WorldWideScience

Sample records for depth sizing capabilities

  1. Pictorial Depth Probed through Relative Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Wagemans

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the physical environment familiar size is an effective depth cue because the distance from the eye to an object equals the ratio of its physical size to its angular extent in the visual field. Such simple geometrical relations do not apply to pictorial space, since the eye itself is not in pictorial space, and consequently the notion “distance from the eye” is meaningless. Nevertheless, relative size in the picture plane is often used by visual artists to suggest depth differences. The depth domain has no natural origin, nor a natural unit; thus only ratios of depth differences could have an invariant significance. We investigate whether the pictorial relative size cue yields coherent depth structures in pictorial spaces. Specifically, we measure the depth differences for all pairs of points in a 20-point configuration in pictorial space, and we account for these observations through 19 independent parameters (the depths of the points modulo an arbitrary offset, with no meaningful residuals. We discuss a simple formal framework that allows one to handle individual differences. We also compare the depth scale obtained by way of this method with depth scales obtained in totally different ways, finding generally good agreement.

  2. Pictorial depth probed through relative sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemans, J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Koenderink, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the physical environment familiar size is an effective depth cue because the distance from the eye to an object equals the ratio of its physical size to its angular extent in the visual field. Such simple geometrical relations do not apply to pictorial space, since the eye itself is not in

  3. Size and depth of vocabulary knowledge: what the research shows

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    When discussing vocabulary, a distinction is often made between size of vocabulary (number of known words) and depth of knowledge (how well those words are known). However, the relationship between the two constructs is still unclear. Some scholars argue that there is little real difference between the two, while regression analyses show that depth typically adds unique explanatory power compared to size alone. Ultimately, the relationship between size and depth of vocabulary knowledge depend...

  4. Pollen size strongly correlates with stigma depth among Pedicularis species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Ping Wang; Wen-Bin Yu; Shi-Guo Sun; Shuang-Quan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Darwin proposed that pollen size should be positively correlated with stigma depth rather than style length among species given that pollen tubes first enter the stigma autotrophically, then grow through the style heterotrophically. However, studies often show a positive relationship between pollen size and style length. Five floral traits were observed to be correlated among 42 bumblebee-pollinated Pedicularis species (Orobanchaceae) in which stigmas are distinct from styles. The phylogenetic independent contrast analysis revealed that pollen grain volume was more strongly correlated with stigma depth than with style length, consistent with Darwin’s functional hypothesis between pollen size and stigma depth.

  5. Depth reversals in stereoscopic displays driven by apparent size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, Gunnar; Hayes, Amy; Thornton, Ian M.; Sereno, Margaret E.; Malony, Allen D.

    1998-04-01

    In visual scenes, depth information is derived from a variety of monocular and binocular cues. When in conflict, a monocular cue is sometimes able to override the binocular information. We examined the accuracy of relative depth judgments in orthographic, stereoscopic displays and found that perceived relative size can override binocular disparity as a depth cue in a situation where the relative size information is itself generated from disparity information, not from retinal size difference. A size discrimination task confirmed the assumption that disparity information was perceived and used to generate apparent size differences. The tendency for the apparent size cue to override disparity information can be modulated by varying the strength of the apparent size cue. In addition, an analysis of reaction times provides supporting evidence for this novel depth reversal effect. We believe that human perception must be regarded as an important component of stereoscopic applications. Hence, if applications are to be effective and accurate, it is necessary to take into account the richness and complexity of the human visual perceptual system that interacts with them. We discuss implications of this and similar research for human performance in virtual environments, the design of visual presentations for virtual worlds, and the design of visualization tools.

  6. Depth and size dependence of Mn-53 activity in chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, S. K.; Imamura, M.; Sinha, N.; Bhandari, N.

    1980-11-01

    The dependence of Mn-53 activity in core samples from four chondrites on sample shielding depth and the pre-atmospheric size of the meteorite is investigated. Cosmogenic Mn-53 activity and cosmic ray track densities were measured at various depths in cores from the Madhipura, Udaipur, Bansur and St. Severin chondrites. Track density analyses indicate effective radii of 6.5, 9, 15 and 25 cm for the meteorites in space, respectively. The depth profiles of Mn-53 activity reveal that the nuclide production rate at any given depth increases with meteorite size, while the activity profile for meteorites with effective radii less than or equal to 15 cm is nearly flat for shielding depths greater than 3 cm and that for meteorites about 25 cm in radius increases by about 40% from near the surface to the center, indicating the importance of the secondary cascade at radii greater than 15 cm. The profiles are then used to determine the spectral hardness parameter as a function of depth which is in turn used in the calculation of production profiles for Al-26 which are found to be in agreement with observations.

  7. Contraction of Perceived Size and Perceived Depth in Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Atsuki; Shimono, Koichi; Zaitsu, Wataru

    2005-01-01

    We investigated how size and depth are perceived in a plane or convex mirror. In Experiment 1, using a plane or convex mirror, 20 observers viewed a separation between two objects that were presented at a constant distance and reproduced it by a separation between other two objects in a natural viewing situation. The mean matches generally…

  8. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM, which uses finely focussed He+ or Ne+ beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 1018 ions/cm2. Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  9. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Patrick; Rzeznik, Lukasz; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which uses finely focussed He(+) or Ne(+) beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation) code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 10(18) ions/cm(2). Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  10. Quercus ilex L. carbon sequestration capability related to shrub size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratani, Loretta; Catoni, Rosangela; Varone, Laura

    2011-07-01

    CO(2) sequestration capacity of Quercus ilex L., an evergreen species developing in shrub and forest communities widely distributed in the Mediterranean Basin, was analysed. Experiments were carried out in the period of January to December 2009 on 20 shrubs of different size, growing at the Botanical Garden of Rome. At shrub level, the largest differences concern total photosynthetic leaf surface area per shrub and shrub volume. Shrubs structure significantly contribute to reduce total irradiance and air temperature below the canopy. Leaf mass per area is higher in sun leaves than in shade ones (20 ± 1 and 12 ± 2 mg cm( -2), respectively). Sun leaves are also characterised by the highest leaf thickness (78% higher in sun than in shade leaves), the spongy parenchyma thickness (71% higher in sun than in shade leaves) and the highest adaxial cuticle thickness (7.2 ± 1.2 and 4.7 ± 0.5 μm, respectively). Net photosynthetic rates (P (N)) of sun and shade leaves are the highest in spring, and shade leaves contribute 6% to the whole shrub P (N). Q. ilex CO(2) sequestration depends on shrub size. In particular, the CO(2) sequestration per shrub was 0.20 ± 0.02 Kg CO(2) year( -1) in small shrubs, and it was 75% and 98% lower than in medium and large ones. The highest CO(2) sequestration is measured in spring, decreasing 77% during drought. Q. ilex may play a significant role in mitigating carbon dioxide concentration and lowering air and soil temperature in areas around the Mediterranean Basin.

  11. Depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the f

  12. Depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the

  13. Reconstruction of size and depth of simulated defects in austenitic steel plate using pulsed infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka-Fotek, Olga; Oliferuk, Wiera; Maj, Michał

    2012-07-01

    In this paper the size and depth (distance from the tested surface) of defects in austenitic steel were estimated using pulse infrared thermography. The thermal contrast calculated from the surface distribution of the temperature is dependent on both these parameters. Thus, two independent experimental methods of defect size and depth determination were proposed. The defect size was estimated on the basis of surface distribution of the time derivative of the temperature, whereas the defect depth was assessed from the dependence of surface thermal contrast vs. cooling time.

  14. The effect of depth variation on size and catch rate of green tiger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    moslem

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... The positive correlation between size of shrimp and water depth can be attributed to the .... (PenaeusaztecusIres) in Galveston Bay, Texas, as related to certain hydrographic ... marine pollution: An Overview. Mar. Poll. Bull.

  15. Body Size Versus Depth: Regional and Taxonomical Variation in Deep-Sea Meio- and Macrofaunal Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Grient, Jesse M A; Rogers, Alex D

    2015-01-01

    Body size (weight per individual) is an important concept in ecology. It has been studied in the deep sea where a decrease in size with increasing depth has often been found. This has been explained as an adaptation to food limitation where size reduction results in a lowered metabolic rate and a decreased energetic requirement. However, observations vary, with some studies showing an increase in size with depth, and some finding no depth correlation at all. Here, we collected data from peer-reviewed studies on macro- and meiofaunal abundance and biomass, creating two datasets allowing statistical comparison of factors expected to influence body size in meio- and macrofaunal organisms. Our analyses examined the influence of region, taxonomic group and sampling method on the body size of meiofauna and macrofauna in the deep sea with increasing depth, and the resulting models are presented. At the global scale, meio- and macrofaunal communities show a decrease in body size with increasing depth as expected with the food limitation hypothesis. However, at the regional scale there were differences in trends of body size with depth, either showing a decrease (e.g. southwest Pacific Ocean; meio- and macrofauna) or increase (e.g. Gulf of Mexico; meiofauna only) compared to a global mean. Taxonomic groups also showed differences in body size trends compared to total community average (e.g. Crustacea and Bivalvia). Care must be taken when conducting these studies, as our analyses indicated that sampling method exerts a significant influence on research results. It is possible that differences in physiology, lifestyle and life history characteristics result in different responses to an increase in depth and/or decrease in food availability. This will have implications in the future as food supply to the deep sea changes as a result of climate change (e.g. increased ocean stratification at low to mid latitudes and reduced sea ice duration at high latitudes).

  16. Effects of sea depths and sizes of winged pearl oysters (Pteria penguin on pearl culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inthonjaroen, N.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental aspects and biology of pearl oysters are the important conditions affecting pearl production. In order to obtain commercially valuable pearl from winged pearl oysters, Pteria penguin, three sizes (shell-length of the oysters: small (130-135 mm, medium (160-165 mm and large (185-200 mm were suspended at 2 m (surface, 5 m (mid-depth and 8 m (bottom below the sea surface from February to November, 2001. Using a factorial design, the data were randomly recorded by month. All sizes of the pearl oysters at the surface produced pearl of significantly greater thickness than those at the greater depths. The small-sized pearl oysters at the surface depth produced the thickest pearl (0.612 mm. which took only 7 months for harvesting, and the pearl thickness was correlated with growth response in shell length. In contrast to the growth rate in tissue weight and mortality rates which were 36.00, 26.00, 24.00% at the surface depth; 30.60, 24.60, 16.00% at mid-depth and 25.30, 19.30, 12.00% at the bottom for the small, medium and large-sized oysters, respectively. The results depended on infestation of fouling organisms on oyster shells which were much more intense at the surface than at a greater depths and slowed the growth rate in tissue weight, especially in the small-sized oysters. However, there was a greater amount of many kinds of plankton, the food resource of marine animals, at surface than at greater depths, so it retained shell-length growth and pearl production of the small-sized oysters: The other environmental factors, such as salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH and sea water temperature, at all depths did not have an impact on the pearl oyster rearing.

  17. Integrated microfluidic system capable of size-specific droplet generation with size-dependent droplet separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Hong, Seok Jun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2013-06-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics is receiving much attention in biomedical research area due to its advantage in uniform size droplet generation. Our previous results have reported that droplet size plays an important role in drug delivery actuated by flagellated bacteria. Recently, many research groups have been reported the size-dependent separation of emulsion droplets by a microfluidic system. In this paper, an integrated microfluidic system is proposed to produce and sort specificsized droplets sequentially. Operation of the system relies on two microfluidic transport processes: initial generation of droplets by hydrodynamic focusing and subsequent separation of droplets by a T-junction channel. The microfluidic system is fabricated by the SU-8 rapid prototyping method and poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) replica molding. A biodegradable polymer, poly-capro-lactone (PCL), is used for the droplet material. Using the proposed integrated microfluidic system, specific-sized droplets which can be delivered by flagellated bacteria are successfully generated and obtained.

  18. Body size and countermovement depth confound relationship between muscle power output and jumping performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Srdjan; Dragan, Mirkov; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Jaric, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies based on maximum vertical jumps have presumed that the maximum jump height reveals the maximum power of lower limb muscles, as well as the tested muscle power output predicts the jumping performance. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that both the body size and countermovement depth confound the relationship between the muscle power output and performance of maximum vertical jumps. Sixty young and physically active males were tested on the maximum countermovement (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ). The jumping performance (Hmax), peak (Ppeak) and the average power output (Pavg) during the concentric phase, countermovement depth (only in CMJ) and body mass as an index of body size were assessed. To assess the power-performance relationship, the correlations between Hmax with both Ppeak and Pavg were calculated without and with controlling for the effects of body mass, as well as for the countermovement depth. The results revealed moderate power-performance relationships (range 0.55depth, CMJ revealed r=0.88 and r=0.77 for Ppeak and Pavg, respectively. Both jumps revealed stronger relationships with Ppeak than with Pavg (p<0.05) when controlled for either body mass or both body mass and countermovement depth. We conclude that both body size (in CMJ and SJ) and countermovement depth (in CMJ) confound the relationship between the muscle power output with the performance of maximum vertical jumps. Regarding routine assessments of muscle power from jumping performance and vice versa, the use of CMJ is recommended, while Ppeak, rather than Pavg, should be the variable of choice. PMID:24280557

  19. Planting depth and rhizome size effects on below ground growth of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza vali allah poor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of planting depth and rhizome sizes on below ground growth of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L. at research glasshouse of Mashhad Unversity in 2001. Factorial experiment containing 2 factors of planting depth (10, 20 and 40‌cm and rhizome sizes (1,2 and 3 buds or 4,7 and 10 gr with two replications in completely randomized block design was employed. Development of different variables during growing season including root and mother rhizome dry weight were measured.The highest and the lowest root dry weight (RDWhave been seen in depth of 20 and 40 cm‌, respectively. About 100 days after planting (DAP, RDW increaseed very slowly but thenafter increased faster‌. Rhizome of any sizes in‌ 20 cm, gave the highest RDW‌. Three-bud rhizomes produced the highest RDW and 1-bud rhizome produced the lowest. Mother rhizome dry weight (MRDW reduced untill 60 days after planting. After 75th day, MRDW has increased and all plants started to fill their mother rhizome and finally rhizome of depth 20 cm produced the highest dry weight. In 160 days after planting, mother rhizomes started to lose their weight‌. 1and 3 -bud mother rhizome produce the lowest and highest MRDW, respectively.

  20. Organizational learning capability, innovation and performance: study in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the relation between the organizational learning capability, organizational innovation and performance has often been studied, there is little empirical evidence to support this perspective in small and medium-sized enterprises. This study aims at analyzing the influence of organizational learning capability in innovative performance and organizational performance of small and medium-sized enterprises. The research was conducted under the quantitative approach, descriptive and causal, and cross-sectional survey. The sample was composed of 92 enterprises in the textile industry. The data were analyzed through the technique of Structural Equation Modeling. The results show that the organizational learning capability influences the innovative performance of small and medium-sized enterprises, however, the influence of the learning capability in organizational performance was not significant. The study provides evidence for these relations and shows that they are significant and positive in the context of small and medium-sized textile enterprises, context in which the empirical literature is particularly scarce. For future research it is suggested to evaluate contingency factors for innovative and organizational performance. Other studies could analyze the differences in innovation between manufacturing and service sector.

  1. A contribution to phased array ultrasonic inspection of welds, part 3: sizing capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciorau, P. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Inspection and Maintenance Services, Pickering, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: peter.ciorau@opg.com

    2008-01-15

    Part 3 of the series presents the sizing capability for length, height, outer and inner ligament for specific implanted weld defects in training samples and mock-ups with thickness between 6.4-52 mm. It is discussed the influence of beam angle on sizing the lack of fusion defect. More than 50 implanted weld defects with 50% crack population were sized using high-frequency (5-10 MHz) linear array probes. The correlation between the design/manufacturer flaw size and PAUT data for length, height and ligament is graphically presented. It was concluded the length is oversized by 2-6 mm, height and inner ligament are undersized by 0.2 to 0.5 mm, and outer ligament is oversized by 0.5 mm. The sizing results were based on non-amplitude techniques and pattern display of S- and B-scan. The sizing capability is far better than ASME Xl tolerances for performance demonstration and comparable to TOFD ideal tolerances. (author)

  2. A contribution to phased array ultrasonic inspection of welds: defect patterns and sizing capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciorau, P., E-mail: peter.ciorau@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Inspection, Maintenance and Commercial Services, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents defect patterns for weld inspection detected with phased array ultrasonic technology (PAUT). The sizing capability for length, height, outer and inner ligament for specific implanted weld defects in training samples and mock-ups with thickness between 6.4-52 mm. It is discussed the influence of beam angle on sizing the lack of fusion defect. More than 50 implanted weld defects with 70% crack population were sized using high-frequency (5-10 MHz) linear array probes. The correlation between the design/manufacturer flaw size and PAUT data for length, height and ligament is graphically presented. It was concluded the length is oversized by 2-6 mm, height and inner ligament are undersized by 0.2 to 0.5 mm, and outer ligament is oversized by 0.5 mm. The sizing results were based on non-amplitude techniques and pattern display of S- and B-scan. The sizing capability is far better than ASME XI tolerances for performance demonstration and comparable to time of flight diffraction (TOFD) ideal tolerances. (author)

  3. Depth Discrimination of Constant Angular Size Stimuli in Action Space: Role of Accommodation and Convergence Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeldjallil eNaceri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In our daily life experience, the angular size of an object correlates with its distance from the observer, provided that the physical size of the object remains constant. In this work, we investigated depth perception in action space (i.e., beyond the arm reach, while keeping the angular size of the target object constant. This was achieved by increasing the physical size of the target object as its distance to the observer increased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a similar protocol has been tested in action space, for distances to the observer ranging from 1.4 to 2.4m. We replicated the task in virtual and real environments and we found that the performance was significantly different between the two environments. In the real environment, all participants perceived the depth of the target object precisely. Whereas, in virtual reality the responses were significantly less precise, although, still above chance level in 16 of the 20 observers. The difference in the discriminability of the stimuli was likely due to different contributions of the convergence and the accommodation cues in the two environments. The values of Weber fractions estimated in our study were compared to those reported in previous studies in peripersonal and action space.

  4. Depth discrimination of constant angular size stimuli in action space: role of accommodation and convergence cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naceri, Abdeldjallil; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Chellali, Ryad

    2015-01-01

    In our daily life experience, the angular size of an object correlates with its distance from the observer, provided that the physical size of the object remains constant. In this work, we investigated depth perception in action space (i.e., beyond the arm reach), while keeping the angular size of the target object constant. This was achieved by increasing the physical size of the target object as its distance to the observer increased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a similar protocol has been tested in action space, for distances to the observer ranging from 1.4–2.4 m. We replicated the task in virtual and real environments and we found that the performance was significantly different between the two environments. In the real environment, all participants perceived the depth of the target object precisely. Whereas, in virtual reality (VR) the responses were significantly less precise, although, still above chance level in 16 of the 20 observers. The difference in the discriminability of the stimuli was likely due to different contributions of the convergence and the accommodation cues in the two environments. The values of Weber fractions estimated in our study were compared to those reported in previous studies in peripersonal and action space. PMID:26441608

  5. Determination of Flaw Size and Depth From Temporal Evolution of Thermal Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Cramer, Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of flaws have tended to be based on either the spatial or temporal response. This independent assessment limits the accuracy of characterization. A variational approach is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for a flaw that incorporates both the temporal and spatial response to improve the characterization. The size and depth are determined from both the temporal and spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above a flaw and constraints on the length of the contour surrounding the delamination. Examples of the application of the technique to simulation and experimental data acquired are presented to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  6. Revisiting the global detection capability of earthquakes during the period immediately after a large earthquake: considering the influence of intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Iwata

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the global earthquake detection capability of the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT catalogue during the periods immediately following large earthquakes, including intermediate-depth (70 ≤ depth < 300 km and deep (300 km ≤ depth events. We have already shown that the detection capability beyond an aftershock zone degrades remarkably and that this condition persists for several hours after the occurrence of large shallow (depth < 70 km earthquakes. Because an intermediate-depth or deep earthquake occasionally generates seismic waves with significant amplitudes, it is necessary to investigate the change in the detection capability caused by such events. To this end, from the GCMT catalogue, we constructed the time sequences of the earthquakes that occurred immediately after the large earthquakes, and stacked these time sequences. To these stacked sequences, we then applied a statistical model representing the magnitude-frequency distribution of all observed earthquakes. This model has a parameter that characterizes the detection capability, and the temporal variation of the parameter is estimated by means of a Bayesian approach with a piecewise linear function. Consequently, we find that the global detection capability is lower after the occurrence of shallow earthquakes with magnitudes ≥ 5.45, intermediate-depth earthquakes with magnitudes ≥ 5.95, and deep earthquakes with magnitudes ≥ 6.95.

  7. Artificial neural network (ANN)-based prediction of depth filter loading capacity for filter sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Harshit; Rathore, Anurag S; Hadpe, Sandeep Ramesh; Alva, Solomon J

    2016-11-01

    This article presents an application of artificial neural network (ANN) modelling towards prediction of depth filter loading capacity for clarification of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) product during commercial manufacturing. The effect of operating parameters on filter loading capacity was evaluated based on the analysis of change in the differential pressure (DP) as a function of time. The proposed ANN model uses inlet stream properties (feed turbidity, feed cell count, feed cell viability), flux, and time to predict the corresponding DP. The ANN contained a single output layer with ten neurons in hidden layer and employed a sigmoidal activation function. This network was trained with 174 training points, 37 validation points, and 37 test points. Further, a pressure cut-off of 1.1 bar was used for sizing the filter area required under each operating condition. The modelling results showed that there was excellent agreement between the predicted and experimental data with a regression coefficient (R(2) ) of 0.98. The developed ANN model was used for performing variable depth filter sizing for different clarification lots. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to estimate the cost savings by using different filter areas for different clarification lots rather than using the same filter area. A 10% saving in cost of goods was obtained for this operation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1436-1443, 2016.

  8. Unlocking the energy capabilities of micron-sized LiFePO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Limin; Zhang, Yelong; Wang, Jiawei; Ma, Lipo; Ma, Shunchao; Zhang, Yantao; Wang, Erkang; Bi, Yujing; Wang, Deyu; McKee, William C; Xu, Ye; Chen, Jitao; Zhang, Qinghua; Nan, Cewen; Gu, Lin; Bruce, Peter G; Peng, Zhangquan

    2015-08-03

    Utilization of LiFePO4 as a cathode material for Li-ion batteries often requires size nanonization coupled with calcination-based carbon coating to improve its electrochemical performance, which, however, is usually at the expense of tap density and may be environmentally problematic. Here we report the utilization of micron-sized LiFePO4, which has a higher tap density than its nano-sized siblings, by forming a conducting polymer coating on its surface with a greener diazonium chemistry. Specifically, micron-sized LiFePO4 particles have been uniformly coated with a thin polyphenylene film via the spontaneous reaction between LiFePO4 and an aromatic diazonium salt of benzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate. The coated micron-sized LiFePO4, compared with its pristine counterpart, has shown improved electrical conductivity, high rate capability and excellent cyclability when used as a 'carbon additive free' cathode material for rechargeable Li-ion batteries. The bonding mechanism of polyphenylene to LiFePO4/FePO4 has been understood with density functional theory calculations.

  9. Chromosomal diversity in tropical reef fishes is related to body size and depth range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, P A; Zurano, J P; Amado, T F; Penone, C; Betancur-R, R; Bidau, C J; Jacobina, U P

    2015-12-01

    Tropical reef fishes show contrasting patterns of karyotypic diversity. Some families have a high chromosomal conservatism while others show wide variation in karyotypic macrostructure. However, the influence of life-history traits on karyotypic diversity is largely unknown. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we assessed the effects of larval and adult species traits on chromosomal diversity rates of 280 reef species in 24 families. We employed a novel approach to account for trait variation within families as well as phylogenetic uncertainties. We found a strong negative relationship between karyotypic diversity rates and body size and depth range. These results suggest that lineages with higher dispersal potential and gene flow possess lower karyotypic diversity. Taken together, these results provide evidence that biological traits might modulate the rate of karyotypic diversity in tropical reef fishes.

  10. Effect of Aerosol Size and Hygroscopicity on Aerosol Optical Depth in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Charles; Wagner, Nick; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is affected by the size, optical characteristics, and hygroscopicity of particles, confounding attempts to link remote sensing observations of AOD to measured or modeled aerosol mass concentrations. In situ airborne observations of aerosol optical, chemical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties were made in the southeastern United States in the daytime in summer 2013. We use these observations to constrain a simple model that is used to test the sensitivity of AOD to the various measured parameters. As expected, the AOD was found to be most sensitive to aerosol mass concentration and to aerosol water content, which is controlled by aerosol hygroscopicity and the ambient relative humidity. However, AOD was also fairly sensitive to the mean particle diameter and the width of the size distribution. These parameters are often prescribed in global models that use simplified modal parameterizations to describe the aerosol, suggesting that the values chosen could substantially bias the calculated relationship between aerosol mass and optical extinction, AOD, and radiative forcing.

  11. Infants' ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces: comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Corrow, Sherryse; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Yonas, Albert

    2014-11-01

    To examine sensitivity to pictorial depth cues in young infants (4 and 5 months-of-age), we compared monocular and binocular preferential looking to a display on which two faces were equidistantly presented and one was larger than the other, depicting depth from the size of human faces. Because human faces vary little in size, the correlation between retinal size and distance can provide depth information. As a result, adults perceive a larger face as closer than a smaller one. Although binocular information for depth provided information that the faces in our display were equidistant, under monocular viewing, no such information was provided. Rather, the size of the faces indicated that one was closer than the other. Infants are known to look longer at apparently closer objects. Therefore, we hypothesized that infants would look longer at a larger face in the monocular than in the binocular condition if they perceived depth from the size of human faces. Because the displays were identical in the two conditions, any difference in looking-behavior between monocular and binocular viewing indicated sensitivity to depth information. Results showed that 5-month-old infants preferred the larger, apparently closer, face in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition when static displays were presented. In addition, when presented with a dynamic display, 4-month-old infants showed a stronger 'closer' preference in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition. This was not the case when the faces were inverted. These results suggest that even 4-month-old infants respond to depth information from a depth cue that may require learning, the size of faces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Infants’ ability to respond to depth from the retinal size of human faces: Comparing monocular and binocular preferential-looking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Corrow, Sherryse; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Yonas, Albert

    2014-01-01

    To examine sensitivity to pictorial depth cues in young infants (4 and 5 months-of-age), we compared monocular and binocular preferential looking to a display on which two faces were equidistantly presented and one was larger than the other, depicting depth from the size of human faces. Because human faces vary little in size, the correlation between retinal size and distance can provide depth information. As a result, adults perceive a larger face as closer than a smaller one. Although binocular information for depth provided information that the faces in our display were equidistant, under monocular viewing, no such information was provided. Rather, the size of the faces indicated that one was closer than the other. Infants are known to look longer at apparently closer objects. Therefore, we hypothesized that infants would look longer at a larger face in the monocular than in the binocular condition if they perceived depth from the size of human faces. Because the displays were identical in the two conditions, any difference in looking-behavior between monocular and binocular viewing indicated sensitivity to depth information. Results showed that 5-month-old infants preferred the larger, apparently closer, face in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition when static displays were presented. In addition, when presented with a dynamic display, 4-month-old infants showed a stronger ‘closer’ preference in the monocular condition compared to the binocular condition. This was not the case when the faces were inverted. These results suggest that even 4-month-old infants respond to depth information from a depth cue that may require learning, the size of faces. PMID:25113916

  13. Linking snow depth to avalanche release area size: measurements from the Vallée de la Sionne field site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitinger, Jochen; Sovilla, Betty

    2016-08-01

    One of the major challenges in avalanche hazard assessment is the correct estimation of avalanche release area size, which is of crucial importance to evaluate the potential danger that avalanches pose to roads, railways or infrastructure. Terrain analysis plays an important role in assessing the potential size of avalanche releases areas and is commonly based on digital terrain models (DTMs) of a snow-free summer terrain. However, a snow-covered winter terrain can significantly differ from its underlying, snow-free terrain. This may lead to different, and/or potentially larger release areas. To investigate this hypothesis, the relation between avalanche release area size, snow depth and surface roughness was investigated using avalanche observations of artificially triggered slab avalanches over a period of 15 years in a high-alpine field site. High-resolution, continuous snow depth measurements at times of avalanche release showed a decrease of mean surface roughness with increasing release area size, both for the bed surface and the snow surface before avalanche release. Further, surface roughness patterns in snow-covered winter terrain appeared to be well suited to demarcate release areas, suggesting an increase of potential release area size with greater snow depth. In this context, snow depth around terrain features that serve as potential delineation borders, such as ridges or trenches, appeared to be particularly relevant for release area size. Furthermore, snow depth measured at a nearby weather station was, to a considerable extent, related to potential release area size, as it was often representative of snow depth around those critical features where snow can accumulate over a long period before becoming susceptible to avalanche release. Snow depth - due to its link to surface roughness - could therefore serve as a highly useful variable with regard to potential release area definition for varying snow cover scenarios, as, for example, the avalanche

  14. The penetration depth and lateral distribution of pigment related to the pigment grain size and the calendering of paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, K.; Kristiansson, P. E-mail: per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se; Schueler, B.; Tullander, E.; Oestling, S.; Elfman, M.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.; Shariff, A

    2002-04-01

    The interaction of ink and newspaper has been investigated and the specific question of penetration of ink into the paper has been addressed with a nuclear microprobe using particle induced X-ray emission. The penetration depth of the newsprint is a critical factor in terms of increasing the quality of newsprint and minimising the amount of ink used. The objective of the experiment was to relate the penetration depth of pigment with the calendering of the paper. The dependence of the penetration depth on the pigment grain size was also studied. To study the penetration depth of pigment in paper, cyan ink with Cu as a tracer of the coloured pigment was used. For the study of the penetration depth dependence of pigment size, specially grounded Japanese ink with well-defined pigment grain size was used. This was compared to Swedish ink with pigment grains with normal size-distribution. The results show that the calendering of the paper considerably affects the penetration depth of ink.

  15. Innovative capabilities, firm performance and foreign ownership: Empirical analysis of large and medium-sized companies form all industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Talaja

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article innovative capability, i.e. the ability of new products and markets development, is analyzed and empirically tested. The results have proven that the companies with more developed innovative capabilities achieve higher performance levels, but that there is no difference in innovative capabilities between large and medium-sized companies. On the other hand, medium-sized companies have slightly higher levels of sales growth and increase in market share. Also, companies in foreign ownership are better at development of new products and new production methods, and they have higher levels of sales growth, market share and increase in market share.

  16. The Effects of Multimedia Learning on Thai Primary Pupils' Achievement in Size and Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingjit, Mathukorn

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to obtain more insight regarding the effect of multimedia learning on third grade of Thai primary pupils' achievement in Size and Depth Vocabulary of English. A quasi-experiment is applied using "one group pretest-posttest design" combined with "time series design," as well as data triangulation. The sample…

  17. Relationship between Entropy, Corporate Entrepreneurship and Organizational Capabilities in Romanian Medium Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Gabriel Ceptureanu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the relations between entropy, organizational capabilities and corporate entrepreneurship. The results indicate strong links between strategy and corporate entrepreneurship, moderated by the organizational capabilities. We find that companies with strong organizational capabilities, using a systematic strategic approach, widely use corporate entrepreneurship as an instrument to fulfil their objectives. Our study contributes to the limited amount of empirical research on entropy in an organization setting by highlighting the boundary conditions of the impact by examining the moderating effect of firms’ organizational capabilities and also to the development of Econophysics as a fast growing area of interdisciplinary sciences.

  18. Disentangling the effects of organizational capabilities, innovation and firm size on SME sales growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlaner, Lorraine M.; van Stel, Andre; Duplat, Valerie; Zhou, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on certain drivers of SME sales growth related to knowledge and innovation. Building on the dynamic capabilities literature, we test whether two organizational capabilities (external sourcing and employee involvement in renewal activities) predict sales growth, and if so, whether

  19. Disentangling the effects of organizational capabilities, innovation and firm size on SME sales growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlaner, Lorraine M.; van Stel, Andre; Duplat, Valerie; Zhou, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on certain drivers of SME sales growth related to knowledge and innovation. Building on the dynamic capabilities literature, we test whether two organizational capabilities (external sourcing and employee involvement in renewal activities) predict sales growth, and if so, whether

  20. Did greater burial depth increase the seed size of domesticated legumes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluyver, Thomas A; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Rees, Mark; Osborne, Colin P

    2013-10-01

    The independent domestication of crop plants in several regions of the world formed the basis of human civilizations, and attracts considerable interest from archaeologists and biologists. Selection under cultivation led to a suite of domestication traits which distinguish crops from their wild progenitors, including larger seeds in most seed crops. This selection may be classified as 'conscious' or 'unconscious' selection according to whether humans were aware of the changes that they were driving. The hypothesis that human cultivation buried seeds deeper than natural dispersal, exerting unconscious selection favouring larger seeds with greater reserves, was tested. Using a comparative approach, accessions of eight grain legumes, originating from independent domestication centres across several continents, were sampled. Seeds were planted at different depths in a controlled environment, and seedling emergence scored for 5 weeks after sowing. Domestication in all species was associated with increased seed mass. In three species, greater mass was not correlated with increased ability to emerge from depth. In five species, emergence depth did correlate with mass, suggesting that selection during domestication may have acted on emergence depth. However, domestication only had a significant effect in two of these species (lentil and mung bean), and the increase in depth was no more than predicted by a cube-root allometric relationship with seed mass. The results do not support the hypothesis that burial under cultivation was a general selection mechanism for increased seed mass during the domestication of grain legumes, but it may have acted in particular species or regions.

  1. Influence of phantom size on output, peak scatter factor, and percentage depth dose in large-field photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.; Evans, M.D.C.; Pla, M.

    1985-09-01

    Machine outputs, peak scatter factors, and central axis percentage depth dose distributions were measured for various phantom sizes in large radiation fields produced at extended distances by cobalt, 6-MV, and 10-MV photon beams. The results can be applied to practical total body irradiation procedures which usually involve treatment volumes smaller than the actual field sizes in order to provide a uniform total body exposure to radiation. Our study addresses the question of the appropriate phantom dimension to be used in the calibration of photon beams employed in total body irradiations. The measurements show that the machine outputs are only slightly dependent on phantom size; the percentage depth dose distributions, however, are strongly dependent on the phantom size, suggesting that machine data for total body irradiations should be measured in phantoms whose dimensions approximate the patient during the total body irradiation. Peak scatter factors measured in large-field/small-phantom configurations link up well with the published small-field/large-phantom data. The finite patient thickness lowers the dose to points close to the beam exit surface by a few percent, when compared to dose measured at the same depths in infinitely thick phantoms. The surface doses in large radiation fields are essentially independent of phantom cross sections and range from 40% for the 10-MV beam, to 65% for the 6-MV beam and 80% for the cobalt beam.

  2. Expading fluvial remote sensing to the riverscape: Mapping depth and grain size on the Merced River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ryan T.

    This study builds upon recent research in the field of fluvial remote sensing by applying techniques for mapping physical attributes of rivers. Depth, velocity, and grain size are primary controls on the types of habitat present in fluvial ecosystems. This thesis focuses on expanding fluvial remote sensing to larger spatial extents and sub-meter resolutions, which will increase our ability to capture the spatial heterogeneity of habitat at a resolution relevant to individual salmonids and an extent relevant to species. This thesis consists of two chapters, one focusing on expanding the spatial extent over which depth can be mapped using Optimal Band Ratio Analysis (OBRA) and the other developing general relations for mapping grain size from three-dimensional topographic point clouds. The two chapters are independent but connected by the overarching goal of providing scientists and managers more useful tools for quantifying the amount and quality of salmonid habitat via remote sensing. The OBRA chapter highlights the true power of remote sensing to map depths from hyperspectral images as a central component of watershed scale analysis, while also acknowledging the great challenges involved with increasing spatial extent. The grain size mapping chapter establishes the first general relations for mapping grain size from roughness using point clouds. These relations will significantly reduce the time needed in the field by eliminating the need for independent measurements of grain size for calibrating the roughness-grain size relationship and thus making grain size mapping with SFM more cost effective for river restoration and monitoring. More data from future studies are needed to refine these relations and establish their validity and generality. In conclusion, this study adds to the rapidly growing field of fluvial remote sensing and could facilitate river research and restoration.

  3. Depth resolution at organic interfaces sputtered by argon gas cluster ions: the effect of energy, angle and cluster size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, M P; Spencer, S J; Havelund, R; Gilmore, I S; Shard, A G

    2015-10-07

    An analysis is presented of the effect of experimental parameters such as energy, angle and cluster size on the depth resolution in depth profiling organic materials using Ar gas cluster ions. The first results are presented of the incident ion angle dependence of the depth resolution, obtained at the Irganox 1010 to silicon interface, from profiles by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). By analysis of all relevant published depth profile data, it is shown that such data, from delta layers in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), correlate with the XPS data from interfaces if it is assumed that the monolayers of the Irganox 1010 adjacent to the wafer substrate surface have an enhanced sputtering rate. SIMS data confirm this enhancement. These results show that the traditional relation for the depth resolution, FWHM = 2.1Y(1/3) or slightly better, FWHM = P(X)Y(1/3)/n(0.2), where n is the argon gas cluster size, and P(X) is a parameter for each material are valid both at the 45° incidence angle of the argon gas cluster sputtering ions used in most studies and at all angles from 0° to 80°. This implies that, for optimal depth profile resolution, 0° or >75° incidence may be significantly better than the 45° traditionally used, especially for the low energy per atom settings required for the best resolved profiles in organic materials. A detailed analysis, however, shows that the FWHM requires a constant contribution added in quadrature to the above such that there are minimal improvements at 0° or greater than 75°. A critical test at 75° confirms the presence of this constant contribution.

  4. Distribution pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particle-size fractions of coking plant soils from different depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Ma, Dong; Yan, Xiulan; Yang, Linsheng

    2013-06-01

    The concentrations of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four size fractions (200 μm) in soils at different depth from a heavily contaminated crude benzol production facility of a coking plant were determined using GC-MS. Vertically, elevated total PAHs concentrations were observed in the soils at 3.0-4.5 m (layer B) and 6.0-7.5 m (layer C), relatively lower at 1.5-3.0 m (layer A) and 10.5-12.0 m (layer D). At all sampling sites, the silt (2-20 μm) contained the highest PAHs concentration (ranged from 726 to 2,711 mg/kg). Despite the substantial change in PAHs concentrations in soils with different particle sizes and lithologies, PAHs composition was similarly dominated by 2-3 ring species (86.5-98.3 %), including acenaphthene, fluorene, and phenanthrene. For the contribution of PAHs mass in each fraction to the bulk soil, the 20-200 μm size fraction had the greatest accumulation of PAHs in loamy sand layers at 1.0-7.5 m, increasing with depth; while in deeper sand layer at 10.5-12.0 m, the >200 μm size fraction showed highest percentages and contributed 81 % of total PAHs mass. For individual PAH distribution, the 2-3 ring PAHs were highly concentrated in the small size fraction (PAHs showed the highest concentrations in the 2-20 μm size fraction, increasing with depth. The distribution of PAHs was primarily determined by the sorption on soil organic matter and the characteristics of PAHs. This research should have significant contribution to PAH migration study and remediation design for PAHs-contaminated sites.

  5. Aerosol spectral optical depths and size characteristics at a coastal industriallocation in India - effect of synoptic and mesoscale weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol spectral optical depths at ten discrete channels in the visible and near IR bands, obtained from a ground-based passive multi-wavelength solar radiometer at a coastal industrial location, Visakhapatnam, on the east coast of India, are used to study the response of the aerosol optical properties and size distributions to the changes in atmospheric humidity, wind speed and direction. It is observed that during high humidity conditions, the spectral optical depths show about 30% higher growth factors, and the size distributions show the generation of a typical new mode around 0.4 microns. The surface wind speed and direction also indicate the formation of new particles when the humid marine air mass interacts with the industrial air mass. This is interpreted in terms of new particle formation and subsequent particle growth by condensation and self-coagulation. The results obtained on the surface-size segregated aerosol mass distribution from a co-located Quartz Crystal Microbalance during different humidity conditions also show a large mass increase in the sub-micron size range with an increase in atmospheric humidity, indicating new particle formation at the sub-micron size range.

  6. A Difraction Element Used to Evaluate the Depth of Bedding of Nano-Sized Radiating Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volostnikov V.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a method to calculate the diffraction optical element (DOE capable of forming a two-lobe light field rotating under its propagation. The basis of the approach is an iteration procedure where the zero-order approximation is defined with the aid of the spiral beams optics. The experimental results are offered on the formation of light fields under consideration by means of a liquid-crystal spatial phase modulator of light, HOLOEYE HEO-1080P.

  7. Open crack depth sizing by multi-speed continuous laser stimulated lock-in thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, C.; Holé, S.

    2017-06-01

    A crack located in the thermal diffusion zone of a heat source behaves like a thermal barrier modifying the heat diffusion. For a moving continuous source, the sample surface is heated on a little area near the crack for a duration which depends on the speed of the thermal source. A lock-in process synchronized by the displacement of the continuous heat source along the crack is studied. The thermal signature of the crack is extracted via a space operator applied to the amplitude and the phase of surface temperature images for various speeds of the thermal source. With the technical solution presented in this article, the thermal signature images are analysed according to a length representative of the thermal diffusion length to give a local evaluation of the crack depth (around 3 mm at the maximum) for crack lengths of about few centimetres long. The multi-speed lock-in thermography approach is initially studied with finite element method simulations. Experimental tests using an infra-red camera validate the method in a second part. The results do not depend on the heating source if its power is sufficient to produce a temperature rise detectable by an infra-red camera. The depth estimations are obtained independently of the crack width and heat source trajectory. The multi-speed lock-in thermography is a method without contact, without sample preparation, non-polluting, non-destructive and with simple optical adjustments.

  8. CALIOP and AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth Comparisons: One Size Fits None

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, A. H.; Winker, D. M.; Tackett, J. L.; Giles, D. M.; Kar, J.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M. A.; Powell, K. A.; Trepte, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the aerosol optical depths (AOD) retrieved from backscatter measurements of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite with coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. Overpass coincidence criteria of +/- 2 h and within a 40 km radius are satisfied at least once at 149 globally distributed AERONET sites from 2006 to 2010. Most data pairs (>80%) use AERONET measurements acquired +/- 30 min of the overpass. We examine the differences in AOD estimates between CALIOP and AERONET for various aerosol, environmental, and geographic conditions. Results show CALIOP AOD are lower than AERONET AOD especially at low optical depths as measured by AERONET (500 nm AOD0.1. Differences in AOD between CALIOP and AERONET are possibly due to cloud contamination, scene inhomogeneity, instrument view angle differences, CALIOP retrieval errors, and detection limits. Comparison of daytime to nighttime number of 5 km 60m (60m in the vertical) features detected by CALIOP show that there are 20% more aerosol features at night. We find that CALIPSO and AERONET do not agree on the cloudiness of scenes. Of the scenes that meet the above coincidence criteria, CALIPSO finds clouds in more than 45% of the coincident atmospheric columns AERONET classifies as clear.

  9. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  10. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  11. Focal depths for moderate-sized aftershocks of the Wenchuan M_S8.0 earthquake and their implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sliding-window cross-correlation method is firstly adopted to identify sPn phase, and to constrain focal depth from regional seismograms, by measuring the time separation between sPn and Pn phases. We present the focal depths of the 17 moderate-sized aftershocks (MS≥5.0) of the Wenchuan MS8.0 earth-quake, using the data recorded by the regional seismic broadband networks of Shaanxi, Qinghai, Gansu, Yunnan and Sichuan. Our results show focal depths of aftershocks range from 8 to 20 km, and tend to cluster at two average depths, separate at 32.5°N, i.e., 11 km to the south and 17 km to the north, indicating that these aftershocks are origin of upper-to-middle crust. Combined with other results, we suggest that the Longmenshan fault is not a through-going crustal fault and the Pingwu-Qingchuan fault may be not the northward extension of the Longmenshan thrust fault.

  12. Focal depths for moderate-sized aftershocks of the Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake and their implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG RuiQing; WU QingJu; LI YongHua; DING ZhiFeng; ZENG RongSheng

    2008-01-01

    Sliding-window cross-correlation method is firstly adopted to identify sPn phase, and to constrain focal depth from regional seismograms, by measuring the time separation between sPn and Pn phases. We present the focal depths of the 17 moderate-sized aftershocks (Ms≥5.0) of the Wenchuan Ms8.0 earth quake, using the data recorded by the regional seismic broadband networks of Shaanxi, Qinghai,Gansu, Yunnan and Sichuan. Our results show focal depths of aftershocks range from 8 to 20 km, and tend to cluster at two average depths, separate at 32.5°N, I.e., 11 km to the south and 17 km to the north,indicating that these aftershocks are origin of upper-to-middle crust. Combined with other results, we suggest that the Longmenshan fault is not a through-going crustal fault and the Pingwu-Qingchuan fault may be not the northward extension of the Longmenshan thrust fault.

  13. Attenuating the size and molecular carrier capabilities of polyacrylate nanoparticles by a hydrophobic fluorine effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruère, Raphaël; Turos, Edward

    2012-08-15

    This study investigates the effect of introducing alkyl chain fluorination on the properties of polyacrylate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous solution by emulsion polymerization. For this, 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (1) and methyl trifluoroacrylate (2) were tested as monomers as a means to prepare fluorinated polyacrylate nanoparticles to evaluate how side chain fluorination may affect nanoparticle size and drug carrier properties. Our results show that as fluorine content within the polyacrylate matrix increases, the size of the nanoparticle systematically diminishes, from 45 nm (for nanoparticles containing no fluoroacrylate) to ~7 nm (for nanoparticles constructed solely of fluoroacrylate). We also observe that as fluoroacrylate content and hydrophobicity increases, the nanoparticles decrease their ability to incorporate lipophilic molecules during the process of emulsification. These findings have meaningful implications in the implementation of fluorinated nanoparticles in molecular delivery.

  14. Thin ice clouds in the Arctic: cloud optical depth and particle size retrieved from ground-based thermal infrared radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Yann; Royer, Alain; O'Neill, Norman T.; Turner, David D.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2017-06-01

    Multiband downwelling thermal measurements of zenith sky radiance, along with cloud boundary heights, were used in a retrieval algorithm to estimate cloud optical depth and effective particle diameter of thin ice clouds in the Canadian High Arctic. Ground-based thermal infrared (IR) radiances for 150 semitransparent ice clouds cases were acquired at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80° N, 86° W). We analyzed and quantified the sensitivity of downwelling thermal radiance to several cloud parameters including optical depth, effective particle diameter and shape, water vapor content, cloud geometric thickness and cloud base altitude. A lookup table retrieval method was used to successfully extract, through an optimal estimation method, cloud optical depth up to a maximum value of 2.6 and to separate thin ice clouds into two classes: (1) TIC1 clouds characterized by small crystals (effective particle diameter ≤ 30 µm), and (2) TIC2 clouds characterized by large ice crystals (effective particle diameter > 30 µm). The retrieval technique was validated using data from the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar (AHSRL) and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR). Inversions were performed over three polar winters and results showed a significant correlation (R2 = 0.95) for cloud optical depth retrievals and an overall accuracy of 83 % for the classification of TIC1 and TIC2 clouds. A partial validation relative to an algorithm based on high spectral resolution downwelling IR radiance measurements between 8 and 21 µm was also performed. It confirms the robustness of the optical depth retrieval and the fact that the broadband thermal radiometer retrieval was sensitive to small particle (TIC1) sizes.

  15. Designing and Validating a Model for Measuring Sustainability of Overall Innovation Capability of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nizam Ab Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The business environment is currently characterized by intensified competition at both the national and firm levels. Many studies have shown that innovation positively affect firms in enhancing their competitiveness. Innovation is a dynamic process that requires a continuous, evolving, and mastered management. Evaluating the sustainability of overall innovation capability of a business is a major means of determining how well this firm effectively and efficiently manages its innovation process. A psychometrically valid scale of evaluating the sustainability of overall innovation capability of a firm is still insufficient in the current innovation literature. Thus, this study developed a reliable and valid scale of measuring the sustainability of overall innovation capability construct. The unidimensionality, reliability, and several validity components of the developed scale were tested using the data collected from 175 small and medium-sized enterprises in Iran. A series of systematic statistical analyses were performed. Results of the reliability measures, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and several components of validity tests strongly supported an eight-dimensional (8D scale of measuring the sustainability of overall innovation capability construct. The dimensions of the scale were strategic management, supportive culture and structure, resource allocation, communication and networking, knowledge and technology management, idea management, project development, and commercialization capabilities.

  16. Retrieval of volcanic ash particle size, mass and optical depth from a ground-based thermal infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A. J.; Bernardo, C.

    2009-09-01

    Volcanoes can emit fine-sized ash particles (1-10 μm radii) into the atmosphere and if they reach the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, these particles can have deleterious effects on the atmosphere and climate. If they remain within the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere, the particles can lead to health effects in humans and animals and also affect vegetation. It is therefore of some interest to be able to measure the particle size distribution, mass and other optical properties of fine ash once suspended in the atmosphere. A new imaging camera working in the infrared region between 7-14 μm has been developed to detect and quantify volcanic ash. The camera uses passive infrared radiation measured in up to five spectral channels to discriminate ash from other atmospheric absorbers (e.g. water molecules) and a microphysical ash model is used to invert the measurements into three retrievable quantities: the particle size distribution, the infrared optical depth and the total mass of fine particles. In this study we describe the salient characteristics of the thermal infrared imaging camera and present the first retrievals from field studies at an erupting volcano. An automated ash alarm algorithm has been devised and tested and a quantitative ash retrieval scheme developed to infer particle sizes, infrared optical depths and mass in a developing ash column. The results suggest that the camera is a useful quantitative tool for monitoring volcanic particulates in the size range 1-10 μm and because it can operate during the night, it may be a very useful complement to other instruments (e.g. ultra-violet spectrometers) that only operate during daylight.

  17. The Silhouette Zoetrope: A New Blend of Motion, Mirroring, Depth, and Size Illusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Veras

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a novel combination of visual illusions in one stimulus device, a contemporary innovation of the traditional zoetrope, called Silhouette Zoetrope. In this new device, an animation of moving silhouettes is created by sequential cutouts placed outside a rotating empty cylinder, with slits illuminating the cutouts successively from the back. This “inside-out” zoetrope incurs the following visual effects: the resulting animated figures are perceived (a horizontally flipped, (b inside the cylinder, and (c appear to be of different size than the actual cutout object. Here, we explore the unique combination of illusions in this new device. We demonstrate how the geometry of the device leads to a retinal image consistent with a mirrored and distorted image and binocular disparities consistent with the perception of an object inside the cylinder.

  18. Kepler: NASA's First Mission Capable of Finding Earth-Size Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Kepler, a NASA Discovery mission, is a spaceborne telescope designed to search a nearby region of our galaxy for Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars like our sun. The habitable zone is that region around a start where the temperature permits water to be liquid on the surface of a planet. Liquid water is considered essential forth existence of life. Mission Phases: Six mission phases have been defined to describe the different periods of activity during Kepler's mission. These are: launch; commissioning; early science operations, science operations: and decommissioning

  19. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  20. Need for liquid-crystal display monitors having the capability of rendering higher than 8 bits in display-bit depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwasa, Takeshi; Morishita, Junji; Hatanaka, Shiro; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to examine the potential usefulness of liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors having the capability of rendering higher than 8 bits in display-bit depth. An LCD monitor having the capability of rendering 8, 10, and 12 bits was used. It was calibrated to the grayscale standard display function with a maximum luminance of 450 cd/m(2) and a minimum of 0.75 cd/m(2). For examining the grayscale resolution reported by ten observers, various simple test patterns having two different combinations of luminance in 8, 10, and 12 bits were randomly displayed on the LCD monitor. These patterns were placed on different uniform background luminance levels, such as 0, 50, and 100%, for maximum luminance. All observers participating in this study distinguished a smaller difference in luminance than one gray level in 8 bits irrespective of background luminance levels. As a result of the adaptation processes of the human visual system, observers distinguished a smaller difference in luminance as the luminance level of the test pattern was closer to the background. The smallest difference in luminance that observers distinguished was four gray levels in 12 bits, i.e., one gray level in 10 bits. Considering the results obtained by use of simple test patterns, medical images should ideally be displayed on LCD monitors having 10 bits or greater so that low-contrast objects with small differences in luminance can be detected and for providing a smooth gradation of grayscale.

  1. Highly crystallized nanometer-sized zeolite a with large Cs adsorption capability for the decontamination of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torad, Nagy L; Naito, Masanobu; Tatami, Junichi; Endo, Akira; Leo, Sin-Yen; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Wu, Kevin C-W; Wakihara, Toru; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Nanometer-sized zeolite A with a large cesium (Cs) uptake capability is prepared through a simple post-milling recrystallization method. This method is suitable for producing nanometer-sized zeolite in large scale, as additional organic compounds are not needed to control zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Herein, we perform a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) study to evaluate the uptake ability of Cs ions by zeolite, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. In comparison to micrometer-sized zeolite A, nanometer-sized zeolite A can rapidly accommodate a larger amount of Cs ions into the zeolite crystal structure, owing to its high external surface area. Nanometer-sized zeolite is a promising candidate for the removal of radioactive Cs ions from polluted water. Our QCM study on Cs adsorption uptake behavior provides the information of adsorption kinetics (e.g., adsorption amounts and rates). This technique is applicable to other zeolites, which will be highly valuable for further consideration of radioactive Cs removal in the future.

  2. A study of the depth and size of concave cube Au nanoparticles as highly sensitive SERS probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Herrera, J. M.; González, A. L.; Guerrini, L.; Castiello, F. R.; Alonso-Nuñez, G.; Contreras, O. E.; Alvarez-Puebla, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    substrates in size-limiting cases. Theoretical calculations indicate that the highest increment of the near-field is located at the eight sharp tips and, interestingly, a medium near-field increment is also activated over the volume next to the concave surface. Remarkably, the plasmonic response of the concave cubic morphology showed great sensitivity to the concavity degree. Experimental SERS analysis nicely matches the outcome of the theoretical model, confirming that medium-sized concave GNCs (35 nm side length) possess the highest SERS activity upon excitation with a 633 nm laser, whereas larger 61 nm side concave GNCs dominate the optical response at 785 nm. Due to their size-intensity trade off, we envision that such small concave gold nanocubes can provide a highly active and efficient SERS platform for size-limiting applications, especially when near infrared excitations are required. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle size distribution analysis (Fig. SI-1); extended TEM analysis on nanocubes morphology (Fig. SI-2, SI-3 and SI-4); comparison of GNCs size and concavity degree (Fig. SI-4); optical response calculations using the curved edges model (Fig. SI-5); simulated optical absorption spectra as a function of the concavity depth (Fig. SI-6); background SERS spectrum (Fig. SI-8) and details on the calculation of the SERS enhancement factors. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01155a

  3. Sensitivity of the correlation between the depth of shower maximum and the muon shower size to the cosmic ray composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younk, Patrick; Risse, Markus

    2012-07-01

    The composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays is an important issue in astroparticle physics research, and additional experimental results are required for further progress. Here we investigate what can be learned from the statistical correlation factor r between the depth of shower maximum and the muon shower size, when these observables are measured simultaneously for a set of air showers. The correlation factor r contains the lowest-order moment of a two-dimensional distribution taking both observables into account, and it is independent of systematic uncertainties of the absolute scales of the two observables. We find that, assuming realistic measurement uncertainties, the value of r can provide a measure of the spread of masses in the primary beam. Particularly, one can differentiate between a well-mixed composition (i.e., a beam that contains large fractions of both light and heavy primaries) and a relatively pure composition (i.e., a beam that contains species all of a similar mass). The number of events required for a statistically significant differentiation is ˜200. This differentiation, though diluted, is maintained to a significant extent in the presence of uncertainties in the phenomenology of high energy hadronic interactions. Testing whether the beam is pure or well-mixed is well motivated by recent measurements of the depth of shower maximum.

  4. Photonic band gap in an imperfect atomic diamond lattice: Penetration depth and effects of finite size and vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    We study the effects of finite size and of vacancies on the photonic band gap recently predicted for an atomic diamond lattice. Close to a Jg=0→Je=1 atomic transition, and for atomic lattices containing up to N≈3×104 atoms, we show how the density of states can be affected by both the shape of the system and the possible presence of a fraction of unoccupied lattice sites. We numerically predict and theoretically explain the presence of shape-induced border states and of vacancy-induced localized states appearing in the gap. We also investigate the penetration depth of the electromagnetic field which we compare to the case of an infinite system.

  5. Effects of crack depth and specimen size on ductile crack growth of SENT and SENB specimens for fracture mechanics evaluation of pipeline steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Richard Birkelands vei 1a, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China); Zhang, Z.L., E-mail: zhiliang.zhang@ntnu.n [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Richard Birkelands vei 1a, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Ostby, E.; Nyhus, B. [SINTEF, Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Sun, D.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    A strong geometry dependence of ductile crack growth resistance emerges under large scale yielding. The geometry dependence is associated with different levels of crack tip constraint conditions. However, in a recent attempt to identify appropriate fracture mechanics specimens for pipeline steels, an 'independent' relationship between the crack growth resistance curves and crack depths for SENT specimens has been observed experimentally. In this paper, we use the complete Gurson model to study the effects of crack depth and specimen size on ductile crack growth behavior. Crack growth resistance curves for plane strain, mode I crack growth under large scale yielding conditions have been computed. SENB and SENT specimens with three different specimen sizes, each specimen size with three different crack depths, have been selected. It has been found that crack tip constraint (Q-parameter) has a weak dependence on the crack depth for specimens in the low constraint regime.

  6. Effects of copper filler sizes on the dielectric properties and the energy harvesting capability of nonpercolated polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putson, C.; Lebrun, L.; Guyomar, D.; Muensit, N.; Cottinet, P.-J.; Seveyrat, L.; Guiffard, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonpercolated composites based on polyurethane (PU) filled with low concentrations copper (Cu) powders of varying sizes were studied as electrostrictive materials for mechanical energy harvesting. The dispersion of the fillers within the polymeric matrix was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and results showed a relatively homogeneous dispersion for the microsized fillers and the existence of agglomerates for their nanosized counterparts. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements displayed that there occurred no interaction between the polymeric matrix and the microsized fillers whereas the nanosized fillers slightly enhanced the glass transition of the soft segments of PU and significantly affected the recrystallization temperature. The dependence of the dielectric properties of the composites as a function of the filler volume fraction and filler size was investigated over a broad range of frequencies, showing an increase in the permittivity when fillers were used. This increase was more pronounced for the composites containing nanosized fillers. The measurement of the harvested current and of the harvested power also demonstrated an enhancement of the energy harvesting capability when nanofillers were employed. From the experimental data, it appeared that the electrostrictive coefficient Q was not proportional to the inverse ratio of the permittivity and the Young modulus for the studied composites. Finally, analytical modeling of the harvested current and of the harvested energy offered an accurate description of the experimental data.

  7. Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2012-10-02

    Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

  8. Use Of Pulsed IR Thermography For Determination Of Size And Depth Of Subsurface Defect Taking Into Account The Shape Of Its Cross-Section Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocka-Fotek O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to reconstruction of size and depth (distance from the tested surface of artificial defects with square and rectangular cross-section areas using the pulsed IR thermography. Defects in form of flat-bottom holes were made in austenitic steel plate. The defect size was estimated on the basis of surface distribution of the time derivative of the temperature. In order to asses the depth of defects with considered geometries on the basis of calibration relations (i.e. dependence of time of contrast maximum vs. defect depth for given defect diameter obtained for circular defects, the ‘equivalent diameter’ describing not only the defect cross-section area but also its shape was assigned. It has been shown that presented approach gives satisfactory results.

  9. Linking snow depth to avalanche release area size: measurements from the Vallée de la Sionne field site

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in avalanche hazard assessment is the correct estimation of avalanche release area size, which is of crucial importance to evaluate the potential danger that avalanches pose to roads, railways or infrastructure. Terrain analysis plays an important role in assessing the potential size of avalanche releases areas and is commonly based on digital terrain models (DTMs) of a snow-free summer terrain. However, a snow-covered winter terrain can significa...

  10. Buffered and unbuffered dike emplacement on Earth and Venus - Implications for magma reservoir size, depth, and rate of magma replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Head, J. W., III

    1993-01-01

    Models of the emplacement of lateral dikes from magma chambers under constant (buffered) driving pressure conditions and declining (unbuffered) driving pressure conditions indicate that the two pressure scenarios lead to distinctly different styles of dike emplacement. In the unbuffered case, the lengths and widths of laterally emplaced dikes will be severely limited and the dike lengths will be highly dependent on chamber size; this dependence suggests that average dike length can be used to infer the dimensions of the source magma reservoir. On Earth, the characteristics of many mafic-dike swarms suggest that they were emplaced in buffered conditions (e.g., the Mackenzie dike swarm in Canada and some dikes within the Scottish Tertiary). On Venus, the distinctive radial fractures and graben surrounding circular to oval features and edifices on many size scales and extending for hundreds to over a thousand km are candidates for dike emplacement in buffered conditions.

  11. Carbon storage potential in size-density fractions from semi-natural grassland ecosystems with different productivities over varying soil depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breulmann, Marc; Boettger, Tatjana; Buscot, François; Gruendling, Ralf; Schulz, Elke

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have increasingly recognised a profound need for more information on SOC stocks in the soil and the factors governing their stability and dynamics. Many questions still remain unanswered about the interplay between changes in plant communities and the extent to which changes in aboveground productivity affect the carbon dynamics in soils through changes in its quantity and quality. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to examine the SOC accumulation potential of semi-natural grasslands of different productivities and determine the distribution of SOM fractions over varying soil depth intervals (0-10, 10-20, 20-30 30-50 50-80 and 80+cm). SOM fractionation was considered as a relative measure of stability to separate SOM associated with clay minerals from SOM of specific light densities less than 2 g cm(-3) (size-density fractionation). Two clay-associated fractions (CF1, soil depths OC was largely attributed to the CF1 fraction of low productivity grasslands. We suggest that the majority of OM in deeper soil depth intervals is microbially-derived, as evidenced by decreasing C/N ratios and decreasing δ(13)C values. The hot water extraction and natural δ(13)C abundance, employed here allowed the characterisation of SOM stabilisation properties, however how climatic changes affect the fate of OM within different soil depth intervals is still unknown.

  12. Increasing lengths of aftershock zones with depths of moderate-size earthquakes on the San Jacinto Fault suggests triggering of deep creep in the middle crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California revealed a shallower locking depth than the seismogenic depth outlined by microseismicity. This disagreement leads to speculations that creeping episodes drive seismicity in the lower part of the seismogenic zone. Whether deep creep occurs along the SJF holds key information on how fault slips during earthquake cycle and potential seismic hazard imposed to southern California. Here we apply a matched filter technique to 10 M > 4 earthquake sequences along the SJF since 2000 and obtain more complete earthquake catalogues. We then systematic investigate spatio-temporal evolutions of these aftershock sequences. We find anomalously large aftershock zones for earthquakes occurred below the geodetically inferred locking depth (i.e. 11-12 km), while aftershock zones of shallower main shocks are close to expectations from standard scaling relationships. Although we do not observe clear migration of aftershocks, most aftershock zones do expand systematically with logarithmic time since the main shock. All the evidences suggest that aftershocks near or below the locking depth are likely driven by deep creep following the main shock. The presence of a creeping zone below 11-12 km may have significant implications on the maximum sizes of events in this region.

  13. Predictors of paravalvular aortic regurgitation following self-expanding Medtronic CoreValve implantation: the role of annulus size, degree of calcification, and balloon size during pre-implantation valvuloplasty and implant depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, O F; Schultz, C; Jabbour, A; Rubens, M; Mittal, T; Mohiaddin, R; Davies, S; Di Mario, C; Van der Boon, R; Ahmad, A S; Amrani, M; Moat, N; De Jaegere, P P T; Dalby, M

    2015-01-20

    We sought to investigate the role of balloon size during pre-implantation valvuloplasty in predicting AR and optimal Medtronic CoreValve (MCS) implantation depth. Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) is common following MCS implantation. A number of anatomical and procedural variables have been proposed as determinants of AR including degree of valve calcification, valve undersizing and implantation depth. We conducted a multicenter retrospective analysis of 282 patients who had undergone MCS implantation with prior cardiac CT annular sizing between 2007 and 2011. Native valve minimum (Dmin), maximum (Dmax) and arithmetic mean (Dmean) annulus diameters as well as agatston calcium score were recorded. Nominal and achieved balloon size was also recorded. AR was assessed using contrast angiography at the end of each procedure. Implant depth was measured as the mean distance from the nadir of the non- and left coronary sinuses to the distal valve frame angiographically. 29 mm and 26 mm MCS were implanted in 60% and 39% of patients respectively. The majority of patients (N=165) developed AR <2 following MCS implantation. AR ≥3 was observed in 16% of the study population. High agatston calcium score and Dmean were found to be independent predictors of AR ≥3 in multivariate analysis (P<0.0001). Nominal balloon diameter and the number of balloon inflations did not influence AR. However a small achieved balloon diameter-to-Dmean ratio (≤0.85) showed modest correlation with AR ≥3 (P=0.04). This observation was made irrespective of the degree of valve calcification. A small MCS size-to-Dmean ratio is also associated with AR ≥3 (P=0.001). A mean implantation depth of ≥8+2mm was also associated with AR ≥3. Implantation depth of ≥12 mm was associated with small MCS diameter-to-Dmean ratio and increased 30-day mortality. CT measured aortic annulus diameter and agatston calcium score remain important predictors of significant AR. Other procedural predictors

  14. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability.......The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities and innovation management. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance...... and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...

  15. Usefulness of dilated blood vessels in the tumor periphery for assessing the invasion depth of small-sized depressed colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Rintaro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Hamamoto, Hidetaka; Yamaoka, Hajime; Nakahori, Masato; Chonan, Akimichi

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between dilated blood vessels in the tumor periphery and the tumor invasion depth is unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the relationship between dilated blood vessels and the invasion depth of small-sized (<30 mm) colorectal cancer (CRC), and its implications on endoscopic treatment.We performed a single-arm observational study of the diagnostic accuracy of the existence of dilated vessels in the tumor periphery of CRC lesions as an indicator of submucosal deep (SM-d, ≥1000 μm) carcinomas. Lesions were classified into two groups based on the existence of dilated vessels by two experienced endoscopists. The clinicopathological features, invasion depth, and lymphovascular invasion/poorly differentiated clusters were analyzed in all resected specimens.Four hundred and two consecutive small-sized CRC lesions were included. The dilated vessels were observed in 96/402 (24%) lesions, and most of them (93/96) were found in depressed lesions. In depressed lesions, the histopathological diagnosis of the dilated vessels group showed SM-d or deeper invasion in 84/93 (90%) cases, whereas 3/20 (15%) had SM-d invasion in the nondilated vessels group (P < 0.001). When the dilated vessels were used as an indicator of SM-d or deeper invasion in depressed lesions, the sensitivity was 95.6%, specificity was 66.7%, and accuracy was 90.2%. No correlation was observed between the existence of dilated vessels and the lesion site, lesion diameter, and lymphovascular invasion/poorly differentiated cluster.The existence of dilated blood vessels in the tumor periphery suggests SM-d or deeper invasion in depressed lesions.

  16. Effects of niobium additions on the structure, depth, and austenite grain size of the case of carburized 0.07% C steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. A.; Bepari, M. M. A.

    1996-10-01

    Carbon (0.07%) steel samples containing about 0.04% Nb singly and in combination with nitrogen were carburized in a natural Titas gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1223 K (950 °C) and a pressure of about 0.10 MPa for 1/2 to 4 h, followed by slow cooling in the furnace. Their microstructures were studied by optical microscopy. The austenite grain size of the case and the case depths were determined on baseline samples of low-carbon steels and also on niobium and (Nb + N) microalloyed steel samples. It was found that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium alone or in combination with nitrogen decreased the thickness of cementite network near the surface of the carburized case of the steels. However, niobium in combination with nitrogen was more effective than niobium in reducing the thickness of cementite network. Niobium with or without nitrogen inhibited the formation of Widmanstätten cementite plates at grain boundaries and within the grains near the surface in the hypereutectoid zone of the case. It was also revealed that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium decreased the case depth of the carburized steels, but that niobium with nitrogen is more effective than niobium alone in reducing the case depth. Niobium as niobium carbide (NbC) and niobium in the presence of nitrogen as niobium carbonitride, [Nb(C,N)] particles refined the austenite grain size of the carburized case, but Nb(C,N) was more effective than NbC in inhibiting austenite grain growth.

  17. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...... it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability....

  18. THE PRESENCE OF METASTASES IN REGIONAL LYMPH NODES IS ASSOCIATED WITH TUMOR SIZE AND DEPTH OF INVASION IN SPORADIC GASTRIC ADENOCARCINOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAMBRUZZI, Eduardo; de AZEREDO, Andreza Mariane; KRONHART, Ardala; FOLTZ, Katia Martins; ZETTLER, Cláudio Galeano; PÊGAS, Karla Lais

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastric adenocarcinoma is more often found in men over 50 years in the form of an antral lesion. The tumor has heterogeneous histopathologic features and a poor prognosis (median survival of 15% in five years). Aim To estimate the relationship between the presence of nodal metastasis and other prognostic factors in sporadic gastric adenocarcinoma. Method Were evaluated 164 consecutive cases of gastric adenocarcinoma previously undergone gastrectomy (partial or total), without clinical evidence of distant metastasis, and determined the following variables: topography of the lesion, tumor size, Borrmann macroscopic configuration, histological grade, early or advanced lesions, Lauren histological subtype, presence of signet ring cell, degree of invasion, perigastric lymph node status, angiolymphatic/perineural invasion, and staging. Results Were found 21 early lesions (12.8%) and 143 advanced lesions (87.2%), with a predominance of lesions classified as T3 (n=99/60, 4%) and N1 (n=62/37, 8%). The nodal status was associated with depth of invasion (p<0.001) and tumor size (p<0.001). The staging was related to age (p=0.048), histological grade (p=0.003), and presence of signet ring cells (p = 0.007), angiolymphatic invasion (p = 0.001), and perineural invasion (p=0.003). Conclusion In gastric cancer, lymph node involvement, tumor size and depth of invasion are histopathological data associated with the pattern of growth/tumor spread, suggesting that a wide dissection of perigastric lymph nodes is a fundamental step in the surgical treatment of these patients. PMID:24676292

  19. Reclamation of acidic colliery spoil. Part 4. The effects of limestone particle size and depth of incorporation. [Lolium perenne L. ; Trifolium repens L. ; Lotus corniculatus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costigan, P.A.; Bradshaw, A.D.; Gemmell, R.P.

    1984-04-01

    The effects of different grades of limestone (up to 2.4 mm diameter) and depths of incorporation (15 and 25 cm) on spoil pH and growth of Lolium perenne L. were measured over 2 years in two field experiments on colliery spoil. A pot experiment was established using three grades of limestone (up to 3 mm diameter) with crops of L. perenne L., Trifolium repens L. or Lotus corniculatus L. The coarser grades of limestone reacted more slowly than the fine grade. When enough limestone was applied, plant growth was not reduced with the coarser grades. There was no evidence that coarser grades became unreactive. Deeper incorporation did improve plant growth over the summer period but not in the winter and the incorporation of the same rate of limestone to a greater depth did not raise pH to the same level. In a pot experiment, spoil pH was affected by crop species. This was attributed to differences in transpiration rates affecting spoil aeration. It appears that coarse limestone particles do have a long-term neutralizing effect provided that sufficient limestone is applied and the particle size does not exceed about 3 mm.

  20. Aerosol optical depth assimilation for a size-resolved sectional model: impacts of observationally constrained, multi-wavelength and fine mode retrievals on regional scale analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, P. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H. C.; da Silva, A. M.; Hyer, E.

    2013-10-01

    An aerosol optical depth (AOD) three-dimensional variational data assimilation technique is developed for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for which WRF-Chem forecasts are performed with a detailed sectional model, the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC). Within GSI, forward AOD and adjoint sensitivities are performed using Mie computations from the WRF-Chem optical properties module, providing consistency with the forecast. GSI tools such as recursive filters and weak constraints are used to provide correlation within aerosol size bins and upper and lower bounds for the optimization. The system is used to perform assimilation experiments with fine vertical structure and no data thinning or re-gridding on a 12 km horizontal grid over the region of California, USA, where improvements on analyses and forecasts is demonstrated. A first set of simulations was performed, comparing the assimilation impacts of using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) dark target retrievals to those using observationally constrained ones, i.e., calibrated with AERONET (Aerosol RObotic NETwork) data. It was found that using the observationally constrained retrievals produced the best results when evaluated against ground based monitors, with the error in PM2.5 predictions reduced at over 90% of the stations and AOD errors reduced at 100% of the monitors, along with larger overall error reductions when grouping all sites. A second set of experiments reveals that the use of fine mode fraction AOD and ocean multi-wavelength retrievals can improve the representation of the aerosol size distribution, while assimilating only 550 nm AOD retrievals produces no or at times degraded impact. While assimilation of multi-wavelength AOD shows positive impacts on all analyses performed, future work is needed to generate observationally constrained multi-wavelength retrievals, which when assimilated will generate size

  1. Compressors selection and sizing

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Royce N

    2005-01-01

    This practical reference provides in-depth information required to understand and properly estimate compressor capabilities and to select the proper designs. Engineers and students will gain a thorough understanding of compression principles, equipment, applications, selection, sizing, installation, and maintenance. The many examples clearly illustrate key aspects to help readers understand the ""real world"" of compressor technology.Compressors: Selection and Sizing, third edition is completely updated with new API standards. Additions requested by readers include a new section on di

  2. Depth keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  3. Capability Paternalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, R.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    A capability approach prescribes paternalist government actions to the extent that it requires the promotion of specific functionings, instead of the corresponding capabilities. Capability theorists have argued that their theories do not have much of these paternalist implications, since promoting c

  4. Design and capabilities of an experimental setup based on magnetron sputtering for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters on ultra-clean surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hannes; Popok, Vladimir; Barke, Ingo;

    2012-01-01

    and analyzed. Size-selected clusters are deposited on substrates and the efficiency of an electrostatic quadrupole mass selector (QMS) is tested. Height analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrates relative standard size deviations of 7-10 % for the particles of various sizes between 6 nm and 19...

  5. Depth statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In 1975 John Tukey proposed a multivariate median which is the 'deepest' point in a given data cloud in R^d. Later, in measuring the depth of an arbitrary point z with respect to the data, David Donoho and Miriam Gasko considered hyperplanes through z and determined its 'depth' by the smallest portion of data that are separated by such a hyperplane. Since then, these ideas has proved extremely fruitful. A rich statistical methodology has developed that is based on data depth and, more general...

  6. The Influence of Information Structure on the Depth of Semantic Processing: How Focus and Pitch Accent Determine the Size of the N400 Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel; Yang, Yufang; Hagoort, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To highlight relevant information in dialogues, both wh-question context and pitch accent in answers can be used, such that focused information gains more attention and is processed more elaborately. To evaluate the relative influence of context and pitch accent on the depth of semantic processing, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) to…

  7. Enhancing Foreign Consumer Acceptance The Role of Capabilities of Creating Export-Market Oriented Products in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmanzah Firmanzah

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to measure the effects of SMEs capabilities on their export performance. This paper offers a model to test the effects of the capabilities of creating export-market oriented products (EMOPs on increasing SMEs’ export performance. Six hypotheses are developed to analyze causal effects of variables. Using 387 Indonesian SMEs as sample, hypotheses testing highlight the importance of SMEs’ capabilities of building export-market oriented products, which highly follow foreign (export market standards. Hence, these kinds of products increase foreign consumer acceptance. In general, this paper offers a possible explanation to predict the determinants of how SMEs’ can perform in the export market.

  8. Capability ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological

  9. Capability ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological theor

  10. Capability ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological theor

  11. Depth relief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.; Koenderink, J.J.; Doorn, A.J. van

    1995-01-01

    A study is reported of the depth relief in a simple three-dimensional scene consisting of a white, rough sphere on a planar support, illuminated in a natural manner. Viewing conditions included monocular and binocular as well as 'synoptical' viewing. In the synoptical condition the eyes are

  12. Design and capabilities of an experimental setup based on magnetron sputtering for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters on ultra-clean surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, H.; Popok, V. N.; Barke, I.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2012-07-01

    The design and performance of an experimental setup utilizing a magnetron sputtering source for production of beams of ionized size-selected clusters for deposition in ultra-high vacuum is described. For the case of copper cluster formation the influence of different source parameters is studied and analyzed. Size-selected clusters are deposited on substrates and the efficiency of an electrostatic quadrupole mass selector is tested. Height analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrates relative standard size deviations of 7%-10% for the particles of various sizes between 6 nm and 19 nm. Combined analysis by AFM and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the clusters preserve almost spherical shape after the deposition on amorphous carbon substrates. Supported nanoparticles of a few nanometres in diameter have crystalline structure with a face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice.

  13. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Depth from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and MODIS to AERONET AOD and IMPROVE PM2.5 Mass at Bondville, Illinois Stratified by Chemical Composition, RH, Particle Size, and Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. C.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.

    2008-05-01

    The USEPA is interested in using satellite remote sensing data to estimate levels of PM2.5. Here we report on comparisons of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from GOES Aerosol and Smoke Product (GASP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to IMPROVE network PM2.5 mass and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based AOD. Before we compare GASP and MODIS AOD to PM2.5, we first evaluate satellite AOD using the ground-based AERONET measurements and how it varies by aerosol chemical composition and size distribution. We focus attention on the Bondville, Illinois site because there is collocated IMPROVE sampling and an AERONET site. GASP provides aerosol optical depth at 0.55 um using top of atmosphere visible channel radiance measured from GOES east and GOES west. Time resolution is typically every 30 minutes during daylight hours. MODIS provides typically once per day AOD for any given location. The IMPROVE sampler provides a 24-hour integrated sample of PM10 mass, and PM2.5 mass and elemental composition on a one day in three schedule. AERONET provides aerosol optical depth at multiple wavelengths and aerosol size distribution as well as other derived parameters such as Angstrom exponent from ground based daytime measurements. We stratified cases by RH group, major chemical component, size distribution, and season. GOES AOD correlated best with PM2.5 mass during periods with mainly small particles, moderate RH, and sulfate dominated aerosol. It correlated poorly when RH is very high or low, aerosol is primarily organic, and when coarse to fine mass ratio is high. GASP AOD also correlated best with AERONET AOD when particles are mainly fine, suggesting the aerosol model assumptions (e.g. size distribution) may need to be varied geographically for GASP to achieve better AOD results.

  14. Effect of Reiki therapy on pain and anxiety in adults: an in-depth literature review of randomized trials with effect size calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrane, Susan; Cohen, Susan M

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate the effect of Reiki therapy for pain and anxiety in randomized clinical trials. A systematic search of PubMed, ProQuest, Cochrane, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, Global Health, and Medline databases was conducted using the search terms pain, anxiety, and Reiki. The Center for Reiki Research also was examined for articles. Studies that used randomization and a control or usual care group, used Reiki therapy in one arm of the study, were published in 2000 or later in peer-reviewed journals in English, and measured pain or anxiety were included. After removing duplicates, 49 articles were examined and 12 articles received full review. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria: four articles studied cancer patients, one examined post-surgical patients, and two analyzed community dwelling older adults. Effect sizes were calculated for all studies using Cohen's d statistic. Effect sizes for within group differences ranged from d = 0.24 for decrease in anxiety in women undergoing breast biopsy to d = 2.08 for decreased pain in community dwelling adults. The between group differences ranged from d = 0.32 for decrease of pain in a Reiki versus rest intervention for cancer patients to d = 4.5 for decrease in pain in community dwelling adults. Although the number of studies is limited, based on the size Cohen's d statistics calculated in this review, there is evidence to suggest that Reiki therapy may be effective for pain and anxiety. Continued research using Reiki therapy with larger sample sizes, consistently randomized groups, and standardized treatment protocols is recommended.

  15. Aurelia labiata (Scyphozoa) jellyfish in Roscoe Bay: Their spatial distribution varies with population size and their behaviour changes with water depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David J.

    2009-02-01

    During 2003 and 2004, there were large numbers of Aurelia labiata medusae in Roscoe Bay and they distributed themselves across the entire bay. A smaller population present during 2006 and 2007 typically formed an aggregation in the west half of the bay. Since currents would have been the same during these two time periods, the behaviour of medusae must have influenced their distribution. The way medusae spaced themselves in aggregations appeared to interact with tidal currents to produce the difference in medusae distribution during the two time periods. In a second series of observations, I found that medusae were not stranded on a Roscoe Bay beach by ebb tides. When the depth of the water column declined to about 1 m or less, medusae in an intertidal zone dove down and bumped into the bottom or swam into rocks or oysters. Their response to these collisions was to swim to the surface or within a few centimetres of the surface. Since the ebb stream was at the surface, being at the surface increased the probability that medusae drifted out of the intertidal zone. The influence of medusae behaviour on their distribution and on their avoidance of stranding is a further indication of the importance of adaptive behaviour in the ecology of Aurelia labiata medusae.

  16. Size characterization of barley starch granules by gravitational field-flow fractionation: a rapid, low-cost method to assess the brewing capability of different strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Casolari, Sonia; Krumlova, Andrea; Budinska, Marcela; Chmelík, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Cereal starch occurs as two types of micrometer-sized granules, large and small. Large starch granules are more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. When cereal starch is used for fermentation processes, as in brewing of barley malt, the barley strains with the highest content of large starch granules should be preferred. Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) is a separation method able to fractionate starch samples at low cost and short analysis time. In this work, the search for the best GFFF conditions for the analytical separation of barley starch within an inter-laboratory approach is presented. For different barley strains cultivated under monitored conditions the size distributions of starch granules is here quickly monitored and characterized by GFFF. As a consequence, dimensional characterization of barley starch can allow for the selection of the most suitable strains with the lowest content of non-degradable starch.

  17. Capability approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    Lærebogen er den første samlede danske præsentation af den af Amartya Sen og Martha Nussbaum udviklede Capability Approach. Bogen indeholder en præsentation og diskussion af Sen og Nussbaums teoretiske platform. I bogen indgår eksempler fra såvel uddannelse/uddannelsespolitik, pædagogik og omsorg....

  18. ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPABILITIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Nielsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse entrepreneurship from an action research perspective. What is entrepreneurship about? Which are the fundamental capabilities and processes of entrepreneurship? To answer these questions the article includes a case study of a Danish entrepreneur and his networks...

  19. Effects of Sowing Depth and Seed Size on Seedling Emergence Percentage and Seedling Growth in Soybean%播种深度和种子大小对大豆出苗率和幼苗生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢皓; 贾秀婷; 陈学珍; 张鑫

    2012-01-01

    The effects of sowing depth and seed size on seedling establishment were focus issue at the seed science all the while. Soybean seed was tested in this paper by comparing the seedling emergence percentage and seedling growth in the different sowing depth and seed size in the field. Seed of two varieties in soybean were divided artificially into three kinds of grain with big, middle and small size. These seed were sowed in depths of 5 cm, 10 cm and 15 cm in the field, respectively, and the seedling emergence time, percentage and main seedling characters were surveyed in the test. The results that the seedling emergence time was prolonged in the field, 6-13 d, 9-17 d and 13-23 d were needed by seedling emergence in 5 cm, 10 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Compared with indoor test, the final seedling emergence percentage in the field were decreased 7%, 34% and 80% in 5 cm, 10 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. The seedling length and dry seedling weight were gradually reduced with sowing depth and shown a very significant difference (P 〈 0.01); Contrarily, root length was the longest in 15 cm depth and was the shortest in 5 cm depth. The dry root weight in 10 cm depth was heavy more than in 5 cm and 15 cm depth and shown significant difference (P〈 0.05). Seedling growth was also affected by seed size. Both big and middle size was higher in seedling emergence percentage than small size with very significant difference (P〈 0.01). The seedling length and dry weight gradually increased with seed size and shown significant difference (P〈 0.05) among three seed size and vary significant difference (P〈 0.01) between big and small size.%播种深度和种子大小对种苗建成的影响一直是种子学研究中的热点问题。以大豆种子为试验材料,研究播种深度和种子大小对大豆出苗率和幼苗生长的影响。试验选用2个大豆品种的种子,分为大、中、小3种粒级,播种深度为5cm、10cm、15

  20. Design and capabilities of an experimental setup based on magnetron sputtering for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters on ultra-clean surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hannes; Popok, Vladimir; Barke, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The design and performance of an experimental setup utilizing a magnetron sputtering source for production of beams of ionized size-selected clusters for deposition in ultra-high vacuum is described. For the case of copper cluster formation the influence of different source parameters is studied...... nm. Combined analysis by AFM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the clusters preserve almost spherical shape after the deposition on amorphous carbon substrates. Supported nanoparticles of a few nanometres in diameter have crystalline structure with a face-centered cubic (fcc...

  1. Standard Practice for Continuous Sizing and Counting of Airborne Particles in Dust-Controlled Areas and Clean Rooms Using Instruments Capable of Detecting Single Sub-Micrometre and Larger Particles

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of the particle concentration, by number, and the size distribution of airborne particles in dust-controlled areas and clean rooms, for particles in the size range of approximately 0.01 to 5.0 m. Particle concentrations not exceeding 3.5 106 particles/m3 (100 000/ft 3) are covered for all particles equal to and larger than the minimum size measured. 1.2 This practice uses an airborne single particle counting device (SPC) whose operation is based on measuring the signal produced by an individual particle passing through the sensing zone. The signal must be directly or indirectly related to particle size. Note 1The SPC type is not specified here. The SPC can be a conventional optical particle counter (OPC), an aerodynamic particle sizer, a condensation nucleus counter (CNC) operating in conjunction with a diffusion battery or differential mobility analyzer, or any other device capable of counting and sizing single particles in the size range of concern and of sampling...

  2. Depth of field simulation for still digital images using a 3D camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alejandro Rodríguez Rosas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In a world where digital photography is almost ubiquitous, the size of image capturing devices and their lenses limit their capabilities to achieve shallower depths of field for aesthetic purposes. This work proposes a novel approach to simulate this effect using the color and depth images from a 3D camera. Comparative tests yielded results similar to those of a regular lens.

  3. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingerle, D.; Meirer, F.; Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possib

  4. Motion-Adaptive Depth Superresolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilov, Ulugbek S; Boufounos, Petros T

    2017-04-01

    Multi-modal sensing is increasingly becoming important in a number of applications, providing new capabilities and processing challenges. In this paper, we explore the benefit of combining a low-resolution depth sensor with a high-resolution optical video sensor, in order to provide a high-resolution depth map of the scene. We propose a new formulation that is able to incorporate temporal information and exploit the motion of objects in the video to significantly improve the results over existing methods. In particular, our approach exploits the space-time redundancy in the depth and intensity using motion-adaptive low-rank regularization. We provide experiments to validate our approach and confirm that the quality of the estimated high-resolution depth is improved substantially. Our approach can be a first component in systems using vision techniques that rely on high-resolution depth information.

  5. Metal detector depth estimation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Jay; McMichael, Ian

    2009-05-01

    This paper looks at depth estimation techniques using electromagnetic induction (EMI) metal detectors. Four algorithms are considered. The first utilizes a vertical gradient sensor configuration. The second is a dual frequency approach. The third makes use of dipole and quadrapole receiver configurations. The fourth looks at coils of different sizes. Each algorithm is described along with its associated sensor. Two figures of merit ultimately define algorithm/sensor performance. The first is the depth of penetration obtainable. (That is, the maximum detection depth obtainable.) This describes the performance of the method to achieve detection of deep targets. The second is the achievable statistical depth resolution. This resolution describes the precision with which depth can be estimated. In this paper depth of penetration and statistical depth resolution are qualitatively determined for each sensor/algorithm. A scientific method is used to make these assessments. A field test was conducted using 2 lanes with emplaced UXO. The first lane contains 155 shells at increasing depths from 0" to 48". The second is more realistic containing objects of varying size. The first lane is used for algorithm training purposes, while the second is used for testing. The metal detectors used in this study are the: Geonics EM61, Geophex GEM5, Minelab STMR II, and the Vallon VMV16.

  6. Potential for Using Satellite Lidar for Seasonal Snow Depth Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, M. F.; Stoll, J.; Harding, D. J.; Fassnacht, S. R.; Carabajal, C. C.; Markus, T.

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluates the potential for estimating snow depth in complex mountainous terrain using high resolution satellite lidar. For over three decades, satellite remote sensing of snow depth and water equivalent has relied primarily on passive microwave sensors with an approximately 25 km footprint. While successfully employed in many global water balance analyses, their large footprints, necessary to capture the natural emission of the surface, are too coarse to define the spatial heterogeneity of mountain watershed-scale snow due to variable topography and vegetation. In this study, the capability of satellite lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth was evaluated primarily using surface elevations observed by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) flown on board the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite from 2003-2009, with a footprint size of ~70m. The evaluation includes the analysis of GLAS waveforms at near-repeat locations during snow-off and snow on conditions, using several snow depth estimation approaches, focusing on the Uinta Mountains of NE Utah. Also presented is the concept for the ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), currently set to launch in July 2016, and its potential capability for characterizing snow depth. The opportunity for partnering through NASA's Early Adopter Program using prototype aircraft observations also is presented.

  7. Snow Depth Retrieval with UAS Using Photogrammetric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Vander Jagt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alpine areas pose challenges for many existing remote sensing methods for snow depth retrieval, thus leading to uncertainty in water forecasting and budgeting. Herein, we present the results of a field campaign conducted in Tasmania, Australia in 2013 from which estimates of snow depth were derived using a low-cost photogrammetric approach on-board a micro unmanned aircraft system (UAS. Using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS sensors mounted on a multi-rotor UAS and photogrammetric image processing techniques, the results demonstrate that snow depth can be accurately retrieved by differencing two surface models corresponding to the snow-free and snow-covered scenes, respectively. In addition to accurate snow depth retrieval, we show that high-resolution (50 cm spatially continuous snow depth maps can be created using this methodology. Two types of photogrammetric bundle adjustment (BA routines are implemented in this study to determine the optimal estimates of sensor position and orientation, in addition to 3D scene information; conventional BA (which relies on measured ground control points and direct BA (which does not require ground control points. Error sources that affect the accuracy of the BA and subsequent snow depth reconstruction are discussed. The results indicate the UAS is capable of providing high-resolution and high-accuracy (<10 cm estimates of snow depth over a small alpine area (~0.7 ha with significant snow accumulation (depths greater than one meter at a fraction of the cost of full-size aerial survey approaches. The RMSE of estimated snow depths using the conventional BA approach is 9.6 cm, whereas the direct BA is characterized by larger error, with an RMSE of 18.4 cm. If a simple affine transformation is applied to the point cloud derived from the direct BA, the overall RMSE is reduced to 8.8 cm RMSE.

  8. Optimal Sizing Analysis on Grid-connected Microgrid with Different Self-balancing Capabilities%不同自平衡能力并网型微电网优化配置分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈健; 赵波; 王成山; 张雪松; 刘海涛; 李逢兵

    2014-01-01

    并网型微电网对于改善本地用电经济效益和供电水平发挥着重要作用。文中以典型风光储并网型微电网为例,从用户效益角度出发,计及初始投资成本、置换成本、运行维护成本、残值及购电费用等经济因素,并考虑并网型微电网运行功率约束,在经济性目标下分析不同自平衡能力水平的优化配置方案。采用遗传算法(GA)与混合整数规划求解软件(CPLEX)相结合的方法进行求解,得到不同自平衡能力水平下并网型微电网的供电经济性,以及售电电价对最优配置方案的影响,从而为并网型微电网优化配置及设计提供一定的参考。%Grid-connected microgrids play an important role in improving local electricity economy and the power supply level. Take a typical wind-solar-battery grid-connected microgrid as an example.Taking into account such economic factors as the initial investment cost,the replacement cost,the operation and maintenance cost,salvage,the electricity cost,etc.,and operating power constraints,the optimal sizing schemes of different self-balancing capabilities under the economic obj ective are discussed from the perspective of user benefits.The genetic algorithm (GA) and mixed integer solver software CPLEX are adopted to obtain the power economy of the grid-connected microgrid of different self-balancing capabilities and the influences on optimal scheme of different electricity selling prices,which can provide a reference to optimal sizing and design of the grid-connected microgrid.

  9. Mobile Test Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Power Mobile Test capabilities are utilized to conduct electrical power quality testing on aircraft and helicopters. This capability allows that the...

  10. Dynamic capabilities, Marketing Capability and Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Roseli Wünsch Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study is to investigate the influence of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance and the role of marketing capabilities as a mediator in this relationship in the context of private HEIs in Brazil. As a research method we carried out a survey with 316 IES and data analysis was operationalized with the technique of structural equation modeling. The results indicate that the dynamic capabilities have influence on organizational performance only when mediated by marketing ability. The marketing capability has an important role in the survival, growth and renewal on educational services offerings for HEIs in private sector, and consequently in organizational performance. It is also demonstrated that mediated relationship is more intense for HEI with up to 3,000 students and other organizational profile variables such as amount of courses, the constitution, the type of institution and type of education do not significantly alter the results.

  11. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    engineering analysis program which contains a general purpose library of over 600 subroutines for numerical analysis. 5) Graphics - The graphics package IPLOT is included in IAC. IPLOT generates vector displays of tabular data in the form of curves, charts, correlation tables, etc. Either DI3000 or PLOT-10 graphics software is required for full graphic capability. In addition to these analysis tools, IAC 2.5 contains an IGES interface which allows the user to read arbitrary IGES files into an IAC database and to edit and output new IGES files. IAC is available by license for a period of 10 years to approved U.S. licensees. The licensed program product includes one set of supporting documentation. Additional copies may be purchased separately. IAC is written in FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer operating under VMS. IAC can be executed by multiple concurrent users in batch or interactive mode. The program is structured to allow users to easily delete those program capabilities and "how to" examples they do not want in order to reduce the size of the package. The basic central memory requirement for IAC is approximately 750KB. The following programs are also available from COSMIC as separate packages: NASTRAN, SINDA/SINFLO, TRASYS II, DISCOS, ORACLS, SAMSAN, NBOD2, and INCA. The development of level 2.5 of IAC was completed in 1989.

  12. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmata, Marcel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Munnik, Frans, E-mail: f.munnik@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Crocoll, Sonja [X-FAB Dresden GmbH and Co. KG, Grenzstraße 28, D-01109 Dresden (Germany); Möller, Wolfhard [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  13. Improvement of depth resolution of ADF-SCEM by deconvolution: effects of electron energy loss and chromatic aberration on depth resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Tezuka, Meguru; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging technique that is capable of depth sectioning with nanometer-scale depth resolution. However, the depth resolution in the optical axis direction (Z) is worse than might be expected on the basis of the vertical electron probe size calculated with the existence of spherical aberration. To investigate the origin of the degradation, the effects of electron energy loss and chromatic aberration on the depth resolution of annular dark-field SCEM were studied through both experiments and computational simulations. The simulation results obtained by taking these two factors into consideration coincided well with those obtained by experiments, which proved that electron energy loss and chromatic aberration cause blurs at the overfocus sides of the Z-direction intensity profiles rather than degrade the depth resolution much. In addition, a deconvolution method using a simulated point spread function, which combined two Gaussian functions, was adopted to process the XZ-slice images obtained both from experiments and simulations. As a result, the blurs induced by energy loss and chromatic aberration were successfully removed, and there was also about 30% improvement in the depth resolution in deconvoluting the experimental XZ-slice image.

  14. Capabilities for Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    This dissertation explores capabilities that enable firms to strategically adapt to environmental changes and preserve competitiveness over time – often referred to as dynamic capabilities. While dynamic capabilities being a popular research domain, too little is known about what these capabilities...... empirical studies through the dynamic capabilities lens and develops propositions for future research. The second paper is an empirical study on the origins of firm-level absorptive capacity; it explores how organization-level antecedents, through their impact on individual-level antecedents, influence...... firms’ ability to absorb and leverage new knowledge. The third paper is an empirical study which conceptualizes top managers’ resource cognition as a managerial capability underlying firms’ resource adaptation; it empirically examines the performance implications of this capability and organizational...

  15. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  16. Indentation Depth Dependent Mechanical Behavior in Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Alisafaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various experimental studies have revealed size dependent deformation of materials at micro and submicron length scales. Among different experimental methods, nanoindentation testing is arguably the most commonly applied method of studying size effect in various materials where increases in the hardness with decreasing indentation depth are usually related to indentation size effects. Such indentation size effects have been observed in both metals and polymers. While the indentation size effects in metals are widely discussed in the literature and are commonly attributed to geometrically necessary dislocations, for polymer the experimental results are far sparser and there does not seem to be a common ground for their rationales. The indentation size effects of polymers are addressed in this paper, where their depth dependent deformation is reviewed along with the rationale provided in the literature.

  17. Technological Innovation Capability Evaluation Index System Research for Small and Medium Sized Technology Enterprises%科技型中小企业技术创新能力评价指标体系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云; 谭淳方; 俞立

    2012-01-01

    A scientific enterprise technological innovation capability evaluation system helps the government and financial institutions to set up specific policies and measurements for SMEs. In order to scientifically evaluate the innovation ability of technological SMEs, this article creates an innovation capability evaluation system combining the existing technological innovation capacity of enterprises and potential ability to upgrade the existing innovation capability indicators based on the characteristics of fast development of technological SMEs.%正确评估科技型中小企业技术的创新能力,可以帮助政府、金融机构等制定有针对性的政策和措施.基于科技型中小企业高成长率的特点,从企业现有技术创新能力和技术创新能力提升潜力两个方面构建创新能力评价指标体系,以科学评价科技型中小企业的创新能力.

  18. Depth Profiles Using ChemCam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, A.; Maurice, S.; Berger, G.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Wiens, R.

    2011-03-01

    ChemCam, which is in part of the MSL payload, uses the LIBS technique to investigate the martian surface. The capabilities of ChemCam for the depth profile have to be understood, as ChemCam will shoot several targets which can have alteration coating.

  19. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...... of the services, such as sequential or reciprocal task activities, influence the development of different types of capabilities. We study five cases of offshore-outsourced knowledge-intensive business services that are distinguished according to their reciprocal or sequential task activities in their production...... process. We find that clients influence the development of human capital capabilities and management capabilities in reciprocally produced services. While in sequential produced services clients influence the development of organizational capital capabilities and management capital capabilities....

  20. Developing Alliance Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimeriks, Koen H.; Duysters, Geert; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    capability. However, empirical testing in this field is scarce and little is known as to what extent different learning mechanisms are indeed useful in advancing a firm's alliance capability. This paper analyzes to what extent intra-firm learning mechanisms help firms develop their alliance capability......This paper assesses the differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the development of alliance capabilities. Prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which specific intra-firm learning mechanisms are used to enhance a firm's alliance....... Differential learning may explain in what way firms yield superior returns from their alliances in comparison to competitors. The empirical results show that different learning mechanisms have different performance effects at different stages of the alliance capability development process. The main lesson from...

  1. DEPTH-AVERAGE ANALYSIS OF HYSTERESIS BETWEEN FLOW AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT UNDER UNSTEADY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiming WU; Mustafa ALTINAKAR; Sam S.Y.WANG

    2006-01-01

    A depth-averaged two-dimensional model has been established to simulate unsteady flow and sediment transport in streams. The difference in flow and sediment velocities is considered. It has been found that the depth-averaged suspended-sediment velocity and the bed-load velocity are smaller than the depth-averaged flow velocity, inducing a time lag between water and sediment transport. The significance of this time lag increases as the sediment size increases. The exchange between the moving sediment and the bed material, which may induce a spatial lag, is modeled by a non-equilibrium transport approach. Tests using laboratory and field measurements have shown that the established model is capable of capturing the hysteresis between flow and sediment transport under unsteady conditions. It is demonstrated that the hysteresis is larger when the hydrograph has steeper rising and falling limbs, and the time delay increases downstream.

  2. Depth of interaction detection for {gamma}-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, (UPV) Camino de Vera s/n, E46022 (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Doering, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D52425 Juelich (Germany); Ros, A. [Institute de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), 22085, Valencia E46071 (Spain); Herrero, V.; Gadea, R.; Aliaga, R.J.; Colom, R.; Mateo, F.; Monzo, J.M.; Ferrando, N.; Toledo, J.F.; Martinez, J.D.; Sebastia, A. [Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, (UPV) Camino de Vera s/n, E46022 (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Institute de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), 22085, Valencia E46071 (Spain)

    2009-03-11

    A novel design for an inexpensive depth of interaction capable detector for {gamma}-ray imaging has been developed. The design takes advantage of the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution in monolithic crystals and the interaction depth of {gamma}-rays. We present in this work an inexpensive modification of the commonly used charge dividing circuits which enables the instantaneous and simultaneous computation of the second order moment of light distribution. This measure provides a good estimate for the depth of interaction and does not affect the determination of the position centroids and the energy release of {gamma}-ray impact. The method has been tested with a detector consisting of a monolithic LSO block sized 42x42x10mm{sup 3} and a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 from Hamamatsu. The mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 3.4mm for the position centroids and 4.9mm for the DOI. The best spatial resolutions were observed at the center of the detector and yielded 1.4mm for the position centroids and 1.9mm for the DOI.

  3. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic capabilities are widely considered to incorporate those processes that enable organizations to sustain superior performance over time. In this paper, we argue theoretically and demonstrate empirically that these effects are contingent on organizational structure and the competitive...... are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  4. Flex: RSRE's capability computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. M.

    The Flex capability based computer architecture is described. It supports a multilanguage environment, and compilers for ALGOL 168 and PASCAL exist; an Ada compiler is being completed. The idea of capabilities is used on backing store as well as main store, so that all kinds of structured object which can be held in main store can also be held on any of the packing stores with the same degree of protection. Capabilities are used across a network of Flex computers, so that capabilities for data in one machine may be passed to and held in another. Flex uses true procedure values in the sense of Landin (1964).

  5. Integrated Process Capability Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen; H; T; Huang; M; L; Hung; Y; H; Chen; K; S

    2002-01-01

    Process Capability Analysis (PCA) is a powerful too l to assess the ability of a process for manufacturing product that meets specific ations. The larger process capability index implies the higher process yield, a nd the larger process capability index also indicates the lower process expected loss. Chen et al. (2001) has applied indices C pu, C pl, and C pk for evaluating the process capability for a multi-process product wi th smaller-the-better, larger-the-better, and nominal-the-best spec...

  6. Development of a Full-Depth Wheel Tracking Test for Asphalt Pavement Structure: Methods and Performance Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Wang; Zepeng Fan; Jiupeng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The rutting performance of asphalt pavement structure relies on the high temperature properties of asphalt mixture as well as the pavement structure and thickness. In order to investigate the influence of the structure and thickness, a full-depth wheel tracking test is developed in this research by improving the conventional wheel tracking test apparatus. The newly proposed test method is capable of varying its load speed and load size, controlling its specimen temperature gradient, and simul...

  7. Telematics Options and Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Cabell [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-05

    This presentation describes the data tracking and analytical capabilities of telematics devices. Federal fleet managers can use the systems to keep their drivers safe, maintain a fuel efficient fleet, ease their reporting burden, and save money. The presentation includes an example of how much these capabilities can save fleets.

  8. A mechanistic model for depth-dependent hardness of ion irradiated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiazi; Chen, Qianying; Yang, Hui; Duan, Huiling; Qu, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    A mechanistic model was developed for modeling the depth-dependent hardness in ion irradiated metallic materials. The model is capable of capturing the indentation size effect, ion irradiation induced damage gradient effect, and effect of unirradiated region acting as a soft substrate. A procedure was developed and described in detail to parametrize the model based on experimentally obtained hardness vs. indentation depth curves. Very good agreement was observed between our model predictions and experimental data of several different stainless steels subjected to various ion irradiation conditions. In addition, two hardening mechanisms are revealed in the new model. One is the well-known indentation size effect arising from the creation of geometrically necessary dislocations as the indenter pierces into the materials. The other is the irradiation hardening due to the presence of irradiation-induced defects. As a function of indentation depth h, the hardening due to indentation size effect is described by hbar∗ / h , while the hardening due to irradiation first follows a power law form Phn , then changes to Z / h - Q /h3 , where hbar∗ , P, n, Z and Q > 0 are constants. This transition occurs at the indentation depth when the plastic zone reaches the end of the irradiated layer.

  9. Extreme skin depth waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Jahani, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a paradigm shift in light confinement strategy and introduced a class of extreme skin depth (e-skid) photonic structures (S. Jahani and Z. Jacob, "Transparent sub-diffraction optics: nanoscale light confinement without metal," Optica 1, 96-100 (2014)). Here, we analytically establish that figures of merit related to light confinement in dielectric waveguides are fundamentally tied to the skin depth of waves in the cladding. We contrast the propagation characteristics of the fundamental mode of e-skid waveguides and conventional waveguides to show that the decay constant in the cladding is dramatically larger in e-skid waveguides, which is the origin of sub-diffraction confinement. Finally, we propose an approach to verify the reduced skin depth in experiment using the decrease in the Goos-H\\"anchen phase shift.

  10. Improving the RPC rate capability

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Stante, L; Iuppa, R; Liberti, B; Paolozzi, L; Pastori, E; Santonico, R; Toppi, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper has the purpose to study the rate capability of the Resistive Plate Chamber, RPC, starting from the basic physics of this detector. The effect of different working parameters determining the rate capability is analysed in detail, in order to optimize a new family of RPCs for applications to heavy irradiation environments and in particular to the LHC phase 2. A special emphasis is given to the improvement achievable by minimizing the avalanche charge delivered in the gas. The paper shows experimental results of Cosmic Ray tests, performed to study the avalanche features for different gas gap sizes, with particular attention to the overall delivered charge. For this purpose, the paper studies, in parallel to the prompt electronic signal, also the ionic signal which gives the main contribution to the delivered charge. Whenever possible the test results are interpreted on the base of the RPC detector physics and are intended to extend and reinforce our physical understanding of this detector.

  11. Depth as randomness deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antunes, L.; Matos, A.; Souto, A.; Vitányi, P.

    2008-01-01

    Depth of an object concerns a tradeoff between computation time and excess of program length over the shortest program length required to obtain the object. It gives an unconditional lower bound on the computation time from a given program in absence of auxiliary information. Variants known as

  12. Depth as Randomness Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.F. Antunes (Luis); A. Matos; A. Souto (Andre); P.M.B. Vitányi (Paul)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractDepth of an object concerns a tradeoff between computation time and excess of program length over the shortest program length required to obtain the object. It gives an unconditional lower bound on the computation time from a given program in absence of auxiliary information. Variants

  13. Depth as randomness deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antunes, L.; Matos, A.; Souto, A.; Vitányi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Depth of an object concerns a tradeoff between computation time and excess of program length over the shortest program length required to obtain the object. It gives an unconditional lower bound on the computation time from a given program in absence of auxiliary information. Variants known as

  14. Capabilities for Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    organizational conditions, such as organizational design, support the emergence and performance of such capabilities. In detail, the dissertation consists of three self-contained research papers. The first paper is a systematic, multilevel review of the innovation literature; it reinterprets evidence from prior...... firms’ ability to absorb and leverage new knowledge. The third paper is an empirical study which conceptualizes top managers’ resource cognition as a managerial capability underlying firms’ resource adaptation; it empirically examines the performance implications of this capability and organizational...... empirical studies through the dynamic capabilities lens and develops propositions for future research. The second paper is an empirical study on the origins of firm-level absorptive capacity; it explores how organization-level antecedents, through their impact on individual-level antecedents, influence...

  15. Defence Capability Plan 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    financed lease , or elements of both. Background Initially, an improved rotary wing training capability was to be provided under two projects – Phase 7A...Destroyer (AWD), Super Hornet and New Air Combat Capability (NACC). Through-life Support The Commonwealth seeks a ‘ turnkey ’ service providing aerial...combination: > Commercial- and/or Military-off-the-Shelf; or > open tender for ADF ownership or lease . Through-life Support Depending on the procurement (ADF

  16. Structural Capability of an Organization toward Innovation Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    competitive advantage in the organizations is the innovation capability. The innovation capability is associated with other organizational capabilities, and many organizations have focused on the need to identify innovation capabilities.This research focuses on recognition of the structural aspect...... of innovation capability and proposes a conceptual framework based on a Qualitative Meta Synthesis of academic literature on organizations innovation capability. This is proposed for the development of the concept of innovation capability in the organizations and this paper includes an expert based validation...... Capability and Structural Capability. Also, it offers the most important components and indices which directly influence and are related to the structural capability of innovation capability....

  17. Monocular transparency generates quantitative depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ian P; Duke, Philip A

    2003-11-01

    Monocular zones adjacent to depth steps can create an impression of depth in the absence of binocular disparity. However, the magnitude of depth is not specified. We designed a stereogram that provides information about depth magnitude but which has no disparity. The effect depends on transparency rather than occlusion. For most subjects, depth magnitude produced by monocular transparency was similar to that created by a disparity-defined depth probe. Addition of disparity to monocular transparency did not improve the accuracy of depth settings. The magnitude of depth created by monocular occlusion fell short of that created by monocular transparency.

  18. MANIFEST OF DEPTH SOCIOPSYCHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    ZELITCHENKO ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The observations of motives of activity of big groups (nations, confessions etc.) as a whole result in discovery of the part of unconscious mind that is common for all members of big group a collective unconscious. Two parts of collective unconscious may be determined: the collective superconscious known first as a group archetype and the collective subconscious, which manifest itself for example in phenomenon of collective trauma. Depth sociopsychology is a science about the collective uncon...

  19. Kokkos? Task DAG Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Harold C.; Ibanez, Daniel Alejandro

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the ASC/ATDM Kokkos deliverable "Production Portable Dy- namic Task DAG Capability." This capability enables applications to create and execute a dynamic task DAG ; a collection of heterogeneous computational tasks with a directed acyclic graph (DAG) of "execute after" dependencies where tasks and their dependencies are dynamically created and destroyed as tasks execute. The Kokkos task scheduler executes the dynamic task DAG on the target execution resource; e.g. a multicore CPU, a manycore CPU such as Intel's Knights Landing (KNL), or an NVIDIA GPU. Several major technical challenges had to be addressed during development of Kokkos' Task DAG capability: (1) portability to a GPU with it's simplified hardware and micro- runtime, (2) thread-scalable memory allocation and deallocation from a bounded pool of memory, (3) thread-scalable scheduler for dynamic task DAG, (4) usability by applications.

  20. Campus Capability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  1. Management Innovation Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Mie

    Management innovation is the implementation of a new management practice, process, technique or structure that significantly alters the way the work of management is performed. This paper presents a typology categorizing management innovation along two dimensions; radicalness and complexity. Then......, the paper introduces the concept of management innovation capabilities which refers to the ability of a firm to purposefully create, extend and modify its managerial resource base to address rapidly changing environments. Drawing upon behavioral theory of the firm and the dynamic capabilities framework......, the paper proposes a model of the foundations of management innovation. Propositions and implications for future research are discussed....

  2. Sandia QIS Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad set of capabilities in quantum information science (QIS), including elements of quantum computing, quantum communications, and quantum sensing. The Sandia QIS program is built atop unique DOE investments at the laboratories, including the MESA microelectronics fabrication facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) facilities (joint with LANL), the Ion Beam Laboratory, and ASC High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Sandia has invested $75 M of LDRD funding over 12 years to develop unique, differentiating capabilities that leverage these DOE infrastructure investments.

  3. Capability Handbook- offline metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Marhöfer, David Maximilian; Tosello, Guido

    This offline metrological capability handbook has been made in relation to HiMicro Task 3.3. The purpose of this document is to assess the metrological capability of the HiMicro partners and to gather the information of all available metrological instruments in the one single document. It provides...... a quick overview of what is possible today by the state of the art, what the HiMicro consortium can do and what metrological requirements we have concerning the HiMicro industrial demonstrators....

  4. Effect of Grain Size and Sowing Depth on Seedling Growth and Yield of Summer Maize in Drought Condition%干旱条件下籽粒大小与播种深度对夏玉米幼苗生长及产量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程秋博; 李孝东; 孔凡磊; 张頔; 王兴龙; 郭翔; 袁继超

    2016-01-01

    为探究籽粒大小与播种深度对玉米出苗及幼苗生长的影响,确定西南丘陵地区夏玉米机播的适宜籽粒大小与播种深度。采用裂区试验设计,以正红505为试验材料,3个籽粒大小为主处理,3个播种深度(2,6,10 cm)为副处理,在大田干旱条件下调查了玉米的出苗率、幼苗素质、产量及产量构成。结果表明,大粒种比小粒种出苗率高,出苗后长势旺,干物质积累量增加,幼苗健壮,抗旱性增强,最终产量更高;浅播(2 cm)利于出苗,刚出苗时以6 cm 播深的幼苗长势最好,之后10 cm 播深的幼苗生长逐渐旺盛,至五叶期(大、中粒种)-七叶期(小粒种)时超过浅播处理,最终也表现出一定的增产效果。因此,在旱地、旱季玉米生产中,选较大粒播种,适当深播,可以有效地培育壮苗、提高植株抗旱性,达到保产增收的目的。%In order to explore the effect of grain size and sowing depth on emergence and seedling growth,de-termining suitable grain size and sowing depth in mechanization of summer maize production of Southwest Hilly Are-a.In the split-plot design,using Zhenghong 505 as the test material,3 kinds of grain size was assigned to the main plot,and 3 sowing depth (2,6,1 0 cm)to the subplot,emergence rate of maize,seedling quality,yield and yield components have been investigated in drought condition.The results showed that compared with small grain,large grain had higher emergence rate,the seedling was more haleness and grew better in drought,and there was a certain effect of increasing yield ultimately;Shallow sowing(2 cm)was conducive to the emergence,and the growth vigor of the seedlings of 6 cm sowing depth was best just when emerging,then the 1 0 cm depth of the seedling grew gradual-ly strong,and obviously better at the 5 leaf period(large and medium grain)-7 leaf period(small grain)than shal-low sowing treatment,which also showed

  5. Capabilities Composition (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-22

    and support , , processes (including ITIL v3) • Understanding of Governance is still evolving Engineering Acquisition and Operational Governance...L – Logistics • NC – Net-Centric • CPM – Capability Portfolio Management • ITIL v3 – Information Technology • ONR – Office of Naval Research

  6. Building server capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    -only”, exporting parts and components back to headquarter for sales in the home country. In the course of time, the role of offshore subsidiaries in a company’s operations network tends to change and, with that, the capabilities, of the subsidiaries. Focusing on Danish subsidiaries in China, the objective...

  7. Building Server Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    2013-01-01

    -only”, exporting parts and components back to headquarter for sales in the home country. In the course of time, the role of offshore subsidiaries in a company’s operations network tends to change and, with that, the capabilities, of the subsidiaries. Focusing on Danish subsidiaries in China, the objective...

  8. Capabilities Report 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    74 Biosurveillance - Rapid Identification of Unknown Microorganisms...RSI is dedicated to the effort and capabilities of enabling biosurveillance through coordinated and integrated national and international systems...natural, accidental, or deliberate in nature. These initiatives include: biosurveillance , outbreak recognition and avoidance, pathogen characterization

  9. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  10. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  11. ISOPHOT - Capabilities and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, D.; Klaas, U.; Abolins, J.

    1996-01-01

    ISOPHOT covers the largest wavelength range on ISO from 2.5 to 240 mu m. Its scientific capabilities include multi filter and multi-aperture photometry, polarimetry, imaging and spectrophotometry. All modes can optionally include a focal plane chopper. The backbone of the photometric calibration...

  12. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  13. The Capability Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2011-01-01

    textabstract In its most general description, the capability approach is a flexible and multi-purpose normative framework, rather than a precise theory of well-being, freedom or justice. At its core are two normative claims: first, the claim that the freedom to achieve well-being is of primary mora

  14. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths.

  15. Training Practices and Organisational Learning Capability: Relationship and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez Gomez, Pilar; Cespedes Lorente, Jose J.; Valle Cabrera, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth study of the relationship between the company's training strategy and its learning capability. On a sample of 111 Spanish companies from the chemical industry, tests a set of hypotheses which link four different training strategies with the learning capability dimensions. The results obtained from the regression…

  16. Eddy current measurement system evaluation for corrosion depth determination on cast aluminum aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surendra; Greving, Dan; Kinney, Andy; Vensel, Fred; Ohm, Jim; Peeler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current (EC) technique was developed to determine the corrosion depth on a bare flange face of a cast aluminum A356-T6 aircraft engine structure. The EC response and the corrosion depths determined through metallurgical cross sections were used to develop an empirical relation between EC response and depth. The EC technique and depth determination are used to inspect the engine structures during overhaul to determine if they are fit for continued service. An accurate and reliable Non-Destructive Inspection is required to ensure that structures returned to service are safe for continued operation. NDE system reliability demonstrations of the eddy current technique are traditionally reported in terms of Probability of Detection (POD) data using MIL-HDBK-1823A. However, the calculation of POD data is based on a simple linear predictive model that is valid only if certain criteria are met. These are: 1) NDE system response is measurable (i.e. continuous data), 2) Flaw size is known and measurable (i.e. continuous data), 3) relationship between the NDE system response and flaw size is linear (or linear on a log scale), 4) variation in measured responseresponse around a predicted response for a given flaw size is normally distributed, 5) the variation around the predicted response is constant (i.e. variation does not change with flaw size), and 6) inherent variability in the NDE system is known and fully understood. In this work, a Measurement System Evaluation (MSE) of the Eddy Current System was used to address some of these concerns. This work was completed on two aircraft structures having varying corrosion depths. The data were acquired in a random manner at fifty regions of interests (ROIs). Three operators participated in this study, and each operator measured Eddy Current response three times in each ROI. In total, there were four hundred and fifty data points collected. Following this, the two structures were sectioned for measuring corrosion depth. The

  17. Depth in box spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, Sylvia C; Nefs, Harold T; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wijntjes, Maarten W A; Te Pas, Susan F; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    Human observers adjust the frontal view of a wireframe box on a computer screen so as to look equally deep and wide, so that in the intended setting the box looks like a cube. Perspective cues are limited to the size-distance effect, since all angles are fixed. Both the size on the screen, and the viewing distance from the observer to the screen were varied. All observers prefer a template view of a cube over a veridical rendering, independent of picture size and viewing distance. If the rendering shows greater or lesser foreshortening than the template, the box appears like a long corridor or a shallow slab, that is, like a 'deformed' cube. Thus observers ignore 'veridicality'. This does not fit an 'inverse optics' model. We discuss a model of 'vision as optical user interface'.

  18. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, L.M.

    2000-03-23

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties in laboratories that conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM and T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. These parameters are summarized.

  19. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, L.M.

    2003-11-12

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

  20. Capabilities and Special Needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    thesis deals with a new Danish innovative policy (Act. no. 564 of 2007), a social work and educational intervention for mentally challenged Young people and other young people with special needs, the so-called individually arranged youth education (STU). The investigated area has lately been taken......The author, Christian Christrup Kjeldsen, presents a comprehensive capability-oriented study of high excellence. For this work he has recieved the doctor titel Dr.phil (Doktor der Philosophie) from Bielefeld University, Germany 2013 with the highest possible grade "ausgezeichnet". The doctoral...... into international consideration in relation to the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. As for the theoretical basis, the research makes use of the sociological open-ended and relational concepts of Pierre Bourdieu and the normative yardstick of the Capability Approach...

  1. Capabilities and Special Needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    The author, Christian Christrup Kjeldsen, presents a comprehensive capability-oriented study of high excellence. For this work he has recieved the doctor titel Dr.phil (Doktor der Philosophie) from Bielefeld University, Germany 2013 with the highest possible grade "ausgezeichnet". The doctoral...... thesis deals with a new Danish innovative policy (Act. no. 564 of 2007), a social work and educational intervention for mentally challenged Young people and other young people with special needs, the so-called individually arranged youth education (STU). The investigated area has lately been taken...... into international consideration in relation to the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. As for the theoretical basis, the research makes use of the sociological open-ended and relational concepts of Pierre Bourdieu and the normative yardstick of the Capability Approach...

  2. Joint Forces Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in space. The Space Operations Center ( SPOC ), USSPACECOM is the single point...of contact for assessing space capabilities. Combatant commanders, subordinate JFCs, and Services can access this information from the SPOC via the...special operations forces SPOC Space Operations Center SSBN fleet ballistic missile submarine SST space support team UJTL Universal Joint Task List UN

  3. Capabilities for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter; Nielsen, René Nesgaard; Bamberger, Simon Grandjean

    2012-01-01

    is a survey that collected information from 601 firms belonging to the private urban sector in Denmark. The survey was carried out in late 2010. Keywords: dynamic capabilities/innovation/globalization/employee/employer cooperation/Nordic model Acknowledgment: The GOPA study was financed by grant 20080053113....../12-2008-09 from the Foundation for Research of Work Environment, Denmark. The funders played no part in the conduct or reporting of the research....

  4. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  5. Depth-resolved ballistic imaging in a low-depth-of-field optical Kerr gated imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yipeng; Tan, Wenjiang, E-mail: tanwenjiang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Si, Jinhai; Ren, YuHu; Xu, Shichao; Hou, Xun [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xianning-xilu 28, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tong, Junyi [Departments of Applied Physics, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China)

    2016-09-07

    We demonstrate depth-resolved imaging in a ballistic imaging system, in which a heterodyned femtosecond optical Kerr gate is introduced to extract useful imaging photons for detecting an object hidden in turbid media and a compound lens is proposed to ensure both the depth-resolved imaging capability and the long working distance. Two objects of about 15-μm widths hidden in a polystyrene-sphere suspension have been successfully imaged with approximately 600-μm depth resolution. Modulation-transfer-function curves with the object in and away from the object plane have also been measured to confirm the depth-resolved imaging capability of the low-depth-of-field (low-DOF) ballistic imaging system. This imaging approach shows potential for application in research of the internal structure of highly scattering fuel spray.

  6. Physical Mechanisms for Earthquakes at Intermediate Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H. W.; Green, H. W.

    2001-12-01

    Conventional brittle shear failure it is strongly inhibited by pressure because it relies on local tensile failure. In contrast, plastic flow processes are thermally activated, making them sensitive functions of temperature, but their pressure dependence is only moderate. As a consequence, in Earth, faulting by unassisted brittle failure is probably restricted to depths less than ~ 30 km because the rocks flow at lower stresses than they fracture. To enable faulting at greater depths, mineral reactions must occur that generate a fluid or fluid-like solid that is much weaker than the parent assemblage. Although a variety of plastic instabilities have been and continue to be proposed to explain earthquakes at depth, dehydration embrittlement remains the only experimentally verified faulting mechanism consistent with the pressures and compositions existing at depths of 50-300km within subducting lithosphere. However, low pressure hydrous phases potentially abundant in subducting lithosphere (e.g. chlorite and antigorite) exhibit a temperature maximum in their stability, implying that the bulk volume change at depths of more than 70-100 km. becomes negative, thereby raising questions about mechanical instability upon dehydration. Further, it is now well-accepted that intermediate-depth earthquakes occur within the descending slab (double seismic zones present in several slabs dramatically demonstrate this fact), in conflict with the maximum depth of 10-12 km accepted for hydration of the lithosphere at oceanic spreading centers. Thus, on the one hand these earthquakes may be evidence that hydrous phases exist deep within subducting slabs but on the other hand, a mechanism for hydration to such depths is not known. One possibility is that large earthquakes outboard of trenches break the surface and allow hydration of the fault zone that can later dehydrate to yield earthquakes at depth, but no mechanism is known for pumping H2O into such fault zones to depths of tens of

  7. Offshore Wind Technology Depth Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal bathymetric depth, measured in meters at depth values of: -30, -60, -900 Shallow Zone (0-30m): Technology has been demonstrated on a commercial scale at...

  8. 中小企业自主创新能力提升策略研究——基于企业家社会资本的视角%Research on Promotion Strategies of Independent Innovation Capabilities in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Based on Entrepreneurial Social Capital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜卫韬

    2012-01-01

    This paper has discussed promotion strategies of independent innovation capabilities in small and medium-sized enterprises based on entrepreneurial social capital (ESC), anatomizing component factors of ESC on the structural, resources and strategic level, expounding the entrepreneurial relation network, the entrepreneurial social resources and the innovation opportunity strategy build up the structural capability, the resources capability, the strategic capability for obtaining innovation opportunity by providing the control benefits, the information benefits and the validity of the innovation opportunity strategy. The paper also derived the influence factors and effect path in the mode of structural holes theory such as the structural autonomy, the nonredundancy and the structural hole strategy. Then, it constructed the model of influence mechanism of ESC, building a theoretical analysis framework of promoting independent innovation capabilities under the paradigm of ESC growth. On this basis, the paper designed the promotion stratigies of independent innovation capabilities, focus on relationship intense, relationship difference and relationship subdivision by proliferating ESC. The all-round practical constructing of independent innovation capabilities promotion in small and medium-sized enterprises are described from strategy essence and strategy optimization, by discrimination of effect and emphasis point in the promotion stratigies.%本文从中小企业家社会资本的视角探讨其自主创新能力提升的对策。从结构、资源、策略三个层面剖析企业家社会资本的构成因子,阐述企业家关系网络、企业家社会资源、创新机会策略分别从控制利益、信息利益、策略有效性等方面建构获取创新赢利机会的结构能力、资源能力和策略能力。并基于结构洞理论推导结构自治、非冗余性、结构洞策略等相应的影响因子及作用路径,进而构建企业家社

  9. Tensor-based projection depth

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yonggang; Wu, Yi; 10.3150/10-BEJ317

    2012-01-01

    The conventional definition of a depth function is vector-based. In this paper, a novel projection depth (PD) technique directly based on tensors, such as matrices, is instead proposed. Tensor projection depth (TPD) is still an ideal depth function and its computation can be achieved through the iteration of PD. Furthermore, we also discuss the cases for sparse samples and higher order tensors. Experimental results in data classification with the two projection depths show that TPD performs much better than PD for data with a natural tensor form, and even when the data have a natural vector form, TPD appears to perform no worse than PD.

  10. Knowledge Management Capabilities Rubrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah B.A. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Recently researchers discerned the vitality and importance of Knowledge Management Capabilities (KMC evaluation in organizations. In fact evaluation of KMC helps to prevent failure in Knowledge Management (KM projects. Approach: One of the most popular methods in the phase of evaluating KMC is Fuzzy method which evaluates seven attributes of KMC. Fuzzy needs KM experts to give their opinion about these attributes as input data. However in some organizations these experts are not available. Results: Therefore in this study a rubric matrix is developed as an assessment tool with ordered rank (very high, medium and very low of descriptive characteristics of criteria (seven attributes that organizations wish to evaluate. Conclusion: This rubric is applicable for members of an organization which are not familiar completely with KMC and also will be maintained by analyzing and surveying many different researches.

  11. PHOBOS physics capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M.D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-07-15

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, the authors outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, they then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that they plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{eta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays.

  12. Binocular coordination: reading stereoscopic sentences in depth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Schotter

    Full Text Available The present study employs a stereoscopic manipulation to present sentences in three dimensions to subjects as they read for comprehension. Subjects read sentences with (a no depth cues, (b a monocular depth cue that implied the sentence loomed out of the screen (i.e., increasing retinal size, (c congruent monocular and binocular (retinal disparity depth cues (i.e., both implied the sentence loomed out of the screen and (d incongruent monocular and binocular depth cues (i.e., the monocular cue implied the sentence loomed out of the screen and the binocular cue implied it receded behind the screen. Reading efficiency was mostly unaffected, suggesting that reading in three dimensions is similar to reading in two dimensions. Importantly, fixation disparity was driven by retinal disparity; fixations were significantly more crossed as readers progressed through the sentence in the congruent condition and significantly more uncrossed in the incongruent condition. We conclude that disparity depth cues are used on-line to drive binocular coordination during reading.

  13. Binocular coordination: reading stereoscopic sentences in depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotter, Elizabeth R; Blythe, Hazel I; Kirkby, Julie A; Rayner, Keith; Holliman, Nicolas S; Liversedge, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    The present study employs a stereoscopic manipulation to present sentences in three dimensions to subjects as they read for comprehension. Subjects read sentences with (a) no depth cues, (b) a monocular depth cue that implied the sentence loomed out of the screen (i.e., increasing retinal size), (c) congruent monocular and binocular (retinal disparity) depth cues (i.e., both implied the sentence loomed out of the screen) and (d) incongruent monocular and binocular depth cues (i.e., the monocular cue implied the sentence loomed out of the screen and the binocular cue implied it receded behind the screen). Reading efficiency was mostly unaffected, suggesting that reading in three dimensions is similar to reading in two dimensions. Importantly, fixation disparity was driven by retinal disparity; fixations were significantly more crossed as readers progressed through the sentence in the congruent condition and significantly more uncrossed in the incongruent condition. We conclude that disparity depth cues are used on-line to drive binocular coordination during reading.

  14. NASA DOEPOD NDE Capabilities Data Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    This data book contains the Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) analyses of the nondestructive inspection data presented in the NTIAC, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book. DOEPOD is designed as a decision support system to validate inspection system, personnel, and protocol demonstrating 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes, a90/95. Although 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes is often stated as an inspection requirement in inspection documents, including NASA Standards, NASA critical aerospace applications have historically only accepted 0.978 POD or better with a 95% one-sided lower confidence bound exceeding 0.90 at critical flaw sizes, a90/95.

  15. Developing Collaborative Product Development Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Tran, Yen

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative product development capabilities support a company’s product innovation activities. In the context of the fast fashion sector, this paper examines the development of the product development capabilities (PDC) that align product development capabilities in a dual innovation context, ......-level, simultaneous learning processes and highlight the role of human agency in capability development with partners. Building on our analyses, we advance propositions for future research and managerial practices on developing dynamic collaboration capabilities....

  16. A multidimensional stability model for predicting shallow landslide size and shape across landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milledge, David G; Bellugi, Dino; McKean, Jim A; Densmore, Alexander L; Dietrich, William E

    2014-11-01

    The size of a shallow landslide is a fundamental control on both its hazard and geomorphic importance. Existing models are either unable to predict landslide size or are computationally intensive such that they cannot practically be applied across landscapes. We derive a model appropriate for natural slopes that is capable of predicting shallow landslide size but simple enough to be applied over entire watersheds. It accounts for lateral resistance by representing the forces acting on each margin of potential landslides using earth pressure theory and by representing root reinforcement as an exponential function of soil depth. We test our model's ability to predict failure of an observed landslide where the relevant parameters are well constrained by field data. The model predicts failure for the observed scar geometry and finds that larger or smaller conformal shapes are more stable. Numerical experiments demonstrate that friction on the boundaries of a potential landslide increases considerably the magnitude of lateral reinforcement, relative to that due to root cohesion alone. We find that there is a critical depth in both cohesive and cohesionless soils, resulting in a minimum size for failure, which is consistent with observed size-frequency distributions. Furthermore, the differential resistance on the boundaries of a potential landslide is responsible for a critical landslide shape which is longer than it is wide, consistent with observed aspect ratios. Finally, our results show that minimum size increases as approximately the square of failure surface depth, consistent with observed landslide depth-area data.

  17. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nmImages from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter bright near the pole

  18. Relationship between vessel diameter and depth measurements within the limbus using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Emmanuel; Hutchings, Natalie; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Simpson, Trefford

    2017-06-16

    To establish a relationship between the diameter and depth position of vessels in the superior and inferior corneo-scleral limbus using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). Volumetric OCT images of the superior and inferior limbus were acquired from 14 healthy subjects with a research-grade UHR-OCT system. Differences in vessel diameter and depth between superior and inferior limbus were analyzed using repeated measured ANOVA in SPSS and R. The mean (± SD) superior and inferior diameters were 29±18μm and 24±18μm respectively, and the mean (± SD) superior and inferior depths were 177±109μm and 207±132μm respectively. The superior limbal vessels were larger than the inferior ones (RM-ANOVA, p=0.004), and the inferior limbal vessels were deeper than the superior vessels (RM-ANOVA, p=0.041). There was a positive linear association between limbal vessel depth and size within the superior and inferior limbus with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.803 and 0.754, respectively. This study demonstrated that the UHR-OCT was capable of imaging morphometric characteristics such as the size and depth of vessels in the limbus. The results of this study suggest a difference in the size and depth of vessels across different positions of the limbus, which may be indicative of adaptations to chronic hypoxia caused by the covering of the superior limbus by the upper eyelid. UHR-OCT may be a useful tool to evaluate the effect of contact lenses on the microvascular properties within the limbus. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. All rights reserved.

  19. LHC Capabilities for Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushanko, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the charmonium and bottomonium resonances in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides crucial information on high-density QCD matter. First, the suppression of quarkonia production is generally agreed to be one of the most direct probes of quark-gluon plasma formation. The observation of anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression at the CERN-SPS and at RHIC is well established but the clarification of some important remaining questions requires equivalent studies of the $\\Upsilon$ family, only possible at the LHC energies. Second, the production of heavy-quarks proceeds mainly via gluon-gluon fusion processes and, as such, is sensitive to saturation of the gluon density at low-x in the nucleus. Measured departures from the expected vacuum quarkonia cross-sections in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC will thus provide valuable information not only on the thermodynamical state of the produced partonic medium, but also on the initial-state modifications of the nuclear parton distribution functions. The capabilities ...

  20. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Todd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lentine, Tony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mudrick, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Okandan, Murat [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodrigues, Arun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  1. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Todd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lentine, Anthony L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mudrick, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Okandan, Murat [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodrigues, Arun F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  2. Improved evaluation of optical depth components from Langley plot data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, S. F.; Gellman, D. I.; Slater, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple, iterative procedure to determine the optical depth components of the extinction optical depth measured by a solar radiometer is presented. Simulated data show that the iterative procedure improves the determination of the exponent of a Junge law particle size distribution. The determination of the optical depth due to aerosol scattering is improved as compared to a method which uses only two points from the extinction data. The iterative method was used to determine spectral optical depth components for June 11-13, 1988 during the MAC III experiment.

  3. Effects of Carbon Depth Profile on INS Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielopolski, L.

    2007-12-01

    Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) is a new system for measuring carbon in soil in situ that is non-destructive. In addition the INS can be used in stationary or scanning modes of operation enabling type of measurements not possible till now. It is based on counting 4.44 MeV characteristic gamma rays emitted from carbon nuclei undergoing inelastic neutron scattering with fast, 14 MeV, neutrons. Because of the attenuation of the neutrons, on their way in, and of the gamma rays, on their way out, the large volume of about 0.3 m3 sampled by the INS system causes it to respond preferentially to carbon atoms located near the surface. Thus, the carbon signal depends on the variations in the carbon depth profile; however, this dependence is reduced by an averaging process resulting from the large footprint of about 1 m2 of the INS system. The encountered variability in the depth profiles on small 30 cm scale and on large field size scale is presented for various fields. We also show results of Monte Carlo simulations of the INS response to various carbon depth profiles. Experimentally we show that depending on the field conditions, i.e. profound variability in the carbon depth profile or extensive changes in the carbon distribution in the field, the scanning results with the INS system may differ from the mean value calculated from few INS discrete stationary measurements. Since the static measurements are analogous to conventional chemical analysis using soil cores, it raises the question which type of measurement is more representative of the field carbon content; the discrete chemical analysis using geostatistical considerations or continuous field scanning made possible with the INS system. Clearly the new INS methodology introduces novel capabilities for soil carbon analysis not possible with the conventional approach of dry combustion. The advantages and pitfalls of the INS system with the need to defining practical new calibration concepts for it are discussed in

  4. Impact of Personnel Capabilities on Organizational Innovation Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    One of the most dynamic capabilities that lead to the strongest competitive advantage in the organizations is the innovation capability. Analysing the development of a firm’s innovation capability is an important research project, and can help organizations to achieve competitive advantage in thi...

  5. Application of Grey Hierarchy Method to Small and Medium-sized Logistics Enterprise Resource Integration Capability Analysis%运用多层次灰色评价法的中小物流企业资源整合能力评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱业刚; 罗定提; 鲁芳

    2013-01-01

    依据中小物流企业资源整合的要求,分别从客户资源整合、信息资源整合、能力资源整合、组织资源整合中得出若干指标。通过运用层次分析法和灰色理论,建立了多层次灰色评价模型。最后,通过具体实例论述了多层次灰色评价方法在中小物流企业资源整合能力分析的应用。%This article concludes a group of indicators from the customer resource integration, information resources integration, and the power resource integration, organization resources integration respectively, according to the small and medium-sized logistics enterprise resource integration requirements. And the paper discusses the gray multi-level method in small and medium-sized logistics enterprise resource integration capability analysis process, by setting up a grey multi-level evaluation model based on the analytic hierarchy process and grey theory.

  6. Small rover exploration capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make the vehicles easier to handle, safer to use and more efficient in the field to cross an obstacle. The final recommendation is to use winches and ramps, which already are widely used by quad drivers. We report on the extension of the reachable areas if such tools were available. This work has been supported by ILEWG, EuroMoonMars and the Austrian Space Forum (OEWF).

  7. Evaluation of Depth of Field for depth perception in DVR

    KAUST Repository

    Grosset, A.V.Pascal

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a user study on the use of Depth of Field for depth perception in Direct Volume Rendering. Direct Volume Rendering with Phong shading and perspective projection is used as the baseline. Depth of Field is then added to see its impact on the correct perception of ordinal depth. Accuracy and response time are used as the metrics to evaluate the usefulness of Depth of Field. The onsite user study has two parts: static and dynamic. Eye tracking is used to monitor the gaze of the subjects. From our results we see that though Depth of Field does not act as a proper depth cue in all conditions, it can be used to reinforce the perception of which feature is in front of the other. The best results (high accuracy & fast response time) for correct perception of ordinal depth occurs when the front feature (out of the two features users were to choose from) is in focus and perspective projection is used. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Optimization of the depth resolution for deuterium depth profiling up to large depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielunska, B.; Mayer, M.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2016-11-01

    The depth resolution of deuterium depth profiling by the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)α is studied theoretically and experimentally. General kinematic considerations are presented which show that the depth resolution for deuterium depth profiling using the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)α is best at reaction angles of 0° and 180° at all incident energies below 9 MeV and for all depths and materials. In order to confirm this theoretical prediction the depth resolution was determined experimentally with a conventional detector at 135° and an annular detector at 175.9°. Deuterium containing thin films buried under different metal cover layers of aluminum, molybdenum and tungsten with thicknesses in the range of 0.5-11 μm served as samples. For all materials and depths an improvement of the depth resolution with the detector at 175.9° is achieved. For tungsten as cover layer a better depth resolution up to a factor of 18 was determined. Good agreement between the experimental results and the simulations for the depth resolution is demonstrated.

  9. The Capability to Hold Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, Rutger|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266224

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of whether a capability theory of justice (such as that of Martha Nussbaum) should accept a basic “capability to hold property.” Answering this question is vital for bridging the gap between abstract capability theories of justice and their institutional implication

  10. The development of capability indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, Paul; Hunter, Graham; Carter, Ian; Dowding, Keith; Guala, Francesco; Van Hees, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper is motivated by sustained interest in the capabilities approach to welfare economics combined with the paucity of economic statistics that measure capabilities at the individual level. Specifically, it takes a much discussed account of the normatively desirable capabilities constitutive o

  11. The Capability to Hold Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, Rutger|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266224

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of whether a capability theory of justice (such as that of Martha Nussbaum) should accept a basic “capability to hold property.” Answering this question is vital for bridging the gap between abstract capability theories of justice and their institutional

  12. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  13. Indexing Depth and Retrieval Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Barbara J.

    1972-01-01

    There are six major studies of the effect of indexing depth on retrieval performance. They differ in purpose, methodology, measures, indexing language, field of study, and data base--nevertheless, all have found depth of indexing to have the same effect upon information retrieval. (13 references) (Author/NH)

  14. Sonic depth sounder for laboratory and field use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E.V.; Simons, Daryl B.; Posakony, G.J.

    1961-01-01

    The laboratory investigation of roughness in alluvial channels has led to the development of a special electronic device capable of mapping the streambed configuration under dynamic conditions. This electronic device employs an ultrasonic pulse-echo principle, similar to that of a fathometer, that utilizes microsecond techniques to give high accuracy in shallow depths. This instrument is known as the sonic depth sounder and was designed to cover a depth range of 0 to 4 feet with an accuracy of ? 0.5 percent. The sonic depth sounder is capable of operation at frequencies of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 kilocycles. The ultrasonic beam generated at the transducer is designed to give a minimum-diameter interrogating signal over the extended depth range. The information obtained from a sonic depth sounder is recorded on a strip-chart recorder. This permanent record allows an analysis to be made of the streambed configuration under different dynamic conditions. The model 1024 sonic depth sounder was designed principally as a research instrument to meet laboratory needs. As such, it is somewhat limited in its application as a field instrument on large streams and rivers. The principles employed in this instrument, however, have many potentials for field applications such as the indirect measurement of bed load when the bed roughness is ripples and (or) dunes, depth measurement, determination of bed configuration, and determination of depth of scour around bridge piers and abutments. For field application a modification of the present system into a battery-operated lightweight instrument designed to operate at a depth range of 0 to 30 feet is possible and desirable.

  15. Sustainable Supply Chain Capabilities: Accumulation, Strategic Types and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Seung Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the cumulative sustainable supply chain (SC capabilities and their effects on supply chain performance, including economic, environmental, and social performance. Using empirical analyses with data from 198 small- and medium-sized suppliers in Korea, this paper provides evidence about the cumulative sustainable SC capabilities, indicating that economic, social, and environmental capabilities in the supply chain mutually reinforce each other rather than traded off. This study also presents the positive effect of cumulative sustainable SC capabilities on supply chain sustainability performance. This paper identifies four distinctive groups of cumulative capabilities: the laggard, environmental-focused, social-cautious, and all-round. This study provides a better understanding about sustainable capabilities and important guidelines for managers of suppliers and buyers who wish to build strong social/environmental management capabilities without compromising economic capability throughout the entire supply chain.

  16. DEPTH: a web server to compute depth and predict small-molecule binding cavities in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kuan Pern; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Madhusudhan, M S

    2011-07-01

    Depth measures the extent of atom/residue burial within a protein. It correlates with properties such as protein stability, hydrogen exchange rate, protein-protein interaction hot spots, post-translational modification sites and sequence variability. Our server, DEPTH, accurately computes depth and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) values. We show that depth can be used to predict small molecule ligand binding cavities in proteins. Often, some of the residues lining a ligand binding cavity are both deep and solvent exposed. Using the depth-SASA pair values for a residue, its likelihood to form part of a small molecule binding cavity is estimated. The parameters of the method were calibrated over a training set of 900 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of single-domain proteins bound to small molecules (molecular weight structures. Users have the option of tuning several parameters to detect cavities of different sizes, for example, geometrically flat binding sites. The input to the server is a protein 3D structure in PDB format. The users have the option of tuning the values of four parameters associated with the computation of residue depth and the prediction of binding cavities. The computed depths, SASA and binding cavity predictions are displayed in 2D plots and mapped onto 3D representations of the protein structure using Jmol. Links are provided to download the outputs. Our server is useful for all structural analysis based on residue depth and SASA, such as guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments and small molecule docking exercises, in the context of protein functional annotation and drug discovery.

  17. Capability-based computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Capability-Based Computer Systems focuses on computer programs and their capabilities. The text first elaborates capability- and object-based system concepts, including capability-based systems, object-based approach, and summary. The book then describes early descriptor architectures and explains the Burroughs B5000, Rice University Computer, and Basic Language Machine. The text also focuses on early capability architectures. Dennis and Van Horn's Supervisor; CAL-TSS System; MIT PDP-1 Timesharing System; and Chicago Magic Number Machine are discussed. The book then describes Plessey System 25

  18. Segmentation by depth does not always facilitate visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Nonie J; Remington, Roger W; Retell, James D; Grove, Philip M

    2013-07-11

    In visual search, target detection times are relatively insensitive to set size when targets and distractors differ on a single feature dimension. Search can be confined to only those elements sharing a single feature, such as color (Egeth, Virzi, & Garbart, 1984). These findings have been taken as evidence that elementary feature dimensions support a parallel segmentation of a scene into discrete sets of items. Here we explored if relative depth (signaled by binocular disparity) could support a similar parallel segmentation by examining the effects of distributing distracting elements across two depth planes. Three important empirical findings emerged. First, when the target was a feature singleton on the target depth plane, but a conjunction search among distractors on the nontarget plane, search efficiency increased compared to a single depth plane. Second, benefits of segmentation in depth were only observed when the target depth plane was known in advance. Third, no benefit of segmentation in depth was observed when both planes required a conjunction search, even with prior knowledge of the target depth plane. Overall, the benefit of distributing the elements of a search set across two depth planes was observed only when the two planes differed both in binocular disparity and in the elementary feature composition of individual elements. We conclude that segmentation of the search array into two depth planes can facilitate visual search, but unlike color or other elementary properties, does not provide an automatic, preattentive segmentation.

  19. Transforming organizational capabilities in strategizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    -term evolvements within the companies. We develop our framework of understanding organizational capabilities drawing on dynamic capability, relational capability and strategy as practice concepts, appreciating the performative aspects of developing new routines. Our two cases are taken from one author’s Ph......Offshored and networked enterprises are becoming an important if not leading organizational form and this development seriously challenges their organizational capabilities. More specifically, over the last years, SMEs have commenced entering these kinds of arrangements. As the organizational...... capabilities of SMEs are limited at the outset, even more emphasis is needed regarding the issues of developing relevant organizational capabilities. This paper aims at investigating how capabilities evolve during an offshoring process of more than 5 years in two Danish SMEs, i.e. not only short- but long...

  20. Effects of magnitude, depth, and time on cellular seismology forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Steven Wolf

    This study finds that, in most cases analyzed to date, past seismicity tends to delineate zones where future earthquakes are likely to occur. Network seismicity catalogs for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), Australia (AUS), California (CA), and Alaska (AK) are analyzed using modified versions of the Cellular Seismology (CS) method of Kafka (2002, 2007). The percentage of later occurring earthquakes located near earlier occurring earthquakes typically exceeds the expected percentage for randomly distributed later occurring earthquakes, and the specific percentage is influenced by several variables, including magnitude, depth, time, and tectonic setting. At 33% map area coverage, hit percents are typically 85-95% in the NMSZ, 50-60% in AUS, 75-85% in CA, and 75-85% in AK. Statistical significance testing is performed on trials analyzing the same variables so that the overall regions can be compared, although some tests are inconclusive due to the small number of earthquake sample sizes. These results offer useful insights into understanding the capabilities and limits of CS studies, which can provide guidance for improving the seismicity-based components of seismic hazard assessments.

  1. Capabilities and Incapabilities of the Capabilities Approach to Health Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This first part of this article critiques Sridhar Venkatapuram's conception of health as a capability. It argues that Venkatapuram relies on the problematic concept of dignity, implies that those who are unhealthy lack lives worthy of dignity (which seems politically incorrect), sets a low bar for health, appeals to metaphysically problematic thresholds, fails to draw clear connections between appealed-to capabilities and health, and downplays the importance/relevance of health functioning. It concludes by questioning whether justice entitlements should pertain to the capability for health versus health achievements, challenging Venkatapuram's claims about the strength of health entitlements, and demonstrating that the capabilities approach is unnecessary to address social determinants of health.

  2. Visuotactile Integration for Depth Perception in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.; Hürst, W.O.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    Augmented reality applications using stereo head-mounted displays are not capable of perfectly blending real and virtual objects. For example, depth in the real world is perceived through cues such as accommodation and vergence. However, in stereo head-mounted displays these cues are disconnected

  3. Measuring perceived depth in natural images and study of its relation with monocular and binocular depth cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Pierre; Raake, Alexander; Barkowsky, Marcus; Le Callet, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The perception of depth in images and video sequences is based on different depth cues. Studies have considered depth perception threshold as a function of viewing distance (Cutting and Vishton, 1995), the combination of different monocular depth cues and their quantitative relation with binocular depth cues and their different possible type of interactions (Landy, l995). But these studies only consider artificial stimuli and none of them attempts to provide a quantitative contribution of monocular and binocular depth cues compared to each other in the specific context of natural images. This study targets this particular application case. The evaluation of the strength of different depth cues compared to each other using a carefully designed image database to cover as much as possible different combinations of monocular (linear perspective, texture gradient, relative size and defocus blur) and binocular depth cues. The 200 images were evaluated in two distinct subjective experiments to evaluate separately perceived depth and different monocular depth cues. The methodology and the description of the definition of the different scales will be detailed. The image database (DC3Dimg) is also released for the scientific community.

  4. On evaluation of depth accuracy in consumer depth sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Aziz, Azim Zaliha; Wei, Hong; Ferryman, James

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of different depth sensors. The aim is to answer the question, whether these sensors give accurate data for general depth image analysis. The study examines the depth accuracy between three popularly used depth sensors; ASUS Xtion Prolive, Kinect Xbox 360 and Kinect for Windows v2. The main attention is to study on the stability of pixels in the depth image captured at several different sensor-object distances by measuring the depth returned by the sensors within specified time intervals. The experimental results show that the fluctuation (mm) of the random selected pixels within the target area, increases with increasing distance to the sensor, especially on the Kinect for Xbox 360 and the Asus Xtion Prolive. Both of these sensors provide pixels fluctuation between 20mm and 30mm at a sensor-object distance beyond 1500mm. However, the pixel's stability of the Kinect for Windows v2 not affected much with the distance between the sensor and the object. The maximum fluctuation for all the selected pixels of Kinect for Windows v2 is approximately 5mm at sensor-object distance of between 800mm and 3000mm. Therefore, in the optimal distance, the best stability achieved.

  5. Study of capabilities and limitations of 3D printing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemu, H. G.

    2012-04-01

    3D printing is one of the developments in rapid prototyping technology. The inception and development of the technology has highly assisted the product development phase of product design and manufacturing. The technology is particularly important in educating product design and 3D modeling because it helps students to visualize their design idea, to enhance their creative design process and enables them to touch and feel the result of their innovative work. The availability of many 3D printers on the market has created a certain level of challenge for the user. Among others, complexity of part geometry, material type, compatibility with 3D CAD models and other technical aspects still need in-depth study. This paper presents results of the experimental work on the capabilities and limitations of the Z510 3D printer from Z-corporation. Several parameters such as dimensional and geometrical accuracy, surface quality and strength as a function of model size, orientation and file exchange format are closely studied.

  6. Depth profilometry via multiplexed optical high-coherence interferometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnoud Kazemzadeh

    Full Text Available Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry.

  7. Archetypal Depth Criticism and Melville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    Applies psychologist James Hillman's idea of soul-making to literary studies. Uses the works of Melville to discuss the terms (1) depth, (2) image, and (3) archetype as they relate to the concept of soul-making. (MM)

  8. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  9. Archetypal Depth Criticism and Melville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    Applies psychologist James Hillman's idea of soul-making to literary studies. Uses the works of Melville to discuss the terms (1) depth, (2) image, and (3) archetype as they relate to the concept of soul-making. (MM)

  10. Technological Dynamics and Social Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Jan; Feldman, Maryann; Srholec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes factors shaping technological capabilities in USA and European countries, and shows that the differences between the two continents in this respect are much smaller than commonly assumed. The analysis demonstrates a tendency toward convergence in technological capabilities...... for the sample as a whole between 1998 and 2008. The results indicate that social capabilities, such as well-developed public knowledge infrastructure, an egalitarian distribution of income, a participatory democracy and prevalence of public safety condition the growth of technological capabilities. Possible...

  11. Jason 2: A Review of Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, R. L.; Bowen, A. D.; Heintz, M. C.; Naiman, M.; Taylor, C. L.; Sellers, W. J.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Howland, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The family of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) for the United States oceanographic research community through the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), represent some of the most advanced tools and technology available for accomplishing a wide variety of deep submergence science and operations. Over the past five years, research done using these vehicles has provided major contributions to the understanding of deep-sea geological, chemical and biological processes at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). The ROV systems have also contributed to successful deployment of ocean floor observatory monitors and various sensors that seek to understand the geophysical and geotechnical properties of young crust and provide an ability to make routine time series measurements. As a result of experience gained during over 25 cruises with Jason and its companion vehicles and input from the user community and the DEep Submergence Science Committee (DESSC) of UNOLS, WHOI has recently completed an upgrade to the Jason vehicle. This has resulted in substantive additions to the vehicle's capabilities, particularly in the area of propulsion power and manipulative capabilities. During its first complete year of operation, the vehicle has operated a cumulative total of approximately 60 days in the water at depths up to a maximum of 6,500 meters. This poster will describe the capabilities of the new Jason vehicle and briefly review if achievements.

  12. The peobing depth of Transient Electromagnetic Method with the large-loop source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N.; Xue, G.; Yan, S.

    2010-12-01

    The probing depth consists of not only the maximum depth, but also the minimum depth. Study the depth of investigation with analytical method, finite difference time domain and time-frequency method. Analytical method proves that transient electromagnetic fields propagate in the earth at a limited velocity, and numerical simulation exhibits reflection phenomenon of the fields under quasi-static conditions. And measuring time determines the depth. Then, we discuss the impact factors of the measuring time. The maximum depth of investigation is the distance that an electromagnetic wave goes to and back from some depth in the earth and may be determined by loop configuration with loop length and transmitting current theoretically. But with the impact of the target size, embedded upper subsurface stratum, it's not easy to calculate the real probing depth. The minimum depth is determined by the non-zero turn-off effect and the transient effect of the transmitting and receiving wires. We will discuss the probing depth of the minimum and maximum depth in theory and in practice. At last, we can get the final conclusion about the depth, to instruct the field survey. In general, we use the loop configuration. The decay delay of self-conductance signal in loop is 10 . So, the minimum probing depth of TEM is 1 to 50m. The minimum depth is greatly affected by the electric property of earth surface’s media rather than loop size. However, loop size may be one prime affect factor for maximum probing depth. In this paper, we give a certain quantitative analysis in some circumstances. To some extent, the maximum probing depth is determined by loop size while other factors are predetermined. But, when there is no anomalous body in host rock, the loop size, i.e. magnetic moment, is not the key factor any more. It is concluded that the low frequencies are the most important factor for maximum depth.

  13. Dynamic perspective cues enhance depth perception from motion parallax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckthought, Athena; Yoonessi, Ahmad; Baker, Curtis L

    2017-01-01

    Motion parallax, the perception of depth resulting from an observer's self-movement, has almost always been studied with random dot textures in simplified orthographic rendering. Here we examine depth from motion parallax in more naturalistic conditions using textures with an overall 1/f spectrum and dynamic perspective rendering. We compared depth perception for orthographic and perspective rendering, using textures composed of two types of elements: random dots and Gabor micropatterns. Relative texture motion (shearing) with square wave corrugation patterns was synchronized to horizontal head movement. Four observers performed a two-alternative forced choice depth ordering task with monocular viewing, in which they reported which part of the texture appeared in front of the other. For both textures, depth perception was better with dynamic perspective than with orthographic rendering, particularly at larger depths. Depth ordering performance with naturalistic 1/f textures was slightly lower than with the random dots; however, with depth-related size scaling of the micropatterns, performance was comparable to that with random dots. We also examined the effects of removing each of the three cues that distinguish dynamic perspective from orthographic rendering: (a) small vertical displacements, (b) lateral gradients of speed across the corrugations, and (c) speed differences in rendered near versus far surfaces. Removal of any of the three cues impaired performance. In conclusion, depth ordering performance is enhanced by all of the dynamic perspective cues but not by using more naturalistic 1/f textures.

  14. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moryama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  15. The Clean Development Mechanism and Dynamic Capabilities of Implementing Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, Aradhna

    This study assesses the impact of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) on the dynamic capabilities of implementing firms in India. While doing so, it uses three indicators of firms' dynamic capabilities: R&D expenditures to sales ratio, fuel consumption to sales ratio and total factor productivi...... the PROWESS database. Our results reveal that the CDM implementation does not have significant outcome effects on the dynamic capabilities of firms. Much depends on the type and size of the project, and size of the firm....

  16. Connecting Curriculum, Capabilities and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Depasquale, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The reported research aims to examine the extent to which sustainability capabilities have been delivered by a specific example of Education for Sustainability (EfS) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), and how important the capabilities have been in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach Students who participated in an…

  17. A business analytics capability framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Cosic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Business analytics (BA capabilities can potentially provide value and lead to better organisational performance. This paper develops a holistic, theoretically-grounded and practically relevant business analytics capability framework (BACF that specifies, defines and ranks the capabilities that constitute an organisational BA initiative. The BACF was developed in two phases. First, an a priori conceptual framework was developed based on the Resource-Based View theory of the firm and a thematic content analysis of the BA literature. Second, the conceptual framework was further developed and refined using a three round Delphi study involving 16 BA experts. Changes from the Delphi study resulted in a refined and confirmed framework including detailed capability definitions, together with a ranking of the capabilities based on importance. The BACF will help academic researchers and industry practitioners to better understand the capabilities that constitute an organisational BA initiative and their relative importance. In future work, the capabilities in the BACF will be operationalised to measure their as-is status, thus enabling organisations to identify key areas of strength and weakness and prioritise future capability improvement efforts.

  18. Connecting Curriculum, Capabilities and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Depasquale, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The reported research aims to examine the extent to which sustainability capabilities have been delivered by a specific example of Education for Sustainability (EfS) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), and how important the capabilities have been in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach Students who participated in an…

  19. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  20. Subcellular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all of its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  1. Feature-based attention resolves depth ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Levinthal, B; Franconeri, S L

    2016-09-07

    Perceiving the world around us requires that we resolve ambiguity. This process is often studied in the lab using ambiguous figures whose structures can be interpreted in multiple ways. One class of figures contains ambiguity in its depth relations, such that either of two surfaces could be seen as being the "front" of an object. Previous research suggests that selectively attending to a given location on such objects can bias the perception of that region as the front. This study asks whether selectively attending to a distributed feature can also bias that region toward the front. Participants viewed a structure-from-motion display of a rotating cylinder that could be perceived as rotating clockwise or counterclockwise (as imagined viewing from the top), depending on whether a set of red or green moving dots were seen as being in the front. A secondary task encouraged observers to globally attend to either red or green. Results from both Experiment 1 and 2 showed that the dots on the cylinder that shared the attended feature, and its corresponding surface, were more likely to be seen as being in the front, as measured by participants' clockwise versus counterclockwise percept reports. Feature-based attention, like location-based attention, is capable of biasing competition among potential interpretations of figures with ambiguous structure in depth.

  2. Monazite Th-Pb age depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grove, M.; Harrison, T.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The significant capabilities of the ion microprobe for thermochronometric investigations of geologic materials remain largely unexploited. Whereas {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th spot analysis allows {approximately} 10-mm-scale imaging of Pb loss profiles or overgrowths in sectioned monazite grains, the spatial resolution offered by depth profiling into the surface region of natural crystals is more than two orders of magnitude higher. The authors document here the ability of the high-resolution ion microprobe to detect {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th age differences of < 1 m.y. with better than 0.05 {micro}m depth resolution in the outer micron of Tertiary monazites from the hanging wall of the Himalayan Main Central thrust. Age gradients on this scale are inaccessible to ion microprobe spot analysis or conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Interpretation of the near-surface {sup 208}Pb distributions with available monazite Pb diffusion data illustrates the potential of the approach for recovering continuous, high-temperature thermal history information not previously available.

  3. Sampling Depths, Depth Shifts, and Depth Resolutions for Bi(n)(+) Ion Analysis in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, R; Seah, M P; Gilmore, I S

    2016-03-10

    Gas cluster sputter depth profiling is increasingly used for the spatially resolved chemical analysis and imaging of organic materials. Here, a study is reported of the sampling depth in secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. It is shown that effects of the sampling depth leads to apparent shifts in depth profiles of Irganox 3114 delta layers in Irganox 1010 sputtered, in the dual beam mode, using 5 keV Ar₂₀₀₀⁺ ions and analyzed with Bi(q+), Bi₃(q+) and Bi₅(q+) ions (q = 1 or 2) with energies between 13 and 50 keV. The profiles show sharp delta layers, broadened from their intrinsic 1 nm thickness to full widths at half-maxima (fwhm's) of 8-12 nm. For different secondary ions, the centroids of the measured delta layers are shifted deeper or shallower by up to 3 nm from the position measured for the large, 564.36 Da (C₃₃H₄₆N₃O₅⁻) characteristic ion for Irganox 3114 used to define a reference position. The shifts are linear with the Bi(n)(q+) beam energy and are greatest for Bi₃(q+), slightly less for Bi₅(q+) with its wider or less deep craters, and significantly less for Bi(q+) where the sputtering yield is very low and the primary ion penetrates more deeply. The shifts increase the fwhm’s of the delta layers in a manner consistent with a linearly falling generation and escape depth distribution function (GEDDF) for the emitted secondary ions, relevant for a paraboloid shaped crater. The total depth of this GEDDF is 3.7 times the delta layer shifts. The greatest effect is for the peaks with the greatest shifts, i.e. Bi₃(q+) at the highest energy, and for the smaller fragments. It is recommended that low energies be used for the analysis beam and that carefully selected, large, secondary ion fragments are used for measuring depth distributions, or that the analysis be made in the single beam mode using the sputtering Ar cluster ions also for analysis.

  4. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  5. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  6. Transforming organizational capabilities in strategizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Offshored and networked enterprises are becoming an important if not leading organizational form and this development seriously challenges their organizational capabilities. More specifically, over the last years, SMEs have commenced entering these kinds of arrangements. As the organizational cap...

  7. Advanced Capabilities for Combat Medics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Convertino, Victor A; Cooke, William H; Salinas, Jose; Holcomb, John B

    2004-01-01

    The US Army Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR) has the lead for directing the Research Program Area for Advanced Triage Capabilities for Combat Medics in the Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC...

  8. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  9. Depth estimation via stage classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedović, V.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Redert, A.; Geusebroek, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    We identify scene categorization as the first step towards efficient and robust depth estimation from single images. Categorizing the scene into one of the geometric classes greatly reduces the possibilities in subsequent phases. To that end, we introduce 15 typical 3D scene geometries, called

  10. A variable depth search branching

    OpenAIRE

    Cornillier, Fabien; Pécora, José Eduardo; Charles, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a variable depth search branching, an extension to the local branching for solving Mixed-Integer Programs. Two strategies are assessed, a best improvement strategy and a first improvement strategy. The extensive computational assessment evidences a significant improvement over the local branching for both strategies. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository service in June, 2017 before shutting down.

  11. Depth filtering for auto-stereoscopic mobile devices

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Gutiérrez, Virginia; Cabrera Quesada, Julian; García Santos, Narciso

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address a scenario where 3D content is transmitted to a mobile terminal with 3D display capabilities. We consider the use of 2D plus depth format to represent the 3D content and focus on the generation of synthetic views in the terminal. We evaluate different types of smoothing filters that are applied to depth maps with the aim of reducing the disoccluded regions. The evaluation takes into account the reduction of holes in the synthetic view as well as the presence of geometr...

  12. Multi-depth fractionated aesthetic ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Michael H.; Lyke, Stephanie; Barthe, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    Objective: Aesthetic ultrasound surgery provides the ability to treat at precise, clinically relevant depths with varied lesion size. This represents a major advantage compared to cosmetic laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of pre-clinical and clinical research aimed at establishing the feasibility of three-dimensional fractional deposition of focused ultrasound energy in the first 3mm of skin. Conformal thermal lesions were created in ex-vivo porcine muscle and live human skin in a variety of depths and geometries. Gross pathology demonstrating a three-dimensional pattern of non-intersecting lesions was micro- photographed and characterized in porcine tissue, and followed up to thirty days post treatment in human tissue. Methods: Image/treat transducers from 7.5 to 10 MHz, focal depths of 1 to 3 mm, and energies of 160 to 300 mJ were used to lay down a three-dimensional pattern of non-intersecting thermal lesions in freshly excised porcine muscle tissue. Human skin was treated in vivo at 120 to 360 mJ per lesion. Results were photographed immediately post-treatment and followed up to 30 days. Results: Porcine tissue lesion geometry was measured. Average lesion dimensions approximated by a sphere ranged from 360 micron (±19%) to 520 micron (±23%) varying with the energy settings. Measured depth and distance between the thermal lesions were within ±13% of the focal depth and lesion spacing. In human skin all lesions for all energy settings were completely resolved during the follow-up period. At lower energy settings of 120 mJ and 160 mJ lesions were completely resolved by day 2. Mild erythema and localized swelling were the only transient side effects and resolved within 48 hours or less. Conclusions: In conclusion, skin may be successfully treated in a three-dimensional fractionated manner with predictable and precise deposition of thermal damage. In vivo results demonstrate tolerability and fast resolution with minimal side effects.

  13. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... organisational skills that enable the firms to successfully initiate, manage and finish their R&D alliances with MNEs. The in-depth longitudinal methodology adds insight and value to the study. It is discussed how the specific aspects of the alliance capability can help born globals to counteract the challenges...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  14. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  15. Sonographic assessment of predictors of depth of the corner pocket for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Prescanning of supraclavicular region for estimating depth of corner pocket should be done before choosing an appropriate size needle. Furthermore, the needle should not be advanced more than the predicted corner pocket depth.

  16. Photon counting compressive depth mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Howland, Gregory A; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 x 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 x 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second.

  17. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  18. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  19. Improving Capabilities for Irregular Warfare. Volume 2. Capabilities Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    ranged from the Israelis and other Jews buying up all the land in Iraq, to the Coca -Cola logo (sup- posedly owned by Jews) as saying “No Mecca, No...Insurgencies en- tail especially demanding learning curves. Not only does one have to master the structure, TTPs, and capabilities of the insurgents, but a

  20. Underwater camera with depth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Lin, Keng-Ren; Tsui, Chi L.; Schipf, David; Leang, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an RGB-D (video + depth) camera that provides three-dimensional image data for use in the haptic feedback of a robotic underwater ordnance recovery system. Two camera systems were developed and studied. The first depth camera relies on structured light (as used by the Microsoft Kinect), where the displacement of an object is determined by variations of the geometry of a projected pattern. The other camera system is based on a Time of Flight (ToF) depth camera. The results of the structural light camera system shows that the camera system requires a stronger light source with a similar operating wavelength and bandwidth to achieve a desirable working distance in water. This approach might not be robust enough for our proposed underwater RGB-D camera system, as it will require a complete re-design of the light source component. The ToF camera system instead, allows an arbitrary placement of light source and camera. The intensity output of the broadband LED light source in the ToF camera system can be increased by putting them into an array configuration and the LEDs can be modulated comfortably with any waveform and frequencies required by the ToF camera. In this paper, both camera were evaluated and experiments were conducted to demonstrate the versatility of the ToF camera.

  1. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  2. A unifying process capability metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jay Flaig

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new economic approach to process capability assessment is presented, which differs from the commonly used engineering metrics. The proposed metric consists of two economic capability measures – the expected profit and the variation in profit of the process. This dual economic metric offers a number of significant advantages over other engineering or economic metrics used in process capability analysis. First, it is easy to understand and communicate. Second, it is based on a measure of total system performance. Third, it unifies the fraction nonconforming approach and the expected loss approach. Fourth, it reflects the underlying interest of management in knowing the expected financial performance of a process and its potential variation.

  3. Responsiveness of Nigerian Students to Pictorial Depth Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. S.; Seddon, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Three groups of Nigerian high school and college students were tested for response to four pictorial depth cues. Students had more difficulty with cues concerning the relative size of objects and the foreshortening of straight lines than with cues involving overlap of lines and distortion of the angles between lines. (Author/JEG)

  4. Mechanistic evaluation of virus clearance by depth filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Fogle, Jace; Patnaik, Purbasa; Kowle, Ron; Chen, Dayue

    2015-01-01

    Virus clearance by depth filtration has not been well-understood mechanistically due to lack of quantitative data on filter charge characteristics and absence of systematic studies. It is generally believed that both electrostatic interactions and sized based mechanical entrapment contribute to virus clearance by depth filtration. In order to establish whether the effectiveness of virus clearance correlates with the charge characteristics of a given depth filter, a counter-ion displacement technique was employed to determine the ionic capacity for several depth filters. Two depth filters (Millipore B1HC and X0HC) with significant differences in ionic capacities were selected and evaluated for their ability to eliminate viruses. The high ionic capacity X0HC filter showed complete porcine parvovirus (PPV) clearance (eliminating the spiked viruses to below the limit of detection) under low conductivity conditions (≤2.5 mS/cm), achieving a log10 reduction factor (LRF) of > 4.8. On the other hand, the low ionic capacity B1HC filter achieved only ∼2.1-3.0 LRF of PPV clearance under the same conditions. These results indicate that parvovirus clearance by these two depth filters are mainly achieved via electrostatic interactions between the filters and PPV. When much larger xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) was used as the model virus, complete retrovirus clearance was obtained under all conditions evaluated for both depth filters, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms other than just electrostatic interactions in XMuLV clearance.

  5. Work system innovation: Designing improvement methods for generative capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David; Møller, Niels

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how a work system’s capability for improvement is influenced by its improvement methods. Based on explorative case study at a Lean manufacturing facility, the methods problem solving and Appreciative Inquiry were compared through in-depth qualitative studies over a 12-month...... period. The findings show how problem solving leads to solutions inside the existing improvement trajectory, whereas Appreciative Inquiry due to increased generative capability enables solutions outside the existing trajectory. The paper suggests how improvement methods can be designed for appropriate...

  6. CLAS Capabilities at Higher Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepan Stepanyan

    1998-06-01

    In order to study the capability of the Hall B CLAS detector at high energies, we studied the resolution and the acceptance for various final states in the electroproduction on a proton target at 10 GeV beam energy. We find that, although CLAS can do some of the interesting physics at higher energies in the present configuration, several modifications can significantly improve the overall physics acceptable to CLAS at high energies. In this report, we present some of the results of those studies with suggestions on possible detector improvements to optimize the physics capabilities of CLAS.

  7. Nanofabrication principles, capabilities and limits

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    This second edition of Nanofabrication is one of the most comprehensive introductions on nanofabrication technologies and processes. A practical guide and reference, this book introduces readers to all of the developed technologies that are capable of making structures below 100nm. The principle of each technology is introduced and illustrated with minimum mathematics involved. Also analyzed are the capabilities of each technology in making sub-100nm structures, and the limits of preventing a technology from going further down the dimensional scale. This book provides readers with a toolkit that will help with any of their nanofabrication challenges.

  8. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Romaine lettuce) One medium baked potato is a computer mouse To control your portion sizes when you ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Improving axial depth of cut accuracy in micromilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    and their rapid warming and cooling, which prevent the achievement of a steady state. Several other factors, independent on the tool-workpiece interaction, influence the machining accuracy. The cutting parameter most heavily affected is the axial depth of cut which is the most critical when using micro end mills......In order to maintain an optimum cutting speed, the reduction of mill diameters requires machine tools with high rotational speed capabilities. A solution to update existing machine tools is the use of high speed attached spindles. Major drawbacks of these attachments are the high thermal expansion......, due to the easy breakage particularly when milling on hard materials. Typical values for the errors on the control of the axial depth of cut are in the order of 50 microns [1], [2], while the aimed depth of cut can be as low as 5 microns. As a result, micromilling cannot enter yet normal workshops...

  10. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  11. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimriks, Koen H.

    We discuss the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories of micro-level components underlying routines...

  12. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Tippo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimericks, Koen H.;

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Special Issue and discusses the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories...

  13. Judgmental Forecasting of Operational Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Tveterås, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Torben Juul

    This paper explores a new judgmental forecasting indicator, the Employee Sensed Operational Capabilities (ESOC). The purpose of the ESOC is to establish a practical prediction tool that can provide early signals about changes in financial performance by gauging frontline employees’ sensing...

  14. Building server capabilities in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi; Slepniov, Dmitrij; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to further our understanding of multinational companies building server capabilities in China. The paper is based on the cases of two western companies with operations in China. The findings highlight a number of common patterns in the 1) managerial challenges related...

  15. ABOUT SOLIDWORKS SUSTAINABILITY MODULE CAPABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin IANCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper are presented the SolidWorks analysis steps to be taken in order to study sustainability of parts or assemblies designed. There are presented the software capabilities and the settings that have to be done for such analysis and the results shown by software.

  16. Variation of curve number with storm depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, K.; Hejduk, L.

    2012-04-01

    The NRCS Curve Number (known also as SCS-CN) method is well known as a tool in predicting flood runoff depth from small ungauged catchment. The traditional way of determination the CNs, based on soil characteristics, land use and hydrological conditions, seemed to have tendency to overpredict the floods in some cases. Over 30 year rainfall-runoff data, collected in two small (A=23.4 & 82.4 km2), lowland, agricultural catchments in Center of Poland (Banasik & Woodward 2010), were used to determine runoff Curve Number and to check a tendency of changing. The observed CN declines with increasing storm size, which according recent views of Hawkins (1993) could be classified as a standard response of watershed. The analysis concluded, that using CN value according to the procedure described in USDA-SCS Handbook one receives representative value for estimating storm runoff from high rainfall depths in the analyzes catchments. This has been confirmed by applying "asymptotic approach" for estimating the watershed curve number from the rainfall-runoff data. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that CN, estimated from mean retention parameter S of recorded events with rainfall depth higher than initial abstraction, is also approaching the theoretical CN. The observed CN, ranging from 59.8 to 97.1 and from 52.3 to 95.5, in the smaller and the larger catchment respectively, declines with increasing storm size, which has been classified as a standard response of watershed. The investigation demonstrated also changeability of the CN during a year, with much lower values during the vegetation season. Banasik K. & D.E. Woodward (2010). "Empirical determination of curve number for a small agricultural watrshed in Poland". 2nd Joint Federal Interagency Conference, Las Vegas, NV, June 27 - July 1, 2010 (http://acwi.gov/sos/pubs/2ndJFIC/Contents/10E_Banasik_ 28_02_10. pdf). Hawkins R. H. (1993). "Asymptotic determination of curve numbers from data". Journal of Irrigation and Drainage

  17. The number and size of subhalo-induced gaps in stellar streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkal, Denis; Belokurov, Vasily; Bovy, Jo; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-11-01

    Ample observational capabilities exist today to detect the small density perturbations that low-mass dark matter subhaloes impart on stellar streams from disrupting Galactic satellites. In anticipation of these observations, we investigate the expected number and size of gaps by combining an analytic prescription for gap evolution on circular orbits with the flux of subhaloes near the stream. We explore the distribution of gap sizes and depths for a typical cold stream around the Milky Way and find that for a given stream age and gap depth, each subhalo mass produces a characteristic gap size. For a stream with an age of a few Gyr, orbiting at a distance of 10-20 kpc from the Galactic centre, even modest subhaloes with a mass of 106-107 M⊙ produce gaps with sizes that are of the order of several degrees. We consider the number and distribution of gap sizes created by subhaloes with masses 105-109 M⊙, accounting for the expected depletion of subhaloes by the Milky Way disc, and present predictions for six cold streams around the Milky Way. For Pal 5, we forecast 0.7 gaps with a density depletion of at least 25 per cent and a typical gap size of 8°. Thus, there appears to be no tension between the recent non-detection of density depletions in the Pal 5 tidal tails and ΛCDM expectations. These predictions can be used to guide the scale of future gap searches.

  18. Rapid Capability Fielding Toolbox Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    should  inventory  and  leverage  the  substantial  capabilities  currently existing across  the  department  in M&S  (game and virtual environment...Northwestern University, and  Samsung .   One example project  that  included  significant  use of UCD  tools was  the development of  the Chicago Bus Rapid...Establish C2E training and career development programs for DoD engineers.  Recommendation:   Inventory  DoD Laboratory Capabilities  The DoD  should

  19. Judgmental Forecasting of Operational Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Carina Antonia; Tveterås, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Torben Juul

    This paper explores a new judgmental forecasting indicator, the Employee Sensed Operational Capabilities (ESOC). The purpose of the ESOC is to establish a practical prediction tool that can provide early signals about changes in financial performance by gauging frontline employees’ sensing...... can predict financial performance. Monthly data were collected from frontline employees in three different companies during an 18-month period, and the initial results indicate that the ESOChas predictive power....... of changes in the firm’s operational capabilities. We present the first stage of the development of ESOC by applying a formative measurement approach to test the index in relation to financial performance and against an organizational commitment scale. We use distributed lag models to test whether the ESOC...

  20. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  1. Human-Centered Design Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  2. Determining your organization's 'risk capability'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Bill; Hancock, Melinda

    2014-05-01

    An assessment of a provider's level of risk capability should focus on three key elements: Business intelligence, including sophisticated analytical models that can offer insight into the expected cost and quality of care for a given population. Clinical enterprise maturity, marked by the ability to improve health outcomes and to manage utilization and costs to drive change. Revenue transformation, emphasizing the need for a revenue cycle platform that allows for risk acceptance and management and that provides incentives for performance against defined objectives.

  3. Exploring Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  4. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs. Methods A standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two differ...

  5. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  6. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  7. Depth-first search in split-by-edges trees

    OpenAIRE

    Brændeland, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    A layerwise search in a split-by-edges tree (as defined by Br{\\ae}ndeland, 2015) of agiven graph produces a maximum independent set in exponential time. A depth-first search produces an independent set, which may or may not be a maximum, in linear time, but the worst case success rate is maybe not high enough to make it really interesting. What may make depth-first searching in split-by-edges trees interesting, though, is the pronounced oscillation of its success rate along the graph size axis.

  8. Simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data

    KAUST Repository

    López-Pintado, Sara

    2014-03-05

    We propose notions of simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data that extend the univariate functional band depth. The proposed simplicial band depths provide simple and natural criteria to measure the centrality of a trajectory within a sample of curves. Based on these depths, a sample of multivariate curves can be ordered from the center outward and order statistics can be defined. Properties of the proposed depths, such as invariance and consistency, can be established. A simulation study shows the robustness of this new definition of depth and the advantages of using a multivariate depth versus the marginal depths for detecting outliers. Real data examples from growth curves and signature data are used to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed depths. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  9. Design to Process Capabilities: challenges for the use of Process Capability Databases (PCDBs) in development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eifler, Tobias; Göhler, Simon Moritz; Howard, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    In approaches such as Robust Design, Tolerance Management, Design for Six Sigma (DfSS), etc. there is little disagreement that a better understanding of inevitable production variation is conducive to the success of development projects [Eifler et al. (2013), Arvidsson and Gremyr (2008), Karmakar...... on experiential approaches or expert judgment. There are numerous examples that this subjective assessment of potential variation and a mostly informal communication between design and production engineers can result in non-satisfying product or manufacturing solutions. Whereas overestimated production...... capabilities may lead to low yields and a cost/time overrun, conservatively underestimated capabilities affect quality through the reduced design space, or through increased play, rattle/noise, size or weight. A possibility to overcome the subjective assessment of variation in development projects is a Process...

  10. Capabilities, innovation, and overall performance in Brazilian export firms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ednilson de Oliveira Cabral

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article extends the current research on innovation by investigating the relationship between innovative capabilities and export firms’ overall performance. From the perspectives of the resource-based view (RBV and dynamic capability, we examine the differential and interactive effects of exploration and exploitation capabilities in product innovation for external markets and overall performance (direct and mediated by a new product. In addition, we test the moderating effect of market dynamism and the controlling effect of firm size on these relationships. Hence, the main contribution of this article is developing and empirically testing an original model, by combining these constructs that address new relationships, in an emerging country. This model was tested with data from 498 Brazilian export firms, distributed throughout all Brazilian manufacturing sectors, by firm size, and in states. The analysis was made with application of the structural equation modeling (SEM. As a result, we found support for the assumptions that exploitation capabilities influence product innovation and overall performance, whereas exploration capabilities and their interaction to exploitation capabilities influence overall performance, but not product innovation. Additionally, the relationship between exploitation capabilities and overall performance is mediated by product innovation. Unlike hypothesized, market dynamism does not moderate the relationship between product innovation and overall performance. Furthermore, firm size works as a controlling variable in the relationships analyzed. Regarding the implications for theory, this study contributes to grasp that exploitation capabilities influences a firm’s overall performance, both directly and indirectly (via product innovation, and highlights the various direct and mediatory effects of innovation on overall performance. These insights show the importance of considering the role of mediating and

  11. Hofer's metrics and boundary depth

    CERN Document Server

    Usher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We show that if (M,\\omega) is a closed symplectic manifold which admits a nontrivial Hamiltonian vector field all of whose contractible closed orbits are constant, then Hofer's metric on the group of Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms of (M,\\omega) has infinite diameter, and indeed admits infinite-dimensional quasi-isometrically embedded normed vector spaces. A similar conclusion applies to Hofer's metric on various spaces of Lagrangian submanifolds, including those Hamiltonian-isotopic to the diagonal in M x M when M satisfies the above dynamical condition. To prove this, we use the properties of a Floer-theoretic quantity called the boundary depth, which measures the nontriviality of the boundary operator on the Floer complex in a way that encodes robust symplectic-topological information.

  12. Aeration equipment for small depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  13. Development of a Full-Depth Wheel Tracking Test for Asphalt Pavement Structure: Methods and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rutting performance of asphalt pavement structure relies on the high temperature properties of asphalt mixture as well as the pavement structure and thickness. In order to investigate the influence of the structure and thickness, a full-depth wheel tracking test is developed in this research by improving the conventional wheel tracking test apparatus. The newly proposed test method is capable of varying its load speed and load size, controlling its specimen temperature gradient, and simulating the support conditions of actual asphalt pavement. The full-depth wheel tracking test based rutting performance evaluation of different asphalt pavement structures indicates that it is not reasonable to explain the rutting performance of asphalt pavement structure from the point of view of single-layer asphalt mixture rutting performance. The developed full-depth wheel tracking test can be used to distinguish rutting performance of different asphalt pavement structures, and two of five typical asphalt pavement structures commonly used in Shanxi Province were suggested for use in practical engineering.

  14. Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forst, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The shakeout in the solar cell and module industry is in full swing. While the number of companies and production locations shutting down in the Western world is increasing, the capacity expansion in the Far East seems to be unbroken. Size in combination with a good sales network has become the key to success for surviving in the current storm. The trade war with China already looming on the horizon is adding to the uncertainties. (orig.)

  15. Materialised Ideals Sizes and Beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Laitala

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Today’s clothing industry is based on a system where clothes are made in ready-to-wear sizes and meant to fit most people. Studies have pointed out that consumers are discontent with the use of these systems: size designations are not accurate enough to find clothing that fits, and different sizes are poorly available. This article discusses in depth who these consumers are, and which consumer groups are the most dissatisfied with today’s sizing systems. Results are based on a web survey where 2834 Nordic consumers responded, complemented with eight in-depth interviews, market analysis on clothing sizes and in-store trouser size measurements. Results indicate that higher shares of the consumers who have a body out of touch with the existing beauty ideals express discontentment with the sizing systems and the poor selection available. In particular, large women, very large men, and thin, short men are those who experience less priority in clothing stores and have more difficulties in finding clothes that fit. Consumers tend to blame themselves when the clothes do not fit their bodies, while our study points out that the industry is to blame as they do not produce clothing for all customers.

  16. Depth Echolocation Learnt by Novice Sighted People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Tonelli

    Full Text Available Some blind people have developed a unique technique, called echolocation, to orient themselves in unknown environments. More specifically, by self-generating a clicking noise with the tongue, echolocators gain knowledge about the external environment by perceiving more detailed object features. It is not clear to date whether sighted individuals can also develop such an extremely useful technique. To investigate this, here we test the ability of novice sighted participants to perform a depth echolocation task. Moreover, in order to evaluate whether the type of room (anechoic or reverberant and the type of clicking sound (with the tongue or with the hands influences the learning of this technique, we divided the entire sample into four groups. Half of the participants produced the clicking sound with their tongue, the other half with their hands. Half of the participants performed the task in an anechoic chamber, the other half in a reverberant room. Subjects stood in front of five bars, each of a different size, and at five different distances from the subject. The dimension of the bars ensured a constant subtended angle for the five distances considered. The task was to identify the correct distance of the bar. We found that, even by the second session, the participants were able to judge the correct depth of the bar at a rate greater than chance. Improvements in both precision and accuracy were observed in all experimental sessions. More interestingly, we found significantly better performance in the reverberant room than in the anechoic chamber. The type of clicking did not modulate our results. This suggests that the echolocation technique can also be learned by sighted individuals and that room reverberation can influence this learning process. More generally, this study shows that total loss of sight is not a prerequisite for echolocation skills this suggests important potential implications on rehabilitation settings for persons with

  17. Capabilities of nitrogen admixed cryogenic deuterium pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, Igor; Sergeev, Vladimir [SPU, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lang, Peter; Ploeckl, Bernhard; Cavedon, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kocsis, Gabor; Szepesi, Tamas [Wigner RCP RMI, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Operation at high core density with high energy confinement - as foreseen in a future fusion reactor like DEMO - is being investigated at ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The efficiency of pellet fuelling from the high-field side usually increases with increasing injection speed. Due to the fragile nature of the deuterium ice, however, the increment of pellet mass losses and subsequent pellet fragmentations take place when the speed is increased. Studies show, that admixing of a small amount of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into D{sub 2} gas can be favorable for the mechanical stability of pellets. This might be helpful for deeper pellet penetration. Besides, seeding by N{sub 2} can enhance plasma performance due to both increasing the energy confinement time and reducing the divertor heat load in the envisaged ELMy H-mode plasma scenario. Fuelling efficiency of N{sub 2}-admixed solid D{sub 2} pellets and their nitrogen seeding capabilities were investigated. It was found that both the overall plasma density increase and the measured averaged pellet penetration depth were smaller in case of the admixed (1% mol. in the gas resulting in about 0.8% in the ice) pellet fuelling. Possibility of the N{sub 2}-seeding by admixed pellets was confirmed by CXRS measurements of N{sup 7+} content in plasma.

  18. Practitioner Perspectives on Foundational Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Juliano, Chrissie; Castrucci, Brian C.; Beitsch, Leslie M.; Dilley, Abby; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: National efforts are underway to classify a minimum set of public health services that all jurisdictions throughout the United States should provide regardless of location. Such a set of basic programs would be supported by crosscutting services, known as the “foundational capabilities” (FCs). These FCs are assessment services, preparedness and disaster response, policy development, communications, community partnership, and organizational support activities. Objective: To ascertain familiarity with the term and concept of FCs and gather related perspectives from state and local public health practitioners. Design: In fall 2013, we interviewed 50 leaders from state and local health departments. We asked about familiarity with the term “foundational capabilities,” as well as the broader concept of FCs. We attempted to triangulate the utility of the FC concept by asking respondents about priority programs and services, about perceived unique contributions made by public health, and about prevalence and funding for the FCs. Setting: Telephone-based interviews. Participants: Fifty leaders of state and local health departments. Main Outcome Measures: Practitioner familiarity with and perspectives on the FCs, information about current funding streams for public health, and the likelihood of creating nationwide FCs that would be recognized and accepted by all jurisdictions. Results: Slightly more than half of the leaders interviewed said that they were familiar with the concept of FCs. In most cases, health departments had all of the capabilities to some degree, although operationalization varied. Few indicated that current funding levels were sufficient to support implementing a minimum level of FCs nationally. Conclusions: Respondents were not able to articulate the current or optimal levels of services for the various capabilities, nor the costs associated with them. Further research is needed to understand the role of FCs as part of the foundational

  19. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant application program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.

  20. EOP TDRs (Temperature-Depth-Recordings) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature-depth-recorders (TDRs) were attached to commercial longline and research Cobb trawl gear to obtain absolute depth and temperature measurement during...

  1. Depth zonation in a Parapandalus narval (Crustacea, Decapoda, Pandalidae) population from Rhodos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thessalou-Legaki, Maria; Frantzis, Alexis; Nassiokas, Kostas; Hatzinikolaou, Savas

    1989-09-01

    The population characteristics of Parapandalus narval are related to depth. Sex ratio (females/males and females) decreases with depth, while female size increases. Dry weight of equal sized individuals decreases with depth. For the 23 and 80 + 140 m females, the relative dry weight reduction was estimated to 10·3% and 16·0% compared to that of the 5 m females, respectively. Males (80-220 m) exhibited the greatest reduction of 19·9%. It is suggested that the depth zonation exhibited by the P. narval population is related to habitat differences along the depth range sampled and has to do with the exploitation of the available food resources by different sex and/or size groups.

  2. Visual Discomfort and Depth-of-Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise O'Hare

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual discomfort has been reported for certain visual stimuli and under particular viewing conditions, such as stereoscopic viewing. In stereoscopic viewing, visual discomfort can be caused by a conflict between accommodation and convergence cues that may specify different distances in depth. Earlier research has shown that depth-of-field, which is the distance range in depth in the scene that is perceived to be sharp, influences both the perception of egocentric distance to the focal plane, and the distance range in depth between objects in the scene. Because depth-of-field may also be in conflict with convergence and the accommodative state of the eyes, we raised the question of whether depth-of-field affects discomfort when viewing stereoscopic photographs. The first experiment assessed whether discomfort increases when depth-of-field is in conflict with coherent accommodation–convergence cues to distance in depth. The second experiment assessed whether depth-of-field influences discomfort from a pre-existing accommodation–convergence conflict. Results showed no effect of depth-of-field on visual discomfort. These results suggest therefore that depth-of-field can be used as a cue to depth without inducing discomfort in the viewer, even when cue conflicts are large.

  3. Geographical Distribution of Crater Depths on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    2010-03-01

    Global maps of crater depths on Mars are constructed using a new dataset that lists depths of >75,000 craters. Distribution of crater depths is interpreted in terms of cryosphere extent, and the locations of deepest craters on Mars are identified.

  4. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorn, A.; Koenderink, J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of “pictorial depth” in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of “depth” is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The

  5. The number and size of subhalo-induced gaps in stellar streams

    CERN Document Server

    Erkal, Denis; Bovy, Jo; Sanders, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    Ample observational capabilities exist today to detect the small density perturbations that low-mass dark matter subhaloes impart on stellar streams from disrupting Galactic satellites. In anticipation of these observations, we investigate the expected number and size of gaps by combining an analytic prescription for gap evolution on circular orbits with the flux of subhaloes near the stream. We explore the distribution of gap sizes and depths for a typical cold stream around the Milky Way and find that for a given stream age and gap depth, each subhalo mass produces a characteristic gap size. For a stream with an age of a few Gyr, orbiting at a distance of 10-20 kpc from the Galactic center, even modest subhaloes with a mass of $10^6-10^7 M_\\odot$ produce gaps with sizes that are on the order of several degrees. We consider the number and distribution of gap sizes created by subhaloes with masses $10^5-10^9 M_\\odot$ and present predictions for six cold streams around the Milky Way. For Pal 5, we forecast 0.7...

  6. Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

    2000-05-15

    Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

  7. Uterine caliper and depth gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Loyd L.; Wheeler, Robert G.; Fish, Thomas M.

    1977-01-01

    A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

  8. The Hubble-Depth Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbom Park

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediante una simulaci n de N cuerpos de un modelo ACDM hemos desarrollado una b squeda de galaxias ficticias hasta la profundidad del Hubble. Para encontrar las galaxias en la distribuci on de part culas, identificamos los halos estables y autoligados mediante un m todo de b squeda de halos en el espacio real y en el cono de luz. Suponemos que cada halo contiene solamente una galaxia con un brillo monot nicamente proporcional a la masa del halo, para as ajustar la funci n de masa con la funci n de luminosidad gal actica obtenida en el Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS. Despu s de aplicar la correcciones K, y de evoluci n a las luminosidades observadas de las galaxias ficticias, hicimos estudios del corrimiento al rojo bajo varias restricciones observacionales. En particular, proponemos un nuevo estudio de corrimientos al rojo, llamado el Hubble Depth Survey, el cual est limitado hasta la magnitud r = 22 y alcanza la distancia de Hubble dH = 3000 h -1 Mpe

  9. Experimental investigation of the ultra-precision turning capability of PVD ZnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-hao; Yang, Kun; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Gao-feng; Liu, Dan-dan

    2016-10-01

    ZnSe is widely used in infrared optical systems because of the good optical characteristics in 0.5 22μm and the good processability. Physical Vapor Deposition(PVD) of ZnSe is good at no pollution in production process, lower price, etc. Infrared optical parts should be made by single point diamond turning or single point diamond fly-cutting after the experimental investigation of the ultra-precision turning capability of PVD ZnSe. The orthogonal experiment of ultra-precision turning PVD ZnSe was done at first, then the smooth turning surface and the rough turning surface were observed by metallographic microscope and 3D profilometer, and the mechanism of the defects on the turning surface was discussed. The result shows: the quality of ultra-precision turning surface of PVD ZnSe was restricted by the grain size and the distribution of the grain which could easily cause the variegated macula at the grain size, rising the spindle speed, reducing the feed rate and reducing the cut depth could make the quality of ultra-precision turning surface better and reduce the roughness Ra value lower, the roughness Ra value of the smooth turning surface was reached 3 4nm which is enough to the infrared optical image systems currently by using the optimization of parameters.

  10. [Pictorial depth perception in central and peripheral visual fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirama, Aya; Mochizuki, Toshiko

    2007-04-01

    The present study aims to examine whether depth perception based on pictorial cues in the peripheral visual field is improved by compensating for the peripheral reduction of visual sensitivity. Figures that partially overlapped or had apparent transparency over a background figure were presented on a CRT monitor at the central-peripheral retinal regions of 2.5-10 degrees eccentricity under the two conditions of same size or size adjusted for the Cortical Magnification Scale (Virsu & Rovamo, 1979). In Experiment 1 the subjects could discriminate the depth relationship of two cortically magnified figures when these were presented within the retinal eccentricity of 10 degrees, even when solutions for the tasks were not dependent on a single visual attribute (brightness, shape). But discrimination in the peripheral visual field became difficult when the number of visual attributes of the stimuli increased (Experiment 2). We conclude that even for peripheral vision, depth perception based on pictorial cues is possible when cortically magnified stimuli are used. However, it should be further study whether or not the visual acuity is an only determinant for the difference between central and peripheral depth perception.

  11. Evolution of tail fork depth in genus Hirundo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masaru; Arai, Emi; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    A classic example of a sexually selected trait, the deep fork tail of the barn swallow Hirundo rustica is now claimed to have evolved and be maintained mainly via aerodynamic advantage rather than sexually selected advantage. However, this aerodynamic advantage hypothesis does not clarify which flight habits select for/against deep fork tails, causing diversity of tail fork depth in hirundines. Here, by focusing on the genus Hirundo, we investigated whether the large variation in tail fork depth could be explained by the differential flight habits. Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we found that migrant species had deeper fork tails, but less colorful plumage, than the other species, indicating that migration favors a specific trait, deep fork tails. At the same time, tail fork depth but not plumage coloration decreased with increasing bill size - a proxy of prey size, suggesting that foraging on larger prey items favors shallower fork tails. Variation of tail fork depth in the genus Hirundo may be explained by differential flight habits, even without assuming sexual selection.

  12. Identification of the primary mass of inclined cosmic ray showers from depth of maximum and number of muons parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Riggi, S; Rodriguez, G; Valino, I; Vazquez, R; Zas, E

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we carry out a study of the high energy cosmic rays mass identification capabilities of a hybrid detector employing both fluorescence telescopes and particle detectors at ground using simulated data. It involves the analysis of extensive showers with zenith angles above 60 degrees making use of the joint distribution of the depth of maximum and muon size at ground level as mass discriminating parameters. The correlation and sensitivity to the primary mass are investigated. Two different techniques - clustering algorithms and neural networks - are adopted to classify the mass identity on an event-by-event basis. Typical results for the achieved performance of identification are reported and discussed. The analysis can be extended in a very straightforward way to vertical showers or can be complemented with additional discriminating observables coming from different types of detectors.

  13. Amartya Sen's Capability Approach and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melanie

    2005-01-01

    The human capabilities approach developed by the economist Amartya Sen links development, quality of life and freedom. This article explores the key ideas in the capability approach of: capability, functioning, agency, human diversity and public participation in generating valued capabilities. It then considers how these ideas relate specifically…

  14. Professionals and Public Good Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Walker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Martha Nussbaum (2011 reminds us that, all over the world people are struggling for a life that is fully human - a life worthy of human dignity. Purely income-based and preference-based evaluations, as Sen (1999 argues, do not adequately capture what it means for each person to have quality of life. There are other things that make life good for a person, including access to publicly provided professional services. The question then is what version of education inflects more towards the intrinsic and transformational possibilities of professional work and contributions to decent societies? This paper suggests that we need a normative approach to professional education and professionalism; it is not the case that any old version will do. We also need normative criteria to move beyond social critique and to overcome a merely defensive attitude and to give a positive definition to the potential achievements of the professions. Moreover universities are connected to society, most especially through the professionals they educate; it is reasonable in our contemporary world to educate professional graduates to be in a position to alleviate inequalities, and to have the knowledge, skills and values to be able to do so. To make this case, we draw on the human capabilities approach of Sen (1999, 2009 and Nussbaum (2000, 2011 to conceptualise professional education for the public good as an ally of the struggles of people living in poverty and experiencing inequalities, expanding the well-being of people to be and to do in ways they have reason to value – to be mobile, cared for, respected, and so on. In particular we are interested in which human capabilities and functionings are most needed for a professional practice and professionalism that can contribute to transformative social change and how professional development is enabled via pedagogical arrangements.

  15. Rhizosphere size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Razavi, Bahar

    2017-04-01

    Estimation of the soil volume affected by roots - the rhizosphere - is crucial to assess the effects of plants on properties and processes in soils and dynamics of nutrients, water, microorganisms and soil organic matter. The challenges to assess the rhizosphere size are: 1) the continuum of properties between the root surface and root-free soil, 2) differences in the distributions of various properties (carbon, microorganisms and their activities, various nutrients, enzymes, etc.) along and across the roots, 3) temporal changes of properties and processes. Thus, to describe the rhizosphere size and root effects, a holistic approach is necessary. We collected literature and own data on the rhizosphere gradients of a broad range of physico-chemical and biological properties: pH, CO2, oxygen, redox potential, water uptake, various nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn and Fe), organic compounds (glucose, carboxylic acids, amino acids), activities of enzymes of C, N, P and S cycles. The collected data were obtained based on the destructive approaches (thin layer slicing), rhizotron studies and in situ visualization techniques: optodes, zymography, sensitive gels, 14C and neutron imaging. The root effects were pronounced from less than 0.5 mm (nutrients with slow diffusion) up to more than 50 mm (for gases). However, the most common effects were between 1 - 10 mm. Sharp gradients (e.g. for P, carboxylic acids, enzyme activities) allowed to calculate clear rhizosphere boundaries and so, the soil volume affected by roots. The first analyses were done to assess the effects of soil texture and moisture as well as root system and age on these gradients. The most properties can be described by two curve types: exponential saturation and S curve, each with increasing and decreasing concentration profiles from the root surface. The gradient based distribution functions were calculated and used to extrapolate on the whole soil depending on the root density and rooting intensity. We

  16. Visuomotor adaptation changes stereoscopic depth perception and tactile discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Robert; Fantoni, Carlo; Caudek, Corrado; Assad, John A; Domini, Fulvio

    2013-10-23

    Perceptual judgments of relative depth from binocular disparity are systematically distorted in humans, despite in principle having access to reliable 3D information. Interestingly, these distortions vanish at a natural grasping distance, as if perceived stereo depth is contingent on a specific reference distance for depth-disparity scaling that corresponds to the length of our arm. Here we show that the brain's representation of the arm indeed powerfully modulates depth perception, and that this internal calibration can be quickly updated. We used a classic visuomotor adaptation task in which subjects execute reaching movements with the visual feedback of their reaching finger displaced farther in depth, as if they had a longer arm. After adaptation, 3D perception changed dramatically, and became accurate at the "new" natural grasping distance, the updated disparity scaling reference distance. We further tested whether the rapid adaptive changes were restricted to the visual modality or were characteristic of sensory systems in general. Remarkably, we found an improvement in tactile discrimination consistent with a magnified internal image of the arm. This suggests that the brain integrates sensory signals with information about arm length, and quickly adapts to an artificially updated body structure. These adaptive processes are most likely a relic of the mechanisms needed to optimally correct for changes in size and shape of the body during ontogenesis.

  17. VISIDEP™: visual image depth enhancement by parallax induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R.; McLaurin, A. P.; Cathey, LeConte

    1984-05-01

    The usual descriptions of depth perception have traditionally required the simultaneous presentation of disparate views presented to separate eyes with the concomitant demand that the resulting binocular parallax be horizontally aligned. Our work suggests that the visual input information is compared in a short-term memory buffer which permits the brain to compute depth as it is normally perceived. However, the mechanism utilized is also capable of receiving and processing the stereographic information even when it is received monocularly or when identical inputs are simultaneously fed to both eyes. We have also found that the restriction to horizontally displaced images is not a necessary requirement and that improvement in image acceptability is achieved by the use of vertical parallax. Use of these ideas permit the presentation of three-dimensional scenes on flat screens in full color without the encumbrance of glasses or other viewing aids.

  18. Bayesian depth estimation from monocular natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Che-Chun; Cormack, Lawrence K; Bovik, Alan C

    2017-05-01

    Estimating an accurate and naturalistic dense depth map from a single monocular photographic image is a difficult problem. Nevertheless, human observers have little difficulty understanding the depth structure implied by photographs. Two-dimensional (2D) images of the real-world environment contain significant statistical information regarding the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the world that the vision system likely exploits to compute perceived depth, monocularly as well as binocularly. Toward understanding how this might be accomplished, we propose a Bayesian model of monocular depth computation that recovers detailed 3D scene structures by extracting reliable, robust, depth-sensitive statistical features from single natural images. These features are derived using well-accepted univariate natural scene statistics (NSS) models and recent bivariate/correlation NSS models that describe the relationships between 2D photographic images and their associated depth maps. This is accomplished by building a dictionary of canonical local depth patterns from which NSS features are extracted as prior information. The dictionary is used to create a multivariate Gaussian mixture (MGM) likelihood model that associates local image features with depth patterns. A simple Bayesian predictor is then used to form spatial depth estimates. The depth results produced by the model, despite its simplicity, correlate well with ground-truth depths measured by a current-generation terrestrial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) scanner. Such a strong form of statistical depth information could be used by the visual system when creating overall estimated depth maps incorporating stereopsis, accommodation, and other conditions. Indeed, even in isolation, the Bayesian predictor delivers depth estimates that are competitive with state-of-the-art "computer vision" methods that utilize highly engineered image features and sophisticated machine learning algorithms.

  19. Prediction of soil frost penetration depth in northwest of Iran using air freezing indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, H.; Moghbel, M.; Ranjbar, F.

    2016-11-01

    Information about soil frost penetration depth can be effective in finding appropriate solutions to reduce the agricultural crop damage, transportations, and building facilities. Amongst proper methods to achieve this information are the statistical and empirical models capable of estimating soil frost penetration depth. Therefore, the main objective of this research is to calculate soil frost penetration depth in northwest of Iran during the year 2007-2008 to validate two different models accuracy. To do so, the relationship between air and soil temperature in different depths (5-10-20-30-50-100 cm) at three times of the day (3, 9, and 15 GMT) for 14 weather stations over 7 provinces was analyzed using linear regression. Then, two different air freezing indices (AFIs) including Norwegian and Finn AFI was implemented. Finally, the frost penetration depth was calculated by McKeown method and the accuracy of models determined by actual soil frost penetration depth. The results demonstrated that there is a significant correlation between air and soil depth temperature in all studied stations up to the 30 cm under the surface. Also, according to the results, Norwegian index can be effectively used for determination of soil frost depth penetration and the correlation coefficient between actual and estimated soil frost penetration depth is r = 0.92 while the Finn index overestimates the frost depth in all stations with correlation coefficient r = 0.70.

  20. Fast depth extraction from a single image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting depth from a single image is an important problem for understanding the 3-D geometry of a scene. Recently, the nonparametric depth sampling (DepthTransfer has shown great potential in solving this problem, and its two key components are a Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT flow–based depth warping between the input image and its retrieved similar images and a pixel-wise depth fusion from all warped depth maps. In addition to the inherent heavy computational load in the SIFT flow computation even under a coarse-to-fine scheme, the fusion reliability is also low due to the low discriminativeness of pixel-wise description nature. This article aims at solving these two problems. First, a novel sparse SIFT flow algorithm is proposed to reduce the complexity from subquadratic to sublinear. Then, a reweighting technique is introduced where the variance of the SIFT flow descriptor is computed at every pixel and used for reweighting the data term in the conditional Markov random fields. Our proposed depth transfer method is tested on the Make3D Range Image Data and NYU Depth Dataset V2. It is shown that, with comparable depth estimation accuracy, our method is 2–3 times faster than the DepthTransfer.

  1. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  2. OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

    2011-08-01

    Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

  3. Opto-thermal Moisture Content and Moisture Depth Profile Measurements in Organic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Peng; GUO Xin-xin; CUI Ying-xin; Robert E. Imhof; Dane Bicanic

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements. In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture content of fruit (tomato, grape, etc. ) skins, and to study the relationship between fruits ripening process and their surface moisture and moisture depth profiles.

  4. Heavy Lift Launch Capability with a New Hydrocarbon Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Holt, James B.; Philips, Alan D.; Garcia, Jessica A.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center was tasked to define the thrust requirement of a new liquid oxygen rich staged combustion cycle hydrocarbon engine that could be utilized in a launch vehicle to meet NASA s future heavy lift needs. Launch vehicle concepts were sized using this engine for different heavy lift payload classes. Engine out capabilities for one of the heavy lift configurations were also analyzed for increased reliability that may be desired for high value payloads or crewed missions. The applicability for this engine in vehicle concepts to meet military and commercial class payloads comparable to current ELV capability was also evaluated.

  5. Current capability of a matured disposable acoustic sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, D. A. R.; Geddes, N. J., II; Hume, A.; Gray, A. J.

    2006-05-01

    In response to the needs of the UK MOD QinetiQ have designed, developed and trialled an ad-hoc, self organising network of acoustic nodes for in-depth deployment that can detect and track military targets in a range of environments and for all types of weapon locating. Research conducted has shown that disposable technologies are sufficiently mature to provide a useful military capability. Work this year has included a 3 month series of trials to exercise the prototype equipment and has provided an indication of in-service capability across a broad range of environments. This paper will discuss the scientific approach that was applied to the development of the equipment, from early laboratory development through to the prototype sensor network deployment in operationally representative environments. Highlights from the trials have been provided. New findings from the fusion of a low cost thermal imager that can be cued by the acoustic network are also discussed.

  6. Dynamic study of milling low depth channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosca Dorin Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of dynamic aspects of the milling cutters used in particular case of low depth channels. A new calculation method was developed, taking into account the high variations of cutting forces during milling small depth channels with peripheral cutting tools. A new formula was established for the minimal value of channel depth that allows cutting process to be performed in conditions of dynamic stability.

  7. The analogy between stereo depth and brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, A; Stevens, K A

    1989-01-01

    Apparent depth in stereograms exhibits various simultaneous-contrast and induction effects analogous to those reported in the luminance domain. This behavior suggests that stereo depth, like brightness, is reconstructed, ie recovered from higher-order spatial derivatives or differences of the original signal. The extent to which depth is analogous to brightness is examined. There are similarities in terms of contrast effects but dissimilarities in terms of the lateral inhibition effects traditionally attributed to underlying spatial-differentiation operators.

  8. Temporal and Spatial Denoising of Depth Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Shing Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a procedure for refining depth maps acquired using RGB-D (depth cameras. With numerous new structured-light RGB-D cameras, acquiring high-resolution depth maps has become easy. However, there are problems such as undesired occlusion, inaccurate depth values, and temporal variation of pixel values when using these cameras. In this paper, a proposed method based on an exemplar-based inpainting method is proposed to remove artefacts in depth maps obtained using RGB-D cameras. Exemplar-based inpainting has been used to repair an object-removed image. The concept underlying this inpainting method is similar to that underlying the procedure for padding the occlusions in the depth data obtained using RGB-D cameras. Therefore, our proposed method enhances and modifies the inpainting method for application in and the refinement of RGB-D depth data image quality. For evaluating the experimental results of the proposed method, our proposed method was tested on the Tsukuba Stereo Dataset, which contains a 3D video with the ground truths of depth maps, occlusion maps, RGB images, the peak signal-to-noise ratio, and the computational time as the evaluation metrics. Moreover, a set of self-recorded RGB-D depth maps and their refined versions are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Vu Le

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries.

  10. ACCURACY ANALYSIS OF KINECT DEPTH DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khoshelham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of the geometric quality of depth data obtained by the Kinect sensor. Based on the mathematical model of depth measurement by the sensor a theoretical error analysis is presented, which provides an insight into the factors influencing the accuracy of the data. Experimental results show that the random error of depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor, and ranges from a few millimetres up to about 4 cm at the maximum range of the sensor. The accuracy of the data is also found to be influenced by the low resolution of the depth measurements.

  11. Depth Perception In Remote Stereoscopic Viewing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika

    1989-01-01

    Report describes theoretical and experimental studies of perception of depth by human operators through stereoscopic video systems. Purpose of such studies to optimize dual-camera configurations used to view workspaces of remote manipulators at distances of 1 to 3 m from cameras. According to analysis, static stereoscopic depth distortion decreased, without decreasing stereoscopitc depth resolution, by increasing camera-to-object and intercamera distances and camera focal length. Further predicts dynamic stereoscopic depth distortion reduced by rotating cameras around center of circle passing through point of convergence of viewing axes and first nodal points of two camera lenses.

  12. An Exploration of the Needling Depth in Acupuncture: The Safe Needling Depth and the Needling Depth of Clinical Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaung-Geng Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the existing scientific information regarding safe needling depth of acupuncture points and the needling depth of clinical efficacy. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED, The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1991 to 2013. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 47 studies were recruited and divided into 6 groups by measuring tools, that is, MRI, in vivo evaluation, CT, ultrasound, dissected specimen of cadavers, and another group with clinical efficacy. Each research was analyzed for study design, definition of safe depth, and factors that would affect the measured depths. Depths of clinical efficacy were discussed from the perspective of de-qi and other clinical observations. Conclusions. Great inconsistency in depth of each point measured from different subject groups and tools exists. The definition of safe depth should be established through standardization. There is also lack of researches to compare the clinical efficacy. A well-designed clinical trial selecting proper measuring tools to decide the actual and advisable needling depth for each point, to avoid adverse effects or complications and promote optimal clinical efficacy, is a top priority.

  13. Evaluation of Process Capability in Gas Carburizing Process to Achieve Quality through Limit Design Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Palaniradja; N. Alagumurthi; V. Soundararajan

    2004-01-01

    Steel is the most important metallic material used in industry. This is because of the versatility of its engineering properties under different conditions. In one condition it can be very mild, soft and suitable for any forming operation. In another condition the same steel can be very hard and strong. This versatility is made possible by the different heat treatments that the steel can be subject to. One such treatment is Gas carburizing. This is the most widely used process for surface hardening of low carbon steels. In this method the surface composition of the steel changes by diffusion of carbon and or nitrogen and result in hard outer surface with good wear resistance properties. A striking feature of Gas Carburizing process is that in this process the original toughness and ductility remains unaffected even after heat treatment. 3% nickel chromium case hardened low carbon steels are widely used for critical automotive and machine applications such as rack and pinion, gears, camshaft, valve rocker shafts and axles which requires high fatigue resistance. Fatigue behaviour of case carburized parts depends to a great extent on the correct combination of Hardness Penetration Depth (HPD) and the magnitude of hardness at the surface and beneath the surface with low size and shape distortion. In order to reduce the manufacturing costs in terms of material consumption and elimination of the number of processing steps, the effect of Gas carburizing parameters on the fatigue behaviour should already be considered in the parameter design stage. Therefore it is of importance to optimize the gas carburizing process variables to attain quality products with respect to hardness and case depth. In the present paper, the evaluation of process capability was carried out through a Limit Design Concept called orthogonal array design of experiment. To optimize the process variables the influence of several parameters (Holding time,Carbon potential, Furnace temperature and Quench

  14. Organizational Economics of Capability and Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyres, Nicholas S.; Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul;

    2012-01-01

    For decades, the literatures on firm capabilities and organizational economics have been at odds with each other, specifically relative to explaining organizational boundaries and heterogeneity. We briefly trace the history of the relationship between the capabilities literature and organizationa...

  15. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: computation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    This report characterizes the computation systems capabilities at Sandia Laboratories. Selected applications of these capabilities are presented to illustrate the extent to which they can be applied in research and development programs. 9 figures.

  16. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  17. DESIGNING AND MEASURING CAPABILITY. A NEW PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu COCENESCU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of capability has long been a topic for debate among planners. The main benefit brought by it is that of ensuring the connection between objectives and necessary financial resources. Thus, capability is a median element within the process of integrated planning. In this context, there are sceptics who consider that capability cannot be measured. However, this article aims at presenting a pattern and a formula for measuring and interpreting the level of capability.

  18. STRATEGIC AIRLIFT CAPABILITY: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Cezar VASILESCU

    2011-01-01

    Strategic airlift remains a critical supporting capability that should be achieved, maintained and improved. This capability ensures the ability to deploy and sustain military forces across possible distant battlefields. The paper analyses the growing strategic airlift capabilities gap between operational needs and current realities, and underlines the need for an enhanced strategic airlift capability to meet current and future NATO alliance needs. By analyzing requirements against the existi...

  19. The capabilities conception of the individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper advances a capabilities conception of the individual, and considers some of the problems involved in developing such a conception. It also makes claims about the nature of the capability space as a whole, frames personal development in terms of the idea of moving though the capability spa

  20. Biotechnology: Opportunities to Enhance Army Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    capabilities for field repair. Also, bioplastics could replace traditional synthetic materials used in equipment because of I greater strength, lighter...robots will require many of the same novel synthetic raterials as commercial robots. However, bioceramics, biopolymers, and bioplastics more suited...biological capability or performance enhanced by electronic or electrochemical devices I Bioplast - a minute quantity of living protoplasm capable of

  1. Selecting Capabilities for Quality of Life Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    The capability approach advocates that interpersonal comparisons be made in the space of functionings and capabilities. However, Amartya Sen has not specified which capabilities should be selected as the relevant ones. This has provoked two types of criticism. The stronger critique is Martha Nussbaum's claim that Sen should endorse one specific…

  2. IT Capability as Moderator Between IT Investment and Firm Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongmei; LU Hongjian; HU Junhua

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting results from previous research relating information technology (IT) investments and firm performance suggest that there is no direct relationship between IT investments and firm performance. The resource-based view (RBV) of the firm is introduced as a research tool to examine how IT resources and capabilities affect firm performance. A theoretical rationale model is then used to investigate the relationship between IT investment and firm performance. The IT capability is assumed to be an important moderator variable rather than a mediator variable linking IT investments to firm performance, while the time period, the firm size, and the industry type, all recognized as factors influencing performance, are treated as control variables. The model and hypotheses are verified by sample data from leading IT firms in China. The data confirms the moderating effect of the IT capability.

  3. A deep view in cultural heritage - confocal micro X-ray spectroscopy for depth resolved elemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanngiesser, B.; Malzer, W.; Mantouvalou, I. [Technical University of Berlin, Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Berlin (Germany); Sokaras, D. [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Nuclear Physics, Athens (Greece); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Karydas, A.G. [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Nuclear Physics, Athens (Greece); International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Spectrometry and Applications Laboratory (NSAL), Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    Quantitative X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) techniques have been developed mostly for the elemental analysis of homogeneous bulk or very simple layered materials. Further on, the microprobe version of both techniques is applied for 2D elemental mapping of surface heterogeneities. At typical XRF/PIXE fixed geometries and exciting energies (15-25 keV and 2-3 MeV, respectively), the analytical signal (characteristic X-ray radiation) emanates from a variable but rather extended depth within the analyzed material, according to the exciting probe energy, set-up geometry, specimen matrix composition and analyte. Consequently, the in-depth resolution offered by XRF and PIXE techniques is rather limited for the characterization of materials with micrometer-scale stratigraphy or 3D heterogeneous structures. This difficulty has been over-passed to some extent in the case of an X-ray or charged particle microprobe by creating the so-called confocal geometry. The field of view of the X-ray spectrometer is spatially restricted by a polycapillary X-ray lens within a sensitive microvolume formed by the two inter-sectioned focal regions. The precise scanning of the analyzed specimen through the confocal microvolume results in depth-sensitive measurements, whereas the additional 2D scanning microprobe possibilities render to element-specific 3D spatial resolution (3D micro-XRF and 3D micro-PIXE). These developments have contributed since 2003 to a variety of fields of applications in environmental, material and life sciences. In contrast to other elemental imaging methods, no size restriction of the objects investigated and the non-destructive character of analysis have been found indispensable for cultural heritage (CH) related applications. The review presents a summary of the experimental set-up developments at synchrotron radiation beamlines, particle accelerators and desktop spectrometers that have driven methodological developments and

  4. A comparison of analytical depth of search metrics with mission simulations for exoplanet imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2016-07-01

    While new, advanced, ground-based instrumentation continues to produce new exoplanet discoveries and provide further insights into exoplanet formation and evolution, our desire to discover and characterize planets of Earth size about stars of all types and ages necessitates dedicated, imaging space instruments. Given the high costs and complexities of space observatories, it is vital to build confidence in a proposed instrument's capabilities during its design phase, and much effort has been devoted to predicting the performance of various flavors of space- based exoplanet imagers. The fundamental problem with trying to answer the question of how many exoplanets a given instrument will discover is that the number of discoverable planets is unknown, and so all results are entirely dependent on the assumptions made about the population of planets being studied. Here, we explore an alternate approach, which involves explicitly separating instrumental and mission biasing from the assumptions made about planet distributions. This allows us to calculate a mission's `depth of search'-a metric independent of the planetary population and defined as the fraction of the contrast-projected separation space reached by a given instrument for a fixed planetary radius and semi-major axis. When multiplied by an assumed occurrence rate for planets at this radius and semi-major axis (derived from an assumed planetary population), this yields the expected number of detections by the instrument for that population. Integrating over the full ranges of semi-major axis and planetary radius provides estimates of planet yield for a full mission. We use this metric to evaluate the coronagraphs under development for the WFIRST mission under different operating assumptions. We also compare the results of convolving the depth of search with an assumed planetary population to those derived by running full mission simulations based on that same population.

  5. Depth-dependent dispersion compensation for full-depth OCT image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liuhua; Wang, Xiangzhao; Li, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xiangyang; Bu, Yang; Nan, Nan; Chen, Yan; Wang, Xuan

    2017-05-01

    A depth-dependent dispersion compensation algorithm for enhancing the image quality of the Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) is presented. The dispersion related with depth in the sample is considered. Using the iterative method, an analytical formula for compensating the depth-dependent dispersion in the sample is obtained. We apply depth-dependent dispersion compensation algorithm to process the phantom images and in vivo images. Using sharpness metric based on variation coefficient to compare the results processed with different dispersion compensation algorithms, we find that the depth-dependent dispersion compensation algorithm can improve image quality at full depth.

  6. Perceptual Depth Quality in Distorted Stereoscopic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiheng; Wang, Shiqi; Ma, Kede; Wang, Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Subjective and objective measurement of the perceptual quality of depth information in symmetrically and asymmetrically distorted stereoscopic images is a fundamentally important issue in stereoscopic 3D imaging that has not been deeply investigated. Here, we first carry out a subjective test following the traditional absolute category rating protocol widely used in general image quality assessment research. We find this approach problematic, because monocular cues and the spatial quality of images have strong impact on the depth quality scores given by subjects, making it difficult to single out the actual contributions of stereoscopic cues in depth perception. To overcome this problem, we carry out a novel subjective study where depth effect is synthesized at different depth levels before various types and levels of symmetric and asymmetric distortions are applied. Instead of following the traditional approach, we ask subjects to identify and label depth polarizations, and a depth perception difficulty index (DPDI) is developed based on the percentage of correct and incorrect subject judgements. We find this approach highly effective at quantifying depth perception induced by stereo cues and observe a number of interesting effects regarding image content dependency, distortion-type dependence, and the impact of symmetric versus asymmetric distortions. Furthermore, we propose a novel computational model for DPDI prediction. Our results show that the proposed model, without explicitly identifying image distortion types, leads to highly promising DPDI prediction performance. We believe that these are useful steps toward building a comprehensive understanding on 3D quality-of-experience of stereoscopic images.

  7. Coding of Depth Images for 3DTV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamarin, Marco; Forchhammer, Søren

    In this short paper a brief overview of the topic of coding and compression of depth images for multi-view image and video coding is provided. Depth images represent a convenient way to describe distances in the 3D scene, useful for 3D video processing purposes. Standard approaches...

  8. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitakoji Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle, muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle. Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  9. A depth integrated model for suspended transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galappatti, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new depth averaged model for suspended sediment transport in open channels has been developed based on an asymptotic solution to the two dimensional convection-diffusion equation in the vertical plane. The solution for the depth averaged concentration is derived from the bed boundary condition and

  10. Depth image enhancement using perceptual texture priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Duhyeon; Shim, Hyunjung

    2015-03-01

    A depth camera is widely used in various applications because it provides a depth image of the scene in real time. However, due to the limited power consumption, the depth camera presents severe noises, incapable of providing the high quality 3D data. Although the smoothness prior is often employed to subside the depth noise, it discards the geometric details so to degrade the distance resolution and hinder achieving the realism in 3D contents. In this paper, we propose a perceptual-based depth image enhancement technique that automatically recovers the depth details of various textures, using a statistical framework inspired by human mechanism of perceiving surface details by texture priors. We construct the database composed of the high quality normals. Based on the recent studies in human visual perception (HVP), we select the pattern density as a primary feature to classify textures. Upon the classification results, we match and substitute the noisy input normals with high quality normals in the database. As a result, our method provides the high quality depth image preserving the surface details. We expect that our work is effective to enhance the details of depth image from 3D sensors and to provide a high-fidelity virtual reality experience.

  11. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-09-26

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide.

  12. Competence Utilization for Innovation Capabilities A Question of Trust?

    OpenAIRE

    Britta BOLZERN-KONRAD; Carolin EGGER; Erika SUMILO

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how trust as an organizational value contributes to employee competence utilization in the case of innovation capability. Thus, it is the objective of this paper to analyze the positive impacts, but also potential limits of trust in business management. The research paper uses two different quantitative empirical studies drawn from German and Austrian mid-sized companies to empirically test this interrelation. As a result, the paper determines particular a...

  13. Fast reconstruction of digital holograms for extended depths of field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.W.M.Tsang; T.-C.Poon; T.Kim; Y.S.Kim

    2016-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that a static,three-dimensional (3D) object scene can be directly recorded as a complex digital hologram.However,numerical reconstruction of the object scene,which may comprise multiple sections located at unknown distances from the hologram,is a complicated and computation-intensive process.To the best of our knowledge,we propose,for the first time,a low complexity method that is capable of reconstructing a complex hologram,such that sections at different depths in the 3D object scene can be automatically reconstructed at the correct focal distances and merged into a single image for an extended depth of field.We demonstrate an order of magnitude increase of the depth of field for binary objects.With the use of a graphical processing unit,the reconstruction of a 512 × 512 complex hologram can be accomplished in about 100 ms,equivalent to around 10 frames per second.

  14. A comprehensive estimation method for enterprise capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Kuzhda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In today’s highly competitive business world, the need for efficient enterprise capability management is greater than ever. As more enterprises begin to compete on a global scale, the effective use of enterprise capability will become imperative for them to improve their business activities. The definition of socio-economic capability of the enterprise has been given and the main components of enterprise capability have been pointed out. The comprehensive method to estimate enterprise capability that takes into account both social and economic components has been offered. The methodical approach concerning integrated estimation of the enterprise capability has been developed. Novelty deals with the inclusion of summary measure of the social component of enterprise capability to define the integrated index of enterprise capability. The practical significance of methodological approach is that the method allows assessing the enterprise capability comprehensively through combining two kinds of estimates – social and economic and converts them into a single integrated indicator. It provides a comprehensive approach to socio-economic estimation of enterprise capability, sets a formal basis for making decisions and helps allocate enterprise resources reasonably. Practical implementation of this method will affect the current condition and trends of the enterprise, help to make forecasts and plans for its development and capability efficient use.

  15. Capability Development in an Offshoring Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaura, Manya

    Capability development can be defined as deliberate firm-level investment involving a search and learning process aimed at modifying or enhancing existing capabilities. Increasingly, firms are relocating advanced services to offshore locations resulting in the challenge of capability development...... in the offshore unit. Guided by the research question – what drives or impedes capability development in an offshoring context – the purpose of this thesis is to investigate how an idiosyncratic offshoring context affects capability development. The thesis consists of three papers using various datasets...... and qualitative methods that investigate capability development in an offshoring context. The first paper investigates how capability development takes place for a service-provider firm at the activity level. The second paper examines the transition made by a captive offshore unit, from performing standardized...

  16. Activity-based resource capability modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Shao-wu; XU Xiao-fei; WANG Gang; SUN Xue-dong

    2008-01-01

    To analyse and optimize a enterprise process in a wide scope, an activity-based method of modeling resource capabilities is presented. It models resource capabilities by means of the same structure as an activity, that is, resource capabilities are defined by input objects, actions and output objects. A set of activity-based re-source capability modeling rules and matching rules between an activity and a resource are introduced. This method can not only be used to describe capability of manufacturing tools, but also capability of persons and applications, etc. It unifies methods of modeling capability of all kinds of resources in an enterprise and supports the optimization of the resource allocation of a process.

  17. Distinctive Dynamic Capabilities for New Business Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenø, Axel; Enkel, Ellen; Mezger, Florian

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the distinctive dynamic capabilities for new business creation in established companies. We argue that these are very different from those for managing incremental innovation within a company's core business. We also propose that such capabilities are needed in both slow...... and fast-paced industries, and that similarities exist across industries. Hence, the study contributes to dynamic capabilities literature by: 1) identifying the distinctive dynamic capabilities for new business creation; 2) shifting focus away from dynamic capabilities in environments characterised by high...... clock-speed and uncertainty towards considering dynamic capabilities for the purpose of developing new businesses, which also implies a high degree of uncertainty. Based on interviews with 33 companies, we identify distinctive dynamic capabilities for new business creation, find that dynamic...

  18. Occurrence patterns of coral-dwelling gall crabs (Cryptochiridae over depth intervals in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj M. van Tienderen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coral-associated invertebrates form a major part of the diversity on reefs, but their distribution and occurrence patterns are virtually unstudied. For associated taxa data are lacking on their distribution across shelves and environmental gradients, but also over various depths. Off Curaçao we studied the prevalence and density of coral-dwelling gall crabs (Cryptochiridae, obligate symbionts of stony corals. Belt transects (10 × 0.5m2 were laid out at 6, 12 and 18 m depth intervals at 27 localities. Twenty-one known host coral species were surveyed, measured, and the number of crab dwellings was recorded to study the influence of host occurrence, depth distribution, and colony size on the occurrence rates of three Atlantic gall crab species: Opecarcinus hypostegus, Troglocarcinus corallicola and Kroppcarcinus siderastreicola. The overall gall crab prevalence rate was 20.3% across all available host corals at all depths. The agariciid-associated species O. hypostegus was found to mostly inhabit Agaricia lamarcki and its prevalence was highest at deeper depths, following the depth distribution of its host. Kroppcarcinus siderastreicola, associated with Siderastrea and Stephanocoenia, inhabited shallower depths despite higher host availability at deeper depths. The generalist species T. corallicola showed no clear host or depth specialisation. These results show that the primary factors affecting the distribution and occurrence rates over depth intervals differed between each of the three Atlantic cryptochirid species, which in turn influences their vulnerability to reef degradation.

  19. Disparity biasing in depth from monocular occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirlin, Inna; Wilcox, Laurie M; Allison, Robert S

    2011-07-15

    Monocular occlusions have been shown to play an important role in stereopsis. Among other contributions to binocular depth perception, monocular occlusions can create percepts of illusory occluding surfaces. It has been argued that the precise location in depth of these illusory occluders is based on the constraints imposed by occlusion geometry. Tsirlin et al. (2010) proposed that when these constraints are weak, the depth of the illusory occluder can be biased by a neighboring disparity-defined feature. In the present work we test this hypothesis using a variety of stimuli. We show that when monocular occlusions provide only partial constraints on the magnitude of depth of the illusory occluders, the perceived depth of the occluders can be biased by disparity-defined features in the direction unrestricted by the occlusion geometry. Using this disparity bias phenomenon we also show that in illusory occluder stimuli where disparity information is present, but weak, most observers rely on disparity while some use occlusion information instead to specify the depth of the illusory occluder. Taken together our experiments demonstrate that in binocular depth perception disparity and monocular occlusion cues interact in complex ways to resolve perceptual ambiguity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Remotely Measuring Snow Depth in Inaccessible Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D.; Boon, S.

    2010-12-01

    In watershed-scale studies of snow accumulation, high alpine areas are typically important accumulation areas. While snow depth measurements may not be collected in these regions due to avalanche danger, failing to include them in basin-wide estimates of snow accumulation may lead to large underestimates of basin-scale water yield. We present a new method to measure spatially distributed point snow depths remotely. Previously described methods using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) systems, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems, and hand-held laser distance meters have several limitations related to cost, data processing, and accuracy, thus reducing their applicability. The use of a modern robotic total station attempts to resolve these limitations. Total stations have much greater measurement accuracy than laser distance meters, and are significantly less expensive then TLS and LiDAR systems. Data can be output in common data formats, simplifying data processing and management. Measurement points can also be resampled repeatedly throughout the season with high accuracy and precision. Simple trigonometry is used to convert total station measurements into estimates of snow depth perpendicular to the slope. We present results of remote snow depth measurements using a Leica Geosystems TCRP 1201+ robotic total station. Snow depth estimates from the station are validated against measured depths in a field trial. The method is then applied in a basin-scale study to collect and calculate high elevation snow depth, in combination with traditional snow surveys at lower elevations.

  1. Boundary Depth Information Using Hopfield Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ruisheng

    2016-06-01

    Depth information is widely used for representation, reconstruction and modeling of 3D scene. Generally two kinds of methods can obtain the depth information. One is to use the distance cues from the depth camera, but the results heavily depend on the device, and the accuracy is degraded greatly when the distance from the object is increased. The other one uses the binocular cues from the matching to obtain the depth information. It is more and more mature and convenient to collect the depth information of different scenes by stereo matching methods. In the objective function, the data term is to ensure that the difference between the matched pixels is small, and the smoothness term is to smooth the neighbors with different disparities. Nonetheless, the smoothness term blurs the boundary depth information of the object which becomes the bottleneck of the stereo matching. This paper proposes a novel energy function for the boundary to keep the discontinuities and uses the Hopfield neural network to solve the optimization. We first extract the region of interest areas which are the boundary pixels in original images. Then, we develop the boundary energy function to calculate the matching cost. At last, we solve the optimization globally by the Hopfield neural network. The Middlebury stereo benchmark is used to test the proposed method, and results show that our boundary depth information is more accurate than other state-of-the-art methods and can be used to optimize the results of other stereo matching methods.

  2. Improved tilt-depth method for fast estimation of top and bottom depths of magnetic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Jin; Ge, Kun-Peng; Chen, Xiao; Nie, Feng-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The tilt-depth method can be used to make fast estimation of the top depth of magnetic bodies. However, it is unable to estimate bottom depths and its every inversion point only has a single solution. In order to resolve such weaknesses, this paper presents an improved tilt-depth method based on the magnetic anomaly expression of vertical contact with a finite depth extent, which can simultaneously estimate top and bottom depths of magnetic bodies. In addition, multiple characteristic points are selected on the tilt angle map for joint computation to improve reliability of inversion solutions. Two- and threedimensional model tests show that this improved tilt-depth method is effective in inverting buried depths of top and bottom bodies, and has a higher inversion precision for top depths than the conventional method. The improved method is then used to process aeromagnetic data over the Changling Fault Depression in the Songliao Basin, and inversion results of top depths are found to be more accurate for actual top depths of volcanic rocks in two nearby drilled wells than those using the conventional tilt-depth method.

  3. P1-26: Influence of Depth from Luminance Contrast on Vergence Eye Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hiratani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A vergence eye movement is the simultaneous movement of both eyes in opposite directions to obtain or maintain single binocular vision. It has been shown that a vergence movement is induced not only by binocular depth but also by the changing size of the stimuli, which produces perception of motion in depth. That is, a monocular depth cue influences the direction of the eye movement, even when the eye movement contradicts depth from the disparity cue. Despite that a number of monocular depth cues are known, the influence on the vergence movement is known only with changing size. In this study, we focused on luminance contrast as a monocular depth cue and examined whether it influences the vergence movement. The stimuli were a Gabor patch with contrast changing sinusoidally in time at a given temporal frequency. When the observer looks at the stimuli, apparent depth changes with the contrast change. Eye movement measurements showed vergence movements synchronizing with luminance changes. Change in perceived depth caused by change of the luminance contrast influences vergence movement.

  4. The interplay between rainfall infiltration depth, rooting depth and water table depth in regulating Amazon evapotranspiration (ET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Fan, Ying; Dominguez, Francina

    2017-04-01

    Plants link the subsurface to the atmosphere via water and carbon fluxes and are therefore a key player in climate. The Amazon, one of Earth's largest ecosystems, is an important climate regulator. As a large source of evapotranspiration, it has significant influence on regional and remote precipitation dynamics. For its equatorial position, it impacts significantly the global climate engine. The Amazon receives abundant annual rainfall but parts of it experience a multi-month dry season. Here we elucidate the interplay among three hydrological depths: precipitation infiltration depth, root water uptake-depth, and the water table depth in regulating dry-season ET, using inverse modeling based on observed productivity, ERA Interim reanalysis atmosphere, and a novel integrated soil-surface-groundwater model with dynamic root uptake to meet the transpiration demand. We perform high-resolution ( 1km) multi-year simulations over the region, with shallow soil, deep soil, with and without groundwater, with and without dynamic rooting depth; attempting to tease out these components. The results demonstrate the strong interactions among the three depths and what each factor does in regulating dry season ET, shedding light on how future global change may preferentially impact Amazon ecosystem functioning.

  5. Variable high-resolution color CCD camera system with online capability for professional photo studio application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfelder, Stefan; Reichel, Frank R.; Gaertner, Ernst; Hacker, Erich J.; Cappellaro, Markus; Rudolf, Peter; Voelk, Ute

    1998-04-01

    Digital cameras are of increasing significance for professional applications in photo studios where fashion, portrait, product and catalog photographs or advertising photos of high quality have to be taken. The eyelike is a digital camera system which has been developed for such applications. It is capable of working online with high frame rates and images of full sensor size and it provides a resolution that can be varied between 2048 by 2048 and 6144 by 6144 pixel at a RGB color depth of 12 Bit per channel with an also variable exposure time of 1/60s to 1s. With an exposure time of 100 ms digitization takes approx. 2 seconds for an image of 2048 by 2048 pixels (12 Mbyte), 8 seconds for the image of 4096 by 4096 pixels (48 Mbyte) and 40 seconds for the image of 6144 by 6144 pixels (108 MByte). The eyelike can be used in various configurations. Used as a camera body most commercial lenses can be connected to the camera via existing lens adaptors. On the other hand the eyelike can be used as a back to most commercial 4' by 5' view cameras. This paper describes the eyelike camera concept with the essential system components. The article finishes with a description of the software, which is needed to bring the high quality of the camera to the user.

  6. Human action recognition with depth cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jiang; Wu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Action recognition technology has many real-world applications in human-computer interaction, surveillance, video retrieval, retirement home monitoring, and robotics. The commoditization of depth sensors has also opened up further applications that were not feasible before. This text focuses on feature representation and machine learning algorithms for action recognition from depth sensors. After presenting a comprehensive overview of the state of the art, the authors then provide in-depth descriptions of their recently developed feature representations and machine learning techniques, includi

  7. The effects of stereoscopic depth on completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, H

    1999-01-01

    Stereoscopic depth has a critical effect on completion of partially occluded figures. However, it has not strictly been distinguished whether the effect is direct or indirect through alteration of contour segmentation or parsing. Here, I report that stereoscopic depth does not influence completion of partially occluded figures when parsing is unambiguous from motion cues. This is consistent with the present proposal that stereoscopic depth does not have a unique role in completion and that it is one of the cues to contour segmentation or parsing, which in turn influences completion and surface representation, like motion, shape, or transparency.

  8. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Player, K.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last decade. Radar instruments can be used to provide a wealth of information regarding the internal and basal conditions of large and small ice masses. These instruments typically operate in the VHF and UHF regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For temperate-ice sounding, however, the high water content produces scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves at VHF and UHF frequencies, which significantly reduce the penetration depths. Radars operating in the HF band are better suited for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice regions. We are developing a dual-frequency Temperate-Ice-Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through water pockets, thus providing more accurate measurements of temperate ice properties such as thickness and basal conditions. The radar is a light-weight, low power consumption portable system for surface-based observations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.7 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum output peak power of 20 W. The transmit waveform is a digitally generated linear frequency-modulated chirp with 1 MHz bandwidth. The radar can be installed on aircrafts such as the CReSIS UAV [1], DCH-6 (Twin Otter), or P-3 Orion for aerial surveys, where it could be supported by the airplane power system. For surface based experiments, TIDSoR can operate in a backpack configuration powered by a compact battery system. The system can also be installed on a sled towed by a motorized vehicle, in which case the power supply can be replaced by a diesel generator. The radar consists of three functional blocks: the digital section, the radio-frequency (RF) section, and the antenna, and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the power supply. The digital section generates the transmit waveforms as well as timing and control signals

  9. Towards the full information chain theory: answer depth and source models

    CERN Document Server

    Perevalov, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    A problem of optimal information acquisition for its use in general decision making problems is considered. This motivates the need for developing quantitative measures of information sources' capabilities for supplying accurate information depending on the particular content of the latter. A companion article developed the notion of a question difficulty functional for questions concerning input data for a decision making problem. Here, answers which an information source may provide in response to such questions are considered. In particular, a real valued answer depth functional measuring the degree of accuracy of such answers is introduced and its overall form is derived under the assumption of isotropic knowledge structure of the information source. Additionally, information source models that relate answer depth to question difficulty are discussed. It turns out to be possible to introduce a notion of an information source capacity as the highest value of the answer depth the source is capable of provid...

  10. Graphical Visualization of Human Exploration Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Erica M.; Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale C.; Simon, Matthew A.; Williams, Phillip A.; Barsoum, Christopher; Cowan, Tyler; Larman, Kevin T.; Hay, Jason; Burg, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NASA's pioneering space strategy will require advanced capabilities to expand the boundaries of human exploration on the Journey to Mars (J2M). The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) architecture serves as a framework to identify critical capabilities that need to be developed and tested in order to enable a range of human exploration destinations and missions. Agency-wide System Maturation Teams (SMT) are responsible for the maturation of these critical exploration capabilities and help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the EMC-identified capabilities. Systems Capability Organization Reporting Engine boards (SCOREboards) were developed to integrate the SMT data sets into cohesive human exploration capability stories that can be used to promote dialog and communicate NASA's exploration investments. Each SCOREboard provides a graphical visualization of SMT capability development needs that enable exploration missions, and presents a comprehensive overview of data that outlines a roadmap of system maturation needs critical for the J2M. SCOREboards are generated by a computer program that extracts data from a main repository, sorts the data based on a tiered data reduction structure, and then plots the data according to specified user inputs. The ability to sort and plot varying data categories provides the flexibility to present specific SCOREboard capability roadmaps based on customer requests. This paper presents the development of the SCOREboard computer program and shows multiple complementary, yet different datasets through a unified format designed to facilitate comparison between datasets. Example SCOREboard capability roadmaps are presented followed by a discussion of how the roadmaps are used to: 1) communicate capability developments and readiness of systems for future missions, and 2) influence the definition of NASA's human exploration investment portfolio through capability-driven processes. The paper concludes with a description

  11. Analysis of the Capability Portfolio Review (CPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    TRAC-M-TR-14-021 June 2014 Analysis of the Capability Portfolio Review ( CPR ) TRADOC Analysis Center 700...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK TRAC-M-TR-14-021 June 2014 Analysis of the Capability Portfolio Review ( CPR ) Authors LTC Thomas Deveans...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Analysis of the Capability Portfolio Review ( CPR ) 5. PROJECT NUMBERS TRAC Project Code 060097 6. AUTHOR(S) LTC Deveans

  12. Compilation of Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundergan, C. D.; Mead, P. L. [eds.

    1975-11-01

    This report is a compilation of 17 individual documents that together summarize the technical capabilities of Sandia Laboratories. Each document in this compilation contains details about a specific area of capability. Examples of application of the capability to research and development problems are provided. An eighteenth document summarizes the content of the other seventeen. Each of these documents was issued with a separate report number (SAND 74-0073A through SAND 74-0091, except -0078). (RWR)

  13. Dynamic Capabilities within the Project Management Environment

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Capabilities is a contemporary popular notion, incorporating the ability to adjust a company’s resources adequately to exploit opportunities, prevent threats and consequently retain competitive advantage. Teece et al. (1997) coined Dynamic Capabilities and triggered a wave of research on the topic. However the notion is still in its infancy through academic disputes, different viewpoints and multiple definitions. Consequently tool, measure and procedures of Dynamic Capabilities are ab...

  14. Evaluating Internal Technological Capabilities in Energy Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Mingook Lee; Sungjoo Lee

    2016-01-01

    As global competition increases, technological capability must be evaluated objectively as one of the most important factors for predominance in technological competition and to ensure sustainable business excellence. Most existing capability evaluation models utilize either quantitative methods, such as patent analysis, or qualitative methods, such as expert panels. Accordingly, they may be in danger of reflecting only fragmentary aspects of technological capabilities, and produce inconsiste...

  15. Capturing Motion and Depth Before Cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Visual representations of biological states have traditionally faced two problems: they lacked motion and depth. Attempts were made to supply these wants over many centuries, but the major advances were made in the early-nineteenth century. Motion was synthesized by sequences of slightly different images presented in rapid succession and depth was added by presenting slightly different images to each eye. Apparent motion and depth were combined some years later, but they tended to be applied separately. The major figures in this early period were Wheatstone, Plateau, Horner, Duboscq, Claudet, and Purkinje. Others later in the century, like Marey and Muybridge, were stimulated to extend the uses to which apparent motion and photography could be applied to examining body movements. These developments occurred before the birth of cinematography, and significant insights were derived from attempts to combine motion and depth.

  16. Quantitative perceived depth from sequential monocular decamouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, K R; Gillam, B J

    2006-03-01

    We present a novel binocular stimulus without conventional disparity cues whose presence and depth are revealed by sequential monocular stimulation (delay > or = 80 ms). Vertical white lines were occluded as they passed behind an otherwise camouflaged black rectangular target. The location (and instant) of the occlusion event, decamouflaging the target's edges, differed in the two eyes. Probe settings to match the depth of the black rectangular target showed a monotonic increase with simulated depth. Control tests discounted the possibility of subjects integrating retinal disparities over an extended temporal window or using temporal disparity. Sequential monocular decamouflage was found to be as precise and accurate as conventional simultaneous stereopsis with equivalent depths and exposure durations.

  17. Monocular depth effects on perceptual fading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Chuan; Kramer, Peter; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2010-08-06

    After prolonged viewing, a static target among moving non-targets is perceived to repeatedly disappear and reappear. An uncrossed stereoscopic disparity of the target facilitates this Motion-Induced Blindness (MIB). Here we test whether monocular depth cues can affect MIB too, and whether they can also affect perceptual fading in static displays. Experiment 1 reveals an effect of interposition: more MIB when the target appears partially covered by, than when it appears to cover, its surroundings. Experiment 2 shows that the effect is indeed due to interposition and not to the target's contours. Experiment 3 induces depth with the watercolor illusion and replicates Experiment 1. Experiments 4 and 5 replicate Experiments 1 and 3 without the use of motion. Since almost any stimulus contains a monocular depth cue, we conclude that perceived depth affects perceptual fading in almost any stimulus, whether dynamic or static. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Depth to top of the Minnekahta Limestone

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a polygon coverage created in ARC/INFO that represents the depth to the top of the Minnekahta Limestone below the land surface, Black Hills, South...

  19. Depth to top of the Madison Limestone

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a polygon coverage created in ARC/INFO that represents the depth to the top of the Madison Limestone below the land surface, Black Hills, South...

  20. Rand Corporation Mean Monthly Global Snow Depth

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All available monthly snow depth climatologies were integrated by the Rand Corporation, in the early 1980s, into one global (excluding Africa and South America)...

  1. EPA Region 1 - Valley Depth in Meters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Raster of the Depth in meters of EPA-delimited Valleys in Region 1. Valleys (areas that are lower than their neighbors) were extracted from a Digital Elevation Model...

  2. Depth to Bedrock: Isopach of Unconsolidated Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This vector dataset gives the approximate depth to bedrock (in feet) from Iowa's current land surface. This 50 foot isopach data was derived from the Digital...

  3. Organic depth profiling of a nanostructured delta layer reference material using large argon cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J L S; Ninomiya, S; Matsuo, J; Gilmore, I S; Seah, M P; Shard, A G

    2010-01-01

    Cluster ion beams have revolutionized the analysis of organic surfaces in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and opened up new capabilities for organic depth profiling. Much effort has been devoted to understanding the capabilities and improving the performance of SF(5)(+) and C(60)(n+), which are successful for many, but not all, organic materials. Here, we explore the potential of organic depth profiling using novel argon cluster ions, Ar(500)(+) to Ar(1000)(+). We present results for an organic delta layer reference sample, consisting of ultrathin "delta" layers of Irganox 3114 (approximately 2.4 nm) embedded between thick layers of Irganox 1010 (approximately 46 or 91 nm). This indicates that, for the reference material, major benefits can be obtained with Ar cluster ions, including a constant high sputtering yield throughout a depth of approximately 390 nm, and an extremely low sputter-induced roughness of <5 nm. Although the depth resolution is currently limited by an instrumental artifact, and may not be the best attainable, these initial results strongly indicate the potential to achieve high depth resolution and suggest that Ar cluster ions may have a major role to play in the depth profiling of organic materials.

  4. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

  5. Wavefield Extrapolation in Pseudo-depth Domain

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2011-12-11

    Wave-equation based seismic migration and inversion tools are widely used by the energy industry to explore hydrocarbon and mineral resources. By design, most of these techniques simulate wave propagation in a space domain with the vertical axis being depth measured from the surface. Vertical depth is popular because it is a straightforward mapping of the subsurface space. It is, however, not computationally cost-effective because the wavelength changes with local elastic wave velocity, which in general increases with depth in the Earth. As a result, the sampling per wavelength also increases with depth. To avoid spatial aliasing in deep fast media, the seismic wave is oversampled in shallow slow media and therefore increase the total computation cost. This issue is effectively tackled by using the vertical time axis instead of vertical depth. This is because in a vertical time representation, the "wavelength" is essentially time period for vertical rays. This thesis extends the vertical time axis to the pseudo-depth axis, which features distance unit while preserving the properties of the vertical time representation. To explore the potentials of doing wave-equation based imaging in the pseudo-depth domain, a Partial Differential Equation (PDE) is derived to describe acoustic wave in this new domain. This new PDE is inherently anisotropic because the use of a constant vertical velocity to convert between depth and vertical time. Such anisotropy results in lower reflection coefficients compared with conventional space domain modeling results. This feature is helpful to suppress the low wavenumber artifacts in reverse-time migration images, which are caused by the widely used cross-correlation imaging condition. This thesis illustrates modeling acoustic waves in both conventional space domain and pseudo-depth domain. The numerical tool used to model acoustic waves is built based on the lowrank approximation of Fourier integral operators. To investigate the potential

  6. Understanding dynamic capabilities through knowledge management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2006-01-01

    In the paper eight knowledge management activities are identified; knowledge creation, acquisition, capture, assembly, sharing, integration, leverage and exploitation. These activities are assembled into the three dynamic capabilities of knowledge development, knowledge (re)combination and knowle......In the paper eight knowledge management activities are identified; knowledge creation, acquisition, capture, assembly, sharing, integration, leverage and exploitation. These activities are assembled into the three dynamic capabilities of knowledge development, knowledge (re......)combination and knowledge use. The dynamic capabilities and the associated knowledge management activities create flows to and from the firm’s stock of knowledge and they support the creation and use of organizational capabilities....

  7. Developing Technological Capabilities in Agro-Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the emergence and trajectory of a new agro-industry in Ghana, the pineapple export industry, using the technological capabilities approach. It explains the limited expansion of the industry and its declining competitiveness in the face of new competition by looking at how...... Ghanaian exporters developed technological capabilities initially and the incentives and disincentives to building on those capabilities. The article argues that at the heart of the industry's crisis was an inability to further develop technological capabilities. The crisis had systemic features that have...

  8. Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities, Equipment, and Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The following facilities, equipment, and capabilities are available in the Aerodynamics Laboratory Facilities and Equipment (1) Subsonic, open-jet wind tunnel with...

  9. Moderate systemic hypothermia decreases burn depth progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Julie A; Burgess, Pamela; Cartie, Richard J; Prasad, Balakrishna M

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been proposed to be beneficial in an array of human pathologies including cardiac arrest, stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, and hemorrhagic shock. Burn depth progression is multifactorial but inflammation plays a large role. Because hypothermia is known to reduce inflammation, we hypothesized that moderate hypothermia will decrease burn depth progression. We used a second-degree 15% total body surface area thermal injury model in rats. Burn depth was assessed by histology of biopsy sections. Moderate hypothermia in the range of 31-33°C was applied for 4h immediately after burn and in a delayed fashion, starting 2h after burn. In order to gain insight into the beneficial effects of hypothermia, we analyzed global gene expression in the burned skin. Immediate hypothermia decreased burn depth progression at 6h post injury, and this protective effect was sustained for at least 24h. Burn depth was 18% lower in rats subjected to immediate hypothermia compared to control rats at both 6 and 24h post injury. Rats in the delayed hypothermia group did not show any significant decrease in burn depth at 6h, but had 23% lower burn depth than controls at 24h. Increased expression of several skin-protective genes such as CCL4, CCL6 and CXCL13 and decreased expression of tissue remodeling genes such as matrix metalloprotease-9 were discovered in the skin biopsy samples of rats subjected to immediate hypothermia. Systemic hypothermia decreases burn depth progression in a rodent model and up-regulation of skin-protective genes and down-regulation of detrimental tissue remodeling genes by hypothermia may contribute to its beneficial effects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Bellm, Eric C.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Narita, Tomohiko

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of intereaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode signals. We demonstrate how a simple empirical formula describing the event distributions in the cathode/anode signal space can dramatically improve the energy resolution. We also estimate the energy and depth resolution of the detector as a function of the energy and the interaction depth. We also show a depth-sensing prototype system currently under development for EXIST in which cathode signals from 8, 16 or 32 crystals can be read-out by a small multi-channel ASIC board that is vertically edge-mounted on the cathode electrode along every second CZT crystal boundary. This allows CZT crystals to be tiled contiguously with minimum impact on throughput of incoming photons. The robust packaging is crucial in EXIST, which will employ very large area imaging CZT detector arrays.

  11. Remote sensing of water depths in shallow waters via artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun, Özçelik; Yalçın, Arısoy

    2010-09-01

    Determination of the water depths in coastal zones is a common requirement for the majority of coastal engineering and coastal science applications. However, production of high quality bathymetric maps requires expensive field survey, high technology equipment and expert personnel. Remotely sensed images can be conveniently used to reduce the cost and labor needed for bathymetric measurements and to overcome the difficulties in spatial and temporal depth provision. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methodology is introduced in this study to derive bathymetric maps in shallow waters via remote sensing images and sample depth measurements. This methodology provides fast and practical solution for depth estimation in shallow waters, coupling temporal and spatial capabilities of remote sensing imagery with modeling flexibility of ANN. Its main advantage in practice is that it enables to directly use image reflectance values in depth estimations, without refining depth-caused scatterings from other environmental factors (e.g. bottom material and vegetation). Its function-free structure allows evaluating nonlinear relationships between multi-band images and in-situ depth measurements, therefore leads more reliable depth estimations than classical regressive approaches. The west coast of the Foca, Izmir/Turkey was used as a test bed. Aster first three band images and Quickbird pan-sharpened images were used to derive ANN based bathymetric maps of this study area. In-situ depth measurements were supplied from the General Command of Mapping, Turkey (HGK). Two models were set, one for Aster and one for Quickbird image inputs. Bathymetric maps relying solely on in-situ depth measurements were used to evaluate resultant derived bathymetric maps. The efficiency of the methodology was discussed at the end of the paper. It is concluded that the proposed methodology could decrease spatial and repetitive depth measurement requirements in bathymetric mapping especially for

  12. Methods for Calculation of Geogenetic Depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ruixun; Lü Guxian; Wang Fangzheng; Wei Changshan; Guo Chusun

    2004-01-01

    Some current methods for the calculation of the geogenetic depth are based on the hydrostatic model, it is induced that the depth in certain underground place is equal to the pressure divided by the specific weight of rock, on the assumption that the rock is hydrostatic and overlain by no other force but gravity. However, most of rock is in a deformation environment and non-hydrostatic state, especially in an orogenic belt, so that the calculated depth may be exaggerated in comparison with the actual depth according to the hydrostatic formula. In the finite slight deformation and elastic model, the relative actual depth value from the 3-axis strain data was obtained with the measurement of strain including that of superimposed tectonic forces but excluding that of time factor for the strain. If some data on the strain speed are obtained, the depth would be more realistically calculated according to the rheological model because the geological body often experiences long-term creep strains.

  13. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  14. Molecular depth profiling by wedged crater beveling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40-keV C(60)(+) cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography, and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ∼(1)/(3) during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm to ∼4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments.

  15. Simulating Kinect Infrared and Depth Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Michael J; Choo, Benjamin Y; Beling, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    With the emergence of the Microsoft Kinect sensor, many developer communities and research groups have found countless uses and have already published a wide variety of papers that utilize the raw depth images for their specific goals. New methods and applications that use the device generally require an appropriately large ensemble of data sets with accompanying ground truth for testing purposes, as well as accurate models that account for the various systematic and stochastic contributors to Kinect errors. Current error models, however, overlook the intermediate infrared (IR) images that directly contribute to noisy depth estimates. We, therefore, propose a high fidelity Kinect IR and depth image predictor and simulator that models the physics of the transmitter/receiver system, unique IR dot pattern, disparity/depth processing technology, and random intensity speckle and IR noise in the detectors. The model accounts for important characteristics of Kinect's stereo triangulation system, including depth shadowing, IR dot splitting, spreading, and occlusions, correlation-based disparity estimation between windows of measured and reference IR images, and subpixel refinement. Results show that the simulator accurately produces axial depth error from imaged flat surfaces with various tilt angles, as well as the bias and standard lateral error of an object's horizontal and vertical edge.

  16. What is the relationship between Dynamic Capabilities, Innovation Performance and Profitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance and profitability of sma......, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability.......The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance and profitability of small...... to establish a positive relationship between innovation performance and profitability. Nor was there any positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and profitability. The main contribution of this study is a better understanding of the realm of small and medium sized enterprises’ internal and external...

  17. What is the relationship between Dynamic Capabilities, Innovation Performance and Profitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance and profitability of sma......, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability.......The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance and profitability of small...... to establish a positive relationship between innovation performance and profitability. Nor was there any positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and profitability. The main contribution of this study is a better understanding of the realm of small and medium sized enterprises’ internal and external...

  18. Depth of field affects perceived depth-width ratios in photographs of natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefs, Harold T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out how much influence depth of field has on the perceived ratio of depth and width in photographs of natural scenes. Depth of field is roughly defined as the distance range that is perceived as sharp in the photograph. Four different semi-natural scenes consisting of a central and two flanking figurines were used. For each scene, five series of photos were made, in which the distance in depth between the central figurine and the flanking figurines increased. These series of photographs had different amounts of depth of field. In the first experiment participants adjusted the position of the two flanking figurines relative to a central figurine, until the perceived distance in the depth dimension equaled the perceived lateral distance between the two flanking figurines. Viewing condition was either monocular or binocular (non-stereo). In the second experiment, the participants did the same task but this time we varied the viewing distance. We found that the participants' depth/width settings increased with increasing depth of field. As depth of field increased, the perceived depth in the scene was reduced relative to the perceived width. Perceived depth was reduced relative to perceived width under binocular viewing conditions compared to monocular viewing conditions. There was a greater reduction when the viewing distance was increased. As photographs of natural scenes contain many highly redundant or conflicting depth cues, we conclude therefore that local image blur is an important cue to depth. Moreover, local image blur is not only taken into account in the perception of egocentric distances, but also affects the perception of depth within the scene relative to lateral distances within the scene.

  19. Depth estimation and camera calibration of a focused plenoptic camera for visual odometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Niclas; Quint, Franz; Stilla, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    . In contrast to monocular visual odometry approaches, due to the calibration of the individual depth maps, the scale of the scene can be observed. Furthermore, due to the light-field information better tracking capabilities compared to the monocular case can be expected. As result, the depth information gained by the plenoptic camera based visual odometry algorithm proposed in this paper has superior accuracy and reliability compared to the depth estimated from a single light-field image.

  20. Focusing and depth of field in photography: application in dermatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Arash; Yentzer, Brad A; Feldman, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    Conventional photography obtains a sharp image of objects within a given 'depth of field'; objects not within the depth of field are out of focus. In recent years, digital photography revolutionized the way pictures are taken, edited, and stored. However, digital photography does not result in a deeper depth of field or better focusing. In this article, we briefly review the concept of depth of field and focus in photography as well as new technologies in this area. A deep depth of field is used to have more objects in focus; a shallow depth of field can emphasize a subject by blurring the foreground and background objects. The depth of field can be manipulated by adjusting the aperture size of the camera, with smaller apertures increasing the depth of field at the cost of lower levels of light capture. Light-field cameras are a new generation of digital cameras that offer several new features, including the ability to change the focus on any object in the image after taking the photograph. Understanding depth of field and camera technology helps dermatologists to capture their subjects in focus more efficiently. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Undetectable Changes in Image Resolution of Luminance-Contrast Gradients Affect Depth Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Morita, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.). It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch) as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder). In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays.

  2. Size effect in thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jun; Liu, Zihang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    Thermoelectric applications have attracted increasing interest recently due to its capability of converting waste heat into electricity without hazardous emissions. Materials with enhanced thermoelectric performance have been reported in recent two decades. The revival of research for thermoelectric materials began in early 1990s when the size effect is considered. Low-dimensional materials with exceptionally high thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) have been presented, which broke the limit of ZT around unity. The idea of size effect in thermoelectric materials even inspired the later nanostructuring and band engineering strategies, which effectively enhanced the thermoelectric performance of bulk materials. In this overview, the size effect in low-dimensional thermoelectric materials is reviewed. We first discuss the quantum confinement effect on carriers, including the enhancement of electronic density of states, semimetal to semiconductor transition and carrier pocket engineering. Then, the effect of assumptions on theoretical calculations is presented. Finally, the effect of phonon confinement and interface scattering on lattice thermal conductivity is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  4. AN IBR METHOD:PANORAMIC MOSAICS OF SLIT IMAGES WITH DEPTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Providing a wider movement range of virtual camera is an unsolvedproblem for state-of-the-art image-based rendering system.In this paper,we present a new image based rendering technology called panoramic mosaics of slit images with depth that can provide large virtual camera motion region for some scenes.By limiting camera motion to a horizontal plane only,a slit image with united depth value is used as the rendering element.The panoramic mosaics of slit images with depth are easy to capture,and the data size is as small as that of panorama.We present here the capturing,construction as well as rendering process of panoramic slit images mosaic with depth.In addition,we present the join up process of multiple panoramic slit images mosaic with depth.

  5. A framework for offshore vendor capability development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf Wibisono, Yogi; Govindaraju, Rajesri; Irianto, Dradjad; Sudirman, Iman

    2016-02-01

    Offshore outsourcing is a common practice conducted by companies, especially in developed countries, by relocating one or more their business processes to other companies abroad, especially in developing countries. This practice grows rapidly owing to the ease of accessing qualified vendors with a lower cost. Vendors in developing countries compete more intensely to acquire offshore projects. Indonesia is still below India, China, Malaysia as main global offshore destinations. Vendor capability is among other factors that contribute to the inability of Indonesian vendor in competing with other companies in the global market. Therefore, it is essential to study how to increase the vendor's capability in Indonesia, in the context of global offshore outsourcing. Previous studies on the vendor's capability mainly focus on capabilities without considering the dynamic of capabilities due to the environmental changes. In order to be able to compete with competitors and maintain the competitive advantage, it is necessary for vendors to develop their capabilities continuously. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework that describes offshore vendor capability development along the client-vendor relationship stages. The framework consists of three main components, i.e. the stages of client-vendor relationship, the success of each stage, and the capabilities of vendor at each stage.

  6. Methodological Individualism and the Organizational Capabilities Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2004-01-01

    critical individual-levelconsiderations, including individual action and heterogeneity. In this note we do not denyor reject the notion of routines or capabilities per se, but rather call for an increasedemphasis on how these collective structures originate and change as a result of individualactions.......Key words: Organizational capabilities, methodological individualism, philosophy ofsocial science...

  7. Methodological Individualism and the Organizational Capabilities Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2004-01-01

    critical individual-levelconsiderations, including individual action and heterogeneity. In this note we do not denyor reject the notion of routines or capabilities per se, but rather call for an increasedemphasis on how these collective structures originate and change as a result of individualactions.......Key words: Organizational capabilities, methodological individualism, philosophy ofsocial science...

  8. Design for Development: A Capability Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterlaken, I.

    2009-01-01

    In this article I suggest a ‘capability approach’ towards designing for society, and particularly, the world’s poor. I will explain that this approach assigns a central place to human capabilities in our discussions of justice and development and criticizes a focus on utility or preference satisfact

  9. Cultivating Human Capabilities in Venturesome Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    The notion of competencies has been a familiar feature of educational reform policies for decades. In this essay, Padraig Hogan begins by highlighting the contrasting notion of capabilities, pioneered by the research of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. An educational variant of the notion of capabilities then becomes the basis for exploring…

  10. Technology support for military capability based acquisition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thaba, Mphahlela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available gap between capability planning and acquisition of product systems in the SANDF. (Thaba J et al, 2015). The need for decision support tools and technologies to assist capability planners to close this gap and make sound decisions has become more...

  11. Knowledge Perspectives on Advancing Dynamic Capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Capability is the organizational capacity to timely adapt to a changing market environment by reconfiguring resources and routines in order to stay competitive. Although dynamic capability is considered the Holy Grail of strategic management, a connection to the knowledge management domain i

  12. Distinctive Dynamic Capabilities for New Business Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenø, Axel; Enkel, Ellen; Mezger, Florian

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the distinctive dynamic capabilities for new business creation in established companies. We argue that these are very different from those for managing incremental innovation within a company's core business. We also propose that such capabilities are needed in both slow...

  13. Building Organisational Capability the Private Provider Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Organisational capability is recognised as a key to organisational success. The combination of human capital (peoples' skills and knowledge), social capital (relationships between people) and organisational capital (the organisation's processes), is central to building an organisation's capability. This paper, presented at the 2008 annual…

  14. Diffusive low optical depth particle disks truncated by planets

    CERN Document Server

    Quillen, Alice C

    2008-01-01

    Two dimensional particle disks in proximity to a planet are numerically integrated to determine when a planet in a circular orbit can truncate a particle disk. Collisions are treated by giving each particle a series of velocity perturbations during the integration. We estimate the mass of a planet required to truncate a particle disk as a function of collision rate, related to the disk optical depth, and velocity perturbation size, related to the disk velocity dispersion. We find that for particle disks in the regime estimated for debris disks, a Neptune mass planet is sufficiently massive to truncate the disk. If both the velocity dispersion and the disk optical depth are low (dispersion less than approximately 0.02 in units of circular motion, and optical depth less than 10^-4) then an Earth mass planet suffices. We find that the disk is smooth and axisymmetric unless the velocity perturbation is small and the planet mass is of order or greater than a Neptune mass in which case azimuthal structure is seen n...

  15. Nasotracheal intubation depth in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M; Dullenkopf, A; Schmidt, A R; Gerber, A; Weiss, M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intubation depth using the Microcuff paediatric endotracheal tube (PET) placed with the intubation depth mark between the vocal cords with that of different published formulae/recommendations for nasotracheal intubation depth in children. Children aged from birth to 10 yr undergoing elective surgery with nasotracheal intubation were included. Tracheal tubes were adjusted according to the intubation depth mark between the vocal cords using direct laryngoscopy. Nasal intubation depth was recorded and the distance 'tube tip to carina' was measured endoscopically. Based on the recorded nasal intubation depth and measured distance 'tube tip to carina', the position of tube tip and cuff was calculated according to six published formulae/recommendations. Seventy-six children were studied. For the Microcuff PET, the median tube tip advancement within the trachea was 52.9% (41.1-73.8%) of tracheal length. The shortest distance from the 'tube tip to carina' was 15 mm for a 3.5 mm internal diameter tube. If the six published formulae/recommendations had been used, this would have resulted in endobronchial tube placement in up to 9.1% of cases, and the tube tip would have been placed above the glottis in up to 2.6% of cases. The upper border of the cuff would have been placed in the subglottic area in up to 42.1% of cases and in a supraglottic position in up to 63.2% of cases. This study indicates that nasal intubation with the intubation depth mark placed between the vocal cords was superior to formula-based nasotracheal tube positioning. The latter would result in a high rate of endobronchial intubations, excessively high cuff positions and even tracheal extubations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ancona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth.

  17. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibillano, Teresa; Rizzi, Domenico; Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Konuk, Ali Riza; Aarts, Ronald; Veld, Bert Huis in 't; Ancona, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth. PMID:23112646

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Combined Well-Bore Flow and Depth-Dependent Water Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Christensen, Allen H.; Hanson, Randall T.; Martin, Peter; Crawford, Steven M.; Smith, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a combined well-bore flow and depth-dependent sample collection tool. It is suitable for use in existing production wells having limited access and clearances as small as 1 inch. The combination of well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data is especially effective in assessing changes in aquifer properties and water quality with depth. These are direct measures of changes in well yield and ground-water quality with depth under actual operating conditions. Combinations of other geophysical tools capable of making these measurements, such as vertical-axis current meters used with wire-line samplers, are commercially available but these tools are large and can not easily enter existing production wells.

  19. STRATEGIC AIRLIFT CAPABILITY: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar VASILESCU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic airlift remains a critical supporting capability that should be achieved, maintained and improved. This capability ensures the ability to deploy and sustain military forces across possible distant battlefields. The paper analyses the growing strategic airlift capabilities gap between operational needs and current realities, and underlines the need for an enhanced strategic airlift capability to meet current and future NATO alliance needs. By analyzing requirements against the existing/potential solutions, this paper further ponders over options like the organic national capability, partnerships such as the Strategic Airlift Consortium (SAC or leasing aircraft through a venture such as the Strategic Airlift Interim Solution (SALIS. The paper also evaluates the feasibility of applying these solutions to European Union airlift needs.

  20. Allocentric information is used for memory-guided reaching in depth: A virtual reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinghammer, Mathias; Schütz, Immo; Blohm, Gunnar; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that humans use allocentric information when reaching to remembered visual targets, but most of the studies are limited to 2D space. Here, we study allocentric coding of memorized reach targets in 3D virtual reality. In particular, we investigated the use of allocentric information for memory-guided reaching in depth and the role of binocular and monocular (object size) depth cues for coding object locations in 3D space. To this end, we presented a scene with objects on a table which were located at different distances from the observer and served as reach targets or allocentric cues. After free visual exploration of this scene and a short delay the scene reappeared, but with one object missing (=reach target). In addition, the remaining objects were shifted horizontally or in depth. When objects were shifted in depth, we also independently manipulated object size by either magnifying or reducing their size. After the scene vanished, participants reached to the remembered target location on the blank table. Reaching endpoints deviated systematically in the direction of object shifts, similar to our previous results from 2D presentations. This deviation was stronger for object shifts in depth than in the horizontal plane and independent of observer-target-distance. Reaching endpoints systematically varied with changes in object size. Our results suggest that allocentric information is used for coding targets for memory-guided reaching in depth. Thereby, retinal disparity and vergence as well as object size provide important binocular and monocular depth cues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This

  2. Depth of penetration of bubbles entrained by a plunging water jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanet, Christophe; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1997-07-01

    A model is proposed to predict the depth of penetration of the air bubbles entrained by a round water jet impacting into a flat, liquid pool. This depth is shown to be determined only by the initial jet momentum and by the non-monotonic nature of the bubble terminal velocities as a function of their size. The model is shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements of the depth and width of penetration of the bubbles performed over a wide range of jet diameters, velocities, and plunging angles.

  3. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  4. Evaluation of the variable depth resolution of active dynamic thermography on human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Hoffman, Hilary A.; Carney, Bonnie C.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Loew, Murray H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2015-06-01

    Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is an imaging technique capable of characterizing the non-homogenous thermal conductance of damaged tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine optimal stimulation parameters and quantify the optical resolution of ADT through various depths of human skin. Excised tissue from plastic surgery operations was collected immediately following excision. A total of 12 thin to thick split-thickness grafts were harvested from 3 patients. Grafts were placed on top of a 3D printed resolution chart and thermal stimulation was applied from a 300W halogen lamp array for between 0.5-10 seconds to determine optimal parameters. Video was captured with a thermal camera, and analysis was performed by reconstructing an image from thermal gradients. In this study ADT resolved 0.445+/-0 lp/mm at a depth of 0.010", 0.356+/-0.048 lp/mm at a depth of 0.015", 0.334+/-0.027 lp/mm at a depth of 0.020" and 0.265+/-0.022 lp/mm at a depth of 0.025". The stimulus energy required for maximum resolution at each depth was 3- 4s, 8s, 12s and 12s respectively. ADT is a sensitive technique for imaging dermal structure, capable of resolving detail as fine as 1124 μm, 1427 μm, 1502 μm and 1893 μm in thin to thick split-thickness skin grafts respectively. This study has characterized a correlation between stimulus input and maximal resolution at differing depths of skin. It has also defined the functional imaging depth of ADT to below the sub-cutis, well below conventional spectrophotometric techniques.

  5. Depth Cameras on UAVs: a First Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deris, A.; Trigonis, I.; Aravanis, A.; Stathopoulou, E. K.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate depth information retrieval of a scene is a field under investigation in the research areas of photogrammetry, computer vision and robotics. Various technologies, active, as well as passive, are used to serve this purpose such as laser scanning, photogrammetry and depth sensors, with the latter being a promising innovative approach for fast and accurate 3D object reconstruction using a broad variety of measuring principles including stereo vision, infrared light or laser beams. In this study we investigate the use of the newly designed Stereolab's ZED depth camera based on passive stereo depth calculation, mounted on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with an ad-hoc setup, specially designed for outdoor scene applications. Towards this direction, the results of its depth calculations and scene reconstruction generated by Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) algorithms are compared and evaluated based on qualitative and quantitative criteria with respect to the ones derived by a typical Structure from Motion (SfM) and Multiple View Stereo (MVS) pipeline for a challenging cultural heritage application.

  6. Depth optimization for topological quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFailakawi, Mohammad; Ahmad, Imtiaz; AlTerkawi, Laila; Hamdan, Suha

    2015-02-01

    Topological quantum computing (TQC) model is one of the most promising models for quantum computation. A circuit implemented under TQC is optimized by reducing its depth due to special construction requirements in such technology. In this work, we propose a hybrid approach that combines a left-edge greedy heuristic with genetic algorithm (GA) to minimize circuit depth through combined line and gate ordering. In our implementation, GA is used to find line ordering, whereas the left edge is used to reduce circuit depth by taking into consideration overlap constraints imposed by line ordering. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can merge gates together realizing circuit with multi-target gates to provide reduced circuit depth. Experimental results on random benchmark circuits show that the proposed algorithm was able to reduce circuit depth by 42 % on average for CNOT circuits, with additional 5 % savings when multi-target optimization is used. Results on RevLib benchmarks revealed a typical enhancement of 21 % and an additional 11 % when multi-target gates are allowed.

  7. A computational method for determining XBT depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stark

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for determining the depth of expendable bathythermographs (XBTs is developed. This new method combines a forward-stepping calculation which incorporates all of the forces on the XBT devices during their descent. Of particular note are drag forces which are calculated using a new drag coefficient expression. That expression, obtained entirely from computational fluid dynamic modeling, accounts for local variations in the ocean environment. Consequently, the method allows for accurate determination of depths for any local temperature environment. The results, which are entirely based on numerical simulation, are compared with an experimental descent of an LM-Sippican T-5 XBT. It is found that the calculated depths differ by less than 3 % from depth estimates using the industry standard FRE. Furthermore, the differences decrease with depth. The computational model allows an investigation of the fluid patterns along the outer surface of the probe as well as in the interior channel. The simulations take account of complex flow phenomena such as laminar-turbulent transition and flow separation.

  8. A computational method for determining XBT depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stark

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for determining the depth of expendable bathythermographs (XBTs is developed. This new method uses a forward-stepping calculation which incorporates all of the forces on the XBT devices during their descent. Of particular note are drag forces which are calculated using a new drag coefficient expression. That expression, obtained entirely from computational fluid dynamic modeling, accounts for local variations in the ocean environment. Consequently, the method allows for accurate determination of depths for any local temperature environment. The results, which are entirely based on numerical simulation, are compared with the experiments of LM Sippican T-5 XBT probes. It is found that the calculated depths differ by less than 3% from depth estimates using the standard fall-rate equation (FRE. Furthermore, the differences decrease with depth. The computational model allows an investigation of the fluid flow patterns along the outer surface of the probe as well as in the interior channel. The simulations take account of complex flow phenomena such as laminar-turbulent transition and flow separation.

  9. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Grindlay, J E; Narita, T

    2003-01-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of interaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode ...

  10. An Empirical, Functional approach to Depth Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Will

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to compute direct damages to structures and contents, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE has traditionally relied on relationships that define damage for a given depth. These relationships are described using paired data relationships of depth and damage. Generally, the curves utilized are based on an Elicitation of Experts (EoE. This paper will present an alternative methodology which takes empirical data of damage and depth, stratified by building classifications, and use Non Linear Least Squares Estimation to fit a parameterized function to compute depth-damage estimates. The general function will be described, and the parameters will be discussed. Parameters include foundation height, ground elevation, percent damages below ground, number of stories, height of stories, maximum damage as a percent, and the beginning elevation for damage. The advantages of this approach include the ability to utilize empirical data, and the ability to change parameters based on building practices across the world. Additionally, the paper will illustrate a bootstrapping approach to the empirical data to assist in describing confidence limits around the parameterized functional depth damage relationship. A Figure (Figure 1 is provided to illustrate the output of the process.

  11. Optics for multimode lasers with elongated depth of field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2017-02-01

    Modern multimode high-power lasers are widely used in industrial applications and control of their radiation, especially by focusing, is of great importance. Because of relatively low optical quality, characterized by high values of specifications Beam Parameter Product (BPP) or M², the depth of field by focusing of multimode laser radiation is narrow. At the same time laser technologies like deep penetration welding, cutting of thick metal sheets get benefits from elongated depth of field in area of focal plane, therefore increasing of zone along optical axis with minimized spot size is important technical task. As a solution it is suggested to apply refractive optical systems splitting an initial laser beam into several beamlets, which are focused in different foci separated along optical axis with providing reliable control of energy portions in each separate focus, independently of beam size or mode structure. With the multi-focus optics, the length of zone of material processing along optical axis is defined rather by distances between separate foci, which are determined by optical design of the optics and can be chosen according to requirements of a particular laser technology. Due to stability of the distances between foci there is provided stability of a technology process. This paper describes some design features of refractive multi-focus optics, examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  12. Depth Transfer: Depth Extraction from Video Using Non-Parametric Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Kevin; Liu, Ce; Kang, Sing Bing

    2014-11-01

    We describe a technique that automatically generates plausible depth maps from videos using non-parametric depth sampling. We demonstrate our technique in cases where past methods fail (non-translating cameras and dynamic scenes). Our technique is applicable to single images as well as videos. For videos, we use local motion cues to improve the inferred depth maps, while optical flow is used to ensure temporal depth consistency. For training and evaluation, we use a Kinect-based system to collect a large data set containing stereoscopic videos with known depths. We show that our depth estimation technique outperforms the state-of-the-art on benchmark databases. Our technique can be used to automatically convert a monoscopic video into stereo for 3D visualization, and we demonstrate this through a variety of visually pleasing results for indoor and outdoor scenes, including results from the feature film Charade.

  13. Conceptual Design of the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) offers a consistent and documented dataset that can be used to guide large-scale field operations, to integrate hydrologic and ecological responses, and to support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem responses to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (Telis, 2006). Ground elevation data for the greater Everglades and the digital ground elevation models derived from them form the foundation for all EDEN water depth and associated ecologic/hydrologic modeling (Jones, 2004, Jones and Price, 2007). To use EDEN water depth and duration information most effectively, it is important to be able to view and manipulate information on elevation data quality and other land cover and habitat characteristics across the Everglades region. These requirements led to the development of the geographic data layer described in this techniques and methods report. Relying on extensive experience in GIS data development, distribution, and analysis, a great deal of forethought went into the design of the geographic data layer used to index elevation and other surface characteristics for the Greater Everglades region. To allow for simplicity of design and use, the EDEN area was broken into a large number of equal-sized rectangles ('Cells') that in total are referred to here as the 'grid'. Some characteristics of this grid, such as the size of its cells, its origin, the area of Florida it is designed to represent, and individual grid cell identifiers, could not be changed once the grid database was developed. Therefore, these characteristics were selected to design as robust a grid as possible and to ensure the grid's long-term utility. It is desirable to include all pertinent information known about elevation and elevation data collection as grid attributes. Also, it is very important to allow for efficient grid post-processing, sub-setting, analysis, and distribution. This document details the

  14. Limited Genetic Connectivity between Gorgonian Morphotypes along a Depth Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Federica; Gori, Andrea; Lopez-González, Pablo; Bramanti, Lorenzo; Rossi, Sergio; Gili, Josep-Maria; Abbiati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Gorgonian species show a high morphological variability in relation to the environment in which they live. In coastal areas, parameters such as temperature, light, currents, and food availability vary significantly with depth, potentially affecting morphology of the colonies and the structure of the populations, as well as their connectivity patterns. In tropical seas, the existence of connectivity between shallow and deep populations supported the hypothesis that the deep coral reefs could potentially act as (reproductive) refugia fostering re-colonization of shallow areas after mortality events. Moreover, this hypothesis is not so clear accepted in temperate seas. Eunicella singularis is one of the most common gorgonian species in Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, playing an important role as ecosystem engineer by providing biomass and complexity to the coralligenous habitats. It has a wide bathymetric distribution ranging from about 10 m to 100 m. Two depth-related morphotypes have been identified, differing in colony morphology, sclerite size and shape, and occurrence of symbiotic algae, but not in mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. In the present study the genetic structure of E. singularis populations along a horizontal and bathymetric gradient was assessed using microsatellites and ITS1 sequences. Restricted gene flow was found at 30-40 m depth between the two Eunicella morphotypes. Conversely, no genetic structuring has been found among shallow water populations within a spatial scale of ten kilometers. The break in gene flow between shallow and deep populations contributes to explain the morphological variability observed at different depths. Moreover, the limited vertical connectivity hinted that the refugia hypothesis does not apply to E. singularis. Re-colonization of shallow water populations, occasionally affected by mass mortality events, should then be mainly fueled by larvae from other shallow water populations.

  15. The Predictor Factor of Reading Comprehension Performance in English as a Foreign Language: Breadth or Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Kameli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the association among vocabulary breadth/size, depth/quality of vocabulary knowledge, and reading comprehension in English as a foreign language. The main intention of this research was to  explore the association of vocabulary knowledge depth/quality and reading comprehension performance. This study was also intended to find out which aspects of vocabulary knowledge, breadth/size or depth/quality, has more significant association with determining EFL learners’ reading comprehension performance. The Vocabulary Level Test (VLT, Word Associates Test (WAT, and Reading Comprehension test (IELTS have been administered among all the respondents. The participants were 220 adult male and female EFL learners who were learning English in advanced level in BAHAR institute, Shiraz, Iran. The findings revealed that 1 test  scores on vocabulary size/ breadth, depth/ quality of vocabulary knowledge, and reading comprehension were  positively correlated, 2 vocabulary size/ breadth was a stronger predictor of reading comprehension than depth/ Quality of vocabulary knowledge.

  16. Community psychology and the capabilities approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Marybeth

    2015-06-01

    What makes for a good life? The capabilities approach to this question has much to offer community psychology, particularly with respect to marginalized groups. Capabilities are freedoms to engage in valued social activities and roles-what people can do and be given both their capacities, and environmental opportunities and constraints. Economist Amartya Sen's focus on freedoms and agency resonates with psychological calls for empowerment, and philosopher Martha Nussbaum's specification of requirements for a life that is fully human provides an important guide for social programs. Community psychology's focus on mediating structures has much to offer the capabilities approach. Parallels between capabilities, as enumerated by Nussbaum, and settings that foster positive youth development, as described in a National Research Council Report (Eccles and Gootman (Eds) in Community programs to promote youth development. National Academy Press, Washington, 2002) suggest extensions of the approach to children. Community psychologists can contribute to theory about ways to create and modify settings to enhance capabilities as well as empowerment and positive youth development. Finally, capabilities are difficult to measure, because they involve freedoms to choose but only choices actually made or enacted can be observed. The variation in activities or goals across members of a setting provides a measure of the capabilities that the setting fosters.

  17. CTH reference manual : composite capability and technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.

    2009-02-01

    The composite material research and development performed over the last year has greatly enhanced the capabilities of CTH for non-isotropic materials. The enhancements provide the users and developers with greatly enhanced capabilities to address non-isotropic materials and their constitutive model development. The enhancements to CTH are intended to address various composite material applications such as armor systems, rocket motor cases, etc. A new method for inserting non-isotropic materials was developed using Diatom capabilities. This new insertion method makes it possible to add a layering capability to a shock physics hydrocode. This allows users to explicitly model each lamina of a composite without the overhead of modeling each lamina as a separate material to represent a laminate composite. This capability is designed for computational speed and modeling efficiency when studying composite material applications. In addition, the layering capability also allows a user to model interlaminar mechanisms. Finally, non-isotropic coupling methods have been investigated. The coupling methods are specific to shock physics where the Equation of State (EOS) is used with a nonisotropic constitutive model. This capability elastically corrects the EOS pressure (typically isotropic) for deviatoric pressure coupling for non-isotropic materials.

  18. Evaluating Internal Technological Capabilities in Energy Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingook Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As global competition increases, technological capability must be evaluated objectively as one of the most important factors for predominance in technological competition and to ensure sustainable business excellence. Most existing capability evaluation models utilize either quantitative methods, such as patent analysis, or qualitative methods, such as expert panels. Accordingly, they may be in danger of reflecting only fragmentary aspects of technological capabilities, and produce inconsistent results when different models are used. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a comprehensive framework for evaluating technological capabilities in energy companies by considering the complex properties of technological knowledge. For this purpose, we first explored various factors affecting technological capabilities and divided the factors into three categories: individual, organizational, and technology competitiveness. Second, we identified appropriate evaluation items for each category to measure the technological capability. Finally, by using a hybrid approach of qualitative and quantitative methods, we developed an evaluation method for each item and suggested a method to combine the results. The proposed framework was then verified with an energy generation and supply company to investigate its practicality. As one of the earliest attempts to evaluate multi-faceted technological capabilities, the suggested model can support technology and strategic planning.

  19. Community Psychology and the Capabilities Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    What makes for a good life? The capabilities approach to this question has much to offer community psychology, particularly with respect to marginalized groups. Capabilities are freedoms to engage in valued social activities and roles—what people can do and be given both their capacities, and environmental opportunities and constraints. Economist Amartya Sen’s focus on freedoms and agency resonates with psychological calls for empowerment, and philosopher Martha Nussbaum’s specification of requirements for a life that is fully human provides an important guide for social programs. Community psychology’s focus on mediating structures has much to offer the capabilities approach. Parallels between capabilities, as enumerated by Nussbaum, and settings that foster positive youth development, as described in a National Research Council Report (Eccles and Gootman (Eds) in Community programs to promote youth development. National Academy Press, Washington, 2002) suggest extensions of the approach to children. Community psychologists can contribute to theory about ways to create and modify settings to enhance capabilities as well as empowerment and positive youth development. Finally, capabilities are difficult to measure, because they involve freedoms to choose but only choices actually made or enacted can be observed. The variation in activities or goals across members of a setting provides a measure of the capabilities that the setting fosters. PMID:25822113

  20. Capabilities' Substitutability and the "S" Curve of Export Diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    Product diversity, which is highly important in economic systems, has been highlighted by recent studies on international trade. We found an empirical pattern, designated as the "S-shaped curve", that models the relationship between economic size (logarithmic GDP) and export diversity (the number of varieties of export products) on the detailed international trade data. As the economic size of a country begins to increase, its export diversity initially increases in an exponential manner, but overtime, this diversity growth slows and eventually reaches an upper limit. The interdependence between size and diversity takes the shape of an S-shaped curve that an be fitted by a logistic equation. To explain this phenomenon, we introduce a new parameter called "substitutability" into the list of capabilities or factors of products in the tri-partite network model (i.e., the country-capability-product model) of Hidalgo et al. As we observe, when the substitutability is zero, the model returns to Hidalgo's original m...

  1. Enhanced depth perception using hyperstereo vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Wendell R.

    1997-06-01

    Recent stereo vision experiments demonstrated the enhancement of depth perception over single line of sight vision for improved vehicular navigation and target acquisition processes. The experiments involves the use of stereo vision headsets connected to visible and 8 - 12 micrometers IR imagers. The imagers were separated by up to 50 m (i.e., wider platform separation than human vision, or hyperstereo) and equipped with telescopes for viewing at ranges of tens of meters up to 4 km. The important findings were: (1) human viewers were able to discern terrain undulations for obstacle avoidance for vehicular navigation, and (2) human viewers were able to detect depth features within the scenes that enhanced the target acquisition process over using monocular or single line of sight viewing. For vehicular navigation improvement, stereo goggles were developed for headset display and simultaneous see through instrumentation viewing for vehicular navigation enhancement. For detection, the depth cues can be used to detect even salient target features.

  2. Flexible Ablators Char Depths LHMEL Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Qu, Vince; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Char and pyrolysis zone depths give physical evidence of peak temperature reached in depth: The pyrolyzing material acts as a temperature indicator within its characteristic thermal decomposition range. A matrix of novel flexible ablators were laser tested in one component of material screening for NASA Entry, Descent and Landing research for future Mars missions. LHMEL tests were run both on virgin materials, and on previously charred materials for a dual pulse simulation of the heating due to aerocapture followed by atmospheric entry. The test models were machined to expose the cross-sections. Char measurements were made at three locations near the center of the exposed area. Data are presented showing the char depths developed in these flexible materials, grouped by reinforcing fiber and pyrolyzing material type.

  3. Coloring night vision imagery for depth perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Gu; Shaoyuan Sun; Jian'an Fang

    2009-01-01

    Depth perception for night vision(NV)imagery could largely improve scene comprehension.We present a novel scheme to give fused multi-band NV imagery smoothly natural color appearance as well as depth sense from color.Our approach is based on simulating color cues by varying saturation values of each object in the color NV image,in correspondence with the ratio between the infrared and low-light-level sensor outputs which in practice is the depth feature for same materials.We render the NV image segment-by-segment by taking advantage of image segmentation,dominant color transfer,saturation variation,and image fusion.Experiments have shown that the proposed scheme can achieve satisfying results.

  4. Depth resolved investigations of boron implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztucki, M. E-mail: michael@sztucki.de; Metzger, T.H.; Milita, S.; Berberich, F.; Schell, N.; Rouviere, J.L.; Patel, J

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the depth distribution and structure of defects in boron implanted silicon (0 0 1). Silicon wafers were implanted with a boron dose of 6x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup -2} at 32 keV and went through different annealing treatments. Using diffuse X-ray scattering at grazing incidence and exit angles we are able to distinguish between different kinds of defects (point defect clusters and extrinsic stacking faults on {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes) and to determine their depth distribution as a function of the thermal budget. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to gain complementary information. In addition we have determined the strain distribution caused by the boron implantation as a function of depth from rocking curve measurements.

  5. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  6. Depth-optimized reversible circuit synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabzadeh, Mona; Saheb Zamani, Morteza; Sedighi, Mehdi; Saeedi, Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, simultaneous reduction of circuit depth and synthesis cost of reversible circuits in quantum technologies with limited interaction is addressed. We developed a cycle-based synthesis algorithm which uses negative controls and limited distance between gate lines. To improve circuit depth, a new parallel structure is introduced in which before synthesis a set of disjoint cycles are extracted from the input specification and distributed into some subsets. The cycles of each subset are synthesized independently on different sets of ancillae. Accordingly, each disjoint set can be synthesized by different synthesis methods. Our analysis shows that the best worst-case synthesis cost of reversible circuits in the linear nearest neighbor architecture is improved by the proposed approach. Our experimental results reveal the effectiveness of the proposed approach to reduce cost and circuit depth for several benchmarks.

  7. Wavefield extrapolation in pseudo-depth domain

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2012-01-01

    Extrapolating seismic waves in Cartesian coordinate is prone to uneven spatial sampling, because the seismic wavelength tends to grow with depth, as velocity increase. We transform the vertical depth axis to a pseudo one using a velocity weighted mapping, which can effectively mitigate this wavelength variation. We derive acoustic wave equations in this new domain based on the direct transformation of the Laplacian derivatives, which admits solutions that are more accurate and stable than those derived from the kinematic transformation. The anisotropic versions of these equations allow us to isolate the vertical velocity influence and reduce its impact on modeling and imaging. The major benefit of extrapolating wavefields in pseudo-depth space is its near uniform wavelength as opposed to the normally dramatic change of wavelength with the conventional approach. Time wavefield extrapolation on a complex velocity shows some of the features of this approach.

  8. Comparison of Capabilities of Quadcopters for Use in Cryospheric Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld Mayer, M. U.; Herzfeld, U. C.

    2014-12-01

    Quadcopters, small unmanned aircraft with 4 wings and 4 rotors, have developed rapidly in recent years. In this paper, we examine and compare the capabilities of quadcopters with respect of their capabilities for use in observations of glaciers and sea ice. We compare the following: Payload, size of aircraft, range and endurance, flight altitude, operation restrictions. Special consideration is given to the type of remote-sensing instrumentation that can be operated, such as video and still cameras, laser altimeters, geolocation such as GPS, and data storage and data transmission and communication. For illustration, we include examples from remote-sensing observations collected from other types of small unmanned and manned aircraft of glaciers and sea ice environments.

  9. The Relative Impacts of Disease on Health Status and Capability Wellbeing: A Multi-Country Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Mark Mitchell

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the impact of interventions for resource allocation purposes commonly focus on health status. There is, however, also concern about broader impacts on wellbeing and, increasingly, on a person's capability. This study aims to compare the impact on health status and capability of seven major health conditions, and highlight differences in treatment priorities when outcomes are measured by capability as opposed to health status.The study was a cross-sectional four country survey (n = 6650 of eight population groups: seven disease groups with: arthritis, asthma, cancer, depression, diabetes, hearing loss, and heart disease and one health population 'comparator' group. Two simple self-complete questionnaires were used to measure health status (EQ-5D-5L and capability (ICECAP-A. Individuals were classified by illness severity using condition-specific questionnaires. Effect sizes were used to estimate: (i the difference in health status and capability for those with conditions, relative to a healthy population; and (ii the impact of the severity of the condition on health status and capability within each disease group.5248 individuals were included in the analysis. Individuals with depression have the greatest mean reduction in both health (effect size, 1.26 and capability (1.22 compared to the healthy population. The effect sizes for capability for depression are much greater than for all other conditions, which is not the case for health. For example, the arthritis group effect size for health (1.24 is also high and similar to that of depression, whereas for the same arthritis group, the effect size for capability is much lower than that for depression (0.55. In terms of severity within disease groups, individuals categorised as 'mild' have similar capability levels to the healthy population (effect sizes <0.2, excluding depression but lower health status than the healthy population (≥0.4.Significant differences exist in the

  10. Factors controlling contrail cirrus optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft contrails develop into contrail cirrus by depositional growth and sedimentation of ice particles and horizontal spreading due to wind shear. Factors controlling this development include temperature, ice supersaturation, thickness of ice-supersaturated layers, and vertical gradients in the horizontal wind field. An analytical microphysical cloud model is presented and validated that captures these processes. Many individual contrail cirrus are simulated that develop differently owing to the variability in the controlling factors, resulting in large samples of cloud properties that are statistically analyzed. Contrail cirrus development is studied over the first four hours past formation, similar to the ages of line-shaped contrails that were tracked in satellite imagery on regional scales. On these time scales, contrail cirrus optical depth and microphysical variables exhibit a marked variability, expressed in terms of broad and skewed probability distribution functions. Simulated mean optical depths at a wavelength of 0.55 μm range from 0.05-0.5 and a substantial fraction 20-50% of contrail cirrus stay subvisible (optical depth <0.02, depending on meteorological conditions.

    A detailed analysis based on an observational case study over the continental USA suggests that previous satellite measurements of line-shaped persistent contrails have missed about 89%, 50%, and 11% of contrails with optical depths 0-0.05, 0.05-0.1, and 0.1-0.2, respectively, amounting to 65% of contrail coverage of all optical depths. When comparing observations with simulations and when estimating the contrail cirrus climate impact, not only mean values but also the variability in optical depth and microphysical properties need to be considered.

  11. Hybrid Reality Lab Capabilities - Video 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Francisco J.; Noyes, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    objects that have the same shape, size, location to their physical object counterpart in virtual reality environment can be a game changer when it comes to training, planning, engineering analysis, science, entertainment, etc. Our Project is developing such capabilities for various types of environments. The video outlined with this abstract is a representation of an ISS Hybrid Reality experience. In the video you can see various Hybrid Reality elements that provide immersion beyond just standard Virtual Reality or Augmented Reality.

  12. A Capability Approach for the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Eiffe, Franz F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a new concept for the EU in order to define and measure poverty no longer on the basis of income1, but on so called capabilities to argue for a capability oriented social policy. The capability approach (CA) was originally developed by Nobel laureate Amartya Sen2 and can be interpreted as critique of the utilitarian tradition of standard economics. In Sen's view, mainstream economic analysis operates on a very narrow base and does not include central inform...

  13. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  14. Dynamic managerial capability of technology-based international new ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altshuler, Liliya

    2014-01-01

    case study of a technology-based INV conducted over the period of 3.5 years, starting 8 years into the firm’s history. This unique design has enabled close observation of the specific events and challenges the firm has been facing after its initial success, and of the aspects in the firm’s management......The article focuses on long-term development of technology-based international new ventures (INVs) and discusses aspects of managing such ventures once they are past the initial success and rapid internationalization and enter the stable development phase. The study builds on an in-depth process...... to resource availability. The study takes the dynamic capability perspective and focuses on INVs’ management, which are seen as founders and builders of the processes, rules and structures that lay the basis for long-term competitive advantage for such firms. Based on the findings, specific aspects...

  15. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, H. [Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC) - Université Paris 7. Paris (France)

    2015-08-17

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  16. Demographics by depth: spatially explicit life-history dynamics of a protogynous reef fish

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Angela B.; McBride, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Distribution and demographics of the hogfish (Lachnolaimus maximus) were investigated by using a combined approach of in situ observations and life history analyses. Presence, density, size, age, and size and age at sex change all varied with depth in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Hogfish (64–774 mm fork length and 0–19 years old) were observed year-round and were most common over complex, natural hard bottom habitat. As depth increased, the presence and density of hogfish decreased, but mea...

  17. Monocular and binocular depth discrimination thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, S B; Siddiqui, A; Ward, A; Noonan, C; Fisher, A C; Green, J R; Brown, M C; Wareing, P A; Watt, P

    1999-11-01

    Measurement of stereoacuity at varying distances, by real or simulated depth stereoacuity tests, is helpful in the evaluation of patients with binocular imbalance or strabismus. Although the cue of binocular disparity underpins stereoacuity tests, there may be variable amounts of other binocular and monocular cues inherent in a stereoacuity test. In such circumstances, a combined monocular and binocular threshold of depth discrimination may be measured--stereoacuity conventionally referring to the situation where binocular disparity giving rise to retinal disparity is the only cue present. A child-friendly variable distance stereoacuity test (VDS) was developed, with a method for determining the binocular depth threshold from the combined monocular and binocular threshold of depth of discrimination (CT). Subjects with normal binocular function, reduced binocular function, and apparently absent binocularity were included. To measure the threshold of depth discrimination, subjects were required by means of a hand control to align two electronically controlled spheres at viewing distances of 1, 3, and 6m. Stereoacuity was also measured using the TNO, Frisby, and Titmus stereoacuity tests. BTs were calculated according to the function BT= arctan (1/tan alphaC - 1/tan alphaM)(-1), where alphaC and alphaM are the angles subtended at the nodal points by objects situated at the monocular threshold (alphaM) and the combined monocular-binocular threshold (alphaC) of discrimination. In subjects with good binocularity, BTs were similar to their combined thresholds, whereas subjects with reduced and apparently absent binocularity had binocular thresholds 4 and 10 times higher than their combined thresholds (CT). The VDS binocular thresholds showed significantly higher correlation and agreement with the TNO test and the binocular thresholds of the Frisby and Titmus tests, than the corresponding combined thresholds (p = 0.0019). The VDS was found to be an easy to use real depth

  18. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, J; Bellm, E.C.; Grindlay, J.E.; Narita, T

    2003-01-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of th...

  19. Saccade amplitude disconjugacy induced by aniseikonia: role of monocular depth cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pia Bucci, M; Kapoula, Z; Eggert, T

    1999-09-01

    The conjugacy of saccades is rapidly modified if the images are made unequal for the two eyes. Disconjugacy persists even in the absence of disparity which indicates learning. Binocular visual disparity is a major cue to depth and is believed to drive the disconjugacy of saccades to aniseikonic images. The goal of the present study was to test whether monocular depth cues can also influence the disconjugacy of saccades. Three experiments were performed in which subjects were exposed for 15-20 min to a 10% image size inequality. Three different images were used: a grid that contained a single monocular depth cue strongly indicating a frontoparallel plane; a random-dot pattern that contained a less prominent monocular depth cue (absence of texture gradient) which also indicates the frontoparallel plane; and a complex image with several overlapping geometric forms that contained a variety of monocular depth cues. Saccades became disconjugate in all three experiments. The disconjugacy was larger and more persistent for the experiment using the random-dot pattern that had the least prominent monocular depth cues. The complex image which had a large variety of monocular depth cues produced the most variable and less persistent disconjugacy. We conclude that the monocular depth cues modulate the disconjugacy of saccades stimulated by the disparity of aniseikonic images.

  20. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingerle, D., E-mail: dingerle@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Meirer, F. [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG Utrecht (Netherlands); Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D. [MiNALab, CMM-irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  1. Classifying organisational capabilities by their nature and role for technological capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rousseva, R.

    2009-01-01

    Based on critical literature review this research highlights a number of gaps in the existing treatment of technological and organisational capabilities. It has been recognised that organisational capabilities have an important role to play in development of technological capabilities both in lateco

  2. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  3. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  4. The Capabilities of the Offshore Middlemen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Wareham, Jonathan

    preliminary theoretical justification for the emergence of offshore intermediaries; describe how and why they develop intermediation capabilities; and offer initial evidence substantiating their function and processes in intermediating transnational offshoring relationships in software development...

  5. Canadian national nuclear forensics capability project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Dimayuga, I., E-mail: joanne.ball@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Summerell, I. [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Totland, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Jonkmans, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Whitlock, J. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); El-jaby, A. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Inrig, E. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Following the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Canada expanded its existing capability for nuclear forensics by establishing a national nuclear forensics laboratory network, which would include a capability to perform forensic analysis on nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as on traditional evidence contaminated with radioactive material. At the same time, the need for a national nuclear forensics library of signatures of nuclear and radioactive materials under Canadian regulatory control was recognized. The Canadian Safety and Security Program, administered by Defence Research and Development Canada's Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS), funds science and technology initiatives to enhance Canada's preparedness for prevention of and response to potential threats. DRDC CSS, with assistance from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is leading the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project to develop a coordinated, comprehensive, and timely national nuclear forensics capability. (author)

  6. Establishment of a corner turning test capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashcraft, R.W.; West, G.T.

    1978-11-01

    A corner turning test capability has been established. While the test is not suited to be the sole criterion for lot qualification, it provides valuable information regarding explosive behavior near failure. Light enhancement and film record analysis techniques are discussed.

  7. Identity Building in Organisations: Proactive Capability Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2002-01-01

    Identity building in organisations is often viewed as legitimacy of value systems of the organisation. Based on empirical studies the task of this article is to argue that such a legitimacy approach risks failing in the longer perspective, if the proactive capability development is neglected....... The participatory scenario method presented in this article is one of the possible methods to enhance identity building based on proactive capability development....

  8. Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, Lee; Hurst, Aaron; Kelly, John; Kondev, Filip; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Nesaraja, Caroline; Slaybaugh, Rachel; Sonzogni, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Workshop on Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications (NDNCA) was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on 27-29 May 2015. The goals of NDNCA were compile nuclear data needs across a wide spectrum of applied nuclear science, and to provide a summary of associated capabilities (accelerators, reactors, spectrometers, etc.) available for required measurements. This document represents the results of the workshop and a compilation of other recent documents assessing nuclear data needs for the above-mentioned applications.

  9. Aging and DNA repair capability. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on DNA repair processes in relation to aging is presented under the following headings: DNA repair processes; age-related occurrence of unrepaired DNA lesions; DNA repair capability as a function of age; tissue-specific DNA repair capability; acceleration of the aging process by exposure to DNA damaging agents; human genetic syndromes; and longevity and DNA repair processes. (HLW)

  10. Expanding Lookout Capabilities for Architectural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shick, B.

    SMC/SYSW/ENY's Lookout tool provides a M&S capability for architectural analysis. It models the contributions of ground and space-based assets in several mission threads and scenarios to quantify overall Space Situational Awareness (SSA) capability. Plotting performance results versus costs enables decision makers to identify and evaluate Best Value families of systems and combinations of architectures. Currently, SMC intends to use Lookout to impact the Fiscal Year 2012 budget programming cycle, the National SSA Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) and Architecture definition effort, planning for programs of record, and AFSPC & SMC leadership. Ultimately, Lookout will enable additional space superiority analysis. Previous Lookout work focused on modeling the metric tracking capabilities of the Space Surveillance Network (detecting and tracking) and proposed concepts to close identified collection shortfalls. SMC/SYSW/ENY leveraged some of the lessons learned in developing and implementing the metric tracking models to expand Lookout to develop an initial characterization capability, including non-resolved space object identification (SOI), imaging, and Foreign Instrumentation and Signals (FIS) Intelligence. Characterization collection phenomenologies added in FY08 and FY09 include mechanical tracking and phased array radars, visible telescopes, and signals collection. Lookout enables evaluating the characterization collections for quantity, quality, and timeliness. Capturing the Tasking, Collection, Processing, Exploitation, and Dissemination processes represent one of the biggest challenges in including characterization capabilities in mission thread and scenario-based analysis. The SMC/SYSW/ENY team met with several representatives of the community and held community-wide Technical Interchange Meetings. Based on feedback from these meetings, SMC created an infrastructure for modeling the tasking processes and scales to relate collection quality to intelligence

  11. Creativity takes courage (and digital capabilities)

    OpenAIRE

    Pinny, Kerry; Elliott, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Our session will detail the work undertaken at the University of Lincoln (Educational Development and Enhancement Unit, 2016; Pinny, 2015; Elliott, 2016) to support staff to develop their digital capabilities. We will detail our journey from the adoption of the Jisc framework and development of an institutional digital capabilities strategy, to gaining senior management buy in, piloting of the Jisc Discovery Tool (2016) and support resources, including a Lynda.com pilot. This session will ...

  12. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    15-001098 Copy Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks Sarah K...other national challenges. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks...noted that the ability of the Military Health System to provide operational healthcare is measured by the readiness of its medical personnel and

  13. Descriptors of server capabilities in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi; Slepniov, Dmitrij; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2013-01-01

    China with the huge market potential it possesses is an important issue for subsidiaries of western multinational companies. The objective of this paper is therefore to strengthen researchers’ and practitioners’ perspectives on what are the descriptors of server capabilities. The descriptors...... are relevant to determine subsidiary roles and as an indication of the capabilities required. These descriptors are identified through extensive literature review and validated by case studies of two Danish multinational companies subsidiaries operating in China. They provided the empirical basis...

  14. Cell size, genome size and the dominance of Angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, K. A.; Roddy, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Angiosperms are capable of maintaining the highest rates of photosynthetic gas exchange of all land plants. High rates of photosynthesis depends mechanistically both on efficiently transporting water to the sites of evaporation in the leaf and on regulating the loss of that water to the atmosphere as CO2 diffuses into the leaf. Angiosperm leaves are unique in their ability to sustain high fluxes of liquid and vapor phase water transport due to high vein densities and numerous, small stomata. Despite the ubiquity of studies characterizing the anatomical and physiological adaptations that enable angiosperms to maintain high rates of photosynthesis, the underlying mechanism explaining why they have been able to develop such high leaf vein densities, and such small and abundant stomata, is still incomplete. Here we ask whether the scaling of genome size and cell size places a fundamental constraint on the photosynthetic metabolism of land plants, and whether genome downsizing among the angiosperms directly contributed to their greater potential and realized primary productivity relative to the other major groups of terrestrial plants. Using previously published data we show that a single relationship can predict guard cell size from genome size across the major groups of terrestrial land plants (e.g. angiosperms, conifers, cycads and ferns). Similarly, a strong positive correlation exists between genome size and both stomatal density and vein density that together ultimately constrains maximum potential (gs, max) and operational stomatal conductance (gs, op). Further the difference in the slopes describing the covariation between genome size and both gs, max and gs, op suggests that genome downsizing brings gs, op closer to gs, max. Taken together the data presented here suggests that the smaller genomes of angiosperms allow their final cell sizes to vary more widely and respond more directly to environmental conditions and in doing so bring operational photosynthetic

  15. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Toledo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds. In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10−3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  16. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  17. "Learning in Depth" in Teaching Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    The "Learning in Depth" program is a simple but radical innovation, which was first implemented in Canada in 2008/2009 and is now being used in a dozen countries with many thousand students. The aim of the program is to ensure that every student becomes an expert on something during schooling. The unusualness of the program and the fact…

  18. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-xiao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil.

  19. Ideal Sowing Depth for Sweetgum Seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. T. Bonner

    1967-01-01

    This paper reports the sowing depths from which sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) seedlings can emerge under near ideal conditions. Little is known about the seedbed conditions required for successful direct seeding of sweetgum, and the information presented here will be useful in planning field trials.

  20. Coding In-depth Semistructured Interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, John L.; Quincy, Charles; Osserman, Jordan;

    2013-01-01

    Many social science studies are based on coded in-depth semistructured interview transcripts. But researchers rarely report or discuss coding reliability in this work. Nor is there much literature on the subject for this type of data. This article presents a procedure for developing coding schemes...

  1. Monocular alignment in different depth planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Koichi; Wade, Nicholas J

    2002-04-01

    We examined (a) whether vertical lines at different physical horizontal positions in the same eye can appear to be aligned, and (b), if so, whether the difference between the horizontal positions of the aligned vertical lines can vary with the perceived depth between them. In two experiments, each of two vertical monocular lines was presented (in its respective rectangular area) in one field of a random-dot stereopair with binocular disparity. In Experiment 1, 15 observers were asked to align a line in an upper area with a line in a lower area. The results indicated that when the lines appeared aligned, their horizontal physical positions could differ and the direction of the difference coincided with the type of disparity of the rectangular areas; this is not consistent with the law of the visual direction of monocular stimuli. In Experiment 2, 11 observers were asked to report relative depth between the two lines and to align them. The results indicated that the difference of the horizontal position did not covary with their perceived relative depth, suggesting that the visual direction and perceived depth of the monocular line are mediated via different mechanisms.

  2. Educator Market Research: In-depth Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Military Advertising ,” Report to Congress, 2000. 20 Defense Manpower Data Center Educator Market ...2000. d. Preliminary Presentation of Results. The contractor formally briefed results to the Joint Marketing and Advertising Committee (JMAC) on...Educator Market Research: DMDC Report No. 2002-024 November 2001 In-depth Interviews For additional copies of this report, contact: Defense Technical

  3. Visual discomfort and depth-of-field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hare, L.; Zhang, T.; Nefs, H.T.; Hibbard, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    Visual discomfort has been reported for certain visual stimuli and under particular viewing conditions, such as stereoscopic viewing. In stereoscopic viewing, visual discomfort can be caused by a conflict between accommodation and convergence cues that may specify different distances in depth. Earli

  4. Kinematic artifacts in prestack depth migration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, C.C.; Symes, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    Strong refraction of waves in the migration velocity model introduces kinematic artifacts¿coherent events not corresponding to actual reflectors¿into the image volumes produced by prestack depth migration applied to individual data bins. Because individual bins are migrated independently, the migrat

  5. Sampling depth confounds soil acidification outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the northern Great Plains (NGP) of North America, surface sampling depths of 0-15 or 0-20 cm are suggested for testing soil characteristics such as pH. However, acidification is often most pronounced near the soil surface. Thus, sampling deeper can potentially dilute (increase) pH measurements an...

  6. Depth to ground water of Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a raster-based, depth to ground-water data set for the State of Nevada. The source of this data set is a statewide water-table contour data set constructed...

  7. Visual discomfort and depth-of-field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hare, L.; Zhang, T.; Nefs, H.T.; Hibbard, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    Visual discomfort has been reported for certain visual stimuli and under particular viewing conditions, such as stereoscopic viewing. In stereoscopic viewing, visual discomfort can be caused by a conflict between accommodation and convergence cues that may specify different distances in depth.

  8. "Learning in Depth" in Teaching Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    The "Learning in Depth" program is a simple but radical innovation, which was first implemented in Canada in 2008/2009 and is now being used in a dozen countries with many thousand students. The aim of the program is to ensure that every student becomes an expert on something during schooling. The unusualness of the program and the fact…

  9. ROMANIAN YOUNG LEADERS CAPABILITIES: AN EMPIRICAL SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGELA-OLIMPIA LOBONEA OLTEAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to disseminate the results of a study focused on young leaders, designed to fill the gap in the specialty literature about the capabilities of young leaders in Romania. Capabilities - in our opinion, represents the leader's potentialities, the engine of transformation. They exist in a latent state and by activation they generate economic effects. Through this study we want to identify young Romanian people's attitudes towards capabilities; when we say capabilities, we understand potential. In this article we will present the capabilities from the perspective of potential. Sure, there are also other classifications, but from an economical perspective we consider that the potential of a leader is relevant through the following components: emotional potential, social potential, cognitive potential, managerial potential and behavioral potential. The overall conclusion is that in the realized study we have identified the following key capabilities of young Romanian leaders: character, confidence, empathy, credibility, leadership style, vision, memory, ability to be proactive, optimism, ability to generate respect.

  10. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  11. Open architecture for rapid deployment of capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Modern warfare has drastically changed from conventional to non-conventional and from fixed threats to dynamic ones over the past several decades. This unprecedented fundamental shift has now made our adversaries and their weapons more nebulous and ever changing. Our current acquisition system however is not suited to develop, test and deploy essential capability to counter these dynamic threats in time to combat them. This environment requires a new infrastructure in our system design to rapidly adopt capabilities that we do not currently plan for or even know about. The key to enabling this rapid implementation is Open Architecture in acquisition. The DoD has shown it can rapidly prototype capabilities such as unmanned vehicles but has severely struggled in moving from the prototyping to deployment. A major driver of this disconnect is the lack of established infrastructure to employ said capability such as launch and recovery systems and command and control. If we are to be successful in transitioning our rapid capability to the warfighter we must implement established well defined interfaces and enabling technologies to facilitate the rapid adoption of capability so the warfighter has the tools to effectively counter the threat.

  12. HEALTH, VITAL GOALS, AND CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or ‘central human capabilities and functionings’. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings—or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. PMID:22420910

  13. Health, vital goals, and central human capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-06-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or 'central human capabilities and functionings'. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings-or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings.

  14. A multi-detector, digitizer based neutron depth profiling device for characterizing thin film materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, P. L.; Cao, L. R.; Turkoglu, D. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) is a mature, nondestructive technique used to characterize the concentration of certain light isotopes in a material as a function of depth by measuring the residual energy of charged particles in neutron induced reactions. Historically, NDP has been performed using a single detector, resulting in low intrinsic detection efficiency, and limiting the technique largely to high flux research reactors. In this work, we describe a new NDP instrument design with higher detection efficiency by way of spectrum summing across multiple detectors. Such a design is capable of acquiring a statistically significant charged particle spectrum at facilities limited in neutron flux and operation time.

  15. A multi-resolution multi-size-windows disparity estimation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Bauza, Judit; Shiralkar, Manish

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for estimating the disparity between 2 images of a stereo pair. The disparity is related to the depth of the objects in the scene. Being able to obtain the depth of the objects in the scene is useful in many applications such as virtual reality, 3D user interfaces, background-foreground segmentation, or depth-image-based synthesis. This last application has motivated the proposed algorithm as part of a system that estimates disparities from a stereo pair and synthesizes new views. Synthesizing virtual views enables the post-processing of 3D content to adapt to user preferences or viewing conditions, as well as enabling the interface with multi-view auto-stereoscopic displays. The proposed algorithm has been designed to fulfill the following constraints: (a) low memory requirements, (b) local and parallelizable processing, and (c) adaptability to a sudden reduction in processing resources. Our solution uses a multi-resolution multi-size-windows approach, implemented as a line-independent process, well-suited for GPU implementation. The multi-resolution approach provides adaptability to sudden reduction in processing capabilities, besides computational advantages; the windows-based image processing algorithm guarantees low-memory requirements and local processing.

  16. The edge effect: how and why wounds grow in size and depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D G; Athanasiou, K A

    1998-01-01

    The central tenet for healing any wound is pressure redistribution and appropriate débridement. It is generally not what you put on these wounds that heals them, but rather what you take off. If the wound is adequately débrided and plantar pressure is redistributed, in the absence of profound ischemia, most diabetic foot wounds will heal. Off-loading is best achieved by spreading force over a wide area of contact, such as with the total contact cast or certain removable cast walkers.

  17. Shallow lakes theory revisited: various alternative regimes driven by climate, nutrients, depth and lake size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Nes, van E.H.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow lakes have become the archetypical example of ecosystems with alternative stable states. However, since the early conception of that theory, the image of ecosystem stability has been elaborated for shallow lakes far beyond the simple original model. After discussing how spatial heterogeneity

  18. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudin, P.; Fourrière, A.; Andreotti, B.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  19. Correlations Between Degree of Petal Fusion, Leaf Size and Fruit Size: A Case in Syzygium (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PUDJI WIDODO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Syzygium is one of large genera of the flowering plants. In order to simplify the identification, a classification is required, e.g. based on degree of petal fusion, leaf size and fruit size. Due to variations of vegetative and generative characters, a correlation analysis was carried out. The aim of this research is to know the correlation between degree of petal fusion, leaf length and fruit diameter. The result of this research showed that there is positive correlation between those three variables. The increase of leaf size will increase fruit size and petal lobe depth.

  20. When depth is no refuge: cumulative thermal stress increases with depth in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, B. P.; Condit, C.; Liu, G.; dos Santos, S.; Kahru, M.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kline, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are increasingly affected by high-temperature stress events and associated bleaching. Monitoring and predicting these events have largely utilized sea surface temperature data, due to the convenience of using large-scale remotely sensed satellite measurements. However, coral bleaching has been observed to vary in severity throughout the water column, and variations in coral thermal stress across depths have not yet been well investigated. In this study, in situ water temperature data from 1999 to 2011 from three depths were used to calculate thermal stress on a coral reef in Bahia Almirante, Bocas del Toro, Panama, which was compared to satellite surface temperature data and thermal stress calculations for the same area and time period from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Watch Satellite Bleaching Alert system. The results show similar total cumulative annual thermal stress for both the surface and depth-stratified data, but with a striking difference in the distribution of that stress among the depth strata during different high-temperature events, with the greatest thermal stress unusually recorded at the deepest measured depth during the most severe bleaching event in 2005. Temperature records indicate that a strong density-driven temperature inversion may have formed in this location in that year, contributing to the persistence and intensity of bleaching disturbance at depth. These results indicate that depth may not provide a stress refuge from high water temperature events in some situations, and in this case, the water properties at depth appear to have contributed to greater coral bleaching at depth compared to near-surface locations. This case study demonstrates the importance of incorporating depth-stratified temperature monitoring and small-scale oceanographic and hydrologic data for understanding and predicting local reef responses to elevated water temperature events.

  1. Sizing-tube-fin space radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Temperature and size considerations of the tube fin space radiator were characterized by charts and equations. An approach of accurately assessing rejection capability commensurate with a phase A/B level output is reviewed. A computer program, based on Mackey's equations, is also presented which sizes the rejection area for a given thermal load. The program also handles the flow and thermal considerations of the film coefficient.

  2. High Energy Telescope With Neutron Detection Capabilities (HETn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böhm, E.; Böttcher, s.; Connell, J. J.; Dröge, W.; Hassler, D. M.; Heber, B.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.; Steigies, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    The High-Energy Telescope with neutron detection capabilities (HETn) for the Solar Orbiter will measure and resolve energetic charged particles, in particular electrons, proton, and heavy ions up to Fe including selected isotopes up to energies equivalen to the penetration depth of 100 MeV protons. The full active anti-coincidence encloses detectors sensitive to 1-30 MeV neutrons and 0.5-5 MeV X-/gamma-rays. The sensor consists of the angle-detecting inclined sensors (ADIS) solid-state detector detector telescope utilizing a shared calorimeter for total energy and X-/gamma-ray measurement. A separate plastic detector provides sensitivity to neutrons via the recoil process. HETn will open a new window on solar eruptive events with its neutron detection capability and allows determination of high-energy close to the Sun. Timing and spectral information on neutral particles (neutrons and X-/gamma rays ), on relativistic electrons and high-energy heavy ions will provide new insights into the processes which accelerate particles to high energies at the sun and into transport processes between the source and the spacecraft in the near-Sun environment.

  3. Handheld White Light Interferometer for Measuring Defect Depth in Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Simmons, Stephen; Cox, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of defects (scratches and impacts) is vital to the certification of flight hardware and other critical components. The amount of damage to a particular component contributes to the performance, reliability, and safety of a system, which ultimately affects the success or failure of a mission or test. The launch-commit criteria on a Space Shuttle Orbiter window are governed by the depth of the defects that are identified by a visual inspection. This measurement of a defect is not easy to obtain given the environment, size of the defect, and location of the window(s). The determination of depth has typically been performed by taking a mold impression and measuring the impression with an optical profiling instrument. Another method of obtaining an estimate of the depth is by using a refocus microscope. To use a refocus microscope, the surface of the glass and bottom of the defect are, in turn, brought into focus by the operator. The amount of movement between the two points corresponds to the depth of the defect. The refocus microscope requires a skilled operator and has been proven to be unreliable when used on Orbiter windows. White light interferometry was chosen as a candidate to replace the refocus microscope. The White Light Interferometer (WLI) was developed to replace the refocus microscope as the instrument used for measuring the depth of defects in Orbiter windows. The WLI consists of a broadband illumination source, interferometer, detector, motion control, displacement sensor, mechanical housing, and support electronics. The illumination source for the WLI is typically a visible light emitting diode (LED) or a near-infrared superluminescent diode (SLD) with power levels of less than a milliwatt. The interferometer is a Michelson configuration consisting of a 1-in. (2.5-cm) cube beam splitter, a 0.5-in. (1.3-cm) optical window as a movable leg (used to closely match the return intensity of the fixed leg from the window), and a

  4. Balancing Strategy, Resources and Capability: Sizing the Force for an Uncertain Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-30

    time consuming enterprise. In the revolutionary era, an Army was built quickly for war from the militia and National Guard, and was just as quickly...her leadership battle with Steny Hoyer in 2001; she’s speaker today due more to Murtha than to anyone else. But, said Work, “No matter how powerful...ground Services recommended for the near future. Lack of strategic priorities and questionable Service programming behaviors allow congressional

  5. Focal Depth of the WenChuan Earthquake Aftershocks from modeling of Seismic Depth Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Zeng, X.; Chong, J.; Ni, S.; Chen, Y.

    2008-12-01

    After the 05/12/2008 great WenChuan earthquake in Sichuan Province of China, tens of thousands earthquakes occurred with hundreds of them stronger than M4. Those aftershocks provide valuable information about seismotectonics and rupture processes for the mainshock, particularly accurate spatial distribution of aftershocks is very informational for determining rupture fault planes. However focal depth can not be well resolved just with first arrivals recorded by relatively sparse network in Sichuan Province, therefore 3D seismicity distribution is difficult to obtain though horizontal location can be located with accuracy of 5km. Instead local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn, sPL and teleseismic pP,sP are very sensitive to depth, and be readily modeled to determine depth with accuracy of 2km. With reference 1D velocity structure resolved from receiver functions and seismic refraction studies, local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn and sPL are identified by comparing observed waveform with synthetic seismograms by generalized ray theory and reflectivity methods. For teleseismic depth phases well observed for M5.5 and stronger events, we developed an algorithm in inverting both depth and focal mechanism from P and SH waveforms. Also we employed the Cut and Paste (CAP) method developed by Zhao and Helmberger in modeling mechanism and depth with local waveforms, which constrains depth by fitting Pnl waveforms and the relative weight between surface wave and Pnl. After modeling all the depth phases for hundreds of events , we find that most of the M4 earthquakes occur between 2-18km depth, with aftershocks depth ranging 4-12km in the southern half of Longmenshan fault while aftershocks in the northern half featuring large depth range up to 18km. Therefore seismogenic zone in the northern segment is deeper as compared to the southern segment. All the aftershocks occur in upper crust, given that the Moho is deeper than 40km, or even 60km west of the

  6. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, Julia; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F.; Schmid, Moritz S.; Cunsolo, Serena; Brambini, Roberto; Noble, Kimberly; Sirks, Lys-Anne; Linders, Theo E. W.; Schoeneich-Argent, Rosanna I.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of the depth profile of buoyant microplastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, from 0 to 5 m depth. Microplastics were separated into size classes (0.5–1.5 and 1.5–5.0 mm) and types (‘fragments’ and ‘lines’), and associated with a sea state. Microplastic concentrations decreased exponentially with depth, with both sea state and particle properties affecting the steepness of the decrease. Concentrations approached zero within 5 m depth, indicating that most buoyant microplastics are present on or near the surface. Plastic rise velocities were also measured, and were found to differ significantly for different sizes and shapes. Our results suggest that (1) surface samplers such as manta trawls underestimate total buoyant microplastic amounts by a factor of 1.04–30.0 and (2) estimations of depth-integrated buoyant plastic concentrations should be done across different particle sizes and types. Our findings can assist with improving buoyant ocean plastic vertical mixing models, mass balance exercises, impact assessments and mitigation strategies. PMID:27721460

  7. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, Julia; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F.; Schmid, Moritz S.; Cunsolo, Serena; Brambini, Roberto; Noble, Kimberly; Sirks, Lys-Anne; Linders, Theo E. W.; Schoeneich-Argent, Rosanna I.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2016-10-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of the depth profile of buoyant microplastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, from 0 to 5 m depth. Microplastics were separated into size classes (0.5–1.5 and 1.5–5.0 mm) and types (‘fragments’ and ‘lines’), and associated with a sea state. Microplastic concentrations decreased exponentially with depth, with both sea state and particle properties affecting the steepness of the decrease. Concentrations approached zero within 5 m depth, indicating that most buoyant microplastics are present on or near the surface. Plastic rise velocities were also measured, and were found to differ significantly for different sizes and shapes. Our results suggest that (1) surface samplers such as manta trawls underestimate total buoyant microplastic amounts by a factor of 1.04–30.0 and (2) estimations of depth-integrated buoyant plastic concentrations should be done across different particle sizes and types. Our findings can assist with improving buoyant ocean plastic vertical mixing models, mass balance exercises, impact assessments and mitigation strategies.

  8. The effect of nanoparticle surfactant polarization on trapping depth of vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian, E-mail: lijian@cqu.edu.cn; Du, Bin; Wang, Feipeng; Yao, Wei; Yao, Shuhan

    2016-02-05

    Nanoparticles can generate charge carrier trapping and reduce the velocity of streamer development in insulating oils ultimately leading to an enhancement of the breakdown voltage of insulating oils. Vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids with three sizes of monodispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared and their trapping depths were measured by thermally stimulated method (TSC). It is found that the nanoparticle surfactant polarization can significantly influence the trapping depth of vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids. A nanoparticle polarization model considering surfactant polarization was proposed to calculate the trapping depth of the nanofluids at different nanoparticle sizes and surfactant thicknesses. The results show the calculated values of the model are in a fairly good agreement with the experimental values. - Highlights: • Three different sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} vegetable-oil based nanofluids was successfully prepared. • The trapping depth of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofluids was investigated. • A new model considering surfactant polarization was proposed to calculate the trapping depth of the nanofluids.

  9. Molecular-sized fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Igor I.; Shiryaev, Andrey A.; Rendler, Torsten; Steinert, Steffen; Lee, Sang-Yun; Antonov, Denis; Vörös, Márton; Jelezko, Fedor; Fisenko, Anatolii V.; Semjonova, Lubov F.; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Sildos, Ilmo; Hemmer, Philip. R.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Gali, Adam; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Doping of carbon nanoparticles with impurity atoms is central to their application. However, doping has proven elusive for very small carbon nanoparticles because of their limited availability and a lack of fundamental understanding of impurity stability in such nanostructures. Here, we show that isolated diamond nanoparticles as small as 1.6 nm, comprising only ~400 carbon atoms, are capable of housing stable photoluminescent colour centres, namely the silicon vacancy (SiV). Surprisingly, fluorescence from SiVs is stable over time, and few or only single colour centres are found per nanocrystal. We also observe size-dependent SiV emission supported by quantum-chemical simulation of SiV energy levels in small nanodiamonds. Our work opens the way to investigating the physics and chemistry of molecular-sized cubic carbon clusters and promises the application of ultrasmall non-perturbative fluorescent nanoparticles as markers in microscopy and sensing.

  10. Capability to care and work: when dual roles intersect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Horrell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing in place is a cost-effective policy solution to eldercare that reflects a dominant positive ageing discourse of choice and independence. It satisfies older people's preference to remain at home and be involved in their community, but depends upon the provision of care and support for frail elders, particularly the oldest-old, who require assistance to achieve these goals. The traditional provision of unpaid eldercare by female relatives is changing as women are increasingly working outside the home, and they have to choose between, or manage, dual roles of caregiving and paid work. Negative effects on health, paid employment, and finances are associated with the intersection of eldercare and employment. Solutions involve reducing or relinquishing paid employment, which would have financial, social, physical, and emotional ramifications in the future. However, being able to successfully accommodate both roles provides a sense of satisfaction and fulfilment. To understand the complexity of managing the tension between work and eldercare requires a detailed analysis of unpaid caregivers’ daily lives. This paper presents findings about eldercare provision and paid work, derived from two qualitative studies that used a participatory methodology for an in-depth exploration of caregivers’ health. The participants’ stories demonstrate that rather than reflecting on access to a range of options, caregivers’ choices are constrained, and involve trading work and other capabilities for the capability to care. Providing care for a loved elder was the first priority, followed by paid work. Having the capability to maintain a healthy and balanced life was the caregivers’ lowest priority. Unpaid informal care has benefits for elders, and it is a valued emotional relationship for caregivers; however, future social policy should address the difficulties that caregiving creates in people's lives along with focusing on the benefits that such care

  11. Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

  12. Machine Process Capability Information Through Six Sigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, M.F.

    1998-03-13

    A project investigating details concerning machine process capability information and its accessibility has been conducted. The thesis of the project proposed designing a part (denoted as a machine capability workpiece) based on the major machining features of a given machine. Parts are machined and measured to gather representative production, short-term variation. The information is utilized to predict the expected defect rate, expressed in terms of a composite sigma level process capability index, for a production part. Presently, decisions concerning process planning, particularly what machine will statistically produce the minimum amount of defects based on machined features and associated tolerances, are rarely made. Six sigma tools and methodology were employed to conduct this investigation at AlliedSignal FM and T. Tools such as the thought process map, factor relationship diagrams, and components of variance were used. This study is progressing toward completion. This research study was an example of how machine process capability information may be gathered for milling planar faces (horizontal) and slot features. The planning method used to determine where and how to gather variation for the part to be designed is known as factor relationship diagramming. Components-of-variation is then applied to the gathered data to arrive at the contributing level of variation illustrated within the factor relationship diagram. The idea of using this capability information beyond process planning to the other business enterprise operations is proposed.

  13. On Capability Approach, Poverty and Corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojiu Hu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The core of development is to face up with the challenge of the issue of poverty, which directly is associated with the ultimate goal of social, political and economic development. If the poverty has not been properly handled, development will be inefficient and unsustainable. This paper briefly indicates the main idea of Amartya Sen’s capability approach, then utilizing the approach to analyze poverty and the bottleneck in dealing such issues. It illustrates the inter-relationship of capability, poverty and corruption, and demonstrates that corruption is both the cause and the consequence of poverty and the failure of capability. When there corruption comes, the essential power to alleviate and eliminate poverty such as political accountability, transparency, engagement and openness are all spoiled and even wiped off. Political accountability, transparence, engagement are of great importance to both anti-corruption and poverty and promotion of capability. Economic aid for the poor and needy should be reinforced by fostering and promoting the capability of the poor and needy, so that the purpose of eliminating poverty and corruption could be achieved.

  14. Higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception: MT+ plays a significant role in monocular depth perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    2014-10-20

    Today, we human beings are facing with high-quality virtual world of a completely new nature. For example, we have a digital display consisting of a high enough resolution that we cannot distinguish from the real world. However, little is known how such high-quality representation contributes to the sense of realness, especially to depth perception. What is the neural mechanism of processing such fine but virtual representation? Here, we psychophysically and physiologically examined the relationship between stimulus resolution and depth perception, with using luminance-contrast (shading) as a monocular depth cue. As a result, we found that a higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception even when the stimulus resolution difference is undetectable. This finding is against the traditional cognitive hierarchy of visual information processing that visual input is processed continuously in a bottom-up cascade of cortical regions that analyze increasingly complex information such as depth information. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results reveal that the human middle temporal (MT+) plays a significant role in monocular depth perception. These results might provide us with not only the new insight of our neural mechanism of depth perception but also the future progress of our neural system accompanied by state-of- the-art technologies.

  15. Object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction for depth video coding in 3D video system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Koo; Lee, Jaejoon; Lim, Ilsoon; Ho, Yo-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the 3D video system using the MVD (multi-view video plus depth) data format is being actively studied. The system has many advantages with respect to virtual view synthesis such as an auto-stereoscopic functionality, but compression of huge input data remains a problem. Therefore, efficient 3D data compression is extremely important in the system, and problems of low temporal consistency and viewpoint correlation should be resolved for efficient depth video coding. In this paper, we propose an object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction method to resolve the problems where object-adaptive mean-depth difference between a current block, to be coded, and a reference block are compensated during inter prediction. In addition, unique properties of depth video are exploited to reduce side information required for signaling decoder to conduct the same process. To evaluate the coding performance, we have implemented the proposed method into MVC (multiview video coding) reference software, JMVC 8.2. Experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed method is especially efficient for depth videos estimated by DERS (depth estimation reference software) discussed in the MPEG 3DV coding group. The coding gain was up to 11.69% bit-saving, and it was even increased when we evaluated it on synthesized views of virtual viewpoints.

  16. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity.

  17. Accuracy of corneal trephination depth using the Moria single-use adjustable depth vacuum trephine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenzl, Carlton R; Gess, Adam J; Moshirfar, Majid

    2014-01-01

    The Moria single-use adjustable depth trephine is a device that allows a goal trephination depth to be set prior to the surgical procedure. Eleven fresh human cadaveric eyes were trephined using 8.0 mm Moria single-use adjustable vacuum trephines. Prior to trephination, the average corneal pachymetry in the peripheral 7-10 mm range was obtained using anterior segment optical coherence tomography. The trephination depth was set to 80% of that value. Light microscopy was used to image anteroposterior cross-sections of each corneal specimen. Digital protractor software was used to evaluate the trephination angle, depth, and length. All adequately processed specimens were included in the analysis. In addition, trephination angle data from a previous publication by Moshirfar et al were used as a comparison with those of this study. Trephination analysis of depth compared with pachymetry revealed a mean of 83.7%±6.53% (95% confidence interval 79.8-87.6). Maximum and minimum trephined depths were 95.35% and 71.3%, respectively. Trephination depth compared with angular corneal thickness yielded a mean of 66.2%±4.79% (95% confidence interval 63.0-69.4). Maximum and minimum depths were 73.7% and 59.7%, respectively. Analysis of trephination angle yielded a mean of 130.2±3.57 degrees (95% confidence interval 127.8-132.61). Maximum and minimum angles were 135.5 degrees and 126 degrees, respectively. The standard deviation of the trephination angle of the Moria trephine was found to be significantly less than that of Hessburg-Barron and Hanna trephines calculated in the previous study. The Moria adjustable vacuum trephine is an accurate method of trephination when a specific depth is desired. Further investigation is needed to determine the relevance of this in relation to deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty.

  18. Evaluating motion parallax and stereopsis as depth cues for autostereoscopic displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Marius; Leiner, Ulrich; Ruschin, Detlef

    2011-03-01

    The perception of space in the real world is based on multifaceted depth cues, most of them monocular, some binocular. Developing 3D-displays raises the question, which of these depth cues are predominant and should be simulated by computational means in such a panel. Beyond the cues based on image content, such as shadows or patterns, Stereopsis and depth from motion parallax are the most significant mechanisms supporting observers with depth information. We set up a carefully designed test situation, widely excluding undesired other distance hints. Thereafter we conducted a user test to find out, which of these two depth cues is more relevant and whether a combination of both would increase accuracy in a depth estimation task. The trials were conducting utilizing our autostereoscopic "Free2C"-displays, which are capable to detect the user eye position and steer the image lobes dynamically into that direction. At the same time, eye position was used to update the virtual camera's location and thereby offering motion parallax to the observer. As far as we know, this was the first time that such a test has been conducted using an autosteresocopic display without any assistive technologies. Our results showed, in accordance with prior experiments, that both cues are effective, however Stereopsis is by order of magnitude more relevant. Combining both cues improved the precision of distance estimation by another 30-40%.

  19. Analysis and evaluation of enterprise risk management capability elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Research on enterprise risk management capability is conducted with a view of discerning and processing risks, in which an evaluation index system and an evaluation model of enterprise risk management capabilities are constructed. The risk management capability consists of four aspects, i.e. risk identification capability, risk assessment capability, risk planning capability and risk control capability. Risk identification and assessment capabilities reflect the level of enterprises on finding and analyzing...

  20. Reproductive variability of Parapandalus narval (Crustacea: Decapoda) along a depth gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thessalou-Legaki, Maria

    1992-12-01

    The variations of the reproductive parameters of Parapandalus narval are studied from a population off Rhodos Island, Greece. Female size (CL), dry weight (FDW) and depth of occurrence are examined as determinants of the reproductive parameters such as the percentage of ovigerous females, the stage of egg maturation, the brood size and the reproductive effort. The percentage of the ovigerous females and the egg maturation are related to depth. More ovigerous, older females with larger eggs in earlier stages of development are found in deeper waters. Nevertheless, brood size or brood dry weight regressions on female size and dry weight, respectively, show that the shallow water reproductive output increases more steeply with size or weight of the females than does that in deeper waters. Finally, the reproductive effort of Parapandalus narval does not seem to be directly related to depth but it is related to the size of the female. Small females have smaller reproductive effort than bigger ones that reach a maximum value.