WorldWideScience

Sample records for deregulated power market

  1. Wind power in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravn, Hans F.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes organisational and economic elements related to wind power in a deregulated market, it describes physical and technical characteristics of wind power and it describes how wind power is handled in daily operation as well as on the market. (author)

  2. Design of reactive power procurement in deregulated electricity market

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reactive power management is different in the deregulated electricity market of various countries. In this paper, a novel reactive power procurement model is proposed, which ensure secure and reliable operation of deregulated electricity market. Various issues of reactive power management in the deregulated electricity ...

  3. Selling power : marketing energy under deregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.; Hanna, F.

    2001-07-01

    This book discussed the marketing of energy in a deregulated environment. Experience from long distance telephone service providers has shown that historical dominance is not a guarantee for future success. As new brands are introduced and as consumer choice increases, so does the ability to change from one provider to another. Price is only one of the factors prompting that change. Old rules and practices do not bind new competitors who must face the challenge of open competition and must be aware of the ever-changing face of business. It was recommended that the strategic solution would be to build a brand and to develop significant market shares and create effective customer retention programs. This book focused on the elements that energy marketing professionals must use to maintain and increase share without product differentiation. It also explained how energy providers can effectively attract and retain customers over the long term while keeping marketing and service delivery costs down. It was suggested that small players can compete with the growing strength of regional providers by creating new alliances between larger energy conglomerates. The chapters of the book were entitled: (1) Introduction, (2) The Goals of Deregulation, (3) Strategic Marketing Choices, (4) Relationship Marketing, (5) The Role of Customer Service, (6) The Question of Outsourcing, and (7) Final Thoughts and Observations. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Selling power : marketing energy under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, J.; Hanna, F.

    2001-01-01

    This book discussed the marketing of energy in a deregulated environment. Experience from long distance telephone service providers has shown that historical dominance is not a guarantee for future success. As new brands are introduced and as consumer choice increases, so does the ability to change from one provider to another. Price is only one of the factors prompting that change. Old rules and practices do not bind new competitors who must face the challenge of open competition and must be aware of the ever-changing face of business. It was recommended that the strategic solution would be to build a brand and to develop significant market shares and create effective customer retention programs. This book focused on the elements that energy marketing professionals must use to maintain and increase share without product differentiation. It also explained how energy providers can effectively attract and retain customers over the long term while keeping marketing and service delivery costs down. It was suggested that small players can compete with the growing strength of regional providers by creating new alliances between larger energy conglomerates. The chapters of the book were entitled: (1) Introduction, (2) The Goals of Deregulation, (3) Strategic Marketing Choices, (4) Relationship Marketing, (5) The Role of Customer Service, (6) The Question of Outsourcing, and (7) Final Thoughts and Observations. 24 refs., 3 figs

  5. Competitive positioning of power generation plants in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.

    1998-01-01

    As industrialized countries deregulate their electric power industries, there is a fundamental shift from guaranteed cost recovery to open market competition on a deregulated grid. Utilities generally competitively bid into a power exchange where the lowest cost power providers are dispatched first. Therefore, the competitiveness of utilities determines their profitability. This commercial structure compels power generators to seek out ways of improving their equipment and plant performance. The inevitability of this trend is demonstrated by a look at the installed base in the US where the move toward deregulation is gaining momentum. More than half of the generating plants in the US are over 20 years old. The average thermal efficiency nation-wide is 33%. In contrast, contemporary coal-and gas-fired plants can operate at efficiency levels up to 45 percent and 55 to 60%, respectfully. With new facilities coming on-line, existing plants will need to make improvements to be dispatched. When deregulation fully envelopes the US market, utilities will not all fit into one pattern; their strategies and actions will depend on a multiple set of factors. Their success will be based on their ability to change landscapes from guaranteed cost recovery to competitive bidding. This paper discussers technical and commercial options available to power producers to improve their competitive positions in a deregulated market as well as software for determining the competitiveness of specific power plants and the location-based market prices of electricity. Examples of the application of alternatives will be cited along with expected payback and impact on cents per kilowatt-hour production costs

  6. The economics of energy storage in 14 deregulated power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, F.C.; Flynn, P.C.; Cabral, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    In regulated power markets, electricity is stored to better utilize existing generation and to defer costly investment in generation. The justification is a reduction in the overall regulated price of power compared to the alternative investment in new primary generation. However, any storage of electrical power also involves a capital investment and incurs the cost of inefficiency. In deregulated energy markets, the sale of electricity or ancillary services from pumped storage can be evaluated based on each individual project. The economic basis for power storage is that power is purchased during periods of low price and resold during periods of high price. This study used historical power price data from 14 deregulated markets around the world to evaluate the economic incentive to use pumped storage for electrical energy. Each market was shown to have a unique average diurnal power price profile that results in a unique price spread for pumped storage. The diurnal price pattern and efficiency of storage was used to assess the net income potential from energy sales from pumped storage for each market. The markets were ranked in terms of the incentive to invest in pumped energy storage as well as on available revenue, and on potential return on investment. An optimal operating profile was illustrated in detail based on historical price patterns for one of the markets. The net income potential was then combined with the capital and operating cost of pumped storage. The adequacy of return on investment for pumped storage was analyzed by two different methods. The differences between markets stem from different diurnal power price patterns that reflect the generation mix, market design and participant behaviours. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs., 1 appendix

  7. Power plant operation and management in a deregulated market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraretto, Cristian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Padova, Via Venezia, 1-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    This paper analyzes the influence of electricity deregulation on the design, operation and management of the power plants owned by strategic and non-strategic producers. After a sensitivity analysis aimed at finding market conditions of profitable operation for thermal and hydroelectric power plants, a Nash-equilibrium market model is used to determine producers' optimum strategies, depending on their relative market power and overall production characteristics. Attention is then focused on the operation of single thermal power plants. Their short-term management plans and consequent effects on emission levels and residual life are described. The available reserve for primary and secondary control deriving from producers' market strategies is discussed. Some design options to improve combined cycles contribution to reserve service are finally described. The paper discusses these problems with a general approach, and uses many cases and examples derived from the current Italian scenario. (author)

  8. Power plant operation and management in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraretto, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of electricity deregulation on the design, operation and management of the power plants owned by strategic and non-strategic producers. After a sensitivity analysis aimed at finding market conditions of profitable operation for thermal and hydroelectric power plants, a Nash-equilibrium market model is used to determine producers' optimum strategies, depending on their relative market power and overall production characteristics. Attention is then focused on the operation of single thermal power plants. Their short-term management plans and consequent effects on emission levels and residual life are described. The available reserve for primary and secondary control deriving from producers' market strategies is discussed. Some design options to improve combined cycles contribution to reserve service are finally described. The paper discusses these problems with a general approach, and uses many cases and examples derived from the current Italian scenario. (author)

  9. Power systems locational marginal pricing in deregulated markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Fung Francis

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, the electricity business is transforming from a vertical integrating business to a competitive market operations. The generation, transmission, distribution subsystem of an electricity utility are operated independently as Genco (generation subsystem), Transco (transmission subsystem), and Distco (distribution subsystem). This trend promotes more economical inter- and intra regional transactions to be made by the participating companies and the users of electricity to achieve the intended objectives of deregulation. There are various types of electricity markets that are implemented in the North America in the past few years. However, transmission congestion management becomes a key issue in the electricity market design as more bilateral transactions are traded across long distances competing for scarce transmission resources. It directly alters the traditional concept of energy pricing and impacts the bottom line, revenue and cost of electricity, of both suppliers and buyers. In this research, transmission congestion problem in a deregulated market environment is elucidated by implementing by the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) method. With a comprehensive understanding of the LMP method, new mathematical tools will aid electric utilities in exploring new business opportunities are developed and presented in this dissertation. The dissertation focuses on the development of concept of (LMP) forecasting and its implication to the market participants in deregulated market. Specifically, we explore methods of developing fast LMP calculation techniques that are differ from existing LMPs. We also explore and document the usefulness of the proposed LMP in determining electricity pricing of a large scale power system. The developed mathematical tools use of well-known optimization techniques such as linear programming that are support by several flow charts. The fast and practical security constrained unit commitment methods are the

  10. Power quality and reliability issues in a deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge of maintaining power quality and reliability in Ontario's new competitive electricity market was the focus of this paper. The intention of Ontario's deregulation is to lower costs and give customers more power and choice. However, some fear that costs pressures may lead to poorer quality. This paper reviewed the causes, costs, and responsibilities, and made some suggestions concerning how customers can protect their interests as the market opens. It was suggested that in order to assure power quality, especially during the transition period, customers need to take care to design their systems and equipment to tolerate some quality variations. Conversely, utilities need to strive for at least minimum industry standards under most conditions. Contracts should be carefully crafted, with responsibilities for reliability and quality clearly stated. 2 refs

  11. Deregulation and competitive power markets -- Its impact on developing economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saran, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of privatization in developed countries is to encourage competition in generation and supply of power whereas the focus of developing economies is to bridge the demand supply gap by addition of capacity. However, there needs to be a reconciliation between these two apparently having conflicting objectives even in case of developing economies. In competitive power markets it is necessary that rules of the game are identified in advance and followed uniformly by all players. Existence of a ''referee'' would be necessary to regulate the game so as to ensure fair play. The regulatory institution would serve this purpose and work as a stimulator to development of privatization and competitive power markets in developing economies. Consumer interests should be of upper-most priority in the mind while establishing power markets and regulatory institutions, particularly as market forces are unfavorable to consumer interests in power shortage conditions. As competition fosters, gradually market forces take over and the ''harsh'' regulator would convert itself to a ''silent vigil referee'' so as to ensure genuine competition. The debate of deregulation vs. regulation will continue but the show must go on for building of an increasingly sound, competitive and vibrant power sector in the interest of end use consumers. The planned and phased restructuring though a delayed process is a preferred process and India is fully determined to achieve this

  12. Does wind energy mitigate market power in deregulated electricity markets?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Moshe, Ori; Rubin, Ofir D.

    2015-01-01

    A rich body of literature suggests that there is an inverse relationship between wind power penetration rate into the electricity market and electricity prices, but it is unclear whether these observations can be generalized. Therefore, in this paper we seek to analytically characterize market conditions that give rise to this inverse relationship. For this purpose, we expand a recently developed theoretical framework to facilitate flexibility in modeling the structure of the electric industry with respect to the degree of market concentration and diversification in the ownership of wind power capacity. The analytical results and their attendant numerical illustrations indicate that the introduction of wind energy into the market does not always depress electricity prices. Such a drop in electricity prices is likely to occur when the number of firms is large enough or the ownership of wind energy is sufficiently diversified, or most often a combination of the two. Importantly, our study defines the circumstances in which the question of which type of firm invests in wind power capacity is crucial for market prices. - Highlights: • Studies show that electricity prices decrease with increased wind power capacity. • We investigate market conditions that give rise to this inverse relationship. • Average prices for wind energy are systematically lower than average market prices. • Conventional generation firms may increase market power by investing in wind farms. • Energy policy should seek to diversify the ownership of wind power capacity

  13. A review of the deregulated power market since market opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runge, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Alberta electrical industry structure was discussed along with the market opportunities and historic market data pertaining to Alberta. The Alberta electrical industry is responsible for 20,000 kilometres of transmission lines, connections with British Columbia and Saskatchewan, operates in excess of 90 generating units, with 200 Power Pool participants. The Alberta electricity generation breakdown was provided (coal, gas, hydro), and a look at the projected growth in installed capacity provided. General information concerning the Power Pool of Alberta was presented. In discussing market opportunities, the author began by looking at the evolution of the Alberta market, noting that the Pool commenced operations in 1996. A discussion followed on real time spot market, direct sales, contract for differences (CfD), and other market opportunities. The last part of the presentation dealt with historical market data. The Alberta annual Pool price from 1996 to 2002 was presented, along with daily pool price 1996-2002. The factors affecting Pool price are: other markets, input costs, supply-demand balance, and other market elements. Alberta imports and exports were discussed, followed by a look at forward trading activity. Market evolution was addressed, including considerations in next phase of Alberta market. figs

  14. Multiobjective clearing of reactive power market in deregulated power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiee, A.; Shayanfar, H.; Amjady, N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a day-ahead reactive power market which is cleared in the form of multiobjective context. Total payment function (TPF) of generators, representing the payment paid to the generators for their reactive power compensation, is considered as the main objective function of reactive power market. Besides that, voltage security margin, overload index, and also voltage drop index are the other objective functions of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem to clear the reactive power market. A Multiobjective Mathematical Programming (MMP) formulation is implemented to solve the problem of reactive power market clearing using a fuzzy approach to choose the best compromise solution according to the specific preference among various non-dominated (pareto optimal) solutions. The effectiveness of the proposed method is examined based on the IEEE 24-bus reliability test system (IEEE 24-bus RTS). (author)

  15. Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets - Reasons for concern?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bye, Torstein; Bruvoll, Annegrete; Aune, Finn Roar [Research Department, Statistics Norway, P.O. Box 8131 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2008-07-15

    In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply. (author)

  16. Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets - Reasons for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bye, Torstein; Bruvoll, Annegrete; Aune, Finn Roar

    2008-01-01

    In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply

  17. Reactive power management and voltage control in deregulated power markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Robert G.

    The research that is the subject of this dissertation is about the management of reactive power and voltage support in the wholesale open access power markets in the United States (US). The purpose of this research is to place decisions about open access market structures, as they relate to reactive power and voltage control, on a logical and consistent economic basis, given the engineering needs of a commercial electric power system. An examination of the electricity markets operating in the US today reveals that current approaches to reactive power management and voltage support are extensions of those based on historical, regulated monopoly electric service. A case for change is built by first looking at the subject of reactive power from an engineering viewpoint and then from an economic perspective. Ultimately, a set of market rules for managing reactive power and voltage support is proposed. The proposal suggests that cost recovery for static and dynamic VARs is appropriately accomplished through the regulated transmission cost of service. Static VAR cost recovery should follow traditional rate recovery methodologies. In the case of dynamic VARs, this work provides a methodology based on the microeconomic theory of the firm for determining such cost. It further suggests that an operational strategy that reduces and limits the use of dynamic VARs, during normal operations, is appropriate. This latter point leads to an increase in the fixed cost of the transmission network but prevents price spikes and short supply situations from affecting, or being affected by, the reactive capability limitations associated with dynamic VARs supplied from synchronous generators. The rules are consistent with a market structure that includes competitive generation and their application will result in the communication of a clear understanding of the responsibilities, related to voltage control, of each type of market entity. In this sense, their application will contribute to

  18. Buying and selling green: deregulation and green power marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the increasing trend towards deregulation of electricity markets, and the driving forces for liberalisation in the EU and North America. The use of green tariffs offered by utilities to differentiate themselves from competitors and to gain and keep customers is reported, and the situation with regard to green energy within the deregulated electricity markets in Australia, the EU, Denmark, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, the UK, Canada and the USA is outlined. Customers switching as a result of green tariffs, the growing role of renewables, and opportunities for the promotion of green tariffs are discussed. (UK)

  19. Impact of electric industry deregulation on gas markets: a power marketer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahns, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of electric industry deregulation on gas markets was examined. The presentation included industry comparisons of 1994 gas total revenues versus electricity total revenues for residential, commercial, and industrial use. A chart forecasting the outlook for gas-fired generation of electric power indicated that the use of natural gas as feedstock for power generation will increase from 12% to 37% during the period 1994 to 2003. 16 figs

  20. Deregulation of the Nordic power market and environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, E.S.; Nesse, A.; Tjoetta, S.

    1999-01-01

    A common Nordic power market will reduce total CO2 emissions in the Nordic countries as compared to a situation of autarky and, thus, reduce the aggregate cost of complying to strict national CO2 emission targets. A common market for CO2 emission permits may reduce the aggregate cost further, but this cost reduction will be smaller the harsher the CO2 emission constraints are. The economic gain of introducing a common Nordic power market will be particularly large in the case of a Swedish nuclear power phase out. In this case, the cost reduction of introducing a common market for CO2 emission permits will not be very large. 10 refs

  1. Design of reactive power procurement in deregulated electricity market

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    novel reactive power procurement model is proposed, which ensure secure and ..... The simulation is performed in the Matlab. .... focus of this paper is a reactive procurement market model, which is a basically two-step optimization process.

  2. Power deregulation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMurchy, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    The impacts of deregulation of the electric power industry in Alberta from the perspective of the natural gas industry was presented with special focus on how the power market can be brought back into balance. The issue of what impacts the deregulated power market will have on natural gas consumption or prices was also reviewed. It was noted that deregulation of the electric power industry will have a definite impact on natural gas consumption but no significant impact on prices. It is estimated that in 1999/2000 gas demand will be 90 million cf/day for incremental electricity generation. However, as long as pipe capacity out of the province exits, this increase in natural gas demand in Alberta is not expected to affect gas prices

  3. Market Power of Local Cable Television Franchises: Evidence from the Effects of Deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Adam B. Jaffe; David M. Kanter

    1990-01-01

    The 1989 Cable Act eliminated most price regulation of cable television operators, including the right of municipalities to enforce price terms in franchise agreements. Deregulation was justified, at least partially, by the contention that competition from other entertainment media eliminated any market power of cable franchises. We examine the value at sale of existing cable systems before and after deregulation. Assuming that this value represents the expected present value of future profit...

  4. Integrated control centre: Trading system for operation in a deregulated power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyland, S.; Reinertsen, T.; Gunnestad, J.; Botnan, G.O.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a trade system for operation in a deregulated power market. The trade system (ICC-Trade) is one of the application programs in the Integrated Control Centre (ICC). The Norwegian deregulated power market is briefly described in order to discuss the consequences of the new power market for the power utilities. The paper will also deal with the interconnection to other ICC application programs and how to make use of the communication with SCADA systems for support of managing market activities. Finally some future developments are presented. The trade system is developed in cooperation between a research institute, vendors of control centres, and power utilities, and is planned to be a commercial product during the spring of 1995. Before release the product will be tested in real life by a pilot customer. 4 figs

  5. Electrical energy market management in deregulated power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abady, A. F.; Niknam, T.

    2003-01-01

    For many decades, vertically integrated electric utilities monopolized the way they control, sell and distribute electricity to customers in their service territories. In this monopoly, each utility managed three main components of the system: generation, transmission and distribution. Analogous to perceived competitions in airline, communication and natural gas industries which demonstrated that vertically integrated monopolies could not provide services as efficiently as competitive firms, the electric power industry plans to improve its efficiency by providing a more reliable energy at least cost to customers. A competition is guaranteed by establishing a restructured environment in which customers could choose to buy from different suppliers and change suppliers as they wish in order to pay market base rates. This paper is dealing with progressive approach of restructuring in power and introduce ISO, its functions and model of electrical energy markets

  6. A small wind power producer on a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jari, Ihonen; Mikko, Jalas; Timo, Lahti

    2000-01-01

    Lumituuli Oy is a customer owned wind power producer in Finland. The company installed one wind turbine (Vestas V47/660kW) on an artificial island in Lumijoki in March 1999 and has sold electricity on the Finnish market since then. This document describes the experiences, which the company has gained in projecting the investment and operating of the turbine. A technical description of the special construction and erection technique, namely the ice road, is also included in this document. (author)

  7. Buying and selling power in a deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The rapid pace at which the restructuring of Ontario's electrical industry is taking place is the focus of this paper. Restructuring began in November 1997, when the government announced in its White Paper the plans to achieve a competitive market in both wholesale and retail sales by the year 2000. This presentation outlines the licensing requirements of the Ontario Energy Board (OEB). The OEB deals with the regulation of both the gas and electricity industries. It is anticipated that the electricity market will evolve in much the same was as the gas market. The OEB is expecting to deal with common issues between the two. Other topics discussed in this presentation include the Market Design Committee's (MDC) recommendations concerning independent market operator rules, market rules, embedded generation, and uniform prices throughout the province during the first 18 months to provide the parties sufficient time to adapt to the new system without having to digest transmission congestion. 3 refs

  8. De-regulated electric power markets and operating nuclear power plants: the case of British energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewlett, James G.

    2005-01-01

    One issue addressed in almost all electric power restructuring/de-regulation plans in both the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) was the recovery of operating nuclear power plant's spent fuel disposal costs and the expenditures to decommission the units when they are retired. Prior to restructuring, in theory at least, in both countries, electricity consumers were paying for the back end costs from operating nuclear power plants. Moreover, in virtually all cases in the US, states included special provisions to insure that consumers would continue to do so after power markets were de-regulated. When power markets in the UK were initially restructured/de-regulated and nuclear power privatized, the shareholders of British Energy (BE) were initially responsible for these costs. However, after electricity prices fell and BE collapsed, the British government shifted many of the costs to future taxpayers, as much as a century forward. If this was not done, the book value of BE's equity would have been about -3.5 billion pounds. That is, BE's liabilities would have been about -3.5 billion pounds greater than their assets. It is difficult to see how BE could remain viable under such circumstances

  9. Ancillary reactive power service allocation cost in deregulated markets: a methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J. Horacio Tovar; Jimenez-Guzman, Miguel; Gutierrez-Alcaraz, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to allocate reactive power costs in deregulated markets. Reactive power supply service is decomposed into voltage regulation and reactive power spinning reserve. The proposed methodology is based on sensitivities and the postage-stamp method in order to allocate the total costs service among all participants. With the purpose of achieving this goal, the system operator identifies voltage support and/or reactive power requirements, and looks out for suitable providers. One case study is presented here to illustrate the methodology over a simplified southeastern Mexican grid. (Author)

  10. Regulating deregulated energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2002-01-01

    The North American gas and electricity markets are fast evolving, and regulators are currently faced with a host of issues such as market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, and incentive regulation are surfacing as a result of deregulation. The regulatory environment in Ontario was reviewed by the author. Deregulated markets rule, from commodities to gas and electricity. Additionally, there is an evolution of traditional utility regulation. A look at deregulated markets revealed that there are regulations on boundary conditions on the deregulated market. Under the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), all generators, transmitters, distributors, and retailers of electricity must be licensed. The standard supply service (SSS) offered by electricity distributors and system gas which is still being sold by natural gas distributors continues to be regulated by OEB. One issue that was addressed was separation for revenues and costs of the utility's purchase and sale of gas business, at least for accounting purposes. The next issue discussed was cost of system gas and SSS, followed by timely signals and prudent incurred costs. Historical benefits were reviewed, such as historical commitments to low-cost electricity. Pooling transportation costs, transmission pricing continued, market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, incentive regulation/ performance based regulation (PBR) were all discussed. Price cap on PBR, both partial and comprehensive were looked at. A requirement to review guidelines on cost of capital and an application to extend blanket approval provisions for gas storage were discussed, as they are amongst some of the challenges of the future. Other challenges include revised rules and practice and procedure; practice directions for cost awards, appeals, and other functions; confidentiality guidelines; and refinements to the role of and approaches to alternative dispute resolution. The future role of regulators was examined in light

  11. Power grab : the impacts of power market deregulation on B.C.'s environment and consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.; Howard, T.; Christensen, R.

    2002-07-01

    The government of British Columbia is developing a new energy policy that will include the deregulation of the province's integrated, publicly-owned electric utilities. The BC Citizens for Public Power Society presents its views on the impact this will have on the BC environment and consumers. It argues that deregulation will result in increased pollution and environmental degradation from new coal and natural gas fired power plants. Deregulation will also result in a lack of accountability and control in the power maker, and prices will increase by a predicted minimum 30 per cent. In addition, the increased price and supply volatility will result in brownouts. This report also discussed the impact that deregulation would have on the transmission system. It was noted that if the public electricity resources are removed from public ownership and control, the province's future options will be restricted under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). The BC Citizens for Public Power Society argues that the future power needs of the province are best met by public investment and energy conservation using BC Hydro. 65 refs

  12. Managing of power networks and business processes in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlfors, F.; Wilhelmsson, K.

    1995-01-01

    The current wave of privatization and deregulation of the electric energy market has created new challenges. This is true in many parts of the world. Power companies are cast in the role of 'energy service companies' instead of 'energy suppliers'. The increasing competition between market actors and the requirements for improved overall security, economy and quality of service is accelerating the demand for more accurate and up-to-date information. Information becomes a strategic resource. To be able to constitute its full potential to users all over the power company the keyword becomes integration. Technical, business and administrative applications need to be viewed in a new, corporate wide perspective. The revised IT-strategy therefore becomes a tool for positioning the company in the competitive market. 8 refs, 4 figs

  13. A review on risk-constrained hydropower scheduling in deregulated power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongling, Liu; Chuanwen, Jiang; Yan, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    In deregulated power market, hydro producer has in principle no other objective than to produce electricity and sell with maximum profit with lower market risk. Attention must focus on profit uncertainty caused by uncertainty in spot prices and reservoir inflow. The purpose of this review is to assess the state-of-the-art in hydropower operations considering profit risk under uncertainty and consider future directions for additional research and application. Physical and financial tools to hedge risk in bilateral market and risk-assessment methods are all discussed in detail. Furthermore, production resources can also be used to manage risk to a certain extent. This concept, when be integrated with variety of risk-management methods under stochastic optimal framework, has operational significance for hydro producer participating in electricity market. (author)

  14. A matrix game model for analyzing FTR bidding strategies in deregulated electric power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Tapas K.; Rocha, Patricio; Babayigit, Cihan

    2010-01-01

    Suppliers in deregulated electric power markets compete for financial transmission rights (FTRs) to hedge against congestion charges. The system operator receives the bids for FTRs submitted by the suppliers and develops an allocation strategy by solving an optimization model. Each FTR bid is defined by a path, a quantity indicating the amount of FTRs the supplier is bidding for in that path, and the price that the supplier is willing to pay for each FTR. The FTR revenue is calculated only after the electricity market has been cleared by computing the differences in the LMPs at the pair of nodes that connect each path. Thus, suppliers rely on forecasts of locational marginal prices (LMPs) to develop their FTR bids. In this paper, we present a game theoretic modeling approach to develop FTR bidding strategies for power suppliers assuming that they have forecasts of LMPs. The game theoretic model considers multiple participants as well as network contingencies. We apply the game theoretic model on a sample network to assess impacts of variations of bid and network parameters on the FTR market outcome. (author)

  15. Electric power industry deregulation in the United States: impacts on U.S. and Canadian markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.R. [Putnam, Hayes and Bartlett, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An overview of the restructuring and deregulation of the United States electric power industry and the implications for the North American natural gas industry was presented. Electric power restructuring and its effect on wholesale and retail competition was discussed. It was suggested that although in the short term electric power deregulation impacts negatively on the natural gas industry, the long term impacts are favourable. The short term impact on the natural gas industry will mean increased competition and downward pressure on gas prices. In contrast, the long term impact could mean increased reliance on gas for electric power generation and convergence of the electric power and natural gas industries.

  16. Market power in deregulated electricity markets : a review of the recent experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullin, K.; Trebilcock, M.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, the electric power industry has been headed by vertically integrated monopolies that combined power generation, transmission, distribution and retail components of electricity supply. Electric utilities were generally publicly owned and subjected to rate-of-return regulation. The industry in many jurisdictions is now being unbundled with the advent of new generation technology that has led the way for small generation facilities to produce competitively priced electricity and enter the electricity market. Regulators have recognized that private monopolies had little incentive to minimize costs resulting in inefficient operation of the utility. The challenge lies in designing a system that truly promotes competitive markets. This presentation examined the characteristics of market power and described the experiences of several jurisdictions in dealing with possible market power abuse. The presentation also presented lessons learned in California, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New Zealand, Alberta, and Ontario that could be applied to future electricity markets. In conclusion, the authors state that governments should use caution when implementing across-the-board price caps, because doing so discourages new investment in generation capacity.152 refs

  17. Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Li; Flynn, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price, and in particular its daily and average weekday vs. weekend pattern of change, for 14 deregulated markets. Power price in deregulated markets shows fundamentally different patterns. North American markets show a monotonic diurnal weekday price pattern, while all other markets studied show more than one price peak. Deregulated power markets differ in maximum vs. minimum daily average price and in average weekday to weekend price, in turn creating a different incentive for a consumer to time shift power consuming activities. Markets differ in the extent to which a small fraction of the days shapes the average diurnal pattern and value of price. Deregulated markets show a wide variation in the correlation between load and price. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent, and hence that can encourage a customer to shape consumption behaviors. Other markets, for example South Australia, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to escape risk through hedging mechanisms. (Author)

  18. Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Flynn, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price, and in particular its daily and average weekday vs. weekend pattern of change, for 14 deregulated markets. Power price in deregulated markets shows fundamentally different patterns. North American markets show a monotonic diurnal weekday price pattern, while all other markets studied show more than one price peak. Deregulated power markets differ in maximum vs. minimum daily average price and in average weekday to weekend price, in turn creating a different incentive for a consumer to time shift power consuming activities. Markets differ in the extent to which a small fraction of the days shapes the average diurnal pattern and value of price. Deregulated markets show a wide variation in the correlation between load and price. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent, and hence that can encourage a customer to shape consumption behaviors. Other markets, for example South Australia, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to escape risk through hedging mechanisms

  19. Deregulation of Lesotho's maize market

    OpenAIRE

    van Schalkwyk, Herman D.; van Zyl, Johan; Botha, P.W.; Bayley, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the past year, there have been major policy reforms in Lesotho and South Africa with respect to maize pricing and marketing. In Lesotho the impact of deregulation on producers, consumers and government revenues was substantially lower than it should have been, and as a result Lesotho was not able to reap the full benefits of these changes. This is partly because information on the changes to the maize marketing system did not reach the potential beneficiaries of the new system. Free an...

  20. Expectations and forward risk premium in the Spanish deregulated power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furio, Dolores; Meneu, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Deregulation in energy markets has entailed important changes in the way agents conduct business. Price risk arises as a result of fluctuations in the future price of electricity and agents assume long or short positions in the forward and spot markets to hedge their exposure to price risk. The presence of forward risk premium in prices is evidence of the fact that agents act in the market according to risk considerations. This work aims to analyse the information content of the difference between the forward and spot prices (the so-called forward premium) regarding the agents' decisions. We find that the sign and magnitude of the ex post forward premium depend on the unexpected variation in demand and on the unexpected variation in the hydroelectric capacity, and that both the ex post and the ex ante forward premia are negatively related to the variance of spot price, as predict. We provide additional insights about relevant aspects of spot price pricing in the Spanish electricity market such as the positive relation between spot prices and CO 2 emission allowance prices or the impact on spot prices of the set of market matching rules introduced in March 2006.

  1. Buying and selling power in a deregulated energy market : proceedings of an Insight conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Issues relating to the restructuring of Ontario's electric power industry, especially the buying and selling of power are the principal focus of this conference. The restructuring began in November 1997 when the Ontario government announced its plans to have open competition in both the wholesale and retail electricity market by the year 2000. The nature of buying and selling in a competitive energy market, the impact that this new regulatory regime will have on Municipal Electrical Utilities (MEUs), supplier certification, load profiling, power quality and reliability, and issues regarding contracts for transmission and distribution of electric power in an open electricity market received much attention. Concerns about the exercise of market power, and issues related to consumer choices and goals were also discussed. refs., tabs., figs

  2. Nash equilibrium strategy in the deregulated power industry and comparing its lost welfare with Iran wholesale electricity market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Hosein; Nazemi, Ali; Hafezalkotob, Ashkan

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing use of different types of auctions in market designing, modeling of participants' behaviors to evaluate the market structure is one of the main discussions in the studies related to the deregulated power industries. In this article, we apply an approach of the optimal bidding behavior to the Iran wholesale electricity market as a restructured electric power industry and model how the participants of the market bid in the spot electricity market. The problem is formulated analytically using the Nash equilibrium concept composed of large numbers of players having discrete and very large strategy spaces. Then, we compute and draw supply curve of the competitive market in which all generators' proposed prices are equal to their marginal costs and supply curve of the real market in which the pricing mechanism is pay-as-bid. We finally calculate the lost welfare or inefficiency of the Nash equilibrium and the real market by comparing their supply curves with the competitive curve. We examine 3 cases on November 24 (2 cases) and July 24 (1 case), 2012. It is observed that in the Nash equilibrium on November 24 and demand of 23,487 MW, there are 212 allowed plants for the first case (plants are allowed to choose any quantity of generation except one of them that should be equal to maximum Power) and the economic efficiency or social welfare of Nash equilibrium is 2.77 times as much as the real market. In addition, there are 184 allowed plants for the second case (plants should offer their maximum power with different prices) and the efficiency or social welfare of Nash equilibrium is 3.6 times as much as the real market. On July 24 and demand of 42,421 MW, all 370 plants should generate maximum energy due to the high electricity demand that the economic efficiency or social welfare of the Nash equilibrium is about 2 times as much as the real market.

  3. Did Globalization Influence Credit Market Deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Eppinger, Peter; Potrafke, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether globalization influenced credit market deregulation over the period 1970-2010. Globalization is measured by the KOF indices of globalization. Credit market deregulation is measured by the credit market freedom indicators of the Fraser Institute. The results from both cross-sectional and panel regressions using ordinary least squares indicate a positive correlation between globalization and credit market deregulation. We account for reverse causality by using predicted t...

  4. Energy subsidies in California's electricity market deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschel, Alexander; Smestad, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation and re-regulation of California's electricity market not only failed in terms of anticipated cost reductions, improved customer service and higher competition, it also led to the introduction of various additional energy subsidies. This paper analyzes California's electricity market deregulation process from a subsidy viewpoint. Under deregulation in California, investor-owned utilities were not allowed to pass their energy procurement costs fully on to their customers, and therefore subsequently, and inevitably, ran into severe financial problems. Such retail price regulation is an energy subsidy that is both economically and environmentally unfavorable, because it veils true price signals to electricity consumers and, in this way, discourages energy conservation. Other policies implemented in California that represent perverse energy subsidies are the purchase of power by the state of California, the suspension of retail competition, and the potential misuse of money from the recovery of stranded costs. Many interventions implemented by the state to smooth out the impacts of the energy crisis insulated electricity consumers from market realities, supported the existing structure of California's electricity market, which is predominantly based on fossil fuels, and suppressed market incentives to improve energy conservation

  5. Major power system failures (Europe, USA) and deregulation of electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, A.

    2004-01-01

    The year 2003 was marked by several electric power blackouts which affected major power systems in the world, and gave rise to many opinions about possible links with developments brought by the opening of the electricity markets. At first the paper presents the outages experienced by North America or August 14 and by Switzerland and Italy on September 28, 2003. Feedback on previous electric power blackouts makes possible to find out already known lessons, then to bring out how the latest blackouts may reveal similarities or differences towards developments brought by the opening of the electricity markets occurred ire the last ten years. Finally, seen from the transmission system operator of a european country within the context of continued institutional developments, the paper points out significant items which must be considered to prevent possible further blackouts. (author)

  6. Deregulated power prices: comparison of volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Flynn, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price variability for 14 deregulated markets. Power price volatility is measured by price velocity, the daily average of the absolute value of price change per hour. Deregulated markets show a wide variability in price velocity. Some price velocity is expected and arises from the daily diurnal price pattern, which differs significantly between markets. Even when the expected daily variability in price is removed, the residual unexpected variability differs between markets. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent and have low values of unexpected price velocity. These markets create a climate conducive to consumers facing the market through real time pricing and shaping consumption behaviors in response to price changes. Other markets, for example, South Australia and Alberta, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to avoid demand side management and escape risk through hedging mechanisms

  7. Analysis of relationships between hourly electricity price and load in deregulated real-time power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, K.L.; Wu, Y.K.

    2004-01-01

    Risk management in the electric power industry involves measuring the risk for all instruments owned by a company. The value of many of these instruments depends directly on electricity prices. In theory, the wholesale price in a real-time market should reflect the short-run marginal cost. However, most markets are not perfectly competitive, therefore by understanding the degree of correlation between price and physical drivers, electric traders and consumers can manage their risk more effectively and efficiently. Market data from two power-pool architectures, both pre-2003 ISO-NE and Australia's NEM, have been studied. The dynamic character of electricity price is mean-reverting, and consists of intra-day and weekly variations, seasonal fluctuations, and instant jumps. Parts of them are affected by load demands. Hourly signals on both price and load are divided into deterministic and random components with a discrete Fourier transform algorithm. Next, the real-time price-load relationship for periodic and random signals is examined. In addition, time-varying volatility models are constructed on random price and random load with the GARCH model, and the correlation between them analysed. Volatility plays a critical role on evaluating option pricing and risk management. (author)

  8. Product Market Deregulation and Employment Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Senftleben-König, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the short- and medium-term effects of the deregulation of shopopening hours legislation on retail employment in Germany. In 2006, the legislative competence was shifted from the federal to the state level, leading to a gradual deregulation of shop opening restrictions in most of Germany’s sixteen federal states. The paper exploits regional variation in the legislation in order to identify the effect product market deregulation has on retail employment. We find robust e...

  9. Electricity market deregulation and its impact on the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y.E.; Alfors, G.

    2000-01-01

    Electricity has traditionally been supplied in OECD countries by state-owned facilities, or state-protected monopolies with regulated pricing. More recently, however, several countries have deregulated their electricity markets, thus opening the door to competitive supply and pricing. Deregulation of electricity markets is a trend that is expected to be followed by many countries, and can have a significant impact on the future of nuclear power programmes. (authors)

  10. Nuclear communications and deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruuskanen, Antti

    1998-01-01

    The electricity market a over the world is facing the most profound change ever. The market is to be deregulated, competition will be increased and companies privatised. The boom started from the UK but today the Nordic market is the most liberalised in the world. Nordic market consists of annual power sales around 350 TWh and only a modest growth potential of 12 percent per year. All fuels and all technologies meet in the marketplace. Nuclear has its good one fourth share of the production there. Nuclear is clearly for base-load with low marginal costs next to hydro electric power. There are four major players in the Nordic market. Swedish Vattenfall, IVO Group and Swedish Sydkraft are the three biggest in that order, and all of them have nuclear assets. The market is characterised by lowest power prices in Europe, two electricity exchanges and continuous power trade across the borders. The described market change from national and less open utility driven sector has clear impacts to companies strategies and consequently also to communications. All these circumstances demand, New target groups from corporate communications' point of view; new communications language to change to more business-like; new insider rules and new information practices; new business orientated journalists against a new reference group. This all opens new challenges and possibilities to re-build nuclear image. Market economy in electricity will also ease governmental nationally oriented energy policies and let market forces to decide whether investments are viable or not. This is positive for nuclear - again if and only if the power plants are managed in an economically viable way. Deregulation may open the market from political deadlock to new nuclear investments in case the above mentioned requirements are correct. All in all, market change comes sooner or later to regions not yet liberalised. It will challenge nuclear companies and their communications. The change always creates

  11. Deregulation of the California electric power industry: An analysis of electric and natural gas corporate mergers and their effect on the California electric power market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbuckle, James Dixon

    Deregulation of the electric utility industry in California is moving in a direction that places greater reliance on the market forces of competition. Investor owned utilities (IOU's) are using mergers and acquisitions to improve their ability to compete in this new environment. Two large mergers were proposed in 1996 that could affect the California market. The first is between Enron Corporation, a large power marketer and Portland General Corporation, owner of Portland General Electric. The second is between Pacific Enterprises Inc., owner of Southern California Gas Company, the largest natural gas utility in the U. S., and Enova Corporation, owner of San Diego Gas and Electric Company. Understanding the impact of these mergers on the California electric power market is the focus of this study. This study examines hypotheses dealing with: (1) Merger Strategy, (2) Efficiency, and (3) Market Power. Using the Miles and Snow (1978) typology, I develop a strategic orientation model for the merger participants and their competitors. The results suggest a two-stage strategic orientation: (1) regulated core business stage, where the firms follow a Defender strategy, and (2) unregulated business stage, where the firms follow a Prospector strategy. Further, the results show the mergers are consistent with the strategy of Enron and Pacific Enterprises. Event study methodology, dollar gains/losses and market value weighted returns are used to determine if the mergers support the efficiency hypothesis. The evidence suggests the mergers lead to increased competitive advantage through improved efficiency for the participants. The results also suggest the mergers do not harm the rivals. The results of structural changes made by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) in deregulation of the California market and analysis of the mergers by the CPUC and the Public Utility Commission of Oregon suggest that the exercise of market power is not a significant issue. Finally

  12. Competing in a fully deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, A.; Schoen, G.; Johansson, B.

    1999-01-01

    Vattenfall, Sweden's largest utility, has provided competitively priced nuclear electricity to a price-conscious market for several decades. As Sweden is an exporting country, the cost of products must be kept as low as possible to meet tough European competition. Since Sweden relies almost exclusively on electricity for energy, electric prices must be low to keep Swedish products competitive. Because of the available hydropower in Sweden and Norway, nuclear power plants have been forced to operate with high availability and low cost. From the first years after nuclear plants began operation, there has been a continuous development of organization, management, and work practices to sustain low-cost production. Now, the European electricity market is undergoing deregulation and open competition. This is taking place in a situation where the increase in demand is relatively weak and where the availability of generation capacity is good. Sweden is at the forefront of the competition. According to the well-known law of supply and demand, this entails the risk of squeezed prices, but the situation also offers many opportunities for those making the right decisions. The availability of electricity at competitive prices has great significance for the competitiveness of the industry in general and for the electricity-intensive industry in particular. If the customer then, in a deregulated market is free to choose the supplier, the focus definitely is on the customer

  13. Developing products and services for a deregulated market while regulated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haites, E.F.

    1997-01-01

    Products and services developed for a deregulated electric power industry were discussed. The wide-ranging discussion covered products created by unbundling existing services, new products and services related to energy use, products created by expansion into communications services, and the pricing of products and services. In addition to products and services, the discussion also covered strategies for a deregulated market and the challenges of raising equity capital in a regulated environment

  14. Is the restructuring of Alberta's power market on the right track? Evaluating Alberta's first two years of deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellenius, K.; Adamson, S.

    2003-07-01

    The performance of Alberta's restructured electricity market was evaluated since its move to wholesale competition in January 2001. This paper presents the following eight conclusions that the authors arrived at following the evaluation: (1) To meet growing demand, the electricity prices in Alberta would have increased regardless of the type of environment (regulated or not). Capacity investment was required, and it was believed that moving to competition was the best way to attract investors. (2) Success in attracting private investment was attained as a result of Alberta's open market. It has restored reliability of supply and moderated prices. (3) Price comparisons must take into account what the prices would have been if the market had remained regulated. Due to unique generation costs and regulatory environments, comparisons with other regulated jurisdictions is inappropriate. (4) Convergence with other energy rates that would have been seen under regulation is being noted with respect to Alberta's market prices. (5) Under deregulation, prices increase according to the need for new investment and fall after the investment is made. Alberta has been on a path toward continued reduction in wholesale prices since 2001. (6) The non-price benefits of restructuring include improved generation efficiency, captured residual value from regulated assets, and shifting investment risk of new capacity additions from consumers to generators. (7) Downward pressure on prices was noted as a result of deregulation, as expected. (8) Significant value for consumers was captured through Alberta's restructuring process. 7 tabs., 7 figs

  15. Optimizing the Operation of Windfarms, Energy Storage and Flexible Loads in Modern Power Systems and Deregulated Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Zamiyad

    The amount of wind energy in power systems is increasing at a significant rate. With this increased penetration, there are certain problems associated with the operation of windfarms which need careful attention. In the operations side, the wake effects of upstream wind turbines on downstream wind turbines can cause a reduction in the total generated power of a windfarm. On the market side, the fluctuation of real-time prices can make the operation of windfarms less profitable. Similarly, the intermittent nature of wind power prevents the windfarms from participating in the day-ahead and forward markets. On the system side, the volatile nature of wind speeds is also an obstacle for windfarms to provide frequency regulation to the system. In this thesis, we address these issues and optimize the operation of windfarms in power systems and deregulated electricity markets. First, the total power generation in a windfarm is maximized by using yaw angle of wind turbines as a control variable. We extend the existing wake models to include the effects of yaw misalignment and wake deflection of wind turbines. A numerical study is performed to find the optimal values of induction factor and yaw misalignment angle of wind turbines in a single row of a windfarm for achieving the maximum total power with wake effects. The numerical study shows that the maximum power is achieved by keeping the induction factor close to 1/3 and only changing the yaw angle to deflect the wake. We then propose a Dynamic Programming Framework (DPF) to maximize the total power production of a windfarm using yaw angle as the control variable. We compare the windfarm efficiency achieved with our DPF with the efficiency values obtained through greedy control strategy and induction factor optimization. We also extend our expressions to a windfarm with multiple rows and columns of turbines and perform simulations on the 3x3 and 4x4 grid topologies. Our results show that the optimal induction factor for

  16. Coal marketability: Effects of deregulation and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attanasi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical utility deregulation will force power plants to compete for sales because they will not longer have captive markets. Market uncertainty and uncertainty about future environmental regulations have encouraged power plants to shift to low sulfur coal and/or to use emissions allowances to comply with Phase 2 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Mines in Northern and Central Appalachia and the Illinois Basin shipped 240 million tons of non-compliance coal to power plants without scrubbers in 1997. Under Phase 2, this coal will be replaced by low sulfur coal and/or be used with emission permits. It is possible that Powder River Basin coal production will have to increase by over 200 million tons/year to meet new demand. The prices of emissions permits will impose penalties on non-compliance coal that will probably drive out marginal coal producers. For example, if the cost of an emission permit is $200, coal from the Pittsburgh bed could bear a sulfur penalty of $6.55 per ton and similarly, coal from the Herrinbed could bear a penalty of $8.64 per ton

  17. The impossible dream? How Nuclear Electric, Ltd. pulled itself out of the ashes of government ownership and became highly competitive in a privatized and deregulating British power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maycock, P.

    1998-01-01

    The day was dark for Nuclear Electric plc. when the British government decided it would privatize and deregulate the electric utility industry. For years, Nuclear Electric and other UK-based fossil power producers had been operating in a regulated market where the state set and guaranteed the price of electricity. All that was changing in Britain as the government introduced competition and as customers looked forward to purchasing power from the lowest bidder. Essentially the situation in England was much the same as it is now in the US: there was major momentum toward deregulation. The reality of competition in Britain came as good news to many power producers--in particular those who kept the lights on cost effectively. Others, However, weren't so optimistic, especially nuclear plants that traditionally bear higher safety and maintenance costs than their fossil counterparts. Taking its cues from the City (Britain's Wall Street), the British government simply considered nuclear generators to be unreliable, high cost, unprofitable organizations incapable of surviving in a privatized environment. It therefore left its nuclear power plants off the docket when selling (privatizing) its generating capacity. This paper describes how Nuclear Electric Ltd. became competitive in a deregulated environment

  18. Reactor decommissioning in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverridge, George; Cooper, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Deregulation of the electricity markets in North America and Western Europe has had many profound effects on the electric utilities and the nuclear industry. Deregulation has led to cost transparency, increased competition, and a drive by the utilities to reduce costs in order to maintain market share and margins. In the context of this more competitive and dynamic market having a clear picture of decommissioning liabilities and their successful discharge has a material impact on the financial performance of a utility. This paper will summarise BNFL Environmental Services' experience with regard to its experience in both the planning and implementation phases of a reactor decommissioning project. In particular it will demonstrate how commercial projects in crucial areas of strategy development, project implementation and site restoration, can be combined with an approach that is both commercial and innovative to reduce the risks to a utility. This paper sets out to demonstrate this viewpoint. (author)

  19. Power system deregulation and the Balkan countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glamochanin, Vlastimir; Stojkovska, Biljana; Cherepnalkoski, Trajche

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to show the current state and planned activities of the Power System deregulation and privatization in the following Balkan countries: Macedonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Greece, Croatia, Slovenia and Turkey

  20. Competitive nuclear production on the nordic deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Nordic electricity market has been partly deregulated since 1994. Today only Denmark follows the timetable recommended by the European Union, while Sweden, Norway and Finland are completely deregulated. As in most countries, the production of electricity is deregulated while the distribution is still a monopoly. This deregulation of the electricity market has created a new situation for plant life management. In order to be competitive on the market it is important to cut cost down a level when the nuclear power companies earn money again. All means to cut cost have to be used while still maintaining safety and the possibilities for operation over at least 40+ years. The possibilities to invest in modernization are limited to the absolutely necessary modifications. All investments must be very thoroughly questioned and the money can only be spent where most benefit is gained. This means new prerequisites for the absolute necessary long-strategic planning. New safety requirements from the authorities have to be discussed between the industry and the authority. The requirement cost must be compared to the benefit to safety. The authority is today requested to carry out such analyses and do so in most cases. Since the electricity market is international the requirements of the authorities must be harmonized on the whole market. The political threat against nuclear power is serious in many countries and it is important to continue working with public acceptance and lobbying. Especially in Sweden a lot of effort is spent on trying to change the taxation of nuclear power. In the near future increasing electricity demand will make the prices go up to a level when nuclear power companies earn money again. The very serious worries about climate change will also strengthen the competitiveness of nuclear power. (author)

  1. Power system restructuring and deregulation: trading, performance and information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loi Lei Lai

    2001-09-01

    Representatives from several countries have contributed to a book addressing the deregulation and restructuring of the electric power industry. Articles covered include guidance on asset management, transmission balancing and meter management systems, tools for studying competitive power markets, environmental impacts, costs and benefits, and the new strategies and technology available for power generation, transmission and distribution. The book should be of interest to power systems engineers, system operators, managers, planners and policy makers in the electric power business

  2. An optimization-based approach for facility energy management with uncertainties, and, Power portfolio optimization in deregulated electricity markets with risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun

    Topic 1. An Optimization-Based Approach for Facility Energy Management with Uncertainties. Effective energy management for facilities is becoming increasingly important in view of the rising energy costs, the government mandate on the reduction of energy consumption, and the human comfort requirements. This part of dissertation presents a daily energy management formulation and the corresponding solution methodology for HVAC systems. The problem is to minimize the energy and demand costs through the control of HVAC units while satisfying human comfort, system dynamics, load limit constraints, and other requirements. The problem is difficult in view of the fact that the system is nonlinear, time-varying, building-dependent, and uncertain; and that the direct control of a large number of HVAC components is difficult. In this work, HVAC setpoints are the control variables developed on top of a Direct Digital Control (DDC) system. A method that combines Lagrangian relaxation, neural networks, stochastic dynamic programming, and heuristics is developed to predict the system dynamics and uncontrollable load, and to optimize the setpoints. Numerical testing and prototype implementation results show that our method can effectively reduce total costs, manage uncertainties, and shed the load, is computationally efficient. Furthermore, it is significantly better than existing methods. Topic 2. Power Portfolio Optimization in Deregulated Electricity Markets with Risk Management. In a deregulated electric power system, multiple markets of different time scales exist with various power supply instruments. A load serving entity (LSE) has multiple choices from these instruments to meet its load obligations. In view of the large amount of power involved, the complex market structure, risks in such volatile markets, stringent constraints to be satisfied, and the long time horizon, a power portfolio optimization problem is of critical importance but difficulty for an LSE to serve the

  3. Generation capacity expansion planning in deregulated electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak

    With increasing demand of electric power in the context of deregulated electricity markets, a good strategic planning for the growth of the power system is critical for our tomorrow. There is a need to build new resources in the form of generation plants and transmission lines while considering the effects of these new resources on power system operations, market economics and the long-term dynamics of the economy. In deregulation, the exercise of generation planning has undergone a paradigm shift. The first stage of generation planning is now undertaken by the individual investors. These investors see investments in generation capacity as an increasing business opportunity because of the increasing market prices. Therefore, the main objective of such a planning exercise, carried out by individual investors, is typically that of long-term profit maximization. This thesis presents some modeling frameworks for generation capacity expansion planning applicable to independent investor firms in the context of power industry deregulation. These modeling frameworks include various technical and financing issues within the process of power system planning. The proposed modeling frameworks consider the long-term decision making process of investor firms, the discrete nature of generation capacity addition and incorporates transmission network modeling. Studies have been carried out to examine the impact of the optimal investment plans on transmission network loadings in the long-run by integrating the generation capacity expansion planning framework within a modified IEEE 30-bus transmission system network. The work assesses the importance of arriving at an optimal IRR at which the firm's profit maximization objective attains an extremum value. The mathematical model is further improved to incorporate binary variables while considering discrete unit sizes, and subsequently to include the detailed transmission network representation. The proposed models are novel in the

  4. Pecuniary evaluation of provided service by local and global based dual-dimensional SDC and PSS2B in the context of deregulated power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayeghi, H.; Hashemi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessing the role and performance of SDC and PSS2B in deregulated power markets. • The profit allocation of WADC as an AS provider is involved in this work. • A dual-dimensional SDC scheme for UPFC is applied to damp the power system swings. • The high share of dual-dimensional SDC shows capability of it in enhancing security. - Abstract: The problem of profit allocation of Unified Power Flow Controller-Supplementary Damping Controller (UPFC-SDC) and accelerating power PSS model (PSS2B) is an important and update issue which has not been properly directed yet. The model of UPFC-SDC that has been used in this paper is a dual-dimensional controller that first dimension of control is resulted from local signals and the second dimension is covered by global signals as additional measuring data from appropriate remote network locations, where swings are well observable. Thus, in this paper the profit allocation of Wide Area Damping Controller (WADC) is also presented as an undefined problem in security subject of deregulated power system. Assuming control action by UPFC-SDC and WADC as an Ancillary Service (AS), the contribution of UPFC-SDC in stability enhancement is evaluated. It is important to appropriately choose a criterion to assess the performance of UPFC-SDC, so that a suitable allocation of profit can be achieved. The sum of deviations of damping ratios and real part of eigenvalues is selected as Oscillation Damping Criterion (ODC). Two scenarios for valuation of small signal stability as an AS provided by UPFC-SDC is considered. The first scenario without retuning of controllers and in the second scenario controllers is retuned due to response of the market situation. A multi-objective optimization approach based on ODC, generation costs and UPFC cost is considered and then Non-Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II) is utilized for solving this problem. A two area four machine test power system is considered for investigation

  5. Electricity pricing and load dispatching in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geerli; Niioka, S.; Yokoyama, R.

    2003-01-01

    A rapid move to a market-based electric power industry will significantly alter the structure of electricity pricing and system operation. In this paper, we consider a game of negotiation in the electricity market, involving electric utilities, independent power producers (IPPs) and large-scale customers. We analyze the two-level game strategies for the negotiation process between utilities, IPPs and customers. These have been previously recognized as a way to come up with a rational decision for competitive markets, in which players intend to maximize their own profits. The derived operation rules based on competition can be viewed as an extension of the conventional equal incremental cost method for the deregulated power system. The proposed approach was applied to several systems to verify its effectiveness. (Author)

  6. Customer choice: Purchasing energy in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumann, A.

    1999-01-01

    This book presents the detailed guidance on how to effectively purchase deregulated energy, based on first-hand reports from many of the nation's most knowledgeable experts. It is designed to provide the kind of practical advice needed by professionals who are responsible for making energy purchasing decisions. The book gives a ten-step program to guide building owners in purchasing decision making, a state-by-state retail competition update, and guidelines for buying electricity and natural gas over the worldwide web. Other topics include contract renegotiation strategies, an assessment of power pools, the role of aggregators in the energy market, real time pricing issues, where cogeneration fits within today's marketplace, and lessons learned from deregulation experiences in Scandinavia and England

  7. European energy markets deregulation observatory. Winter 2002/2003 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Launched in 2002, the European energy markets deregulation observatory (EEMDO/OELME) aims at actualizing the main energy market indicators and at observing the advance of deregulation within the European countries. While for most of these markets, the deregulation of electricity has preceded the deregulation of gas, the natural gas market is at the evidence a key-market in Europe. For this reason, the 4. edition of the observatory (October 2003) takes into consideration for the first time the specific elements of gas markets, in addition to those of electricity markets. This article presents some excerpts of this last edition, published by Cap Gemini Ernst and Young, and synthesizes the present day situation of gas supplies and the conditions of network access by third parties. The informations reported in the EEMDO come from organizations like UCTE, Nordel, Eurelectric or from energy stock exchanges. (J.S.)

  8. BDI position on energy policy and energy market deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreklau, C.

    2003-01-01

    Secure energy supplies are indispensable for our modern way of life and our economy. Energy policy is a part of economic policy and must be shaped within the magic triangle of objectives, i.e. security, competitiveness, environmental compatibility. As a result of their outstanding role, electricity and natural gas, with respective shares of 70% in industrial energy use and 85% in energy costs, are in the focus of energy policy interest of the Federation of German Industries (BDI). One important development over the past few years has been the deregulation of the markets for electricity and gas. However, the markedly lower electricity rates to be paid by industry, commercial tariff consumers, and private customers are being offset by new burdens arising from government intervention and taxes. Other dirigistic interventions into the energy market by the red-green federal government since 1998, referred to as 'turning point of energy policy', are invalidating what market opening had been achieved. With a view to a sustainable energy policy for the future, BDI pleads in favor of a broad energy mix. In a mix neutral with respect to competition, this includes the classical energy sources, the renewables, and low-cost, environmentally friendly nuclear power. In principle, it is the forces of the market, coupled with responsible action, which are to steer further developments. On a European level, speedy implementation of the opening of the electricity and gas markets, as decided, should be urged. It is important that the leeway won as a result of deregulation not be constrained again by new regulations. More market, less regulation, and more direct responsibility must provide room for a powerful energy supply system under the premises of the triangle of objectives referred to above. (orig.) [de

  9. Natural gas and deregulation in the European Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The gas market is progressively moving towards new organizations under the effect of deregulation initiated in the United States, the United Kingdom and transposed to other countries, particularly in Europe, at least for the member countries of the European Union. Within the framework provided by this overall trend, Cedigaz proposes a study titled 'Natural Gas and Deregulation' in order to describe the main developments affecting these markets on account of deregulation. This report is structured on the basis of three main topics (market organization, marketing modes, pricing) which appears to be the most cogent in terms of deregulation. This grouping by major topics accordingly offers a relatively synthetic view of the main trends which could be observed in the European market, for example. The analysis is largely based on the example of the American market and, to a lesser extent, on the British situation. Incidentally, it has adapted the terms 'regulated market' to define conventional markets and 'deregulated market' to define markets which have incorporated the principle of Third Party Access (TPA). This is obviously a mere convention, since in both cases, the gas market, a network market, is regulated either by the State or by an independent agency. Also noteworthy is the diversity of the regulation methods for the network markets. While an underlying principle prevails throughout, particularly the introduction of TPA, political and energy considerations alike are liable to condition strongly the final structure of a given market. The apparently comparable British and American experience thus display substantial differences. In other words, one should not imagine a sudden transposition of either case to the European market. The different States preserve considerable leeway to guide market developments in one direction or another. On the whole, deregulation is not a frozen process, but has to adapt permanently to developments in a market stage-managed by

  10. Investments into plant replacements in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    The amendment to the Power Energy Act in April 1998 marked the complete deregulation of the electricity market in Germany. The debate is now beginning about ways and means to ensure new capital investments safeguarding the continuity of supply. The present power plant park has been characterized by a broad mix of primary energy sources and, admittedly, by some overcapacity as well. However, any further reduction of generating capacity will be at the expense of the continuity of supply. Although electricity prices in Germany are on the rise again after a clear drop, they have not yet reached a level sufficient for new investments. Only subsidized power plants are recovering their full costs. The question is for how long our economy is going to sustain this state of affairs. The balance among the energy policy goals of continuity of supply, environmental performance, and economic efficiency has been upset. In the period up until 2020, Germany alone will require approx. 37,000 MW of new generating capacity. Renewable and decentralized technologies alone do not constitute a sufficient and reliable alternative. However, there is the matter also of the practical feasibility of building the new power plants required. No experience is as yet available with re-investment cycles in the deregulated electricity market. Options are needed for a diversified structure of primary energy sources. There must be neither political definition of generating technologies nor exaggerated goals of environmental protection and climate protection. We advocate the free system of market prices and free access to the market. Major players able to guarantee sufficient security of investments are needed to cope with the challenges ahead. New investments with a life of thirty to forty years require a modicum of stability and realism in political framework conditions. (orig.)

  11. Economic use of a nuclear park in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, L.

    2000-01-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market has created a new situation for plant life management. In order to be competitive it is important to cut costs. All means to cut costs have to be used while still maintaining safety and production capacity. The possibilities to invest in modernization are limited to the absolute necessary modifications. All investments must be very thoroughly questioned and the money can only be spent where most benefit is gained. This means new prerequisites for the absolute necessary long strategic planning. New safety requirements from the regulatory body have to be discussed between the industry and the regulator. The cost of new requirements must be compared to the benefit for the safety. The regulator is today requested to carry out such analyses and do so in most cases. Still the electricity market is international and the requirements of the regulator must be harmonized on the whole market. The political threat against nuclear power is serious in many countries and it is important to continue working with public and political understanding and acceptance. Especially in Sweden a lot of effort is spent on trying to get harmonized taxes and environmental fees. Nuclear power is paying for all its costs and the external costs are already internalized. Still, at the deregulated market, nuclear power is competitive, creating positive cash flow, a good object for investments and environmentally favourable. Threats have to be removed to get prerequisites for long term strategic planning and investments. Steps in that direction will be increasing electricity demand, in the near future, which will make the prices to raise creating an improved economic situation. Also the very serious worries about climate change will strengthen the competitiveness of nuclear power. (author)

  12. Core designs for the de-regulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, J.; Bernro, R.; Pettersson, H.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: The electricity market deregulation in the Nordic countries encourages innovations and cost reductions for power production in the Vattenfall reactors. The competition on the electricity market is strong, electricity price reductions dramatic and uncertainties about the future power demand is large. In the fuel area this situation has given increased attention to traditional areas like flexibility in power production, improved core designs, need for margins (improved fuel designs), improved surveillance, decreased lead times. At Vattenfall new fuel designs are already being implemented following the last fuel purchase, for which flexibility and margins, were given high values in the evaluations with the multipurpose task of eliminating fuel related problems and meeting the future market situation. This strategy has given Vattenfall a flying start to meeting the demands of the de-regulated market. What has been added are broad studies undertaken to investigate the various route into the future with respect to finding the most effective strategies for fuel and core design and optimization. In the present paper the Vattenfall priorities for fuel designs and margins are presented in a schematic manner summarizing the results of the last fuel purchase and also presenting the current program for LFAs. Technical limitations, licensing and R and D aspects, with respect to improving the fuel utilization will be mentioned. The main focus in the paper is on the broad study carried out in the PWR core design area. Driven by the relatively low power demand various possibilities for higher production flexibility have been investigated specifically extended coast-down, coast-up and yearly load follow. Further to reduce the costs for fuel consumption improvements in core designs have been studied: improved low leakage loading patterns, low enriched end zones, improved Gd designs etc. Main results and conclusions of the core design studies will

  13. A congestion line flow control in deregulated power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatarajan Shanmuga Sundaram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under open access, market-driven transactions have become the new independent decision variables defining the behavior of the power system. The possibility of transmission lines getting over-loaded is relatively more under deregulated operation because different parts of the system are owned by separate companies and in part operated under varying service charges. This paper discusses a two-tier algorithm for correcting the lone overloads in conjunction with the conventional power-flow methods. The method uses line flow sensitivities, which are computed by the East Decoupled Power-flow algorithm and can be adapted for on-line implementation.

  14. Internet-based wide area measurement applications in deregulated power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Abdel-Rahman Amin

    Since the deregulation of power systems was started in 1989 in the UK, many countries have been motivated to undergo deregulation. The United State started deregulation in the energy sector in California back in 1996. Since that time many other states have also started the deregulation procedures in different utilities. Most of the deregulation market in the United States now is in the wholesale market area, however, the retail market is still undergoing changes. Deregulation has many impacts on power system network operation and control. The number of power transactions among the utilities has increased and many Independent Power Producers (IPPs) now have a rich market for competition especially in the green power market. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) called upon utilities to develop the Regional Transmission Organization (RTO). The RTO is a step toward the national transmission grid. RTO is an independent entity that will operate the transmission system in a large region. The main goal of forming RTOs is to increase the operation efficiency of the power network under the impact of the deregulated market. The objective of this work is to study Internet based Wide Area Information Sharing (WAIS) applications in the deregulated power system. The study is the first step toward building a national transmission grid picture using information sharing among utilities. Two main topics are covered as applications for the WAIS in the deregulated power system, state estimation and Total Transfer Capability (TTC) calculations. As a first step for building this national transmission grid picture, WAIS and the level of information sharing of the state estimation calculations have been discussed. WAIS impacts to the TTC calculations are also covered. A new technique to update the TTC using on line measurements based on WAIS created by sharing state estimation is presented.

  15. Opportunities for electricity storage in deregulating markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, F.; Jenkin, T.; Murphy, D.

    1999-01-01

    This article addresses the value of electricity storage and its ability to take advantage of emerging energy arbitrage opportunities: buying power when it is inexpensive, and reselling it at a higher price. The focus of this article is on electricity markets and the opportunities they present for a merchant storage device, rather than on storage technologies themselves. There are a number of existing and emerging storage technologies: pumped hydro, various batteries, compressed air energy storage (CAES), superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), flywheels--even conventional hydro has storage-like properties. However, all these technologies operated on the same basic principle of exploiting short-term differentials in electricity prices: buy low, sell high (a strategy that is actually meaningful in electricity markets, unlike in financial markets). The object of this article is to develop and demonstrate a means for assessing the potential value of storage in different electricity markets, rather than to attempt to assess the prospects of a particular technology. The approach taken here is to look at price data from a number of actual electricity markets to determine what opportunities they might offer to a generic storage device. A storage technology is described here by its basic performance parameters--charge and generate capacity, energy inventory limits, and efficiency--which are sufficient to assess the basic economic potential of storage in a given market. The authors look primarily at US markets, but also compare and contrast findings with the situation in foreign markets in the U.K., Norway, Canada, and Australia, and discuss how market structure can influence the value of storage. Moreover, the authors use empirically observed relationships between hourly and 5 x 16 blocked prices to infer a rule for adjusting the value of storage assets in regions where only blocked price information is available

  16. Optimal DG placement in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, Durga; Mithulananthan, Nadarajah

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents two new methodologies for optimal placement of distributed generation (DG) in an optimal power flow (OPF) based wholesale electricity market. DG is assumed to participate in real time wholesale electricity market. The problem of optimal placement, including size, is formulated for two different objectives, namely, social welfare maximization and profit maximization. The candidate locations for DG placement are identified on the basis of locational marginal price (LMP). Obtained as lagrangian multiplier associated with active power flow equation for each node, LMP gives the short run marginal cost (SRMC) of electricity. Consumer payment, evaluated as a product of LMP and load at each load bus, is proposed as another ranking to identify candidate nodes for DG placement. The proposed rankings bridges engineering aspects of system operation and economic aspects of market operation and act as good indicators for the placement of DG, especially in a market environment. In order to provide a scenario of variety of DGs available in the market, several cost characteristics are assumed. For each DG cost characteristic, an optimal placement and size is identified for each of the objectives. The proposed methodology is tested in a modified IEEE 14 bus test system. (author)

  17. Electricity deregulation - impact on gas users and markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Various scenarios for the natural gas market as a function a electricity deregulation were predicted. One scenario was the formation of an integrated market where sellers would offer a broad spectrum of energy products. This diversification would expand into the retail sector across North America. The second effect of electricity deregulation was energy cost reduction. The consumers have already been experiencing this benefit of deregulation. Cost reduction has also stimulated competition among energy suppliers, and improved suppliers' response to consumers'demands. The eventual shake-out of energy suppliers was predicted. Smaller companies that could not survive the competition would give up the market to larger companies that understood and met the customers' needs. It was concluded that deregulation of the electricity industry would have an enormous impact on the natural gas industry and that there would be opportunities for gain among buyers and sellers

  18. How to manage flexible nuclear power plants in a deregulated electricity market from the point of view of social welfare?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykidi, Maria; Gourdel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Flexible nuclear power plants can adjust their electricity production to the predicted evolution of demand. Under certain conditions, flexible operation is necessary to ensure the stability of the electricity system. However, despite the potential advantages of nuclear energy including the flexibility of nuclear reactors, the social acceptance of nuclear has reduced after the Fukushima accident, leading some countries to reduce or even phase out nuclear (e.g. Germany). So, a question that arises is how flexible nuclear power plants have to be operated in order to maximize social welfare. The French nuclear fleet gives an illustration of flexible management while social acceptance of nuclear is questioned; this was reflected in the new French Energy Transition law. Theoretically and numerically, we found that the production behavior that maximizes social welfare is characterized by a constant thermal production and a totally flexible nuclear production given sufficient nuclear capacity. - Highlights: • We determine the management of flexible nuclear plants to maximize social welfare. • We model the nuclear fuel stock as a “reservoir” of energy. • Social optimum is given by a totally flexible management of the nuclear production. • The level of thermal production of the optimal solution is always constant. • We need to invest in nuclear energy to ensure social optimum within our model

  19. The European gaseous market deregulation and its consequences for Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.; Locatelli, C.

    2002-07-01

    Russia, the first world producer of gas in 2001 is also the main producer in the european gas market. In this framework the evolution of its gas exportations market is a major stake for the russian gas industry and for the country economy. The consequences of this gas market deregulation are analyzed in this document. (A.L.B.)

  20. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-01-01

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium mo...

  1. Bluewater Power goes ERP route to address deregulation : case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broad, K. [Bluewater Power Distribution Corp., Sarnia, ON (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Bluewater Power Distribution Corporation distributes electricity to 35,000 customers in southwestern Ontario, including residential customers, large industries and commercial establishments. Their distribution system network consists of more than 344 miles of overhead wires and 125 miles of underground wires. The company employs more than 90 full-time people and is the result of a merger of six local utilities in year 2000. Ontario's energy market was preparing to deregulate at the time of the merger. Under the deregulation rules, utilities in the province were required to provide unbundled bills and exchange customer electronic business transactions with energy retailers. New rules opened up the cost of power on the wholesale side, requiring utilities to conduct wholesale settlements with the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO). The IESO manages Ontario's bulk electricity power system and operates the wholesale market. This article described the solution that Bluewater Power's information technology (IT) team found to support Ontario's local market, meet regulatory demands and adapt to future regulatory changes.

  2. Reliability evaluation of deregulated electric power systems for planning applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehsani, A.; Ranjbar, A.M.; Jafari, A.; Fotuhi-Firuzabad, M.

    2008-01-01

    In a deregulated electric power utility industry in which a competitive electricity market can influence system reliability, market risks cannot be ignored. This paper (1) proposes an analytical probabilistic model for reliability evaluation of competitive electricity markets and (2) develops a methodology for incorporating the market reliability problem into HLII reliability studies. A Markov state space diagram is employed to evaluate the market reliability. Since the market is a continuously operated system, the concept of absorbing states is applied to it in order to evaluate the reliability. The market states are identified by using market performance indices and the transition rates are calculated by using historical data. The key point in the proposed method is the concept that the reliability level of a restructured electric power system can be calculated using the availability of the composite power system (HLII) and the reliability of the electricity market. Two case studies are carried out over Roy Billinton Test System (RBTS) to illustrate interesting features of the proposed methodology

  3. Global implications of U.S. power deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschoff, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    With U.S. power deregulation remaining a topic that is dominating the entire North American energy marketplace, this paper provides an update of events occurring in U.S. electric power markets, offering some observations about changes due to increasing competition in electric power markets, and discusses some reasons why the events in U.S. electric power markets will soon transform global energy markets. How quickly is the move from local service territory to global markets proceeding? More than fifty U.S. utility companies with revenues of over $1 billion (U.S.) will soon be actively seeking and participating in global business opportunities. Using the same logic that led them to pursue utility initiatives nationally, U.S. utilities will use their core capabilities to compete in global energy services markets. In connection with these global initiatives, U.S. utilities will bring the same fuel-neutral, gas-electric perspective to international electric power and natural gas markets. (Author)

  4. An Agent-based Application to Enable Deregulated Energy Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capodieci, Nicola; Cabri, Giacomo; Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Private houses are more and more enabled with devices that can produce renewable energy, and the not so remote chance of selling the surplus energy makes them new players in the energy market. This market is likely to become deregulated since each energy home-producer can negotiate the energy price

  5. Impacts of Contingency Reserve on Nodal Price and Nodal Reliability Risk in Deregulated Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    The deregulation of power systems allows customers to participate in power market operation. In deregulated power systems, nodal price and nodal reliability are adopted to represent locational operation cost and reliability performance. Since contingency reserve (CR) plays an important role...... in reliable operation, the CR commitment should be considered in operational reliability analysis. In this paper, a CR model based on customer reliability requirements has been formulated and integrated into power market settlement. A two-step market clearing process has been proposed to determine generation...

  6. Is the restructuring of Alberta's power market on the right track? Evaluating Alberta's first two years of deregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellenius, K.; Adamson, S. [Tabors Caramanis and Associates, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The performance of Alberta's restructured electricity market was evaluated since its move to wholesale competition in January 2001. This paper presents the following eight conclusions that the authors arrived at following the evaluation: (1) To meet growing demand, the electricity prices in Alberta would have increased regardless of the type of environment (regulated or not). Capacity investment was required, and it was believed that moving to competition was the best way to attract investors. (2) Success in attracting private investment was attained as a result of Alberta's open market. It has restored reliability of supply and moderated prices. (3) Price comparisons must take into account what the prices would have been if the market had remained regulated. Due to unique generation costs and regulatory environments, comparisons with other regulated jurisdictions is inappropriate. (4) Convergence with other energy rates that would have been seen under regulation is being noted with respect to Alberta's market prices. (5) Under deregulation, prices increase according to the need for new investment and fall after the investment is made. Alberta has been on a path toward continued reduction in wholesale prices since 2001. (6) The non-price benefits of restructuring include improved generation efficiency, captured residual value from regulated assets, and shifting investment risk of new capacity additions from consumers to generators. (7) Downward pressure on prices was noted as a result of deregulation, as expected. (8) Significant value for consumers was captured through Alberta's restructuring process. 7 tabs., 7 figs.

  7. Deregulation, privatization and the Ontario power failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) has examined the history of deregulation of the electricity industry in the United States and presents lessons that could be learned from the California electricity crisis, the collapse of Enron, and the massive blackout that occurred in August 2003 across Ontario and northeastern United States. Unlike the United States, Canada's electricity system is mostly publicly owned and operated. This report emphasized that the need for public investment in the electricity system is greater than ever, and offers suggestions on how to strengthen the Canadian electricity system. It examines the attempts made to deregulate and privatize the electricity system in Ontario, Alberta, New Brunswick and British Columbia and exposes the reality of price caps and the debt of public utilities. It demonstrates that privatization has failed to provide a safe, reliable, affordable and adequate supply of electricity. The report claims that profit-seeking power producers want to keep supply and demand in their favour to sell electricity at the highest possible price. In addition to emphasizing the need for public investment in the electricity system, this report emphasizes the need for Canadian electricity cooperation, with particular mention of the large energy supplies in Manitoba and Quebec. 37 refs

  8. Competing in a deregulated market : what are we learning from the Alberta experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, D.

    2002-01-01

    A history of the deregulation schedule in Alberta was presented. The spot market in the province opened in January 1996. What Albertans wanted from deregulation was a competitive power generation market, a liquid spot market, a liquid forward market, competitive retail market, a clear transmission policy, transparent pricing, and innovation. They got a competitive power generation market and a liquid spot market, but with few buyers and an unclear transmission policy with only medium transparency in prices. Innovation was seen in the form of small power and distributed generation such as wind energy. In 2001, the Alberta government stepped in to subsidize consumers because wholesale prices were trading at record highs. In 2002 wholesale prices collapsed. It was shown that prices have declined in Alberta as supply and demand came into balance. The Keephills Generating Plants 3 and 4 will have a large impact on the market in 2005. It was emphasized that new transmission would unlock additional potential market for Alberta generation. The paper presented viewgraphs showing existing generation capacity and the high Alberta prices following deregulation. It was noted that commodity cycles dominate growth plans in the electric power industry. The four generation markets in Alberta were identified. The lesson learned from past experience is that price signals will attract new generators to the market and that government leadership must be consistent. 4 tabs., 6 figs

  9. Retail experience in the de-regulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the experience gained to date in the de-regulated electricity market through an examination of the commercial market. In 2001, chaos provided opportunity, while in 2002 the emphasis was on operations. In 2003, the landscape reflected hyper-competition, selling second services, and a changing landscape. A discussion followed on the residential market with a look at market structure, economics, and uncertainty concerning the future. The following components were identified as working well: wholesale market, commercial market, market model/data, and innovation in offerings and green supply. Areas requiring further improvement were also identified. It was suggested that the residential de-regulated roadmap should be clarified and retail friendly transactions should be imposed. Other improvements involve education and operations/system capabilities. The author concluded that the deregulated electricity market is still an immature market, where progress is being made in the commercial market. The residential market is in a critical period, with a market model still evolving. figs

  10. Efficiency and deregulation of the electricity market in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngho Chang; Tuan Hin Tay

    2006-01-01

    This study examines production efficiency of electricity generation in the New Electricity Market of Singapore (NEMS), where deregulation is currently proceeding. Singapore is reliant on foreign direct investments and exports so competition from countries with lower costs such as China and India is exerting pressure on the government to reduce the costs of doing business here. Electricity cost is one of these. Deregulation is believed to be able to bring about lower electricity costs due to the various efficiency gains possible. This study concerns itself mainly with production efficiency and attempts to calculate possible production efficiency gains by using linear programming model. Production-efficiency gains are quantified by the base case scenario of continued regulation versus four counterfactual deregulation scenarios. The results indicate that cost gains could be about eight per cent of current production cost, and this is possibly a lower-bound estimate. However, whether the purported efficiency gains are realized is to be seen as the deregulation proceeds. (author)

  11. Efficiency and deregulation of the electricity market in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Youngho; Hin Tay, Tuan

    2006-01-01

    This study examines production efficiency of electricity generation in the New Electricity Market of Singapore (NEMS), where deregulation is currently proceeding. Singapore is reliant on foreign direct investments and exports so competition from countries with lower costs such as China and India is exerting pressure on the government to reduce the costs of doing business here. Electricity cost is one of these. Deregulation is believed to be able to bring about lower electricity costs due to the various efficiency gains possible. This study concerns itself mainly with production efficiency and attempts to calculate possible production efficiency gains by using linear programming model. Production-efficiency gains are quantified by the base case scenario of continued regulation versus four counterfactual deregulation scenarios. The results indicate that cost gains could be about eight per cent of current production cost, and this is possibly a lower-bound estimate. However, whether the purported efficiency gains are realized is to be seen as the deregulation proceeds

  12. Protecting consumer interests in Alberta's deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains why the province of Alberta decided to deregulate its electricity sector. In the early 1990s, electricity rates were reasonable in Alberta, there was no utility debt, and electricity costs were low. In 1994 California's open access transmission system suggested that open markets would result in lower electricity rates and attract new economic activity. The government of Alberta also believed that competitive markets would set prices with no need for economic regulation. In the initial transition to competition, regulated electricity rates were offered to customers who were not ready to switch to the new competitive market. The RRO rate was set by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). The rates included the forecasted cost of purchasing energy from markets, cost of system access, and retail service costs. The end of the RRO rate was scheduled for 2005 when the market was expected be well developed. This paper also describes other protection mechanisms for consumers. Alberta's new electricity policy (NEP) eliminates generator participant costs related to transmission. EUB's zonal interconnection charges are also overruled along with the EUB-approved 50/50 division of transmission costs. Under the NEP, the ISO is to build transmission in anticipation of new generation. Consumers will fund the total cost to build new transmission capacity for exports and imports. This new transmission policy is a complete change from the original government policy which allocated some transmission costs to generators. The sudden change in policy was due to pressure from oil sands producers and oil sands co-generation developers. The claimed benefit to Albertans is a 25 per cent reduction in pool price and greater system reliability. However, the author cautioned that government interference with competitive electricity markets will cripple the electric power industry in the foreseeable future because it interferes with market prices

  13. Decision modelling tools for utilities in the deregulated energy market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, S. [Process Vision Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    This thesis examines the impact of the deregulation of the energy market on decision making and optimisation in utilities and demonstrates how decision support applications can solve specific encountered tasks in this context. The themes of the thesis are presented in different frameworks in order to clarify the complex decision making and optimisation environment where new sources of uncertainties arise due to the convergence of energy markets, globalisation of energy business and increasing competition. This thesis reflects the changes in the decision making and planning environment of European energy companies during the period from 1995 to 2004. It also follows the development of computational performance and evolution of energy information systems during the same period. Specifically, this thesis consists of studies at several levels of the decision making hierarchy ranging from top-level strategic decision problems to specific optimisation algorithms. On the other hand, the studies also follow the progress of the liberalised energy market from the monopolistic era to the fully competitive market with new trading instruments and issues like emissions trading. This thesis suggests that there is an increasing need for optimisation and multiple criteria decision making methods, and that new approaches based on the use of operations research are welcome as the deregulation proceeds and uncertainties increase. Technically, the optimisation applications presented are based on Lagrangian relaxation techniques and the dedicated Power Simplex algorithm supplemented with stochastic scenario analysis for decision support, a heuristic method to allocate common benefits and potential losses of coalitions of power companies, and an advanced Branch- and-Bound algorithm to solve efficiently nonconvex optimisation problems. The optimisation problems are part of the operational and tactical decision making process that has become very complex in the recent years. Similarly

  14. Economic evaluation of photovoltaic electric power generation connected to the grid in deregulated electric power markets; Avaliacao economica da geracao de energia eletrica fotovoltaica conectada a rede em mercados eletricos desregulados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumaran, David Richard Orosco

    2000-12-01

    This work presents an analysis of economic, tariff and regulating issues related to the introduction of Grid Connected Photovoltaic Systems in a deregulated electric market context; a case study for the peruvian electric market is realized. Based on the pricing system of the electric market, it is developed an economic assessment model that can be used by institutions interested in promoting this technology for generating electricity. (author)

  15. Power Buying: Planning For Your Deregulated Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wayne K.

    1997-01-01

    Colleges and universities can benefit from the coming deregulation of utilities. Deregulation creates opportunity for facility managers to aggressively negotiate agreements, implement changes to the physical plant to make the institution a more attractive customer, and explore new, less expensive energy supply options and alternatives. Some action…

  16. Structural Reforms and Growth : Product and Labor Market Deregulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Rossi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper focuses on labor and product market deregulations, as fundamental elements in the passage from an investment to an innovation-based economy.The approach undertaken is prominently empirical.After a very brief description of the regulatory levels on the two sides of the Atlantic, we take two

  17. Insurance brokers market dynamics in Poland before deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Krajewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focus on insurance broker profession in connection with second part of professions deregulations. It briefly presents modifications in polish law in this domain. Next part concerns the insurance brokers market dynamics analysis. The results shows permanent increase in brokers quantity in spite of existing regulations. Presented paper makes start point to following analysis.

  18. Cycles in deregulated electricity markets: Empirical evidence from two decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arango, Santiago; Larsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the 'cycle hypothesis' in electricity generation, which states that the introduction of deregulation in an electricity system might lead to sustained fluctuations of over- and under-capacity. The occurrence of cycles is one of the major threats for electricity markets as it affects the security of supply, and creates uncertainty in both the profitability of electricity companies and in consumer prices. We discuss the background for these cycles using analogies with other capital-intensive industries, along with evidence from the analysis of behavioral simulation models as well as from experimental electricity markets. Using data from the oldest deregulated markets we find support for the hypothesis in the case of the English and Chilean markets, based on an autocorrelation analysis. Evidence from the Nordpool market is more ambiguous, although we might be observing the first half of a cycle in generation capacity. Comparing a simulation of the English market performed in 1992 with the actual performance we can observe that the qualitative behavior of the model is consistent with the actual evolution. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for damping cycles in electricity generation, such as mothballing, capacity payments, and reliability markets. - Research highlights: → We explore the emergence of cycles in the electricity generation capacity after deregulation. → We discuss the reason for cycles in generation capacity and compare different theories. → Analysis of England and Chile data show strong indications that cycles have emerged.

  19. The deregulation of electricity and gas markets. The great economic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirabel, Francois; Guerassimoff, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    As the process of deregulation of electricity and gas markets started in Europe ten years ago, this book aims at recalling and describing the consequences of this evolution, notably for companies which were in a monopoly situation for electricity and gas production, transport, retailing and selling, but also in terms of new entities to be created and of entities having to give up their specialty. The author first presents the economic characteristics of gas and electricity industries in terms of infrastructures and final services, scale, coordination and size of energy networks, of existence of strong externalities in networks, of commitment in public service missions. He describes the background and implementation of this deregulation. He analyses the strategies of companies and how energy markets are controlled: strategies to mitigate competition and to strengthen their market power, firm strategies and public policies, merging strategies, strategies of competition distortion. The last chapter addresses the various priority fields of deregulation: public service missions in a deregulated environment (issues of service continuity and of affordable prices), the environmental constraint in energy market organisation (limitation of CO 2 emissions, promotion of renewable energies, and reduction of energy consumption). In conclusion, the author discusses how to conciliate deregulation and sustainable development of energy

  20. Labor market deregulation and globalization: empirical evidence from OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Potrafke , Niklas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This paper empirically investigates the influence of globalization on various aspects of labor market deregulation. I employ the data set by Bassanini and Duval (2006) on labor market institutions in OECD countries and the KOF index of globalization. The data set covers 20 OECD countries in the 1982?2003 period. The results suggest that globalization did neither influence the unemployment replacement rate, the unemployment benefit length, public expenditures on ALMP, the t...

  1. Optimal electricity price calculation model for retailers in a deregulated market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusta, J.M.; Dominguez-Navarro, J.A. [Zaragoza Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Zaragoza (Spain); Ramirez-Rosado, I.J. [La Rioja Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Logrono (Spain); Perez-Vidal, J.M. [McKinnon and Clarke, Energy Services Div., Zaragoza (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The electricity retailing, a new business in deregulated electric power systems, needs the development of efficient tools to optimize its operation. This paper defines a technical-economic model of an electric energy service provider in the environment of the deregulated electricity market in Spain. This model results in an optimization problem, for calculating the optimal electric power and energy selling prices that maximize the economic profits obtained by the provider. This problem is applied to different cases, where the impact on the profits of several factors, such as the price strategy, the discount on tariffs and the elasticity of customer demand functions, is studied. (Author)

  2. Optimal electricity price calculation model for retailers in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusta, J.M.; Dominguez-Navarro, J.A.; Ramirez-Rosado, I.J.; Perez-Vidal, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The electricity retailing, a new business in deregulated electric power systems, needs the development of efficient tools to optimize its operation. This paper defines a technical-economic model of an electric energy service provider in the environment of the deregulated electricity market in Spain. This model results in an optimization problem, for calculating the optimal electric power and energy selling prices that maximize the economic profits obtained by the provider. This problem is applied to different cases, where the impact on the profits of several factors, such as the price strategy, the discount on tariffs and the elasticity of customer demand functions, is studied. (Author)

  3. Steady state security assessment in deregulated power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjure, Durgesh Padmakar

    Power system operations are undergoing changes, brought about primarily due to deregulation and subsequent restructuring of the power industry. The primary intention of the introduction of deregulation in power systems was to bring about competition and improved customer focus. The underlying motive was increased economic benefit. Present day power system analysis is much different than what it was earlier, essentially due to the transformation of the power industry from being cost-based to one that is price-based and due to open access of transmission networks to the various market participants. Power is now treated as a commodity and is traded in an open market. The resultant interdependence of the technical criteria and the economic considerations has only accentuated the need for accurate analysis in power systems. The main impetus in security analysis studies is on efficient assessment of the post-contingency status of the system, accuracy being of secondary consideration. In most cases, given the time frame involved, it is not feasible to run a complete AC load flow for determining the post-contingency state of the system. Quite often, it is not warranted as well, as an indication of the state of the system is desired rather than the exact quantification of the various state variables. With the inception of deregulation, transmission networks are subjected to a host of multilateral transactions, which would influence physical system quantities like real power flows, security margins and voltage levels. For efficient asset utilization and maximization of the revenue, more often than not, transmission networks are operated under stressed conditions, close to security limits. Therefore, a quantitative assessment of the extent to which each transaction adversely affects the transmission network is required. This needs to be done accurately as the feasibility of the power transactions and subsequent decisions (execution, curtailment, pricing) would depend upon the

  4. Deregulation of the electric utility industry - implications for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.Rose

    2000-01-01

    The deregulation movement sweeping the international electric utility community represents a dramatic shift om the traditional business model of utilities. This paper will focus on deregulation in thc United States and the new challenges for nuclear power plant operators. An overview of the new operating models being implemented in the US will lead into a discussion on new economic and operating concerns for nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  5. Deregulation of the electric utility industry - implications for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    The deregulation movement sweeping the international electric utility community represents a dramatic shift from the traditional utility business model. This paper will focus on deregulation in the United States and the new challenges for nuclear power plant operators. An overview of the new operating models being implemented in the US will lead into a discussion on new economic and operating concerns for nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  6. Allocation of Transaction Cost to Market Participants Using an Analytical Method in Deregulated Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasankari, S.; Jeslin Drusila Nesamalar, J.; Charles Raja, S.; Venkatesh, P.

    2014-04-01

    Transmission cost allocation is one of the major challenges in transmission open access faced by the electric power sector. The purpose of this work is to provide an analytical method for allocating transmission transaction cost in deregulated market. This research work provides a usage based transaction cost allocation method based on line-flow impact factor (LIF) which relates the power flow in each line with respect to transacted power for the given transaction. This method provides the impact of line flows without running iterative power flow solution and is well suited for real time applications. The proposed method is compared with the Newton-Raphson (NR) method of cost allocation on sample six bus and practical Indian utility 69 bus systems by considering multilateral transaction.

  7. Power marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioshansi, F.P.; Altman, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most significant developments in the US electric power industry in recent years has been the phenomenal growth of power marketing. What was barely a blimp on the radar screen in 1992 has turned out to be a jumbo jet. This article explains what is power marketing who are power marketers, what role play these players and what will be their longer-term impact on the traditional industry [it

  8. A dynamic approach for the optimal electricity dispatch in the deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraretto, Cristian; Lazzaretto, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The electricity market has been experiencing the deregulation process in many countries. Effective approaches to the management of single power plants or groups of plants are therefore becoming crucial for the competitiveness of energy utilities. A dynamic programming approach is presented in this paper for the optimal plant management in the new Italian deregulated market. A thorough description of the method is given in cases of free or fixed production over time (e.g. when the overall production is limited by bilateral contracts or cogeneration). Analysis of market characteristics, detailed thermodynamic models of plant operation and reliable price forecasts over the time period of interest are required. The suggested approach is useful for both long-term scheduling and planning daily offers in the market

  9. Generation capacity adequacy in deregulated markets : options for Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) is a Calgary-based non-profit organization that conducts studies on energy and related environmental issues to help Canadian business and government organizations. This paper summarized the information in a two volume CERI study report which assessed generation capacity issues in deregulated electricity markets in Canada. The study observed the restructuring experience in several jurisdictions and described how, or if, energy-only markets are succeeding in ensuring capacity additions. Supply-side and demand-side mechanisms have been proposed as solutions to address these problems. Theoretical and practical issues of adequacy that are most relevant from a Canadian perspective were presented. In fully developed energy markets, the price of energy reflects scarcity. When generating resources are abundant prices are low. Since investment decisions are based on price expectations, it is unlikely that deregulated markets in their current state can offer adequate generation for the long term. It was concluded that long-term investment will occur with competitive markets and by adding a capacity mechanism to the market design. tabs., figs

  10. Decentralized power systems. Advanced technologies in a deregulated power market. 3. rev. and enl. ed.; Dezentrale Energiesysteme. Neue Technologien im liberalisierten Energiemarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, Juergen [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Energieverfahrenstechnik

    2012-11-01

    The book covers a very broad spectra of different technologies. Beside conventional power engineering of heat- and power generation cogeneration innovative engineering like fuel cells and use of renewable energy sources are presented taking into account their special importance for small decentralized systems. Ways and application fields are shown to progress development and introduction of this technologies. The book describes comprehensively how can be compensated economical disadvantages of this small decentralized supply stations by cogeneration or connected to ''virtual power plants''. Because of consisting detailed examples of calculation, comparison of cost and tables the book is very useful for students as also for engineers in practice: Students have a good guide for examina, engineers have a good companion to solve problems of professional every day life.

  11. Impact of electricity market deregulation on information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharabod, E.; Berrier, M.

    2005-01-01

    Electricity market deregulation is based on un-bundling of activities between generation, transmission and distribution. In a very short time, mechanisms were put in place in order to allow the new market participants to buy and sell electricity. The market operation requires to exchange information at various time horizon, from yearly to real time exchanges, between various actors geographically distributed. The recent market opening to professional customers has also increased the amount of data involved. The information system developed by RTE to manage these data is organised around referential data base, internal and external exchange tools. It must be operated respecting confidentiality of commercial data and being non discriminatory with actors. The security of this information system is now a key issue for the electricity market operation. (authors)

  12. Game-theoretic equilibrium analysis applications to deregulated electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Manho

    This dissertation examines game-theoretic equilibrium analysis applications to deregulated electricity markets. In particular, three specific applications are discussed: analyzing the competitive effects of ownership of financial transmission rights, developing a dynamic game model considering the ramp rate constraints of generators, and analyzing strategic behavior in electricity capacity markets. In the financial transmission right application, an investigation is made of how generators' ownership of financial transmission rights may influence the effects of the transmission lines on competition. In the second application, the ramp rate constraints of generators are explicitly modeled using a dynamic game framework, and the equilibrium is characterized as the Markov perfect equilibrium. Finally, the strategic behavior of market participants in electricity capacity markets is analyzed and it is shown that the market participants may exaggerate their available capacity in a Nash equilibrium. It is also shown that the more conservative the independent system operator's capacity procurement, the higher the risk of exaggerated capacity offers.

  13. A novel approach for modeling deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Ofir D., E-mail: rubino@agri.huji.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Economics and Management, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Babcock, Bruce A., E-mail: babcock@iastate.ed [Department of Economics, Iowa State University, 578F Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070 (United States); Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD), Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1070 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    The theoretical framework developed in this study allows development of a model of deregulated electricity markets that explains two familiar empirical findings; the existence of forward premiums and price-cost markups in the spot market. This is a significant contribution because electricity forward premiums have been previously explained exclusively by the assumptions of perfect competition and risk-averse behavior while spot markups are generally the outcome of a body of literature assuming oligopolistic competition. Our theoretical framework indicates that a certain premium for forward contracting is required for efficient allocation of generation capacity. However, due to the uniqueness of electricity and the design of deregulated electricity markets this premium might be substantially higher than its optimal level. - Research highlights: {yields} The state of knowledge regarding modeling electricity markets is incomplete. {yields} Electricity forward premiums are not necessarily driven by risk aversion. {yields} Efficiency in production requires a certain premium for forward contracting. {yields} It is likely that market premiums are substantially higher than their optimal level. {yields} Policy regulation should not seek to eliminate forward premium entirely.

  14. A novel approach for modeling deregulated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Ofir D.; Babcock, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical framework developed in this study allows development of a model of deregulated electricity markets that explains two familiar empirical findings; the existence of forward premiums and price-cost markups in the spot market. This is a significant contribution because electricity forward premiums have been previously explained exclusively by the assumptions of perfect competition and risk-averse behavior while spot markups are generally the outcome of a body of literature assuming oligopolistic competition. Our theoretical framework indicates that a certain premium for forward contracting is required for efficient allocation of generation capacity. However, due to the uniqueness of electricity and the design of deregulated electricity markets this premium might be substantially higher than its optimal level. - Research highlights: → The state of knowledge regarding modeling electricity markets is incomplete. → Electricity forward premiums are not necessarily driven by risk aversion. → Efficiency in production requires a certain premium for forward contracting. → It is likely that market premiums are substantially higher than their optimal level. → Policy regulation should not seek to eliminate forward premium entirely.

  15. A study on the deregulation of the Finnish electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsakangas-Savolainen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Governments have regarded the electricity industry as a leading industrial sector throughout the history. Because of its strategic importance to industrial development, its impacts on the social and environmental issues and its natural monopoly characteristics, it has been seen necessary to regulate electricity industry effectively. However, in the mid 1980s it was realised that even though transmission and distribution networks are natural monopolies, the scale economies in electricity production at the generating unit level had exhausted at a unit size of about 500 MW. This meant that supply and generation had become potentially competitive activities. In Finland the new Electricity Market Act (EMA) came into force in 1.11.1995. According to it the production and supply of electricity became deregulated and competition was introduced to the industry. The main aim of the law was to improve efficiency. This dissertation analyses, both theoretically and empirically, the impacts of deregulation to the Finnish electricity markets. In chapter two we discuss on the grounds and incentives of the deregulation processes that have been carried out in different countries. We also determine the crucial factors in order succeed in the deregulation process. According to our view the success depend on the number of active players in the wholesale market, the rules of the bidding procedure, the organisation of the demand side operation, the neutrality of transmission grid, the structure of production technologies and the ownership structure of the industry. In chapter three we theoretically model the profit maximising behaviour of the Finnish electricity companies based on different stages of vertical integration and on different stage of competition. According to our results the profit maximising pricing rules of distribution units is dependent on the stage of integration and on the stage of competition. The separated distribution company maximises profits by setting the

  16. Nuclear and global warming issues at a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesarovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The present challenge is to develop such an energy mix that best supports industrial and societal development and improves the quality of life, while simultaneously minimizing health and environmental impacts. Although two decades ago nuclear was considered to be the energy of the future, it is often overlooked in this context and is now even being questioned in many parts of the world. But, for a world facing increased energy demand and growing concerns about global warming due to the emissions of the 'greenhouse' gasses from burning fossil fuels, nuclear power may become the first priority again, since the nuclear power plants proved to be a reliable and safe source of electricity that produce no greenhouse or acid rain gases, and have already demonstrated their economic competitiveness with alternative generating sources of electrical energy. The competitiveness of nuclear power depends essentially on capital investments which must remain low enough to secure its competitive position. However, nuclear electricity in most countries is less competitive than coal and gas, particularly so after deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets have taken place. In the European Union (EU) there are at present 151 reactor blocks and 68 more in the rest of the European continent. Nuclear power plants in EU currently generate about 35% of electricity, but with the new competitive markets, a major decline in the use of coal is compensated for by an increase in gas because of its lower carbon content, and thus almost all new power stations fully or partially use gas as fuel. However, nuclear power is expected to remain a necessary component of the EU's energy mix for the next 20 years and beyond, and in Central and Eastern Europe it is continuing its growth. While Hungary recently gave up plans to construct two more blocks in its 'Pacs' plant, the Czech government agreed to continue construction of two blocks at its 'Temelin' plant. In Rumania, the second unit of

  17. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow in Deregulated Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselyn, J. Preetha; Devaraj, D.; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar

    2013-11-01

    Voltage stability is an important issue in the planning and operation of deregulated power systems. The voltage stability problems is a most challenging one for the system operators in deregulated power systems because of the intense use of transmission line capabilities and poor regulation in market environment. This article addresses the congestion management problem avoiding offline transmission capacity limits related to voltage stability by considering Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (VSCOPF) problem in deregulated environment. This article presents the application of Multi Objective Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm to solve the VSCOPF problem in new competitive power systems. The maximum of L-index of the load buses is taken as the indicator of voltage stability and is incorporated in the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The proposed method in hybrid power market which also gives solutions to voltage stability problems by considering the generation rescheduling cost and load shedding cost which relieves the congestion problem in deregulated environment. The buses for load shedding are selected based on the minimum eigen value of Jacobian with respect to the load shed. In the proposed approach, real power settings of generators in base case and contingency cases, generator bus voltage magnitudes, real and reactive power demands of selected load buses using sensitivity analysis are taken as the control variables and are represented as the combination of floating point numbers and integers. DE/randSF/1/bin strategy scheme of differential evolution with self-tuned parameter which employs binomial crossover and difference vector based mutation is used for the VSCOPF problem. A fuzzy based mechanism is employed to get the best compromise solution from the pareto front to aid the decision maker. The proposed VSCOPF planning model is implemented on IEEE 30-bus system, IEEE 57 bus practical system and IEEE 118 bus system. The pareto optimal

  18. The Nightmare of the Leader: The Impact of Deregulation on an Oligopoly Insurance Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer L. Wang; Larry Y. Tzeng; En-Lin Wang

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of deregulation of licensing on an oligopoly insurance market. We show that deregulation of licensing in a Stackelberg-type oligopoly market may not have any impact on the leader’s output if the number of firms increases but the market structure remains. On the other hand, if the market structure is reorganized because of the deregulation of licensing, the leader’s output could be significantly reduced after deregulation. By using the unique data of the insuranc...

  19. An integrated marketing approach for a medium-sized South African airline in a deregulated market

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Comm. The overall goal of this study is to provide a medium-sized South African airline with the theoretical framework and necessary research and analyses, in developing an integrated marketing approach in a deregulated environment. The objectives of the study are : to analyse the macro and market variables that could impact on the marketing efforts of a medium-sized South African airline. to assess a medium-sized South African airline's marketing efforts (in response to external variabl...

  20. Natural gas market assessment ten years after deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Changes which have taken place in the Canadian natural gas market in the ten years since the gas market was de-regulated, were reviewed. A 1985 agreement created conditions for a competitive natural gas market. However, the National Energy Board ensured that the pipeline transmission sector of the gas industry would continue to be regulated because of its natural monopoly characteristics. Open non-discriminatory access was to be provided to all shippers on inter-provincial gas pipelines. One objective of this report was to provide the Board with the means of assuring itself that the market was operating in such a way that Canadian requirements for natural gas were being met at fair market prices. The report also provided a review of the major changes in the gas producing and transmission sector, and reviewed developments in gas markets and sales practices. The overall assessment was that the natural gas industry was efficient and responsive to the demands of the marketplace. 5 tabs., 30 figs

  1. Th european market of the electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the CRE (commission of the Electric power Control) progress report concerning the first july 2000 to the 30 june 2001. Three main subjects are discussed, illustrated by economic data and graphs: the electric power european market, the french market control and the CRE. A special interest is given to the deregulation of the market and its consequences. (A.L.B.)

  2. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-05-01

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

  3. Transmission investment and planning in deregulated market environment : a literature survey (part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, F.; Wu, F.F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first half of a 2-part paper that provided details of a comprehensive survey of issues related to transmission investment and expansion planning in the electricity market. The lack of adequate transmission capacity has played an important role in recent power crises, and deregulation has had a significant impact on the investment and planning process of transmission systems. The main objective of transmission investment is to meet load demands as cheaply as possible. In a deregulated market, there is no longer centrally coordinated planning of new generation. Transmission planning is generally not coordinated with generation planning. There is considerable uncertainty with regard to transmission capacity requirements due to long lead times for transmission construction. Generating plants and transmission lines are built according to investor assessments and private interests, and current transmission systems were not designed to handle supply and demand patterns in competitive markets. It was recommended that new transmission plans should meet reliability requirements while minimizing expected unserved energy. It was concluded that reliability criteria must be redefined to account for the fact that transmission systems are more stressed under deregulation. Two popular financial transmission rights were also discussed, notably (1) point-to-point financial transmission rights (FTR); and (2) financial flowgate rights (FGR)

  4. Power marketing and renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Power marketing refers to wholesale and retail transactions of electric power made by companies other than public power entities and the regulated utilities that own the generation and distribution lines. The growth in power marketing has been a major development in the electric power industry during the last few years, and power marketers are expected to realize even more market opportunities as electric industry deregulation proceeds from wholesale competition to retail competition. This Topical Issues Brief examines the nature of the power marketing business and its relationship with renewable power. The information presented is based on interviews conducted with nine power marketing companies, which accounted for almost 54% of total power sales by power marketers in 1995. These interviews provided information on various viewpoints of power marketers, their experience with renewables, and their respective outlooks for including renewables in their resource portfolios. Some basic differences exist between wholesale and retail competition that should be recognized when discussing power marketing and renewable power. At the wholesale level, the majority of power marketers stress the commodity nature of electricity. The primary criteria for developing resource portfolios are the same as those of their wholesale customers: the cost and reliability of power supplies. At the retail level, electricity may be viewed as a product that includes value-added characteristics or services determined by customer preferences

  5. Overview of the developments in the domestic airline industry in South Africa since market deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation or liberalisation of air transport has had major global impacts on the domestic air transport markets, with effects ranging from stimulation to changes in the structure and functioning of these markets. In South Africa, deregulation has had wide-reaching effects on the domestic market. The purpose of this article was to investigate the current domestic air transport market. A literature review was performed to examine the effects of deregulation in other domestic air transport markets around the world. This was followed by a review of the South African domestic air transport market prior to deregulation in order to determine the changes that were made following deregulation. The ten-year period immediately following deregulation was also examined; this period was characterised by relatively large numbers of market entries and exits. A database was obtained from the Airports Company South Africa; air traffic movements, passenger numbers and load factors were evaluated. The study showed that the market is still characterised by regular market entries and exits. Also that the entry of the low-cost carriers has stimulated the market, resulting in increased air traffic movements, higher passenger numbers, higher load factors in general and the opening of a secondary airport in Gauteng, Lanseria International. Deregulation and, more specifically, the entry of the low-cost carriers has resulted in structural changes in the market and more choice for passengers.

  6. Distributed control of deregulated electrical power networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for reliable operation of electrical power networks is that supply and demand are balanced at all time, as efficient ways for storing large amounts of electrical energy are scarce. Balancing is challenging, however, due to the power system's dimensions and complexity, the low

  7. Costs of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.K.; King, M.

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed efforts throughout the world to deregulate the electricity industry, with varied results. While there have been a few qualified success stories, many challenges of deregulation have come to light. These challenges can lead to negative, even disastrous, outcomes. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this paper catalogues problems experienced in various deregulation efforts, and considers the application of the lessons learned from this history to Israel, which is considering deregulation. Failings of deregulation are found to center around the following problems: high set-up cost; complicated market design; inevitable spot price volatility; market power abuse; inefficient investment; difficulty in reducing generation cost; dysfunctional input markets; stranded cost; unequal distribution of benefits. We find that many of these problems are exacerbated by the particular circumstances faced by Israel, and advise any country or region considering deregulation to carefully consider these obstacles to success. (author)

  8. Influence of TCSC Devices on Congestion Management in a Deregulated Power System Using Evolutionary Programming Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthichristy, A., Dr.; Elanthirayan, R.; Brindha, R., Dr.; Siddhiq, M. S.; Venkatesh, N.; Harshit, M. V.; Nikhilreddy, M.

    2018-04-01

    Congestion management is one of the technical challenges in power system deregulation. In deregulated electricity market it may always not be possible to dispatch all of the contracted power transactions due to congestion of the transmission corridors. Transmission congestion occurs when there is insufficient transmission capacity to simultaneously accommodate all constraints for transmission of a line. Flexible Alternative Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices can be an alternative to reduce the flows in the heavily loaded lines, resulting in an increased loadability, low system loss, improved stability of the network, reduced cost of production and fulfilled contractual requirement by controlling the power flow in the network. A method to determine the optimal location of FACTS has been suggested based on reduction of total system VAR power losses. The simulation was done on IEEE 14 bus system and results were obtained.

  9. Product Market Deregulation and Employment Outcomes: Evidence from the German Retail Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Senftleben-König

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the short- and medium-term effects of the deregulation of shopopening hours legislation on retail employment in Germany. In 2006, the legislative competence was shifted from the federal to the state level, leading to a gradual deregulation of shop opening restrictions in most of Germany’s sixteen federal states. The paper exploits regional variation in the legislation in order to identify the effect product market deregulation has on retail employment. We find robust...

  10. The End of a Natural Monopoly. Deregulation and Competition in the Electric Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, P.Z.; Cole, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    For a hundred years, scholars and government officials understood, or thought they did, the electric power industry. Electric power, based on a single, large service provider, connected by wires to all of its customers, was thought to be an industry that could only operate efficiently as a monopoly; indeed it was something called a 'natural monopoly'. Since it had to be a monopoly, with all the attendant inefficiencies and potential market abuses monopoly entails, government regulation was necessary. These basic assumptions, which at times seemed to conflict with observed facts remained largely unquestioned for the better part of 75 years. Then, changing institutional and technological circumstances led economists to question the basis in fact of the theory of natural monopoly, and the regulatory system it entailed. Movement toward a deregulated electric power system began albeit in piece-meal fashion. Indeed, the result has been a crazy quilt of deregulation and re-regulations, which often have resulted in more costs than benefits for society as a whole. In the most infamous case, California, the entire enterprise of regulatory change has been called into question. The process of deregulation or reregulation in several other states has stopped because of fear of repeating California's mistakes. This book addresses some of the fundamental issues underlying the debate over electric power regulation and deregulation. Only by understanding these questions and exploring a variety of possible answers to them can we hope to move the debate over the proper structure of the electric power industry. Undoubtedly, electric power deregulation will be a major legal and economic concern for years to come

  11. Bi-Level Optimization for Available Transfer Capability Evaluation in Deregulated Electricity Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Available transfer capability (ATC is the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses which needs to be posted in the electricity market to facilitate competition. ATC evaluation is a complicated task including the determination of total transfer capability (TTC and existing transfer capability (ETC. In the deregulated electricity market, ETC is decided by the independent system operator’s (ISO’s economic dispatch (ED. TTC can then be obtained by a continuation power flow (CPF method or by an optimal power flow (OPF method, based on the given ED solutions as well as the ETC. In this paper, a bi-level optimization framework for the ATC evaluation is proposed in which ATC results can be obtained simultaneously with the ED and ETC results in the deregulated electricity market. In this bi-level optimization model, ATC evaluation is formulated as the upper level problem and the ISO’s ED is the lower level problem. The bi-level model is first converted to a mathematic program with equilibrium constraints (MPEC by recasting the lower level problem as its Karush-Kuhn-Tucher (KKT optimality condition. Then, the MPEC is transformed into a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP problem, which can be solved with the help of available optimization software. In addition, case studies on PJM 5-bus, IEEE 30-bus, and IEEE 118-bus systems are presented to demonstrate the proposed methodology.

  12. Assessing the Significance of Telecommunication Deregulation on the Growth of Japan's Mobile Phone Market

    OpenAIRE

    Yuqing Xing

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyzes the development of Japan's mobile phone market. Specifically, it focuses on the regulatory reforms of Japan's mobile communication sector and their impact on the growth of the market. The analysis based on a monopolistic competition model shows that the deregulation policies perform an essential role in fostering the rapid expansion of Japan's mobile phone market. Using quarterly data from 1991 to 1999, the paper tests the significance of the telecommunication deregulation...

  13. The liberalization of the electricity market in Austria aspects of competition and deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lausegger, S.

    2001-05-01

    The subject of the thesis is the deregulation of the Austrian electricity market. It starts with an introduction in the historical background of the legal basis, which until 1998 had been determined exclusively by national law. The main fields of interest in this chapter lay within the federal nature of Austrian electricity law. The next chapter deals with electricity in European Community law, it focuses on the fundamental freedoms of the Treaty on one hand and the Directive 96/92 on Common Provisions for the Electricity Markets on the other. On the basis of this introduction, the Austrian National Electricity Law (e.g. the 'Elektrizitaewirtschafts- und -organisationsgesetz 1998' and the 'Energieliberalisierungsgesetz 2000') has to be assessed. It can be shown that the transformation of Community Law has only partly been successful. Only on the basis of this national and European regulatory framework, an evaluation of the current situation is made according to the principles of competition law (e.g. horizontal agreements, abuse of market power, merger control, state aid). Either national and Community competition law is being discussed, as Community competition law also applies to competition restrictions that are caused by state action. The Austrian way of furthering renewable energies can be named as an example for an insufficient transformation. The last chapter focuses on various aspects of contract law in the deregulated market. Finally, a short summary presents the academic results of the thesis. (author)

  14. Nuclear energy in the increasingly deregulated brazilian energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, Sergio G

    2003-01-01

    The Brazilian Electric Energy Market is presently undergoing an institutional transition from a strictly regulated to a commercially competitive market, due to be completed by January, 2006. The operation and maintenance costs of the two presently existing Brazilian nuclear power plants allow them to be economically competitive with other types of plants for meeting the load demand in the country. The commercialization of the energy produced by the two existing nuclear power plants must cope with the impact of the new market rules, which establish that power purchase contracts must be freely negotiated between generating and distributing companies. The projected costs for the construction and operation of a third NPP also indicate that it may be economically feasible under the new market rules (author)

  15. The role of clean coal technologies in a deregulated rural utility market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, J.W. [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The nation`s rural electric cooperatives own a high proportion of coal-fired generation, in excess of 80 percent of their generating capacity. As the electric utility industry moves toward a competitive electricity market, the generation mix for electric cooperatives is expected to change. Distributed generation will likely serve more customer loads than is now the case, and that will lead to an increase in gas-fired generation capacity. But, clean low-cost central station coal-fired capacity is expected to continue to be the primary source of power for growing rural electric cooperatives. Gasification combined cycle could be the lowest cost coal based generation option in this new competitive market if both capital cost and electricity production costs can be further reduced. This paper presents anticipated utility business scenarios for the deregulated future and identifies combined cycle power plant configurations that might prove most competitive.

  16. Measuring and testing natural gas and electricity markets volatility : evidence from Alberta's deregulated markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serletis, A.; Shahmoradi, A.

    2005-01-01

    A number of innovative methods for modelling spot wholesale electricity prices have recently been developed. However, these models have primarily used a univariate time series approach to the analysis of electricity prices. This paper specified and estimated a multivariate GARCH-M model of natural gas and electricity price changes and their volatilities, using data over the deregulated period between January 1996 to November 2004 from Alberta's spot power and natural gas markets. The primary objective of the model was to investigate the relationship between electricity and natural gas prices. It was noted that the model allows for the possibilities of spillovers and asymmetries in the variance-covariance structure for natural gas and electricity price changes, and also for the separate examination of the effects of the volatility of anticipated and unanticipated changes in natural gas and electricity prices. Section 2 of the paper provided a description of the model used to test for causality between natural gas and electricity price changes, while section 3 discussed the data and presented the empirical results. It was concluded that there is a bidirectional causality between natural gas and electricity price changes. However, neither anticipated nor unanticipated natural gas price volatility causes electricity price changes. Anticipated electricity price volatility has a causal effect on natural gas. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Electric power and gas markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    These two days organized by EFE in Paris, dealt with the european market of the gas and the electrical power. The first day developed the actual situation and the tendencies. The french market deregulation, the possibility of a united market and the energy transportation sector are discussed. The second day dealt with the new commercial technologies, the convergence of Gas and Electricity and the competing in a change world, the opportunities of the NTIC (new technologies of the information and communication). (A.L.B.)

  18. Russian electricity market reform: Deregulation or re-regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Olga; Viljainen, Satu; Makkonen, Mari; Kuleshov, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    Russia commenced liberalization of electricity prices in 2007 increasing the liberalization rate by 10–25% every six months. It was planned to reach full liberalization by 2011. Currently, the degree of liberalization is uncertain because of intense price regulation and a highly concentrated market in the hands of four large generating companies. Increased regulation and further consolidation may drive the market towards its pre-reform state. This paper analyses the competitive landscape of the Russian electricity market by assessing the ownership structure of electricity generation, price drivers, and government involvement in the electricity wholesale market in Russia. The main research question is why the targeted level of market liberalization has not been fully achieved in the Russian electricity market. - Highlights: ► Congested grid; deficit of capacity and market concentration hinder competition. ► Investment needs of the power sector led to price shocks. ► Price increase and poor competition force the government to regulate prices. ► Low liberalization rate and non-cost-reflective pricing is a result of price regulation. ► Increased regulation and consolidation drive the market toward its pre-reform state.

  19. Essays on wholesale auctions in deregulated electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaduonis, Rimvydas

    2007-12-01

    The early experience in the restructured electric power markets raised several issues, including price spikes, inefficiency, security, and the overall relationship of market clearing prices to generation costs. Unsatisfactory outcomes in these markets are thought to have resulted in part from strategic generator behaviors encouraged by inappropriate market design features. In this dissertation, I examine the performance of three auction mechanisms for wholesale power markets - Offer Cost Minimization auction, Payment Cost Minimization auction and Simple-Offer auction - when electricity suppliers act strategically. A Payment Cost Minimization auction has been proposed as an alternative to the traditional Offer Cost Minimization auction with the intention to solve the problem of inflated wholesale electricity prices. Efficiency concerns for this proposal were voiced due to insights predicated on the assumption of true production cost revelation. Using a game theoretic approach and an experimental method, I compare the two auctions, strictly controlling for the level of unilateral market power. A specific feature of these complex-offer auctions is that the sellers submit not only the quantities and the minimum prices that they are willing to sell at, but also the start-up fees, which are designed to reimburse the fixed start-up costs of the generation plants. I find that the complex structure of the offers leaves considerable room for strategic behavior, which consequently leads to anti-competitive and inefficient market outcomes. In the last chapter of my dissertation, I use laboratory experiments to contrast the performance of two complex-offer auctions against the performance of a simple-offer auction, in which the sellers have to recover all their generation costs - fixed and variable - through a uniform market-clearing price. I find that a simple-offer auction significantly reduces consumer prices and lowers price volatility. It mitigates anti-competitive effects

  20. The Importance of Management in the Deregulated Retail Electricity Distribution Market in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Drago Papler; Stefan Bojnec

    2006-01-01

    This paper underlines the importance of management in the deregulated retail electricity distribution market, entrepreneurship and business behaviours toward consumers’ satisfaction with quality of services. The coefficients of concentration indicate a high concentration of electricity suppliers and users in the deregulated electricity retail market for industry. The production function reveals the importance of education and electricity infrastructure, and to a lesser extent of capital inten...

  1. Maintenance cost models in deregulated power systems under opportunity costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, K.; Dahal, K.; Azaiez, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    In a centralized power system, the operator is responsible for scheduling maintenance. There are different types of maintenance, including corrective maintenance; predictive maintenance; preventive maintenance; and reliability-centred maintenance. The main cause of power failures is poor maintenance. As such, maintenance costs play a significant role in deregulated power systems. They include direct costs associated with material and labor costs as well as indirect costs associated with spare parts inventory, shipment, test equipment, indirect labor, opportunity costs and cost of failure. In maintenance scheduling and planning, the cost function is the only component of the objective function. This paper presented the results of a study in which different components of maintenance costs were modeled. The maintenance models were formulated as an optimization problem with single and multiple objectives and a set of constraints. The maintenance costs models could be used to schedule the maintenance activities of power generators more accurately and to identify the best maintenance strategies over a period of time as they consider failure and opportunity costs in a deregulated environment. 32 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  2. Nuclear power in competitive electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Economic deregulation in the power sector raises new challenges for the prospects of nuclear power. A key issue is to assess whether nuclear power can be competitive in a de-regulated electricity market. Other important considerations include safety, nuclear liability and insurance, the nuclear power infrastructure, and health and environmental protection. This study, conducted by a group of experts from twelve OECD Member countries and three international organisations, provides a review and analysis of these issues, as related to both existing and future nuclear power plants. It will be of particular interest to energy analysts, as well as to policy makers in the nuclear and government sectors. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactors in de-regulated markets: Integration between providers and customers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The deregulation of electricity markets has in most cases coincided with the end of state monopolies, where financial risks were borne by customers/citizens. Today, despite an economic advantage, nuclear power development faces two main problems: public acceptance and reticence of investors (banks, utilities shareholders). The development of electricity markets provides different financial instruments in order to hedge financial risks, but it is currently difficult to fix forward contracts for more than three to four years, and this period is insufficient for the financing of a nuclear reactor. A solution could be the evolution of nuclear providers into nuclear operators selling electricity (MWh) rather than selling nuclear capacity (MW), nuclear fuel and services. In this case, their customers would be utilities and big customers aiming to hedge a part of their supplies with long-term contracts or stakes in nuclear reactors without some nuclear constraints. (author)

  4. Dynamic voltage stability constrained congestion management framework for deregulated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjady, Nima; Hakimi, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new congestion management method for electricity markets is proposed. ► The proposed method includes dynamic models of generators and loads. ► Dynamic voltage stability limits are properly modeled in the proposed method. ► The proposed method is compared with several other congestion management methods. ► It leads to a more robust power system with a lower congestion management cost. - Abstract: Congestion management is an important part of power system operation in today deregulated electricity markets. However, congestion management is traditionally performed based on static analysis tools, while these tools may not correctly capture dynamic voltage stability limits of a power system. In this paper, a new congestion management framework considering dynamic voltage stability boundary of power system is proposed. For this purpose, precise dynamic modeling of power system equipment, including generators and loads, is incorporated into the proposed congestion management framework. The proposed method alleviates congestion with a lower congestion management cost and more dynamic voltage stability margin, resulting in a more robust power system, compared with the previous congestion management methods. The validity of proposed congestion management framework is studied based on the New England 39-bus power system. The obtained results confirm the validity of the developed approach.

  5. The deregulation effects of Finnish electricity markets on district heating prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, Mikael; Peltola-Ojala, Paeivi

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates an empirical econometric panel data model in order to test deregulation and regional market structure effects on district heating prices in Finland for period 1996-2002. The data was collected from 76 district heating firms throughout Finland. Special emphasis is placed on the modeling of policy-induced competition, which began in year 1999, regional based fuel selection, local market structures, and distribution network sharing effects. The results imply that the local structures of energy production and sales have an important role to play in the formation of market prices and that the price lowering effects of energy market deregulation are permanent. (author)

  6. An options model for electric power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Kanchan; Ramesh, V.C.

    1997-01-01

    The international electric utility industry is undergoing a radical transformation from an essentially regulated and monopolistic industry to an industry made uncertain with impending deregulation and the advent of competitive forces. This paper investigates the development of an options market for bulk power trading in a market setup while considering power system planning and operational constraints and/or requirements. In so doing it considers the different market based financial derivative instruments while can be used to trade electrical power in bulk and examines how established tools such as Optimal Power Flow (OPF) may be applied in helping to develop a price for bulk power transactions under a market based setup. (Author)

  7. Empowering markets?: The construction and maintenance of a deregulated market for electricity in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlstrom, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Contrary to some claims, deregulation is not just a technical affair, but encapsulates a range of political and social changes to a system. The four papers that comprise this thesis explore some of these changes empirically through interviews, reading of policy documents and public discourse as well as a large electricity user survey in order to capture as much as possible of the affected surrounding areas of deregulation. Theoretically, it debates some notions of how individuals are affected by and supposed to react to the emergence of a new market in addition to the question of how important scientific theory and advice is to real-life policies. While there are a myriad of ways of presenting this quite diverse material, I have chosen to frame it by highlighting three themes: the professional background of the people implementing deregulation, the changes in expectation of how users of electricity should behave and the uncertainty that arises when there are problems in a system that is supposed to work without regulation. The first of these themes, dealt with in the first paper presented, is in line with classical political science and institutional sociology. In order to understand how policy comes about it is not enough to just study the documents that are passed in parliament - one must also look at who is passing them, who drafted them and who is responsible for implementing the policies contained within them. Often, professional interests or specific institutional arrangements can impact the end results in otherwise transparent procedures. The second theme deals with the configuration of users of electricity. A tenet of neoclassical economic thought that has been much criticised is the idea of the rational, utility maximising actor who carefully calculates returns before taking any action. While serious economic theory is beginning to move away from this vision of human action, there is no denying that market liberalism relies on the considered choice of

  8. Congestion management by determining optimal location of TCSC in deregulated power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besharat, Hadi; Taher, Seyed Abbas

    2008-01-01

    In a deregulated electricity market, it may always not be possible to dispatch all of the contracted power transactions due to congestion of the transmission corridors. The ongoing power system restructuring requires an opening of unused potentials of transmission system due to environmental, right-of-way and cost problems which are major hurdles for power transmission network expansion. Flexible AC transmission systems (FACTSs) devices can be an alternative to reduce the flows in heavily loaded lines, resulting in an increased loadability, low system loss, improved stability of the network, reduced cost of production and fulfilled contractual requirement by controlling the power flows in the network. A method to determine the optimal location of thyristor controlled series compensators (TCSCs) has been suggested in this paper based on real power performance index and reduction of total system VAR power losses. (author)

  9. Electricity deregulation - impact on gas users and markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girling, R.

    1995-01-01

    A profile of TransCanada Northridge Power Ltd. (TNPL) was presented. The peculiarities of the market for electricity was described. The topic of focus in this presentation was competition and its effects on producers and consumers of natural gas. It was stated that competition was necessary to stimulate growth. The evolution of competition in the electricity market, existing competition, and future competition were discussed. The effect of competition was that it encouraged producers and consumers to optimize revenue and expense. In the long term, competition was seen as the keystone of free enterprise in that it gives consumers a choice, provides signals for producers and consumers to invest capital, and provides opportunities to understand and respond to historic inefficiencies

  10. Day-ahead deregulated electricity market price forecasting using neural network input featured by DCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbazhagan, S.; Kumarappan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We presented DCT input featured FFNN model for forecasting in Spain market. • The key factors impacting electricity price forecasting are historical prices. • Past 42 days were trained and the next 7 days were forecasted. • The proposed approach has a simple and better NN structure. • The DCT-FFNN mode is effective and less computation time than the recent models. - Abstract: In a deregulated market, a number of factors determined the outcome of electricity price and displays a perplexed and maverick fluctuation. Both power producers and consumers needs single compact and robust price forecasting tool in order to maximize their profits and utilities. In order to achieve the helter–skelter kind of electricity price, one dimensional discrete cosine transforms (DCT) input featured feed-forward neural network (FFNN) is modeled (DCT-FFNN). The proposed FFNN is a single compact and robust architecture (without hybridizing the various hard and soft computing models). It has been predicted that the DCT-FFNN model is close to the state of the art can be achieved with less computation time. The proposed DCT-FFNN approach is compared with 17 other recent approaches to estimate the market clearing prices of mainland Spain. Finally, the accuracy of the price forecasting is also applied to the electricity market of New York in year 2010 that shows the effectiveness of the proposed DCT-FFNN approach

  11. Integrated Computing, Communication, and Distributed Control of Deregulated Electric Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajura, Richard; Feliachi, Ali

    2008-09-24

    Restructuring of the electricity market has affected all aspects of the power industry from generation to transmission, distribution, and consumption. Transmission circuits, in particular, are stressed often exceeding their stability limits because of the difficulty in building new transmission lines due to environmental concerns and financial risk. Deregulation has resulted in the need for tighter control strategies to maintain reliability even in the event of considerable structural changes, such as loss of a large generating unit or a transmission line, and changes in loading conditions due to the continuously varying power consumption. Our research efforts under the DOE EPSCoR Grant focused on Integrated Computing, Communication and Distributed Control of Deregulated Electric Power Systems. This research is applicable to operating and controlling modern electric energy systems. The controls developed by APERC provide for a more efficient, economical, reliable, and secure operation of these systems. Under this program, we developed distributed control algorithms suitable for large-scale geographically dispersed power systems and also economic tools to evaluate their effectiveness and impact on power markets. Progress was made in the development of distributed intelligent control agents for reliable and automated operation of integrated electric power systems. The methodologies employed combine information technology, control and communication, agent technology, and power systems engineering in the development of intelligent control agents for reliable and automated operation of integrated electric power systems. In the event of scheduled load changes or unforeseen disturbances, the power system is expected to minimize the effects and costs of disturbances and to maintain critical infrastructure operational.

  12. Power Transmission Scheduling for Generators in a Deregulated Environment Based on a Game-Theoretic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingtuan Gao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a deregulated environment of the power market, in order to lower their energy price and guarantee the stability of the power network, appropriate transmission lines have to be considered for electricity generators to sell their energy to the end users. This paper proposes a game-theoretic power transmission scheduling for multiple generators to lower their wheeling cost. Based on the embedded cost method, a wheeling cost model consisting of congestion cost, cost of losses and cost of transmission capacity is presented. By assuming each generator behaves in a selfish and rational way, the competition among the multiple generators is formulated as a non-cooperative game, where the players are the generators and the strategies are their daily schedules of power transmission. We will prove that there exists at least one pure-strategy Nash equilibrium of the formulated power transmission game. Moreover, a distributed algorithm will be provided to realize the optimization in terms of minimizing the wheeling cost. Finally, simulations were performed and discussed to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed non-cooperative game approach for the generators in a deregulated environment.

  13. European Energy Markets Deregulation Observatory (EEMDO). Fourth Edition. Winter 2002/2003 data set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    In this research publication (European Energy Markets Deregulation Observatory or EEMDO) the levels of deregulation across 17 European countries are assessed. Based upon publicly available quantitative data, analysed and commented, EEMDO provides an accurate overview of European energy markets. Short-term indicators such as liquidity, market volatility, fragmentation, availability of the offer or nature of the demand as well as long-term indicators such as present and future market impacts relative to generation and physical transportation capacities have been examined to provide a clearer picture of the electricity industry across Europe. The 4th edition of EEMDO covers the winter 2002/2003 period (October 2002 - March 2003), when we saw markets entering maturity as factors other than competition start to drive prices. In this edition attention is paid to the evolution of the main indicators designed for EEMDO and for the first time, gas data are included in addition to the traditional data on the electricity market

  14. The impact of the deregulated electricity market on the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    Deregulation means that the consumer may choose between different electricity suppliers. These have to pay for transmission through the net of other distributers. In Europe first steps to deregulation began in 1991 in Britain and Norway followed by Sweden and Finnland in 1996.Following a directive of the European Commission 12 out of 15 countries should have liberalized their markets until 1999. With the exception of France this took place. The German market was opened completely in 1999 with a high dynamic, resulting in price cuts for the industrial consumers by 30-50% and even for private households by 15- 20%. Without an increase of overall electricity consumption and with overcapacity of generating units, utilities try to increase their market shares in a highly competitive market. The price for the positive changes was a strict cost management in the German electricity industry with a reduction of 30 000 employees from about 230 000 before and a reduction of investments in generating and transmission. Today electricity is sold in the high voltage grid for 4-5 Pfg/kwh, leaving after reduction for transmission about 2-2,5 Pfg/kwh for production. New gasfired combined power plants (G+D) produce electricity for about 5 Pfg/kwh. Although always praised as the best performers, they cannot meet the tolerable price limit in Germany for base load. The same is true for new coal plants, as long as a large overcapacity exists. But existing nuclear plants are generating at marginal costs of about 1,5 Pfg/kwh. These written off plants have an excellent position in the market. Therefor the future of nuclear energy will not be the construction of new plants in the coming years but will be determined by the extension of the lifetime of existing plants, their improvement and safe operation. Because of the actual political opposition in Germany it is difficult to make previsions for a long term future. The cost and market considerations made for Germany should be valid for most

  15. Options for pricing ancillary services in a deregulated power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Hatim Yahya

    2001-07-01

    GENCOs in restructured systems are compensated for selling energy in the market. In a restructured market, a mechanism is required to entice participants in the market to provide ancillary services and to ensure adequate compensation that would guarantee its economic viability. The ISO controls the dispatch of generation, manages the reliability of the transmission grid, provides open access to the transmission, buys and provides ancillary services as required, coordinates day-ahead, hour-ahead schedules and performs real time balancing of load and generation, settles real time imbalances and ancillary services sales and purchases. The ISO, also, administers congestion management protocols for the transmission grid. Since the ISO does not own any generating units it must ensure that there is enough reserves for maintaining reliability according to FERC regulations, and sufficient unloaded generating capacity for balancing services in a real-time market. The ISO could meet these requirements by creating a competitive market for ancillary services, which are metered and remain unbundled to provide an accurate compensation for each supplier and cost to each consumer, In this study, we give an overview for restructuring and ancillary services in a restructured power marketplace. Also, we discuss the effect of GENCOs' actions in the competitive energy and ancillary service markets. In addition, we propose an auction market design for hedging ancillary service costs in California market. Furthermore, we show how to include the n-1 and voltage contingencies in security constrained unit commitment. Finally, we present two approaches for GENCOs' unit commitment in a restructured power market; one is based on game theory and the other is based on market price forecasting. In each of the two GENCOs' unit commitment approaches, we discuss the GENCOs' optimal bidding strategies in energy and ancillary service markets to maximize the GENCOs' profit.

  16. Deregulation of the electric power market. Results from the pioneering countries Chile, England, Norway and Argentina; Avreglering av elmarknaden. Facit fraan de fyra pionjaerlaenderna Chile, England, Norge och Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, B; Sannebro, N [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    In Sweden the goal of the deregulation is to reach a more efficient utilization of the resources through increased competition, and to guarantee the customers flexible deliveries to lowest cost. This need free transition rights on the Swedish transmission grid. If the Swedish deregulation follows the pattern seen in the other countries, the deregulation will show effects also in related areas. 18 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Deregulation of the electric power market. Results from the pioneering countries Chile, England, Norway and Argentina; Avreglering av elmarknaden. Facit fraan de fyra pionjaerlaenderna Chile, England, Norge och Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, B.; Sannebro, N. [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    In Sweden the goal of the deregulation is to reach a more efficient utilization of the resources through increased competition, and to guarantee the customers flexible deliveries to lowest cost. This need free transition rights on the Swedish transmission grid. If the Swedish deregulation follows the pattern seen in the other countries, the deregulation will show effects also in related areas. 18 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Restructured electric power systems analysis of electricity markets with equilibrium models

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Electricity market deregulation is driving the power energy production from a monopolistic structure into a competitive market environment. The development of electricity markets has necessitated the need to analyze market behavior and power. Restructured Electric Power Systems reviews the latest developments in electricity market equilibrium models and discusses the application of such models in the practical analysis and assessment of electricity markets.

  19. Electric utilities deregulation and its impact on nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trehan, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Under restructuring and deregulation, it is not clear as to who would have the responsibility, and what obligations the market participants would have to ensure that the electrical system reliability (stability) is maintained. Due to the dynamic nature of the electrical grid, especially with the implementation of restructuring and deregulation, vulnerabilities exist which may impact the reliability (stability) of the offsite electrical power system. In a nuclear power generating unit, an offsite electric power system and an onsite electric power system are required to permit the functioning of structures, systems, and components which are important to safety. The safety function for each system is to provide sufficient capacity and capability to assure that the containment integrity is maintained during power operation or in the event of a postulated accident. Analyses performed by the applicants must verify that the electrical grid remains stable in the event of a loss of the nuclear unit generator, the largest other unit on the grid or the most critical transmission line. The stability of the electric grid is assumed in the safety analyses and a change in it would impact those analyses. However, it may impact the availability of a stable electric power to the safety buses because of the limited number of available transmission lines. This paper discusses electrical power generation and demand, reserve margins, power transfer capability, development of new innovative technologies to compensate for lack of the construction of transmission lines, legislation for the formulation of a self regulation organization (SRO), grid disturbances that may lead to a voltage collapse, and the vulnerabilities which may impact the availability of a stable power to the nuclear power generating stations

  20. Electrical deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Deregulation in the electricity sector took effect on January 1, 2001 in Alberta. Business consumers discovered that their electricity rates had almost doubled in a one-month period. The government argued that it was the case of short term pain for long term gain. The intent of the deregulation is the lowering of prices through competition. This principle applies when the supply meets the demand, but when the demand exceeds the supply, prices increase. When initial plans were made for the deregulation of the sector, utilities did not invest huge amounts of capital to build new generation plants, as it was not known how they would fare in the deregulated environment. This situation was compounded by the fact that there was an economic boom around the same time in Alberta, adding to the demands made on the existing generation infrastructure (approximately 4 per cent per year over the past decade). At the moment, some resource developers such as Syncrude, Amoco, and Daishowa produce their own electricity and export their excess capacity to the provincial grid for general use. The rules of the deregulated market have been clarified and a number of utilities are planning new generation plants and facilities. TransAlta, EPCOR, and Enmax Corp. have announced plans to expand or build new coal-fired plants. Alberta has an estimated 35 billion tonnes of recoverable coal, and 25 million tonnes of coal were used in 1999 to produce 75 per cent of the electricity required in Alberta. Over the next ten years, 4,000 megawatts of new capacity is planned, representing a 50 per cent increase over current levels. AES Corporation, a Virginia power giant, has also announced plans to build a generator in Alberta

  1. Generation capacity issues in deregulated markets : a Canadian perspective, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, M.; Brereton, B.; Czamanski, D.; Van Melle, B.; Penman, A.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) to assess generation capacity issues in deregulated electricity markets in Canada. This first volume is based on observations of the restructuring experience in several jurisdictions. It describes how, or if, energy-only markets are succeeding in ensuring capacity additions, and under what conditions. Supply-side and demand-side mechanisms have been proposed as solutions to address these problems. The report focuses on theoretical and practical issues of adequacy that are most relevant from a Canadian perspective. In fully developed energy markets, the price of energy reflects scarcity. Prices are low when generating resources are abundant, and owners make investment decisions based on price expectations. Although deregulated markets may theoretically offer a solution to the capacity adequacy problem, experience has shown that it is not easy to make the rules that make markets operate efficiently. It was concluded that it seems unlikely that deregulated markets in their current state will be able to offer adequate generation for the long term. The challenge lies in moving to competitive markets that encourage long term investment, and adding a capacity mechanism to the market design. refs., tabs., figs

  2. Systems solutions for new market situations in the deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vouets, W.

    2001-01-01

    This extensive article presents a comprehensive overview of the various functions that are necessary for the efficient and secure operation of the electricity supply system in Switzerland within the framework of a deregulated electricity market. Both the physical and financial markets involved in the restructuring of the electricity market are examined in detail. The challenges placed on the parties involved in this process and the basic principles involved are discussed, including the generation, distribution and consumption of electricity and the control of production and demand. The mechanisms involved in this complex system are illustrated graphically and the requirements placed on an 'energy exchange' and its 'stockbrokers' are discussed from both the physical and financial points of view. Practical solutions are discussed and questions on topics in this area that are still to be answered are listed, including the availability of industrial solutions, support provided by information technology and grid-protection systems. Finally, the role of utilities that provide services both in the energy area (e.g. the supply of electricity, gas and water) as well as in the financial area (e.g. cost-calculation, wholesale and customer tariff aspects, profit optimisation and customer relations management) is discussed. The article is concluded with a summary of the situation and a look at the future of the energy market in Switzerland

  3. The energy markets deregulation; L'ouverture des marches de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document is devoted to the opening of the energy markets and the associated production forms. The deregulation is going to change the technology with the need of a global answer to the the energy demands of the manufacturers and the local governments. In this context, the nuclear pole in the world facing the other forms of energy is discussed. (A.L.B.)

  4. Growth strategies of electric utilities in context of deregulation and liberalization of electricity market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Đogić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the growth strategies adopted by the electric utilities sector in the context of changes resulting from the deregulation and liberalization of the electricity market. Strategies pursued by the electric utilities sector were rarely the subject of research in the field of strategic management despite the fact that electricity is an indispensable element of everyday life and the economy as a whole. Therefore, a case study of the largest incumbent electric utilities in the Republic of Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, and Macedonia has been conducted, and differences in the degree of market liberalization and core features of these companies have been noted. Research findings have shown that the degree of deregulation can affect the growth strategies of electric utilities. In those countries where the degree of deregulation is lower, electric utilities focus on the domestic market. On the other hand, a higher level of deregulation enables electric utilities to achieve their growth through diversification or innovation. Given the fact that the analyzed electric utilities are operating within relatively small economies, they cannot compete with electric utilities in developed countries, and, apart from international electricity trading, are mostly focused on their domestic markets.

  5. Energy- and value added services in the electric power market in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsson, Peter

    2000-03-01

    This report tries to give a comprehensive picture of the offerings of energy- and value added services on the deregulated Swedish electric power market. A compilation of the service offerings from some 50 electric utilities is given. Market movements within deregulated sectors are treated with special emphasis on the electric power business

  6. The consumers' role in a de-regulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bye, Torstein; Doehl, Oeystein; Halvorsen, Bente; Larsen, Bodil M.; Larsson, Jan; Nesbakken, Runa

    2001-01-01

    The electricity market is market characterized by large price variations. This may have many causes, such as large variation of demand, large differences in the operating costs of the utilities or large variation in precipitation. Price variations caused by the supply side of the market may be counterbalanced by reducing consumption when the price is high, for example by using other energy sources, or by increasing consumption when the price is low

  7. Deregulation and sustainable energy supply: perspectives of nuclear power and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the concept expressed by the Brundtland Commission and in the Rio Declaration, sustainability incorporates the need - contradictory at first sight - to make sparing use of the environment and promote economic and social development at the same time. Future generations must not be stripped of their possibilities to live and develop. In this comprehensive interpretation, some quantitative orientation for various energy options can be obtained by means of lifetime analyses. The parameters available for evaluation are resource, environmental and economic aspects. Introducing competition and deregulation in the power industry is legitimate not only for reasons of economic theory. Experience has shown that efficient growth and careful management of scarce resources are achieved not by government planning and regulation, but by the allocation efficiency of the markets. This makes competition a key factor of sustainable development. Against this background, perspectives of nuclear power and of renewable energy sources are evaluated. (orig.) [de

  8. A new cascade NN based method to short-term load forecast in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouhi, Sajjad; Keynia, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We are proposed a new hybrid cascaded NN based method and WT to short-term load forecast in deregulated electricity market. • An efficient preprocessor consist of normalization and shuffling of signals is presented. • In order to select the best inputs, a two-stage feature selection is presented. • A new cascaded structure consist of three cascaded NNs is used as forecaster. - Abstract: Short-term load forecasting (STLF) is a major discussion in efficient operation of power systems. The electricity load is a nonlinear signal with time dependent behavior. The area of electricity load forecasting has still essential need for more accurate and stable load forecast algorithm. To improve the accuracy of prediction, a new hybrid forecast strategy based on cascaded neural network is proposed for STLF. This method is consists of wavelet transform, an intelligent two-stage feature selection, and cascaded neural network. The feature selection is used to remove the irrelevant and redundant inputs. The forecast engine is composed of three cascaded neural network (CNN) structure. This cascaded structure can be efficiently extract input/output mapping function of the nonlinear electricity load data. Adjustable parameters of the intelligent feature selection and CNN is fine-tuned by a kind of cross-validation technique. The proposed STLF is tested on PJM and New York electricity markets. It is concluded from the result, the proposed algorithm is a robust forecast method

  9. Improving firm performance in out-of-equilibrium, deregulated markets using feedback simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.; Larsen, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    Deregulation has reshaped the utility sector in many countries around the world. Organisations in these deregulated industries must adopt new polices which guide strategic decisions, in an uncertain and unfamiliar environment, that determine the short- and long-term fate of their companies. Traditional economic equilibrium models do not adequately address the issues facing these organisations in the shift towards deregulated market competition. Equilibrium assumptions break down in the out-of-equilibrium transition to competitive markets, and therefore different underpinning assumptions must be adopted in order to guide management in these periods. Simulation models incorporating information feedback through behavioural policies fill the void left by equilibrium models and support strategic policy analysis in out-of-equilibrium markets. As an example, we present a feedback simulation model developed to examine firm and industry level performance consequences of new generation capacity investment policies in the deregulated UK electricity sector. The model explicitly captures behavioural decision polices of boundedly rational managers and avoids equilibrium assumptions. Such models are essential to help managers evaluate the performance impact of various strategic policies in environments in which disequilibrum behaviour dominates. (Author)

  10. U.S. Banking Deregulation and Emerging Market Loans: Potential Links and Evidence, 1984~2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Koo Cho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available How did the deregulation of U.S. bank activities affect the patterns of cross-border lending to emerging economies? Unlike bank lending from Europe or Japan, U.S. bank lending to emerging economies exhibited increasing volatility over time. Using U.S. cross-border bank exposure data, this study identifies a temporal association between important deregulation initiatives and the volatility of U.S. bank emerging market lending. This association is explained by the linkages between an important outcome of bank deregulation-earnings volatility from diversified bank activities-and the rising volatility. Together, it argues that U.S. banking deregulation had unanticipated effects of exacerbating the volatility of bank lending to emerging economies.

  11. Basic Studies on Chaotic Characteristics of Electric Power Market Price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuya; Miyauchi, Hajime; Kita, Toshihiro

    Recently, deregulation and reform of electric power utilities have been progressing in many parts of the world. In Japan, partial deregulation has been started from generation sector since 1995 and partial deregulation of retail sector is executed through twice law revisions. Through the deregulation, because electric power is traded in the market and its price is always fluctuated, it is important for the electric power business to analyze and predict the price. Although the price data of the electric power market is time series data, it is not always proper to analyze by the linear model such as ARMA because the price sometimes changes suddenly. Therefore, in this paper, we apply the methods of chaotic time series analysis, one of non-linear analysis methods, and investigate the chaotic characteristics of the system price of JEPX.

  12. Pricing behaviour of pharmacies after market deregulation for OTC drugs: the case of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stargardt, Tom; Schreyögg, Jonas; Busse, Reinhard

    2007-11-01

    To examine the price reactions of German pharmacies to changes made to OTC drug regulations in 2004. Prior to these changes, regulations guaranteed identical prices in all German pharmacies. Two years after market deregulation, 256 pharmacies were surveyed to determine the retail prices of five selected OTC drugs. A probit regression model was used to identify factors that increased the likelihood of price changes. In addition, 409 pharmacy consumers were interviewed to gather information on their knowledge of the regulatory changes and to better explain consumer behaviour. Data was collected on a total of 1215 prices. Two years after deregulation, 23.1% of the participating pharmacies had modified the price of at least one of the five OTCs included in our study. However, in total, only 7.5% of the prices differed from their pre-deregulation level. The probit model showed that population density and the geographic concentration of pharmacies were significantly associated with price changes. Interestingly, the association with the geographic concentration of pharmacies was negative. The consumer survey revealed that 47.1% of those interviewed were aware of the deregulation. Our findings indicate that, two years after deregulation, very few pharmacies had made use of individual pricing strategies; price competition between pharmacies in Germany is thus taking place only a very small scale.

  13. UPFC Location and Performance Analysis in Deregulated Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abbas Taher

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We deal with the effect of Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC installation on the objective function of an electricity market. Also this paper proposes a Novel UPFC modelling in OPF which facilities the consideration of the impact of four factors on power market. These include the series transformer impedance addition, the shunt reactive power injection, the in-phase component of the series voltage and the quadrature component of the series voltage. The impact of each factor on the electricity market objective function is measured and then compared with the results from a sensitivity approach. The proposed sensitivity approach is fast so it does not need to repeat OPF solutions. The total impacts of the factors are used to offer UPFC insertion candidate points. It is shown that there is a clear match between the candidate points of the sensitivity method and those proposed by the introduced UPFC modelling in our test case. Furthermore, based on the proposed method, the relation between settings of UPFC series part and active and reactive power spot prices is presented.

  14. Neural networks approach to forecast several hour ahead electricity prices and loads in deregulated market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Paras; Senjyu, Tomonobu [Department of Electrical and Electronics, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nagakami Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Funabashi, Toshihisa [Meidensha Corporation, Tokyo 103-8515 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    In daily power markets, forecasting electricity prices and loads are the most essential task and the basis for any decision making. An approach to predict the market behaviors is to use the historical prices, loads and other required information to forecast the future prices and loads. This paper introduces an approach for several hour ahead (1-6h) electricity price and load forecasting using an artificial intelligence method, such as a neural network model, which uses publicly available data from the NEMMCO web site to forecast electricity prices and loads for the Victorian electricity market. An approach of selection of similar days is proposed according to which the load and price curves are forecasted by using the information of the days being similar to that of the forecast day. A Euclidean norm with weighted factors is used for the selection of the similar days. Two different ANN models, one for one to six hour ahead load forecasting and another for one to six hour ahead price forecasting have been proposed. The MAPE (mean absolute percentage error) results show a clear increasing trend with the increase in hour ahead load and price forecasting. The sample average of MAPEs for one hour ahead price forecasts is 9.75%. This figure increases to only 20.03% for six hour ahead predictions. Similarly, the one to six hour ahead load forecast errors (MAPE) range from 0.56% to 1.30% only. MAPE results show that several hour ahead electricity prices and loads in the deregulated Victorian market can be forecasted with reasonable accuracy. (author)

  15. Neural networks approach to forecast several hour ahead electricity prices and loads in deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Paras; Senjyu, Tomonobu; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    2006-01-01

    In daily power markets, forecasting electricity prices and loads are the most essential task and the basis for any decision making. An approach to predict the market behaviors is to use the historical prices, loads and other required information to forecast the future prices and loads. This paper introduces an approach for several hour ahead (1-6 h) electricity price and load forecasting using an artificial intelligence method, such as a neural network model, which uses publicly available data from the NEMMCO web site to forecast electricity prices and loads for the Victorian electricity market. An approach of selection of similar days is proposed according to which the load and price curves are forecasted by using the information of the days being similar to that of the forecast day. A Euclidean norm with weighted factors is used for the selection of the similar days. Two different ANN models, one for one to six hour ahead load forecasting and another for one to six hour ahead price forecasting have been proposed. The MAPE (mean absolute percentage error) results show a clear increasing trend with the increase in hour ahead load and price forecasting. The sample average of MAPEs for one hour ahead price forecasts is 9.75%. This figure increases to only 20.03% for six hour ahead predictions. Similarly, the one to six hour ahead load forecast errors (MAPE) range from 0.56% to 1.30% only. MAPE results show that several hour ahead electricity prices and loads in the deregulated Victorian market can be forecasted with reasonable accuracy

  16. Nuclear power and deregulation in the United Kingdom. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.

    2001-01-01

    This article (Chapter Three) reviews the development of the British nuclear industry and the country's experience with privatised and liberalized electricity markets - an experience that is much earlier than Canada's. The U.K. industry is of special interest because a British firm, British Energy, has leased the Bruce A and B nuclear stations until 2018. This article tries to explain how the economic transformation of nuclear power has been achieved, and why nuclear power and a competitive electricity market are so hard to reconcile. The article gives a brief history of nuclear power in Britain up to 1987; a summary of the main events relating to nuclear power; a discussion of why nuclear power could not be privatised in 1990, but could be in 1996; examines the improvements in cost and competitiveness since 1990; a discussion of the issues surrounding the discharge of nuclear liabilities; the future for British Energy, Britain's leading nuclear company, and nuclear power in Britain; and finally, changes to other nuclear companies in Britain

  17. Conference Proceedings: Effectively utilizing energy derivatives in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This conference was devoted to a discussion about the likely impacts of deregulation on electricity markets in North America. Many of the presentations emphasized price risk in a competitive open access energy market. It was noted that deregulation is frequently associated with the creation of larger companies, higher risks and lower costs. Some of the individual topics addressed by the speakers included discussion of : (1) how underlying physical markets will work in Ontario, (2) experiences in derivative trading in the natural gas industry, (3) how to create value through multiple commodity risk management products, (4) trading with energy derivatives in the U.S. (5) how derivatives can add value for municipal electrical utilities, and (6) risk management mechanisms for energy derivative trading. refs., tabs., figs

  18. Evaluation on Influence of Unstable Primary-Energy Price in a Deregulated Electric Power Market—Analysis based on a simulation model approach—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitani, Tatsuyuki; Tezuka, Tetsuo

    The electric power market of Japan has been locally monopolized for a long time. But, like many countries, Japan is moving forward with the deregulation of its electric power industry so that any power generation company could sell electric power in the market. The power price, however, will fluctuate inevitably to balance the power supply and demand. A new appropriate market design is indispensable when introducing new market mechanisms in the electric power market to avoid undesirable results of the market. The first stage of deregulation will be the competition between an existing large-scaled power utility and a new power generation company. In this paper we have investigated the wholesale market with competition of these two power companies based on a simulation model approach. Under the competitive situation the effects of exogenous disturbance may bring serious results and we estimated the influence on the market when the price of fossil fuel rises. The conclusion of this study is that several types of Nash equilibriums have been found in the market: the larger the new power generation company becomes, the higher the electricity price under the Nash equilibriums rises. Because of the difference in their structure of generation capacity, the existing large-scaled power utility gets more profit while the new power generation company loses its profit when the price of fossil fuel rises.

  19. Retail gas markets - a case of regulated deregulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, T.

    2001-01-01

    While much has been said recently on the introduction of full retail contestability in Australia's gas markets, the process is far from over. The General Manager (Retail) with Origin Energy-and a new addition to the Australian Gas Association Board-provides an overview of the process to date, and how it might progress in the future. He concluded that in Australia, the retail gas market is relatively small and the processes initiated to achieve full retail competition are still largely fragmented across jurisdictions. These factors have potential to generate costs which could severely dent, if not exceed the anticipated benefit of competition

  20. Deregulation of the electric power market and chances of ecopolicy-based regulatory action. Report on the symposium organised by Forschungsstelle Umweltrecht at Hamburg University on June 2, 1994; Liberalisierung des Strommarktes und die Chancen fuer umweltpolitische Steuerungen. Bericht ueber das Symposium der Forschungsstelle Umweltrecht an der Universitaet Hamburg am 2. Juni 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, A [Freiherr-vom-Stein-Institut, Muenster (Germany)

    1994-08-01

    The report briefly discusses each paper presented at the symposium. Eleven experts from academia, administration and the power industry have been ventilating the various models of reform for deregulation of the electric power market currently under debate at national and international level, and the possibilities available under these models for ecopolicy-based regulatory activities for avoiding adverse effects on the environment. Other topics discussed addressed framework conditions to be defined for the reform models on the basis of constitutional laws, and rules of competition. (orig.) [Deutsch] Elf Experten aus Wissenschaft, Verwaltung und Energiewirtschaft eroertern die zur Zeit auf nationaler und internationaler Ebene diskutierten Reformmodelle fuer eine Liberalisierung des Strommarktes sowie die mit diesen jeweils verbundenen Moeglichkeiten der umweltpolitischen Steuerung von oekologischen Folgewirkungen. Weitere Themen des Symposions waren die wettbewerbs- und verfassungsrechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen einer Deregulierung des Strommarktes. Der Bericht behandelt in kurzer Form alle beim Symposion gehaltenen Referate. (orig.)

  1. New trends in electricity sales on deregulated markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svercek, M.

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the influence of the e-sales on the market is made. Seven critical factors for the success are outlined, namely: community offerings, connectivity, customer care, communication, convenience, content, customization. Examples for the application of the e-sales in Europe are given and expected trends are discussed

  2. New trends in electricity sales on deregulated markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svercek, M [AT Kearney, (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    An analysis of the influence of the e-sales on the market is made. Seven critical factors for the success are outlined, namely: community offerings, connectivity, customer care, communication, convenience, content, customization. Examples for the application of the e-sales in Europe are given and expected trends are discussed.

  3. Deregulation of the energy industry in the United States : access conditions to the American market and business opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcoux, D.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of deregulation in the North American electricity market on the energy industry in Quebec was discussed. Increased competition, a direct result of deregulation, can lead to open markets for Quebec utilities. It is expected that Quebec utilities such as Hydro-Quebec and Gaz-Metropolitain will profit from an open market since consumers will have the choice of electricity suppliers that will best suit their needs. Open markets enabling Hydro-Quebec to sell at market prices in the American market present tremendous opportunities for Quebec utilities, especially in view of the lower production costs, the accumulated knowledge about energy markets, and their aggressive policy to form constructive partnerships.. Figs

  4. TCSC based automatic generation control of deregulated power system using quasi-oppositional harmony search algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Nandi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In present aspect, automatic generation control (AGC of deregulated power system with thyristor controlled series compensator (TCSC device is investigated. The objective is to discuss bilateral power transaction issue with the TCSC effect. A deregulated two-area power system model having two thermal units in each control area is considered for this act. A quasi-oppositional harmony search (QOHS algorithm is being applied for the constrained optimization problem. Three cases, commonly studied in deregulation, are discussed for the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Further, sensitivity analysis is studied by varying the test system parameters up to ±25% from their rated values. The obtained simulation plots are analytically discussed with the calculation of oscillatory modes, transient details and the studied performance indices. Sugeno fuzzy logic control technique is also investigated to the studied test system. The simulation results show that the proposed QOHS based TCSC controller is quite effective in deregulated environment.

  5. Nuclear energy faced with the deregulation of the electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleski, C.P.; Meritet, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we present a study of the likely development of nuclear power in the world between now and 2030. We consider in particular the impact on nuclear's development of the introduction of competition between electricity producers, while noting that in any case, the role of public authorities will remain important. In this analysis, we present economic elements related to nuclear power as well as to its main competitors, coal-fired and natural gas-fired power. We discuss the risks that an investor must take into account when he commits to construction of a power plant operating in base-load mode. Finally, we consider the cases of a few countries that are key to nuclear power development, since situations vary widely between countries. (authors)

  6. Assessment for feasibility and pricing of wheeling transactions under deregulated environment of power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yog Raj Sood; Narayana Prasad Padhy; Hari Om Gupta

    2004-01-01

    Many transactions of electrical power are expected to take place due to deregulation of electrical power industry. It is important for independent power producers, independent system operator and bulk power consumers (load centers) to know and select the least cost transaction among all the feasible transactions. In this paper, selection of best possible wheeling transaction in a deregulated power system has been determined based on available transfer capability and short run marginal cost. The proposed algorithm has been tested and analyzed for IEEE-30 bus test system and hence applied to South African power industry, the results so obtained are found to be of very much practical use. (author)

  7. AGC of a multi-area power system under deregulated environment using redox flow batteries and interline power flow controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasichandra Sekhar Gorripotu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Proportional Integral Derivative with Filter (PIDF is proposed for Automatic Generation Control (AGC of a multi-area power system in deregulated environment. Initially, a two area four units thermal system without any physical constraints is considered and the gains of the PIDF controller are optimized employing Differential Evolution (DE algorithm using ITAE criterion. The superiority of proposed DE optimized PIDF controller over Fuzzy Logic controller is demonstrated. Then, to further improve the system performance, an Interline Power Flow Controller (IPFC is placed in the tie-line and Redox Flow Batteries (RFB is considered in the first area and the controller parameters are tuned. Additionally, to get an accurate insight of the AGC problem, important physical constraints such as Time Delay (TD and Generation Rate Constraints (GRC are considered and the controller parameters are retuned. The performance of proposed controller is evaluated under different operating conditions that take place in a deregulated power market. Further, the proposed approach is extended to a two area six units hydro thermal system. Finally, sensitivity analysis is performed by varying the system parameters and operating load conditions from their nominal values.

  8. Essays on pricing electricity and electricity derivatives in deregulated markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Julia

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation is composed of four essays on the behavior of wholesale electricity prices and their derivatives. The first essay provides an empirical model that takes into account the spatial features of a transmission network on the electricity market. The spatial structure of the transmission grid plays a key role in determining electricity prices, but it has not been incorporated into previous empirical models. The econometric model in this essay incorporates a simple representation of the transmission system into a spatial panel data model of electricity prices, and also accounts for the effect of dynamic transmission system constraints on electricity market integration. Empirical results using PJM data confirm the existence of spatial patterns in electricity prices and show that spatial correlation diminishes as transmission lines become more congested. The second essay develops and empirically tests a model of the influence of natural gas storage inventories on the electricity forward premium. I link a model of the effect of gas storage constraints on the higher moments of the distribution of electricity prices to a model of the effect of those moments on the forward premium. Empirical results using PJM data support the model's predictions that gas storage inventories sharply reduce the electricity forward premium when demand for electricity is high and space-heating demand for gas is low. The third essay examines the efficiency of PJM electricity markets. A market is efficient if prices reflect all relevant information, so that prices follow a random walk. The hypothesis of random walk is examined using empirical tests, including the Portmanteau, Augmented Dickey-Fuller, KPSS, and multiple variance ratio tests. The results are mixed though evidence of some level of market efficiency is found. The last essay investigates the possibility that previous researchers have drawn spurious conclusions based on classical unit root tests incorrectly applied to

  9. Deregulated electricity markets with thermal losses and production bounds: models and optimality conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aussel, D.; Červinka, Michal; Marechal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2016), s. 19-38 ISSN 0399-0559 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/12/1309; GA ČR GA201/09/1957 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Deregulated electricity market * production bounds * mathematical program with complementarity constraints * M-stationarity * calmness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.550, year: 2016

  10. Risk classification and cream skimming on the deregulated German insurance market

    OpenAIRE

    Beschorner, Patrick F. E.

    2003-01-01

    In a two-stage model insurance companies first decide upon risk classification and then compete in prices. I show that the observed heterogeneous behavior of similar firms is compatible with rational behavior. On the deregulated German insurance market individual application of classification schemes induces welfare losses due to cream skimming. Classification costs and pricing above marginal cost can be prevented by common industry-wide loss statistics which already exist to a rudimentary ex...

  11. Market Power in Hydro-Thermal Supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edin, Karl-Axel

    2006-12-01

    Despite having had a deregulated electricity market in Sweden for over ten years we still need to increase our understanding as to how deregulated electricity markets actually work and how possible problems are to be solved. One question that is always in focus is if the competition between generators in the Nordic electricity market really works the way it was intended. Many argue that the concentration in ownership of generation plants already has gone too far. Together with joint ownership in nuclear facilities and barriers for entrance, critics say that this has resulted in higher electricity prices than necessary. In this report different methods to (ex ante) study potential possibilities for generating firms to influence the electricity price (market power) and (ex post) discover possible manipulation through analysing the spot price and other observed factors on the electricity market are analysed. The purpose of the longer underlying paper is to give a comprehensive treatment of the electricity market with storage, i.e. hydro power, with an auction market organisation and to test the models on the Nordic market in order to explore the explanatory power of auction market theory and the theory of contestable market. The main theoretical effort in the paper concerns auction theory with inventories. The paper develops an inter-temporal auction model of a thermal-hydro power market. Parallel to the derivation of the basic equations a numerical model is developed in order to illustrate the results of the model. Section 2 of the present paper summarizes the basic equations (derived in the longer paper) for an inter-temporal auction thermal-hydro market. Section 3 contains the illustrations of solutions to equations for some stylized markets. In section 4 the auction model is tested on the Nordic market

  12. Power Markets. Creating a regional power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, K.; Belin, H.

    2009-01-01

    One article and one column in the section 'Power markets'. In the article attention is paid to the leading role of the Netherlands in the pursuit of a fully integrated North West European electricity market. the column 'View from Brussels' focuses on the 'Sustainable Energy Europe' campaign and the related EU Sustainable Energy Week in February 2009

  13. Electricity price forecasting in deregulated markets: A review and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Sanjeev Kumar; Saini, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Ashwani [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra, Haryana (India)

    2009-01-15

    The main methodologies used in electricity price forecasting have been reviewed in this paper. The following price-forecasting techniques have been covered: (i) stochastic time series, (ii) causal models, and (iii) artificial intelligence based models. The quantitative analysis of the work done by various authors has been presented based on (a) time horizon for prediction, (b) input variables, (c) output variables, (d) results, (e) data points used for analysis, (f) preprocessing technique employed, and (g) architecture of the model. The results have been presented in the form of tables for ease of comparison. Classification of various price-influencing factors used by different researchers has been done and put for reference. Application of various models as applied to different electricity markets is also presented for consideration. (author)

  14. Electricity price forecasting in deregulated markets: A review and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Sanjeev Kumar; Saini, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Ashwani

    2009-01-01

    The main methodologies used in electricity price forecasting have been reviewed in this paper. The following price-forecasting techniques have been covered: (i) stochastic time series, (ii) causal models, and (iii) artificial intelligence based models. The quantitative analysis of the work done by various authors has been presented based on (a) time horizon for prediction, (b) input variables, (c) output variables, (d) results, (e) data points used for analysis, (f) preprocessing technique employed, and (g) architecture of the model. The results have been presented in the form of tables for ease of comparison. Classification of various price-influencing factors used by different researchers has been done and put for reference. Application of various models as applied to different electricity markets is also presented for consideration. (author)

  15. Deregulation, market structure and gas prices in the Canadian Natural Gas Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhler, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    During the course of the development of the natural gas industry in Canada, gas purchase and sales markets have evolved from being relatively free of regulation to being highly regulated and back again. Though pipeline transport charges were regulated, the pipeline companies, or their subsidiaries, owned the gas that they transported and price and other provisions of purchase and sales contracts were freely negotiated with the producers at one end and distributing utilities or industrial users at the other end. The Western Accord of 1985 set the process of deregulation of the Canadian natural gas industry in motion. On November 1, 1986, natural gas prices in interprovincial trade were deregulated in that domestic natural gas prices were to be freely negotiated. Although not stated explicitly, government policy is to permit export prices to be freely negotiated so long as they do not fall below domestic prices. The deregulation process has dramatically changed the relationship between buyers and sellers. Of particular importance is that deregulation has permitted companies to negotiate gas purchase contracts directly with producers with the pipeline company acting solely as a gas transporter. The purpose of this paper is to examine the forces that have led to shorter term contracts and to examine the likely effect of these contract terms on reservoir development investment incentives. 5 refs., 3 figs

  16. Do acquisitions by electric utility companies create value? Evidence from deregulated markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Jo; Goto, Mika; Inoue, Kotaro

    2017-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the United Kingdom (the UK) initiated widespread reforms in the electricity industry through a series of market liberalization policies. Several other countries have subsequently followed the lead and restructured their electricity industry. A major outcome of the deregulation effort is the spate of takeovers, both domestic and global, by electric utility companies. With the entry of new players and increasing competition, the business environment of the electricity industry has changed dramatically. This study analyzes the economic impact of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the electric utility industry after deregulation. We have examined acquisitions that took place between 1998 and 2013 in the United States, Canada, the UK, Germany, and France. Although previous studies showed no evidence of a positive effect on acquiring firms through M&As, we find that acquisitions by electric utility companies increased the acquiring firms’ share value and improved their operating performance, primarily through efficiency gains after the deregulation. These results are consistent with the empirical evidence and implications presented by Andrade et al. (2001) that M&A created value for the shareholders of the acquiring and target combined firms. - Highlights: • This study examined mergers and acquisitions (M&A) in electric utility industry. • The sample covered M&A between 1998 and 2013 in North America and Europe. • We found M&A significantly increased acquiring firms’ share value and operating performance. • Deregulation policy realized gains for shareholders without incurring costs for consumers.

  17. Less Government is Good Government? Deregulation as an Undermining Principle of Financial Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Engartner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Since liberalization became the dominant global narrative the stock response to market shortcomings has been to “slim down” the state and deregulate. In most countries the slogan of “less government is good government” has become a constitutive feature of economic policy since the 1980s. Markets lie at the heart of every successful economy, and despite not necessarily working well on their own, the economic policy of deregulation has been one of the most persistent currents in the global economy. Based as it is on classical liberalism and – at least in its origins and leanings – neoclassical theory, deregulation aims to minimize the influence of the state. But in the context of the current financial and economic meltdown – the worst economic dislocation since the Great Crash of 1929-32 – “downsizing” the state causes growing turmoil. Global networking has made financial markets much more volatile and therefore much more susceptible to crisis.

  18. Evaluation of nodal reliability risk in a deregulated power system with photovoltaic power penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the intermittent characteristic of solar radiation, power system reliability may be affected with high photovoltaic (PV) power penetration. To reduce large variation of PV power, additional system balancing reserve would be needed. In deregulated power systems, deployment of reserves...... and customer reliability requirements are correlated with energy and reserve prices. Therefore a new method should be developed to evaluate the impacts of PV power on customer reliability and system reserve deployment in the new environment. In this study, a method based on the pseudo-sequential Monte Carlo...... simulation technique has been proposed to evaluate the reserve deployment and customers' nodal reliability with high PV power penetration. The proposed method can effectively model the chronological aspects and stochastic characteristics of PV power and system operation with high computation efficiency...

  19. Reliability constrained generation expansion planning with consideration of wind farms uncertainties in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmati, Reza; Hooshmand, Rahmat-Allah; Khodabakhshian, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Generation expansion planning is presented in deregulated electricity market. • Wind farm uncertainty is modeled in the problem. • The profit of each GENCO is maximized and also the safe operation of system is satisfied. • Salve sector is managed as an optimization programming and solved by using PSO technique. • Master sector is considered in pool market and Cournot model is used to simulate it. - Abstract: This paper addresses reliability constrained generation expansion planning (GEP) in the presence of wind farm uncertainty in deregulated electricity market. The proposed GEP aims at maximizing the expected profit of all generation companies (GENCOs), while considering security and reliability constraints such as reserve margin and loss of load expectation (LOLE). Wind farm uncertainty is also considered in the planning and GENCOs denote their planning in the presence of wind farm uncertainty. The uncertainty is modeled by probability distribution function (PDF) and Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS) is used to insert uncertainty into the problem. The proposed GEP is a constrained, nonlinear, mixed-integer optimization programming and solved by using particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. In this paper, Electricity market structure is modeled as a pool market. Simulation results verify the effectiveness and validity of the proposed planning for maximizing GENCOs profit in the presence of wind farms uncertainties in electricity market

  20. The electricity customer's lot. The status of the deregulated Finnish electricity market - Consequences for the customer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.E.; Pakkanen, M.; Muroma, M.

    2004-09-01

    Since November 1998 a 'fully competitive supply market' has arguably been in operation in Finland, whereby all types of customer are able to purchase their electricity from the supplier of their choice. During the years since deregulation there has been much and increasing discussion and speculation about the consequences of competition for customers. This independent research report objectively considers the consequences of competition so far in the supply market from the point of view of the electricity customer (residential, industrial and commercial customers). The report additionally highlights successes, failures and areas for future improvement. The report combines existing data from a wide range of sources with original empirical data collected specifically for this report. Original empirical data was derived primarily from questionnaire responses from 1393 household customers and 281 I and C customers. In- depth interviews were also extensively conducted with electricity industry and consumer representatives. The report finds that although there have been achievements, and all customers may have benefited in at least some way, the overall net picture is one of disappointing neutrality and missed opportunities. In fact the report suggests that deregulation has neither led to extensive competition amongst suppliers, nor extensive benefits for customers. Customer awareness, prices, service quality, additional offerings, environmentalism, equality and fairness have apparently not fared particularly well as a result of deregulation, except perhaps for the largest or most active customers. As a result of the situation, customers are mostly rather negative towards the state of competition in Finland at present. The report nevertheless identifies the great potential within the deregulated electricity market. In particular, the report identifies a clear need for increased awareness amongst customers and points out many other known barriers to effective competition

  1. Deregulation in an energy market and its impact on R and D for low-carbon energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Minoru

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of deregulation in an energy market on R and D activities for new energy technology when climate policy is implemented. A model of growth with vertical innovation is modified by including an oligopolistic energy supply sector for demonstrating to what extent deregulation in the energy supply sector will affect R and D activities for low-carbon energy technology, provided that carbon taxation is implemented. The analysis shows that, when the elasticity of substitution between input factors is less than unity, deregulation will drive energy R and D activities and reduce CO 2 accumulation if the energy market is highly concentrated in the beginning. (author)

  2. A smooth transition logit model of the effects of deregulation in the electricity market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurn, A. Stan; Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    2016-01-01

    of the model are derived along with their asymptotic properties, together with a Lagrange multiplier test of the null hypothesis of linearity in the underlying latent index. The development of the STL model is motivated by the desire to assess the impact of deregulation in the Queensland electricity market...... and ascertain whether increased competition has resulted in significant changes in the behaviour of the spot price of electricity, specifically with respect to the occurrence of periodic abnormally high prices. The model allows the timing of any change to be endogenously determined and also market participants...

  3. I.T., Optimized energy systems and new customer services. The deregulated electricity market and the Ronneby case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, U

    1999-03-01

    This thesis concerns the utilization of information technology to obtain optimized energy systems and the increasing dependence on IT applications within the power industry in general, and especially within electricity. Based on energy system optimizations, industrial simulations, interviews and literature surveys, the thesis concludes that information technology is a condition for optimized energy systems. Through large-scale load control, enabled by IT, the energy system cost for supplying a local energy system can be reduced considerably. Diurnal energy system optimizations further illustrate the increased utilization of load control, accentuated, when customers are exposed to the variations of the spot market price. Thereby, the increased need for load management on a deregulated market, where real time pricing is applied, is mirrored. However, given the boundary conditions of the deregulated electricity market, optimization of energy systems is no condition for competitiveness within electricity sales. This study also points out that, apart from industrial customers, other market actors, like electricity sales companies and local distributors, have few incentives to introduce load control. Distributors mainly lose money on power reducing measures, except for when there are distribution limitations. Neither do electricity sales companies make short-term earnings from large-scale load control. The combination with small economic savings for residential customers make the financing of large-scale load control problematic. Regarding electricity sales companies, increased IT utilization is observed to enable marketing and service offerings on the Internet, and IT-based value-added services (VAS). For pure communication services, the sales companies utilize IT to offer telephone services (analogue technique) and Internet access, the latter is sometimes performed on the electricity grid. Extended IT-systems for customer administration, customer service, and market

  4. Data modeling and processing in deregulated power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin

    The introduction of open electricity markets and the fast pace of changes brought by modern information technology bring both opportunities and challenges to the power industry. Vast quantities of data are generated by the underlying physical system and the business operations. Fast and low cost communications allow the data to be more widely accessed. For electric utilities, it is becoming clear that data and information are vital assets. Proper management and modeling of these assets is as essential to the engineering of the power system as is the underlying physical system. This dissertation introduces several new methods to address information modeling and data processing concerns in the new utility environment. Presently, legacy information systems in the industry do not make adequate use of the data produced. Hence, a new information infrastructure using data warehousing---a data integration technology used for decision support---is proposed for novel management and utilization of data. Detailed examples and discussion are given on the schema building, extract transform and load (ETL) strategies for power system specific data. The benefits of this approach are shown through a new viewpoint of state estimation. Inaccurate grid information, especially topology information, can be a major detriment to energy market traders' ability to make appropriate bids. A two-stage DC state estimation algorithm is presented to provide them with a simpler data viewpoint to make knowledgeable trading decisions. Numerical results show how the results of a DC state estimator can be accurately made available to all concerned. Additionally, the proposed communication and information infrastructure allow for new formulations and solutions to traditional power problems. In this vein, a new distributed communication model of the power system using publisher/subscriber paradigm is presented and simulated. The simulation results prove its feasibility and show it has adequate

  5. Measuring and testing natural gas and electricity markets volatility : evidence from Alberta's deregulated markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, A.; Shahmoradi, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Economics

    2005-03-01

    A number of innovative methods for modelling spot wholesale electricity prices have recently been developed. However, these models have primarily used a univariate time series approach to the analysis of electricity prices. This paper specified and estimated a multivariate GARCH-M model of natural gas and electricity price changes and their volatilities, using data over the deregulated period between January 1996 to November 2004 from Alberta's spot power and natural gas markets. The primary objective of the model was to investigate the relationship between electricity and natural gas prices. It was noted that the model allows for the possibilities of spillovers and asymmetries in the variance-covariance structure for natural gas and electricity price changes, and also for the separate examination of the effects of the volatility of anticipated and unanticipated changes in natural gas and electricity prices. Section 2 of the paper provided a description of the model used to test for causality between natural gas and electricity price changes, while section 3 discussed the data and presented the empirical results. It was concluded that there is a bidirectional causality between natural gas and electricity price changes. However, neither anticipated nor unanticipated natural gas price volatility causes electricity price changes. Anticipated electricity price volatility has a causal effect on natural gas. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  6. Blemished image? Results of an Emnid study into the effects of recent spent fuel cask transports and the deregulation of the energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinzmann, U.

    1998-01-01

    Have the radioactivity leaks from spent nuclear fuel casks conveyed to waste management sites in Germany left a stain on the image of the electric power companies? The Bielefeld-based Emnid Institute, unit for energy market research, carried out an opinion poll among the population late in May and again in mid-June 1998, in oder to find out whether the leaking casks have blemished the image of the nuclear power industry. Another aspect inquired was the expectations of the population in connection with the deregulation of the electric power market. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Free Market Ideology and Deregulation in Colorado’s Oilfields: Evidence for triple movement activism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Stephanie A.; Mayer, Adam; Shreeve, Kelly; Olson-Hazboun, Shawn K.; Adgate, John

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional oil and gas extraction (UOGE) has spurred an unprecedented boom in on-shore production in the U.S. Despite a surge in related research, a void exists regarding inquiries into policy outcomes and perceptions. To address this, support for federal regulatory exemptions for UOGE is examined using survey data collected in 2015 from two northern Colorado communities. Current regulatory exemptions for UOGE can be understood as components of broader societal processes of neoliberalization. Free market ideology increases public support for federal regulatory exemptions for UOGE. Perceived negative impacts do not necessarily drive people to support increased federal regulation. Utilizing neo-Polanyian theory, interaction between free market ideology and perceived negative impacts is explored. Free market ideology appears to moderate people’s views of regulation: increasing the effect of perceived negative impacts while simultaneously increasing support for deregulation. To conclude, the ways in which free market ideology might normalize the impacts of UOGE activity are discussed. PMID:29225425

  8. Energy- and value added services in the electric power market in Sweden; Energi- och mervaerdestjaenster paa elmarknaden i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsson, Peter

    2000-03-01

    This report tries to give a comprehensive picture of the offerings of energy- and value added services on the deregulated Swedish electric power market. A compilation of the service offerings from some 50 electric utilities is given. Market movements within deregulated sectors are treated with special emphasis on the electric power business.

  9. A novel quasi-oppositional harmony search algorithm for AGC optimization of three-area multi-unit power system after deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Kumar Shiva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work addresses a decentralized, well tested three-area multi-unit power system for its automatic generation control (AGC after deregulation which is characterized by price-based market operation. To match with the actual deregulated environment, as prevailing in the real one, the market structure is kept generic enough enabling to capture all possibilities occurring in real-time day-to-day power environment. In accordance to the modifications, as done in the investigated three-area power system model, the concerned objective is to intensify the deregulated AGC operation followed by load disturbances. At the present platform, three different classes of case study results are postulated for the studied test system. The first two illustrate the behavior of unilateral and bilateral based power contract transactions while the third one considers the contract violation case as it exists in present time. The contractual agreement, instituted by DISCO participation matrix, is initialized to address the power transaction contracts. In this work, a novel quasi-oppositional harmony search (QOHS algorithm is explored and presented its significances in deregulated AGC operation. In the second phase of investigation, fast acting Sugeno fuzzy logic technique is explored for on-line, off-nominal operating conditions. For analysis purpose, both the qualitative and the quantitative aspects of the proposed QOHS are presented in reference to genetic algorithm (GA. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis is also performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed QOHS based controller. Simulation work reveals that the proposed QOHS may be, effectively, worked out to order to improve the deregulated AGC performance. It is also being observed that the proposed QOHS outperforms the GA in sense of deregulated AGC operation of power system.

  10. Deregulation - a source of crisis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haavardstein, Hilde; Sandsmark, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, deregulation has become widespread in many of the worlds power markets. When it is no longer the authorities, but the players in the market who are deciding on investments in new production capacity, on the basis of business economic estimates of profitability, it is important that the external conditions are worked out such that they provide incentives to investments of the right extent and to the right time. Examples from deregulated markets show that the formulation of such external frames has contributed to a tight power balance

  11. Congestion management of deregulated power systems by optimal setting of Interline Power Flow Controller using Gravitational Search algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Mishra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In a deregulated electricity market it may at times become difficult to dispatch all the required power that is scheduled to flow due to congestion in transmission lines. An Interline Power Flow Controller (IPFC can be used to reduce the system loss and power flow in the heavily loaded line, improve stability and loadability of the system. This paper proposes a Disparity Line Utilization Factor for the optimal placement and Gravitational Search algorithm based optimal tuning of IPFC to control the congestion in transmission lines. DLUF ranks the transmission lines in terms of relative line congestion. The IPFC is accordingly placed in the most congested and the least congested line connected to the same bus. Optimal sizing of IPFC is carried using Gravitational Search algorithm. A multi-objective function has been chosen for tuning the parameters of the IPFC. The proposed method is implemented on an IEEE-30 bus test system. Graphical representations have been included in the paper showing reduction in LUF of the transmission lines after the placement of an IPFC. A reduction in active power and reactive power loss of the system by about 6% is observed after an optimally tuned IPFC has been included in the power system. The effectiveness of the proposed tuning method has also been shown in the paper through the reduction in the values of the objective functions.

  12. Electric power markets in Europe 1993; Elmarknaderna i Europa 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanson, K; Lublin, Z; Olofsdotter, A; Petsala, B; Wuolikainen, T

    1993-12-01

    The development of power markets in Europe is described. Special attention is devoted to the development in France, Germany, Denmark, Finland and Norway. The planned deregulation of the Swedish electric power market will promote an increased trade with electricity across the border. The possibilities and consequences of this trade is elucidated. Also given is a compilation of electric power prices for different groups of consumers, and the differences among European countries. 7 figs, 26 tabs

  13. Electricity prices in a competitive market: a preliminary analysis of the deregulated Thai electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipattanasomporn, M.; Ongsakul, W.; Pacudan, R.; Lefevre, T.

    2000-01-01

    The electricity industry throughout the world is currently undergoing a significant transition towards restructuring and deregulation. Following this new legislation, Thailand has initiated an institutional and structural reform with a belief that this could be the best way forward for the Thai electricity supply industry (ESI) to improve efficiency, lower electricity prices, and tackle financial debts. This paper presents an analysis of the extent to which prices for generation services in a competitive market may differ from regulated electricity prices, if competitive prices are based on marginal costs and regulated prices are based on average costs, by using Thailand as a case study. (Author)

  14. Power market competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the Unites States the prospect of greater competition in wholesale power market was immediately eclipsed by talk of retail competition. Attempts to move to retail competition have been costly and complex. Prudent public policy and economic analyses suggest that retail competition not be implemented until it can first be demonstrated that effective competition exists in wholesale power markets [it

  15. A hybrid DE–PS algorithm for load frequency control under deregulated power system with UPFC and RFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra Kumar Sahu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a Modified Integral Derivative (MID controller is proposed for Load Frequency Control (LFC of multi-area multi-source power system in deregulated environment. The multi-source power system is having different sources of power generation such as thermal, hydro, wind and diesel generating units considering boiler dynamics for thermal plants, Generation Rate Constraint (GRC and Governor Dead Band (GDB non-linearity. The superiority of proposed hybrid Differential Evolution and Pattern Search (hDE-PS optimized MID controller over GA and DE techniques is demonstrated. Further, the effectiveness of proposed hDE-PS optimized MID controller over Integral (I and Integral Derivative (ID controller is verified. Then, to further improve the system performance, Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC is placed in the tie-line and Redox Flow Batteries (RFBs are considered in the first area. The performance of proposed approach is evaluated at all possible power transactions that take place in a deregulated power market.

  16. Electric deregulation in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    An outline of the electric power deregulation activities across Canada, particularly in Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario, was presented. A central element of the restructuring is creation of a power pool which acts as an open spot market, and a transmission administrator that provides access to the generators, distribution companies, importers and exporters. Load forecasts, average daily load profile and hourly pool prices for TransAlta Corporation were presented as an example. 22 figs

  17. The power of Alberta business : the impact of electricity deregulation on Alberta small and medium-sized business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, C.; Kelly, D.

    2001-07-01

    Deregulation of the electricity market came into effect on January 1, 2001 in Alberta. This deregulation affects the retail and generation fields of electricity. The intention was to introduce competition and apply downward pressure on electricity prices, but the reverse effect was witnessed: power prices increased. It resulted in a period of anxiety on the part of businesses, caused by the volatility of electricity prices. A survey of Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) members was conducted in May and June 2001 to better understand the impacts of electricity deregulation on small and medium-sized businesses. A broad range of businesses provided responses (951 responses) covering all sectors of industry and regions in Alberta. A large proportion of respondents were dissatisfied with deregulation, caused in part by the confusion created by the flurry of rebate and credit announcements designed to ease the transition. Small firms were faced with significant increases in electricity prices, and several could not estimate the size of the increase as it was too difficult to measure. Responses varied from a low of 5 per cent increase to a high of 400 per cent in power rates. Most respondents also indicated that the increases had an impact on their business. The impact of power rate increases by sector was examined. Another consequence of deregulation was the fact that billing moved from a single invoice received to the requirement to actively manage energy usage. It was discovered that a lack of information on electricity cost and consumption management impeded the the ability to make business decisions. The CFIB asked respondents to indicate the measures being considered to address management of electricity costs. Incorporating energy-saving devices and/or methods had been considered by slightly more than 40 per cent of respondents. Negotiating with power retailers represented another option under consideration by some. It was felt that government must

  18. Risk handling in the power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindbaek-Nilsen, Brian; Strand, Krister

    2004-01-01

    In 1991 a new energy law was implemented in Norway. The Norwegian power market became deregulated and the law created a basis for a market based trade of electrical energy in Norway. In 1998 Nord Pool was founded and this has gradually become a common Nordic power exchange. The power market is characterized by large price fluctuations periodically. The reason is a variable resource supply and demand. In important factor in this context is that electricity cannot be stored after production. The large variations in supply and demand lead to large market risks for the involved parties. The derivate markets make hedging possible and thereby make it possible for the parties to guard against risks connected to future prices. This study presents risk elements in the power market, supplier and consumer sectors in view of the deregulation. In addition the present and future risk management is studied in with focus upon power suppliers that offer one-year fixed price contracts to the consumers. A study focuses on how a supplier may secure a certain volume of power in a year against price fluctuations in the market. As a basis the term market at Nord Pool is used and based on historical facts an estimated price for a supplier to eliminate the price risk for the volume is stipulated. This price is called the hedging cost and is compared with the offer a selection of power suppliers have for their one-year fixed price contracts. The possible difference between the two prices may be regarded as the power supplier risk price (premium) by offering these one-year fixed price contracts to the end consumers. The most surprising in the results in this study is how close the hedging costs are to the prices on the fixed price contracts. This means that compared to the hedging costs in the study the power suppliers operated with a small margin. Another tendency is that the fixed price contracts do not seem to have a high correlation to the hedging costs even if some companies follow the

  19. Impacts of market restructuring and deregulation on nuclear safety: lessons learned from rail, aviation, and the British experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, J.; Bier, V.; Glyer, D.; Welsh, M.; Tracey, J.

    2001-01-01

    The prime objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive list of possible consequences of electricity deregulation that could affect the safety of nuclear power plants. In particular, the study addressed not only the effects of deregulation on safety-related equipment failures and human errors, but also the effects on other variables that are believed to affect safety, such as financial pressures and corporate culture. (author)

  20. Th european market of the electric power; Le marche europeen de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document presents the CRE (commission of the Electric power Control) progress report concerning the first july 2000 to the 30 june 2001. Three main subjects are discussed, illustrated by economic data and graphs: the electric power european market, the french market control and the CRE. A special interest is given to the deregulation of the market and its consequences. (A.L.B.)

  1. Th european market of the electric power; Le marche europeen de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document presents the CRE (commission of the Electric power Control) progress report concerning the first july 2000 to the 30 june 2001. Three main subjects are discussed, illustrated by economic data and graphs: the electric power european market, the french market control and the CRE. A special interest is given to the deregulation of the market and its consequences. (A.L.B.)

  2. Cooperative consumers in a deregulated electricity market - dynamic consumption strategies and price coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, R.P.; Maentysaari, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Systems Analysis Lab.; Ruusunen, J. [Fortum Power and Heat Inc. (Finland); Pineau, P.O. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Systems Analysis Lab.; Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales, Monteal , Quebec (Canada)

    2000-09-01

    As the trend in electricity markets is strongly towards deregulation, new players, new rules and new behaviors will continue to emerge. One of the new developments on the demand side is purchases made by a coalition of consumers. It seems indeed likely that in the future this will be more common, and that coalitions of consumers will emerge when they are worthwhile. The aim of this paper is to study how such an organization of consumers can be set up in a hierarchical framework. This new approach has not been described before in the deregulated electricity markets but is clearly an important research topic. We focus our interest on electric space heating, which is an energy need especially important in the Nordic countries such as Finland. We examine the consumption strategies of individual electricity buyers within a coalition. The decision problem all consumers face is to find the optimal use of their space heating system with respect to changes in electricity prices and to their tolerance to indoor temperature variation. A mathematical model for this problem is defined. Physical parameters of sample houses were gathered from an experimental field test conducted in Helsinki during the winter of 1996. The coalition buys in the market at marginal cost. However, as marginal cost pricing may not always fulfill metering and communication needs of the members of the coalition, we consider Time-Of-Use (TOU) pricing within the coalition. Different groups of consumer behavior are constructed to simulate this coalition. The optimal marginal price is used as a reference point to estimate the nearest TOU price within the coalition. (author)

  3. Dispatching power system for preventive and corrective voltage collapse problem in a deregulated power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemadi, Nasser Ahmed

    Deregulation has brought opportunities for increasing efficiency of production and delivery and reduced costs to customers. Deregulation has also bought great challenges to provide the reliability and security customers have come to expect and demand from the electrical delivery system. One of the challenges in the deregulated power system is voltage instability. Voltage instability has become the principal constraint on power system operation for many utilities. Voltage instability is a unique problem because it can produce an uncontrollable, cascading instability that results in blackout for a large region or an entire country. In this work we define a system of advanced analytical methods and tools for secure and efficient operation of the power system in the deregulated environment. The work consists of two modules; (a) contingency selection module and (b) a Security Constrained Optimization module. The contingency selection module to be used for voltage instability is the Voltage Stability Security Assessment and Diagnosis (VSSAD). VSSAD shows that each voltage control area and its reactive reserve basin describe a subsystem or agent that has a unique voltage instability problem. VSSAD identifies each such agent. VS SAD is to assess proximity to voltage instability for each agent and rank voltage instability agents for each contingency simulated. Contingency selection and ranking for each agent is also performed. Diagnosis of where, why, when, and what can be done to cure voltage instability for each equipment outage and transaction change combination that has no load flow solution is also performed. A security constrained optimization module developed solves a minimum control solvability problem. A minimum control solvability problem obtains the reactive reserves through action of voltage control devices that VSSAD determines are needed in each agent to obtain solution of the load flow. VSSAD makes a physically impossible recommendation of adding reactive

  4. The deregulation of the Canadian natural gas market: a consumer progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, H.

    1998-01-01

    The report concludes that the Canadian experience with gas deregulation has been a cautious approach to date by regulators and government. From the point of view of the consumer the marketing tactics by some of the new entrant gas resellers in Ontario has caused some consternation and potential problems could arise from further changes in the Ontario natural gas industry such as lack of consumer information and lack of workable competition. The study outlines the evolution of natural gas industry deregulation in Canada, British Columbia and Ontario and how the industrial pressures created by pipeline access and pricing changes were handled by these different jurisdictions. The federally mandated open access regime in the U.S. as well as subsequent state unbundling and aggregation initiatives and specific experiences of California, Ohio and New York are highlighted. There is a case study of the Australian natural gas industry, highlighting the implementation of a Commonwealth framework and the unbundling initiatives in the state of New South Wales. The rest of the report focuses on consumer protection issues surrounding the potential local gas distribution companies' exit from the merchant function and mechanisms for redress suggested by various jurisdictions. Methods for the division of demand side management and the maintenance of system benefits are explored. In light of these risks, predictions of consumer savings are assessed. Section six focuses on the protection of meaningful consumer choice within a more devolved natural gas industry. 43 refs., 2 figs

  5. The Norwegian electricity industry: a deregulated market in a regulated Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diesen, E

    1994-12-01

    According to the 1990 Energy Act, the hydro power based Norwegian electricity supply industry was deregulated. The main aim of the act was to promote efficient utilisation of resources through introduction of competition. The act introduced open access for everyone to the network and fair and non-discriminatory pricing for network services. The consumers have now a free choice of suppliers. The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Administration, NVE, has the responsibility for regulating the monopolized parts of the industry - the network - As well as supervising the competitive parts - production and trading. The Norwegian transmission grid has several connections with the neighbouring countries. Connections to Germany and the Netherlands are planned. The foreign power exchange is primarily based on exploiting the specific properties of the hydro based system by exporting peak power at high prices and import base load in off peak periods. (author).

  6. Local impacts of the deregulation and internationalisation of electricity supply on the EU market with some examples from Northern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeding, P.

    2000-01-01

    The main message of this paper is a hypothesis on the growing gap between the local and the European level, between the large scale actors on the European and global market on one side and the local actors, especially the local and regional politicians, on the other. The Nations regulatory body often creates different rules for the electricity market. As a consequence, energy companies have to adjust their business from country to country and within EU. The market trends of electricity and energy in Europe are similar to those of other large scale industries. The common trends are clear: internationalization and deregulation. As lessons are learnt from the local point of view, this paper discusses what the EU and other important, international actors could and should do to strengthen the legitimate rights of the concerned local and regional population, most often through the elected politicians. On the local level we feel more and more as smaller and smaller pawns in a game, often dominated by anonymous and powerful actors. The national political scene is more and more a too limited area also regarding local affairs. The contents of this paper include four points: History (from the Romans and from the Vikings to EU); the history of siting and of closing nuclear facilities; the new Geography of Electricity in Europe, recent trends; and lessons learnt from the trends at the grass-root-level (subsidiarity)

  7. The adaptation of the electric power companies to the power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otterstad, B.; Ottosen, R.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the challenges met by the Norwegian electric power companies in adapting to a more market oriented business and their possibilities and strategies when facing the uncertainties on the market side. The main principles of adaptation to the market are described and various strategies are illustrated by means of simple calculations and figures. The theoretical basis for analyses of adaptation to the market and for pricing period contracts and options are discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the de-regulation of the North American gas market and draws parallels to the Norwegian power market. 17 figs

  8. Impact of nuclear fuel performance and reliability in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnoski, M.; Kaiser, B.

    1997-01-01

    US nuclear plants are now placing a great deal of importance on fuel performance and reliability because of their direct effect on a plant's capacity factor, availability, operating flexibility, outage duration, and worker exposure. This is reflected by utilities making fuel reliability a principal vendor evaluation criterion and making fuel performance an important bonus/penalty provision. Defect-free fuel, combined with ever improving design features, makes it possible for plants to operate at higher outputs while reducing operating and maintenance costs. Higher electrical output at lower cost is essential for US nuclear plants to meet the expected competition in a deregulated market. Through continued investment in manufacturing improvements and a vigilant, systematic design process, ABB's nuclear fuel has contributed to helping its nuclear utility customers reduce their cost of doing business. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Law of the electricity sector in France. The legal framework for the French electricity supply between legal market deregulation requirements and public service obligations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckler, Julius

    2016-01-01

    The process of creating an internal electricity market is still unfinished. This has, in addition to technical reasons, also legal reasons: The persistence of the structures and regulatory frameworks that have grown during monopoly times, in part is very strong, which is particularly evident in France. The power supply there is intensively controlled by its state as a public service, both indirectly by the state-owned company EDF and directly by statutory regulations. The market deregulation is not thereby completely prevented. However, together with the particular importance of nuclear power for the French power supply, considerable barriers to market opening are emerging. Against this background and out of the historical development, the author examines the current French law of the electricity sector across all value-creation stages in its relations to EU law. [de

  10. Achieving emissions reduction through oil sands cogeneration in Alberta’s deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellette, A.; Rowe, A.; Sopinka, A.; Wild, P.

    2014-01-01

    The province of Alberta faces the challenge of balancing its commitment to reduce CO 2 emissions and the growth of its energy-intensive oil sands industry. Currently, these operations rely on the Alberta electricity system and on-site generation to satisfy their steam and electricity requirements. Most of the on-site generation units produce steam and electricity through the process of cogeneration. It is unclear to what extent new and existing operations will continue to develop cogeneration units or rely on electricity from the Alberta grid to meet their energy requirements in the near future. This study explores the potential for reductions in fuel usage and CO 2 emissions by increasing the penetration of oil sands cogeneration in the provincial generation mixture. EnergyPLAN is used to perform scenario analyses on Alberta’s electricity system in 2030 with a focus on transmission conditions to the oil sands region. The results show that up to 15–24% of CO 2 reductions prescribed by the 2008 Alberta Climate Strategy are possible. Furthermore, the policy implications of these scenarios within a deregulated market are discussed. - Highlights: • High levels of cogeneration in the oil sands significantly reduce the total fuel usage and CO 2 emissions for the province. • Beyond a certain threshold, the emissions reduction intensity per MW of cogeneration installed is reduced. • The cost difference between scenarios is not significant. • Policy which gives an advantage to a particular technology goes against the ideology of a deregulated market. • Alberta will need significant improvements to its transmission system in order for oil sands cogeneration to persist

  11. Electric power distribution: in the direction of a competitive market?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.R.A. de.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of electric power sector deregulation, occurred in several countries, frequently followed of privatization, which the aim is activate the competition and, consequently, the efficiency between the companies of the electric power sector. The competition in the supply market of electric power, by the Great Britain, France, Spain and United States are shown as an example of this energy policy. (C.G.C.)

  12. Financing unemployment benefits by goods market competition: fiscal policy and deregulation with market imperfections

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Scial…; Riccardo Tilli

    2007-01-01

    We consider a model in which the labor market is characterized by search frictions and there is monopolistic competition in the goods market. We introduce proportional income taxation and unemployment benefits with Government balanced budget constraint. Then, we evaluate the effects of both more competition in the goods market and higher unemployment benefits on labor market equilibrium and equilibrium tax rate. We show that more competition has a positive effect on equilibrium unemployment a...

  13. Regression and tracing methodology based prediction of oncoming demand and losses in deregulated operation of power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nallagownden, P.; Mukerjee, R.N.; Masri, S.

    2010-01-01

    of the transmission services hiring contract, inputs such as extent of use of a transmission circuit for a transaction and the associated power loss in the said transmission circuit are also required. To provide the necessary lead time to frame transaction and transmission contracts for an oncoming operational...... coefficients are used advantageously to predict a generator's contribution to a retailer's demand and power loss for this transaction. This paper proposes a procedure that can be implemented real time, to quantify losses in each transmission circuit used by a specific transaction, based on proportionality......The deregulated electricity market can be thought of as a conglomeration of generation providers, transmission service operators (TSO) and retailers, where both generation and retailing may have open access to the transmission grid for trading electricity. For a transaction contract bid to take...

  14. Market power and storage in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaar, Jostein

    2004-05-01

    Market power in liberalised electricity markets dominated by hydropower is analyzed in four chapters. The existing literature on competition in hydropower markets is briefly presented and examined. Chapter 1 discusses the effects of market power in the context of acquisitions in a situation where transmission capacity is constrained. Chapter 2 and 3 elaborate on the issue of competition and market power when water inflow is uncertain, and finally Chapter 4 focuses on the supply function equilibrium model in the context of a hydropower market

  15. Market Power in Laboratory Emission Permit Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godby, R.

    2002-01-01

    Many proposals suggesting the use of markets to control pollution assume markets will be competitive. When markets do not exhibit competitive characteristics, however, should they still be expected to result in efficiency improvement relative to traditional approaches? This paper employs experimental economic methods to examine the effect of market structure on the use of marketable emissions permits. Results indicate that in a market with one dominant firm and a number of fringe firms, strategic manipulation occurs repeatedly in the laboratory as predicted by market power models, undermining the allocative and dynamic efficiency benefits such markets offer. When firms compete in a downstream product market dominated by the same single firm, market efficiency can actually be reduced with the implementation of permit markets. Final market efficiencies reflect initial endowments and are influenced by competitive conditions elsewhere in the economy, indicating that policy-makers should carefully consider whether markets are appropriate in such circumstances

  16. Electricity deregulation roundup : Ontario prepares for electricity deregulation and anxiously watches impact elsewhere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, R.

    2000-01-01

    As the time for deregulation of Ontario's electric power industry approaches, consumers are watching other Canadian and American jurisdictions to see what deregulation will mean in terms of energy costs. Albertans have expressed serious concerns about the impact of deregulating their electric power industry. They found that in the four years since deregulation in their province, electricity prices increased when markets opened to competition. The proposed start date for deregulation in Ontario is November 1, 2000. This paper suggests that if investors don't put out significant resources, problems such as power shortages and brownouts could occur, as was the case in Alberta. Potential investors in the Ontario electricity market are already sceptical because the Ontario government, in an effort to protect consumers from unreasonable price increases, has tabled legislation that restricts the efforts of municipal utility companies to raise distribution rates. One step that will inspire some confidence is the recently finalized deal between Ontario Power Generation and British Energy to operate the Bruce Nuclear Power Station. Independent consultants have warned that electricity prices will continue to increase with deregulation for a least the next few years. Industrial customers will be the hardest hit. In California, America's first deregulated electricity market, the power grid is strained and prices have doubled or tripled in one year

  17. Ownership structure and market power in the nordic power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, E.S.; Bergman, L.

    1999-01-01

    The opening of Nord Pool in 1996 seriously constrained the power companies' ability to exercise market power within their national borders. Currently there is an integration process going on among the power companies in the Nord Pool area. It manifest itself in terms of take-over and reciprocal acquisition of shares in the power companies - nationally and abroad. This process may undo what the introduction of the common power market achieved in curtailing market power. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects on market power of increased cross- ownership in the Nordic power market. (au)

  18. Using public relations/marketing communications to gain a competitive advantage in the US power market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzman, L.R. [Full Spectrum Communications, Loudonville, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    For many industries throughout the United States, deregulation will make or break a company. In the power generation and transmission arena, deregulation is currently underway. Many utilities and power generation equipment suppliers alike are being forced to compete very differently in this new market due to legislative changes. Also, as many companies reorganize, cut costs and downsize, public relations and marketing communications (PR/marcom) is often one of the first programs to be cut. This paper will offer some solid public relationships that can enhance a company`s image, help it generate sales leads and assist it in staying healthy in this competitive power area. Also provided will be a discussion of marketing communications and why PR/marcom efforts should not be discarded but stepped up during downsizing.

  19. Deregulation of Electricity Market and Drivers of Demand for Electrical Energy in Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojnec Štefan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates deregulation of electricity market focusing on electricity prices and drivers of demand for electrical energy in industry in Slovenia. The patterns in evolution of real electricity price developments and the three main components of the electricity price are calculated: liberalized market share for purchased electricity price, regulated infrastructure share for use of electricity network grids and mandatory state charges in the sale of electricity (duty, excise duty and value-added tax. To calculate the real value of electricity prices, producer price index of industrial commodities for electricity prices in industry is used as deflator and implicit deflator of gross domestic product for the size of the economy. In the empirical econometric part is used regression analysis for the amount electricity consumption in the industry depending on the real gross domestic product, direct and cross-price elasticity for natural gas prices in the industry. The results confirmed volatility in real electricity price developments with their increasing tendency and the increasing share of different taxes and state charges in the electricity prices for industry. Demand for electrical energy in industry is positively associated with gross domestic product and price of natural gas as substitute for electrical energy in industry use, and negatively associated with prices of electrical energy for industry.

  20. A proposal for investment recovery of FACTS devices in deregulated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mithulananthan, Nadarajah; Acharya, Naresh

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology to quantify the benefits, in terms of monetary values, of FACTS devices when used in deregulated electricity market for congestion management. The proposed methodology is used in the proposal for investment recovery of FACTS devices. Despite the long history of development and mature technology, the practical installations of FACTS devices are still limited. The main reasons for few installations are high investment cost and lack of viable measures to quantify the long list of benefits offered by FACTS device. In this respect, the methodology proposed in the paper provides a promising solution. The proposed methodology is based on establishing pricing schemes with and without FACTS devices using OPF formulation. The volume of market with FACTS devices and the increase in surplus due to them forms the basis of quantifying their benefits. The pricing scheme does not destroy the incentive effect in short run and also makes possible the provision of merchant FACTS. The proposed concept was tested and validated with TCSC in five-bus test system. Result shows that, when TCSC is used to relieve congestion in the system and the investment on TCSC can be recovered. (author)

  1. Transmission investment and planning in deregulated market environment : a literature survey (part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, F.; Wu, F.F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second half of a 2-part paper that provided details of a comprehensive survey of issues related to transmission investment and expansion planning in the electricity market. Results of the survey suggested that transmission regulation is needed to provide a fair playing field for competition and to ensure that transmission networks are optimally expanded while also meeting reliability constraints. Regulations will create further incentives for cost reduction while ensuring that regulated firms have assurance of cost recovery. Transmission planning should be controlled or monitored by a government organization or regulator. Legislation is needed to ensure that regulatory authorities can enforce reliability criteria. Mandatory reliability standards and metrics for reliability services should be implemented. The economic benefits of transmission expansion in a deregulated market should be modelled using non-deterministic approaches. It was concluded that transmission expansion plans should be able to meet future transmission capacity requirements, secure returns on investment, and ensure reliability levels for customers. Various international transmission expansion plans were also provided. 38 refs

  2. How gas producers can position themselves to take advantage of a deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of Norcen Energy Resource's finances, their production of oil, natural gas liquids (NGL) and gas, and their approach to marketing was provided in this poster presentation. Formerly owned power projects and current opportunities for Norcen were summarized. The potential role of natural gas in electrical restructuring, and some possible marketing strategies were highlighted

  3. Portugal: Lisbon seeks to juggle power sell-off, oil deregulation and advent of gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, K.

    1994-01-01

    A profile of Portugal's energy sector is presented and the energy balance (1993) in terms of oil, gas, coal, electricity and other sources is located. Topics discussed include the import of natural gas supplies from Algeria by 1996; the construction of a 400km natural gas pipeline; the breakup of the Electricidada de Portugal into separate units, and the impact of liberation and privatisation on the power sector. The first large-scale private power generation, and deregulation and competition in Portugal's oil industry are also examined in this article. (UK)

  4. MVA power flow and loss analysis for electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.Q.; Chen, G.Z.

    2001-01-01

    MVA power-flow and loss analysis is the basis for allocating the fixed costs and power losses under electricity-market deregulation. It is pointed out that the decomposition allocation of active and reactive power losses is not reasonable. The theory of active and reactive loss allocation and branch-power-flow decomposition has been proposed. Various contributory factors have been deduced. These contributory factors include the contribution factors of the active and reactive generation power, load-power-to-branch flows, the contribution factors of active and reactive generation power to active and reactive load power, the contribution factors of active and reactive load power to generation power, and the contribution factors of active and reactive load power and active and reactive generation power to line power losses. The detailed calculation results are presented and analysed, demonstrating that the theory presented provides a good charging algorithm for all the market participants. (Author)

  5. Optimal model of congestion management in deregulated environment of power sector with promotion of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, Yog Raj; Singh, Randhir

    2010-01-01

    In the competitive electricity market it becomes very much important to give special consideration for development of renewable energy sources (RESs) due to environmental and other social problems related with conventional generations. So this paper presents an optimal model of congestion management with special emphasis for promotion of RES in competitive electricity market. This paper presents a generalized optimal model of congestion management for deregulated power sector that dispatches the pool in combination with privately negotiated bilateral and multilateral contracts while maximizing social benefit. This model determines the locational marginal pricing (LMP) based on marginal cost theory. It also determines the size of non-firm transactions as well as pool demand and generations. Both firms as well as non-firm transactions are considered in this model. The proposed model has been applied to IEEE-30 bus test system with addition of some RES for analysis of the proposed model. The RES supplies its power to load either through the firm transaction or through power pool. The power from RES is not subjected to any curtailment in proposed model of congestion management. (author)

  6. Competitiveness of nuclear power in Japanese liberalized electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The liberalization of Japanese electricity market expanded to customers of over 50 kV on April 1, 2005 and more than 60% of the market has been already open. The discussion about the assistance measures of nuclear power generation in Japanese liberalization of electricity market has come to grow warmer gradually. The opinions on the competitiveness of nuclear power are inconsistency among the supporters of nuclear power. Some says that nuclear power is the most competitive, others says nuclear power require some sort of financial or political assistance in the deregulation of electricity market. In this study, based on financial statements of each Japanese electric power company, the constitution of generation cost of nuclear power is illustrated and various financial and economic characteristics, including ''merit of scale'' and the impact of new nuclear power plant construction on the finance of electric power company, are discussed. In addition, the economic features of nuclear power generation are compared with those of thermal power generation through the analysis of financial statements. Finally, support policies for nuclear power required in deregulation of electric utilities are examined in terms of fairness of competition and security of electricity supply

  7. Safety Margins and Their Economical Value in a De-regulated Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidard, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The definition of safety margins is sometimes ambiguous. Depending on assumptions used to evaluate the evolution of plant parameters and on acceptance criteria, the same design could well turn out to have positive, zero, or negative margin for the same operating situation. Very often, considering that an optimized reactor would have to operate with zero margin compared to at least one safety criterion, designers or utilities considered in their analyses penalizing assumptions. This was done for example either considering reduced component capability or very high core peaking factors, the latter generally exceeding by far what would be anticipated in perturbed situations. This approach has three major drawbacks: -having a reasonable understanding of the real importance of safety margins is difficult, -if a non-conservatism is identified in a methodology, there is a high risk of being in a no-compliance situation from a regulatory standpoint, -it leads to a limitation on allowable electrical output and constraints on technical specifications for example. In a regulated market, such a situation can be tolerable as the final customer has to pay the extra financial burden in any case. In a de-regulated market, the situation is significantly different. The final customer can choose his supplier, and is likely to go to those offering the best prices, i.e. those making optimal use of their available resources. There is so a need for better understanding of real plant capabilities. Revisiting assumptions used for evaluating safety margins is so highly recommended, if not imperative, to electricity companies. This will helpful to reshape company strategies in case of evolution of market conditions. (author)

  8. A strategy for improving the profitability of utility power plants in a deregulated industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhart, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    When deregulation of the utility industry becomes a reality in the near future, power plant managers and engineers will face a completely changed business climate. Surviving in a competitive business world will require a dramatic alteration in the way most utility power plants are maintained and upgraded, and in their budget planning. Strategies will have to be developed and implemented that follow the guidelines of good business practices in competitive industries. Some utilities have already started to reduce overhead maintenance costs. Key aspects of their programs can serve as examples to other utilities who want to develop a strategy to improve their operating cost effectiveness. Cost-cutting measures have included development of procedures and data bases that allowed utilities to become independent of original equipment manufacturer (OEM) support and to keep their costs for maintenance, repairs, and replacement of power plant components to a minimum. Also, scheduled power plant outages based on the concepts of reliability-centered maintenance (Smith, 1993), remaining life assessment, and advanced integrity monitors instead of a fixed calendar (Swanekamp, 1996), have allowed utilities to extend the time between some outages by several years. These and other innovative approaches will become critical to power plants operating in the new, deregulated business climate. Examples of actual cost savings are presented here

  9. Telecommunications Deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry A. Hausman; William E. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    From Fred Kahn's writings and experiences as a telecommunications regulator and commenter, we draw the following conclusions: prices must be informed by costs; costs are actual incremental costs; costs and prices are an outcome of a Schumpeterian competitive process, not the starting point; excluding incumbents from markets is fundamentally anticompetitive; and a regulatory transition to deregulation entails propensities to micromanage the process to generate preferred outcomes, visible compe...

  10. Studies in market-based electric power trade and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, Einar

    2000-01-01

    This is a compilation of articles written by the author during the last fifteen years. Most of the articles are related to the reform of the Norwegian electric power market. This reform led to the Energy Act of 1990 and to the subsequent development of the power markets. Some of the sections are in Norwegian, some in English. The sections discuss (1) Markets for electricity trade in Norway, (2) Economic incentives and public firm behaviour, (3) Market alternatives to the present forms of occasional power trade, (4) Socio-economic considerations about electricity pricing, (5) Scenarios for market based power trade in Norway, (6) Markets for electricity: economic reform of the Norwegian electricity industry, (7) The Norwegian power market, (8) A common Nordic energy market?, (9) Organization of supply markets for natural gas in Europe, (10) The extent of the central grid, (11) Optimum regulation of grid monopolies in the power trade, (12) Power markets and competition policy, (13) Deregulation of the Norwegian power sector, (14) designing a market based system for the Icelandic electricity industry and (15) regulation regimes for the power sector

  11. Challenges for the nuclear safety of the deregulation of electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Eurosafe 2000 was organised around two round tables on the first day and four seminars on the second day. The first round table dealt with general aspects of deregulation including the economic constraints and the special challenges arising during transition from regulated to deregulated structures. The second round table focussed on technical and organisational safety issues which are directly or indirectly related to the changes introduced by deregulation. The four seminars hold in order to provide opportunities for comparing experiences and learning about recent activities of IPSN, GRS and their partners in the European Union and Eastern Europe: Seminar 1 (Nuclear installation safety, assessment and analysis): assessment of the flooding incident at the Blayais nuclear power plant; PSA data base, comparison of the French and German approach; assessment of the Balakovo fire probabilistic study and elaboration of a guide for reviewing fire PSA; comprehensive technical assessment of an advanced German PWR by PSA - objectives and main results; PSA approach for the safety assessment of low-power and shutdown states; correlation of initiating events with the PSA level-2 results; safety assessment for fission products tests in the Phebus reactor; use of NPP simulators for applied human factor studies; assessment of the 'deterministic realistic method' applied to large LOCA analysis; assessment of the feasibility of an improvement programme enabling operation of units 3 and 4 of Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Seminar 2 (nuclear installation safety, research): PHEBUS 2K project on severe accidents; current status of the COCOSYS development; fission product modeling in ASTEC; Euratom Framework Programme (FP) research in reactor safety: main achievements of FP- 4 (1994-1998), some preliminary results of FP-5 (1998-2002) and prospects for beyond 2002; development of coupled systems of 3D neutronics and fluid-dynamic system codes and their application for safety analyses

  12. Four essays on market power in energy economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Petter Vegard

    2008-07-01

    Market power in energy markets is discussed intensively in both academic and public arenas. There has been an intense energy debate on market power at least since the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) exercised its market power and caused the 'oil crisis' of the 1970s, and again following the deregulation of electricity markets at the beginning of the 1990s. However, this debate is not new. In 1911, for example, the US Supreme Court divided Standard Oil into 34 separate companies using antitrust law. With increasing energy prices and the ongoing process of liberalization of electricity markets throughout the world, the topic is still relevant for future markets. The four essays in this dissertation discuss specific aspects of market power in energy markets. The first essay concerns the crude oil market, and the remaining three essays relate to market power in the Nordic and Norwegian electricity markets. In the first essay, a multi-equation dynamic econometric model tests whether the behaviour of OPEC, as a whole or as different subgroups, is consistent with the behaviour of dominant producers in the world crude oil market. The second essay is a theoretical work that introduces uncertainty in inflow to the discussion of market power in hydropower markets by analysing the effects of uncertainty in inflow on market performance under alternative assumptions about market structure. In the third essay, high-frequency data are used to analyse how price signals from the spot market affect end-user demand in the Norwegian and Swedish electricity markets. Finally, in the fourth essay, retailer and household behaviour in the Norwegian electricity market are analysed using detailed information on prices and other market characteristics. In the following section, I provide highlights from a general discussion of market power in order to set the essays included in this dissertation in context. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  13. Stochastic control for risk under deregulated electricity market : a case study using a new formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.L.; Ponnambalam, K. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Systems Design Engineering

    2005-08-01

    A study was conducted to address some of the multi-reservoir operational problems associated with hydropower generation. Inflow, release, spill and storage are some of the large scale, nonlinear and stochastic problems that can be solved using the Fletcher Ponnambalam (FP) model for risk management in hydropower systems under deregulated energy markets. The main objective is to maximize benefits and minimize the total cost while satisfying the system constraints. The FP model was developed for the first and second order of storage state distributions in terms of inflow distribution. The FP method is suitable for multi-reservoir problems because it offers statistical information on the nature of random behaviour of the system state variables without discretization. It is a cost-effective method because it avoids a scenario-based optimization. In this study, price uncertainty was introduced into the model along with inflow uncertainty. The FP model and the Bender's Decomposition method were applied to the Lake Nipigon reservoir system. The FP results were compared with the stochastic dual dynamic programming. Results show that the FP method achieves optimum operations, including risk minimization. However, sensitivity analysis must always be carried out because the FP model is sensitive to initial values. 10 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs., 1 appendix.

  14. Green certificates and market power in the Nordic power market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Eirik S; Bergman, Lars

    2012-01-01

    principles and a numerical model based on that to investigate the Swedish TGC market operating in a setting of a common Nordic electricity market. The analysis shows that Swedish producers may exercise market power using the TGC-market but that this problem will be eliminated by opening the TGC-market......The purpose of this study is to elucidate under which circumstances, how, and to what extent market power on a Tradable Green Certificates (TGC) market can be used to affect an entire electricity market. There are basically two reasons for being concerned with this. One is that a small number...

  15. [Effects of pharmacy market deregulation regarding patient-centred drug care in Germany from a health economics perspecitve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumm, R; Böcking, W

    2013-03-01

    This article analyses the impact of a potential deregulation Germany's pharmacy market by allowing foreign ownership of pharmacies and removing the limit of the number pharmacies that can be owned by a pharmacist. Based on a mathematical model and empirical values of foreign countries, scenarios for the German market are calculated and the impact on all participants of the health care system analysed. The key outcomes are:- A deregulation would enables the creation of pharmacy chains- In all simulated scenarios the total number of pharmacies would drastically grow- The increased pharmacy density improves patient centred drug care- The competition among pharmacies increases and leads to the closure of many independently owned and operated pharmacies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Market value of wind power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de J.E.S.; Shoeb, M.A.; Lopes Ferreira, H.M.; Kling, W.L.

    2013-01-01

    Variability and predictability constraints of wind hinder the cost-efficient integration of wind power generation into power markets. Within the framework of EIT KIC INNOENERGY Offwindtech project, a ‘Market Value’ tool is developed. Here, the market value of wind power generation can be assessed

  17. The OMEGA Project: Open Market Energy Generation Allocation in deregulated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, J.; Conejo, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The OMEGA project is part of the 5th Framework Programme for R and D that the European Union has started in the year 2000. It is a highly complex and interdisciplinary project, with five countries and several companies involved. The project aims at developing a decision support system for electricity producers to support energy management and energy trading groups within these companies in the commercial activities on open and competitive electricity markets using an e-commerce framework. This paper presents the OMEGA project, describes the objectives pursued, evaluates the project workplan, shows the complex project management structure, highlights the management problems, and presents relevant conclusions. (author)

  18. The OMEGA Project: Open Market Energy Generation Allocation in deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, J. [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, (Spain). Project Management Group, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales; Conejo, A.J. [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, (Spain). Power Engineering Group, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales

    2002-08-01

    The OMEGA project is part of the 5th Framework Programme for R and D that the European Union has started in the year 2000. It is a highly complex and interdisciplinary project, with five countries and several companies involved. The project aims at developing a decision support system for electricity producers to support energy management and energy trading groups within these companies in the commercial activities on open and competitive electricity markets using an e-commerce framework. This paper presents the OMEGA project, describes the objectives pursued, evaluates the project workplan, shows the complex project management structure, highlights the management problems, and presents relevant conclusions. (author)

  19. Multi-stage fuzzy PID power system automatic generation controller in deregulated environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayeghi, H.; Shayanfar, H.A.; Jalili, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-stage fuzzy proportional integral derivative (PID) type controller is proposed to solve the automatic generation control (AGC) problem in a deregulated power system that operates under deregulation based on the bilateral policy scheme. In each control area, the effects of the possible contracts are treated as a set of new input signals in a modified traditional dynamical model. The multi-stage controller uses the fuzzy switch to blend a proportional derivative (PD) fuzzy logic controller with an integral fuzzy logic input. The proposed controller operates on fuzzy values passing the consequence of a prior stage on to the next stage as fact. The salient advantage of this strategy is its high insensitivity to large load changes and disturbances in the presence of plant parameter variations and system nonlinearities. This newly developed strategy leads to a flexible controller with simple structure that is easy to implement, and therefore, it can be useful for the real world power systems. The proposed method is tested on a three area power system with different contracted scenarios under various operating conditions. The results of the proposed controller are compared with those of the classical fuzzy PID type controller and classical PID controller through some performance indices to illustrate its robust performance

  20. Improving the quality of competition in the US power generation market: Lessons learned in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, K.; Tivey, B.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation examines the effects of deregulation and liberalization of the power generation market in the United Kingdom and the potential for translation of that experience to other markets. The topics of the presentation include the changes in the UK, the pool and electricity contracts, competition, continued state ownership of nuclear power plants, transitioning the coal industry to free market conditions, the benefits, and the impact of privatization on the National Power government agency

  1. Green Certificates and Market Power on the Nordic Power Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, Lars; Amundsen, Eirik S

    2007-06-01

    In Sweden a market for Tradable Green Certificates (TGCs) was introduced in 2003. The purpose was to stimulate investments in electricity generation based on renewable energy sources without using direct governmental subsidies to renewable energy. More precisely the aim is to create a market where different types of renewable electricity can compete on equal terms, thus relieving governments and public agencies from being directly involved in power industry investment decisions. The purpose of this study is to elucidate under which circumstances, how, and to what extent market power in the TGC market can be used to affect the entire electricity market. There are basically two reasons for being concerned with market power in TGC markets. The first is the fact that the industry average cost curve for 'green' electricity tends to be upward sloping. This is because the cost of wind power, the main source of green electricity, depends on the location of the power plants, and that the availability of first rate sites that do not involve sizable investments in new transmission and network infrastructure, is limited. The situation is similar for environmentally friendly hydro power, and, to some extent, for other types of 'green' electricity. Thus, given the state of technology and an upper cost limit, there is a maximum amount of 'green' electricity that can be produced within a country. This means that some generators, by getting access to the suitable sites, will become dominating producers of 'green' electricity and thus may be able to exercise market power in the TGC market. The second reason for being concerned with market power in a TGC market is that, as a result of the percentage requirement, the withdrawal of a given number of TGCs from the market forces a much larger reduction of electricity consumption. Thus relatively modest exercise of market power in the TGC market may have a significant impact on the price of electricity and the allocation of resources in

  2. Pomen managementa na dereguliranem maloprodajnem trgu električne energije v Sloveniji = The Importance of Management in the Deregulated Retail Electricity Distribution Market in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Drago Papler; Stefan Bojnec

    2006-01-01

    This paper underlines the importance of management in the deregulated retail electricity distribution market, entrepreneurship and business behaviours toward consumers’ satisfaction with quality of services. The coefficients of concentration indicate a high concentration of electricity suppliers and users in the deregulated electricity retail market for industry. The production function reveals the importance of education and electricity infrastructure, and to a lesser extent of capital inte...

  3. THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF THE EU-UKRAINE DCFTA: EVIDENCE FROM THE ONGOING DEREGULATION REFORM IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Rabinovych

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The lack of genuine transformative power in the region was repeatedly distinguished as a major weakness of the Eastern Partnership (EaP in Ukraine. However, the intensity and comprehensiveness of ongoing reform processes cause the need to revise the transformative power of the initiative in general and specific incentives in particular. Thus, the paper aims to assess the transformative power of the EU-Ukraine DCFTA, based on the evidence from the deregulation reform that represents an important prerequisite for the intensification of the EU-Ukraine economic relations. The study focuses on the general economic aspects of deregulation and combines ’black letter law’ approach with an empirical insight into the reform’s implementation. The results of the study show that the EU-Ukraine DCFTA holds significant transformative power with regard to the deregulation of Ukraine’s economy and invite for further reconsideration of the EaP incentives’ impact in target states.

  4. Power market restructuring in Asia : Russia, China, India, and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammons, T.J.; Zhong, J.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Kurihara, I.

    2008-01-01

    Many countries are now in the process of deregulating their power industries in order to promote growth and competitiveness. This paper discussed power market restructuring activities in Russia, China, India and Japan. Economic convergence points in Russian and Asian power markets were reviewed. The state of Russia and China's power industry after the implementation of recent power restructuring initiatives was discussed. Technical characteristics of the industries were evaluated, and market development plans were outlined. Regional electricity markets in Asia were discussed, as well as issues related to domestic and foreign investment. Institutional reforms were reviewed, and individual outlines of revisions for the power industries of the 4 countries were presented. The study demonstrated that structuring processes vary from country to country. Differences in restructuring patterns were attributed to economic differences; country-specific features established within the electric power industry; and attitudes towards deregulation. It was concluded that the reforms adopted by the countries will lead to the expansion of national electric power systems. 23 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  5. Market Power Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    2015-01-01

    Market Power Europe (MPE) constitutes an important contribution to the literature on the global role and actorness of the EU. In order to develop MPE as a theory, this contribution provides an assessment of how Russia, the USA and China have converged towards three EU trade policies in 2013....... The analysis finds that MPE fails to account for important dynamics related to externalization in the three cases. In order to improve MPE analytically, the article suggests that MPE should include three intervening variables to account for the EU’s ability to externalize its policies and act as MPE...

  6. Introduction to market power issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an initial introduction to market power issues in wholesale electric power markets. Market power was described as the ability of sellers to act together to profitably maintain prices above competitive levels for a significant period of time. The two general forms of market power, vertical and horizontal market power, were described with reference to how they may be exercised. The factors that should be considered when evaluating the competitiveness of a market include: (1) market share of suppliers, (2) overall market concentration, (3) elasticity of demand, (4) shape of the industry supply curve, (5) the amount and distribution of excess supply, (6) typical contractual arrangements and the process for establishing prices, and (7) the relative ease to enter the market. It was noted that a narrow market scope allows only wholesale market sector (such as municipal utilities) to access competitive electricity supplies, however, a more expansive definition of market scope would consider the sale of electricity to industrial customers. This would allow more players to enter the Nova Scotia market. The barriers to entry for wholesale electric power markets are: (1) access to the transmission grids and services, (2) sites for new capacity development, (3) major inputs to power generation, (4) transportation of major inputs to generation, and (5) lack of liquidity

  7. Energy data flow control within the deregulated internal energy market. Harmonization of data formats and designations; Energiedatenfluesse in Europa. Harmonisierung von Datenformaten und Bezeichnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanzetta, J. [RWE Net AC, Brauweiler (Germany)

    2003-05-05

    The functions and the co-ordination of activities of transmission utilities and transmission network users (power resellers, industrial users and power plants operators) in the deregulated internal energy market are explained referring in particular to the rapidly increasing volume of data interchange and its growing complexity. For improving the situation in the current power supply and trading environment within the EU, a major task is to achieve interoperability of the systems, while maintaining the present level of systems reliability. (orig./CB) [German] Die Aufgaben und das Zusammenwirken von Uebertragungsnetzbetreibern (UeNB) und Netznutzern (Haendlern, Stromabnehmern und Kraftwerken) im liberalisierten Strommarkt werden beschrieben mit Fokus auf den fuer die Systemfuehrung benoetigten Datenaustausch, der durch die Schaffung des europaweiten Elektrizitaetsbinnenmarktes mit unterschiedlichen nationalen Auspraegungen wesentlich komplexer und umfangreicher geworden ist. Die Bewaeltigung dieser wachsenden Anforderungen an die Datenstroeme traegt wesentlich dazu bei, dass der europaeische Elektrizitaetsmarkt weiter entwickelt werden kann, ohne dass dies zu Einschraenkungen der Systemzuverlaessigkeit fuehrt. (orig.)

  8. Market power mitigation, monitoring and surveillance in the Ontario electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, A.

    2001-01-01

    This power point presentation discussed the meaning of market power and how Ontario Power Generation's market power is one of the most contentious market implementation issues in the deregulation debate. Market power was described as being the ability to profitably maintain prices above competitive levels for a significant period of time. The presentation referred to the key elements of the market power mitigation framework (MPMF) of Ontario and how it strikes a balance between the three major objectives of creating a competitive marketplace, to pay down the stranded debt, and to ensure viable power generation in the province. It was concluded that there will be a viable competitive market in Ontario in the near future, but a pragmatic, fact-based view of the market is needed to allow market forces to work. It was emphasized that markets by nature are unpredictable and volatility does not necessarily means that the market is not working. The author stated that Ontario Power Generation recognized that it is important to coordinate roles and responsibilities to minimize duplication and reduce confusion. tags., figs

  9. Power system economics : the Nordic electricity market. 2nd ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangensteen, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    This book written as a textbook for students of engineering is designed for the Norwegian Power Markets course which is part of the Energy and Environment Master's Program and the recently established international MSc program in Electric Power Engineering. As the title indicates, the book deals with both power system economics in general and the practical implementation and experience from the Nordic market. Areas of coverage include: -- Restructuring/deregulation of the power supply system -- Grid access including tariffs and congestion management -- Generation planning -- Market modeling -- Ancillary services -- Regulation of grid monopolies. Although Power Systems Economics is written primarily as a textbook for students, other readers will also find the book interesting. It deals with problems that have been subject of considerable attention in the power sector for some years and it addresses issues that are still relevant and important. (au)

  10. Power system economics : the Nordic electricity market. 2nd ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangensteen, Ivar

    2012-07-01

    This book written as a textbook for students of engineering is designed for the Norwegian Power Markets course which is part of the Energy and Environment Master's Program and the recently established international MSc program in Electric Power Engineering. As the title indicates, the book deals with both power system economics in general and the practical implementation and experience from the Nordic market. Areas of coverage include: -- Restructuring/deregulation of the power supply system -- Grid access including tariffs and congestion management -- Generation planning -- Market modeling -- Ancillary services -- Regulation of grid monopolies. Although Power Systems Economics is written primarily as a textbook for students, other readers will also find the book interesting. It deals with problems that have been subject of considerable attention in the power sector for some years and it addresses issues that are still relevant and important. (au)

  11. Economic and institutional dynamics of electricity markets deregulation: the interaction between sectoral regulation and antitrust policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanel, B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define regulatory intervention as a part of a global monitoring procedure allowing the definition and adaptation of market structures and rules, given the observed behavior of market participants. Nevertheless, the possible inefficiency in its (decisional) coordination with competition authorities implies further analysis. We thus adopt a comparative methodology based on the studying PJM and NETA wholesale markets. This analysis enables us to stress two possible 'models' in the distribution and coordination of monitoring powers. The first one privileges a strong 'informational coordination' between the sectoral regulator and the Transmission System Operator. By contrast, the second model is characterized by a constrained informational coordination, leading to a greater 'decisional convergence' between regulatory intervention and antitrust policy. Lastly, we put these conclusions into perspective with the specific issue of the achievement of an efficient and integrated European market for electricity. In particular, we stress the need for a single regulatory agency, which should be given autonomous decisional powers in the adoption of regional markets reform initiatives (author)

  12. A market power model with price caps and compact DC power flow constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuwei Yu [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Industrial Engineering

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a spatial gaming model with price caps for deregulated electricity markets. There has been heated debate on price caps that have been enforced in deregulated electricity markets. Opponents argue that price caps may send wrong economic signals while advocates argue that price caps are good for damping market power. This paper does not intend to take a stand in the argument. Given the fact that price caps are enforced in several deregulated regional electricity markets in the US, a logical step is to reflect this reality in gaining modeling. However, current gaining models have not included any price cap formulation. This paper is the first one to address the issue. DC power flow equations are used for representing the spatial nature of an electrical network. An algorithm is proposed to find a generalized Nash equilibrium under the enforcement of price caps based on the Kuhn-Tucker Vector Optimization Theorem. Case studies show the successful application of the model. The conclusion is that market power impact can be reduced under appropriate price caps. (author)

  13. The European gaseous market deregulation and its consequences for Russia; La liberalisation du marche gazier europeen et ses consequences pour la Russie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finon, D.; Locatelli, C

    2002-07-01

    Russia, the first world producer of gas in 2001 is also the main producer in the european gas market. In this framework the evolution of its gas exportations market is a major stake for the russian gas industry and for the country economy. The consequences of this gas market deregulation are analyzed in this document. (A.L.B.)

  14. The market will take care of that. Real Investment Practices on the Deregulated Electricity Market; Det daer ordnar marknaden. Investeringspraktik paa den avreglerade marknaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennborg, Petter (Univ. of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden). School of Business, Economics and Law)

    2009-06-15

    concrete real-investment situations? 3) How do the market actors justify real-investments in production capacity? Building on twenty-five in-depth interviews, and two extensive case studies, the study shows that the stationary electricity industry is characterized by a technical norm-system, which contains institutionalized logics, and norms of rationality. The act of construing and interpreting is a question of different market actors' attitudes towards the technical norm-system, and the organizational role-definition. In concrete real-investment situations, the market actors must conduct their actions in relation to conflicting norms of rationality. Hence, the market actors justification of real-investments in production capacity is a question of their attitudes towards normative institutions and their ability to predict the future. The study concludes that capacity investments in the deregulated electricity market are not caused by market actors' perceptions concerning profitability per se. Indeed, construing of market prices are important, but the undertaking of capacity investments should rather be described as a result of acts of construing and translating political signals, and the will of exercising power. In order to make possible the undertaking of capacity investments, the individual actor is engaged in activities of stabilizing its internal conditions of production as well as its political environment

  15. Consequences of electricity deregulation on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podjavorsek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of deregulation of electricity market started a couple of years ago and has not been finished yet. Deregulation causes increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This presents a new challenge to regulatory bodies. They have to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the deregulation. Today's trend is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe and also in Slovenia due to tough competition in the electricity market. The electricity price has decreased after the introduction of the deregulated market in most countries. This has been also the main reason for less investment to new generating capacities since the price has been lower than the generation costs. Investment problems are also present for the existing units, because of danger of inappropriate maintenance and reduction of the number of staff and their qualifications below the desired level that leads to loss of institutional memory. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of competition in electricity prices and consequential pressure to reduce the cost. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points are discussed in this paper such as the need to cut costs of companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and /or outsourcing of activities, power station operating regime, safety culture, grid reliability, reliability and safety of operation, increased number of transients, ageing of components, outage duration, extended cycle and response of nuclear regulators. From a regulatory point of view the impact of deregulation on nuclear safety is an important issue. This paper also discusses analyses and evaluations of this impact and proposes some measures how to

  16. POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE DEREGULATION POLICY FOR THE ISRAELI POWER INDUSTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deich, I.; Elmakais, D.; Frant, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the outcomes of a study prepared by the system planners of the Israel Electric Corp. It is intended to reveal general trends expected from opening of the Israeli power generation market to competition and to analyze possible implications of the different behavior of competitive markets compared to a regulated monopoly on electricity prices, system reliability, market stability and medium- and long-term development of the Israeli power system. It is the first work analyzing this issue in Israel, which was based on simulations of the Israeli power system functioning under competition for a comprehensive set of scenarios regarding possible future. (auth)

  17. Assembling Markets for Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Trine

    hand, as an economic good, wind power is said to suffer from (techno-economic) ‘disabilities’, such as high costs, fluctuating and unpredictable generation, etc. Therefore, because of its performance as a good, it is argued that the survival of wind power in the market is premised on different......This project studies the making of a market for wind power in France. Markets for wind power are often referred to as ‘political markets: On the one hand, wind power has the potential to reduce CO2-emissions and thus stall the effects of electricity generation on climate change; and on the other...... instruments, some of which I will refer to as ‘prosthetic devices’. This thesis inquires into two such prosthetic devices: The feed-in tariff and the wind power development zones (ZDE) as they are negotiated and practiced in France, and also the ways in which they affect the making of markets for wind power....

  18. Strategic Maintenance Scheduling of an Offshore Wind Farm in a Deregulated Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Mazidi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model for strategic maintenance scheduling of offshore wind farms (SMSOWF in a deregulated power system. The objective of the model is to plan the maintenance schedules in a way to maximize the profit of the offshore wind farm. In addition, some network constraints, such as transmission lines capacity, and wind farm constraints, such as labor working shift, wave height limit and wake effect, as well as unexpected outages, are included in deterministic and stochastic studies. Moreover, the proposedmodel provides theability to incorporate information from condition monitoring systems. SMSOWF is formulated through a bi-level formulation and then transformed into a single-level through Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions. The model is validated through a test system, and the results demonstrate applicability, advantages and challenges of harnessing the full potential of the model.

  19. Job Placement in Germany: Developments before and after Deregulation. IAB Labour Market Research Topics No. 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwei, Ulrich

    Since 1994, the German public employment service has not had a monopoly on placement. A new law permits private job placement as an independent activity, but only with a license from the public employment service. Since deregulation, the number of job placement licenses has increased continuously, but the number of placements made by private…

  20. A novel optimal distribution system planning framework implementing distributed generation in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkar, S.; Poure, P.; Abbaspour-Tehrani-fard, A.; Saadate, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new framework included mathematical model and a new software package interfacing two powerful softwares (MATLAB and GAMS) for obtaining the optimal distributed generation (DG) capacity sizing and sitting investments with capability to simulate large distribution system planning. The proposed optimization model allows minimizing total system planning costs for DG investment, DG operation and maintenance, purchase of power by the distribution companies (DISCOs) from transmission companies (TRANSCOs) and system power losses. The proposed model provides not only the DG size and site but also the new market price as well. Three different cases depending on system conditions and three different scenarios depending on different planning alternatives and electrical market structures, have been considered. They have allowed validating the economical and electrical benefits of introducing DG by solving the distribution system planning problem and by improving power quality of distribution system. DG installation increases the feeders' lifetime by reducing their loading and adds the benefit of using the existing distribution system for further load growth without the need for feeders upgrading. More, by investing in DG, the DISCO can minimize its total planning cost and reduce its customers' bills. (author)

  1. A novel optimal distribution system planning framework implementing distributed generation in a deregulated electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porkar, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Groupe de Recherches en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nancy, GREEN-UHP, Universite Henri Poincare de Nancy I, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France); Poure, P. [Laboratoire d' Instrumentation Electronique de Nancy, LIEN, EA 3440, Universite Henri Poincare de Nancy I, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France); Abbaspour-Tehrani-fard, A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Saadate, S. [Groupe de Recherches en Electrotechnique et Electronique de Nancy, GREEN-UHP, Universite Henri Poincare de Nancy I, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    This paper introduces a new framework included mathematical model and a new software package interfacing two powerful softwares (MATLAB and GAMS) for obtaining the optimal distributed generation (DG) capacity sizing and sitting investments with capability to simulate large distribution system planning. The proposed optimization model allows minimizing total system planning costs for DG investment, DG operation and maintenance, purchase of power by the distribution companies (DISCOs) from transmission companies (TRANSCOs) and system power losses. The proposed model provides not only the DG size and site but also the new market price as well. Three different cases depending on system conditions and three different scenarios depending on different planning alternatives and electrical market structures, have been considered. They have allowed validating the economical and electrical benefits of introducing DG by solving the distribution system planning problem and by improving power quality of distribution system. DG installation increases the feeders' lifetime by reducing their loading and adds the benefit of using the existing distribution system for further load growth without the need for feeders upgrading. More, by investing in DG, the DISCO can minimize its total planning cost and reduce its customers' bills. (author)

  2. A new spinning reserve requirement forecast method for deregulated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjady, Nima; Keynia, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    Ancillary services are necessary for maintaining the security and reliability of power systems and constitute an important part of trade in competitive electricity markets. Spinning Reserve (SR) is one of the most important ancillary services for saving power system stability and integrity in response to contingencies and disturbances that continuously occur in the power systems. Hence, an accurate day-ahead forecast of SR requirement helps the Independent System Operator (ISO) to conduct a reliable and economic operation of the power system. However, SR signal has complex, non-stationary and volatile behavior along the time domain and depends greatly on system load. In this paper, a new hybrid forecast engine is proposed for SR requirement prediction. The proposed forecast engine has an iterative training mechanism composed of Levenberg-Marquadt (LM) learning algorithm and Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA), implemented on the Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network. The proposed forecast methodology is examined by means of real data of Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) electricity market and the California ISO (CAISO) controlled grid. The obtained forecast results are presented and compared with those of the other SR forecast methods. (author)

  3. A new spinning reserve requirement forecast method for deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amjady, Nima; Keynia, Farshid [Department of Electrical Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran)

    2010-06-15

    Ancillary services are necessary for maintaining the security and reliability of power systems and constitute an important part of trade in competitive electricity markets. Spinning Reserve (SR) is one of the most important ancillary services for saving power system stability and integrity in response to contingencies and disturbances that continuously occur in the power systems. Hence, an accurate day-ahead forecast of SR requirement helps the Independent System Operator (ISO) to conduct a reliable and economic operation of the power system. However, SR signal has complex, non-stationary and volatile behavior along the time domain and depends greatly on system load. In this paper, a new hybrid forecast engine is proposed for SR requirement prediction. The proposed forecast engine has an iterative training mechanism composed of Levenberg-Marquadt (LM) learning algorithm and Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA), implemented on the Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network. The proposed forecast methodology is examined by means of real data of Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) electricity market and the California ISO (CAISO) controlled grid. The obtained forecast results are presented and compared with those of the other SR forecast methods. (author)

  4. Wind power and market power in competitive markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Average market prices for intermittent generation technologies are lower than for conventional generation. This has a technical reason but can be exaggerated in the presence of market power. When there is much wind smaller amounts of conventional generation technologies are required, and prices are lower, while at times of little wind prices are higher. This effect reflects the value of different generation technologies to the system. But under conditions of market power, conventional generators with market power can further depress the prices if they have to buy back energy at times of large wind output and can increase prices if they have to sell additional power at times of little wind output. This greatly exaggerates the effect. Forward contracting does not reduce the effect. An important consequence is that allowing market power profit margins as a support mechanism for generation capacity investment is not a technologically neutral policy.

  5. Coupled energy and reactive power market clearing considering power system security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiee, Abdorreza; Shayanfar, Heidarali; Amjady, Nima

    2009-01-01

    In a deregulated environment, when talking about electricity markets, one usually refers to energy market, paying less attention to the reactive power market. Active and reactive powers are, however, coupled through the AC power flow equations and branch loading limits as well as the synchronous generators capability curves. However, the sequential approach for energy and reactive power markets cannot present the optimal solution due to the interactions between these markets. For instance, clearing of the reactive power market can change active power dispatch (e.g. due to a change of transmission system losses and the capability curve limitation), which can lead to degradation of the energy market clearing point. This paper presents a coupled day ahead energy and reactive power market based on the pay-at-MCP settlement mechanism. Besides, the proposed coupled framework considers voltage stability and security issues and branch loading limits. The coupled market is cleared through optimal power flow (OPF). Its objective function includes total payment of generating units for their active power production along with the total payment function (TPF) of units for their reactive power compensation. Moreover, lost opportunity cost (LOC) of the units is also considered. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is examined on the IEEE 24 bus Reliability Test System

  6. Coupled energy and reactive power market clearing considering power system security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiee, Abdorreza; Shayanfar, Heidarali [Center of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Electrical Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran); Amjady, Nima [Department of Electrical Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran)

    2009-04-15

    In a deregulated environment, when talking about electricity markets, one usually refers to energy market, paying less attention to the reactive power market. Active and reactive powers are, however, coupled through the AC power flow equations and branch loading limits as well as the synchronous generators capability curves. However, the sequential approach for energy and reactive power markets cannot present the optimal solution due to the interactions between these markets. For instance, clearing of the reactive power market can change active power dispatch (e.g. due to a change of transmission system losses and the capability curve limitation), which can lead to degradation of the energy market clearing point. This paper presents a coupled day ahead energy and reactive power market based on the pay-at-MCP settlement mechanism. Besides, the proposed coupled framework considers voltage stability and security issues and branch loading limits. The coupled market is cleared through optimal power flow (OPF). Its objective function includes total payment of generating units for their active power production along with the total payment function (TPF) of units for their reactive power compensation. Moreover, lost opportunity cost (LOC) of the units is also considered. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is examined on the IEEE 24 bus Reliability Test System. (author)

  7. A hybrid PSO technique for procuring VAR ancillary service in the deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Araby, E.E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Suez Canal University (Egypt); Yorino, Naoto [Department of Artificial Complex Systems Engineering, Hiroshima University (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    This paper develops a new market-based technique for acquiring VAR ancillary service in the electricity market. The main objective of the developed market is to enable transmission operator ''TO'' to procure VAR service in a long term contract from the critical VAR providers that satisfy minimum VAR service payment while maintaining system security. Reactive power control problem for voltage stability is introduced into the VAR market problem in an explicit manner for normal and emergency states. An integration of particle swarm optimization ''PSO'' is presented with successive linear programming ''SLP'' for dealing with the VAR ancillary service problem. The problem is formulated as a large-scale nonlinear constrained optimization problem with a non-differentiable objective function representing VAR payment and operational costs. This type of problem is hard to be treated straightforwardly by the classical optimization methods. Therefore, we propose here a two-layer hybrid PSO/SLP approach, which is suited for carrying out the difficulties associated with non-differentiable and discontinuous objective functions. The proposed method has been examined on the standard IEEE 57 bus-system and compared with GA/SLP method to demonstrate its capability. (author)

  8. Equilibrium pricing in electricity markets with wind power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Ofir David

    Estimates from the World Wind Energy Association assert that world total wind power installed capacity climbed from 18 Gigawatt (GW) to 152 GW from 2000 to 2009. Moreover, according to their predictions, by the end of 2010 global wind power capacity will reach 190 GW. Since electricity is a unique commodity, this remarkable expansion brings forward several key economic questions regarding the integration of significant amount of wind power capacity into deregulated electricity markets. The overall dissertation objective is to develop a comprehensive theoretical framework that enables the modeling of the performance and outcome of wind-integrated electricity markets. This is relevant because the state of knowledge of modeling electricity markets is insufficient for the purpose of wind power considerations. First, there is a need to decide about a consistent representation of deregulated electricity markets. Surprisingly, the related body of literature does not agree on the very economic basics of modeling electricity markets. That is important since we need to capture the fundamentals of electricity markets before we introduce wind power to our study. For example, the structure of the electric industry is a key. If market power is present, the integration of wind power has large consequences on welfare distribution. Since wind power uncertainty changes the dynamics of information it also impacts the ability to manipulate market prices. This is because the quantity supplied by wind energy is not a decision variable. Second, the intermittent spatial nature of wind over a geographical region is important because the market value of wind power capacity is derived from its statistical properties. Once integrated into the market, the distribution of wind will impact the price of electricity produced from conventional sources of energy. Third, although wind power forecasting has improved in recent years, at the time of trading short-term electricity forwards, forecasting

  9. Generator Rescheduling under Congested Power System with Wind Integrated Competitive Power Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhan Gope

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Integration of renewable energy like wind or solar energy creates a huge pressure to the system operator (SO to ensure the congestion free transmission network under deregulated power market. Congestion Management (CM with integration of wind farm in double auction electricity market are described in this work to minimize fuel cost, system losses and locational marginal price (LMP of the system. Location of Wind Farm (WF is identified based by using Bus sensitivity factor (BSF, which is also used for selection of load bus for double auction bidding (DAB. The impacts of wind farm in congested power system under deregulated environment have been investigated in this work. Modified 39-bus New England test system is used for demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented approach by using Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP.

  10. Maintenance strategies and safety on a deregulated market. Mapping of changes in maintenance strategies and their possible consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of the project was to make a survey of the changes in the Swedish nuclear power plants over the last five years. There is a risk that nuclear power companies after a deregulation will focus especially on reducing operation and maintenance costs and that the changes could have a negative effect on the reactor safety. The task has involved summarising the actual changes, describing the present situation, the need for future development and the differences between the plants as well as identifying possible reactor safety related risks. The survey has been carried out in a broad perspective, studying the changes in equipment, maintenance strategies and the work situation of the staff. Three case studies were carried out at the Swedish nuclear power plants. Documentation from the companies has been analysed and a selection of in total 27 'informed' employees in different positions have been interviewed in total. The project also included a fourth case study concerning railway traffic. This branch of business is interesting because of its longer experience on a deregulated and competitive market. Conclusions concerning the companies individually as well as similarities and differences between them are presented in this report. Results: There have been more changes both in strategy and organisation in the last five years than during the preceding 5-10-year-period and the pace has been relatively rapid. The deregulation of the electricity market was implemented January 1997 and became the main motive force for the changes. The staffing has been reduced or unchanged and the work demands have increased. The maintenance skills have been redistributed within the organisation. New methods and equipment, i.e. RCM, and programmable systems make increased demands for analytical and theoretical competence. In the short term, job satisfaction and motivation have in some cases been negatively influenced by the new organisation forms, according to several of the

  11. Operating cost minimization of a radial distribution system in a deregulated electricity market through reconfiguration using NSGA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandramohan, S.; Atturulu, Naresh; Devi, R.P. Kumudini; Venkatesh, B.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, mechanisms for trade in ancillary services such as reactive power will be implemented in many deregulated power systems. In such an operating framework, a Distribution Corporation (DisCo) would have to purchase reactive power along with real power from the connected transmission corporation. A DisCo would want to minimize its operating costs by minimizing the total amount of real and reactive power drawn from the connected transmission system. Optimally reconfiguring the network will achieve such a goal. In this work, we use a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA) for reconfiguring a radial DisCo to minimize its operating costs considering real and reactive power costs while maximizing its operating reliability and satisfying the regular operating constraints. This method is tested on sample test systems and reported. (author)

  12. A survey of critical research areas in the energy segment of restructured electric power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanduri, Vishnu; Das, Tapas K.

    2009-01-01

    Availability of a large volume of recent literature on deregulated (a.k.a. restructured) electricity markets underscores the importance of the research needs to ensure proper design and functioning of the markets. Researchers have made significant contributions fueling the evolution of the fundamental market design changes that have taken place since the beginning of the restructuring process. Due to the vast scope, existing survey papers are focused on particular facets of deregulated electricity markets. We adopt a similar approach by focusing on the most important research areas related to the energy market. The contributions of the survey paper lie in the novel approach used in classifying the literature based on critical research areas. Some areas of research such as auction based pricing, bidding strategy formulation, market equilibria, and market power are reviewed in a different light than other existing survey papers. We conclude by providing some future research directions for the energy markets. (author)

  13. A robust mixed H2/H∞ based LFC of a deregulated power system including SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayeghi, H.; Jalili, A.; Shayanfar, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new robust decentralized controller based on mixed H 2 /H ∞ control technique for the solution of load frequency control (LFC) problem including superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in a deregulated electricity environment. To achieve decentralization, in each control area, the connections between this area and the rest of the system and the effects of possible contracts are treated as a set of new disturbance signals. In order to minimize effects of load disturbances and to achieve desired level of robust performance in the presence of modeling uncertainties and practical constraints on control action the idea of mixed H 2 /H ∞ control technique is being used for the solution of LFC problem. This newly developed design strategy combines advantage of H 2 and H ∞ control syntheses and gives a powerful multi-objectives design addressed by the linear matrix inequalities (LMI) technique. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method a four-area restructured power system is considered as a test system under different operating conditions. The simulation results with the proposed controller are shown to maintain robust performance in the presence of SMES unit in two areas at power system and without SMES unit in any of the areas. Analysis reveals that the proposed control strategy with considering SMES unit improves significantly the dynamical performances of system such as settling time and overshoot against parametric uncertainties for a wide range of area load demands and disturbances in either of the areas even in the presence of system nonlinearities

  14. Modelling the transition from cost-based to bid-based pricing in a deregulated electricity-market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, Donald J. [BC Hydro, 6911 Southpoint Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    Alberta is a province in western Canada with a deregulated electricity-market. Market clearing prices for most hours reflect the cost of either coal-fired or gas-fired thermal generation. Whenever there is a chronic shortage of generation or even a temporary one due to an outage, prices can be bid much higher than fuel costs would suggest. The province of British Columbia borders Alberta to the west and its electric utility, BC Hydro, has a history of trade with the utilities in Alberta. BC Hydro has predominantly hydroelectric resources and large storage reservoirs. Prior to Alberta's deregulation in 1996, BC Hydro was able to enter into mutually beneficial load-factoring contracts with the Alberta utilities. Now, as long as the transmission is available, BC Hydro can buy low priced off-peak coal-fired energy and sell into the high priced periods without having to share the benefits. BC Hydro uses a combination of econometric and Monte Carlo modelling to simulate hourly price-duration curves for Alberta that capture both cost-based and bid-based characteristics. This approach provides a good fit with the stochastic dynamic programming model that BC Hydro has developed for its mid-term hydro scheduling. (author)

  15. Modelling the transition from cost-based to bid-based pricing in a deregulated electricity-market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Alberta is a province in western Canada with a deregulated electricity-market. Market clearing prices for most hours reflect the cost of either coal-fired or gas-fired thermal generation. Whenever there is a chronic shortage of generation or even a temporary one due to an outage, prices can be bid much higher than fuel costs would suggest. The province of British Columbia borders Alberta to the west and its electric utility, BC Hydro, has a history of trade with the utilities in Alberta. BC Hydro has predominantly hydroelectric resources and large storage reservoirs. Prior to Alberta's deregulation in 1996, BC Hydro was able to enter into mutually beneficial load-factoring contracts with the Alberta utilities. Now, as long as the transmission is available, BC Hydro can buy low priced off-peak coal-fired energy and sell into the high priced periods without having to share the benefits. BC Hydro uses a combination of econometric and Monte Carlo modelling to simulate hourly price-duration curves for Alberta that capture both cost-based and bid-based characteristics. This approach provides a good fit with the stochastic dynamic programming model that BC Hydro has developed for its mid-term hydro scheduling

  16. Deregulation of the electric power industry in Europe and in the USA: a decomposition-recombining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, J.

    1997-07-01

    The deregulation of electric industry in Europe and in the U.S.A. assumes various aspects according to each country. Several institutional, economic and political reasons explain this evolution. Electric firms take this opportunity to merge and to implement offensive strategies on global markets. A lot of questions remains unsolved, in particular the problem of TPA pricing and the problem of planning of network infrastructures over the long run. (authors)

  17. Distributed power generation, a market assessment; Marktaspekte der verteilten Energieerzeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, T.

    2001-03-01

    The article assesses in the light of current energy policy the development of distributed power generation in the future, and resulting impacts on the structure the deregulated power industry in Germany. The author defines the essential characteristics of distributed power generation as opposed to centralized power generation, explains the various existing and emerging power generation technologies, and discusses market penetration scenarios and marketing opportunities in the context of technological developments, environmental and energy efficiency aspects, and consumer attitudes. (orig./CB) [German] Der Artikel bietet wichtige Definitionen fuer eine zielfuehrende Diskussion ueber das gesamte Gebiet der verteilten und dezentralen Energieerzeugung. Er versucht, teilweise emotional besetzte Themen auf sachlich begruendbare Grundannahmen zurueckzufuehren und zieht erste Folgerungen fuer das Zusammenwirken von erneuerbaren Energien und verteilter Energieerzeugung. (orig./CB)

  18. Industrial consumers and electricity sector deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jukic, A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the electricity sector deregulation from the point of view of major industrial consumers (MIC). Possibilities and limitations of MIC's impact on the introduction and development of an open power market in some European countries, the USA and Croatia are discussed. (author)

  19. Regulatory concern about economic deregulation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virolainen, R.; Koutaniemi, P.

    2002-01-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market may cause an increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This makes a new challenge to the regulatory body to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the economic deregulation. This paper is to discuss the current situation in Finland with regard to the economic deregulation of the electricity market and the experiences so far. A common view today is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe because of tough competition in the electricity market. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of tough competition in electricity prices and the consequential pressure to reduce costs. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points have been discussed in this paper such as change of ownership of power companies due to the economic pressure, the need to cut costs of the companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and/or outsourcing of activities. The need to pursue reduction or delay of planned investments in safety upgrades are discussed as well. (author)

  20. Regulatory concern about economic deregulation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virolainen, R.; Koutaniemi, P.

    2001-01-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market may cause an increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This makes a new challenge to the regulatory body to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the economic deregulation. This paper is to discuss the current situation in Finland with regard to the economic deregulation of the electricity market and the experiences so far. A common view today is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe because of tough competition in the electricity market. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of tough competition in electricity prices and the consequential pressure to reduce costs. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points have been discussed in this paper, such as change of ownership of power companies due to the economic pressure, the need to cut costs of the companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and/or outsourcing of activities. The need to pursue reduction or delay of planned investments in safety upgrades are discussed as well. (author)

  1. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition

  2. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition.

  3. Exchange markets for regulating power; ''Boersliche'' Regelenergiemaerkte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, A. [European Energy Exchange AG, Leipzig (Germany). Abt. Produktentwicklung

    2004-07-01

    Free markets for the commodity power are an organic component of a deregulated energy industry. This applies also for the procurement of regulating power by the transmission system operators (TSO). The foundation of exchanges makes perfect sense, when the price of the commodity has an impact beyond the exchange transaction. Exchange structures can help to solve the existing problems for the minute reserve markets in Germany. (orig.)

  4. PV electrofinance: A proposed product for insurers in a deregulated electric market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordes, J.N.; Leggett, J.

    1999-01-01

    The thesis that global climate change could disrupt world-wide weather patterns is not new but the potential losses it represents have drawn attention from the financial community--particularly property-casualty insurers who are subject to large damage claims if climate change occurs. With the deregulation of the electricity sector, the specter of climate change can be transformed from a threat into an exciting opportunity for insurers, bankers and other financiers who have the need, foresight and capacity to invest in energy conservation and photovoltaics as mitigation strategies

  5. Effects of series compensation on spot price power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, G.B.; Wang Feng

    2005-01-01

    The operation of a deregulated power market becomes more complex as the generation scheduling is dependent on suppliers' and consumers' bids. With large number of transactions in the power market changing in time, it is more likely for some transmission lines to face congestion. Series compensation, such as TCSC, with its ability to directly control the power flow can be very helpful to improve the operation of transmission networks. The effects of TCSC on the operation of a spot price power market are studied in this paper using the modified IEEE 14-bus system. Optimal Power Flow incorporating TCSC is used to implement the spot price market. Linear bids are used to model suppliers' and consumers' bids. Issues of location and cost of TCSC are discussed. The effects of levels of TCSC compensation on wide range of system quantities are studied. The effects on the total social benefit, the spot prices, transmission congestion, total generation and consumption, benefit to individual supplier and consumer etc. are discussed. It is demonstrated that though use of TCSC makes the system more efficient and augments competition in the market, it is not easy to establish general relationships between the levels of compensation and various market quantities. Simulation studies like these can be used to assess the effects of TCSC in specific systems. (Author)

  6. Study on economic potential of nuclear-gas combined cycle power generation in Chinese market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhiwei; Bian Zhiqiang; Yang Mengjia

    2004-01-01

    Facing the challenges of separation of electric power plant and grid, and the deregulation of Chinese electricity supplying market in near future, nuclear power plants mainly operated as based load at the present regulated market should look for new operation mode. The economics of electric generation with nuclear-natural gas combined cycle is studied based on current conditions of natural gas and nuclear power plants in China. The results indicate that the technology development of nuclear-natural gas combined cycle for power generation is of potential prospects in Chinese electric market. (authors)

  7. Game theory application to operation control and pricing in deregulated power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid move to a market-based electric power industry will significantly change electric utility operations. In this paper, we consider economic load dispatching rules in power systems under competitive environment when independent power producers (IPPs) are introduced and analyze their economic consequences by using game theory. An electric utility and IPPs are included in the model as players of the game where IPPs enter into the game firstly as a group, and secondly as individually. The utility and IPPs intend to maximize their own profit. We mainly use the Stackelberg strategy game theory and Nash equilibrium solution to analyze the negotiation process between the electric utility and IPPS, since it is widely recognized as rational decisions for competitive markets in terms of axiom. (author)

  8. Gas directive. Which deregulation for France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This study deals with the following aspects of natural gas market: deregulation of the French market; status and perspectives of the gas market: overview of the gas supplies in Europe at the 2010/2015 vista; situation of regulations: status of the gas directive at the European level and impact on member states market, transposition of the gas directive in France: present day legislation, main stakes and situation of the dialogue with the actors; consequences and actors' strategy: testimony of suppliers, past and future situation, development of new activities in the gas/power industry, possible contractual evolutions, position of the supplier; testimony of clients: new suppliers, new contracts, new risks; legal stakes for the clients: impact of deregulation on contracts, future contractual organization of the market, evolution of 'take or pay' contracts, impairment of contracts obligations, negotiation of supply contracts. (J.S.)

  9. The influence of market deregulation on fast food consumption and body mass index: a cross-national time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vogli, Roberto; Kouvonen, Anne; Gimeno, David

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of fast food consumption on mean population body mass index (BMI) and explore the possible influence of market deregulation on fast food consumption and BMI. The within-country association between fast food consumption and BMI in 25 high-income member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development between 1999 and 2008 was explored through multivariate panel regression models, after adjustment for per capita gross domestic product, urbanization, trade openness, lifestyle indicators and other covariates. The possible mediating effect of annual per capita intake of soft drinks, animal fats and total calories on the association between fast food consumption and BMI was also analysed. Two-stage least squares regression models were conducted, using economic freedom as an instrumental variable, to study the causal effect of fast food consumption on BMI. After adjustment for covariates, each 1-unit increase in annual fast food transactions per capita was associated with an increase of 0.033 kg/m2 in age-standardized BMI (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.013-0.052). Only the intake of soft drinks--not animal fat or total calories--mediated the observed association (β: 0.030; 95% CI: 0.010-0.050). Economic freedom was an independent predictor of fast food consumption (β: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.16-0.37). When economic freedom was used as an instrumental variable, the association between fast food and BMI weakened but remained significant (β: 0.023; 95% CI: 0.001-0.045). Fast food consumption is an independent predictor of mean BMI in high-income countries. Market deregulation policies may contribute to the obesity epidemic by facilitating the spread of fast food.

  10. Global power: Markets and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirer, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The author will first present an updated view of the global power market activity, including opportunities in power generation, transmission and distribution. This will include a review of the trends in closings and transaction flowed by type of activity and geographic area. Estimates will be based on Hagler Bailly's comprehensive database on global power transactions and project announcements. The firm has also worked with dozens of global power companies since 1990. Second, the author will review trends in terms of regulatory changes, project cost trends, developers' project experiences, and financing issues. This systematic review will be the foundation for projection of future market activity (e.g., number of closing by type of project through 2000). A forecast of future greenfield and privatization activity will be provided and the key markets will be highlighted. Third, the author will present an updated view of the competition in the global power market (including the various types of competitors and changes in their respective market posture). Finally, the author will discuss the various types of strategies and business models that are followed by key global power players

  11. An OPF based approach for assessing the minimal reactive power support for generators in deregulated power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.; Yu, C.W.; Xu, N.; Lin, X.J.

    2008-01-01

    Reactive power support is an important ancillary service for secure and reliable operation in power markets. It has recently been recognized that the reactive power support for a generator has two components: one for supporting its own real power transmission and the other for supplying reactive demand, improving system security, and controlling system voltage; and that only the second part should receive financial compensation in competitive power markets. This makes the problem of separating these two components a new focus of current research. An OPF based reactive power optimization model along with a power flow tracing based method is proposed in this paper to tackle this problem. The methodology is tested on four test systems. Detailed analysis of the results of the 39-bus test system is reported. (author)

  12. Industrial DSM in a deregulated European electricity market - a case study of 11 plants in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trygg, Louise; Karlsson, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 Sweden will become part of a common European electricity market. This implies that the price of electricity in Swedish will adapt to a higher European electricity price due to the increase in cross-border trading. Swedish plant is characterized as more electricity-intensive than plant on the European continent, and this, in combination with a higher European electricity price will lead to a precarious scenario. This paper studies the energy use of 11 plants in the municipality of Oskarshamn in Sweden. The aim is to show how these plants can reduce their electricity use to adapt to a European level. We have found that the plants could reduce their use of electricity by 48% and their use of energy by 40%. In a European perspective, where coal-condensing power is assumed to be the marginal production that alters as the electricity demand changes, the decrease in the use of electricity in this study leads to a reduction in global emissions of carbon dioxide of 69,000 tonne a year. Electricity generated in Sweden emits very low emissions of carbon dioxide and have thus consequently very low external cost. The freed capacity in Sweden could therefore replace electricity generated with higher external cost and as a result lower the total external cost in Europe. The emissions from the saved electricity could also be valuable within the EU emissions trading scheme, if the emissions calculation is done assuming the marginal electricity is fossil fuel based

  13. A new computational method for reactive power market clearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Elkasrawy, A.; Venkatesh, B.

    2009-01-01

    After deregulation of electricity markets, ancillary services such as reactive power supply are priced separately. However, unlike real power supply, procedures for costing and pricing reactive power supply are still evolving and spot markets for reactive power do not exist as of now. Further, traditional formulations proposed for clearing reactive power markets use a non-linear mixed integer programming formulation that are difficult to solve. This paper proposes a new reactive power supply market clearing scheme. Novelty of this formulation lies in the pricing scheme that rewards transformers for tap shifting while participating in this market. The proposed model is a non-linear mixed integer challenge. A significant portion of the manuscript is devoted towards the development of a new successive mixed integer linear programming (MILP) technique to solve this formulation. The successive MILP method is computationally robust and fast. The IEEE 6-bus and 300-bus systems are used to test the proposed method. These tests serve to demonstrate computational speed and rigor of the proposed method. (author)

  14. New electric power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorzoli, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    In a trend analysis of methods of energy production and use, this paper cites forecasted significant gains in efficiency through the use of combined cycles for heat and power production, and rapidly falling costs of solar and wind power plants. A technical/economic feasibility analysis is then performed on the future use of electric vehicles in Italy. Here, the paper cites the possible benefits in terms of energy conservation and air pollution abatement. A review is made of current progress in research efforts aimed at reducing electric battery sizing, weight and recharging constraints

  15. Green power marketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltshire, S. [Selectpower Inc., Guelph, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Selectpower Inc. is an unregulated affiliate of Guelph Hydro and was formed to market green energy alternatives. Details of their Selectwind program were reviewed in this presentation. The program is available to both individuals and organizations. Customers sign a 3 or 5 year agreement to purchase monthly blocks of wind energy at a premium of $6.53 per month, which is billed on their Hydro bill. Details of the program's business strategy and branding policy were presented. The program markets itself by using full page colour newspaper ads, direct mailing and making forms available at Selectpower retail stores, mall kiosks and community events. In addition, Selectwind leaders are profiled in Enernews, and also have a quarterly newsletter. An example of an order form was provided, as well as an outline of Selectwind educational materials and details of their quality assurance procedures, EcoLogo certification and guarantees. Fifty percent of customers currently buy more than 100 kWh per month, and several customers buy 100 per cent equivalent of their electricity use as Selectwind. Minimum Selectwind purchase is 1200 kWh per year with a 3 year contract. Approximately 100 MWh are purchased every month, and 3,607,494 kWh have been sold for the life of the contracts. Selectwind's combined emissions reduction commitments are 3,206 tonnes of CO{sub 2}. It was observed that 45,000 Ontario customer using wind energy represented 6.2 MW of installed capacity. refs., tabs., figs.

  16. Regulatory trends : deregulation, where in the world is it working?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofield, J.

    2001-01-01

    The issue of electricity deregulation was the focus of this Power-Point presentation, which discussed what deregulation entails, what it is meant to achieve and whether there is only one right answer. Different approaches and performance results were presented with reference to international experiences in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and California. The main objective of deregulation is introduce competition to give customers a choice between suppliers and products, to allow market forces to set prices with the hope that they will be lower, and to encourage industry efficiency, reduce costs, improve productivity, and ensure that the right investments are made. The underlying agenda is to raise billions of dollars to reduce government debt and to transfer the risks and investment requirements to the investors and away from the government/taxpayers and ratepayers. Deregulation entails restructuring, privatization and unbundling of monopolies. It also entails a set of market rules and new systems processes to enable retail competition. The author emphasized that there are different characteristics to deregulation in each jurisdiction and that the state of the pre-deregulation industry plays a significant role in the eventual success of deregulation. The lessons learned from international experience is that open, non-discriminatory access is essential for both transmission and distribution and that political will for restructuring is essential. It was also determined that partial deregulation will not work, since wholesale and retail markets are connected. It was concluded that deregulation can work to different degrees under different designs. Progress so far has been slow and customers have yet to see the full benefits of deregulation. tabs

  17. Power plant engineering for overseas market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    Korea`s experience in power plant engineering for the overseas market is reviewed. The following topics are discussed: the Asian electric power market, ordering characteristics, country situations, and overseas market requirements.

  18. Deregulation and restructuring of the electricity sector in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francia, L.

    2000-01-01

    This economic analysis of the Electric Power industry and market in Spain shows how the electricity deregulation and liberalization in Spain have given rise to an electricity industry which not only complies in spirit and letter with the E.U. Directive on the internal energy market, but which in fact goes much further. (A.L.B.)

  19. Natural gas and deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, G.

    2001-01-01

    The gas market is progressively moving towards new organizations under the effect of the deregulation initiated in the United States, the United Kingdom and transposed to other countries, particularly in Europe, at least for the member countries of the European union. Within the framework provided by this overall trend, Cedigaz proposes this study in order to describe the main developments affecting these markets on account of deregulation. This report is structured on the basis of three main topics (market organization, marketing modes, pricing) which appear to be the most cogent in terms of deregulation. This grouping by major topics accordingly offers a relatively synthetic view of the main trends which could be observed on the European market, for example. Our analysis is largely based on the example of the American market and, to a lesser extent, on the British situation. Whenever possible, concrete examples are provided for a closer understanding of this complex subject. On the whole, deregulation is not a frozen process, but has to adapt permanently to developments in a market stage-managed by politics, the regulator and the industrial players. This obviously means a dynamic and constantly evolving process, making it a highly complex process. This report aims to shed some light on the subject. (author)

  20. Free Market Ideology and Deregulation in Colorado's Oilfields: Evidence for triple movement activism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Stephanie A; Mayer, Adam; Shreeve, Kelly; Olson-Hazboun, Shawn K; Adgate, John

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional oil and gas extraction (UOGE) has spurred an unprecedented boom in on-shore production in the U.S. Despite a surge in related research, a void exists regarding inquiries into policy outcomes and perceptions. To address this, support for federal regulatory exemptions for UOGE is examined using survey data collected in 2015 from two northern Colorado communities. Current regulatory exemptions for UOGE can be understood as components of broader societal processes of neoliberalization. Free market ideology increases public support for federal regulatory exemptions for UOGE. Perceived negative impacts do not necessarily drive people to support increased federal regulation. Utilizing neo-Polanyian theory, interaction between free market ideology and perceived negative impacts is explored. Free market ideology appears to moderate people's views of regulation: increasing the effect of perceived negative impacts while simultaneously increasing support for de regulation. To conclude, the ways in which free market ideology might normalize the impacts of UOGE activity are discussed.

  1. Grant places market power mitigation at top of the agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In his address to the IPPSO Conference, John Grant, the Vice Chair of the Ontario Market Design Committee (MDC) reviewed the events leading up to the formation of the MDC, outlined the mandate of the Committee, and reviewed the various issues that they will be reporting on to the Ontario Minister of Energy before the end of 1998. In all, the MDC is expected to submit four quarterly progress reports. The first was submitted in March 1998. It focused on the structure and governance of the central market-management body, the independent Market Operator (IMO), the IMO's relationship to the Ontario Energy Board, and some guidelines for the design of the wholesale electricity market. The remaining three reports, prepared by the several subcommittees of the MDC, will deal with market power mitigation, wholesale and retail market design, the environment, and transmission and distribution. He identified mitigation of the market power of Ontario Hydro as the dominant generator as the major challenge facing the MDC. He explained that the MDC is looking at some measures to put in place before deregulation takes effect, as well as measures that may be introduced after, in response to problems as they arise

  2. Deregulation of the electric power industry in Europe and in the USA: a decomposition-recombining process; La deregulation de l'industrie electrique en Europe et aux Etats-Unis: un processus de decomposition-recomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percebois, J

    1997-07-01

    The deregulation of electric industry in Europe and in the U.S.A. assumes various aspects according to each country. Several institutional, economic and political reasons explain this evolution. Electric firms take this opportunity to merge and to implement offensive strategies on global markets. A lot of questions remains unsolved, in particular the problem of TPA pricing and the problem of planning of network infrastructures over the long run. (authors)

  3. Deregulation of the electric power industry in Europe and in the USA: a decomposition-recombining process; La deregulation de l'industrie electrique en Europe et aux Etats-Unis: un processus de decomposition-recomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percebois, J

    1997-07-01

    The deregulation of electric industry in Europe and in the U.S.A. assumes various aspects according to each country. Several institutional, economic and political reasons explain this evolution. Electric firms take this opportunity to merge and to implement offensive strategies on global markets. A lot of questions remains unsolved, in particular the problem of TPA pricing and the problem of planning of network infrastructures over the long run. (authors)

  4. Pomen managementa na dereguliranem maloprodajnem trgu električne energije v Sloveniji = The Importance of Management in the Deregulated Retail Electricity Distribution Market in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Papler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper underlines the importance of management in the deregulated retail electricity distribution market, entrepreneurship and business behaviours toward consumers’ satisfaction with quality of services. The coefficients of concentration indicate a high concentration of electricity suppliers and users in the deregulated electricity retail market for industry. The production function reveals the importance of education and electricity infrastructure, and to a lesser extent of capital intensity, in labour productivity growth in the retail electricity distribution enterprise. Electricity demand in industry is determined positively by real income growth and negatively by real electricity price increases. Multivariate factor analysis confirms two main common components of efficient retail electricity supply and satisfaction of consumers in industry. In the first group of factors of efficient retail electricity supply the highest weights are for consumption, quality of services, expenses and advice. In the second group of factors of consumers’ satisfaction the highest weights are for response, needs, reliability and personnel. The impacts of changes in the dynamics of competition in the deregulated retail electricity market on management and organisational behaviours are found significant for quality of services, marketing and marketing strategies, supply-chain and customer relationship management.

  5. Competitive business and marketing strategies for utilities: how to thrive in a deregulated energy marketplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Materials submitted by the speakers at this seminar on marketing strategies for electric utilities are contained in this binder. A dozen papers were presented, discussing topics ranging from advice to retail customers on how to find their way through the existing mire of legislation, codes and licenses, through tips and suggestions to utilities on capturing customers who fail to choose a provider, understanding performance-based regulation, developing innovative pricing strategies, using customer profiling and market segmentation techniques to identify and target different customer groups, bundling services to add value, creating branding strategies to achieve product differentiation and the impact of metering technology development on retail business. In most instances no complete text, only viewgraphs are available. Two half-day workshops, one on investing in a new product or service, the other on market uncertainties, and risks and rewards facing energy distributors, were also held under the auspices of the conference.

  6. Investments in liberalised power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenaa Jensen, S.; Meibom, P.

    2005-01-01

    There is considerable uncertainty in the Nordic electricity system with respect to the long-term development in production capacity. The process towards liberalisation of the electricity sector started with a situation of a large capacity margin, but this margin is gradually vanishing. Since the potential investors in new production capacity are unaccustomed with investments under the new regime, it is unknown if and when investments will take place. The purpose of the present study is to analyze if and when investors choose to invest in new electricity production capacity depending on their existing portfolio of power producing units. Electricity price scenarios generated with a partial equilibrium model (Balmorel) are combined with a model of investment decisions. In this, various scenarios concerning the development in the Nordic power market, such as new transmission lines between neighbouring countries, more installed wind power, and changes in CO 2 emission trading costs, are used to investigate the consequences for investments in a natural gas fired, combined cycle power plant. The main result of the analysis is that new investments are highly sensitive to investors existing power production portfolio, as new production units affect the merit order in the power market, i.e. compete with the existing power plants. (au)

  7. Study on Stochastic Optimal Electric Power Procurement Strategies with Uncertain Market Prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakchai, Siripatanakulkhajorn; Saisho, Yuichi; Fujii, Yasumasa; Yamaji, Kenji

    The player in deregulated electricity markets can be categorized into three groups of GENCO (Generator Companies), TRNASCO (Transmission Companies), DISCO (Distribution Companies). This research focuses on the role of Distribution Companies, which purchase electricity from market at randomly fluctuating prices, and provide it to their customers at given fixed prices. Therefore Distribution companies have to take the risk stemming from price fluctuation of electricity instead of the customers. This entails the necessity to develop a certain method to make an optimal strategy for electricity procurement. In such a circumstance, this research has the purpose for proposing the mathematical method based on stochastic dynamic programming to evaluate the value of a long-term bilateral contract of electricity trade, and also a project of combination of the bilateral contract and power generation with their own generators for procuring electric power in deregulated market.

  8. Modeling market power in Korea's emerging power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Nam-sung; Niemeyer, Victor

    2007-01-01

    The Korean power market is being formed from the unbundled generation, transmission and distribution assets of Korea Electric Power Corporation. The KEPCO generation has been allocated to six independent gencos with a combined generating capacity of 46,629 MW in 2002. This gave an 11% margin over the peak load that year (41,921 MW). One of the concerns for any power market is whether individual participants can increase profits (and prices) by withholding generation from the market. To address this concern, a Cournot-based model of Korean power system was created and applied to a set of loads representing the load duration curve for Korea's system loads in 2002. Our simulation results show a strong possibility for exercise of market power to increase market price in Korean market. Under tight market conditions, even 1 GW of withholding can cause a large increase in market price. If loads unexpectedly grow faster than the 5% recent experience, the gencos will have the collective ability and incentive to spike prices further. Vesting contracts can reduce the incentive to act strategically. Requiring that the gencos offer 50% of their capacity in long-term forward contracts greatly reduces the payoff to act strategically, and requiring vesting for 75% of their capacity results in prices that are essentially the same as the competitive equilibrium. Depending on the price for the vesting contracts, this policy can reduce the incentives to add new generation by gencos or the competitive fringe. Another approach to reducing the effects of market power is establishing demand-response programs, simulated here by increasing the elasticity of overall demand. These programs can reduce the incentives to withhold capacity, but to a lesser degree than vesting contracts. The genco with the greatest ability to influence prices through withholding is the largest, KNHP. However, acting on its own, without the support of the other gencos, its ability to raise prices is limited. This

  9. Methods for Estimation of Market Power in Electric Power Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcik, M.; Oleinikova, I.; Junghans, G.; Kolcun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The article is related to a topical issue of the newly-arisen market power phenomenon in the electric power industry. The authors point out to the importance of effective instruments and methods for credible estimation of the market power on liberalized electricity market as well as the forms and consequences of market power abuse. The fundamental principles and methods of the market power estimation are given along with the most common relevant indicators. Furthermore, in the work a proposal for determination of the relevant market place taking into account the specific features of power system and a theoretical example of estimating the residual supply index (RSI) in the electricity market are given.

  10. Analysis of the French gasoline market since the deregulation of prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, F.; Ioannidis, C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the behaviour of gasoline prices in France over the period 1980-1990. We have established that the price liberalization measures introduced in 1985 were successful in integrating the domestic market to the European one, but the process of integration is still in progress. The behaviour of the Tax Authorities did not inhibit price flexibility with final gasoline prices responding symmetrically to international gasoline price changes. 8 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Green power: A renewable energy resources marketing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Green power is electricity generated from renewable energy sources such as power generated from the sun, the wind, the heat of the earth, and biomass. Green pricing is the marketing strategy to sell green power to customers who voluntarily pay a premium for it. Green pricing is evolving from the deregulation of the electric industry, the need for clean air, reflected in part as concern over global warming, and technology advances. The goal of the renewable energy marketing plan is to generate enough revenues for a utility to fund power purchase agreements (PPAs) with renewable energy developers or construct its own renewable facilities. Long-term, fixed price PPAs enable developers to obtain financing to construct new facilities, sometimes taking technological risks which a utility might not take otherwise. The marketing plan is built around different rate premiums for different categories of ratepayers, volunteer customer participation, customer participation recognition, and budget allocations between project costs and power marketing costs. Green prices are higher than those for conventional sources, particularly prices from natural gas fired plants. Natural gas is abundant relative to oil in price per British thermal unit (Btu). Green pricing can help bridge the gap between the current oversupply of gas and the time, not far off, when all petroleum prices will exceed those for renewable energy. The rapid implementation of green pricing is important. New marketing programs will bolster the growing demand for renewable energy evidenced in many national surveys thus decreasing the consumption of power now generated by burning hydrocarbons. This paper sets forth a framework to implement a green power marketing plan for renewable energy developers and utilities working together

  12. Market power analysis for the Iranian electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgari, Mohammad Hossein; Monsef, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The market power problem in Iranian electricity market is addressed in this study. This paper by using various structural indices of market power and reviewing market results analyzes the intensity of competition in Iran's electricity market and examines whether this market is functioning at an appropriate level of efficiency. In this article the most well-known indices of market power are calculated in two approaches for two different scenarios (current situation and future outlook of generation sector's ownership in Iran's power industry). Comparing the results of these scenarios promises more competitive market for the second scenario. Calculating Residual Supply Index for Iran's power market shows despite admissible values of concentration ratios, due to supply scarcity during periods when the demand is close to the total available capacity, some suppliers can exercise market power even with a relatively small market share. The most important price and load indices like weighted average prices and load/price duration curves of Iranian electricity market during March 2007-March 2008 are also analyzed in this paper. These results imply the existence of economic withholding. The main limiting factors of competition and significant implemented countermeasures for market power mitigation in Iran's electricity market are also mentioned.

  13. Intermittently renewable energy, optimal capacity mix and prices in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milstein, Irena; Tishler, Asher

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses the effect of intermittently renewable energy on generation capacity mix and market prices. We consider two generating technologies: (1) conventional fossil-fueled technology such as combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT), and (2) sunshine-dependent renewable technology such as photovoltaic cells (PV). In the first stage of the model (game), when only the probability distribution functions of future daily electricity demand and sunshine are known, producers maximize their expected profits by determining the CCGT and PV capacity to be constructed. In the second stage, once daily demand and sunshine conditions become known, each producer selects the daily production by each technology, taking the capacities of both technologies as given, and subject to the availability of the PV capacity, which can be used only if the sun is shining. Using real-world data for Israel, we confirm that the introduction of PV technology amplifies price volatility. A large reduction in PV capacity cost increases PV adoption but may also raise the average price. Thus, when considering the promotion of renewable energy to reduce CO 2 emissions, regulators should assess the behavior of the electricity market, particularly with respect to characteristics of renewable technologies and demand and supply uncertainties. - Research Highlights: → This paper assesses the effect of intermittently renewable energy on generation capacity mix and market prices. → We consider two generating technologies: (1) conventional fossil-fueled technology such as CCGT and (2) sunshine-dependent renewable technology such as photovoltaic cells (PV). →Using real-world data for Israel, we confirm that the introduction of PV technology amplifies price volatility. → A large reduction in PV capacity cost increases PV adoption but may also raise the average price.

  14. A Primer on Electric Utilities, Deregulation, and Restructuring of U.S. Electricity Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, William M.

    2002-06-03

    This primer is offered as an introduction to utility restructuring to better prepare readers for ongoing changes in public utilities and associated energy markets. It is written for use by individuals with responsibility for the management of facilities that use energy, including energy managers, procurement staff, and managers with responsibility for facility operations and budgets. The primer was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Federal Energy Management Program. The impetus for this primer originally came from the Government Services Administration who supported its initial development.

  15. Electricity pricing model in thermal generating stations under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reji, P.; Ashok, S.; Moideenkutty, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    In regulated public utilities with competitive power markets, deregulation has replaced the monopoly. Under the deregulated power market, the electricity price primarily depends on market mechanism and power demand. In this market, generators generally follow marginal pricing. Each generator fixes the electricity price based on their pricing strategy and it leads to more price volatility. This paper proposed a model to determine the electricity price considering all operational constraints of the plant and economic variables that influenced the price, for a thermal generating station under deregulation. The purpose of the model was to assist existing stations, investors in the power sector, regulatory authorities, transmission utilities, and new power generators in decision-making. The model could accommodate price volatility in the market and was based on performance incentive/penalty considering plant load factor, availability of the plant and peak/ off peak demand. The model was applied as a case study to a typical thermal utility in India to determine the electricity price. It was concluded that the case study of a thermal generating station in a deregulated environment showed that the electricity price mainly depended on the gross calorific value (GCV) of fuel, mode of operation, price of the fuel, and operating charges. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  16. An Integrated Design approach to Power Systems: from Power Flows to Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Subhonmesh

    Power system is at the brink of change. Engineering needs, economic forces and environmental factors are the main drivers of this change. The vision is to build a smart electrical grid and a smarter market mechanism around it to fulfill mandates on clean energy. Looking at engineering and economic issues in isolation is no longer an option today; it needs an integrated design approach. In this thesis, I shall revisit some of the classical questions on the engineering operation of power systems that deals with the nonconvexity of power flow equations. Then I shall explore some issues of the interaction of these power flow equations on the electricity markets to address the fundamental issue of market power in a deregulated market environment. Finally, motivated by the emergence of new storage technologies, I present an interesting result on the investment decision problem of placing storage over a power network. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that modern optimization and game theory can provide unique insights into this complex system. Some of the ideas carry over to applications beyond power systems.

  17. Market power in electricity markets: Beyond concentration measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borenstein, S.; Bushnell, J.; Knittel, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    The wave of electricity market restructuring both within the US and abroad has brought the issue of horizontal market power to the forefront of energy policy. Traditionally, estimation and prediction of market power has relied heavily on concentration measures. In this paper, the authors discuss the weaknesses of concentration measures as a viable measure of market power in the electricity industry, and they propose an alternative method based on market simulations that take advantage of existing plant level data. The authors discuss results from previous studies they have performed, and present new results that allow for the detection of threshold demand levels where market power is likely to be a problem. In addition, the authors analyze the impact of that recent divestitures in the California electricity market will have on estimated market power. They close with a discussion of the policy implications of the results

  18. Market integration of Virtual Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mette Kirschmeyer; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2013-01-01

    develop a three stage market model, which includes Day-Ahead (Spot), Intra-Day and Regulating Power Markets. This allows us to test the hypothesis that the Virtual Power Plant can generate additional profit by trading across several markets. We find that even though profits do increase as more markets...

  19. Market Design and Supply Security in Imperfect Power Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwenen, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Supply security in imperfect power markets is modelled under different market designs. In a uniform price auction for electricity with two firms, strategic behaviour may leave firms offering too few capacities and unable to supply all realized demand. Market design that relies oncapacity markets...... increases available generation capacities for sufficiently high capacity prices and consequently decreases energy prices. However, equilibrium capacity prices are non-competitive. Capacity markets can increase security of supply, but cannot mitigate market power, which is exercised in the capacity market...

  20. Carbon auctions, energy markets and market power: An experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormady, Noah C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an experimental analysis of a simultaneous energy-emissions market under conditions of market power. The experimental design employs real-world institutional features; including stochastic demand, permit banking, inter-temporal (multi-round) dynamics, a tightening cap, and resale. The results suggest that dominant firms can utilize energy-emissions market linkages to simultaneously inflate the price of energy and suppress the price of emissions allowances. Whereas under prior market designs, regulators were concerned with dominant firms exercising their market power over the emissions market to exclude rivals and manipulate the permit market by hoarding permits; the results of this paper suggest that this strategy is less profitable to dominant firms in contemporary auction-based markets than strategic capacity withholding in the energy market and associated demand reduction in the emissions market. - Highlights: • Laboratory simulation of joint energy-emissions market. • Evaluates market power under collusion and real-world institutional features. • Dominant firms can exercise market power to inflate energy prices. • Dominant firms can exercise market power to suppress emissions prices. • Supply withholding is an implicit demand reduction in the emissions market

  1. The Nordic electric power market. A study of the market characteristics, price factors and the competitive environment of the Nordic power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskikallio, J.; Lindholm, J.

    2003-06-01

    The market price of power depends on the balance between energy supply and demand. This balance depends on several external factors: the hydrological situation, temperature, time, fuel prices and exchange rates, transmission capacity and congestion, business cycles, other weather-related factors (wind, sun etc.) There are interdependencies between the factors, but the greatest price effects are caused by changes in the hydrological situation (affects energy supply) and temperature (affects mainly demand). Transmission capacity is normally sufficient, especially between Sweden and Finland. When congestion occurs, the price effects may be drastic, due to differences between the countries in the energy production mix. Price areas with several other bordering price areas (Oslo) have the lowest price level. The Helsinki area has the highest price level over time. Congestion is more frequent between southern Sweden and Norway, which accounts for a major part of the difference between the Helsinki area price and the system price. Market concentration is very high in separate price areas, but only moderate for the Nordic market as a whole. Congestion automatically leads to a highly concentrated sub-market. Further market concentration should be avoided, and congestion management should be improved in order to ensure a functioning market. Our findings also included the fact that although power producers have increased their profits since the deregulation of the market, there were no conclusive evidence of market power abuse. A continued trend toward higher profits may change the situation in the future, as the possibility to take advantage of market power already exists. Transmission System Operators (TSO's) have a crucial role for ensuring a functioning power market. As the actions of the TSO may have adverse effects, they should be continuously monitored and subject to much tighter scrutiny than 'ordinary' energy companies. Issues have arisen from the TSO's trading of

  2. A great potential for market power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trong, Maj Dang

    2003-01-01

    In a report the competition authorities of Norway, Sweden and Denmark conclude that there is a great potential for exerting market power in the Nordic countries. Bottlenecks in the transmission grid divide the Nordic market in shifting constellations of geographic markets and the market concentration in each market may therefore become very high

  3. Transmission rights and market power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, J.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the concerns about physical transmission rights relate to the ability to implicitly or explicitly remove that transmission capacity from the market-place. Under a very strict form of physical right, owners could simply choose not to sell it if they don't want to use it. Modifications that require the release of spare capacity back into an open market could potentially alleviate this problem but there is concern that such releases would not occur far enough in advance to be of much use to schedulers. Similarly, the transmission capacity that is made available for use by non-rights holders can also be manipulated by the owners of transmission rights. The alternative form, financial transmission rights, provide to their owners congestion payments, but physical control of transmission paths. In electricity markets such as California's, even financial transmission rights could potentially be utilized to effectively withhold transmission capacity from the marketplace. However, methods for withholding transmission capacity are somewhat more convoluted, and probably more difficult, for owners of financial rights than for owners of physical rights. In this article, the author discusses some of the potential concerns over transmission rights and their use for the exercise of various forms of market power

  4. Money, Markets and Social Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The future science of Economics must be human-centered, value-based, inclusive, global in scope and evolutionary in perspective. It needs to be fundamentally interdisciplinary to reflect the increasingly complex sectoral interconnections that characterize modern society. It must also be founded on transdisciplinary principles of social existence and human development that constitute the theoretical foundation for all the human sciences. This paper examines three fundamental aspects of modern economy to illustrate the types of issues and perspectives relevant to a reformulation of Economics framed within a broader political, social, cultural, psychological and ecological context. It examines the social forces responsible for the present functioning of economies, which can be effectively addressed and controlled only when they are made conscious and explicit. Whatever the powers that have shaped its development in the past, the rightful aim of economic science is a system of knowledge that promotes the welfare and well-being of all humanity. Markets and money are instruments for the conversion of social potential into social power. They harness the power of organization to transform human energies into the capacity for social accomplishment. The distribution of rights and privileges in society determines how these social institutions function and who benefits. Freedom means access to social power and is only possible in the measure all forms of that power—political, economic and social—are equitably distributed. The current system is inherently biased in favor of privileged elites reinforcing domination by the more powerful. The emergence of the individual is the vanguard of social evolution and the widest manifestation of creative individuality is its pinnacle. This emergence can only be fully achieved in conditions of freedom and equality. Economic theory needs to make explicit the underlying forces determining the distribution of power and

  5. Market power behaviour in the danish food marketing chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and demonstrates an econometric approach to analysing food industry firms' market pricing behaviour within the framework of translog cost functions and based on firm-level accounts panel data. The study identifies effects that can be interpreted as firms' market power behaviour...... in output or input markets. The most robust indications of market power behaviour in output markets are found in the pork and poultry processing sectors, as well as for firms in the bakeries sector. On the other hand, the most robust market power behaviour indications regarding input markets are found...... for poultry processing. In general, the patterns with regard to market power behaviour seem to be more clearly identified in the processing sectors than in the distribution sectors....

  6. Market design and supply security in imperfect power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenen, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Supply security in imperfect power markets is modelled under different market designs. In a uniform price auction for electricity with two firms, strategic behaviour may leave firms offering too few capacities and unable to supply all realized demand. Market design that relies on capacity markets increases available generation capacities for sufficiently high capacity prices and consequently decreases energy prices. However, equilibrium capacity prices are non-competitive. Capacity markets can increase security of supply, but cannot mitigate market power, which is exercised in the capacity market instead of the energy market. - Highlights: • I model two power generating firms who compete to serve stochastic demand in a multiunit uniform price auction. • In equilibrium, blackout probabilities can arise through capacity withholding. • Capacity mechanisms decrease capacity withholding and the expected energy price. • With dominant firms, capacity mechanisms are only effective if capacity prices are non-competitive and include a mark-up for leaving the energy-only market optimum

  7. Peak Power Markets for Satellite Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces first Indonesia, comprises 15,000 islands, has land area of two millions square kilometers. Extending from 95 to 141 degrees East longitude and from 6 degrees North to 11 degrees South latitude. Further the market of the Space Solar Power/SPS must be worldwide, including Indonesia. As we know, it can provide electricity anywhere in the world from the Earth's orbit, mostly Indonesia an equator country. We have to perform case studies of various countries to understand their benefits and disadvantages provided by the SSP, because each country has much different condition on energy from other countries. We are at the moment starting the international collaboration between Indonesia and Japan to carry out the case study for Indonesia. We understand that in Indonesia itself each province has much different micro-climate between one province compared to the other. In Japan, METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) has already organized a committee to investigate the feasibility of Space Solar Power and to make a plan to launch a space demonstration of the SPS. While, Indonesia is quickly developing economy and increasing their energy demand. We are investigating the detailed energy conditions of Indonesia, the benefits and disadvantages of the Space Solar Power for Indonesia. Especially, we will perform the investigation on the receiving system for the Japanese pilot Space Power Satellite.

  8. Energy and the deregulated marketplace 1998 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    In this comprehensive survey of the energy and deregulated marketplace, 911 respondents indicate how deregulation will impact their business. Well organized for easy reference this published survey report provides answers on how companies will procure electricity and natural gas, and what criteria will be used in their decision process. The results presented also illustrate effect of real time pricing on the procurement of energy equipment. Readers will be able to see whether companies are delaying the purchase of energy efficiency equipment as a result of deregulation, as well as what current trends are developing in the use of energy services and performance contracting. The performance and overall cost effectiveness of various types of energy efficient equipment is also rated by respondents, and the results of existing installations is reported. Responses are broken down and can be assessed by respondent categories, including utility, energy supplier, energy user, power marketer, ESCO, equipment supplier, and consultant. This survey report offers a valuable tool for all companies whose business and marketing strategies are impacted by deregulation

  9. The Brazilian electric power industry restructuring: an evaluation of the competition through the contestable market theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhaes, Elbia; Santana, Edvaldo de

    1999-01-01

    The central issue of debate was the need to align the energy sector's options and organization with changing global patterns of economic and social development, characterized by the increasing role played by the private sector, greater integration in the world economy, and new economic and social priorities such as efficiency, decentralization, deregulation, and a closer attention to environmental issues. The aim of the work is to evaluate the competition in the Brazilian electric power industry through the Contestable Market Theory proposed by Baumol

  10. Electric power and gas markets; Marches de l'electricite et du gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    These two days organized by EFE in Paris, dealt with the european market of the gas and the electrical power. The first day developed the actual situation and the tendencies. The french market deregulation, the possibility of a united market and the energy transportation sector are discussed. The second day dealt with the new commercial technologies, the convergence of Gas and Electricity and the competing in a change world, the opportunities of the NTIC (new technologies of the information and communication). (A.L.B.)

  11. Photovoltaic power. Industries and market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic conversion should become competitive with respect to other power generation sources before the second half of the 21. century. This article treats first of the different solar cell technologies (monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon, thin film silicon, cadmium telluride-based materials, copper-indium selenide-based materials, multi-spectral cells, organic cells) with respect to their conversion efficiency, production and energy cost, and environmental impact. A second part describes the solar cells market, its growth with respect to the different applications (isolated sites, decentralized generation, power plants). A third part deals with the perspectives of photovoltaic conversion with respect to the advance in the development of new cell materials. (J.S.)

  12. Green Power Marketing - from Niches to Mass Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenhagen, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    In the process of liberalization of the electricity market the customers are now in a position to participate in the decision on how their electricity is produced. In particular, many consumers have a preference for renewable energies. For the producers, marketing of 'eco-power' is an opportunity to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. However, the market share of these products is still quite small today, and 'eco-power' is usually marketed as an expensive niche product. From the perspective of sustainable development these niches are a necessary but not sufficient step. In this book, ways are discussed which could lead to a mass-market penetration of eco-power products. A theoretical analysis is combined with empirical evidence derived from the eco-power market in Germany, Switzerland, Great Britain and the U.S. as well as with a comparison with other market segments [de

  13. Electric power market regulations in UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federico, G.; Napolano, L.

    2000-01-01

    The wholesale electricity market in UK is being radically reformed, with the abolition of a centralised market (the Pool) and the introduction of a system based around bilateral trading and real-time balancing (NETA), with the aim of increasing competition in the sector. This article analyses the English experience to draw some implications on the relationship between market design, market structure and market power, and to provide some insights for the design of the future Italian market [it

  14. Electrical connections: Iran's power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2000-01-01

    Attention is drawn to business opportunities in Iran, a middle-eastern country that is still in the process of rebuilding its power generating capacity in the wake of its eight-year-long war with Iraq. In reviewing opportunities to tap into this market , the article lists a number of factors that must be considered before rushing to follow the current. One of these factors is the U.S. trade embargo against Iran. Under this embargo Canada does not allow the re-export of goods of U.S. origin from Canada to Iran. The complex character of doing business in Iran by foreign companies must also be considered. Nevertheless,, those who are well prepared to face the restrictions and are willing to take the time to learn about the 'Iranian way' may receive considerable help from the Export Development Corporation, including financing and insurance on a case-by-case basis. The Canadian government's program for export market development also offers direct financial assistance to Canadian exporters in an effort to reduce the risk of entering a foreign market. The Canadian Embassy in Tehran can also provide useful advice and assistance. There is also http://exportsource.gc.ca., Team Canada Inc.'s on-line resource that may be consulted for export information

  15. Power Pool of Alberta annual report 2000 : building a market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As of January 1, 2001, deregulation of the electricity market in Alberta became a reality, and was accompanied by steady growth in demand for electricity combined with other factors that pushed the price of electricity upward. The Power Pool of Alberta ensures that market operations are open and fair. Its mandate, under the Electric Utilities Act, is the overall market surveillance in Alberta's electric industry. It is accomplished by working closely with industry and seeking feedback through four standing committees: Human Resources, Operations, Finance and Audit, and Balancing Pool. The goal for the coming years is to build confidence in the market, whereby consumers are confident about the fairness of the market price for electricity in Alberta, the choices available, and the continued reliability of the electric system in Alberta. The Energy Trading System was explained with information about system control and customer service, and details provided on the consultation and collaboration processes. The financial analysis of the year 2000 was provided, as well as a statement of operation, a balance sheet, and a statement of cash flows. tabs., figs

  16. Market based solutions for power pricing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangensteen, Ivar

    2002-06-01

    The report examines how the price for effect reserves, spot market power and regulated power is formed provided ideal market conditions rule. Primarily the price determining factors in a market for power reserves are examined and how the connection between this market and the energy market (the spot market) is. In a free market there would be a balance between what the actors may obtain by operating in the open market for power reserves/regulated power on the one hand and the market for spot power on the other. Primarily we suppose that the desired amount of power reserve is known. Secondly the problem constellation is extended to comprise the size of the effect reserves i.e. the optimising of the requirement to the power reserves. The optimal amount of power reserves is obtained when there is a balance between the cost and the benefit. This optimal balance is achieved when expected macro economical loss due to outfacing balances against the cost of maintaining larger reserves. By using a simple model it is demonstrated that a system operator regulates the maximal price in the regulated market and this equals the rationing price. The actors will offer sufficient reserves even if the reserve price is zero (provided risk neutrality). If the maximal price for regulated power is lower the price of effect reserves will rise. Based on the same simple model calculations are made for how short and long term market balance will be for increasing demands

  17. Optimal electricity market for wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holttinen, H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is about electricity market operation when looking from the wind power producers' point of view. The focus in on market time horizons: how many hours there is between the closing and delivering the bids. The case is for the Nordic countries, the Nordpool electricity market and the Danish wind power production. Real data from year 2001 was used to study the benefits of a more flexible market to wind power producer. As a result of reduced regulating market costs from better hourly predictions to the market, wind power producer would gain up to 8% more if the time between market bids and delivery was shortened from the day ahead Elspot market (hourly bids by noon for 12-36 h ahead). An after sales market where surplus or deficit production could be traded 2 h before delivery could benefit the producer almost as much, gaining 7%

  18. Competition in the power markets of Northern Europe; Konkurranse i kraftmarkedene i Nord-Europa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennbakk, Berit

    1998-12-01

    This report analyses the question whether a working wholesale market for electricity will develop in Northern Europe despite the differences in external conditions and in industrial structure. A recent EC directive and the approach towards a liberalization of the European energy markets direct attention to increased integration and trade with electricity. It is unclear whether the directive will have the intended impact. Norway, Sweden and Finland have deregulated their power markets, while Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands still have a monopolistic market structure. The most important difference between the deregulated and the monopolistic systems is that in the deregulated system the technical network activities are separated out and regulated while the suppliers compete in a market. The technical properties of network operation and the systems properties of the network imply advantages under large-scale operation that indicate that network operation is a natural monopoly which must be regulated. However, there are few essential large-scale advantages in the production of electric power. Thus, business based on competition implies that transmission and distribution should be regulated and that competition is allowed in those parts of the trade that do not profit from large-scale operation. International power trade is not necessarily a goal in itself. If transporting the energy carriers used in power production is cheaper than electric power, then the power plants should be placed where the demand is. In the development of the national systems, requirements have been imposed on the power sector in addition to cost-efficiency. Hence there is great variation in production structure and costs among countries, which provides a basis for profitable trade. In fact, there is a great potential for increased efficiency by increasing the trade among the EC countries. 23 refs., 7 tabs.

  19. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  20. The hydroelectric power market in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The second-largest producer of hydroelectric power in the world is the United States, right after Canada. In the United States, 7.1 per cent of net electricity generation was attributed to hydroelectric power in 2000, which totalled 269 terawatt hours (TWh). Aging facilities, outdated technology in some facilities, a cumbersome licensing process, and increasing environmental demands from interest groups for the preservation of river systems and surrounding wildlife challenge the industry. Pacific Coast states, especially California, were faced with electric power shortages during the summer of 2001, due to low market prices, high power usage among consumers and drought. The problems with the deregulation of the electricity market were brought to light by these shortages. Legislation to restructure the electric power industry in 25 states had not been enacted as of January 2002. The purchase of more power from both Canada and the Mexico is being considered by the government of the United States, as is the creation of a national power grid to allow for power transmission throughout the country. The Canada-United States energy trade might be affected by such a move, and result in project construction opportunities for Canadian companies. Renewable energy sources must be responsible for the generation of 10 per cent of power generation levels by 2020, on a gradual basis as mandated by law. By 2005, New York City must purchase 10 per cent of its power from renewable energy sources, reaching 20 per cent by 2010. The repair and replacement of aging dam equipment, the development of advanced turbine technology to protect fish stocks and water quality, dam removal, the construction of power lines are all opportunities open to Canadian companies. 60 refs., 5 tabs

  1. Market power in interactive environmental and energy markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Eirik S; Nese, Gjermund

    2017-01-01

    electricity and TGC markets, and focus on the role of market power (i.e., Stackelberg leadership). One result is that a certificate system faced with market power may collapse into a system of per-unit subsidies. Also, the model shows that TGCs may be an imprecise instrument for regulating the generation......A market for tradable green certificates (TGCs) is strongly interwoven in the electricity market in that the producers of green electricity are also the suppliers of TGCs. Therefore, strategic interaction may result. We formulate an analytic equilibrium model for simultaneously functioning...

  2. Nuclear Power Plants in a Competitive Electricity Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankauskas, V.

    2002-01-01

    Electricity demand is growing in the world by an average rate of 3% and, according to the International Energy Agency, is going to keep this pace of growth for the 1st quarter of the 21st century. At the same time, the role of the nuclear in the world energy mix is diminishing, and in 2020 only 9% of the world electricity will be produced at the nuclear plants versus 17% in 2000. The main reasons for the nuclear power diminishing share in the world market are not environmental or safety problems, as one may assume, but technical and economical. Long construction time, high capital cost, huge liabilities connected with the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste treatment, storage and final disposal are the main factors restricting the further growth of the nuclear power. Nevertheless, in the liberalized markets (U.K., Germany, Scandinavian countries) nuclear power plants are operating rather successfully. In a short run nuclear plants may become very competitive as they have very low short-run marginal costs, but in the long run they may become very in competitive. The Ignalina NPP plays the dominant ro]e in the Lithuanian electricity market, producing more than 75% of the total domestic electricity. It produces the cheapest electricity in Lithuania, mostly due to its higher availability, than the thermal power plants. The price of electricity sold by Ignalina is also lower as it does not cover all costs connected with the future decommissioning of the plant, spent fuel storage and final disposal. If at least part of this cost were included into the selling price, Ignalina might become highly competitive in a liberalised electricity market. As the Lithuanian Electricity law requires to deregulate electricity. generation prices, these prices should be set by the market. (author)

  3. Forward reliability markets: Less risk, less market power, more efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramton, Peter; Stoft, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A forward reliability market is presented. The market coordinates new entry through the forward procurement of reliability options - physical capacity bundled with a financial option to supply energy above a strike price. The market assures adequate generating resources and prices capacity from the bids of competitive new entry in an annual auction. Efficient performance incentives are maintained from a load-following obligation to supply energy above the strike price. The capacity payment fully hedges load from high spot prices, and reduces supplier risk as well. Market power is reduced in the spot market, since suppliers enter the spot market with a nearly balanced position in times of scarcity. Market power in the reliability market is addressed by not allowing existing supply to impact the capacity price. The approach, which has been adopted in New England and Colombia, is readily adapted to either a thermal system or a hydro system. (author)

  4. Market power mitigation, monitoring and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, H.

    2001-01-01

    This power point presentation described the working of the Independent Market Operator (IMO) in Ontario in terms of its function and structure, competencies, operating principles, and interagency coordination in the electricity sector. An independent market surveillance panel (MSP) appointed by the IMO Board empowers the IMO to monitor, investigate and request information from market participants regarding power system operations, market and strategic development and industrial economics. The six operating principles of the MSP are efficiency, consistency, fairness, transparency, timeliness and confidentiality

  5. Will cross-ownership reestablish market power in the Nordic power market?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, Eirik S.; Bergman, Lars

    2000-01-01

    The integration of the power markets in Norway and Sweden in 1996 significantly constrained the major power companies' ability to exercise market power within their national borders. In recent years, however, mergers and reciprocal acquisition of shares have reduced the number of independent players on the Norwegian-Swedish power market. The aim of this paper is to explore to what extent increasing cross-ownership among major power companies in Norway and Sweden might re-establish the market power that was lost when the two national power markets were integrated. The analysis is based on a numerical model, assuming Cournot quantity setting behaviour, of the Norwegian-Swedish power market. The simulation results suggest that partial ownership relations between major generators and other power-producing firms tend to increase horizontal market power and thus the market price of electricity. (author)

  6. Electric deregulation in Texas : the next steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, R.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation provided a look at the deregulated market in Texas and provided some statistics and facts about the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) which monitors the reliability of 37,000 miles of power transmission lines and 77,000 MW of generation. The governance adopted by ERCOT was described along with market design and wholesale operation in terms of open access to transmission and distribution systems, reliability, timely conveyance of information needed to support customer choice, and accurate accountability for electricity production and delivery. Transmission has been one the greatest challenges facing ERCOT, but retail operations are progressing well despite initial start-up problems. tabs., figs

  7. Deregulation for the electric power industry in Japan and the outlook; Nippon no denryoku sangyo no kisei kanwa to sono tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, N. [The Institute of Energy Economics, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The future direction and outlook of the electric power industry in Japan was described in a new systematical framework based on the amendment to the Electric Utility Industry Law. When viewing the deregulation system from a viewpoint of `induction of competition,` comparative assessment may mean competition introduced among electric power companies; establishment of the competitive bidding system by the whole supply business may mean competition introduced into the power generation sector; establishment of the specified electric utility industry system may mean competition introduced into the retailing sector. Further, a system to notify the authority of the price list, rationalization of safety rules, deregulation on the entry into another business, etc. can be interpreted as the spread of a width of discretion on business management. An increase in economic efficiency by cost reduction is expected as an influence of this deregulation, but the subject is how well the deregulation can balance with publicity and social responsibility. Relating to the entry of IPP, there is some anxiety: small scale power sources have high failure rates and difficulty in load frequency control. Moreover, it affects the public benefit in a sense of the apparently worsening air pollution. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. What drives customer choice in competitive power markets? Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cates, S.

    1998-12-01

    Understanding what drives customer choice is a crucial first step toward meeting customer needs in competitive power markets. To understand the key drivers of customer choice, Research Triangle Institute (RTI) conducted in-depth telephone interviews with 150 customers in California, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island and with 12 energy service providers (ESPs) serving these states. Because it is a qualitative study, the number of interviews is small; however, these interviews provide a first look at actual choice behavior in the US. This study also drew on previous EPRI research on customer choice and switching intentions, the US pilot program experience, actual customer choice behavior in international markets, and lessons learned in other deregulated industries. This study identified by customer sector--residential, small and medium commercial and industrial (C/I), and large C/I--the factors customers consider when choosing an electricity supplier, customers' reasons for switching electricity supplier, and customers' reasons for not switching. One of the key findings of the study is that the key driver for switching electricity supplier is the desire to save money. In markets where energy service providers can offer significant savings, customers are switching; but, in markets where no price incentives exist, customers are reluctant to switch

  9. Transmission management in the deregulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.D.; Wollenberg, B.F.; Wangensteen, I.

    2000-01-01

    Three very different methods of accomplishing the same task--managing the operation of the transmission system in the deregulated power system operating environment--have been implemented as deregulated market structures have been created around the world. They are first, the optimal power flow (OPF) model found in various implementations in the United Kingdom, parts of the United States, and in Australia and New Zealand. Second, the point tariff, price area congestion control model used in the Nordpool market area in Norway and Sweden. Third, the US transaction-based model. All are pragmatic solutions implemented in advance of complete theoretical understanding. Each has strengths and flaws, and there are some surprising inter-relationships. Each maintains power system security but differs in its impact on the economics of the energy market. No clearly superior method has so far emerged. In the future, methods of combining decentralized market solutions with operational use of optimal power flow may provide better solutions to existing and emerging problems

  10. Dealing with risk in the power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtan, J.A.; Mo, B.

    1995-01-01

    The report describes the most important sources of risk in the electric power market and how risk can be dealt with by the actors in the market. It stresses recharge risk, price risk, and quantity risk in various types of contracts. It is shown how these risk sources interact and how power traders can exploit the opportunities in the power market to their own benefit. 17 refs

  11. The political economy of (de)regulation: Theory and evidence from the U.S. electricity market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerriero, C.

    2010-01-01

    The decision to introduce competition into regulated industries is a key issue in economics. Provided that the demand is sufficiently inelastic, competition assures lower allocative distortions at the cost of weaker cost-reducing investment incentives via lower profits. Hence, deregulation is more

  12. France liberalizes its power supply market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The French market of power supply to companies is now free. This means that Electricite de France (EdF), the first world electric utility now has competitors in its domestic market. This is an important challenge for EdF because 3 millions of clients (70% of the French power consumption) are now concerned by the opening of the power market. According to A. Merlin, head of the energy transportation network (RTE), the opening of the market does not increase the risk of black-out, it just makes the operation of power networks more complex. The implementation of a single power transportation company (RTE) simplifies the mastery of networks safety but the development of investments is necessary to ensure the maintenance of 400 kV power lines. A comparison of the situation of power market liberalization is made for 6 countries (Germany, UK, Spain, US, Netherlands and Italy). Short paper. (J.S.)

  13. Utility deregulation and AMR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the effects of deregulation on other utilities and services and examines how the electric utilities can avoid the worst of these effects and capitalize of the best aspects of competition in achieving marketing excellence. The article presents deregulation as a customer service and underscores the need for utilities to learn to compete aggressively and intelligently and provide additional services available through technology such as automated meter reading

  14. Law of the electricity sector in France. The legal framework for the French electricity supply between legal market deregulation requirements and public service obligations; Stromwirtschaftsrecht in Frankreich. Der Rechtsrahmen fuer die franzoesische Elektrizitaetsversorgung zwischen unionsrechtlichen Marktoeffnungsvorgaben und gemeinwirtschaftlichen Verpflichtungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckler, Julius

    2016-07-01

    The process of creating an internal electricity market is still unfinished. This has, in addition to technical reasons, also legal reasons: The persistence of the structures and regulatory frameworks that have grown during monopoly times, in part is very strong, which is particularly evident in France. The power supply there is intensively controlled by its state as a public service, both indirectly by the state-owned company EDF and directly by statutory regulations. The market deregulation is not thereby completely prevented. However, together with the particular importance of nuclear power for the French power supply, considerable barriers to market opening are emerging. Against this background and out of the historical development, the author examines the current French law of the electricity sector across all value-creation stages in its relations to EU law. [German] Der Strombinnenmarktprozess ist nach wie vor unvollendet. Dies hat neben technischen auch rechtliche Gruende: Die Beharrungskraefte der zu Monopolzeiten gewachsenen Strukturen und Ordnungsrahmen sind zum Teil aeusserst stark, was sich besonders in Frankreich deutlich zeigt. Die dortige Stromversorgung wird ausgehend von ihrer Einordnung als Service Public sowohl mittelbar durch das Staatsunternehmen EDF als auch unmittelbar durch gesetzliche Regelungen intensiv staatlich kontrolliert. Die Marktoeffnung wird dadurch zwar nicht vollkommen verhindert. Zusammen mit der besonderen Bedeutung der Kernkraft fuer die franzoesische Stromversorgung ergeben sich hieraus aber erhebliche Marktoeffnungshemmnisse. Vor diesem Hintergrund und ausgehend von der historischen Entwicklung untersucht der Autor das geltende franzoesische Stromwirtschaftsrecht ueber alle Wertschoepfungsstufen hinweg in seinen Bezuegen zum EU-Recht.

  15. Security-based rescheduling of transactions in a deregulated power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, A.K.; Fang, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper studies security-driven rescheduling in the context of electricity supply industry restructuring. Given that price-based operation is encouraged in an open-market system and that bilateral and pool contracts may coexist within this system, a mathematical methodology to reschedule these transactions, when required for security-related reasons, is developed. The post-contingency corrective capability of each transaction is considered and an attempt is made to achieve optimal rescheduling both for preventive and for post-contingency control. The computational results are helpful for providing an insight into the security challenges faced by an independent system operator in the emerging market structures. (author)

  16. Market power and technological bias in electricity generation markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult or very costly to avoid all market power in electricity markets. A recurring response is that a limited amount of market power is accepted with the justification that it is necessary to produce revenues to cover some of the fixed costs. It is assumed that all market participants benefit equally from the increased prices. However, this assumption is not satisfied if different production technologies are used. We assess the case of a generation mix of conventional generation and intermittent generation with exogenously varying production levels. If all output is sold in the spot market, then intermittent generation benefits less from market power than conventional generation. If forward contracts or option contracts are signed, then market power might be reduced but the bias against returns to intermittent generators persists. Thus allowing some level of market power as a means of encouraging investment in new generation may result in a bias against intermittent technologies or increase the costs of strategic deployment to achieve renewable quotas. (Author)

  17. Electricity deregulation, spot price patterns and demand-side management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Flynn, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines extensive hourly or half-hourly power price data from 14 deregulated power markets. It analyzes average diurnal patterns, relationship to system load, volatility, and consistency over time. Diurnal patterns indicate the average price spread between off-peak and on-peak and weekend vs. weekday power consumption. Volatility is measured by price velocity: the average normalized hourly change in power price, calculated daily. The calculated price velocity is broken down into an expected component that arises from the diurnal pattern and an unexpected component that arises from unknown factors. The analysis reveals significant differences among markets, suggesting that demand-side management (DSM) of power consumption is far more difficult in some markets than in others. At one extreme, Spain, Britain and Scandinavia show consistent diurnal price patterns, a stable relationship between price and system load, and a low unexplained component of price volatility. A power consumer in these markets could form a reasonable expectation of a reward for DSM of elective power consumption. At the other extreme, two markets in Australia show erratic diurnal price patterns from year to year, low correlation between price and system load, and a high amount of unexpected price velocity. A power consumer in these markets would have far greater difficulty in realizing a benefit from DSM. Markets that experienced one period of very high prices without a clear external cause, such as California and Alberta, appear to have a significant longer-term erosion of public support for deregulation. (author)

  18. Financial derivatives in power marketing: The basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, V.C.; Ghosh, K.

    1996-01-01

    With the ongoing changes in the power industry worldwide, electricity is beginning to be traded like other commodities. The use of financial derivative instruments in power markets is on the rise. The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of these derivatives in risk management which is vital for survival in the increasingly competitive industry. Starting with the familiar cash markets, the paper discusses the basics of futures, options, and swap markets as applied to electric energy trading

  19. Modelling of demand response and market power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristoffersen, B.B.; Donslund, B.; Boerre Eriksen, P.

    2004-01-01

    Demand-side flexibility and demand response to high prices are prerequisites for the proper functioning of the Nordic power market. If the consumers are unwilling to respond to high prices, the market may fail the clearing, and this may result in unwanted forced demand disconnections. Being the TSO of Western Denmark, Eltra is responsible of both security of supply and the design of the power market within its area. On this basis, Eltra has developed a new mathematical model tool for analysing the Nordic wholesale market. The model is named MARS (MARket Simulation). The model is able to handle hydropower and thermal production, nuclear power and wind power. Production, demand and exchanges modelled on an hourly basis are new important features of the model. The model uses the same principles as Nord Pool (The Nordic Power Exchange), including the division of the Nordic countries into price areas. On the demand side, price elasticity is taken into account and described by a Cobb-Douglas function. Apart from simulating perfect competition markets, particular attention has been given to modelling imperfect market conditions, i.e. exercise of market power on the supply side. Market power is simulated by using game theory, including the Nash equilibrium concept. The paper gives a short description of the MARS model. Besides, focus is on the application of the model in order to illustrate the importance of demand response in the Nordic market. Simulations with different values of demand elasticity are compared. Calculations are carried out for perfect competition and for the situation in which market power is exercised by the large power producers in the Nordic countries (oligopoly). (au)

  20. Tender frequency and market concentration in balancing power markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaut, Andreas; Obermueller, Frank; Weiser, Florian

    2017-01-15

    Balancing power markets ensure the short-term balance of supply and demand in electricity markets and their importance may increase with a higher share of fluctuating renewable electricity production. While it is clear that shorter tender frequencies, e.g. daily or hourly, are able to increase the efficiency compared to a weekly procurement, it remains unclear in which respect market concentration will be affected. Against this background, we develop a numerical electricity market model to quantify the possible effects of shorter tender frequencies on costs and market concentration. We find that shorter time spans of procurement are able to lower the costs by up to 15%. While market concentration decreases in many markets, we - surprisingly - identify cases in which shorter time spans lead to higher concentration.

  1. Tender frequency and market concentration in balancing power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaut, Andreas; Obermueller, Frank; Weiser, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Balancing power markets ensure the short-term balance of supply and demand in electricity markets and their importance may increase with a higher share of fluctuating renewable electricity production. While it is clear that shorter tender frequencies, e.g. daily or hourly, are able to increase the efficiency compared to a weekly procurement, it remains unclear in which respect market concentration will be affected. Against this background, we develop a numerical electricity market model to quantify the possible effects of shorter tender frequencies on costs and market concentration. We find that shorter time spans of procurement are able to lower the costs by up to 15%. While market concentration decreases in many markets, we - surprisingly - identify cases in which shorter time spans lead to higher concentration.

  2. Crossover marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of a deregulated energy market on customers in Ontario was discussed. In particular, the way in which Sunoco will deal with energy convergence and how Sunoco plans to generate interest among residential consumers in a deregulated and competitive energy market was described. Integrated energy solutions that offer customers value-added heating, ventilating and air conditioning products and services, inclusive of equipment sales, installation, repair, rental, leasing, financing, warranty, insurance and maintenance is the ultimate goal of Sunoco. The major retail issues in the energy market such as licensing of marketers, customer mobility, transfer of utility assets to affiliates, Ontario Hydro's market power in electrical generation, distribution of stranded debt charges, and a timetable for deregulation were also addressed. figs

  3. Coal gasification and the power production market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howington, K.; Flandermeyer, G.

    1995-01-01

    The US electric power production market is experiencing significant changes sparking interest in the current and future alternatives for power production. Coal gasification technology is being marketed to satisfy the needs of the volatile power production industry. Coal gasification is a promising power production process in which solid coal is burned to produce a synthesis gas (syn gas). The syn gas may be used to fuel combustion integrated into a facility producing electric power. Advantages of this technology include efficient power production, low flue gas emissions, flexible fuel utilization, broad capability for facility integration, useful process byproducts, and decreased waste disposal. The primary disadvantages are relatively high capital costs and lack of proven long-term operating experience. Developers of coal gasification intend to improve on these disadvantages and lop a strong position in the power generation market. This paper is a marketing analysis of the partial oxidation coal gasification processes emerging in the US in response to the market factors of the power production industry. A brief history of these processes is presented, including the results of recent projects exploring the feasibility of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as a power production alternative. The current power generation market factors are discussed, and the status of current projects is presented including projected performance

  4. Evolving natural gas markets: LNG possibilities for a hydrothermal power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Tiago B.; Resende, Joao P.; Costa, Agnes M. [Brazilian Ministry of Mines and Energy, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The latest advancements in the natural gas - NG industry have brought new opportunities for the resource's application, especially in the power industry. On the one hand, rapid growth in demand and falling costs of transportation over long distances, particularly as liquefied natural gas - LNG, should lead to a more integrated NG world market. On the other, the deregulation of electricity markets and the growth of independent power producers - IPPs using NG as a fuel for generating peak load power have increased the demand for more flexible NG supply contracts. These factors have allowed a shift in the timing of investment and contract negotiation in NG market. Traditionally, firms searched for trading partners and signed long-term contracts before investing in infrastructure. In the evolving LNG market, producers invest in infrastructure before they have buyers for all their expected outputs, while buyers undertake investment before having firm contracts for all their expected NG needs. These technological and market changes may foster greater participation of a fully flexible NG power plants in the Brazilian electricity market. Nowadays, thermal power long-term capacity contracts customized and negotiated in the local electricity pool (ACR) require power producer to award guarantees of NG firm supply, substantially increasing their cost. A combination of flexible LNG supply contracts and electricity pool contracts may present a solution to the lack of competitiveness of NG power plants in the Brazilian power industry. (author)

  5. Marketing of wind power; Vermarktung von Windenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roon, Serafin von [Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft e.V., Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    With the integration of the fluctuating production in the system of power supply, there is the question about the impact on the electricity market. The special features of the commercialization of wind energy are: (1) The production exclusively takes place supply-dependent; (2) With fex exceptions, the supplied current is compensated according to the Renewable Energy Law; (3) The actual sale is performed by the operators of transmission systems; (4) The marginal cost are close to zero; (5) The day-ahead marketing solely based on a faulty prognosis. The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the actors and the process of wind power marketing. The alternative of direct marketing and the associated barriers and opportunities are discussed. The impact of the marketing of wind power on pricing in the electricity market is shown by means of an empirical analysis. The compensation amounts are be quantified, and the resulting cost to the balance of the forecast error are estimated.

  6. Deregulation experiences in Alberta and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction of Nexen Chemicals, one of the largest producers of sodium chlorate in the world, was offered, and a map displaying its locations throughout the world was displayed. Nexen is one of Canada's largest independent oil and gas producers, while Nexen Marketing is involved in the marketing of natural gas in North America. In January 2001, the deregulated market opened in Alberta. High natural gas prices, generation shortages, high prices in California and an upcoming provincial election all combined to complicate the situation. A high degree of volatility characterized the market. A chart displaying weekly average Alberta power and gas prices from Jan 2002 to 13 Oct 2002 was shown. In Ontario, the market opened in May 2002, and the demand growth rate was in the 1 to 2 per cent range. The author indicated that approximately 20 per cent of homeowners in Ontario have signed deals with retailers, contrary to Alberta where very few have done so. A similar chart displaying weekly average Ontario power prices was presented. The issues in Ontario are: consistency in policy, increase market transparency, transmission / distribution price flexibility, overall transmission / distribution to industrial consumers high, and increasing costs of the system operator. In Alberta, the issues are: government intent, congestion management issues, and billing settlement errors that continue. The opportunities offered by a deregulated market include process responsiveness which is rewarded, the ability to look in forward prices when prices fit margin requirement, and gives companies the opportunity to participate in the development of the market. Various charts were also displayed to further illustrate the market in both Alberta and Ontario. figs

  7. Examining market power in the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, R.G.; Gabriel, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a mixed complementarity equilibrium model for the European natural gas market. This model has producers as Cournot players with conjectured supply functions relative to their rivals. As such, these producers can withhold production to increase downstream prices for greater profits. The other players are taken to be perfectly competitive and are combined with extensive pipeline, seasonal, and other data reflecting the current state of the market. Four market scenarios are run to analyze the extent of market power by these producers as well as the importance of pipeline and storage capacity. (author)

  8. Examining market power in the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, Rudolf G.; Gabriel, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a mixed complementarity equilibrium model for the European natural gas market. This model has producers as Cournot players with conjectured supply functions relative to their rivals. As such, these producers can withhold production to increase downstream prices for greater profits. The other players are taken to be perfectly competitive and are combined with extensive pipeline, seasonal, and other data reflecting the current state of the market. Four market scenarios are run to analyze the extent of market power by these producers as well as the importance of pipeline and storage capacity

  9. Market power monitoring and mitigation in the US wholesale power markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, Udi [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20426 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Under current statutory requirements, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) must ensure that prices in US wholesale power markets are 'just and reasonable'. This has been interpreted by the agency and the courts as requiring the monitoring and mitigation of undue market power. This paper focuses on generation market power. Prior to electricity sector restructuring, wholesale bilateral power trading took place among vertically integrated monopoly utilities trading at the margin or between small independent producers and the utilities. Under those conditions, the authorization of trading at market prices, called 'market-based rates', required only that the generation supplier pass a simple market share screen for market power. As restructuring unfolded, and market conditions changed, there has been a steady evolution in FERC's market power mitigation rules, encompassing (a) changes in the market power assessment required for granting market-based rates and related methods for merger approval, and (b) development and refinement of new techniques for screening and mitigating offers into the organized day-ahead and real-time markets operated by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). This paper reviews these changes to date, as FERC continues to clarify its approved rules and procedures. It also examines recent methods for quantitative market power analysis that could augment current procedures or supplant them, as found appropriate. (author)

  10. Tracing and Prediction of Losses for Deregulated Operation of Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nallagownden, Perumal; Mukerjee, Ravindra Nath; Masri, Syafrudin

    2011-01-01

    To facilitate both generation and retailing to have an open access to the transmission grid for trading electricity, a real time procedure is proposed. The line flows for an operation are assumed to be available from PMU and WAM validated state estimation. Power tracing determines different...... at the retail end and its associated line losses, for an oncoming operating scenario....

  11. Recipe for success in solar power marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, S.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the results of a campaign run jointly by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy and the Association of Swiss Electricity Utilities called 'Solar Power from your Utility'. An analysis of solar power marketing efforts made by ten utilities is presented. The results of assessments of these market measures made by solar power customers and non-customers are presented and questions of pricing, product-image and product-confidence are discussed. Finally, suggestions for the optimisation of the marketing measures are made

  12. Analysis of deregulation models; Denryoku shijo jiyuka model no bunseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    Trends toward power market deregulation were investigated in Japan and 16 other countries, and various deregulation models were examined and evaluated for their merits and demerits. There are four basic models, that is, franchise bidding model, competitive bidding in power generation model, wholesale wheeling or retail wheeling model, and mandatory pool or voluntary pool model. Power market deregulation has been a global tendency since the second half of the 1970s, with various models adopted by different countries. Out of the above-said models, it is the retail wheeling model and pool models (open access models) that allow the final customer to select power suppliers, and the number of countries adopting these models is increasing. The said models are characterized in that the disintegration of the vertical transmission-distribution integration (separation of distribution service and retail supply service) and the liberation of the retail market are simultaneously accomplished. The pool models, in particular, are enjoying favor because conditions for fair competition have already been prepared and because it is believed high in efficiency. In Japan and France, where importance is attached to atomic power generation, the competitive bidding model is adopted as a means to harmonize the introduction of competition into the source development and power generation sectors. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Funding of renewable energy sources in the deregulated German electricity market; Foerderung erneuerbarer Energien im liberalisierten deutschen Strommarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawer, T.

    2007-12-14

    This study intends to develop an efficient market design for the German electricity market, with particular regard to renewable energy sources. The German electricity market is disintegrated, i.e. market sectors are not coordinated by a central agency but by their own interactions. The first part of the investigation analyzes the interdependences of market sectors, while the second part will analyze funding instruments for renewable energy sources on this basis. (orig.)

  14. Natural gas deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, M.

    1993-01-01

    With the aim of establishing realistic options for deregulation in the natural gas industry, this paper first considers the structural evolution of this industry and evidences how it differs from the petroleum industry with which it exhibits some essential characteristics in common. This comparison is made in order to stress that, contrary to popular belief, that which is without doubt good for the petroleum industry is not necessarily so also for the natural gas industry. The paper concludes with separate analyses of the natural gas markets in the principal industrialized countries. Arguments are provided to show that the 'soft' deregulation option for the natural gas industry is not feasible, and that 'total' deregulation instead, backed by the passing of a suitable package of anti-trust laws 'unbundling' the industry's four major activities, i.e., production, storage, primary and secondary distribution, is the preferable option. The old concept of guaranteed supplies for minor users of natural gas should give way to the laws of supply and demand governing inter-fuel competition ensured through the strict supervision of vigilance committees

  15. PI2 controller based coordinated control with Redox Flow Battery and Unified Power Flow Controller for improved Restoration Indices in a deregulated power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thirunavukarasu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of power system restoration problem involves status assessment, optimization of generation capability and load pickup. This paper proposes the evaluation of Power System Restoration Indices (PSRI based on the Automatic Generation Control (AGC assessment of interconnected power system in a deregulated environment. The PSRI are useful for system planners to prepare the power system restoration plans and to improve the efficiency of the physical operation of the power system with the increased transmission capacity in the network. The stabilization of frequency and tie-line power oscillations in an interconnected power system becomes challenging when implemented in the future competitive environment. This paper also deals with the concept of AGC in two-area reheat power system having coordinated control action with Redox Flow Battery (RFB and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC are capable of controlling the network performance in a very fast manner and improve power transfer limits in order to have a better restoration. In addition to that a new Proportional–Double Integral (PI2 controller is designed and implemented in AGC loop and controller parameters are optimized through Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO algorithm. Simulation results reveal that the proposed PI2 controller is that it has good stability during load variations, excellent transient and dynamic responses when compared with the system comprising PI controller. Moreover the AGC loop with RFB coordinated with UPFC has greatly improved the dynamic response and it reduces the control input requirements, to ensure improved PSRI in order to provide the reduced restoration time, thereby improving the system reliability.

  16. Nuclear power in the United States of America and in Europe - a market survey from a vendor's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher, T.A.; Gueldner, R.

    2002-01-01

    A world population continuing to grow must be provided with sufficient energy supplies at acceptable prices and so as to affect the environment and the climate as little as possible. A growing energy requirement can be met sustainably by a diversified energy mix. Globally, there is a reassessment of nuclear power. Under aspects of the economy, protection of the environment and the climate, geological availability, and geopolitics, nuclear power will make valuable contributions to a solution. In the United States, the use of nuclear power has become attractive again in the course of deregulation and as a result of massive increases in plant availability. The nuclear power plants currently in operation offer a promising outlook for the future, also because of the current price increases for natural gas. As a consequence of the Green Paper by the EU Commission on the continuity of supply, nuclear power is being reassessed also in Europe. As a result of deregulation of the electricity market, efforts have been made to increase the competitiveness of existing generating capacities. In accordance with changed market conditions, producers have adapted to the requirements of the market by establishing strategic partnerships. The envisaged construction of a nuclear power plant in Finland shows that also new nuclear power plants can be attractive in deregulated European markets and that, e.g., also the problems of spent fuel and waste management can be solved if the political will exists to do so. In Germany, on the other hand, the political framework conditions for nuclear power continue to be difficult. Unless Germany is willing to fall behind internationally in power generation, all available types of power generation will have to be advanced and combined into a mix serving future needs also in this country. There must be no disruption of technological know-how. Nuclear power must be an important option kept open under reasonable political boundary conditions. (orig.) [de

  17. The missions of the regulator confronted with the collusive behaviour of the actors in a deregulated electricity market (the case of France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, J.

    2004-01-01

    Regulatory Commissions play a major role in a competitive electricity market. Some missions are positive: public service objectives, third party access pricing on the transmission and distribution networks, anticipation of necessary production capacities. Other missions are rather defensive: avoiding collusive behaviour on the electricity spot markets, reducing market power position and avoiding 'shadow congestions' on the inter-states networks. (author)

  18. Windonomics. Empirical essays on the economics of wind power in the Nordic electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauritzen, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    From the introduction: The following chapters in this dissertation take up three topics surrounding the interaction of wind power investment in Denmark and the functioning of the deregulated Nordic electricity market. The first two chapters take up the issue of how wind power a affects prices in the deregulated market. I find that electricity price variation in the spot market is lower in days with more wind power. In the following chapter I extend this analysis to see how wind power in Denmark affects prices in neighbouring hydro power dominated Norway. I find that wind power affects the magnitude of trade between the countries asymmetrically - dependent on the net direction of trade. I also find that wind power has a slight but statistically significant negative effect on prices in Norway, likely due to a slackening of hydro power producers supply constraints. The last chapter starts with the observation that most turbines are scrapped in order to make room for a newer turbine. An opportunity cost that comes from the interaction of scarce land resources, technological change and government policy is then a dominant reason for the scrapping of wind turbines. This leads to the implication that turbines located on windier, better situated land have a higher risk of being scrapped. Policy is also shown to have a strong and in some respects unexpected effect on scrappings. Over the last two decades two major trends have taken place in power markets around the world. The first has been a movement towards market based power systems. Vertically integrated power companies have been split into component generation, transmission and retailing companies. Generation and retailing have been opened to competition. Increasingly, regulated prices and bilateral trade are being replaced by regulated markets that establish prices through auction mechanisms. The second trend has been investment in renewable and intermittent energy sources - notably wind power. What started as

  19. The North American power delivery system: Balancing market restructuring and environmental economics with infrastructure security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud Amin, S.; Gellings, Clark W.

    2006-01-01

    The North American electric power system was developed over the last 100 years without a conscious awareness and analysis of the system-wide implications of its current evolution under the forces of deregulation, system complexity, power-market impacts, terrorism, and human error. The possibility of power delivery beyond neighboring areas was a distant secondary consideration. Today, the North American power network may realistically be considered to be the largest machine in the world. With the advent of deregulation and competition in the electric power industry, new ways are being sought to improve the efficiency of that network without seriously diminishing its reliability and security. Controlling a heterogeneous, widely dispersed, yet globally interconnected system is a serious technological problem in any case. It is even more complex and difficult to control it for optimal efficiency and maximum benefit to the ultimate consumers while still allowing all its business components to compete fairly and freely. In this paper we present an overview of key issues and the context in which the electricity infrastructure is being operated under the above forces along with a strategic vision extending to a decade, or longer, that would enable more secure and robust systems operation, security monitoring, and efficient energy markets. (author)

  20. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a 15 month assessment of Alberta's new competitive electricity market. It also presents lessons that Ontario customers could learn from Alberta's experience. The goal for restructuring is to achieve lower electricity prices, competitive retail markets, increased flexibility of contracts, and to remove investment risks from consumers. Alberta's restructured market includes power generation, high voltage transmission, low voltage transmission and retail sales. Economists agree that deregulation has brought lower prices and other consumer benefits despite some imperfections. After one year, prices in Alberta have gone down from $130/MWh to $30/MWh. Power supply has increased along with demand response, market competitiveness, liquidity, and thermal and economic efficiency. In 2001, Alberta was a net exporter of electricity. In 2001, it was ranked by the Center for Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM) which ranks states and provinces by 22 attributes for how they are restructuring their power markets. Alberta ranked first overall in North America. Ontario ranked sixteenth. 4 tabs., 5 figs

  1. A Market-Based Virtual Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Træholt, Chresten; Poulsen, Bjarne

    2009-01-01

    The fast growing penetration of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and the continuing trend towards a more liberalized electricity market requires more efficient energy management strategies to handle both emerging technical and economic issues. In this paper, a market-based Virtual Power Plant...... (MBVPP) model is proposed which provides individual DER units the accesses to current electricity markets. General bidding scenario and price signal scenario as two optional operation scenarios are operated by one MBVPP. In the end, a use case of a MBVPP with micro Combined Heat and Power (μCHP) systems...

  2. Electric power: the liberalization effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, J.

    1999-01-01

    Nine months after the beginning of the deregulation of electric power markets in Europe, the first effects are being felt: fall of prices, amalgamation of electric power companies, development of new technologies and unemployment. (O.M.)

  3. Market architecture and power demand management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rious, Vincent; Roques, Fabien

    2014-12-01

    Demand response is a cornerstone problem in electricity markets considering climate change constraint. Most liberalized electricity markets have a poor track record at developing demand response. In Europe, different models are considered for demand response, from a development under a regulated regime to a development under competitive perspectives. In this paper, focusing on demand response for mid-size and small consumers, we investigate which types of market signals should be sent to demand response aggregators to see demand response emerge as a competitive activity. Using data from the French power system over eight years, we compare the possible market design options to allow demand response to develop. Our simulations demonstrate that with the current market rules, demand response is not a profitable activity in the French electricity industry. Introducing a capacity remuneration could bring additional revenues to demand response aggregators if the power system has no over-capacity

  4. Auction game in electric power market place

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, J.; Sheble, G.

    1996-01-01

    The power industry in the US is presently an evolving changing business environment. While planning to meet future peak demand is still a concern, the efficient utilization of existing generation and transmission resources is fast becoming a primary interest. This interest suggests a move from cost-based market operations to price based market operations. Auction market structure is one of the various ways to perform price based operation. Such a market place would be very new and challenging to all players of the electric power industry. This paper describes an overview of the new business environment. The paper presents a detailed description of the auction game. The trading objectives in the bidding game are defined. The framework of auction process is described by defining the rules to play the game. Finally, strategies for market players are discussed

  5. Wind power generation and dispatch in competitive power markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Lisias

    Wind energy is currently the fastest growing type of renewable energy. The main motivation is led by more strict emission constraints and higher fuel prices. In addition, recent developments in wind turbine technology and financial incentives have made wind energy technically and economically viable almost anywhere. In restructured power systems, reliable and economical operation of power systems are the two main objectives for the ISO. The ability to control the output of wind turbines is limited and the capacity of a wind farm changes according to wind speeds. Since this type of generation has no production costs, all production is taken by the system. Although, insufficient operational planning of power systems considering wind generation could result in higher system operation costs and off-peak transmission congestions. In addition, a GENCO can participate in short-term power markets in restructured power systems. The goal of a GENCO is to sell energy in such a way that would maximize its profitability. However, due to market price fluctuations and wind forecasting errors, it is essential for the wind GENCO to keep its financial risk at an acceptable level when constituting market bidding strategies. This dissertation discusses assumptions, functions, and methodologies that optimize short-term operations of power systems considering wind energy, and that optimize bidding strategies for wind producers in short-term markets. This dissertation also discusses uncertainties associated with electricity market environment and wind power forecasting that can expose market participants to a significant risk level when managing the tradeoff between profitability and risk.

  6. Wind Generators and Market Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misir, Nihat

    price thresholds are significantly higher when the monopolist at the peakload level owns both types of generators. Furthermore, when producing electricity with the peakload generator, the monopolist can avoid facing prices below marginal cost by owning a certain share of the wind generators.......Electricity production from wind generators holds significant importance in European Union’s 20% renewable energy target by 2020. In this paper, I show that ownership of wind generators affects market outcomes by using both a Cournot oligopoly model and a real options model. In the Cournot...... oligopoly model, ownership of the wind generators by owners of fossil-fueled (peakload) generators decreases total peakload production and increases the market price. These effects increase with total wind generation and aggregate wind generator ownership. In the real options model, start up and shut down...

  7. The move to power marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, C.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of energy convergence was defined as being able to freely substitute any form of energy, be it oil, natural gas or electricity for another. In order for convergence to occur, there must be price transparency, competition between energy providers, liquidity in both the physical and financial energy markets, arbitrage between energy sources, and end users having the ability to switch fuels quickly and cost effectively. It was predicted that the core markets will be dominated by string retailers that can deliver multiple energy offerings along with other commodities and services. Their success will depend on structuring joint ventures and partnerships. Customers, too, will benefit from competition through lower prices, and a choice of suppliers and commodities. 1 fig

  8. Deregulation in environmental policy. Aufsaetze zur Wirtschaftspolitik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, J

    1983-01-01

    In the USA the attempt is being made for the first time to leave the solution of the apparent conflict between economy and ecology to a considerable extent to the powers of the market. The framework conditions and rules for that market are characterized by the new approaches of 'deregulation': 'They create a market in which business can make a profit by producing clean air and water.' The aim of the volume is to present that new strategy, with regard to the sector of air pollution, in its individual components, explain their mode of function and briefly indicate associated problems. However, before dealing with the new approaches based on free enterprise, the publication provides some basic information current legislation in the USA regarding air pollution.

  9. The hydroelectric power market in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junius, A.

    2004-10-01

    This work makes a synthesis of the hydroelectric power market, of its present day capacity in the world, and of its perspectives of development in the future. The first part treats of the hydroelectric facilities and of the market of hydroelectric power plants. It presents the technology used and the different types of plants, the evolution of their geographical setting and the future potentialities of development. The second part deals with the competitiveness of this industry with respect to: the energy policy stakes, the profitability, the energy independence of countries, the regulation of power networks and the environmental impacts. (J.S.)

  10. The directive on ''internal market of electric power'': a satisfactory balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The european directive on the ''internal market for electric power'' has allowed for the first time the implementation of harmonized regulations among european partners concerning the operation of electric utilities and systems in Europe, while taking into consideration the subsidiarity principles to which France is very much attached and finding an equilibrium between the status-quo based on national or regional monopolies and a global deregulation inspired by ultra-liberal views coming from Britain or the US. The main consequences on France's energy policy and organization are discussed

  11. The Rio Grande do Norte electric power market: the competitiveness that won't come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Neilton Fidelis da; Pernambuco Univ., Recife

    1999-01-01

    The central issue of debate was the need to align the energy sector's options and organization with changing global patterns of economic and social development, characterized by the increasing role played by the private sector, greater integration in the world economy, and new economic and social priorities such as efficiency, decentralization, deregulation, and a closer attention to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to analyze the Rio Grande Norte, a Brazilian state, electric power market after privatization advent based on regulations established by National Agency of Electric Energy

  12. Price signals in the power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Which price signals should be given to the players in the power market to promote a socio-economic power supply in the short term and the long term? In a model with perfect competition, without problems involving delivery quality, and with free scalable capacity in both transmission and production, price signals that reflect marginal losses and shortage of transmission capacity are all that is needed. Stepwise investments create a need for measures that are specific to the situation. Price signals reflecting delivery reliability are probably too weak today. Market power may create a need for greater transmission capacity, but gives no reason for new price signals. Tariffs that reduce installed capacity weakens delivery quality and increases the probability of market power

  13. Novel approach to assess local market power considering transmission constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Canbing; Xia, Qing; Kang, Chongqing; Jiang, Jianjian

    2008-01-01

    Market power (MP) assessment and mitigation affect the efficiency of the generation market. The traditional indices such as HHI and Lerner index can not express local market power, which caused by transmission constraints. Transmission constraints divide the market into some smaller parts. Some generators can abuse their MP in one part but not in the whole market. This paper describes a new approach to assess market power. The main contributions of the new method can be summarized as following. First, the concept of local market is developed, and the whole power system is divided into several local markets, as transmission congestions dividing the market. In the local markets, there are no transmission constraints so local market power does not exist. Then the local market power index (LMPI) is calculated according to market concentration, transmission constraints, and demand-supply ratio. Based on LMPI, the integrated local market power index which describes the whole picture of market can be obtained. It has been proved that the new approach can assess market power exactly, and identify the critical factor that results in market power and where generators are easy to exercise market power. The finding in this paper is helpful for market monitoring and mitigating market power. Moreover, the new index can be used to evaluate the power grid availability to generation competition and the power transmission expansion planning. (author)

  14. Energy deregulation: the Vattenfall experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1992, Sweden prepared itself for deregulation by transforming Vattenfall, the country's main supplier of energy, from a public utility into a limited liability company. Vattenfall was still 100% owned by the state, but began to operate as a commercial entity with a separate board of directors. On January 1, 1996, Sweden and Finland deregulated, and the three Nordic countries - Norway, Sweden and Denmark - became a completely open market. Beginning November 1, 1999, Sweden will introduce simplified metering, bringing competition directly to consumers, which represents the purest and most advanced form of electricity competition, forcing Vattenfall and its peers to fight for the loyalty of customers from the smallest retail household upwards. As a central participant in deregulation, Vattenfall was faced with some major challenges. In essence, Vattenfall had to evolve from a parochial Swedish public utility into a pan-European energy services company. The transition was successful and Vattenfall today represents about 20% of Scandinavia's generation capacity, with operations that are about 1/2 the size of those of Ontario Hydro. Vattenfall had to take a number of steps to get ready for a fully competitive retail market. First it established a market oriented group organization based on three units: Vattenfall Electricity Generation, Vattenfall Energy Market, and Vattenfall Electricity Networks and Services. Second it expanded its relationship with its customers. Third it adjusted to the fact that electricity deregulation led to an immediate generation surplus. The main lessons learned from the experience are summarized

  15. A green certificate market combined with a liberalised power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morthorst, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    The development of renewable energy sources is expected to play an important role in the implementation of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets in the EU member states. Among the highly relevant instruments for promoting the renewable development is the establishment of a market for tradable green certificates (TGCs) and markets based on TGCs or equivalent instruments are already established a number of places, among these Australia, Holland, England, Italy and Texas. Other countries are in the preparation phase. Sweden and Belgium (Flanders) are moving fast towards certificate-schemes, while although an early mover the Danish Parliament has postponed the introduction in Denmark until 2004-2005. The initiatives for establishing national TGC-markets are very much in line with the fixed targets for renewable development launched by the EU-commission. Thus, although the different countries have not chosen the same concept for establishing national TGC-markets, nevertheless there seems to be a good starting point for establishing an international one. This paper discusses the separate introduction of an international tradable green certificate market into a liberalised power market, especially in relation to cost-effectiveness and the possible contributions to national GHG-reduction strategies. The combination of a TGC and a liberalised power market encounters a number of problems in relation to achieving national GHG-reduction targets. One of the main results from a three-country case study described in the paper is that those countries most ambitious in renewable target setting by increasing their TGC-quotas will only partly be gaining the CO 2 -reduction benefits themselves. How large a share they gain themselves will depend only on the marginal conditions at the spot market

  16. Power exchange game in the electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyykko, S.; Partanen, J.; Viljainen, S.; Lassila, J.; Honkapuro, S.; Tahvanainen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Since it is not economically reasonable to build parallel electricity networks, in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark, electricity distribution is protected by monopoly. However, electricity production and selling have been opened up to competition by connecting the transmission networks of these countries together, and it is possible to produce electricity where it is cheapest. A common electricity power market, called Nord Pool, has been created where electricity can be bought, sold or used as an exchange product. In order to help students understand the operation of electricity markets and the use of different electricity exchange products, the Department of Electrical Engineering at Lappeenranta University developed a scheme in which the theory can be used in practice. In the scheme, students are given the responsibility to manage the electricity markets of power companies in order analyze, plan and make decisions, which are skills required on the open power markets. The paper provided an introduction to the electricity markets in Nordic countries and discussed Nord Pool and its products. Information about education at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Lappeenranta University of Technology was also presented. The paper also provided details of the power exchange scheme on the electricity markets. 6 refs., 17 figs

  17. Green power marketing. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, S.

    2005-01-01

    Selectpower Inc. is an unregulated affiliate of Guelph Hydro and was formed to market green energy alternatives. Details of their Selectwind program were reviewed in this presentation. The program is available to both individuals and organizations. Customers sign a 3 or 5 year agreement to purchase monthly blocks of wind energy at a premium of $6.53 per month, which is billed on their Hydro bill. Details of the program's business strategy and branding policy were presented. The program markets itself by using full page colour newspaper ads, direct mailing and making forms available at Selectpower retail stores, mall kiosks and community events. In addition, Selectwind leaders are profiled in Enernews, and also have a quarterly newsletter. An example of an order form was provided, as well as an outline of Selectwind educational materials and details of their quality assurance procedures, EcoLogo certification and guarantees. Fifty percent of customers currently buy more than 100 kWh per month, and several customers buy 100 per cent equivalent of their electricity use as Selectwind. Minimum Selectwind purchase is 1200 kWh per year with a 3 year contract. Approximately 100 MWh are purchased every month, and 3,607,494 kWh have been sold for the life of the contracts. Selectwind's combined emissions reduction commitments are 3,206 tonnes of CO 2 . It was observed that 45,000 Ontario customer using wind energy represented 6.2 MW of installed capacity. refs., tabs., figs

  18. The Power of the Network: Teach for America's Impact on the Deregulation of Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretchmar, Kerry; Sondel, Beth; Ferrare, Joseph J.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we illustrate the relationships between Teach For America (TFA) and the deregulation of university-based teacher education programs. We use policy network analysis to create a visual representation of TFA's connections to individuals, organizations, and private corporations who are working to shift the way teachers are prepared.…

  19. The development of market power in the Spanish power generation sector: Perspectives after market liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciarreta, Aitor; Nasirov, Shahriyar; Silva, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the market power problem in the Spanish power generation sector and examines how and to which extent the market has developed in terms of market power concerns after the market liberalization reforms. The methodology applied in this study includes typical ex-post structural and behavioral measures employed to estimate potential for market power, namely: concentration ratios (CR) (for the largest and the three largest suppliers), the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index (HHI), Entropy, Pivotal Supply Index, the Residual Supply Index and Residual Demand Elasticity (RDE). The results are presented for the two largest Spanish generating companies (Endesa and Iberdrola) acting in the Iberian Electricity Market (MIBEL), and in the Spanish Day-ahead electricity market. The results show evidence that these companies have behaved much more competitively in recent periods than in the beginning of the market liberalization. In addition, the paper discusses important structural and regulatory changes through market liberalization processes in the Spanish Day-ahead electricity market. - Highlights: •Competition and regulation in the Spanish electricity market. •The methodology applied in this study: ex-post structural and behavioral measures. •Key dominant companies behaved more competitively in recent periods. •Important structural and regulatory changes in the Spanish electricity market.

  20. Increase of the competition on the electric power french market: 6000 MW for the concurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the energy market deregulation in France, EDF became wedded to three objectives: encourage the competition in France, contribute to the development of a unique energy market in Europe and and allowed the EDF group development in the same conditions of the concurrence. In this mind, EDF put 6000 MW for auction. An economic analysis of the EDF group policy facing the competition of the new energy de-regulated market is proposed. (A.L.B.)

  1. Photovoltaic energy in power market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, D.T.; Frunt, J.; Myrzik, J.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) penetration in the grid connected power system has been growing. Currently, PV electricity is usually directly sold back to the energy supplier at a fixed price and subsidy. However, subsidies should always be a temporary policy, and will eventually be terminated. A question is

  2. Structural versus behavioral remedies in the deregulation of electricity markets: an experimental investigation motivated by policy concerns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Koten, Silvester; Ortmann, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, November (2013), s. 256-265 ISSN 0014-2921 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542; GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/11/0364 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : European electricity markets * economics experiments * forward markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.364, year: 2013

  3. Power market model with energy- and power dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, T.A.; Larsen, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report discusses a mathematical model of the Norwegian power market. The year is divided into three seasons. Each season is subdivided into a high-load period and a low-load period according to the demand. High-load occurs in daytime on workdays while low-load occurs at night and on holidays. The model is intended to be a tool for studying variations in prices, production, demand and trade throughout the year in a market of free competition. The model establishes equilibrium prices of electricity in Norway in high-load and low-load periods. Equilibrium prices with added transport tariffs and charges give customer an indication of the cost of using electricity. And the equilibrium prices indicate to the power producers the value of further energy or power capacity. Examples of calculations using the model show that extended export and import between Norway and other countries affect power prices and production in Norway. In the examples, power intensive industry and wood processing are subjected to market prices on energy. World market prices which give unilateral power export in the high-load periods cause the Norwegian power prices to rise strongly. If to the export from Norway in periods of high-load there corresponds import in periods of low-load, then the pressure on the prices in the power market is significantly reduced. A more extensive power exchange implies that foreign power producers may use the Norwegian power system to avoid large variations in their thermal power production. 23 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  4. An agent-based simulation of power generation company behavior in electricity markets under different market-clearing mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliabadi, Danial Esmaeili; Kaya, Murat; Şahin, Güvenç

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated electricity markets are expected to provide affordable electricity for consumers through promoting competition. Yet, the results do not always fulfill the expectations. The regulator's market-clearing mechanism is a strategic choice that may affect the level of competition in the market. We conceive of the market-clearing mechanism as composed of two components: pricing rules and rationing policies. We investigate the strategic behavior of power generation companies under different market-clearing mechanisms using an agent-based simulation model which integrates a game-theoretical understanding of the auction mechanism in the electricity market and generation companies' learning mechanism. Results of our simulation experiments are presented using various case studies representing different market settings. The market in simulations is observed to converge to a Nash equilibrium of the stage game or to a similar state under most parameter combinations. Compared to pay-as-bid pricing, bid prices are closer to marginal costs on average under uniform pricing while GenCos' total profit is also higher. The random rationing policy of the ISO turns out to be more successful in achieving lower bid prices and lower GenCo profits. In minimizing GenCos' total profit, a combination of pay-as-bid pricing rule and random rationing policy is observed to be the most promising. - Highlights: • An agent-based simulation of generation company behavior in electricity markets is developed. • Learning dynamics of companies is modeled with an extended Q-learning algorithm. • Different market clearing mechanisms of the regulator are compared. • Convergence to Nash equilibria is analyzed under different cases. • The level of competition in the market is studied.

  5. The undertow of deregulation : reregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Alberta, Ontario and New Brunswick each initiated measures to deregulate their electric power industries in order to remain competitive with lower electricity rates in some U.S. states where the industry was also moving towards deregulation. This paper considers how the original sweep of deregulation policy goals succumbed to electricity reregulation policies. The decision by British Columbia to re-examine its deregulation plans in light of the experience in Canada's 3 other province's was also examined. The paper describes the electric power industry from 1900 to 1960s, before the deregulation wave hit the industry. It then proceeds to the 1970s which was marked by the oil embargo. The 1980s saw a new era of policy shifts towards deregulation and privatization activity which was intended to introduce competition into regulated industries. Alberta was the first Canadian province to introduce competition to its electricity industry in an effort to remain competitive with neighbouring U.S. jurisdictions. By the 1990s Ontario's vertically integrated electricity industry was in trouble and recommendations were made to dissolve Ontario's Hydro One monopoly, particularly in power generation. In 1999, New Brunswick restructured its electricity industry to remain competitive with New England's electricity industry. The paper describes the gradual pull back from deregulation by all 3 provinces and the measures taken to impose price controls. Both industry and consumers paid a price for major policy changes. Complete competition in New Brunswick never materialized. It was suggested that controlled competition will likely move the electricity industry in the future. 40 refs

  6. Application of Q-learning with temperature variation for bidding strategies in market based power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghibi-Sistani, M.B.; Akbarzadeh-Tootoonchi, M.R.; Javidi-Dashte Bayaz, M.H.; Rajabi-Mashhadi, H.

    2006-01-01

    The electric power industry is confronted with restructuring in which the operation scheduling is going to be decided based on a competitive market. In this new arrangement, bidding strategy has become a major issue. Participants in this deregulated energy market place may be able to compete better by choosing a suitable bidding strategy for trading electricity. Different classical methods for decision making in the uncertain environment of the market can be applied to select a suitable strategy. Most of these methods, such as game theory, that insure reaching the best solution for all market participants, require a lot of information about the other market players and the market. However, in the real market place only a little information, such as the spot price, is available for all participants. In this paper, a modified reinforcement learning based on temperature variation has been first proposed and then applied to determine the optimal strategy for a power supplier in the electricity market. A Pool-Co model has been considered here, and the simulation results are shown to be the same as those of standard game theory. Adaptation of the method in the presence of parameter variation has been verified as well. The main advantage of the proposed method is that no information about other participants is required. Furthermore, our investigation shows that even if all participants use this method, they will stay in Nash equilibrium. (author)

  7. Green power marketing. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltshire, S. [Selectpower Inc., Guelph, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Selectpower Inc. is an unregulated affiliate of Guelph Hydro and was formed to market green energy alternatives. Details of their Selectwind program were reviewed in this presentation. The program is available to both individuals and organizations. Customers sign a 3 or 5 year agreement to purchase monthly blocks of wind energy at a premium of $6.53 per month, which is billed on their Hydro bill. Details of the program's business strategy and branding policy were presented. The program markets itself by using full page colour newspaper ads, direct mailing and making forms available at Selectpower retail stores, mall kiosks and community events. In addition, Selectwind leaders are profiled in Enernews, and also have a quarterly newsletter. An example of an order form was provided, as well as an outline of Selectwind educational materials and details of their quality assurance procedures, EcoLogo certification and guarantees. Fifty percent of customers currently buy more than 100 kWh per month, and several customers buy 100 per cent equivalent of their electricity use as Selectwind. Minimum Selectwind purchase is 1200 kWh per year with a 3 year contract. Approximately 100 MWh are purchased every month, and 3,607,494 kWh have been sold for the life of the contracts. Selectwind's combined emissions reduction commitments are 3,206 tonnes of CO{sub 2}. It was observed that 45,000 Ontario customer using wind energy represented 6.2 MW of installed capacity. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. Market Prices in a Power Market with more than 50% Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Klaus; Grohnheit, Poul Erik

    2018-01-01

    Denmark has the highest proportion of wind power in the world. Wind power provided a world record of 39.1% of the total annual Danish electricity consumption in 2014 with as much as 51.7% in Western Denmark. Many would argue that the present power markets are not designed for such high shares...... of wind power production and that it would be hard to get good and stable prices. However, analyses in this chapter show that the Nordic power market works, extreme events have been few, and the current infrastructure and market organization has been able to handle the amount of wind power installed so...... far. It is found that geographical bidding areas for the wholesale electricity market reflect external transmission constraints caused by wind power. The analyses in this chapter use hourly data from West Denmark—which has the highest share of wind energy in Denmark and which is a separate price area...

  9. Market Prices in a Power Market with more than 50% Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Klaus; Grohnheit, Poul Erik

    2017-01-01

    Denmark has the highest proportion of wind power in the world. Wind power provided a world record of 39.1% of the total annual Danish electricity consumption in 2014 with as much as 51.7% in Western Denmark. Many would argue that the present power markets are not designed for such high shares...... of wind power production and that it would be hard to get good and stable prices. However, analyses in this chapter show that the Nordic power market works, extreme events have been few, and the current infrastructure and market organization has been able to handle the amount of wind power installed so...... far. It is found that geographical bidding areas for the wholesale electricity market reflect external transmission constraints caused by wind power. The analyses in this chapter use hourly data from West Denmark—which has the highest share of wind energy in Denmark and which is a separate price area...

  10. The challenge of market power under globalization

    OpenAIRE

    David Arie Mayer-Foulkes

    2014-01-01

    The legacy of Adam Smith leads to a false confidence on the optimality of laissez faire policies for the global market economy. Instead, the polarized character of current globalization deeply affects both developed and underdeveloped economies. Current globalization is characterized by factor exchange between economies of persistently unequal development. This implies the existence of persistent extraordinary market power in transnational corporations, reflected in their disproportionate par...

  11. Development of Danish wind power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Niels I.

    2004-01-01

    The modern phase of Danish wind power started after the oil crisis in 1973. Based on long traditions of Danish wind power dating back to the beginning of the century a new commercial phase was initiated by small industrial entrepreneurs with support by the Danish government, the Danish Academy of Technical Sciences and green organizations. During the eighties technological development resulted in increased cost efficiency, while the investment subsidies from the state were gradually phased out. Conflicts between utilities and wind power producers over tariffs and the costs of grid connections, then slowed down the penetration of wind power on the Danish market. In addition, many local municipalities were setting up administrative barriers for wind turbines. These barriers were removed by government intervention in the early nineties when favourable feed-in tariffs were introduced together with easy access to the grid, simple procedures for construction allowances and priority to green electricity. As a result wind power was booming in the Danish home market and Danish turbines achieved a global market share of around 50%. After a change of government in December 2001, however the Danish home market for wind power has more or less collapsed. (Author)

  12. Track 2: business outlook and the significance of safety - safety of nuclear power reactor installations in a deregulated environment. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Stephen P.; Floyd, Stephen; Berkow, Herbert N.; Quinn, Edward L.; Hagen, Ronald E.; Esselman, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Deregulation in the nuclear industry sets the stage for a new production environment with cost and profit-based competition. This not only affects the commercial reactor sector but also is a key element of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DoE's) strategy for facility deployment and commercialization. This panel is designed to explore how these transitions are being made with the assurance of the principle of safety in operations. Panelists have been assembled from industry, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and DOE to explore these challenges and opportunities in the deregulated operational environment from a variety of perspectives. Presentations by each panelist will be followed by a panel session that will explore both technical and process elements of these major transitions. Success in a deregulated environment requires both safety and economic operation of facilities. With respect to each of these attributes, competition may be expected to result in substantially higher levels of performance. This panel will examine how these expectations are likely to be set, how they will be measured, and what will constitute success. The baseline for evaluation begins with assessment of past performance. The panelists have examined this for both the commercial nuclear reactor sector, as well as for the DOE complex. The Nuclear Energy Institute and the NRC have been working over the past few years on a program to establish new performance indicators for monitoring safety of reactor operation. The session participants will first examine the effectiveness of this system as it is designed to measure performance in today's environment. Second, the panelists will project the capabilities and attributes of this system in monitoring safety in transition to a deregulated, consolidated market. Will these systems have the capability to identify trends that will be significant in this new environment? Will today's system and metrics be

  13. Insurer Market Power Lowers Prices In Numerous Concentrated Provider Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Richard M; Arnold, Daniel R

    2017-09-01

    Using prices of hospital admissions and visits to five types of physicians, we analyzed how provider and insurer market concentration-as measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI)-interact and are correlated with prices. We found evidence that in the range of the Department of Justice's and Federal Trade Commission's definition of a moderately concentrated market (HHI of 1,500-2,500), insurers have the bargaining power to reduce provider prices in highly concentrated provider markets. In particular, hospital admission prices were 5 percent lower and cardiologist, radiologist, and hematologist/oncologist visit prices were 4 percent, 7 percent, and 19 percent lower, respectively, in markets with high provider concentration and insurer HHI above 2,000, compared to such markets with insurer HHI below 2,000. We did not find evidence that high insurer concentration reduced visit prices for primary care physicians or orthopedists, however. The policy dilemma that arises from our findings is that there are no insurer market mechanisms that will pass a portion of these price reductions on to consumers in the form of lower premiums. Large purchasers of health insurance such as state and federal governments, as well as the use of regulatory approaches, could provide a solution. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Wind power and the conditions at a liberalized power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morthorst, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Wind power is undergoing a rapid development nationally as well as globally and in a number of countries covers an increasing part of the power supply. At the same time an ongoing liberalization of power markets is taking place and to an increasing extent the owners of wind power plants will themselves have to be responsible for trading the power at the spot market and financially handling the balancing. In the western part of Denmark (Jutland/Funen area), wind-generated power from time to time covers almost 100% of total power consumption. Therefore some examples are chosen from this area to analyse in more detail how well large amounts of wind power in the short-term are handled at the power spot market. It turns out that there is a tendency that more wind power in the system in the short run leads to relatively lower spot prices, while less wind power implies relatively higher spot prices, although, with the exception of December 2002, in general no strong relationship is found. A stronger relationship is found at the regulating market, where there is a fairly clear tendency that the more wind power produced, the higher is the need for down-regulation, and, correspondingly, the less wind power produced, the higher is the need for up-regulation. In general for the Jutland/Funen area the average cost of down-regulation is calculated as 1 2 c euros/kWh regulated for 2002, while the cost of up-regulation amounts to 0 7 c euros/kWh regulated. (author)

  15. Carbon Pricing, Power Markets and the Competitiveness of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the competitiveness of nuclear power against coal- and gas-fired power generation in liberalized electricity markets with either CO 2 trading or carbon taxes. It uses daily price data for electricity, gas, coal and carbon from 2005 to 2010, which encompasses the first years of the European Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), the world's foremost carbon trading framework. The study shows that even with modest carbon pricing, competition for new investment in electricity markets will take place between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power struggling to be profitable. The data and analyses contained in this study provide a robust framework for assessing cost and investment issues in liberalized electricity markets with carbon pricing. (authors)

  16. Regulatory Assessment of the Effects of Economic Deregulation of the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    The European Commission Nuclear Regulators Working Group (NRWG) appointed a Task Force (TF) to develop a common view among European regulators on the assessment of typical safety consequences resulting from economic pressure on operators as a result of deregulation of electricity markets. Although the report seems to imply that there are only negative aspects of deregulation, this is not the case. As the focus of the TF has been potential safety consequences we have not dealt with potential positive effects of deregulation. To provide a general background to the analyses of the safety consequences, the TF undertook a survey of the current situation within the EU and candidate countries on aspects of economic deregulation of the countries nuclear industry and the experiences so far of regulating these issues. Answers were submitted in of July 2001. 13 NRWG members with nuclear power plants took part in the survey. (author)

  17. Short-term optimal wind power generation capacity in liberalized electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsina, Fernando; Roescher, Mark; Larisson, Carlos; Garces, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Mainly because of environmental concerns and fuel price uncertainties, considerable amounts of wind-based generation capacity are being added to some deregulated power systems. The rapid wind development registered in some countries has essentially been driven by strong subsidizing programs. Since wind investments are commonly isolated from market signals, installed wind capacity can be higher than optimal, leading to distortions of the power prices with a consequent loss of social welfare. In this work, the influence of wind generation on power prices in the framework of a liberalized electricity market has been assessed by means of stochastic simulation techniques. The developed methodology allows investigating the maximal wind capacity that would be profitably deployed if wind investments were subject to market conditions only. For this purpose, stochastic variables determining power prices are accurately modeled. A test system resembling the size and characteristics of the German power system has been selected for this study. The expected value of the optimal, short-term wind capacity is evaluated for a considerable number of random realizations of power prices. The impact of dispersing the wind capacity over statistical independent wind sites has also been evaluated. The simulation results reveal that fuel prices, installation and financing costs of wind investments are very influential parameters on the maximal wind capacity that might be accommodated in a market-based manner

  18. Generation reliability assessment in oligopoly power market using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haroonabadi, H.; Haghifam, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addressed issues regarding power generation reliability assessment (HLI) in deregulated power pool markets. Most HLI reliability evaluation methods are based on the loss of load (LOLE) approach which is among the most suitable indices to describe the level of generation reliability. LOLE refers to the time in which load is greater than the amount of available generation. While most reliability assessments deal only with power system constraints, this study considered HLI reliability assessment in an oligopoly power market using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS). It evaluated the sensitivity of the reliability index to different reserve margins and future margins. The reliability index was determined by intersecting the offer and demand curves of power plants and comparing them to other parameters. The paper described the fundamentals of an oligopoly power pool market and proposed an algorithm for HLI reliability assessment for such a market. The proposed method was assessed on the IEEE-Reliability Test System with satisfactory results. In all cases, generation reliability indices were evaluated with different reserve margins and various load levels. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 appendix

  19. Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described.

  20. Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described

  1. Pricing of power in the new market: the impact on industrial/commercial customers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannson, K.

    2001-01-01

    A series of viewgraphs were part of this presentation where the author discussed the operations of TransCanada Power. The company operates a power plant that generate 1500 MW, and has 1000 MW in the advanced development stage. TransCanada Power is also a wholesale marketer that actively participates in regulatory and market design forums. It handles 20 per cent of large industrial loads. A brief overview of power price risk was provided, where the concept of value at risk (VAR), a measurement technique, was explained. An example further illustrated the concept. The author reviewed power markets in Alberta from an historical perspective, noting the differences between regulated wholesale markets and the markets found today. A discussion of the drivers of regulated markets ensued, followed by the drivers of the deregulated market, where generation assets are privately owned, operating outside of the adjudication of the regulator, and the merit order is established by ranking of offers, not costs. Return is made from energy commodity sales, the market price is affected by outside influences, and the average market price does not reflect the average system costs. The author explained the changes that took place and discussed some pricing issues. A section on pricing options reviewed pricing decision objectives, term, short term purchases, long term fixed price energy, gas tolling agreements. The author concluded that each organization must define its tolerance to risk, its comfort level with treating electricity differently than gas. The fundamentals behind pricing must be understood, as well as the competitive position of company. tabs., figs

  2. Pricing of power in the new market: the impact on industrial/commercial customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannson, K. [TransCanada Power, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    A series of viewgraphs were part of this presentation where the author discussed the operations of TransCanada Power. The company operates a power plant that generate 1500 MW, and has 1000 MW in the advanced development stage. TransCanada Power is also a wholesale marketer that actively participates in regulatory and market design forums. It handles 20 per cent of large industrial loads. A brief overview of power price risk was provided, where the concept of value at risk (VAR), a measurement technique, was explained. An example further illustrated the concept. The author reviewed power markets in Alberta from an historical perspective, noting the differences between regulated wholesale markets and the markets found today. A discussion of the drivers of regulated markets ensued, followed by the drivers of the deregulated market, where generation assets are privately owned, operating outside of the adjudication of the regulator, and the merit order is established by ranking of offers, not costs. Return is made from energy commodity sales, the market price is affected by outside influences, and the average market price does not reflect the average system costs. The author explained the changes that took place and discussed some pricing issues. A section on pricing options reviewed pricing decision objectives, term, short term purchases, long term fixed price energy, gas tolling agreements. The author concluded that each organization must define its tolerance to risk, its comfort level with treating electricity differently than gas. The fundamentals behind pricing must be understood, as well as the competitive position of company. tabs., figs.

  3. Financing power projects in emerging markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.T.

    1996-01-01

    Financing for power generation projects in the developing countries of the world has been provided by the United States Export-Import Bank. The loans provided by its new Project Finance Division, totalling $8.3 billion are described. The future of project financing for the power generation industry should, it is argued, rest not with government financing agencies, but with private sector financial markets. (UK)

  4. Canada in the world power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Canadian exports around the world are discussed. Canada is already playing a role, or has entered into an agreement with development of nuclear power in Argentina, South Korea, Romania and Mexico. Power generation projects are underway in parts of Asia, Africa and Pacific regions. Exports are taking place to Central and South America, Europe and the Middle East. Federal government assistance in the export market is also discussed. (T.I.)

  5. The market value of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Thompson, H.G. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    What are the factors and circumstances that have made some plants more valuable to others than to their original owners? What is currently keeping nuclear plants, with their relatively low operating cost and environmental impacts, at the bottom of the heap? Why will some nuclear plants have significantly higher market values in the future while others will fail? What circumstances are likely to change in the near future that could significantly alter this market? In this article, the authors address these questions and attempt to provide insights into the unique market for nuclear power. The authors will proceed by first introducing the components of generation asset valuation, then discussing recent experiences with the sales of non-nuclear and nuclear power plants. Next, the authors will provide some explanation for why non-nuclear assets are enjoying a robust market while the market for nuclear plants remains immature. Finally, the authors present an analysis of the future value of nuclear power and a view of one road to take to get there

  6. The market value of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N.K.; Thompson, H.G. Jr.

    1999-10-01

    What are the factors and circumstances that have made some plants more valuable to others than to their original owners? What is currently keeping nuclear plants, with their relatively low operating cost and environmental impacts, at the bottom of the heap? Why will some nuclear plants have significantly higher market values in the future while others will fail? What circumstances are likely to change in the near future that could significantly alter this market? In this article, the authors address these questions and attempt to provide insights into the unique market for nuclear power. The authors will proceed by first introducing the components of generation asset valuation, then discussing recent experiences with the sales of non-nuclear and nuclear power plants. Next, the authors will provide some explanation for why non-nuclear assets are enjoying a robust market while the market for nuclear plants remains immature. Finally, the authors present an analysis of the future value of nuclear power and a view of one road to take to get there.

  7. An equal opportunity power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    As the House and Senate head to conference on the energy bill, the outlook for PUHCA reform and mandatory wholesale transmission access is excellent. During the opening months of 1991, the US Senate was debating the administration's proposal for a comprehensive national energy strategy. Reform of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act of 1935 (PUHCA) was a controversial issue in that debate. Independent energy producers and others strongly supported reform but investor-owned utilities were sharply split on the issue. The Senate refused to consider transmission access, and it was the one issue which had the potential to unite the investor-owned utility community in opposition to PUHCA reform. Now, as we approach the mid-point of 1992, the Senate and the House have passed energy bills and are headed to conference to work out their differences. There is no longer effective opposition to PUHCA reform, and although the Senate would still prefer to avoid the issue, transmission access appears likely to be included in the final energy package. Energy legislation will almost certainly be enacted before the November elections and was expected possibly as early as June. This article addresses transmission access, transmission policies, voluntary transmission, independent power producers influence, the retail wheeling juggernaut, and Public Utilities Holding Company Act reform

  8. The expanded role of municipal utilities in a deregulated power market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudhomme, H. [Sudbury Hydro Electric Commission, Sudbury, ON (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    A review of how Sudbury Hydro Electric Commission is meeting the challenges of transforming itself from a regulated monopoly into a competitive business was presented. The utility designed its organization in a Business Unit Model and has developed alliances and partnerships with the City of Sudbury, other municipalities, other utilities and the private sector. The internal `business units` include wires, metering, billing, energy services, district energy, telecommunications and radio services. The physical network includes (1) SCADA (Supervisory Control And Acquisition) devices at all substations and many switch locations, (2) automated meter reading devices for electric, water and gas for all their customers, and (3) load control devices at customer locations. Sudbury Hydro`s partners include AT and T Canada, Cisco, ICS and sureNet, the Sudbury Regional Network which is a consortium of 21 health, education, municipal and industry stakeholders. In the future, Sudbury Hydro will offer services such as cable television programming, movie videos on demand, telephone and access to the INTERNET. Beyond the direct benefits to consumers, the city of Sudbury will also benefit significantly from the building of this network.

  9. Market Power in Power Markets: Evidence from Forward Prices of Electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Jensen, Thomas Elgaard; Mølgaard, Rune

    We examine the forward market for electricity for indications of misuse of market power, using a unique data set on OTC price indications posted by Elsam A/S, the dominant producer in Western Denmark, which is one of the price areas under the Nordic power exchange Nord Pool. The Danish Competition...... Council (the regulatory government agency) has ruled that Elsam has used its dominant position to obtain excessive spot prices over a period from July 2003 through December 2006. We show that significant forward premia exist, and that they are related both to spot market volatility and misuse of market...... are consistent across forward premium regressions and structural forward pricing models....

  10. Market: why is thermal solar power down?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Jannic, N.

    2010-01-01

    After a 10 year period of steady growth the French market of the thermal solar power dropped by 15% in 2009. Only 265.000 m 2 were installed instead of 313.000 m 2 in 2008. The main reason of this decrease is the economic crisis: the European market for thermal solar energy dropped by 10%. The second reason is the unfair competition of the photovoltaic power that benefits from very favourable electricity purchase prices, from higher subsidies and from a better image in the public's eye. Another competitor on the market is the new equipment called 'thermodynamic water heater' that involves a heat pump, this equipment is cheaper but only on a short term basis. (A.C.)

  11. Competition and deregulation in electricity : the national and continental dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garant, D.

    2000-01-01

    Some of the recent developments with Hydro-Quebec in terms of moving towards a deregulated competitive market were presented. In June 2000, the Quebec National Assembly passed legislation allowing for power generation and wholesale supply of electricity within Quebec will to be a deregulated business based on the gradual introduction of a competitive, contested market at the wholesale level. This legislation mitigates Hydro-Quebec's market power by legislating a long term fixed price supply contract between Hydro-Quebec's generation and distribution groups, operating as a functionally separate division within corporate Hydro-Quebec. Hydro-Quebec's market power in generation is 36,000 MW, the bulk of which will be committed to the Quebec distribution market at a fixed price of about 2.8 cents per kWh. Hydro-Quebec will maintain the rights to develop large scale hydro in Quebec if the development meets conditions of economic viability, environmental soundness and is locally acceptable. Hydro-Quebec is also expanding into new areas of generation such as wind power. The electric utility also believes it can play a role in Atlantic Canada by trading and moving off-peak and on-peak energy by using the storage capacity of their large hydro reservoirs

  12. Civilization versus Commerce: On the Sociolinguistic Effects of the Deregulation of the TV Market on Flemish Public Service Broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    In the globalized economy, old metadiscursive regimes have been challenged by new conditions which are often considered to be more favourable to heteroglossic practices. In Flemish Belgium, the liberalization of the TV market is said to have transformed the broadcaster VRT from a public service aiming at educating viewers into a competitive…

  13. Legally separated joint ownership of bidder and auctioneer: illustrated by the partial deregulation of the EU electricity markets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Koten, Silvester

    -, č. 346 (2007), s. 1-47 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : asymmetric auctions * bid ding behavior * electricity markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp346.pdf

  14. Bidding behavior when one bidder and the auctioneer are vertically integrated: implications for the partial deregulation of EU electricity markets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Koten, Silvester

    -, č. 313 (2006), s. 1-35 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : asymmetric auctions * bidding behavior * electricity markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp313.pdf

  15. Ontario's new electricity market and the future of OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, H.

    2002-01-01

    The recent measures taken by Ontario Power Generation since 1998 to deregulate the electricity market in the province of Ontario are reviewed. The opening of Ontario's power market in May 2002 will oblige Ontario Power Generation to reduce its market share. The author reviewed the current status of the energy market in Ontario and noted a modest growth in demand. A significant portion of the energy supply is being provided by nuclear, fossil fuels and hydro energy. The challenge facing Ontario Power Generation is to stay competitive in the new deregulated market and to participate in the energy market in the United States. 6 figs

  16. Local Buyer Market Power and Horizontally Differentiated Manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shinn-Shyr; Rojas, Christian; Lavoie, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a farmer-processor relationship, where market power is bidirectional: processors have buyer as well as seller market power. Farmers supply a homogeneous raw input to the processors, which, in turn, process it into a horizontally differentiated product. The analysis shows that the spread between prices that both parties receive can be decomposed into two components: one due to buyer market power in the agricultural input market and one due to seller market power in the d...

  17. International technologies market for coal thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports a general framework of potential market of clean coal combustion technologies in thermal power plants, specially for commercialization and market penetration in developing countries [it

  18. Power generation investment in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Most IEA countries are liberalizing their electricity markets, shifting the responsibility for financing new investment in power generation to private investors. No longer able to automatically pass on costs to consumers, and with future prices of electricity uncertain, investors face a much riskier environment for investment in electricity infrastructure. This report looks at how investors have responded to the need to internalize investment risk in power generation. While capital and total costs remain the parameters shaping investment choices, the value of technologies which can be installed quickly and operated flexibly is increasingly appreciated. Investors are also managing risk by greater use of contracting, by acquiring retail businesses, and through mergers with natural gas suppliers. While liberalization was supposed to limit government intervention in the electricity market, volatile electricity prices have put pressure on governments to intervene and limit such prices. This study looks at several cases of volatile prices in IEA countries' electricity markets, and finds that while market prices can be a sufficient incentive for new investment in peak capacity, government intervention into the market to limit prices may undermine such investment

  19. New wholesale power market design using linked forward markets :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William; Ellison, James F.; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Guttromson, Ross; Tesfatsion, Leigh S.

    2013-04-01

    This report proposes a reformulation of U.S. ISO/RTO-managed wholesale electric power mar- kets for improved reliability and e ciency of system operations. Current markets do not specify or compensate primary frequency response. They also unnecessarily limit the participation of new technologies in reserve markets and o er insu cient economic inducements for new capacity invest- ment. In the proposed market reformulation, energy products are represented as physically-covered rm contracts and reserve products as physically-covered call option contracts. Trading of these products is supported by a backbone of linked ISO/RTO-managed forward markets with planning horizons ranging from multiple years to minutes ahead. A principal advantage of this reformulation is that reserve needs can be speci ed in detail, and resources can o er the services for which they are best suited, without being forced to conform to rigid reserve product de nitions. This should improve the business case for electric energy storage and other emerging technologies to provide reserve. In addition, the facilitation of price discovery should help to ensure e cient energy/reserve procurement and adequate levels of new capacity investment.

  20. Challenges for the nuclear safety of the deregulation of electricity markets; Defis pour la surete nucleaire de la dereglementation des marches de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Eurosafe 2000 was organised around two round tables on the first day and four seminars on the second day. The first round table dealt with general aspects of deregulation including the economic constraints and the special challenges arising during transition from regulated to deregulated structures. The second round table focussed on technical and organisational safety issues which are directly or indirectly related to the changes introduced by deregulation. The four seminars hold in order to provide opportunities for comparing experiences and learning about recent activities of IPSN, GRS and their partners in the European Union and Eastern Europe: Seminar 1 (Nuclear installation safety, assessment and analysis): assessment of the flooding incident at the Blayais nuclear power plant; PSA data base, comparison of the French and German approach; assessment of the Balakovo fire probabilistic study and elaboration of a guide for reviewing fire PSA; comprehensive technical assessment of an advanced German PWR by PSA - objectives and main results; PSA approach for the safety assessment of low-power and shutdown states; correlation of initiating events with the PSA level-2 results; safety assessment for fission products tests in the Phebus reactor; use of NPP simulators for applied human factor studies; assessment of the 'deterministic realistic method' applied to large LOCA analysis; assessment of the feasibility of an improvement programme enabling operation of units 3 and 4 of Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Seminar 2 (nuclear installation safety, research): PHEBUS 2K project on severe accidents; current status of the COCOSYS development; fission product modeling in ASTEC; Euratom Framework Programme (FP) research in reactor safety: main achievements of FP- 4 (1994-1998), some preliminary results of FP-5 (1998-2002) and prospects for beyond 2002; development of coupled systems of 3D neutronics and fluid-dynamic system codes and their application for safety analyses

  1. Challenges for the nuclear safety of the deregulation of electricity markets; Defis pour la surete nucleaire de la dereglementation des marches de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Eurosafe 2000 was organised around two round tables on the first day and four seminars on the second day. The first round table dealt with general aspects of deregulation including the economic constraints and the special challenges arising during transition from regulated to deregulated structures. The second round table focussed on technical and organisational safety issues which are directly or indirectly related to the changes introduced by deregulation. The four seminars hold in order to provide opportunities for comparing experiences and learning about recent activities of IPSN, GRS and their partners in the European Union and Eastern Europe: Seminar 1 (Nuclear installation safety, assessment and analysis): assessment of the flooding incident at the Blayais nuclear power plant; PSA data base, comparison of the French and German approach; assessment of the Balakovo fire probabilistic study and elaboration of a guide for reviewing fire PSA; comprehensive technical assessment of an advanced German PWR by PSA - objectives and main results; PSA approach for the safety assessment of low-power and shutdown states; correlation of initiating events with the PSA level-2 results; safety assessment for fission products tests in the Phebus reactor; use of NPP simulators for applied human factor studies; assessment of the 'deterministic realistic method' applied to large LOCA analysis; assessment of the feasibility of an improvement programme enabling operation of units 3 and 4 of Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Seminar 2 (nuclear installation safety, research): PHEBUS 2K project on severe accidents; current status of the COCOSYS development; fission product modeling in ASTEC; Euratom Framework Programme (FP) research in reactor safety: main achievements of FP- 4 (1994-1998), some preliminary results of FP-5 (1998-2002) and prospects for beyond 2002; development of coupled systems of 3D neutronics and fluid-dynamic system codes and their application for safety

  2. Real-time Pricing in Power Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Anette; Schwenen, Sebastian

    We examine welfare e ects of real-time pricing in electricity markets. Before stochastic energy demand is known, competitive retailers contract with nal consumers who exogenously do not have real-time meters. After demand is realized, two electricity generators compete in a uniform price auction...... to satisfy demand from retailers acting on behalf of subscribed customers and from consumers with real-time meters. Increasing the number of consumers on real-time pricing does not always increase welfare since risk-averse consumers dislike uncertain and high prices arising through market power...

  3. Real-time Pricing in Power Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Anette; Schwenen, Sebastian

    We examine welfare eects of real-time pricing in electricity markets. Before stochastic energy demand is known, competitive retailers contract with nal consumers who exogenously do not have real-time meters. After demand is realized, two electricity generators compete in a uniform price auction...... to satisfy demand from retailers acting on behalf of subscribed customers and from consumers with real-time meters. Increasing the number of consumers on real-time pricing does not always increase welfare since risk-averse consumers dislike uncertain and high prices arising through market power...

  4. Power system models - A description of power markets and outline of market modelling in Wilmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meibom, P.; Morthors, P.E.; Nielsen, L.H.; Weber, C.; Snader, K.; Swider, D.; Ravn, H.

    2003-12-01

    This report is Deliverable 3.2 of the Wilmar project. The report describes the power markets in the Nordic countries and Germany, together with the market models to be implemented in the Wilmar Planning model-ling tool developed in the project. (au)

  5. Deregulator: Judgment Day for microeconomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, S.

    2004-01-01

    The economic theory that motivated the deregulation and privatization of the US electricity industry is seriously flawed in three crucial ways. First, the Marshallian theory of the firm is based on two mathematical errors which, when amended, reverse the accepted welfare rankings of competitive and monopoly industry structures: on the grounds of corrected neoclassical theory, monopoly should be preferred to competition. Second, while proponents of deregulation expected market-clearing equilibrium prices to apply, it is well known that the equilibrium of a system of spot market prices is unstable. This implies that imposing spot market pricing on as basic an industry as electricity is likely to lead to the kind of volatility observed under the deregulation. Third, extensive empirical research has established that on the order of 95% of firms do not produce under conditions of rising marginal cost. Requiring electricity firms to price at marginal cost was therefore likely to lead to bankruptcies, as indeed occurred. The economic preference for marginal cost spot market pricing is therefore theoretically unsound, and it is no wonder that the actual deregulatory experience was as bad as it was. (author)

  6. Deregulator: Judgment Day for microeconomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, S. [University of Western Sydney, Penrith (Australia). School of Economics and Finance

    2004-09-01

    The economic theory that motivated the deregulation and privatization of the US electricity industry is seriously flawed in three crucial ways. First, the Marshallian theory of the firm is based on two mathematical errors which, when amended, reverse the accepted welfare rankings of competitive and monopoly industry structures: on the grounds of corrected neoclassical theory, monopoly should be preferred to competition. Second, while proponents of deregulation expected market-clearing equilibrium prices to apply, it is well known that the equilibrium of a system of spot market prices is unstable. This implies that imposing spot market pricing on as basic an industry as electricity is likely to lead to the kind of volatility observed under the deregulation. Third, extensive empirical research has established that on the order of 95% of firms do not produce under conditions of rising marginal cost. Requiring electricity firms to price at marginal cost was therefore likely to lead to bankruptcies, as indeed occurred. The economic preference for marginal cost spot market pricing is therefore theoretically unsound, and it is no wonder that the actual deregulatory experience was as bad as it was. (author)

  7. 18 CFR 284.503 - Market-power determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Market-power determination. 284.503 Section 284.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELATED AUTHORITIES Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.503 Market-power determination...

  8. The liberalization of the Norwegian energy market - consequences for the international exchange of electric power. Die Liberalisierung des norwegischen Energiemarktes. Konsequenzen fuer den internationalen Stromaustausch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedswang, R G [Statnett SF, Oslo (Norway)

    1993-10-01

    The Norwegian electric power market was deregulated according to the resolutions passed by the Norwegian Parliament. A new energy law was passed after the Norwegian power systems had been made accessible to third parties. The Norwegian government was given a share in power plant and main system operation through foundation of the Norwegian Energy Corporation and the Norwegian Power Grid Company. The transmission tariffs were adapted to the competing sales of electric power. The Samkjoringen utilities fused with the Norwegian Power Grid Company. The deregulation coincided with an energy surplus period. The energy export should have been liberalized before or simultaneously with the internal liberalization, and certain interim regulations could have been established to facilitate the process of liberalization. (orig.)

  9. A law enforcement perspective of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Ira

    2006-01-01

    In April 2004, the California Attorney General's (AG) office issued a white paper that provided a 'law enforcement perspective of the California energy crisis.' To complete this special issue's coverage, I summarize three aspects of that paper: notably, the deficiencies in market oversight and enforcement that left the deregulated market prone to potential abuse, the principal modus operandi that some market agents used to exploit those deficiencies without fear of retribution, and the AG's 'recommendations for improving enforcement and protecting consumers in deregulated energy markets.'. (author)

  10. A law enforcement perspective of electricity deregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Ira [Warrington College of Business, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7169 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    In April 2004, the California Attorney General's (AG) office issued a white paper that provided a 'law enforcement perspective of the California energy crisis.' To complete this special issue's coverage, I summarize three aspects of that paper: notably, the deficiencies in market oversight and enforcement that left the deregulated market prone to potential abuse, the principal modus operandi that some market agents used to exploit those deficiencies without fear of retribution, and the AG's 'recommendations for improving enforcement and protecting consumers in deregulated energy markets.'. (author)

  11. Markets for electric power. International experience and its applicability to German conditions. Maerkte fuer Strom. Internationale Erfahrungen und Uebertragbarkeit auf Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopfer, T; Schulz, W

    1993-01-01

    The electricity supply in all countries has traditionally been organised in enclosed supply areas (regional monopoly). During the worldwide trend of privatisation and deregulation, a process towards competitivity in the power supply of many countries has been started. In England and Norway, market fragmentation has been created in the power industry. Future markets are emerging. These developments have influenced considerations on creating an internal market for energy in Europe. The study illustrates the experiences of reform in other countries (e.g. England, Norway, USA) and discusses opportunities for competitiveness reforms in Germany and Europe. (orig.)

  12. Deregulation : unlocking value : the Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, F.

    2002-01-01

    Macquarie is a global investment bank based in Australia whose international focus is on niche markets such as infrastructure and utilities. A corporate review of Macquarie is presented along with a review of the evolution of the utility industry from the stages of an integrated utility to fully unbundled entities. In the first stage, the utility is vertically integrated and owned by government, or it is highly regulated. The second stage of evolution involves the unbundling of the utility into separate generation, transmission and distribution companies, each preparing for competition. The third stage involves the introduction of competition to power generation and retail sectors. Transmission and distribution remains regulated in the third stage. The fourth stage involves down-sizing in response to competition and benchmarking. It is also a period of convergence between electricity and gas. The fifth and final stage is for deriving value. Deregulation results in major structural changes and utility managers have to decide how the utility can best deliver value to the shareholders in the new environment. The author discusses how these lessons can be applied to the case of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta

  13. Electricity market competition and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, C.; Paffenbarger, J.

    1999-01-01

    Throughout the world, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries' governments are promoting competitive electricity markets. In particular, there is a move away from administrative price-setting by government institutions to market price-setting through the introduction of competition. Today this is often focused on competition in generation. However, competition among final electricity suppliers and distributors to provide effective consumer choice is a further step that governments are likely to pursue as experience with market reform grows. This competitive environment will undoubtedly impact upon the nuclear generation industry. Competition will provide an opportunity to reinvigorate nuclear power; it will improve the transparency of energy policy-making and the policy framework for nuclear power; it will spur innovation in existing plants and help prospects for new plant build; and provide a strong impetus for cost reduction and innovation. This paper discusses these issues in detail. It looks at the potential benefits and challenges to the nuclear generation industry arising from an increasingly competitive market. (author)

  14. Markets and pricing for interruptible electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedra, T.W.; Varaiya, P.P.

    1993-01-01

    The authors propose a market for interruptible, or callable, forward contracts for electric power, in which the consumer grants the power supplier the right to interrupt a given unit of load in return for a price discount. The callable forward contracts are traded continuously until the time of use. This allows recourse for those customers with uncertain demand, while risk-averse consumers can minimize their price risk by purchasing early. Callable forward contracts are simple in form, and can be directly incorporated into the utility's economic dispatch procedure

  15. Statistical Analysis of the Impact of Wind Power on Market Quantities and Power Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Jónsson, Tryggvi; Zugno, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In view of the increasing penetration of wind power in a number of power systems and markets worldwide, we discuss some of the impacts that wind energy may have on market quantities and cross-border power flows. These impacts are uncovered through statistical analyses of actual market and flow data...... of load and wind power forecasts on Danish and German electricity markets....

  16. Do we need a power exchange if there are enough power marketers ?

    OpenAIRE

    SMEERS, Yves; WEI, Jing-Yuan

    1997-01-01

    Decentralization in electricity restructuring is a growing trend that Power Marketers are ex- pected to take advantage of. We consider a market composed of Power Marketers, an Indepen- dent System Operator, generators and retailers. Power Marketers behave a` la Cournot-Nash and the ISO implements a Transmission Capacity Reservation market a` la FERC. Retailers are price taker. Generators’ behavior is only reflected in the purchase costs of the Power Marketers. Their behavior is thus not reall...

  17. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised

  18. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised

  19. Information Brief on Green Power Marketing, 2nd Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezey, B.; Houston, A.

    1998-02-01

    This document is the second in a series of information briefs on green power marketing activity in the United States. It includes descriptions of utility green pricing programs, green power marketing activity, retail access legislation and pilot programs, and other data and information supporting the development of green power markets.

  20. 18 CFR 35.37 - Market power analysis required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Market power analysis required. 35.37 Section 35.37 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.37 Market...

  1. Deregulation and internationalisation - impact on the Swedish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, Sverre R.

    2010-01-01

    The deregulation of the Swedish electricity market in 1996 was well known in advance, and the nuclear power plants in Sweden, as well as their main suppliers, made early preparations for a this new situation. In a study - performed by the author at Malardalen University in Sweden - it is concluded that the electricity industry, including the nuclear power plants, was fundamentally transformed in conjunction with market liberalisation. Two large foreign companies, E-on and Fortum, entered the Swedish market and became part-owners of the nuclear plants. After deregulation, the electricity market in Sweden is dominated by these two companies and the large national company Vattenfall. Similarly, Vattenfall has recently grown into an international energy company, acquiring generation capacity in Northern Europe outside of Sweden, including nuclear power plants in Germany. Restructuring of the nuclear industry on the supplier side started in the 1980's, when the Swedish company ASEA and BBC of Switzerland merged to become ABB. Several years later the Swedish nuclear plant supplier ABB-Atom became part of Westinghouse Electric Company, today owned by Toshiba. The Swedish experience thus confirms an international trend of mergers and consolidation in the nuclear industry. (authors)

  2. Where will the buying and opportunities be in Ontario's competitive power market?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, B.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviewed some aspects of: (1) competition in market supply, (2) competition in the retail business, (3) improving the odds as a retailer, (4) improving the odds as a large customer, (5) lessons learned from elsewhere, and (6) getting ready for the new marketplace. The comments are based on experiences gained by TransAlta Energy Marketing Corporation from New Zealand, as they might relate to the situation in Ontario. The fact remains that power generation in Ontario is currently dominated by one supplier, which makes true competition rather difficult. New suppliers are also needed because nuclear generation lacks full public confidence and there are many environmental concerns regarding coal-fired generation in urban areas. Also, there are weak transmission links with adjoining markets. New suppliers can help by bringing attractive supply technologies that are competitive in 'market-sized' chunks, while new power marketers can help by providing insights and capabilities which customers and smaller producers would otherwise have to develop, by linking electricity markets with other energy markets and financial markets to create more opportunities, and by taking on electricity market risks which customers and and producers would otherwise have to address. The choices facing municipal electric utilities, issues relating to competition in the retail business, including such fundamentals as understanding the de-regulation process and the opportunities and risks of the new situation, are reviewed. As far as lessons learned from elsewhere are concerned, the important things are that customers expect reliability, 'wires' must not subsidize 'retail', competition laws must be robust and fast acting, and costs must be reduced and services improved

  3. Transmission planning in a deregulated environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhao

    2006-01-01

    The worldwide trend for the deregulation of the electricity generation and transmission industries has led to dramatic changes in system operation and planning procedures. The optimum approach to transmission-expansion planning in a deregulated environment is an open problem especially when the r...... electricity market grid are performed. In addition, the proposed method is compared with a traditional planning method to further verify its effectiveness....... the responsibilities of the organisations carrying out the planning work need to be addressed. To date there is a consensus that the system operator and network manager perform the expansion planning work in a centralised way. However, with an increasing input from the electricity market, the objectives, constraints...... and approaches toward transmission planning should be carefully designed to ensure system reliability as well as meeting the market requirements. A market-oriented approach for transmission planning in a deregulated environment is proposed. Case studies using the IEEE 14-bus system and the Australian national...

  4. Dutch Wholesale Power Market Review 2002. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollebregt, T.; Rusch, H.

    2002-01-01

    Chapter 1 provides a background to the Dutch power market, covering generation, transmission, distribution, supply, and laws and regulations. Chapter 2 reviews the key market events during 2001 and early 2002, providing analysis and background on an important and tumultuous period in the Dutch market. Chapter 3 explains the structure and timing of the key market mechanisms (Amsterdam Power Exchange, interconnector capacity auctions, TenneT 15-minute balancing market). Chapter 4 briefly reviews fuel price developments and discusses their impact on the costs of generation. Chapter 5 contains a detailed review of the traded Dutch power markets (APX, OTC, interconnection), including the linkages between these markets and an analysis of arbitrage opportunities

  5. Research on market power and market structure: A direct measure of market power of internet platform enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baowen Sun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This paper aims to clear whether the monopoly structure of the internet industry has produced market power and discussed the welfare change of the internet industry monopoly. Design/methodology/approach – By using new empirical industrial organization methods and taking the e-commerce market as an example, the authors measured market power and economies of scale of the internet platform companies. Findings – Internet platform enterprises have formed scale economy, but it has not had market power, and the industry still maintains high levels of competition; also, the emergence of large enterprises may increase the welfare of consumers. Originality/value – The conclusion of this paper clarified actual competition status of internet industry and provided a new foothold for regulation and ideas for the traditional industry to crack the Marshall Conflict.

  6. GasFair and Power '99 and the Ontario Competitive Power Conference: proceedings of the 8. annual natural gas and electricity market conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The 47 presentations at Enerdata's 1999 annual conference and trade show were divided between the GasFair and Power '99 Natural Gas and Electricity Market Conference, and the Ontario Competitive Power Conference. The four major sessions of GasFair and Power '99 included the: (1) gas track, (2) power track, (3) gas and power, and (4) forums and workshops. In general, the papers reviewed the recent activities in the natural gas and electric power industry in North America. The presentations highlighted the recent changes that are occurring as a result of deregulation and new environmental policies. The North American electric power and natural gas industry are moving towards competition. Most market participants will benefit from this change because it creates a more level playing field. Several papers also discussed issues regarding the long-term outlook for new Canadian gas supplies to eastern and midwest markets. Some of the other topics discussed included issues regarding the impact of basis tradin g, tools of the energy marketer, and the advantages of pipeline planning. The challenges facing Ontario Hydro to diversify their existing power generation and to use natural gas for power generation in order to meet energy demand was also discussed. tabs., figs

  7. GasFair and Power '99 and the Ontario Competitive Power Conference: proceedings of the 8. annual natural gas and electricity market conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The 47 presentations at Enerdata's 1999 annual conference and trade show were divided between the GasFair and Power '99 Natural Gas and Electricity Market Conference, and the Ontario Competitive Power Conference. The four major sessions of GasFair and Power '99 included the: (1) gas track, (2) power track, (3) gas and power, and (4) forums and workshops. In general, the papers reviewed the recent activities in the natural gas and electric power industry in North America. The presentations highlighted the recent changes that are occurring as a result of deregulation and new environmental policies. The North American electric power and natural gas industry are moving towards competition. Most market participants will benefit from this change because it creates a more level playing field. Several papers also discussed issues regarding the long-term outlook for new Canadian gas supplies to eastern and midwest markets. Some of the other topics discussed included issues regarding the impact of basis trading, tools of the energy marketer, and the advantages of pipeline planning. The challenges facing Ontario Hydro to diversify their existing power generation and to use natural gas for power generation in order to meet energy demand was also discussed. tabs., figs.

  8. New Markets for Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Chacko; Jennings, Philip; Singh, Dilawar

    2007-10-01

    Over the past five years solar photovoltaic (PV) power supply systems have matured and are now being deployed on a much larger scale. The traditional small-scale remote area power supply systems are still important and village electrification is also a large and growing market but large scale, grid-connected systems and building integrated systems are now being deployed in many countries. This growth has been aided by imaginative government policies in several countries and the overall result is a growth rate of over 40% per annum in the sales of PV systems. Optimistic forecasts are being made about the future of PV power as a major source of sustainable energy. Plans are now being formulated by the IEA for very large-scale PV installations of more than 100 MW peak output. The Australian Government has announced a subsidy for a large solar photovoltaic power station of 154 MW in Victoria, based on the concentrator technology developed in Australia. In Western Australia a proposal has been submitted to the State Government for a 2 MW photovoltaic power system to provide fringe of grid support at Perenjori. This paper outlines the technologies, designs, management and policies that underpin these exciting developments in solar PV power.

  9. Electricity market deregulation and CO2 emissions reduction : dancing at different tunes across Canada and U.S. border

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.T.; Clavet, F.; Ondo, J.C.

    2003-07-01

    Industrial producers are concerned that Canada's decision to ratify the Kyoto Protocol will have a negative impact on competitiveness programs with its main trading partner, the United States, which has not ratified the Protocol. This paper discusses the concerns expressed by Canadian industrial producers regarding the negative impact of Canada's proposed policy actions to lower carbon dioxide equivalent emissions by 100 Mt, of which 55 Mt are to be realized by large industrial emitters such as oil and gas production, electricity generation from fossil fuels, and a few heterogeneous industries. The power generators' share is approximately 20 Mt. In response to these concerns, the Government of Canada has proposed a ceiling on the price of emissions permits paid by industrial users. It has proposed that no measure that costs more than $15 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent should be undertaken by industries. In addition, Canadian industries will not be required to make carbon dioxide equivalent emissions reductions that exceed 15 per cent of their emissions associated with the business as usual scenario in 2010. This study evaluated how such a scheme would affect electricity production and trade between Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, New England and New York. It was shown that the scheme has nearly no influence on electricity production and trade flows. As such, it is very effective in protecting the competitive position of electricity products, but it does little to reduce greenhouse gases. 4 refs., 14 tabs., 1 fig

  10. Optimal Operation and Value Evaluation of Pumped Storage Power Plants Considering Spot Market Trading and Uncertainty of Bilateral Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenta; Hara, Ryoichi; Kita, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Jun

    In recent years, as the deregulation in electric power industry has advanced in many countries, a spot market trading of electricity has been done. Generation companies are allowed to purchase the electricity through the electric power market and supply electric power for their bilateral customers. Under this circumstance, it is important for the generation companies to procure the required electricity with cheaper cost to increase their profit. The market price is volatile since it is determined by bidding between buyer and seller. The pumped storage power plant, one of the storage facilities is promising against such volatile market price since it can produce a profit by purchasing electricity with lower-price and selling it with higher-price. This paper discusses the optimal operation of the pumped storage power plants considering bidding strategy to an uncertain spot market. The volatilities in market price and demand are represented by the Vasicek model in our estimation. This paper also discusses the allocation of operational reserve to the pumped storage power plant.

  11. Sharing wind power forecasts in electricity markets: A numerical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exizidis, Lazaros; Pinson, Pierre; Kazempour, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    In an electricity pool with significant share of wind power, all generators including conventional and wind power units are generally scheduled in a day-ahead market based on wind power forecasts. Then, a real-time market is cleared given the updated wind power forecast and fixed day......-ahead decisions to adjust power imbalances. This sequential market-clearing process may cope with serious operational challenges such as severe power shortage in real-time due to erroneous wind power forecasts in day-ahead market. To overcome such situations, several solutions can be considered such as adding...... flexible resources to the system. In this paper, we address another potential solution based on information sharing in which market players share their own wind power forecasts with others in day-ahead market. This solution may improve the functioning of sequential market-clearing process through making...

  12. Waste Heat to Power Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elson, Amelia [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Tidball, Rick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Hampson, Anne [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Waste heat to power (WHP) is the process of capturing heat discarded by an existing process and using that heat to generate electricity. In the industrial sector, waste heat streams are generated by kilns, furnaces, ovens, turbines, engines, and other equipment. In addition to processes at industrial plants, waste heat streams suitable for WHP are generated at field locations, including landfills, compressor stations, and mining sites. Waste heat streams are also produced in the residential and commercial sectors, but compared to industrial sites these waste heat streams typically have lower temperatures and much lower volumetric flow rates. The economic feasibility for WHP declines as the temperature and flow rate decline, and most WHP technologies are therefore applied in industrial markets where waste heat stream characteristics are more favorable. This report provides an assessment of the potential market for WHP in the industrial sector in the United States.

  13. The international power market: Myth and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, H.C.; Roseman, E.

    1992-01-01

    As the market for independent power (IP) explodes overseas, a number of companies that have been active in project development in the United States are looking hungrily abroad. Some developers view the international market as less competitive than in the U.S., and many are attracted by its size. The backlog of IP activity overseas has now reached over 140,000 MW, primarily in Asia and Europe. The U.S. has about a ten-year head start on IP projects abroad, where project activity has taken off only in the last three years. In 1978, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Acr (PURPA) required U.S. utilities to purchase power from developers of qualified facilities (QFs), and in the process, created a business that has thrown to over $10 billion in annual sales. Since 1985, IP has added as much new capacity as utilities. The authors project that in the 1990s, IP will add 45-50 GW of new capacity, or between 40%-50% of total U.S. capacity. With nearly 3,200 IP projects (over 46,000 MW) on line in the U.S., many developers are hoping that their U.S. experience will serve them well in developing projects elsewhere. Moreover, many developers expect that such experience will give them a leg up on foreign competitors, who have few, if any, megawatts on line. Do these hopes reflect the emerging reality, or are they dangerous misinformation? As U.S. developers approach projects elsewhere, what are the key advantages and constraints their U.S. experience confers? This paper reviews five common myths about the international market for IP and compares the U.S. market with the opportunities abroad. In the process, the authors explore issues specific to IP, not general issues of doing business outside the U.S

  14. Wind power investment within a market environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringo, L.; Conejo, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The interaction of a wind power investor and the pool is represented via an MPEC. → The considered electricity pool is cleared through a network constrained auction. → Uncertainty of load and wind production is characterized by a moderate number of scenarios. → The investment model can be recast as a mixed integer linear programming problem. → Large instances of the considered model are computationally tractable. - Abstract: Within an existing transmission network, this paper considers the problem of identifying the wind power plants to be built by a wind power investor to maximize its profit. For this analysis a future target year is considered and the loads at different buses are represented by stepwise load-duration curves. The stochastic nature of both load and wind is represented via scenarios. The considered electric energy system operates under a pool-market arrangement and each producer/consumer is paid/pays the Local Marginal Price (LMP) of the bus at which it is located. The higher the wind penetration is, the lower the resulting LMPs. To tackle this problem a stochastic bilevel model is proposed, whose upper-level represents the wind investment and operation decisions with the target of maximizing profits; and its lower-level represents the market clearing under differing load and wind conditions and provides LMPs. This model can be recast as a mixed-integer linear programming problem solvable using commercially available branch-and-cut solvers. The proposed model is illustrated using an example and two case studies.

  15. Nuclear power within liberalised electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Competition between various methods of generating electricity in liberalised markets means that all power plants must be cost-effective. The price of electricity from nuclear power includes all waste disposal and decommissioning costs, unlike other electricity generating technologies. Most existing nuclear power plants are likely to prosper under electricity liberalization. Many will receive operating life extensions and be able to compete in the electricity market for many years to come. Investment costs are particularly heavy for nuclear plants. Capital expenditure appraisal methodologies mean that such plants suffer financial disadvantages in times of high interest rates. Low and stable fuel costs are the prime advantage of nuclear plants against other sources of generating electricity. There will be significant demand for new generating capacity, both incremental and replacement, in the next 20 years. Under present conditions, where there is access to a stable and cheap supply of piped gas, nuclear and coal plants find it difficult to compete against gas-fired plants. The nuclear industry is addressing the need for new reactor designs, offering significant capital and operating cost reductions from the previous generation of reactors. This development and the need for carbon abatement on a worldwide basis offers nuclear plants a further economic advantage against alternative technologies. (author)

  16. Market aspects of smart power grids development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Makowski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart Grids herald a revolution in the power sector. The centralized and passive power grid model known for over a century is before our very eyes assuming a completely brand new shape: of an active and dynamic network with an increasingly relevant role of consumers – prosumers, who are offered brand new products and services. Such an active development is possible due to a number of factors, such as: 1. Synergy of ICT with power engineering – these disciplines are becoming an indispensable element of the modern power grid’s operation, 2. The European Union’s regulations in the area of reduction of CO2 emission and improved energy efficiency, as well as identification of Smart Grids as one of the optimum tools, 3. Growth, thanks to continuously increasing expenditures, public awareness of the purchase and rational use of energy. However, the Smart Grid development and ICT implementation in the power sector also carry a risk in the matter of setting up system and process links between the systems of concerned energy market players, which should be mitigated by development of technical standards, methods and principles of good cooperation between the concerned parties. Mitigation of the risk, and as a consequence, effective Smart Grids development will provide conditions for dynamic development of new roles and mechanisms on the energy market. Offering modern products and services to consumers and prosumers, and effective implementation on a national scale of demand management mechanisms will be a source of multidimensional benefits of a functional and financial nature, and will also have a positive impact on the National Lower Grid’s security.

  17. Electricity spot price forecasting in free power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleberg, J.; Laitinen, E.K.

    1998-01-01

    Deregulation has brought many changes to the electricity market. Freedom of choice has been granted to both the consumers and the utilities. Consumers may choose the seller of their energy. Utilities have a wider array of sources to acquire their electricity from. Also the types of sales contracts used are changing to fill the needs of this new situation. The consumers' right to choose has introduced a new risk uncertainty of volume, which was not true during the times of monopoly. As sold volume is unsure and the energy is not sold on same terms as it is bought, a price risk has to be dealt with also. The electric utility has to realize this, select a risk level that suits its business strategy and optimize its actions according to the selected risk level. The number of participants will grow as the electricity market integrates into a common market for Scandinavia and even Europe. Big customers are also taking a more active role in the market, further increasing the number of participants. This makes old bilateral arrangements outdated. New tools are needed to control the new business environment. The goal of this project has been to develop a theoretical model to predict the price in the Finnish electricity exchange, El-Ex Oy. An extensive literature review was conducted in order to (1) examine the solutions in deregulation of electricity markets in other countries, esp. in Norway and UK, (2) find similarities and differences in electricity exchange and exchanges generally and (3) find major sources of problems and inefficiency in the market

  18. Electricity spot price forecasting in free power market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleberg, J; Laitinen, E K [Vaasa Univ. (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    Deregulation has brought many changes to the electricity market. Freedom of choice has been granted to both the consumers and the utilities. Consumers may choose the seller of their energy. Utilities have a wider array of sources to acquire their electricity from. Also the types of sales contracts used are changing to fill the needs of this new situation. The consumers` right to choose has introduced a new risk uncertainty of volume, which was not true during the times of monopoly. As sold volume is unsure and the energy is not sold on same terms as it is bought, a price risk has to be dealt with also. The electric utility has to realize this, select a risk level that suits its business strategy and optimize its actions according to the selected risk level. The number of participants will grow as the electricity market integrates into a common market for Scandinavia and even Europe. Big customers are also taking a more active role in the market, further increasing the number of participants. This makes old bilateral arrangements outdated. New tools are needed to control the new business environment. The goal of this project has been to develop a theoretical model to predict the price in the Finnish electricity exchange, El-Ex Oy. An extensive literature review was conducted in order to (1) examine the solutions in deregulation of electricity markets in other countries, esp. in Norway and UK, (2) find similarities and differences in electricity exchange and exchanges generally and (3) find major sources of problems and inefficiency in the market

  19. Fast Food, Addiction, and Market Power

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Timothy J.; Patterson, Paul M.; Hamilton, Stephen F.

    2007-01-01

    Many attribute the rise in obesity since the early 1980's to the overconsumption of fast food. A dynamic model of a different-product industry equilibrium shows that a firm with market power will price below marginal cost in a steady-state equilibrium. A spatial hedonic pricing model is used to test whether fast food firms set prices in order to exploit their inherent addictiveness. The results show that firms price products dense in addictive nutrients below marginal cost, but price products...

  20. Green Power Marketing Abroad: Recent Experience and Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Wustenhagen, R.; Aabakken, J.

    2002-04-01

    Green power marketing--the act of differentially selling electricity generated wholly or in part from renewable sources--has emerged in more than a dozen countries around the world. This report reviews green power marketing activity abroad to gain additional perspective on consumer demand and to discern key factors or policies that affect the development of green power markets. The objective is to draw lessons from experience in other countries that could be applicable to the U.S. market.