decisions. Listening and explanation of treatments were aspects of nurse communication that were rated highly by patients. Listening and dealing sensitively with emotions were also aspects of the videotaped consultations that were rated highly by assessors. Nurses were less consistent in providing information about medicines. Triangulated data from this study suggest that nurse prescribing enhances the care of patients with dermatological conditions through improved prescribing decisions. If patients are to be more involved in this decision-making, nurses must give them more information about their medicines. The benefits of prescribing were most evident in the practices of dermatology specialist nurses. Further evidence is required to identify whether prescribing by specialist nurses offers similar benefits in other therapeutic areas.

  11. Neuro-ophthalmological manifestations of neurosyphilis in 22 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Juan Fan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the characteristics of neurological ophthalmology manifestation of patients with neurosyphilis.METHODS: Retrospective and nonrandomized case analysis were used. Totally 22 cases of 39 eyes were included. They were 17 males and 5 females, aged from 34 to 65 years old. The average age were 49.6 years old. RESULTS: The optic nerve atrophy presented in 11 cases of 22 eyes. One eye of them accompanied by left eye oculomotor nerve palsy; 5 eyes in 3 cases expressed as optic neuritis acute phase; neuroretinitis appeared in 4 cases of 6 eyes; 1 case of 2 eyes expressed as chorioretinitis accompanied by optic disc edema; central retinal artery occlusion were found in 1 case of 1 eye. Argyll-Robertson pupil was as only manifestation in 2 cases of 3 eyes. In all cases, Argyll-Robertson pupil signs can be seen in 19 eyes. Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test(TPPAwere positive in all 22 cases. Syphilis rapid plasma reactin test(RPRwere positive in 19 of 21 cases. All patients underwent lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid were detected for RPR, cerebrospinal fluid protein, white blood cell count. Cerebrospinal fluid RPR were positive in 13 cases. Cerebrospinal fluid protein were greater than 450mg/L in 18 cases. Cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count were greater than 5/mm3 in 13 cases. CONCLUSION: Neurosyphilis involving neuro-ophthalmology often occurs in middle-aged men and subacute onset. Both eyes can suffered from optic nerve disease simultaneously or sequencely. A few can be expressed as other cranial nerve palsy, which may lead to misdiagnosis. Considering medical history, clinical manifestations, ophthalmic examination, serum and cerebrospinal fluid laboratory tests can improve the diagnostic rate.

  12. Ophthalmology on social networking sites: an observational study of Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micieli JA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan A Micieli,1 Edmund Tsui2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA Background: The use of social media in ophthalmology remains largely unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the extent and involvement of ophthalmology journals, professional associations, trade publications, and patient advocacy and fundraising groups on social networking sites. Methods: An archived list of 107 ophthalmology journals from SCImago, trade publications, professional ophthalmology associations, and patient advocacy organizations were searched for their presence on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Activity and popularity of each account was quantified by using the number of “likes” on Facebook, the number of followers on Twitter, and members on LinkedIn. Results: Of the 107 journals ranked by SCImago, 21.5% were present on Facebook and 18.7% were present on Twitter. Journal of Community Eye Health was the most popular on Facebook and JAMA Ophthalmology was most popular on Twitter. Among the 133 members of the International Council of Ophthalmology, 17.3% were present on Facebook, 12.8% were present on Twitter, and 7.5% were present on LinkedIn. The most popular on Facebook was the International Council of Ophthalmology, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology was most popular on Twitter and LinkedIn. Patient advocacy organizations were more popular on all sites compared with journals, professional association, and trade publications. Among the top ten most popular pages in each category, patient advocacy groups were most active followed by trade publications, professional associations, and journals. Conclusion: Patient advocacy groups lead the way in social networking followed by professional organizations and journals. Although some journals use social media, most have yet to engage its full potential and maximize the number of

  13. Mind the Gap: Representation of Medical Education in Cardiology-Related Articles and Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Clint; Berlacher, Kathryn; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Auseon, Alex J

    2016-07-01

    Cardiology fellowship programs are at the interface of medical education and the care of patients suffering from the leading cause of mortality in the United States, yet there is an apparent lack of research guiding the effective education of fellows. We sought to quantify the number of publications in cardiology journals that pertained to the education of cardiology trainees and the number of cardiologists participating in education research. For the period between January and December 2012, we cataloged cardiology-specific and general medical/medical education journals and sorted them by impact factor. Tables of content were reviewed for articles with an educational focus, a cardiology focus, or both. We recorded the authors' areas of medical training, and keywords from each cardiology journal's mission statement were reviewed for emphasis on education. Twenty-six cardiology journals, containing 6645 articles, were reviewed. Only 4 articles had education themes. Ten general medical and 15 medical education journals contained 6810 articles. Of these, only 7 focused on medical education in cardiology, and none focused on cardiology fellowship training. Among the 4887 authors of publications in medical education journals, 25 were cardiologists (less than 1%), and among the 1036 total words in the mission statements of all cardiology journals, the term "education" appeared once. Published educational research is lacking in cardiology training, and few cardiologists appear to be active members of the education scholarship community. Cardiology organizations and academic journals should support efforts to identify target areas of study and publish scholarship in educational innovation.

  14. The Canadian Dermatology Workforce Survey: implications for the future of Canadian dermatology--who will be your skin expert?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiness, Sheilagh; Searles, Gordon E; From, Lynn; Swiggum, Susan

    2004-01-01

    To survey Canadian dermatologists for specialty-specific physician resource information including demographics, workload and future career plans. In 2001, the Canadian Dermatology Association (CDA) surveyed 555 dermatologists in Canada to gain specialty-specific physician resource information. Three hundred and seventy-one dermatologists (69%) provided information about themselves, their workloads and their future career goals. The average Canadian dermatologist is 52 years old and 35% of practicing dermatologists are over the age of 55. Eighty-nine percent of dermatologists practice in an urban setting, 19% include practice in a rural setting while less than 0.5% practice in remote areas. Canadian dermatologists spend 61% of their clinical time providing services in Medical Dermatology. Within 5 years, 50% of dermatologists reported that they plan to reduce their practices or retire. The Canadian Dermatology Workforce Survey provides a snapshot of the current practice of dermatology in Canada. It also serves to highlight the critical shortage of dermatologists, which will continue to worsen without immediate, innovative planning for the future.

  15. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  16. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  17. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  19. THE DOPPLER ECHOGRAPHY – FROM GREEK MYTHOLOGY TO MODERN CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana DĂNIŞOR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The following pages shall demonstrate how the nature of things is made evident through the science of naming, the structure of designation. Through this extensive analysis, I aim at establishing the connection between Greek mythology and modern cardiology by exploring the origin of the word echography and its modern counterpart the Doppler echography.

  20. Dermatology consultations significantly contribute quality to care of hospitalized patients: a prospective study of dermatology inpatient consults at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Fabrizio; Guren, Lauren; Fernandez, Anthony P; Sood, Apra

    2016-10-01

    Cutaneous abnormalities are common in hospitalized patients but are frequently missed or misdiagnosed by admitting teams. Inpatient dermatology consultations provide important information to help diagnose and manage these patients. However, few studies have analyzed dermatology inpatient consultations and their effect. We prospectively collected information for 691 consecutive dermatology consultations from November 2013 to November 2014. Patients ranged in age from newborns to 97 years old. The internal medicine service requested the most consultations (45%). Only 6.5% of consultations were requested within 24 hours of appearance of cutaneous findings. Before consultation, 70.3% of patients did not receive treatment for or based on their cutaneous findings. Dermatology consultation resulted in treatment change in 81.9% of patients. The most common diagnoses were drug rash and contact dermatitis. Biopsies confirmed 71.7% of the initial bedside diagnoses by the dermatology consultation team. Common skin diseases were responsible for the majority of dermatology consultations. Most patients were not treated for their cutaneous conditions before the dermatology consultation. Dermatology consultations resulted in treatment changes in the majority of cases. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Epidemiologic features of patients affected by herpes zoster: database analysis of the Ferrara University Dermatology Unit, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabutti, G; Serenelli, C; Sarno, O; Marconi, S; Corazza, M; Virgili, A

    2010-05-01

    The recent authorization and commercialization in the USA of a "Zoster vaccine" with high antigenic titer opens interesting perspectives of prevention against herpes zoster (HZ). This disease is characterized by a vesicular rash with dermatomeric extension and by moderate to severe pain. Many patients present with post-herpetic neuralgia. In Italy, complete and recent epidemiological data are not available. We evaluated the epidemiological features of patients presenting with HZ observed at the Ferrara University Dermatology unit from 2000 to 2008. The following data were collected: gender, age, residence, date and place of consultation, localization, and therapy. The place of consultation was often (43%) not specified; in the remaining 57% of cases, patients were sent from general and ophthalmology emergency rooms. The most frequent localizations were: 32% ophthalmic; 16.5% thoracic; 16% facial. Most patients were treated with oral antiviral drugs for seven days. According to localization and severity, topical or oral antibiotics, analgesics, neurotrophic drugs were prescribed. This data, although not representative of all cases in the province of Ferrara, confirmed the epidemiological impact of Zoster, which brings a number of patients to use the hospital and specialized structures for diagnosis and cure. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Methods of investigation in clinical cardiology. VIII. Socioeconomic evaluation of clinical cardiology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro de Mercado, P

    1997-06-01

    Health services are systems whose mission is to improve the health status of both individuals and society in general. In recent decades, these systems have faced challenges such as their increasing complexity, limited resources, rapid innovation and diffusion of medical technologies, pressures on demand from society and professionals, and the lack of knowledge of the effects of these factors on costs and society's health. In addition, health care expenditures have grown twice as fast as wealth in industrialized countries during the last 25 years. These problems have prompted cost containment as a key issue in health policy and, at the same time, have promoted the development of socioeconomic evaluation as a scientific activity in the frame of health services research. Socioeconomic evaluation tries to determine if the sacrifice made by society, which devotes part of its limited resources to health care, maximizes the outcomes for population. This article describes basic concepts and methods of economic appraisal in health services which are illustrated with examples of clinical practice in cardiology. Common methods of evaluation are described; the relation between the clinical outcome of a procedure and its associated costs is emphasized in explaining the types of efficiency analysis (cost-efficacy, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit); and finally a guide for socioeconomic evaluation is provided.

  3. Student loan burden and its impact on career decisions in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jannett; Song, Eingun; Liu, Michael A; Lee, Patrick K; Truong, Sam

    2017-12-01

    Dermatology departments in the United States face difficulties in recruiting dermatologists to academic positions, raising concerns for the future of dermatology education and research. This preliminary study aimed to explore the impact of student loan burden on career plans in dermatology and to determine if the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program can be used as a recruitment tool for academic positions in dermatology. Results from this electronic survey, which was distributed to dermatology residents and attending physicians, revealed that debt burden may influence career decisions in dermatology. Dermatologists may not be fully educated on loan repayment options. With increased awareness, the PSLF can potentially be used as a recruitment tool for academic positions in dermatology.

  4. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zain Husain,1 Tina S Alster1,2 1Department of Dermatology, Georgetown University Hospital, 2Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. Keywords: laser, intense pulsed light, treatment, dermatology, technology

  5. Update protocols for evaluating nuclear cardiology and management of coronary heart disease. Chilean Society of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo, Teresa; Jaimovich, Rodrigo; Canessa, Jose; Castro, Gabriel; Soto, Juan Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Protocols are reviewed nuclear cardiology present, with emphasis on imaging studies Single photon ( S PECT ) myocardial perfusion mainly in assessment of coronary heart disease (EC). The indications and protocols used are detailed as well as the literature review relevant both to clinical use as a quality control and interpretation of studies

  6. Diverse perspectives and training paths in cardiology: An analysis of authorship in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danek, Barbara A; Karatasakis, Aris; Karacsonyi, Judit; Rangan, Bavana V; Abdullah, Shuaib; Sorajja, Paul; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2018-03-15

    The role of women and foreign medical graduates (FMGs) in cardiology research published in the United States has received limited study. We examined the characteristics of the first and last authors of all original contributions and review articles published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology from October 1, 2015, to October 1, 2016. A total of 345 articles were identified, with 687 first and last authors originating from ≥50 different countries. Overall, 17% of authors were women (20% of the first and 14% of the last authors). Overall, 86% of authors held a medical degree (MD) or equivalent, and 25% of those also held another advanced degree (PhD, MPH, and/or MBA). The proportion of authors with an advanced degree in addition to an MD/equivalent was higher among foreign graduates and international contributors as compared with American graduates (31% vs. 30% vs. 17%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Of US-based authors with an MD/equivalent, 67% were American medical graduates (AMGs) and 33% were FMGs. Women authors represented 11% of FMGs, 16% of AMGs, and 12% of international physicians as contributors (p = 0.23). Foreign graduates and international researchers contribute substantially to cardiology research in the US, but women authors remain under-represented. Copyright © 2018 Hellenic Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Scientometric analysis of published papers in global ophthalmology in the past ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zheng-Lu; Hu, Xin-Yue; Wang, Ying-Na; Ma, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the published papers of ophthalmology in past ten years and explore the development of ophthalmology. The data of this study retrieved from Science Citation Index Expanded and downloaded online in November 2017, including all the papers with publication year from 2007-2016 were analyzed. The papers were based on the Web of Science category and the journals were based on the Journal Citation Report category. The number of ophthalmology papers increased from 7450 to 9089 during 2007 to 2017. The average rate increased 2.2% annually. USA accounts for one thirds of the total and two thirds of the highly cited papers. In Asia, China, Japan and South Korea were in Top 10 by the number of ophthalmology papers. UK, Germany, Japan and Australia also had great impact in global ophthalmology. The hot spots included endothelial growth factor, optical coherence tomography and open-angle glaucoma. USA is in the leading position in global ophthalmology. Part of Asian countries play an important role in the development of ophthalmology, but the impact needs to be improved.

  8. Prototype Development: Context-Driven Dynamic XML Ophthalmologic Data Capture Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Kadolph, Christopher; Finamore, Joseph; Cancel, Efrain; McCarty, Catherine A; Okorie, Asha; Thomas, Kate L; Allen Pacheco, Jennifer; Pathak, Jyotishman; Ellis, Stephen B; Denny, Joshua C; Rasmussen, Luke V; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S; Vrabec, Tamara R; Brilliant, Murray H

    2017-01-01

    Background The capture and integration of structured ophthalmologic data into electronic health records (EHRs) has historically been a challenge. However, the importance of this activity for patient care and research is critical. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype of a context-driven dynamic extensible markup language (XML) ophthalmologic data capture application for research and clinical care that could be easily integrated into an EHR system. Methods Stakeholders in the medical, research, and informatics fields were interviewed and surveyed to determine data and system requirements for ophthalmologic data capture. On the basis of these requirements, an ophthalmology data capture application was developed to collect and store discrete data elements with important graphical information. Results The context-driven data entry application supports several features, including ink-over drawing capability for documenting eye abnormalities, context-based Web controls that guide data entry based on preestablished dependencies, and an adaptable database or XML schema that stores Web form specifications and allows for immediate changes in form layout or content. The application utilizes Web services to enable data integration with a variety of EHRs for retrieval and storage of patient data. Conclusions This paper describes the development process used to create a context-driven dynamic XML data capture application for optometry and ophthalmology. The list of ophthalmologic data elements identified as important for care and research can be used as a baseline list for future ophthalmologic data collection activities. PMID:28903894

  9. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... dermatology. (a) Identification. (1) A carbon dioxide laser for use in general surgery and in dermatology is a...) An argon laser for use in dermatology is a laser device intended to destroy or coagulate tissue by...

  10. A Proposal for the Consolidation of Dermatology Services of Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the National Naval Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    This includes the treatment of common skin conditions such as acne, dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo or alopecia to the more complex laser surgeries and...Phototherapy, Laser Surgery, Pediatric Dermatology, HIV Dermatology, Patch Testing, MOHS Micrographic Surgery, and Dermatologic Surgery. The entire...Dermatology Service is located on the first floor of the hospital. Minor surgical and MOHS Micrographic Surgery, ultraviolet treatment, and laser surgery

  11. Back pain in ophthalmology: National survey of Indian ophthalmologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim is to assess the prevalence, severity, and associations of back pain among Indian ophthalmologists. Methods: A self-reporting questionnaire was sent to ophthalmologists with valid e-mail addresses registered with the All India Ophthalmological Society. The survey was open for responses for 2 months. Results: A total of 651 (5.96% responses were obtained; 394 (61% males and 257 (39% females. Half (50% of responses were obtained from doctors belonging to 31–40 years' age group. Two hundred and thirty (35% of the ophthalmologists had height ranging from 161 to 170 cm and 443 (68% had weight ranging from 51 to 75 kg. Four hundred and eighty-one (73.8% of the respondents had <15 years of ophthalmic experience. Cataract (346; 53.1% and general ophthalmology (342; 52.5% were commonly practised by the ophthalmologists. Time spent in the outpatient department (OPD was 39.37 ± 16.32 h/week and in the operating theater 13.64 ± 9.89 h/week, respectively. Self-reported prevalence of back pain was 70.5%. Fully 49% of respondents had low back pain, followed by neck pain (33% and upper extremity symptoms (16%. Age <50 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4485, female gender (OR = 2.0265, long working hours in OPD (OR = 1.6524, and performing retinal lasers and indirect ophthalmoscopy (OR = 3.3251 showed positive association with back pain. The intolerable back pain was noted in <7% of the respondents. Around 398 (61% respondents felt that their back pain was exacerbated while doing work and 86.6% felt that up to 5 h/week was lost due to persistent backache. Yoga and some form of exercise (74.3% was practised to alleviate back pain. Conclusion: Back pain symptoms appear to be common among ophthalmologists. Awkward posture and prolonged working hours are responsible for developing back pain among ophthalmologists. Performing yoga and regular exercises, modifications in instrumentation and creating a larger workforce of eye care practitioners are needed

  12. MR detection of retinal hemorrhages: correlation with graded ophthalmologic exam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavers, Angela J.; Allbery, Sandra M.; Stagner, Anna M.; Hejkal, Thomas W.; Lyden, Elizabeth R.; Haney, Suzanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Dilated fundoscopic exam is considered the gold standard for detecting retinal hemorrhage, but expertise in obtaining this exam is not always immediately available. MRI can detect retinal hemorrhages, but correlation of the grade or severity of retinal hemorrhage on dilated fundoscopic exam with retinal hemorrhage visibility on MRI has not been described. To determine the value of standard brain protocol MRI in detecting retinal hemorrhage and to determine whether there is any correlation with MR detection of retinal hemorrhage and the dilated fundoscopic exam grade of hemorrhage. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 77 children <2 years old who were seen for head trauma from April 2007 to July 2013 and had both brain MRI and dilated fundoscopic exam or retinal camera images. A staff pediatric radiologist and radiology resident reviewed the MR images. Retinal hemorrhages were graded by a chief ophthalmology resident on a 12-point scale based on the retinal hemorrhage type, size, location and extent as seen on review of retinal camera images and detailed reports by ophthalmologists. Higher scores indicated increased severity of retinal hemorrhages. There was a statistically significant difference in the median grade of retinal hemorrhage examination between children who had retinal hemorrhage detected on MRI and children who did not have retinal hemorrhage detected on MRI (P = 0.02). When examination grade was categorized as low-grade (1-4), moderate-grade (5-8) or high-grade (>8) hemorrhage, there was a statistically significant association between exam grade and diagnosis based on MRI (P = 0.008). For example, only 14% of children with low-grade retinal hemorrhages were identified on MRI compared to 76% of children with high-grade hemorrhages. MR detection of retinal hemorrhage demonstrated a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 63%. Retinal hemorrhage was best seen on the gradient

  13. A software platform for the analysis of dermatology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassi, Maria; Mavraganis, Vlasios; Asvestas, Panteleimon

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a software platform developed in Python programming environment that can be used for the processing and analysis of dermatology images. The platform provides the capability for reading a file that contains a dermatology image. The platform supports image formats such as Windows bitmaps, JPEG, JPEG2000, portable network graphics, TIFF. Furthermore, it provides suitable tools for selecting, either manually or automatically, a region of interest (ROI) on the image. The automated selection of a ROI includes filtering for smoothing the image and thresholding. The proposed software platform has a friendly and clear graphical user interface and could be a useful second-opinion tool to a dermatologist. Furthermore, it could be used to classify images including from other anatomical parts such as breast or lung, after proper re-training of the classification algorithms.

  14. Sandalwood Album Oil as a Botanical Therapeutic in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ronald L; Levenson, Corey

    2017-10-01

    Many skin conditions and diseases are characterized by inflammation, infection, and hyperplasia. Safe and effective topical treatment options that can be used long-term are needed. Traditional botanical medicines, which are often complex mixtures that exert their biological activities via multiple mechanisms of action, are being studied as potential new active ingredients in dermatology. Sandalwood album oil (SAO), also known as East Indian sandalwood oil (EISO), is an essential oil distilled from the Santalum album tree and has demonstrated biological activity as an anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-proliferative agent. Sandalwood album oil has also shown promise in clinical trials for treatment of acne, psoriasis, eczema, common warts, and molluscum contagiosum. The favorable safety profile, ease of topical use, and recent availability of pharmaceutical-grade sandalwood album oil support its broader use as the basis of novel therapies in dermatology.

  15. [Dermatological features of auto-inflammatory recurrent fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudier, A; Mauvais, F-X; Bastard, P; Boussard, C; Jaoui, A; Koskas, V; Lecoq, E; Michel, A; Orcel, M-C; Truelle, P-E; Wohrer, D; Piram, M

    2018-02-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases are characterized by unexplained and recurrent attacks of systemic inflammation often involving the skin, joints, or serosal membranes. They are due to a dysfunction or dysregulation of the innate immunity, which is the first line of defense against pathogens. Early recognition of these diseases by the clinician, especially by pediatricians encountering such pathologies in pediatric patients, is primordial to avoid complications. Skin manifestations, common in most auto-inflammatory diseases, are helpful for prompt diagnosis. After a brief physiopathological review, we will describe auto-inflammatory recurrent fevers by their main dermatological presentations: urticarial lesions, neutrophilic dermatoses, panniculitis, other maculopapular eruptions, dyskeratosis, skin vasculitis, and oral aphthous. We finally suggest a decision tree to help clinicians better target genetic exams in patients with recurrent fevers and dermatological manifestations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a lar...... number of applications in the fields of non-melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanomas, psoriasis and dermatitis, infestations, bullous skin diseases, tattoos, nails, haemangiomas, and other skin diseases. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a large...

  17. Dermatological manifestations in patients with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahily De la Paz Peña

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In view of the frequency of the dermatological manifestations in patients who suffer from AIDS/HIV, and with the objective of describing their behaviour, a descriptive,observational, and cross sectional investigation was carried out in the cases of the AIDS provincial consultation at Ernesto Guevara General Teaching Hospital of Las Tunas from January, 2007 to June, 2008. The information was obtained from the survey, the dermatological examination, and the clinical charts. The sample was made up of 43 patients, in which males and 31 to 40 age groups prevailed. There were no important quantity differences between the seropositive number and AIDS cases. The 27, 9% had dermatosis that made suspect the presence of the chronic retrovirus. The viral and the mycotic diseases were the most frequent ones, being the neoplastic type and drugreactions the least frequent ones. Other sexually transmitted diseases (STD appeared associated to the primary disease, mainly herpes simplex type II, and verruca acuminata.

  18. Processing of hyperspectral medical images applications in dermatology using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Koprowski, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This book presents new methods of analyzing and processing hyperspectral medical images, which can be used in diagnostics, for example for dermatological images. The algorithms proposed are fully automatic and the results obtained are fully reproducible. Their operation was tested on a set of several thousands of hyperspectral images and they were implemented in Matlab. The presented source code can be used without licensing restrictions. This is a valuable resource for computer scientists, bioengineers, doctoral students, and dermatologists interested in contemporary analysis methods.

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis in dermatologic surgery: advisory statement 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tina I; Baddour, Larry M; Berbari, Elie F; Roenigk, Randall K; Phillips, P Kim; Jacobs, M Amanda; Otley, Clark C

    2008-09-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is an important component of dermatologic surgery, and recommendations in this area should reflect the updated 2007 guidelines of the American Heart Association, the American Dental Association with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons guidelines, and recent prospective studies on surgical site infection. To provide an update on the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis in dermatologic surgery for the prevention of infective endocarditis, hematogenous total joint infection, and surgical site infection. A literature review was performed, expert consensus was obtained, and updated recommendations were created, consistent with the most current authoritative guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American Dental Association with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For patients with high-risk cardiac conditions, and a defined group of patients with prosthetic joints at high risk for hematogenous total joint infection, prophylactic antibiotics are recommended when the surgical site is infected or when the procedure involves breach of the oral mucosa. For the prevention of surgical site infections, antibiotics may be indicated for procedures on the lower extremities or groin, for wedge excisions of the lip and ear, skin flaps on the nose, skin grafts, and for patients with extensive inflammatory skin disease. These recommendations are not based on multiple, large-scale, prospective trials. There is a strong shift away from administration of prophylactic antibiotics in many dermatologic surgery settings, based on updated authoritative guidelines. These recommendations provide guidance to comply with the most current guidelines, modified to address dermatology-specific considerations. Managing physicians may utilize these guidelines while individualizing their approach based on all clinical considerations.

  20. Use and potential of nanotechnology in cosmetic dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfrancesco Morganti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pierfrancesco MorgantiDepartment of Dermatology and Venereal Diseases, II University of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Biotechnology and nanotechnology are the key technologies of the twenty-first century, having enormous potential for innovation and growth. The academic and industrial goals for these technologies are the development of nanoscale biomolecular substances and analytical instruments for investigating cell biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Developments in nanotechnology will provide opportunities for cosmetic dermatology to develop new biocompatible and biodegradable therapeutics, delivery systems and more active compounds. Cosmetics have the primary function of keeping up a good appearance, changing the appearance, or correcting body odors, while maintaining the skin and its surroundings in good conditions. Thus cosmetic dermatology, recognizing the new realities of skin care products, has to emphasize the functional aspects of cosmetics through an understanding of their efficacy and safety in promoting good health. Nanoscience may help the scientific community to find more innovative and efficacious cosmetics. Understanding the physical model of the cell as a machine is essential to understand how all the cell components work together to accomplish a task. The efficacy and safety of new nanomaterials has to be deeply studied by ex vivo tests and innovative laboratory techniques. New delivery systems and natural nanocompounds, such as chitin nanofibrils for wound healing, are being used in cosmetic dermatology with good results, as are nanostructured TiO2 and ZnO sunscreens. The challenge is open.Keywords: nanotechnology, nanobiotechnology, delivery systems, chitin nanofibrils, TiO2, ZnO

  1. Feline dermatology at Cornell University: 1407 cases (1988-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Danny W; Miller, William H; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-04-01

    Medical records of 1407 cats with dermatologic diagnoses made at Cornell University teaching hospital from 1988 to 2003 were tabulated. We expressed the diagnoses as counts, percentages of the cats with dermatologic disease (1407) and percentages of all cats seen at the university hospital (22,135) during the same period. A total of 1887 diagnoses were made in the 1407 cats. We compared the age, sex and breed group of our cases with all those 22,135 cats in ('1-by-c') χ(2) tests in which the hospital population was considered a standard (rather than a 'sample'). The 10 most common dermatoses, their counts, and the proportions of dermatologic diagnoses and of the total cat population that the cats with these dermatoses represented were: allergy (298; 15.8%; 1.35%), atopic dermatitis (194; 10.3%; 0.88%), bacterial folliculitis/furunculosis (189; 10.0%; 0.85%), otodectic mange (115; 6.1%; 0.52%), flea infestation (99; 5.2%; 0.45%), feline acne (74; 3.9%; 0.33%), flea-bite allergy (70; 3.7%; 0.32%), cutaneous adverse drug reaction (56; 3.0%; 0.25%), idiopathic eosinophilic-granuloma complex (55; 2.9%; 0.25%) and abscess (51; 2.7%; 0.23%). Allergies of all types, combined, accounted for 32.7% of all the feline dermatoses. Relative to the standard of the total hospital population, cats <2 years old and females (both intact and spayed) were significantly under-represented (all P≤0.001) in the dermatologic case series. In contrast, Himalayans (compared with domestic short- or longhair, Persian, Siamese and other breeds) and males (both intact and neutered) were significantly over-represented (all P ≤0.001).

  2. The science of dermocosmetics and its role in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreno, B; Araviiskaia, E; Berardesca, E; Bieber, T; Hawk, J; Sanchez-Viera, M; Wolkenstein, P

    2014-11-01

    Our increased knowledge of normal skin physiology has ushered in a subtle revolution in cosmetic science. Originally designed as preparations to enhance personal appearance by direct application on to the skin, cosmetics have now taken on a new role in dermatology, through the support of the management of many skin disorders. This evolving role of cosmetics in skin care is primarily due to scientific and technological advancements that have changed our understanding of normal skin physiology and how cosmetics modify its appearance both physically and biologically. The vast array of techniques currently available to investigate skin responsivity to multiple stimuli has brought about a new era in cosmetic and dermocosmetic development based on a robust understanding of skin physiology and its varied responses to commonly encountered environmental insults. Most cosmetic research is undertaken on reconstructed skin models crucial in dermatological research, given the strict ban imposed by the European Union on animal testing. In addition, the design and conduct of trials evaluating cosmetics now follow rules comparable to those used in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical products. Cosmetic research should now aim to ensure all trials adhere to strictly reproducible and scientifically sound methodologies. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the multidisciplinary scientific approach used in formulating dermocosmetics, and to examine the major advances in dermocosmetic development and assessment, the safety and regulatory guidelines governing their production and the exciting future outlook for these dermocosmetic processes following good practice rules. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. THE APIPHYTOTHERAPY WITH PROACTIVATOR IN THE VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY AND SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SICEANU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this clinical study consisted in evaluation of the therapeutic effects of the propolis extract used in different disorders at company animals, thus being improved the palette of the apitherapeutical products used in veterinary purposes. The experiments were carried out on company animals (two experimental groups during the 2007-2008 period, in the frame of the Veterinary Medicine Faculty – Bucharest and the University - Spiru Haret, at the veterinary departments: Parasitology, Dermatology and Surgery. The raw propolis was collected from the bee colonies belonging to the Institute of the Beekeeping Research & Development– Bucharest and the apiphytotherapeutical product based on propolis was obtained in the Apitherapy sector of the same Institute. In a first stage were obtained the antiparasite, dermatological and surgical veterinary product PROACTIVATOR based on propolis alcoholic extract and Aloe vera gel. The experiments consisted in administration of the obtained preparation in different disorders on the experimental groups as: dermatological (plagues, chemical and physical burns, parasitological (extern parasites: scabies supra infected or not and in veterinary surgery (as a protective layer applied on the sutured plague. In dermatologic disorders the effects of the PROACTIVATOR product were established by way of clinical periodical examinations until the total recover were done. In external parasites and connected disorders it was established the repellent or killing effect of the preparation on the infestation with parasites and the degree of control in the correlated infections. In skin tissue surgery it was established the cicatrising effect in sutured plagues and the anaesthesic local effect. The established of the studied preparation efficiency was similar as those used in classical treatments with synthesis products. The advantage of the utilization of PROACTIVATOR eliminates the toxic and cumulative effects

  4. Beyond Bitcoin: Potential Applications of Blockchain Technology in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J K; Nambudiri, V E

    2018-06-26

    Since its initial popularization in 2008 as the underpinnings of the digital currency Bitcoin, blockchain has seen its implications spread beyond the financial industry. 1 The field of dermatology presents promising potential applications for this burgeoning technology. Blockchain facilitates communication on a peer-to-peer platform with users sharing data directly with each other (Figure). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear cardiology in the UK: activity and practice 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvulovich, Elizabeth; Metcalfe, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 251 nuclear medicine centres asking for details of nuclear medicine activity, and nuclear cardiology activity and practice in 1997. One hundred and seventy-one (68%) centres replied. Nuclear medicine activity was estimated at 11.8 studies/1,000 population/year, and 9.5% of these studies were within cardiology (1.12 studies/1,000/year). Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies accounted for 77% and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for 22% of all nuclear cardiology. On a national basis this represents activity levels of 0.86 and 0.25 studies/1,000/year for MPI and RNV, respectively. Of the 171 responding centres, 102 (60%) performed MPI studies and 81 (79%) of these reported that activity was increasing. However, MPI activity was unevenly distributed between hospitals. Two centres accounted for 13% of total MPI; others had far lower activity rates, and 51/102 (50%) centres performed less than 200 MPI studies/year. Comparison with previous surveys showed that nuclear medicine activity had almost doubled since 1990 (it was 6.0 studies/1,000 population in 1990, 9.3 studies/1,000 in 1994 and 11.8 studies/1,000 in 1997). Over the same period, nuclear cardiology activity had also risen, the greatest increase being seen for the last 3 years (it was 0.7 studies/1,000 population in 1990, 0.82 studies/1,000 in 1994 and 1.12 studies/1,000 in 1997). Despite these encouraging figures, MPI activity for 1997 remained well below that recommended by the British Cardiac Society in 1994 (2.6 studies/1,000/year) as adequate to serve the needs of patients with cardiac disease in the UK; it was also below the European average activity for the same year (2.2 studies/1,000/year). The anticipated increased workload for nuclear cardiology is encouraging despite the wide and varied practice of nuclear cardiology around the UK. The nuclear medicine community now needs to address the issues that will prevent it keeping up with demand, such as restricted camera

  6. Radiation treatment and radiation reactions in dermatology. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizzon, Renato G. [Univ. Hospital CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Dermatology; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich (ed.) [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Explains the use of radiation treatment in the full range of skin cancers and precancerous lesions. Covers physical and radiobiological principles, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. Revised and updated edition that includes new chapters and numerous additional figures. In this book, leading experts in the dermatological and oncological field describe the use of radiation therapy for the treatment of the full range of dermatological malignancies - including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell tumor - as well as those precancerous lesions and non-malignant dermatological disorders which are amenable to radiation therapy. In each case the specific indications for the use of radiotherapy and its application are clearly explained with the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations. In addition, the book provides a concise introduction to physical and radiobiological principles, selection of radiation factors, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect advances in practical knowledge and clinical practice. It will be an invaluable source of information on the management of skin tumors and related non-malignant disorders for both dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  7. Radiation treatment and radiation reactions in dermatology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panizzon, Renato G.

    2015-01-01

    Explains the use of radiation treatment in the full range of skin cancers and precancerous lesions. Covers physical and radiobiological principles, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. Revised and updated edition that includes new chapters and numerous additional figures. In this book, leading experts in the dermatological and oncological field describe the use of radiation therapy for the treatment of the full range of dermatological malignancies - including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell tumor - as well as those precancerous lesions and non-malignant dermatological disorders which are amenable to radiation therapy. In each case the specific indications for the use of radiotherapy and its application are clearly explained with the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations. In addition, the book provides a concise introduction to physical and radiobiological principles, selection of radiation factors, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect advances in practical knowledge and clinical practice. It will be an invaluable source of information on the management of skin tumors and related non-malignant disorders for both dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  8. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the dermatology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Jarosz, Patricia; Gupta, Aditya K

    Dermatologic symptoms can be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in several situations: (1) as features of some core PTSD symptoms, such as intrusion symptoms manifesting as cutaneous sensory flashbacks, as autonomic arousal manifesting as night sweats and idiopathic urticaria, and as dissociation manifesting as numbness and dermatitis artefacta; (2) the cutaneous psychosomatic effects of emotional and physical neglect and sexual abuse (eg, infantile eczema, cutaneous self-injury, and body-focused repetitive behaviors such as trichotillomania and skin picking disorder) and eating disorders, which can have dermatologic effects; (3) the direct effect of physical or sexual abuse or catastrophic life events (eg, earthquakes) on the skin; and (4) as a result of significant alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and sympatho-adrenal medullary axes, which can affect neuroendocrine and immune functions, and can lead to exacerbations of stress-reactive inflammatory dermatoses such as psoriasis, chronic urticaria, and atopic dermatitis. Elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers and impaired epidermal barrier function have been reported in situations involving sustained psychologic stress and sleep deprivation. Some PTSD patients show hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyporesponsiveness and higher circulating T lymphocytes, which can exacerbate immune-mediated dermatologic disorders. PTSD should be considered an underlying factor in the chronic, recurrent, or treatment-resistant stress-reactive dermatoses and in patients with self-induced dermatoses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermatological image search engines on the Internet: do they work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrone, M; Grimalt, R

    2007-02-01

    Atlases on CD-ROM first substituted the use of paediatric dermatology atlases printed on paper. This permitted a faster search and a practical comparison of differential diagnoses. The third step in the evolution of clinical atlases was the onset of the online atlas. Many doctors now use the Internet image search engines to obtain clinical images directly. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of the image search engines compared to the online atlases. We tested seven Internet image search engines with three paediatric dermatology diseases. In general, the service offered by the search engines is good, and continues to be free of charge. The coincidence between what we searched for and what we found was generally excellent, and contained no advertisements. Most Internet search engines provided similar results but some were more user friendly than others. It is not necessary to repeat the same research with Picsearch, Lycos and MSN, as the response would be the same; there is a possibility that they might share software. Image search engines are a useful, free and precise method to obtain paediatric dermatology images for teaching purposes. There is still the matter of copyright to be resolved. What are the legal uses of these 'free' images? How do we define 'teaching purposes'? New watermark methods and encrypted electronic signatures might solve these problems and answer these questions.

  10. Dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanjani Shirazi, Azam; Nasiri, Morteza; Yazdanpanah, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic Foot Syndrome (DFS) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), which early effective assessment can reduce the severity of complications including ulceration and amputations. This study aimed to review dermatological and musculoskeletal assessment of diabetic foot. In this review article, we searched for articles published between March 1, 1980 and July 28, 2015 in PubMed, Science Direct, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus, for both English and non-English language articles with the following keywords: "Diabetic foot syndrome", "Ulceration", "Amputation", "Foot assessment", "Skin disorders" and "Musculoskeletal deformities". In dermatological dimension, most studies focused on elucidated changes in skin temperature, color, hardiness and turgor as well as common skin disorders such as Diabetic Dermopathy (DD), Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum (NLD) and Diabetic Bullae (DB), which are common in diabetic patients and have high potential for leading to limb-threatening problems such as ulceration and infection. In musculoskeletal dimension, most studies focused on range of motion and muscle strength, gait patterns and as well as foot deformities especially Charcot osteoarthropathy (COA), which is the most destructive musculoskeletal complication of diabetes. DFS as a common condition in DM patients lead to ulceration and lower limb amputation frequently unless a prompt and comprehensive assessment was taken. So that dermatological and musculoskeletal assessments are usually neglected in primary health care, these assessments should be done frequently to reduce the high risk of serious complications. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. JPEG vs. JPEG2000: benchmarking with dermatological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, F; Vaccaro, M; Guarneri, C; Cannavò, S P

    2014-02-01

    Despite the importance of images in the discipline and the diffusion of digital imaging devices, the issue of image compression in dermatology was discussed only in few studies, which yielded results often not comparable, and left some unanswered questions. To evaluate and compare the performance of the JPEG and JPEG2000 algorithms for compression of dermatological images. Nineteen macroscopic and fifteen videomicroscopic images of skin lesions were compressed with JPEG and JPEG2000 at 18 different compression rates, from 90% to 99.5%. Compressed images were shown, next to uncompressed versions, to three dermatologists with different experience, who judged quality and suitability for educational/scientific and diagnostic purposes. Moreover, alterations and quality were evaluated by calculation of mean 'distance' of pixel colors between compressed and original images and by peak signal-to-noise ratio, respectively. JPEG2000 was qualitatively better than JPEG at all compression rates, particularly highest ones, as shown by dermatologists' ratings and objective parameters. Agreement between raters was high, but with some differences in specific cases, showing that different professional experience can influence judgement on images. In consideration of its high qualitative performance and wide diffusion, JPEG2000 represents an optimal solution for the compression of digital dermatological images. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Quantitative analysis of drug expenditures variability in dermatology units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ramírez, David; Ferrándiz, Lara; Ramírez-Soto, Gabriel; Muñoyerro, M Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Variability in adjusted drug expenditures among clinical departments raises the possibility of difficult access to certain therapies at the time that avoidable expenditures may also exist. Nevertheless, drug expenditures are not usually applied to clinical practice variability analysis. To identify and quantify variability in drug expenditures in comparable dermatology department of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud. Comparative economic analysis regarding the drug expenditures adjusted to population and health care production in 18 dermatology departments of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud. The 2012 cost and production data (homogeneous production units -HPU-)were provided by Inforcoan, the cost accounting information system of the Servicio Andaluz de Salud. The observed drug expenditure ratio ranged from 0.97?/inh to 8.90?/inh and from 208.45?/HPU to 1,471.95?/ HPU. The Pearson correlation between drug expenditure and population was 0.25 and 0.35 for the correlation between expenditure and homogeneous production (p=0.32 and p=0,15, respectively), both Pearson coefficients confirming the lack of correlation and arelevant degree of variability in drug expenditures. The quantitative analysis of variability performed through Pearson correlation has confirmed the existence of drug expenditure variability among comparable dermatology departments. Copyright © 2013 SEFH. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of amniotic membrane in ophthalmology surgery, first cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, P.; Ogrodnik, M.T.; Zarate, H; Silva, S.; Azocar, M.; Hitschfeld, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results obtained with the implant of amniotic membranes have propitiated their use in different medical fields.One of the most important barriers that have to be solved is the risk to transmit illness from donor to patient. A cooperative work between the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN) and the Complejo de Salud San Borja Arriaran (CSSBA) has been done to prepare the membranes with the main purpose of assuring the quality and effectiveness of the tissue, since the procurement to the moment that it is used as biological apposite. In the production of this radiation sterilized tissue, we have followed a strict protocol that considers selection criteria for each donor, obtainment and processing of each membrane in aseptic conditions including the washing steps, cutting,drying in laminar flow hood, packing and identification.This is followed by sterilization with gamma radiation,quality controls which include the count of colonies formation units and the assurance of sterility. The average size of each membrane was 2 x 2 cm. The membranes have been used in 57 patients since 2002 up to date on surgical procedures of ophthalmology specialty: 38 Pterigeon, 3 Recoverment of anophthalmic cavity, 4 Corneal perforations, 2 Sclera ulcers, 1 extirpation of a conjunctiva inclusion cyst and 1 Reconstruction of Lachrymal sac, with very good results

  14. Surgical adhesives in ophthalmology: history and current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhan, Samantha; Peng, Si-Liang; Janbatian, Hrag; Saadeh, Stephanie; Greenstein, Stephen; Al Bahrani, Faisal; Fadlallah, Ali; Yeh, Tsai-Chu; Melki, Samir A

    2018-03-26

    Tissue adhesives are gaining popularity in ophthalmology, as they could potentially reduce the complications associated with current surgical methods. An ideal tissue adhesive should have superior tensile strength, be non-toxic and anti-inflammatory, improve efficiency and be cost-effective. Both synthetic and biological glues are available. The primary synthetic glues include cyanoacrylate and the recently introduced polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives, while most biological glues are composed of fibrin. Cyanoacrylate has a high tensile strength, but rapidly polymerises upon contact with any fluid and has been associated with histotoxicity. Fibrin induces less toxic and inflammatory reactions, and its polymerisation time can be controlled. Tensile strength studies have shown that fibrin is not as strong as cyanoacrylate. While more research is needed, PEG variants currently appear to have the most promise. These glues are non-toxic, strong and time-effective. Through MEDLINE and internet searches, this paper presents a systematic review of the current applications of surgical adhesives to corneal, glaucoma, retinal, cataract and strabismus surgeries. Our review suggests that surgical adhesives have promise to reduce problems in current ophthalmic surgical procedures. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. An outbreak of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis at an outpatient ophthalmology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Doyle

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC is an acute eye infection caused by adenovirus. We investigated an outbreak of EKC at an outpatient ophthalmology practice in the context of a suspected community wide increase in EKC activity. A site visit was made to the facility reporting the outbreak. A line list was created of patients clinically diagnosed with EKC at the practice during the previous 5 months. A questionnaire was faxed to all other licensed ophthalmologists in the county regarding recent EKC activity in their facility. Descriptive data analyses were conducted. The outbreak facility reported 37 patients clinically diagnosed with EKC during the previous 5 months. In addition, the single ophthalmologist at the practice also had symptoms compatible with EKC during the outbreak period. Specimens were collected on 4 patients and all were positive for adenovirus serotype 8. Forty percent of ophthalmologists surveyed in the county saw at least one EKC patient in the previous 3 months, and 20% reported a perceived increase in EKC activity in recent months over normal seasonal patterns. The outbreak at the facility likely began as part of a widespread community increase in EKC that may have been amplified at the facility through nosocomial transmission. Medical providers experiencing increases in EKC activity above seasonally expected norms should contact their public health department for assistance with etiologic diagnoses and outbreak control.

  16. A secure and synthesis tele-ophthalmology system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhuo; Wu, Yongdong; Deng, Robert H; Yu, Shengsheng; Yao, Haixia; Zhao, Zhigang; Ngoh, Lek Heng; Han, Lim Tock; Poh, Eugenie W T

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a secure and synthesis ophthalmology telemedicine system, referred to as TeleOph. Under a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) channel, patient prerecorded data can be safely transferred via the Internet. With encrypted videoconference and white-board, the system not only supports hospital-to-clinic consultation, but also supplies hospital-tohospital joint discussion. Based on Directshow technology (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA), video cameras connected to the computer by firewire can be captured and controlled to sample video data. By using TWAIN technology, the system automatically identifies networked still cameras (on fundus and slitlamp devices) and retrieves images. All the images are stored in a selected format (such as JPEG, DICOM, BMP). Besides offline-transferring prerecorded data, the system also supplies online sampling of patient data (real-time capturing from remote places). The system was deployed at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore and Ang Mo Kio, Singapore, where 100 patients were enrolled in the system for examination. TeleOph can be successfully used for patient consultation, and hospital joint discussion. Meanwhile, TeleOph can supply both offline and online sampling of patient data.

  17. Optical design and tolerancing of an ophthalmological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Ingo; Martin, Thomas; Yi, Allen; Li, Likai; Rübenach, Olaf

    2014-09-01

    Tolerance analysis by means of simulation is an essential step in system integration. Tolerance analysis allows for predicting the performance of a system setup of real manufactured parts and for an estimation of the yield with respect to evaluation figures, such as performance requirements, systems specification or cost demands. Currently, optical freeform optics is gaining importance in optical systems design. The performance of freeform optics often strongly depends on the manufacturing accuracy of the surfaces. For this reason, a tolerance analysis with respect to the fabrication accuracy is of crucial importance. The characterization of form tolerances caused by the manufacturing process is based on the definition of straightness, flatness, roundness, and cylindricity. In case of freeform components, however, it is often impossible to define a form deviation by means of this standard classification. Hence, prediction of the impact of manufacturing tolerances on the optical performance is not possible by means of a conventional tolerance analysis. To carry out a tolerance analysis of the optical subsystem, including freeform optics, metrology data of the fabricated surfaces have to be integrated into the optical model. The focus of this article is on design for manufacturability of freeform optics with integrated alignment structures and on tolerance analysis of the optical subsystem based on the measured surface data of manufactured optical freeform components with respect to assembly and manufacturing tolerances. This approach will be reported here using an ophthalmological system as an example.

  18. Cerebral visual impairment in children: Causes and associated ophthalmological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehere, Niranjan; Chougule, Pratik; Dutton, Gordon N

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to identify common causes, associated ophthalmological abnormalities, and systemic comorbidities in children in Andhra Pradesh, India, with cerebral visual impairment (CVI). A retrospective review of case records of all children aged visual impairment was seen in 88.8%, and 11.2% had high functioning CVI. Fifty-eight (46.4%) patients had significant refractive errors, 40 (32.25%) had strabismus, 4 (3.2%) had visually significant cataract, and 40 (32%) had optic atrophy. Motor delay was observed in 39.5%, speech delay was evident in 22.4%, and cognitive delay in 16%. HIE is the most common cause (one-third) of CVI in our population, and the majority of them presented at age visual impairment (88.8%). A significant number of them have treatable ophthalmic conditions such as refractive errors (46.4%), accommodative insufficiency (12.1%), and cataract (3.2%), and more than one-third of them also have delay in other areas of development.

  19. CARDIOLOGICAL MANAGEMENT OF PREGNANT WOMEN IN THE UDMURT REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Gaisin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the efficacy of specialized management of pregnant women with cardiovascular diseases (CVD in the Udmurt Republic (UR of Russia.Material and methods. In prospective and retrospective study we investigated pregnancy outcomes in all 17948 women in management system created for pregnant patients with CVD in the UR from 2000 to 2007. The system comprises specialized outpatient and inpatient departments and an obstetric hospital within the regional cardiological centre. Pregnant women had different CVD including hypertension, congenital and rheumatic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, noncoronary myocardial disease, disorders and autoimmune diseases of connective tissue, etc.Results. Perinatal mortality decreased by 41,1% from 11,2‰ in 2000 to 6,6‰ in 2007. During 8 years, no one woman died.Conclusion. The management system for pregnant women with CVD within the regional cardiological clinic makes it possible to reduce of maternal and perinatal mortality rates significantly. 

  20. The value of independent specialty designation for interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, James C; Powell, Wayne A; Gray, Dawn R; Duffy, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Interventional cardiology has finally completed, after 26 years of advocacy, a professional hat trick: independent board certification, membership as a unique specialty in the American Medical Association House of Delegates (AMA HOD), and recognition by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) as a separate medical specialty. This article points out how these distinctions for interventional cardiology and its professional society, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), have led to clear and definite benefits for interventional cardiologists and their patients. We focus on the least understood of these three-recognition by CMS and its implications for reimbursement and quality assessment for interventional cardiologists. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nuclear Cardiology. Guidance and Recommendations for Implementation in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology represents one of the most widely used non-invasive techniques for the assessment of coronary artery disease and other cardiovascular conditions. It has been proven as a cost effective tool for the management of cardiac patients and usually has a decisive role in diagnosis, prognosis and risk stratification, as well as in evaluation of therapy. Clinical scenarios in which nuclear cardiology can be helpful are continuously expanding, with the identification of special subgroups of patients as potential beneficiaries of these methods and the emergence of technological developments in instrumentation and software that tend to enhance the cost-benefit ratio and the reliability of results. Many developing countries have introduced nuclear cardiology, with increasing use of this technique in view of the epidemic of cardiovascular disease that is taking place in most low to middle income countries. Longer life expectancies, changes in lifestyle, diabetes, overweight and obesity are thought to be some of the factors underlying the rapidly growing incidence of this life threatening condition. Today, cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in adults in most, if not all, countries of the world, although specific diseases show different relative weights according to local socioeconomic conditions. Thus, proper utilization of available resources such as nuclear cardiology and other imaging methods is essential to effectively combat these diseases. The practice of nuclear cardiology, however, is not homogeneous worldwide, owing to differences in technological capabilities, availability of consumables, education and training of human resources, and access to evidence based medicine, among other factors. Evidence based medicine is the judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. The practice of evidence based medicine means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available

  2. Telemedicine: Its Importance in Cardiology Practice. Experience in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Escobar, MD, FACC, FAHA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need worldwide to take medical care to distant locations far from the main urban centers, particularly to rural areas. Furthermore, there is the ethical imperative to provide equal access to medical care to all patients, regardless of their place of residence, so as to satisfy an increasingly demanding population. A widespread problem, from which cardiology is not excepted, is the insufficient number of specialists and their uneven distribution. The upsurge in information and communications technology has made available a large collection of tools, mainly computers, smartphones, e-mail, and the Internet, to name just a few, to meet the needs of communication between individuals and organizations. This article defines telemedicine and describes its application in the practice of cardiology and its impact in Chile.

  3. Providing Cardiology Care in Rural Areas Through Visiting Consultant Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Thomas S; Pyo, Tae-Hyung; Nelson, Gregory C

    2016-06-30

    Workforce experts predict a future shortage of cardiologists that is expected to impact rural areas more severely than urban areas. However, there is little research on how rural patients are currently served through clinical outreach. This study examines the impact of cardiology outreach in Iowa, a state with a large rural population, on participating cardiologists and on patient access. Outreach clinics are tracked annually in the Office of Statewide Clinical Education Programs Visiting Medical Consultant Database (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine). Data from 2014 were analyzed. In 2014, an estimated 5460 visiting consultant clinic days were provided in 96 predominantly rural cities by 167 cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states. Forty-five percent of Iowa cardiologists participated in rural outreach. Visiting cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states drive an estimated 45 000 miles per month. Because of monthly outreach clinics, the average driving time to the nearest cardiologist falls from 42.2±20.0 to 14.7±11.0 minutes for rural Iowans. Cardiology outreach improves geographic access to office-based cardiology care for more than 1 million Iowans out of a total population of 3 million. Direct travel costs and opportunity costs associated with physician travel are estimated to be more than $2.1 million per year. Cardiologists in Iowa and adjoining states have expanded access to office-based cardiology care from 18 to 89 of the 99 counties in Iowa. In these 71 counties without a full-time cardiologist, visiting consultant clinics can accommodate more than 50% of office visits in the patients' home county. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Longer-term impact of cardiology e-consults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Jason H; Rao, Sandhya K; Kalwani, Neil; Chittle, Melissa D; Richardson, Calvin A; Gallen, Kathleen M; Isselbacher, Eric M; Kimball, Alexandra B; Ferris, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac e-consults may be an effective way to deliver value-oriented outpatient cardiology care in an accountable care organization. Initial results of cardiac e-consults have demonstrated high satisfaction among both patients and referring providers, no known adverse events, and low rates of diagnostic testing. Nevertheless, differences between e-consults and traditional consults, effects of e-consults on traditional consult volume, and whether patients seek traditional consults after e-consults are unknown. We established a cardiac e-consult program on January 13, 2014. We then conducted detailed medical record reviews of all patients with e-consults to detect any adverse clinical events and detect subsequent traditional visits to cardiologists. We also performed 2 comparisons. First, we compared age, gender, and referral reason for e-consults vs traditional consults. Second, we compared changes in volume of referrals to cardiology vs other medical specialties that did not have e-consults. From January 13 to December 31, 2014, 1,642 traditional referrals and 165 e-consults were requested. The proportion of e-consults of all evaluations requested over that period was 9.1%. Gender balance was similar among traditional consults and e-consults (44.8% male for e-consults vs 45.0% for traditional consults, P = .981). E-consult patients were younger than traditional consult patients (55.3 vs 60.4 years, P cardiology visit during the follow-up period. E-consults are an effective and safe mechanism to enhance value in outpatient cardiology care, with low rates of bounceback to traditional consults. E-consults can account for nearly one-tenth of total outpatient consultation volume at 1 year within an accountable care organization and are associated with a reduction in traditional referrals to cardiologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Barrett, Cindy S; Franklin, Wayne H; Graham, Eric M; Halnon, Nancy J; Hattendorf, Brandy A; Krawczeski, Catherine D; McGovern, James J; O'Connor, Matthew J; Schultz, Amy H; Vinocur, Jeffrey M; Chowdhury, Devyani; Anderson, Jeffrey B

    2017-12-01

    In 2012, the American College of Cardiology's (ACC) Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Council established a program to develop quality metrics to guide ambulatory practices for pediatric cardiology. The council chose five areas on which to focus their efforts; chest pain, Kawasaki Disease, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries after arterial switch, and infection prevention. Here, we sought to describe the process, evaluation, and results of the Infection Prevention Committee's metric design process. The infection prevention metrics team consisted of 12 members from 11 institutions in North America. The group agreed to work on specific infection prevention topics including antibiotic prophylaxis for endocarditis, rheumatic fever, and asplenia/hyposplenism; influenza vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis (palivizumab); preoperative methods to reduce intraoperative infections; vaccinations after cardiopulmonary bypass; hand hygiene; and testing to identify splenic function in patients with heterotaxy. An extensive literature review was performed. When available, previously published guidelines were used fully in determining metrics. The committee chose eight metrics to submit to the ACC Quality Metric Expert Panel for review. Ultimately, metrics regarding hand hygiene and influenza vaccination recommendation for patients did not pass the RAND analysis. Both endocarditis prophylaxis metrics and the RSV/palivizumab metric passed the RAND analysis but fell out during the open comment period. Three metrics passed all analyses, including those for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with heterotaxy/asplenia, for influenza vaccination compliance in healthcare personnel, and for adherence to recommended regimens of secondary prevention of rheumatic fever. The lack of convincing data to guide quality improvement initiatives in pediatric cardiology is widespread, particularly in infection prevention. Despite this, three metrics were

  6. What is the purpose of launching World Journal of Cardiology?

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Lian-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The first issue of World Journal of Cardiology (WJC), whose preparatory work was initiated on December 13, 2009, will be published on December 31, 2009. The WJC Editorial Board has now been established and consists of 298 distinguished experts from 40 countries. Our purpose of launching WJC is to publish peer-reviewed, high-quality articles via an open-access online publishing model, thereby acting as a platform for communication between peers and the wider public, and maximizing the benefits...

  7. Ophthalmology on social networking sites: an observational study of Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Tsui, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    The use of social media in ophthalmology remains largely unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the extent and involvement of ophthalmology journals, professional associations, trade publications, and patient advocacy and fundraising groups on social networking sites. An archived list of 107 ophthalmology journals from SCImago, trade publications, professional ophthalmology associations, and patient advocacy organizations were searched for their presence on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Activity and popularity of each account was quantified by using the number of "likes" on Facebook, the number of followers on Twitter, and members on LinkedIn. Of the 107 journals ranked by SCImago, 21.5% were present on Facebook and 18.7% were present on Twitter. Journal of Community Eye Health was the most popular on Facebook and JAMA Ophthalmology was most popular on Twitter. Among the 133 members of the International Council of Ophthalmology, 17.3% were present on Facebook, 12.8% were present on Twitter, and 7.5% were present on LinkedIn. The most popular on Facebook was the International Council of Ophthalmology, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology was most popular on Twitter and LinkedIn. Patient advocacy organizations were more popular on all sites compared with journals, professional association, and trade publications. Among the top ten most popular pages in each category, patient advocacy groups were most active followed by trade publications, professional associations, and journals. Patient advocacy groups lead the way in social networking followed by professional organizations and journals. Although some journals use social media, most have yet to engage its full potential and maximize the number of potential interested individuals.

  8. Investigating the perception of Romanian adults on ophthalmology services from an experiential marketing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Consuela-Mădălina; Gheorghe, Iuliana-Raluca; Purcărea, Victor Lorin

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, we live in a world in which we are daily bombed by hundreds of advertisements. Specialists have to discover other channels or embed attractive elements in the advertisements' messages to cut through the clutter and catch the consumers' attention. The evolution of the concept of service has changed from the commercial status to determining a lifestyle. Buying a service has led to a change in the consumer behavior. Consumers want to buy services that dazzle their senses, touch their hearts, and stimulate their minds, not as before, excellent or satisfying. Ophthalmology is the medical specialty that is the most oriented toward outpatient care, as hospitalization is required only in a small percentage of cases. The objective of this case study was to investigate the perception of Romanian adult consumers on ophthalmology services from an experiential marketing perspective, by using the Focus Group method. Ophthalmology requires a wide range of skills due to the diversity of consumers who demand specialized consultations. Experiential marketing is a valuable strategy that ophthalmologic organizations may use to target specific consumers. The purpose of this case study was to identify the perceptions of Romanian adults on experiential marketing campaigns and determine the degree to which these campaigns influenced their decisions of buying an ophthalmologic service. Using a snowball sampling technique we have sent a filter questionnaire to 40 people on the internet. The filter questionnaire consisted of questions about wearing eyeglasses, the period of wearing them, the last ophthalmologic consultation, the type of ophthalmologic clinic they were going to, age and education. The respondents revealed there is almost no visibility on promoting services even if there is an upsurge of organizations offering this type of health service in the Romanian ophthalmology sector.

  9. Communication Skills Training in Ophthalmology: Results of a Needs Assessment and Pilot Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anuradha; Browning, David; Haviland, Miriam J; Jackson, Mary Lou; Luff, Donna; Meyer, Elaine C; Talcott, Katherine; Kloek, Carolyn E

    To conduct a needs assessment to identify gaps in communication skills training in ophthalmology residency programs and to use these results to pilot a communication workshop that prepares residents for difficult conversations. A mixed-methods design was used to perform the needs assessment. A pre-and postsurvey was administered to workshop participants. Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School (HMS), Department of Ophthalmology. HMS ophthalmology residents from postgraduate years 2-4 participated in the needs assessment and the workshop. Ophthalmology residency program directors in the United States participated in national needs assessment. Ophthalmology program directors across the United States were queried on their perception of resident communication skills training through an online survey. A targeted needs assessment in the form of a narrative exercise captured resident perspectives on communication in ophthalmology from HMS residents. A group of HMS residents participated in the pilot workshop and a pre- and postsurvey was administered to participants to assess its effectiveness. The survey of program directors yielded a response rate of 40%. Ninety percent of respondents agreed that the communication skills training in their programs could be improved. Fifteen of 24 residents (62%) completed the needs assessment. Qualitative analysis of the narrative material revealed four themes; (1) differing expectations, (2) work role and environment, (3) challenges specific to ophthalmology, and (4) successful strategies adopted. Nine residents participated in the workshop. There was a significant improvement post-workshop in resident reported scores on their ability to manage their emotions during difficult conversations (p = 0.03). There is an opportunity to improve communication skills training in ophthalmology residency through formalized curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Investigating the perception of Romanian adults on ophthalmology services from an experiential marketing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Consuela-Mădălina; Gheorghe, Iuliana-Raluca; Purcărea, Victor Lorin

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, we live in a world in which we are daily bombed by hundreds of advertisements. Specialists have to discover other channels or embed attractive elements in the advertisements’ messages to cut through the clutter and catch the consumers’ attention. The evolution of the concept of service has changed from the commercial status to determining a lifestyle. Buying a service has led to a change in the consumer behavior. Consumers want to buy services that dazzle their senses, touch their hearts, and stimulate their minds, not as before, excellent or satisfying. Ophthalmology is the medical specialty that is the most oriented toward outpatient care, as hospitalization is required only in a small percentage of cases. The objective of this case study was to investigate the perception of Romanian adult consumers on ophthalmology services from an experiential marketing perspective, by using the Focus Group method. Ophthalmology requires a wide range of skills due to the diversity of consumers who demand specialized consultations. Experiential marketing is a valuable strategy that ophthalmologic organizations may use to target specific consumers. The purpose of this case study was to identify the perceptions of Romanian adults on experiential marketing campaigns and determine the degree to which these campaigns influenced their decisions of buying an ophthalmologic service. Using a snowball sampling technique we have sent a filter questionnaire to 40 people on the internet. The filter questionnaire consisted of questions about wearing eyeglasses, the period of wearing them, the last ophthalmologic consultation, the type of ophthalmologic clinic they were going to, age and education. The respondents revealed there is almost no visibility on promoting services even if there is an upsurge of organizations offering this type of health service in the Romanian ophthalmology sector. PMID:29450395

  11. Nuclear cardiology procedures to diagnose ischemia in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropp, J.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is equipped with a broad spectrum of diagnostic capabilities which allow the evaluation of ventricular performance, perfusion and metabolism of the heart. The principle of nuclear medicine procedures consists in the administration of free radioisotopes or radiopharmaceuticals to detect their spatial distribution within the body by detecting their y-rays from outside by gamma cameras. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is the most important procedure in nuclear cardiology and is performed on a routine basis with 201 Thallium-Chloride ( 201 Tl) since 1975. With the Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) technique it is possible to diagnose ischemia of the left ventricle on the basis of coronary artery disease with a sensitivity of 90-95% and a specificity of about 55%. Recently 99m Tc-tracers were developed for this purpose, which have many advantages due to their better physical properties, their easy handling and availability. The diagnostic accuracy is the same compared to ( 201 Tl). Free fatty acids labeled with 123 Iodine like 123 IPPA are alternative tracers to diagnose ischemia by the metabolic alteration and are pathognomonic tracers to diagnose the heart involvement in myopathies or metabolic defects related to fatty acid degradation which are the main fuel of the normal myocytes. Finally we should not forget the radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG) which is one of the oldest nuclear cardiology procedures providing us with very objective, reliable results of ventricular performance. (orig.)

  12. Enabling Precision Cardiology Through Multiscale Biology and Systems Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipp W. Johnson, BS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The traditional paradigm of cardiovascular disease research derives insight from large-scale, broadly inclusive clinical studies of well-characterized pathologies. These insights are then put into practice according to standardized clinical guidelines. However, stagnation in the development of new cardiovascular therapies and variability in therapeutic response implies that this paradigm is insufficient for reducing the cardiovascular disease burden. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine 3 interconnected ideas we put forth as key concepts for enabling a transition to precision cardiology: 1 precision characterization of cardiovascular disease with machine learning methods; 2 the application of network models of disease to embrace disease complexity; and 3 using insights from the previous 2 ideas to enable pharmacology and polypharmacology systems for more precise drug-to-patient matching and patient-disease stratification. We conclude by exploring the challenges of applying a precision approach to cardiology, which arise from a deficit of the required resources and infrastructure, and emerging evidence for the clinical effectiveness of this nascent approach. Key Words: cardiology, clinical informatics, multi-omics, precision medicine, translational bioinformatics

  13. Status of Early-Career Academic Cardiology: A Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Carl W; Madhur, Meena S; Rzeszut, Anne K; Abdalla, Marwah; Abudayyeh, Islam; Alexanderson, Erick; Buber, Jonathan; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Gopinathannair, Rakesh; Hira, Ravi S; Kates, Andrew M; Kessler, Thorsten; Leung, Steve; Raj, Satish R; Spatz, Erica S; Turner, Melanie B; Valente, Anne Marie; West, Kristin; Sivaram, Chittur A; Hill, Joseph A; Mann, Douglas L; Freeman, Andrew M

    2017-10-31

    Early-career academic cardiologists, who many believe are an important component of the future of cardiovascular care, face myriad challenges. The Early Career Section Academic Working Group of the American College of Cardiology, with senior leadership support, assessed the progress of this cohort from 2013 to 2016 with a global perspective. Data consisted of accessing National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute public information, data from the American Heart Association and international organizations, and a membership-wide survey. Although the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute increased funding of career development grants, only a small number of early-career American College of Cardiology members have benefited as funding of the entire cohort has decreased. Personal motivation, institutional support, and collaborators continued to be positive influential factors. Surprisingly, mentoring ceased to correlate positively with obtaining external grants. The totality of findings suggests that the status of early-career academic cardiologists remains challenging; therefore, the authors recommend a set of attainable solutions. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jimmy C; Bansal, Manish; Behera, Sarina K; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cardis, Brian; Hokanson, John S; Kakavand, Bahram; Jedeikin, Roy

    2017-12-01

    As part of the American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section effort to develop quality metrics (QMs) for ambulatory pediatric practice, the chest pain subcommittee aimed to develop QMs for evaluation of chest pain. A group of 8 pediatric cardiologists formulated candidate QMs in the areas of history, physical examination, and testing. Consensus candidate QMs were submitted to an expert panel for scoring by the RAND-UCLA modified Delphi process. Recommended QMs were then available for open comments from all members. These QMs are intended for use in patients 5-18 years old, referred for initial evaluation of chest pain in an ambulatory pediatric cardiology clinic, with no known history of pediatric or congenital heart disease. A total of 10 candidate QMs were submitted; 2 were rejected by the expert panel, and 5 were removed after the open comment period. The 3 approved QMs included: (1) documentation of family history of cardiomyopathy, early coronary artery disease or sudden death, (2) performance of electrocardiogram in all patients, and (3) performance of an echocardiogram to evaluate coronary arteries in patients with exertional chest pain. Despite practice variation and limited prospective data, 3 QMs were approved, with measurable data points which may be extracted from the medical record. However, further prospective studies are necessary to define practice guidelines and to develop appropriate use criteria in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Advanced Imaging of Intracranial Atherosclerosis: Lessons from Interventional Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Pavlin-Premrl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Patients with a high degree of stenosis have a significant rate of stroke despite medical therapy. Two randomized trials of stenting have failed to show benefit. Improving periprocedural complication rates and patient selection may improve stenting outcomes. Fractional flow reserve (FFR, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, and optical coherence tomography (OCT are intravascular imaging techniques employed to improve patient selection and stent placement in interventional cardiology. FFR has been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes when used in patient selection for intervention. Studies of FFR in intracranial atherosclerosis show that the measure may predict which plaques lead to stroke. IVUS is used in cardiology to quantify stenosis and assist with stent placement. Comparisons with histology show that it can reliably characterize plaques. Several case reports of IVUS in intracranial arteries show the technique to be feasible and indicate it may improve stent placement. Plaque characteristics on IVUS may help identify vulnerable plaques. In interventional cardiology, OCT provides excellent visualization of vessel geometry and is useful periprocedurally. Images reliably identify thin-capped fibroatheromas and other plaque features. Case reports indicate that OCT is safe for use in intracranial arteries. OCT can be used to identify perforator vessels and so may be useful in avoiding perforator strokes, a common complication of stenting. Plaque characteristics on OCT may be useful in patient selection.

  16. Review of paediatric cardiology services in district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Hannah; Singh, Yogen

    2016-03-01

    Following the Safe and Sustainable review of Paediatric Services in 2012/2013, National Health Service England recommended that local paediatric cardiology services should be provided by specially trained paediatricians with expertise in cardiology in all non-specialist hospitals. To understand the variation in local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom. An internet-based questionnaire was sent out via the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology Special Interest Group and the Neonatologists with Interest in Cardiology and Haemodynamics contact databases and the National Health Service directory. Non-responders were followed-up via telephone. The response rate was 80% (141 of 177 hospitals), and paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were available in 68% of those. Local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were provided in 96 hospitals (68%), whereas specialist outreach clinics were held in 123 centres (87%). A total of 11 hospitals provided neither specialist outreach clinics nor any local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology. Paediatric echocardiography services were provided in 83% of the hospitals, 12-lead electrocardiogram in 96%, Holter electrocardiogram in 91%, and exercise testing in only 47% of the responding hospitals. Telemedicine facilities were established in only 52% of the centres, where sharing echocardiogram images via picture archiving and communication system was used most commonly. There has been a substantial increase in the availability of paediatricians with expertise in cardiology since 2008. Most of the hospitals are well-supported by specialist cardiology centres via outreach clinics; however, there remains significant variation in the local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

  17. VALUE-BASED MEDICINE AND OPHTHALMOLOGY: AN APPRAISAL OF COST-UTILITY ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gary C; Brown, Melissa M; Sharma, Sanjay; Brown, Heidi; Smithen, Lindsay; Leeser, David B; Beauchamp, George

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To ascertain the extent to which ophthalmologic interventions have been evaluated in value-based medicine format. Methods Retrospective literature review. Papers in the healthcare literature utilizing cost-utility analysis were reviewed by researchers at the Center for Value-Based Medicine, Flourtown, Pennsylvania. A literature review of papers addressing the cost-utility analysis of ophthalmologic procedures in the United States over a 12-year period from 1992 to 2003 was undertaken using the National Library of Medicine and EMBASE databases. The cost-utility of ophthalmologic interventions in inflation-adjusted (real) year 2003 US dollars expended per quality-adjusted life-year ($/QALY) was ascertained in all instances. Results A total of 19 papers were found, including a total of 25 interventions. The median cost-utility of ophthalmologic interventions was $5,219/QALY, with a range from $746/QALY to $6.5 million/QALY. Conclusions The majority of ophthalmologic interventions are especially cost-effective by conventional standards. This is because of the substantial value that ophthalmologic interventions confer to patients with eye diseases for the resources expended. PMID:15747756

  18. Analysis of inpatient dermatologic referrals: insight into the educational needs of trainee doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, K

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To analyse inpatient consultation referrals to the Dermatology Department and to identify the educational needs of junior\\/trainee doctors. METHODS: Consultation data of inpatients referred to the Dermatology Department between 2001 and 2006 was reviewed. RESULTS: There were 703 referrals identified. Patients were referred from all wards in the hospital. There were a total of 113 different dermatological diagnoses in the group. One-fifth (22%) consultations were for skin infections, 12% had atopic dermatitis, 8% had psoriasis and 8% had clear or suspected drug cause for their rash. In 391 cases, the Consultant Dermatologist\\'s diagnosis was different to the inpatient referral diagnosis on the consultation referral form. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasise the need for junior dermatology trainees to undertake extra training in both the dermatologic conditions. This data supports the need for expansion of service provision of dermatology in the region.

  19. Comparison of EuroMISE Minimal Data Model for Cardiology and HL7 V3 DAM: Cardiology Rel. 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seidl, Libor; Hanzlíček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 33-36 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : data model * EuroMISE MDMC * HL7 V3 DAM cardiology * comparison Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Seidl_en.pdf

  20. Ophthalmology in North America: Early Stories (1491-1801

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T Leffler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available New World plants, such as tobacco, tomato, and chili, were held to have beneficial effects on the eyes. Indigenous healers rubbed or scraped the eyes or eyelids to treat inflammation, corneal opacities, and even eye irritation from smoke. European settlers used harsh treatments, such as bleeding and blistering, when the eyes were inflamed or had loss of vision with a normal appearance (gutta serena. In New Spain, surgery for corneal opacity was performed in 1601 and cataract couching in 1611. North American physicians knew of contralateral loss of vision after trauma or surgery (sympathetic ophthalmia, which they called “sympathy.” To date, the earliest identified cataract couching by a surgeon trained in the New World was performed in 1769 by John Bartlett of Rhode Island. The American Revolution negatively affected ophthalmology, as loyalist surgeons were expelled and others were consumed with wartime activities. After the war, cataract extraction was imported to America in earnest and academic development resumed. Charles F Bartlett, the son of John, performed cataract extraction but was also a “rapacious privateer.” In 1801, a doctor in the frontier territory of Kentucky observed anticholinergic poisoning by Datura stramonium (Jimsonweed and suggested that this agent be applied topically to dilate the pupil before cataract extraction. John Warren at Harvard preferred couching in the 1790s, but, after his son returned from European training, recommended treating angle closure glaucoma by lens extraction. Other eye procedures described or advertised in America before the 19th century included enucleation, resection of conjunctival lesions or periocular tumors, treatment of lacrimal fistula, and fitting of prosthetic eyes.

  1. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell's palsy, Ramsay-Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell's palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell's palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell's phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell's palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration with

  2. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  3. Low Rates of Dermatologic Care and Skin Cancer Screening Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alyce; Ferris, Laura K; Click, Benjamin; Ramos-Rivers, Claudia; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Hashash, Jana G; Dunn, Michael; Barrie, Arthur; Schwartz, Marc; Regueiro, Miguel; Binion, David G

    2018-04-30

    Dermatologic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are common, and certain IBD medications increase the risk of skin cancer. To define the rates of care and factors associated with dermatologic utilization with a focus on skin cancer screening. We utilized a prospective, natural history IBD research registry to evaluate all outpatient healthcare encounters from 2010 to 2016. Gastrointestinal, dermatologic and primary care visits per individual were identified. We calculated the proportion of patients obtaining care, categorized primary indications for dermatologic visits, determined the incidence of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, and used logistic regression to determine factors associated with dermatology utilization. Of the 2127 IBD patients included, 452 (21.3%) utilized dermatology over the study period, and 55 (2.6%) had a total body skin examination at least once. The 452 patients incurred 1633 dermatology clinic visits, 278 dermatologic procedures, and 1108 dermatology telephone encounters. The most frequent indication was contact dermatitis or dermatitis. Factors associated with dermatology use were family history of skin cancer, employment, systemic steroids, longer disease duration, emergency room use, and the number of IBD-related clinic visits. Between 8.3 and 11% of IBD patients recommended for skin cancer screening visited dermatology each year, and the resulting incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer was 35.4/10,000 [95% CI 23.3-51.5] and melanoma was 6.56/10,000 [95% CI 2.1-15.3]. Less than one in ten IBD patients obtain dermatologic care. Given the increased risk of skin cancers among IBD patients, an emphasis on education, prevention, and screening merits attention.

  4. Perspective of ophthalmology residents in the United States about residency programs and competency in relation to the International Council of Ophthalmology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Nizar Saleh; Radwan, Ahmed E; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the perspective of ophthalmology residents in the US about their residency programs and compare the competency of residency programs to international competency levels set by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO). A cross-sectional web-based survey extracted from the ICO published competency standards was sent to program directors of ophthalmology residency programs in the US to forward it to current PGY-3, 4 residents, and residency graduates from 2011 to 2014. Eighty-seven responses were received, comprising 61 residents and 26 graduates. Most respondents were highly satisfied with their programs (93.6%). Clinic-based training was rated satisfactorily. Insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation (38.5%), refraction and contact lenses prescription (38.5%), and vitreo-retinal surgeries (38.5%) was reported. Respondents were satisfied with their overall surgical experiences, with the vast majority (>83%) rating case volume, complexity, and variety as satisfactory or better. A significant group stated they had insufficient exposure to extra-capsular cataract extraction (26.3%), refractive surgery (19.7%), and orbital surgery (64.5%). All graduates surveyed passed their Ophthalmic Knowledge Assessment Program (OKAP) examinations, and 72% felt their residency programs adequately prepared them for the examinations. All respondents reported insufficient training in certain nonclinical areas, such as practice management, staffing, and administration skills. Ophthalmology residents in the US express high levels of satisfaction with their residency training programs. While most programs adequately address most ICO core objectives, certain curriculum modifications should be considered.

  5. Trends in types of dermatology books available over the last ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2009-06-15

    Shifts in interest toward cosmetic and surgical dermatology and away from medical and academic dermatology have been observed in recent years. We hypothesized that this trend would be evident in the types of books available for purchase from a major medical textbook supplier. Books published from 1998-2008 were categorized by type and statistical testing was performed to determine if this trend has been reflected in books published. The percentage of medical dermatology books decreased over time, whereas the percentage of cosmetic and surgical dermatology books increased over time.

  6. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  7. Prevalence of actinic keratosis among dermatology outpatients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrándiz, C; Plazas, M J; Sabaté, M; Palomino, R

    2016-10-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are common skin lesions associated with an increased risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma. Few studies in Europe have focused on AK prevalence. To determine the point prevalence of AKs in a dermatology outpatient population in Spain, to describe the clinical characteristics of these lesions and to characterise the profile of AK patients. Observational, cross-sectional, multicentre study conducted in 19 hospitals (dermatology outpatient services) around Spain. A total of 204 consecutive patients per hospital who were ≥45 years old were screened for the presence of AKs. 3877 patients were assessed and the overall AKs prevalence was 28.6%. Prevalence was significantly higher in men than women (38.4% vs. 20.8%, p<0.0001) and increased with age for both sexes (45.2% in 71-80 years). Scalp and ear lesion locations were significantly more frequent in men (51.9% vs. 2.7% and 16.9% vs. 2.4%, respectively, p<0.0001 both cases) and the cheek, nose and neckline in women (46.3% vs. 34.0% [p<0.0001], 43.0% vs. 24.8% [p<0.0001] and 5.3% vs. 1.8% [p=0.002]). Men showed a significantly higher frequency of ≥2 affected areas than women (42.7% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001). Among patients with AK lesions, only 65% confirmed that they were the reason for the visit to the clinic. Approximately a quarter of the dermatology outpatient population in Spain aged ≥45 years old have AKs, with the prevalence rate being highest in men and in older age groups. AK is underdiagnosed and a proactive strategy is needed for the diagnosis and early treatment of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifying randomized clinical trials in Spanish-language dermatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, G; Pardo, H; Sánchez, S; Bonfill, X

    2015-06-01

    The necessary foundation for good clinical practice lies in knowledge derived from clinical research. Evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the pillar on which decisions about therapy are based. To search exhaustively and rigorously to identify RCTs in dermatology journals published in Spanish. We located dermatology journals through the following search engines and indexes: PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, Periódica, Latindex, Índice Médico Español, C-17, IBECS, EMBASE, and IMBIOMED. We also sought information through dermatology associations and dermatologists in countries where Spanish was the usual language of publication, and we searched the Internet (Google). Afterwards we searched the journals electronically and manually to identify RCTs in all available volumes and issues, checking from the year publication started through 2012. Of 28 journals identified, we included 21 in the search. We found a total of 144 RCTs published since 1969; 78 (54%) were in Latin American journals and 66 (46%) were in Spanish journals. The most frequent disease contexts for RCTs in Spanish journals were psoriasis, mycoses, and acne vulgaris. In Latin American journals, the most frequent disease contexts were common warts, mycoses, acne vulgaris, and skin ulcers on the lower limbs. Manual searches identified more RCTs than electronic searches. Manual searches found a larger number of RCTs. Relatively fewer RCTs are published in Spanish and Latin American journals than in English-language journals. Internet facilitated access to full texts published by many journals; however, free open access to these texts is still unavailable and a large number of journal issues are still not posted online. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Sub-nanosecond lasers for cosmetics and dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Aleksandr A.; Chu, Hong

    2018-02-01

    We report about the development of two new subnanosecond solid-state laser models for application in dermatology and cosmetics. One model uses subnanosecond Nd: YAG microchip laser as a master oscillator and includes Nd: YAG double- and single-pass amplifiers. At 10 Hz this laser produces more than 600 mJ pulse energy with duration 500 +/- 5 ps. Another model (under development) is gain-switched Ti: Sapphire laser with short cavity. This laser produces 200 mJ, 560 ps pulses at 790 nm and uses standard Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser with nanosecond pulse duration as a pumping sourse.

  10. Dermatologic radiotherapy and thyroid cancer. Dose measurements and risk quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid doses for various dermatologic radiation techniques were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization rate meters in an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom. The effects of changes in radiation quality and of the use or nonuse of treatment cones and thyroid shields were evaluated in detail. The results indicate that the potential risk of radiogenic thyroid cancer is very small when proper radiation protection measures are used. The probability of radiogenic thyroid cancer developing and the potential mortality risk were assessed quantitatively for each measurement. The quantification of radiation risks allows comparisons with risks of other therapeutic modalities and the common hazards of daily life

  11. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  12. Azelaic acid in dermatological treatment – current state of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomir Reszke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Azelaic acid (AZA is a naturally occurring substance produced by Malassezia furfur which exerts various effects on the skin. Azelaic acid has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, keratolytic, comedolytic, sebostatic and tyrosinase-inhibiting properties. Topical application of AZA as 20% cream or 15% gel is a well-established therapeutic method in various common dermatoses, mainly acne vulgaris, rosacea and disorders associated with hyperpigmentation. Azelaic acid is used as a component of chemical peels as well. The paper summarizes the most relevant issues concerning AZA application in dermatological treatment based on current knowledge.

  13. Dermatology Eponyms – sign –Lexicon (O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Brzeziński

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eponyms are used almost daily in the clinical practice of dermatology. And yet, information about the person behind the eponyms is difficult to find. Indeed, who is? What is this person’s nationality? Is this person alive or dead? How can one find the paper in which this person first described the disease? Eponyms are used to describe not only disease, but also clinical signs, surgical procedures, staining techniques, pharmacological formulations, and even pieces of equipment. In this article we present the symptoms starting with (O and other. The symptoms and their synonyms, and those who have described this symptom or phenomenon.

  14. Dermatology eponyms – phenomen / sign – Lexicon (F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Brzezinski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eponyms are used almost daily in the clinical practice of dermatology. And yet, information about the person behind the eponyms is difficult to find. Indeed, who is? What is this person's nationality? Is this person alive or dead? How can one find the paper in which this person first described the disease? Eponyms are used to describe not only disease, but also clinical signs, surgical procedures, staining techniques, pharmacological formulations, and even pieces of equipment. In this article we present the symptoms starting with (F. The symptoms and their synonyms, and those who have described this symptom or phenomenon.

  15. Dermatology eponyms – sign – Lexicon (R: Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Brzeziński

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eponyms are used almost daily in the clinical practice of dermatology. And yet, information about the person behind the eponyms is difficult to find. Indeed, who is? What is this person’s nationality? Is this person alive or dead? How can one find the paper in which this person first described the disease? Eponyms are used to describe not only disease, but also clinical signs, surgical procedures, staining techniques, pharmacological formulations, and even pieces of equipment. In this article we present the symptoms starting with (R and other. The symptoms and their synonyms, and those who have described this symptom or phenomenon.

  16. Dose to patients and professionals in cardiology interventional: Progress of multicenter group Doccaci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R. M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Goicolea Ruigomez, J.; Pifarre, X.; Escaned, J.; Rovira, J. J.; Garcia del Blanco, B.; Carrera, F.; Diaz, J. F.; Ordiales, J. M.; Nogales, J. M.; Hernandez, J.; Bosa, F.; Rosales, F.; Saez, J. R.; Soler, M. M.; Romero, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The multidisciplinary group and multicenter DOCCACI (dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional cardiology), sponsored by the section of haemodynamics of the Spanish society of Cardiology, is intended to propose reference levels to doses received by patients in interventional cardiology procedures such as recommended by the International Commission on radiological protection It also investigates the doses received by professionals, in particular dose in Crystallyne whose recommended limit dose has been reduced recently from 150 to 20 mSv/year. (Author)

  17. Prototype Development: Context-Driven Dynamic XML Ophthalmologic Data Capture Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peissig, Peggy; Schwei, Kelsey M; Kadolph, Christopher; Finamore, Joseph; Cancel, Efrain; McCarty, Catherine A; Okorie, Asha; Thomas, Kate L; Allen Pacheco, Jennifer; Pathak, Jyotishman; Ellis, Stephen B; Denny, Joshua C; Rasmussen, Luke V; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S; Vrabec, Tamara R; Brilliant, Murray H

    2017-09-13

    The capture and integration of structured ophthalmologic data into electronic health records (EHRs) has historically been a challenge. However, the importance of this activity for patient care and research is critical. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype of a context-driven dynamic extensible markup language (XML) ophthalmologic data capture application for research and clinical care that could be easily integrated into an EHR system. Stakeholders in the medical, research, and informatics fields were interviewed and surveyed to determine data and system requirements for ophthalmologic data capture. On the basis of these requirements, an ophthalmology data capture application was developed to collect and store discrete data elements with important graphical information. The context-driven data entry application supports several features, including ink-over drawing capability for documenting eye abnormalities, context-based Web controls that guide data entry based on preestablished dependencies, and an adaptable database or XML schema that stores Web form specifications and allows for immediate changes in form layout or content. The application utilizes Web services to enable data integration with a variety of EHRs for retrieval and storage of patient data. This paper describes the development process used to create a context-driven dynamic XML data capture application for optometry and ophthalmology. The list of ophthalmologic data elements identified as important for care and research can be used as a baseline list for future ophthalmologic data collection activities. ©Peggy Peissig, Kelsey M Schwei, Christopher Kadolph, Joseph Finamore, Efrain Cancel, Catherine A McCarty, Asha Okorie, Kate L Thomas, Jennifer Allen Pacheco, Jyotishman Pathak, Stephen B Ellis, Joshua C Denny, Luke V Rasmussen, Gerard Tromp, Marc S Williams, Tamara R Vrabec, Murray H Brilliant. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 13.09.2017.

  18. [Scientific role of German ophthalmology in the European telecommunication project OPHTEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, M; Mann, G; Zahlmann, G; Obermaier, M

    1997-07-01

    In Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain and Italy, the OPHTEL project combines clinical centers of ophthalmology and internal medicine, an institute for medical informatics and health services research, a publishing company and different industrial partners in the EDP market. With the aid of visual telecommunication and rapid data transfer, methods and conditions will be developed and proved so that any physician can very easily obtain sufficient information for treating his patient. Thus, the regional differences in the quality of structured health service (e.g., urban/ rural) will be overcome throughout Europe. SCIENTIFIC TASKS: A multilingual diagnostic and therapeutic thesaurus has to be worked out in order to create standards for communication and quality control. Based on literature, images and image analysis in a knowledge-based data bank, a monitoring system (containing watch-dog functions) and the basic aspects of an ophthalmological patient/disease register will be investigated. (In parallel, a technical development of synchronous and asynchronous telecommunication between eye physicians is taking place in close cooperation with the regional Bavarian project Teleopathalmology in Bavaria on-line). State of the art 6 months after starting the project:the knowledge-based image data bank has been founded and also an ophthalmological 8 language thesaurus and definition standard. All data transfer lines are installed. The project is taking place amid diverging sections of medicine: ophthalmology and internal medicine, health politics and data protection, individual treatment and common interest (health care), product management and office organization. Thus, the scientific quality of the transferred ophthalmological content must undergo sophisticated controls. FUTURE STEPS: Intense cooperation with the big German associations for ophthalmology (DOG, BVA) and the European ophthalmological societies concerning EDP, classification and quality control.

  19. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Papadakis, Michael; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Nicole; Carré, François; Dugmore, Dorian; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Rasmusen, Hanne Kruuse; Solberg, Erik E; Borjesson, Mats; Corrado, Domenico; Pelliccia, Antonio; Sharma, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum potential benefit at the lowest possible risk. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advocates systematic preparticipation cardiovascular screening in an effort to identify competitive athletes at risk of exercise-related cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. However, the implementation of preparticipation screening is hindered because of lack of structured training and as a result lack of sufficient expertise in the field of sports cardiology. In 2008 the European Society of Cardiology published a core curriculum for the general cardiologist, in which sports cardiology was incorporated within the topic 'Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology'. However, the exponential rise in knowledge and the growing demand for expertise in the field of sports cardiology dictates the need to systematically structure the knowledge base of sports cardiology into a detailed curriculum. We envisage that the curriculum would facilitate more uniform training and guideline implementation throughout Europe, and safeguard that evaluation and guidance of competitive athletes or individuals who wish to engage in leisure-time sports activities is performed by physicians with expertise in the field. The current manuscript provides a comprehensive curriculum for sports cardiology, which may serve as a framework upon which universities and national and international health authorities will develop the training, evaluation and accreditation in sports cardiology.

  20. TECHNIQUES OF EVALUATION OF HEMOGLOBIN OXYGEN SATURATION IN CLINICAL OPHTHALMOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Petrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen content in body fluids and tissues is an important indicator of life support functions. A number of ocular pathologies, e.g. glaucoma, are of presumable vascular origin which means altered blood supply and oxygen circulation. Most oxygen is transported in the blood in the association with hemoglobin. When passing through the capillaries, hemoglobin releases oxygen, converting from oxygenated form to deoxygenated form. This process is accompanied by the changes in spectral characteristics of hemoglobin which result in different colors of arterial and venous blood. Photometric technique for the measurement of oxygen saturation in blood is based on the differences in light absorption by different forms of hemoglobin. The measurement of saturation is called oximetry. Pulse oximetry with assessment of tissue oxygenation is the most commonly used method in medicine. The degree of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the eye blood vessels is the most accessible for noninvasive studies during ophthalmoscopy and informative. Numerous studies showed the importance of this parameter for the diagnosis of retinopathy of various genesis, metabolic status analysis in hyperglycemia, diagnosis and control of treatment of glaucoma and other diseases involving alterations in eye blood supply. The specific method for evaluation of oxygen concentration is the measurement of pressure of oxygen dissolved in the blood, i.e. partial pressure of oxygen. In ophthalmological practice, this parameter is measured in anterior chamber fluid evaluating oxygen level for several ophthalmopathies including different forms of glaucoma, for instillations of hypotensive eye drops as well as in vitreous body near to the optic disc under various levels of intraocular pressure. Currently, monitoring of oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels, i.e. retinal oximetry, is well developed. This technique is based on the assessment of light absorption by blood depending on