WorldWideScience

Sample records for depth profiling analysis

  1. Photodegradation of wood and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Photochemical degradation is a key process of the weathering that occurs when wood is exposed outdoors. It is also a major cause of the discoloration of wood in indoor applications. The effects of sunlight on the chemical composition of wood are superficial in nature, but estimates of the depth at which photodegradation occurs in wood vary greatly from 80 microm to as much as 2540 mic rom. Better understanding of the photodegradation of wood through depth profile analysis is desirable because it would allow the development of more effective photo-protective treatments that target the surface layers of wood most susceptible to photodegradation. This paper briefly describes fundamental aspects of photodegradation of wood and reviews progress made in the field of depth profile study on the photodegradation of wood. (author)

  2. SIMS depth profile analysis of environmental microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and technological research demands chemical characterization of aerosol particles so minute in size, that conventional methods for bulk analyses are simply not applicable. In this work novel application of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for characterization of microparticles suspended in atmosphere of the working environment of glass plant Thomson Polkolor, Piaseczno and steelworks Huta Sendzimira, Cracow is presented. The new technique based on sample rotation in depth profile analysis of sub-micrometer particulate material was performed on SAJW-02 analyser equipped with Balzers 16 mm quadrupole spectrometer and sample rotation manipulator using 5 keV Ar + and O 2 + ion beams. The results were compared with the standard method used on ims-3f Cameca analyser 12 keV O 2 + ion beam. Grain size distributions of aerosol microparticles were estimated using eight-stage cascade impactor with particle size range of 0.2 μm to 15 μm. Elemental concentration and crystalline structure of the collected dust particles were performed using spark source mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction methods. SIMS depth profile analysis shows that sub-micrometer particles do not have uniform morphology, The core-shell structure has been observed for particles collected in both factories. Presented models show that the steelworks particles consists mainly of iron and manganese cores. At the shells of these microparticles :lead, chlorine and fluorine are found. The cores of glass plant submicrometer particles consists mainly of lead-zirconium glass covered by a shell containing carbon and copper. Sample rotation technique applied SIMS appears to be an effective tool for environmental microparticle morphology studies. (author)

  3. Secondary neutral mass spectrometry depth profile analysis of silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, P.; Kopnarski, M.; Oechsner, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Direct Bombardment Mode (DBM) of Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) has been applied for depth profile analysis of two different multilayer systems containing metal silicides. Due to the extremely high depth resolution obtained with low energy SNMS structural details down to only a few atomic distances are detected. Stoichiometric information on internal oxides and implanted material is supplied by the high quantificability of SNMS. (Author)

  4. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  5. Depth profile and interface analysis in the nm-range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswald, S.; Reiche, R.; Zier, M.; Baunack, S.; Wetzig, K.

    2005-01-01

    In modern technology, thin films are shrinking more and more to a thickness of few nanometers. Analytical investigations of such thin films using the traditional sputter depth profiling, sputtering in combination with surface-analytical techniques, have limitations due to physical effects especially for very thin films. These limitations are pointed out and some alternatives are discussed. Non-destructive analysis with angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is demonstrated to be a useful method for such investigations. Both qualitative and quantitative results can be obtained even for complex layer structures. Nevertheless, there are also limitations of this method and some alternatives or complementary methods are considered

  6. Ultra-low energy Ar+ beam applied for SIMS depth profile analysis of layered nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Mierzejewska, A.; Iwanejko, I.

    2001-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile analyses of flat layered nanostructures: 10 nm Ta 2 O 3 /Ta and 20 nm (10 x B 4 C/Mo)/Si as well as microparticles of core (illite) - shell (rutile) structure, performed with the use of ultra-low energy ion beam (180-880 eV, Ar + ), are presented. The profiles were obtained using 'mesa' scanning technique and also sample rotation. Depth profile resolution below 1 nanometer was obtained for flat nanostructures. Presented experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo sputtering simulations of analysed structures. A method of finding beam energy, optimal for the best resolution SIMS depth profile analysis, is suggested. (author)

  7. Depth profile analysis of polymerized fluorine compound on photo-resist film with angle-resolved XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Yoshitoki; Kubota, Toshio; Oinaka, Syuhei

    2013-01-01

    Angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) is an observation technique which is very effective in chemical depth analysis method less than photoelectron detected depth. For the analysis of depth profile, several analysis methods have been proposed to calculate the depth profile using the ARXPS method. The present report is the measurements of depth profile of the fluorine in a fluorine-containing photo-resist film using the ARXPS method and the depth profile of concentration have been successfully determined using the ARCtick 1.0 software. It has been observed that thickness of the fluorocarbon enriched surface layer of the photo-resist was 2.7 nm, and so that the convert of the ARXPS data from the angle profile to the depth profile was proved to be useful analysis method for the ultrathin layer depth. (author)

  8. Statistically sound evaluation of trace element depth profiles by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, K.; Toussaint, U. von

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the underlying physics and statistical models that are used in the newly developed program NRADC for fully automated deconvolution of trace level impurity depth profiles from ion beam data. The program applies Bayesian statistics to find the most probable depth profile given ion beam data measured at different energies and angles for a single sample. Limiting the analysis to % level amounts of material allows one to linearize the forward calculation of ion beam data which greatly improves the computation speed. This allows for the first time to apply the maximum likelihood approach to both the fitting of the experimental data and the determination of confidence intervals of the depth profiles for real world applications. The different steps during the automated deconvolution will be exemplified by applying the program to artificial and real experimental data.

  9. Elemental thin film depth profiles by ion beam analysis using simulated annealing - a new tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeynes, C; Barradas, N P; Marriott, P K; Boudreault, G; Jenkin, M; Wendler, E; Webb, R P

    2003-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and related techniques have long been used to determine the elemental depth profiles in films a few nanometres to a few microns thick. However, although obtaining spectra is very easy, solving the inverse problem of extracting the depth profiles from the spectra is not possible analytically except for special cases. It is because these special cases include important classes of samples, and because skilled analysts are adept at extracting useful qualitative information from the data, that ion beam analysis is still an important technique. We have recently solved this inverse problem using the simulated annealing algorithm. We have implemented the solution in the 'IBA DataFurnace' code, which has been developed into a very versatile and general new software tool that analysts can now use to rapidly extract quantitative accurate depth profiles from real samples on an industrial scale. We review the features, applicability and validation of this new code together with other approaches to handling IBA (ion beam analysis) data, with particular attention being given to determining both the absolute accuracy of the depth profiles and statistically accurate error estimates. We include examples of analyses using RBS, non-Rutherford elastic scattering, elastic recoil detection and non-resonant nuclear reactions. High depth resolution and the use of multiple techniques simultaneously are both discussed. There is usually systematic ambiguity in IBA data and Butler's example of ambiguity (1990 Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 45 160-5) is reanalysed. Analyses are shown: of evaporated, sputtered, oxidized, ion implanted, ion beam mixed and annealed materials; of semiconductors, optical and magnetic multilayers, superconductors, tribological films and metals; and of oxides on Si, mixed metal silicides, boron nitride, GaN, SiC, mixed metal oxides, YBCO and polymers. (topical review)

  10. A continuous OSL scanning method for analysis of radiation depth-dose profiles in bricks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the development of a method for directly measuring radiation depth-dose profiles from brick, tile and porcelain cores, without the need for sample separation techniques. For the brick cores, examples are shown of the profiles generated by artificial irradiation using...... the different photon energies from Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma sources; comparison is drawn with both the theoretical calculations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, as well as experimental measurements made using more conventional optically stimulated luminescence methods of analysis....

  11. Experimental analysis of bruises in human volunteers using radiometric depth profiling and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-07-01

    We combine pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) depth profiling with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements for a comprehensive analysis of bruise evolution in vivo. While PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin), DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths and thus offers an additional insight into dynamics of the hemoglobin degradation products. Combining the two approaches enables us to quantitatively characterize bruise evolution dynamics. Our results indicate temporal variations of the bruise evolution parameters in the course of bruise self-healing process. The obtained parameter values and trends represent a basis for a future development of an objective technique for bruise age determination.

  12. Depth profile analysis of electrodeposited nanoscale multilayers by Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, G.L.; Berenyi, Z.; Vad, K.; Peter, L.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Nanoscale multilayers have been in the focus of research since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in this family of nanostructures. The first observation of GMR on sputtered magnetic/non-magnetic multilayers was followed by the detection of the same effect in electrodeposited Co-Ni-Cu/Cu multilayers within half a decade. Electrodeposition has long been considered as an inexpensive alternative of the high-vacuum methods to produce multilayers with GMR, although the GMR effect observed for electrodeposited multilayers is usually inferior to multilayers produced by physical methods. Electrochemistry appears to be an exclusive technology to produce multilayered nanowires by using porous templates. In spite of the large number of papers about the multilayers themselves, data on the depth profile of electrodeposited multilayer samples are very scarce. It has long been known that the simultaneous electrodeposition of the iron group metals takes place in the so-called anomalous manner. The diagnostic criterion of the anomalous codeposition is that the metallic component of lower standard potential (the Co in the case of Ni/Co) can be discharged together with the more noble one (Ni) at potentials where the less noble component (Co) alone cannot be deposited onto a substrate composed of the parent metal; moreover, the less noble metal (Co) is deposited preferentially. We have investigated the composition gradient along the growth direction of electrodeposited Co/Cu and CoNiCu/Cu multilayers films using SNMS. Samples were electrodeposited using the single bath method. Commercial Cu sheets and an Cr/Cu layer evaporated onto Si (111) surface were used as substrates with high and low roughness, respectively. The depth profiles of the samples were recorded using SNMS (INA-X, Specs GmbH, Berlin) in the Direct Bombardment Mode. Depth profile analysis of electrodeposited magnetic/nonmagnetic layered structures on

  13. Shave-off depth profiling: Depth profiling with an absolute depth scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, M.; Maekawa, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Tomiyasu, B.; Sakamoto, T.; Owari, M.; Nihei, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Shave-off depth profiling provides profiling with an absolute depth scale. This method uses a focused ion beam (FIB) micro-machining process to provide the depth profile. We show that the shave-off depth profile of a particle reflected the spherical shape of the sample and signal intensities had no relationship to the depth. Through the introduction of FIB micro-sampling, the shave-off depth profiling of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) tip was carried out. The shave-off profile agreed with a blue print from the manufacturing process. Finally, shave-off depth profiling is discussed with respect to resolutions and future directions

  14. Analysis of the Tikhonov regularization to retrieve thermal conductivity depth-profiles from infrared thermography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín; Celorrio, Ricardo

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the ability of the Tikhonov regularization to retrieve different shapes of in-depth thermal conductivity profiles, usually encountered in hardened materials, from surface temperature data. Exponential, oscillating, and sigmoidal profiles are studied. By performing theoretical experiments with added white noises, the influence of the order of the Tikhonov functional and of the parameters that need to be tuned to carry out the inversion are investigated. The analysis shows that the Tikhonov regularization is very well suited to reconstruct smooth profiles but fails when the conductivity exhibits steep slopes. We check a natural alternative regularization, the total variation functional, which gives much better results for sigmoidal profiles. Accordingly, a strategy to deal with real data is proposed in which we introduce this total variation regularization. This regularization is applied to the inversion of real data corresponding to a case hardened AISI1018 steel plate, giving much better anticorrelation of the retrieved conductivity with microindentation test data than the Tikhonov regularization. The results suggest that this is a promising way to improve the reliability of local inversion methods.

  15. Deuterium depth profiling in JT-60U W-shaped divertor tiles by nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Ochiai, K.; Masaki, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Kutsukake, C.; Arai, T.; Nishitani, T.; Miya, N.

    2006-01-01

    Deuterium concentrations and depth profiles in plasma-facing graphite tiles used in the divertor of JAERI Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) were investigated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The highest deuterium concentration of D/ 12 C of 0.053 was found in the outer dome wing tile, where the deuterium accumulated probably through the deuterium-carbon co-deposition. In the outer and inner divertor target tiles, the D/ 12 C data were lower than 0.006. Additionally, the maximum (H + D)/ 12 C in the dome top tile was estimated to be 0.023 from the results of NRA and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Orbit following Monte-Carlo (OFMC) simulation showed energetic deuterons caused by neutral beam injections (NBI) were implanted into the dome region with high heat flux. Furthermore, the surface temperature and conditions such as deposition and erosion significantly influenced the accumulation process of deuterium. The deuterium depth profile, scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation and OFMC simulation indicated the deuterium was considered to accumulate through three processes: the deuterium-carbon co-deposition, the implantation of energetic deuterons and the deuterium diffusion into the bulk

  16. Depth profile analysis of thin TiOxNy films using standard ion beam analysis techniques and HERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, A.; Dytlewski, N.; Cohen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Ion beam assisted deposition is used to fabricate thin titanium oxynitride films (TiO x N y ) at Industrial Research (typical film thickness 100nm). At the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, the thin films are analysed using non-destructive standard ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques. High-resolution titanium depth profiles are measured with RBS using 1.5MeV 4 He + ions. Non-resonant nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is performed for investigating the amounts of O and N in the deposited films using the reactions 16 O(d,p) 17 O at 920 keV and 14 N(d,α) 12 C at 1.4 MeV. Using a combination of these nuclear techniques, the stoichiometry as well as the thickness of the layers is revealed. However, when oxygen and nitrogen depth profiles are required for investigating stoichiometric changes in the films, additional nuclear analysis techniques such as heavy ion elastic recoil detection (HERDA) have to be applied. With HERDA, depth profiles of N, O, and Ti are measured simultaneously. In this paper comparative IBA measurement s of TiO x N y films with different compositions are presented and discussed

  17. Auger and depth profile analysis of synthetic crystals for dispersion of soft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachocki, K.D.; Brown, D.R.; Springer, R.W.; Arendt, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Numerous samples have been fabricated and analyzed as part of a program to produce soft x-ray dispersion elements for various laboratory applications. The majority of this work has centered around the carbon/tungsten system, although several other low-Z/high-Z pairs have been investigated. This report describes the development of certain vacuum-deposition techniques for fabricating these dispersion elements, based upon results obtained from x-ray reflectivity measurements and Auger depth-profile analysis. The composition of the films is chiefly alternating layers of tungsten carbide and carbon. Excess carbon is introduced during the deposition of the tungsten to ensure that the carbide layer is fully stoichiometric. Layer thickness ranged from approx. 5 to 30 A for the carbide and from approx. 15 to 80 A for the carbon. The reflectivity measurements were made using Fe and Al K/sub α/ at grazing incidence. The emphasis in these studies is on the application of surface-analysis results in suggesting modifications to the fabrication process and in evaluating the results such modifications have on the layer stoichiometry, continuity, and periodicity of the dispersion elements so produced

  18. Quantitative depth profiling of near surface semiconductor structures using ultra low energy SIMS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliner, D.I.

    1999-09-01

    The continual reduction in size of semiconductor structures and depths of junctions is putting a greater strain on characterization techniques. Accurate device and process modelling requires quantified electrical and dopant profiles from the topmost few nanometres. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an analytical technique commonly used in the semiconductor industry to measure concentration depth profiles. To allow the quantification of the features that are closer to the surface, lower energy ions are employed, which also improves the available depth resolution. The development of the floating ion gun (FLIG) has made it possible to use sub keV beam energies on a routine basis, allowing quantified dopant profiles to be obtained within the first few nanometres of the surface. This thesis demonstrates that, when profiling with oxygen ion beams, greatest certainty in the retained dose is achieved at normal incidence, and when analysing boron accurate profile shapes are only obtained when the primary beam energy is less than half that of the implant. It was shown that it is now possible to profile, though with slower erosion rates and a limited dynamic range, with 100 eV oxygen (0 2 + ) ion beams. Profile features that had developed during rapid thermal annealing, that could only be observed when ultra low energy ion beams were used, were investigated using various analytical techniques. Explanations of the apparently inactive dopant were proposed, and included suggestions for cluster molecules. The oxide thickness of fully formed altered layers has also been investigated. The results indicate that a fundamental change in the mechanism of oxide formation occurs, and interfaces that are sharper than those grown by thermal oxidation can be produced using sub-keV ion beams. (author)

  19. Quantitative considerations in medium energy ion scattering depth profiling analysis of nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalm, P.C.; Bailey, P. [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Reading, M.A. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Rossall, A.K. [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Berg, J.A. van den, E-mail: j.vandenberg@hud.ac.uk [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The high depth resolution capability of medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) is becoming increasingly relevant to the characterisation of nanolayers in e.g. microelectronics. In this paper we examine the attainable quantitative accuracy of MEIS depth profiling. Transparent but reliable analytical calculations are used to illustrate what can ultimately be achieved for dilute impurities in a silicon matrix and the significant element-dependence of the depth scale, for instance, is illustrated this way. Furthermore, the signal intensity-to-concentration conversion and its dependence on the depth of scattering is addressed. Notably, deviations from the Rutherford scattering cross section due to screening effects resulting in a non-coulombic interaction potential and the reduction of the yield owing to neutralization of the exiting, backscattered H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles are evaluated. The former mainly affects the scattering off heavy target atoms while the latter is most severe for scattering off light target atoms and can be less accurately predicted. However, a pragmatic approach employing an extensive data set of measured ion fractions for both H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions scattered off a range of surfaces, allows its parameterization. This has enabled the combination of both effects, which provides essential information regarding the yield dependence both on the projectile energy and the mass of the scattering atom. Although, absolute quantification, especially when using He{sup +}, may not always be achievable, relative quantification in which the sum of all species in a layer adds up to 100%, is generally possible. This conclusion is supported by the provision of some examples of MEIS derived depth profiles of nanolayers. Finally, the relative benefits of either using H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions are briefly considered.

  20. Applications of positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM)

  1. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R A

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  2. Depth Profiling Analysis of Aluminum Oxidation During Film Deposition in a Conventional High Vacuum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmin; Weimer, Jeffrey J.; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of aluminum thin films deposited in a conventional high vacuum chamber has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and depth profiling. The state of the Al layer was preserved by coating it with a protective MgF2 layer in the deposition chamber. Oxygen concentrations in the film layers were determined as a function of sputter time (depth into the film). The results show that an oxidized layer is formed at the start of Al deposition and that a less extensively oxidized Al layer is deposited if the deposition rate is fast. The top surface of the Al layer oxidizes very quickly. This top oxidized layer may be thicker than has been previously reported by optical methods. Maximum oxygen concentrations measured by XPS at each Al interface are related to pressure to rate ratios determined during the Al layer deposition.

  3. Degradation effects ad Si-depth profiling in photoresists using ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijzendoorn, L.J. van; Schellekens, J.P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of silicon-containing vapour with a photoresist layer, as used in dry developable lithographic processes, was studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Degradation of the polymer layer was observed, but the total amount of incorporated Si was found to be constant during the measurement. Si-depth profiles were found to be independent of dose and in agreement with profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The detection of hydrogen by elastic recoil detection (ERD) was used to study the degradation in detail. The decrease in hydrogen countrate from a layer of polystyrene on Si in combination with the shift of the Si-substrate edge in the corresponding RBS spectra was used for a model description. Only one degradation cross-section for hydrogen and one for carbon, both independent of beam current and dose, were required for a successful fit of the experimental data. (orig.)

  4. Hydrogen depth profiling using elastic recoil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, B.L.; Peercy, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    The elastic recoil detection (ERD) analysis technique for H profiling in the near surface regions of solids is described. ERD is shown to have the capability of detecting H and its isotopes down to concentrations of approx. 0.01 at. % with a depth resolution of a few hundred angstroms. Is is demonstrated that 2.4-MeV He ions can be used successfully to profile 1 H and 2 D using this technique. 12 figures

  5. Radiometric dating of sediment core from waterwork reservoir Rozgrund and analysis of mercury concentration depth profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanek, M.

    2005-01-01

    Radioisotope dating of lake sediments combined with analysis of chemical properties of the sediment layers allow us to study the history of the human impact on nature. Undisturbed sediment layers in the core samples serve as chronicle database with information about lake ecosystem and surrounding environment in the time of deposition. A sediment core sample from the bottom of the water-work reservoir Rozgrund was collected and separated into 2 cm thick layers. Samples were analysed by HPGe spectrometry for anthropogenous Cs-137 activity. From identified peaks corresponding to nuclear tests and Chernobyl accident the sedimentation rate was calculated and the chronology of layers established. Sub-samples from each layer were prepared separately for the analysis of the Hg concentration by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results show very small variations in Hg concentrations and there is no significant trend present in the profile. (author)

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Human Pluripotency and Neural Specification by In-Depth (PhosphoProteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Singec

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can be utilized for precise analysis of cell type identities during early development. We established a highly efficient neural induction strategy and an improved analytical platform, and determined proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of hESCs and their specified multipotent neural stem cell derivatives (hNSCs. This quantitative dataset (nearly 13,000 proteins and 60,000 phosphorylation sites provides unique molecular insights into pluripotency and neural lineage entry. Systems-level comparative analysis of proteins (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, kinase families, phosphorylation sites, and numerous biological pathways allowed the identification of distinct signatures in pluripotent and multipotent cells. Furthermore, as predicted by the dataset, we functionally validated an autocrine/paracrine mechanism by demonstrating that the secreted protein midkine is a regulator of neural specification. This resource is freely available to the scientific community, including a searchable website, PluriProt.

  7. Surface analysis and depth profiling of corrosion products formed in lead pipes used to supply low alkalinity drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C M; Peters, N J; Britton, A; Brady, L; Gardiner, P H E; Lewis, B D

    2004-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have been applied to investigate the nature of lead pipe corrosion products formed in pH adjusted, orthophosphate-treated, low alkalinity water, under supply conditions. Depth profiling and surface analysis have been carried out on pipe samples obtained from the water distribution system in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. X-ray diffraction spectrometry identified basic lead carbonate, lead oxide and lead phosphate as the principal components. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed the crystalline structure within the corrosion product and also showed spatial correlations existed between calcium, iron, lead, oxygen and phosphorus. Elemental profiling, conducted by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutrals mass spectrometry (SNMS) indicated that the corrosion product was not uniform with depth. However, no clear stratification was apparent. Indeed, counts obtained for carbonate, phosphate and oxide were well correlated within the depth range probed by SIMS. SNMS showed relationships existed between carbon, calcium, iron, and phosphorus within the bulk of the scale, as well as at the surface. SIMS imaging confirmed the relationship between calcium and lead and suggested there might also be an association between chloride and phosphorus.

  8. A compact CMA spectrometer with axially integrated hybrid electron-ion gun for ISS, AES and sputter depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, E.; Bas, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, the combined application of electrons and ions in surface analysis required two separate sources for electrons and ions with different incidence angles. The newly developed hybrid electron-ion gun, however, allows bombardment of the same sample area both with noble gas ions and with electrons coming from the same direction. By integrating such a hybrid gun axially in a cylindrical mirror energy analyser (CMA) a sensitive compact single flange spectrometer obtains for ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and sputtering all within normal beam incidence. This concept makes accurate beam centering very easy. Additionally, the bombardment from the same direction both for sputtering and for surface analysis brings advantages in depth profiling. The scattering angle for ISS has a constant value of about 138 0 . The hybrid gun delivers typically an electron beam current of -20μA at 3keV for AES, and an ion beam current of +40 nA and +1.2μA at 2 keV for ISS and sputtering respectively. The switching time between ISS, AES, and sputtering mode is about 0.1 s. So this system is best suited for automatically controlled depth profile analysis. The design and operation of this new system will be described and some applications will be discussed. (author)

  9. Quantitative analysis of Si1-xGex alloy films by SIMS and XPS depth profiling using a reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won Jin; Jang, Jong Shik; Lee, Youn Seoung; Kim, Ansoon; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative analysis methods of multi-element alloy films were compared. The atomic fractions of Si1-xGex alloy films were measured by depth profiling analysis with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Intensity-to-composition conversion factor (ICF) was used as a mean to convert the intensities to compositions instead of the relative sensitivity factors. The ICFs were determined from a reference Si1-xGex alloy film by the conventional method, average intensity (AI) method and total number counting (TNC) method. In the case of SIMS, although the atomic fractions measured by oxygen ion beams were not quantitative due to severe matrix effect, the results by cesium ion beam were very quantitative. The quantitative analysis results by SIMS using MCs2+ ions are comparable to the results by XPS. In the case of XPS, the measurement uncertainty was highly improved by the AI method and TNC method.

  10. Improved quantitative analysis of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films using MCs{sup +}-SIMS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Advanced Analysis Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byoung Koun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Clean Energy Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The chalcopyrite semiconductor, Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2} (CIGS), is popular as an absorber material for incorporation in high-efficiency photovoltaic devices because it has an appropriate band gap and a high absorption coefficient. To improve the efficiency of solar cells, many research groups have studied the quantitative characterization of the CIGS absorber layers. In this study, a compositional analysis of a CIGS thin film was performed by depth profiling in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with MCs{sup +} (where M denotes an element from the CIGS sample) cluster ion detection, and the relative sensitivity factor of the cluster ion was calculated. The emission of MCs{sup +} ions from CIGS absorber elements, such as Cu, In, Ga, and Se, under Cs{sup +} ion bombardment was investigated using time-of-flight SIMS (TOF-SIMS) and magnetic sector SIMS. The detection of MCs{sup +} ions suppressed the matrix effects of varying concentrations of constituent elements of the CIGS thin films. The atomic concentrations of the CIGS absorber layers from the MCs{sup +}-SIMS exhibited more accurate quantification compared to those of elemental SIMS and agreed with those of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Both TOF-SIMS and magnetic sector SIMS depth profiles showed a similar MCs{sup +} distribution for the CIGS thin films. (orig.)

  11. Measurement and Analysis of Composition and Depth Profile of H in Amorphous Si1−xCx:H Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hua; Shu-De, Yao; Kun, Wang; Zhi-Bo, Ding

    2008-01-01

    Composition in amorphous Si 1−X C x :H heteroepitaxial thin films on Si (100) by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is analysed. The unknown x (0.45–0.57) and the depth profile of hydrogen in the thin films are characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrum (RBS), resonance-nuclear reaction analysis (R-NRA) and elastic recoil detection (ERD), respectively. In addition, the depth profile of hydrogen in the unannealed thin films is compared to that of the annealed thin films with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) or laser spike annealing (LSA) in nitrogen atmosphere. The results indicate that the stoichiometric amorphous SiC can be produced by PECVD when the ratio of CH 4 /SiH 4 is approximately equal to 25. The content of hydrogen decreases suddenly from 35% to 1% after 1150° C annealing. RTA can reduce hydrogen in SiC films effectively than LSA. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  12. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  13. The national psychological/personality profile of Romanians: An in depth analysis of the regional national psychological/personality profile of Romanians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David, D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we perform an in depth analysis of the national psychological/personality profile of Romanians. Following recent developments in the field (see Rentfrow et al., 2013; 2015, we study the regional national psychological/personality profile of Romanians, based on the Big Five model (i.e., NEO PI/R. Using a representative sample (N1 = 1000, we performed a cluster analysis and identified two bipolar personality profiles in the population: cluster 1, called “Factor X-”, characterized by high neuroticism and low levels of extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and cluster 2, called “Factor X+”, characterized by the opposite configuration in personality traits, low neuroticism and high levels of extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. The same two cluster pattern/solution emerged in other samples (N = 2200, with other Big Five-based instruments, and by using various methods of data (e.g., direct vs. reversed item score, controlling for item desirability and cluster (i.e., with and without “running means” analyses. These two profiles are quite evenly distributed in the overall population, but also across all geographical regions. Moreover, comparing the distribution of the five personality traits, we found just few small differences between the eight geographical divisions that we used for our analysis. These results suggest that the regional national psychological/personality profile of Romania is quite homogenous. Directions for harnessing the potential of both personality profiles are presented to the reader. Other implications based on the bipolar and fractal structure of the personality profile are discussed from an interdisciplinary perspective.

  14. Defect and dopant depth profiles in boron-implanted silicon studied with channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.; Boerma, D.O.; Smulders, P.J.M.; Oosterhoff, S.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystals of silicon were implanted at RT with 1 MeV boron ions to a dose of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The depth profile of the boron was measured using the 2060-keV resonance of the 11B(α, n)14N nuclear reaction. The distribution of the lattice disorder as a function of depth was determined from

  15. Measurements of europium-152 depth profile of stone embankments exposed the Nagasaki atomic bomb for neutron spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi-Miyajima, Junko; Shimasaki, Tatsuya; Okajima, Shunzo; Takada, Jitsuya; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki; Okumura, Yutaka; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of neutron-induced radionuclide of 152 Eu in rocks near the hypocenter (ground center of the atomic bomb explosion) in Nagasaki was performed to obtain the depth profiles and calculate the neutron energy spectrum. Core samples were drilled and taken from the stone embankments on both sides of river within a radius of 500 m from the hypocenter. After cutting each core into about 27 mm-thick sections, each section was measured its gamma-ray spectrum with a pure germanium semiconductor detector and analyzed a content of natural europium by the activation method. The highest value 8.0 x 10 -2 Bq/μg of 152 Eu at the time of the blast was obtained from the surface plates of rock cores collected near the hypocenter. The surface activity of cores was reduced with increasing the slant distances from the hypocenter. The slopes of the depth profiles were similar among samples taken from the same location. In order to analyze the depth profile of 152 Eu activity in rock andesite, experiments using a fast neutron reactor and thermal neutron reactor were carried out. Comparing the measurements on the A-bomb exposure rock with the simulated results at the reactors, among the experiments, the depth profile using the neutron moderator of 10 mm polyethylene was closed to that obtained from the A-bomb exposed samples. The experiment of thermal neutron incidence only could not reproduce the profiles from the A-bomb exposed samples. This fact indicates that the depth profiles of 152 Eu in rock exposed to the A-bomb include valuable information concerning the neutron spectrum and intensity. (author)

  16. A new method for depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chittleborough, C.W.; Chaudhri, M.A.; Rouse, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple method for obtaining depth profiles of concentrations has been developed for charged particle induced nuclear reactions which produce γ-rays or neutrons. This method is particularly suitable for non-resonant reactions but is also applicable to resonant reactions and can examine the concentration of the sought nuclide throughout the entire activation depth of the incoming particles in the matrix

  17. Rapid quantitative analysis of elemental composition and depth profile of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin solar cell film using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Chan-Kyu; Lee, Seok-Hee; Choi, Jang-Hee; Jeong, Sungho, E-mail: shjeong@gist.ac.kr

    2015-03-31

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is reported as a method for rapid quantitative analysis of elemental composition and depth profile of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin film. A calibration model considering compositional grading over depth was developed and verified with test samples. The results from eight test samples showed that the average concentration of Cu, In, Ga and Se could be predicted with a root mean square error of below 1% and a relative standard deviation of also below 1%. The depth profile of each constituent element of CIGS predicted by LIBS was close to those by Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The average ablation depth per pulse during depth profiling was about 100 nm. - Highlights: • LIBS was adopted for quantitative analysis of CIGS thin film. • A calibration model considering compositional grading over depth was developed. • Concentration prediction of CIGS thin film was accurate and precise. • Quantitative depth profiling by LIBS was compared with those by AES and SIMS.

  18. Sputtering as a means of depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitton, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Probably the most common technique for determination of depth profiles by sputtering is that of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Many problems occur in the important step of converting the time (of sputtering) scale to a depth scale and these problems arise before the secondary ions are ejected. An attempt is made to present a comprehensive list of the effects that should be taken into consideration in the use of sputtering as a means of depth profiling. The various parameters liable to affect the depth profile measurements are listed in four sections: beam conditions; target conditions; experimental environment; and beam-target interactions. The effects are discussed and where interplay occurs, cross-reference is made and examples are provided where possible. (B.R.H.)

  19. DS86 neutron dose. Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of {sup 152}Eu activity in a large stone sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fujita, Shoichiro; Hasai, Hiromi

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of {sup 152}Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and {sup 152}Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation. (author)

  20. Chemometric characterization of soil depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, M.; Einax, J.

    1994-01-01

    The application of multivariate-statistical methods to the description of the metal distribution in soil depth profiles is shown. By means of cluster analysis, it is possible to get a first overview of the main differences in the metal status of the soil horizons. In case of anthropogenic soil pollution or geogenic enrichment, cluster analysis was able to detect the extent of the polluted soil layer or the different geological layers. The results of cluster analysis can be confirmed by means of multidimensional variance and discriminant analysis. Methods of discriminant analysis can also be used as a tool to determine the optimum number of variables which has to be measured for the classification of unknown soil samples into different pollution levels. Factor analysis yields an identification of not directly observable relationships between the variables. With additional knowledge about the orographic situation of the area and the probable sources of emission the factor loadings give information on the immission structure at the sampling location. (orig.)

  1. Shallow surface depth profiling with atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, J.; Dastoor, P.C.; King, B.V.; O'Connor, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    It is possible to derive atomic layer-by-layer composition depth profiles from popular electron spectroscopic techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). When ion sputtering assisted AES or XPS is used, the changes that occur during the establishment of the steady state in the sputtering process make these techniques increasingly inaccurate for depths less than 3nm. Therefore non-destructive techniques of angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) or AES (ARAES) have to be used in this case. In this paper several data processing algorithms have been used to extract the atomic resolved depth profiles of a shallow surface (down to 1nm) from ARXPS and ARAES data

  2. Investigation of Arctic and Antarctic spatial and depth patterns of sea water in CTD profiles using chemometric data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotwa, Ewelina Katarzyna; Lacorte, Silvia; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine 2- and 3-way chemometric methods for analysis of Arctic and Antarctic water samples. Standard CTD (conductivity–temperature–depth) sensor devices were used during two oceanographic expeditions (July 2007 in the Arctic; February 2009 in the Antarctic) covering a total of 174...

  3. Possibilities of LA-ICP-MS technique for the spatial elemental analysis of the recent fish scales: Line scan vs. depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, Marketa; Kalvoda, Jiri; Novakova, Hana; Skoda, Radek; Kanicky, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    LA-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS in combination with electron microprobe are presented as a method for the determination of the elemental spatial distribution in fish scales which represent an example of a heterogeneous layered bone structure. Two different LA-ICP-MS techniques were tested on recent common carp (Cyprinus carpio) scales: (a)A line scan through the whole fish scale perpendicular to the growth rings. The ablation crater of 55 μm width and 50 μm depth allowed analysis of the elemental distribution in the external layer. Suitable ablation conditions providing a deeper ablation crater gave average values from the external HAP layer and the collagen basal plate. (b)Depth profiling using spot analysis was tested in fish scales for the first time. Spot analysis allows information to be obtained about the depth profile of the elements at the selected position on the sample. The combination of all mentioned laser ablation techniques provides complete information about the elemental distribution in the fish scale samples. The results were compared with the solution based ICP-MS and EMP analyses. The fact that the results of depth profiling are in a good agreement both with EMP and PIXE results and, with the assumed ways of incorporation of the studied elements in the HAP structure, suggests a very good potential for this method.

  4. Possibilities of LA-ICP-MS technique for the spatial elemental analysis of the recent fish scales: Line scan vs. depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kalvoda, Jiri, E-mail: jkalvoda@centrum.cz [Department of Geological Sciences, Masaryk University of Brno, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Novakova, Hana [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Skoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Masaryk University of Brno, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-01

    LA-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS in combination with electron microprobe are presented as a method for the determination of the elemental spatial distribution in fish scales which represent an example of a heterogeneous layered bone structure. Two different LA-ICP-MS techniques were tested on recent common carp (Cyprinus carpio) scales: (a)A line scan through the whole fish scale perpendicular to the growth rings. The ablation crater of 55 {mu}m width and 50 {mu}m depth allowed analysis of the elemental distribution in the external layer. Suitable ablation conditions providing a deeper ablation crater gave average values from the external HAP layer and the collagen basal plate. (b)Depth profiling using spot analysis was tested in fish scales for the first time. Spot analysis allows information to be obtained about the depth profile of the elements at the selected position on the sample. The combination of all mentioned laser ablation techniques provides complete information about the elemental distribution in the fish scale samples. The results were compared with the solution based ICP-MS and EMP analyses. The fact that the results of depth profiling are in a good agreement both with EMP and PIXE results and, with the assumed ways of incorporation of the studied elements in the HAP structure, suggests a very good potential for this method.

  5. Element depth profiles of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzev, A.P.; Nikonov, O.A.; Kulik, M.; Zuk, J.; Krzyzanowska, H.; Ochalski, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Element depth profiles of porous silicon were measured on the Van-de-Graaff accelerator in the energy range of 4 He + ions from 2 to 3.2 MeV. Application of complementary RBS, ERD and 16 O(α,α) 16 O nuclear reaction methods permits us to obtain: 1) the exact silicon, oxygen and hydrogen distribution in the samples, 2) the distribution of partial pore concentrations. The oxygen concentration in porous silicon reaches 30%, which allows one to assume the presence of silicon oxide in the pores and to explain the spectrum shift of luminescence into the blue area

  6. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  7. An angle-resolved, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for depth profile analysis of ion-implanted semiconductors using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W.; Hormes, J.; Kuetgens, U.; Gries, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for angle-resolved, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation has been built and tested at the beam line BN2 of the Bonn electron stretcher and accelerator (ELSA). The apparatus is to be used for nondestructive depth profile analysis of ion-implanted semiconductors as part of the multinational Versailles Project of Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) project on ion-implanted reference materials. In particular, the centroid depths of depth profiles of various implants is to be determined by use of the angle-resolved signal ratio technique. First results of measurements on implants of phosphorus (100 keV, 1016 cm-2) and sulfur (200 keV, 1014 cm-2) in silicon wafers using ``white'' synchrotron radiation are presented and suggest that it should be generally possible to measure the centroid depth of an implant at dose densities as low as 1014 cm-2. Some of the apparative and technical requirements are discussed which are peculiar to the use of synchrotron radiation in general and to the use of nonmonochromatized radiation in particular.

  8. An angle-resolved, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for depth profile analysis of ion-implanted semiconductors using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, W.; Hormes, J.; Kuetgens, U.; Gries, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for angle-resolved, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation has been built and tested at the beam line BN2 of the Bonn electron stretcher and accelerator (ELSA). The apparatus is to be used for nondestructive depth profile analysis of ion-implanted semiconductors as part of the multinational Versailles Project of Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) project on ion-implanted reference materials. In particular, the centroid depths of depth profiles of various implants is to be determined by use of the angle-resolved signal ratio technique. First results of measurements on implants of phosphorus (100 keV, 10 16 cm -2 ) and sulfur (200 keV, 10 14 cm -2 ) in silicon wafers using ''white'' synchrotron radiation are presented and suggest that it should be generally possible to measure the centroid depth of an implant at dose densities as low as 10 14 cm -2 . Some of the apparative and technical requirements are discussed which are peculiar to the use of synchrotron radiation in general and to the use of nonmonochromatized radiation in particular

  9. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I; Trompetter, B [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1994-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  10. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I.; Trompetter, B. [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I. [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Molecular depth profiling of organic and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, John S. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Fletcher@manchester.ac.uk; Conlan, Xavier A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Lockyer, Nicholas P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    Atomic depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is common in the field micro-electronics; however, the generation of molecular information as a function of sample depth is difficult due to the accumulation of damage both on and beneath the sample surface. The introduction of polyatomic ion beams such as SF{sub 5} and C{sub 60} have raised the possibility of overcoming this problem as they deposit the majority of their energy in the upper surface of the sample resulting in increased sputter yields but with a complimentary reduction in sub-surface damage accumulation. In this paper we report the depth profile analysis of the bio-polymer polycaprolactone, PCL, using the polyatomic ions Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} and the monoatomic Au{sup +}. Results are compared to recent analysis of a similar sample using SF{sub 5}{sup +}. C{sub 60}{sup +} depth profiling of cellulose is also demonstrated, an experiment that has been reported as unsuccessful when attempted with SF{sub 5}{sup +} implications for biological analysis are discussed.

  12. Depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers on Si wafers by pulsed r.f. glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsberg, K.-G.; Schumacher, C.; Tempez, A.; Nielsch, K.; Broekaert, J.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers deposited on Au and Cr covered Si wafers with the aid of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pulsed RF-GD-TOFMS also called plasma profiling TOFMS (PP-TOFMS™)) is described. For thermoelectric materials the depth resolutions obtained with both PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are shown to be well comparable and in the order of the roughness of the corresponding layers (between 20 and 3700 nm). With both methods a direct solid analysis without any preparation steps is possible. In addition, the analysis of the samples with PP-TOFMS proved to be faster by a factor of 26 compared to SIMS, as sputtering rates were found to be 80 nm s −1 and 3 nm s −1 , respectively. For the analyzed samples the results of PP-TOFMS and SIMS show that a homogeneous deposition was obtained. Quantitative results for all samples could also be obtained directly by PP-TOFMS when the stoichiometry of one sample was determined beforehand for instance by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SEM-EDX). For Bi 2 Te 3 the standard deviation for the main component concentrations within one sample then is found to be between 1.1% and 1.9% and it is 3.6% from sample to sample. For Sb 2 Te 3 the values within one sample are from 1.7% to 4.2% and from sample to sample 5.3%, respectively. - Highlights: ► Depth resolution in sub micrometer size by glow discharge mass spectrometry. ► Bi and Sb telluride layers composition with GD-TOF-MS, ICP-OES and SEM-EDX agree. ► Homogeneities of layers measured with GD-TOF-MS and SIMS agree.

  13. Depth profile measurement with lenslet images of the plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Zhaomin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Hongying; Qu, Weijuan; Zhao, Haimeng; Asundi, Anand; Yan, Lei

    2018-03-01

    An approach for carrying out depth profile measurement of an object with the plenoptic camera is proposed. A single plenoptic image consists of multiple lenslet images. To begin with, these images are processed directly with a refocusing technique to obtain the depth map, which does not need to align and decode the plenoptic image. Then, a linear depth calibration is applied based on the optical structure of the plenoptic camera for depth profile reconstruction. One significant improvement of the proposed method concerns the resolution of the depth map. Unlike the traditional method, our resolution is not limited by the number of microlenses inside the camera, and the depth map can be globally optimized. We validated the method with experiments on depth map reconstruction, depth calibration, and depth profile measurement, with the results indicating that the proposed approach is both efficient and accurate.

  14. Depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers on Si wafers by pulsed r.f. glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinsberg, K.-G. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Schumacher, C. [Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Tempez, A. [HORIBA Jobin Yvon, 16-18 rue du Canal, F-91160 Longjumeau (France); Nielsch, K. [Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Broekaert, J.A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    In this work the depth-profile analysis of thermoelectric layers deposited on Au and Cr covered Si wafers with the aid of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pulsed RF-GD-TOFMS also called plasma profiling TOFMS (PP-TOFMS Trade-Mark-Sign )) is described. For thermoelectric materials the depth resolutions obtained with both PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are shown to be well comparable and in the order of the roughness of the corresponding layers (between 20 and 3700 nm). With both methods a direct solid analysis without any preparation steps is possible. In addition, the analysis of the samples with PP-TOFMS proved to be faster by a factor of 26 compared to SIMS, as sputtering rates were found to be 80 nm s{sup -1} and 3 nm s{sup -1}, respectively. For the analyzed samples the results of PP-TOFMS and SIMS show that a homogeneous deposition was obtained. Quantitative results for all samples could also be obtained directly by PP-TOFMS when the stoichiometry of one sample was determined beforehand for instance by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SEM-EDX). For Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} the standard deviation for the main component concentrations within one sample then is found to be between 1.1% and 1.9% and it is 3.6% from sample to sample. For Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} the values within one sample are from 1.7% to 4.2% and from sample to sample 5.3%, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depth resolution in sub micrometer size by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi and Sb telluride layers composition with GD-TOF-MS, ICP-OES and SEM-EDX agree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneities of layers measured with GD-TOF-MS and SIMS agree.

  15. Wind profiler mixing depth and entrainment measurements with chemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angevine, W.M.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D.D.; Buhr, M.P.; Fehsenfeld, F.C. [NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Kok, G.L. [NCAR Research Aviation Facility, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Wind profiling radars operating at 915 MHz have been present at a number of regional air quality studies. The profilers can provide a continuous, accurate record of the depth of the convective mixed layer with good time resolution. Profilers also provide information about entrainment at the boundary layer top. Mixing depth data from several days of the Rural Oxidants in the Southern Environment II (ROSE II) study in Alabama in June, 1992 are presented. For several cases, chemical measurements from aircraft and ground-based instruments are shown to correspond to mixing depth and entrainment zone behavior observed by the profiler.

  16. Depth resolution and preferential sputtering in depth profiling of sharp interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, S.; Han, Y.S.; Wang, J.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Interfacial depth resolution from MRI model depends on sputtering rate differences. • Depth resolution critically depends on the dominance of roughness or atomic mixing. • True (depth scale) and apparent (time scale) depth resolutions are different. • Average sputtering rate approximately yields true from apparent depth resolution. • Profiles by SIMS and XPS are different but similar to surface concentrations. - Abstract: The influence of preferential sputtering on depth resolution of sputter depth profiles is studied for different sputtering rates of the two components at an A/B interface. Surface concentration and intensity depth profiles on both the sputtering time scale (as measured) and the depth scale are obtained by calculations with an extended Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI)-model. The results show a clear difference for the two extreme cases (a) preponderant roughness and (b) preponderant atomic mixing. In case (a), the interface width on the time scale (Δt(16–84%)) increases with preferential sputtering if the faster sputtering component is on top of the slower sputtering component, but the true resolution on the depth scale (Δz(16–84%)) stays constant. In case (b), the interface width on the time scale stays constant but the true resolution on the depth scale varies with preferential sputtering. For similar order of magnitude of the atomic mixing and the roughness parameters, a transition state between the two extremes is obtained. While the normalized intensity profile of SIMS represents that of the surface concentration, an additional broadening effect is encountered in XPS or AES by the influence of the mean electron escape depth which may even cause an additional matrix effect at the interface.

  17. Depth resolution and preferential sputtering in depth profiling of sharp interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S. [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Han, Y.S. [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Interfacial depth resolution from MRI model depends on sputtering rate differences. • Depth resolution critically depends on the dominance of roughness or atomic mixing. • True (depth scale) and apparent (time scale) depth resolutions are different. • Average sputtering rate approximately yields true from apparent depth resolution. • Profiles by SIMS and XPS are different but similar to surface concentrations. - Abstract: The influence of preferential sputtering on depth resolution of sputter depth profiles is studied for different sputtering rates of the two components at an A/B interface. Surface concentration and intensity depth profiles on both the sputtering time scale (as measured) and the depth scale are obtained by calculations with an extended Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI)-model. The results show a clear difference for the two extreme cases (a) preponderant roughness and (b) preponderant atomic mixing. In case (a), the interface width on the time scale (Δt(16–84%)) increases with preferential sputtering if the faster sputtering component is on top of the slower sputtering component, but the true resolution on the depth scale (Δz(16–84%)) stays constant. In case (b), the interface width on the time scale stays constant but the true resolution on the depth scale varies with preferential sputtering. For similar order of magnitude of the atomic mixing and the roughness parameters, a transition state between the two extremes is obtained. While the normalized intensity profile of SIMS represents that of the surface concentration, an additional broadening effect is encountered in XPS or AES by the influence of the mean electron escape depth which may even cause an additional matrix effect at the interface.

  18. A small and compact AMS facility for tritium depth profiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    employing diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils at this accelerator, another ... the switching magnet the tritium ions are counted with a surface barrier detector. .... AMS has been successfully applied to depth profiling of tritium in graphite ...

  19. Study on the depth profile analysis of Fe/Co intermixing in [SmCo{sub 5}/Fe]{sub 11} magnetic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, P., E-mail: psdrdo@gmail.com [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jen-Hwa, E-mail: jhhsu@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Perumal, A.; Gayen, Anabil [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Reddy, G.L.N.; Kumar, Sanjiv [National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, ECIL Post, Hyderabad 500062 (India); Kamat, S.V. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India)

    2014-09-01

    Multilayer films were sputtered on Si (1 0 0) substrate by following a layer sequence of Cr (10 nm)/[Fe (4 nm)/SmCo{sub 5} (20 nm)]{sub 11}/Cr (90 nm) at room temperature and subsequently, subjected to two-stage annealing. The phase composition, the extent of inter-diffusion at the SmCo{sub 5}/Fe interfaces and the magnetic properties of multilayered samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), RBS and super-conducting quantum interference device (SQUID), respectively. The XRD studies showed the crystallization of SmCo{sub 5}-phase in the hard layer along with a bcc-Fe (Co)-phase in the soft layer, while the RBS depth profile analysis revealed the changes that occur in the effective Fe-layer thickness and diffused Co-content as minimal for the Fe-layer index, n{sub Fe}≤5. A single-phase behavior associated with strong in-plane anisotropy was evidenced with the SQUID measurements. The observed remanence enhancement (1020 kA/m) and energy product value (286 kJ/m{sup 3}) in these multilayers are discussed in the context of Fe-layer thickness and diffused Co-content.

  20. Development and Applications of Time of Flight Neutron Depth Profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, Bingham; Unlu, Kenan

    2005-01-01

    The depth profiles of intentional or intrinsic constituents of a sample provide valuable information for the characterization of materials. For example, the subtle differences in spatial distribution and composition of many chemical species in the near surface region and across interfacial boundaries can significantly alter the electronic and optical properties of materials. A number of analytical techniques for depth profiling have been developed during the last two decades. neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is one of the leading analytical techniques. The NDP is a nondestructive near surface technique that utilizes thermal/cold neutron beam to measure the concentration of specific light elements versus their depth in materials. The depth is obtained from the energy loss of protons, alphas or recoil atoms in substrate materials. Since the charged particle energy determination using surface barrier detector is used for NDP, the depth resolution is highly dependent on the detectors an d detection instruments. The depth resolutions of a few tens of nm are achieved with available NDP facilities in the world. However, the performance of NDP needs to be improved in order to obtain a few A depth resolutions

  1. An optical fiber expendable seawater temperature/depth profile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Shizhe; Zhang, Keke; Yan, Xingkui; Yang, Xianglong; Bai, Xuejiao; Liu, Shixuan

    2017-10-01

    Marine expendable temperature/depth profiler (XBT) is a disposable measuring instrument which can obtain temperature/depth profile data quickly in large area waters and mainly used for marine surveys, scientific research, military application. The temperature measuring device is a thermistor in the conventional XBT probe (CXBT)and the depth data is only a calculated value by speed and time depth calculation formula which is not an accurate measurement result. Firstly, an optical fiber expendable temperature/depth sensor based on the FBG-LPG cascaded structure is proposed to solve the problems of the CXBT, namely the use of LPG and FBG were used to detect the water temperature and depth, respectively. Secondly, the fiber end reflective mirror is used to simplify optical cascade structure and optimize the system performance. Finally, the optical path is designed and optimized using the reflective optical fiber end mirror. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of temperature and depth sensing based on FBG-LPG cascade structure is about 0.0030C and 0.1%F.S. respectively, which can meet the requirements of the sea water temperature/depth observation. The reflectivity of reflection mirror is in the range from 48.8% to 72.5%, the resonant peak of FBG and LPG are reasonable and the whole spectrum are suitable for demodulation. Through research on the optical fiber XBT (FXBT), the direct measurement of deep-sea temperature/depth profile data can be obtained simultaneously, quickly and accurately. The FXBT is a new all-optical seawater temperature/depth sensor, which has important academic value and broad application prospect and is expected to replace the CXBT in the future.

  2. Photothermal depth profiling for multilayered Structures by particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z J; Fang, J W; Zhang, S Y

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method to reconstruct thermal conductivity depth profile of a layered medium using noisy photothermal data. The method tries to obtain an accurate reconstruction of discontinuous profile using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and total variation (TV) regularization. The reconstructions of different thermal conductivity profiles have been tested on simulated photothermal data. The simulation results show that the method can find accurately the locations of discontinuities, and the reconstructed profiles are in agreement with the original ones. Moreover, the results also show the method has good robustness and anti-noise capability.

  3. Development of Cold Neutron Depth Profiling System at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B. G.; Choi, H. D.; Sun, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The depth profiles of intentional or intrinsic constituents of a sample provide valuable information for the characterization of materials. A number of analytical techniques for depth profiling have been developed. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) system which was developed by Ziegler et al. is one of the leading analytical techniques. In NDP, a thermal or cold neutron beam passes through a material and interacts with certain isotopes that are known to emit monoenergetic-charged particle remaining a recoil nucleus after neutron absorption. The depth is obtained from the energy loss of those charged particles escaping surface of substrate material. For various applications of NDP technique, the Cold Neutron Depth Profiling System (CN-NDP) was developed at a neutron guide CG1 installed at the HANARO cold neutron source. In this study the design features of the cold neutron beam and target chamber for the CN-NDP system are given. Also, some experiments for the performance tests of the CN-NDP system are described

  4. PIXE depth profiling using variation of detection angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.; Rickards, J.; Trejo-Luna, R.

    2006-01-01

    A method to apply particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for depth profiling, based on the variation of the X-ray detection angle, is proposed. The procedure uses X-ray yields normalized to those emitted at a particular reference angle. Application of the method to implanted samples and thin metallic films gave excellent results regarding the range of implanted ions and film thickness, respectively. However, there is no complete information about the width of the distribution of the implanted ions, emphasizing the need to develop a full mathematical algorithm to obtain the general depth profile

  5. Depth-profiling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijolat, M.; Hollinger, G.

    1980-12-01

    The possibilities of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (or ESCA) for depth-profiling into shallow depths (approximately 10-100 A) have been studied. The method of ion-sputtering removal has first been investigated in order to improve its depth-resolution (approximately 50-150 A). A procedure which eliminates the effects due to the resolution function of the instrumental probe (analysed depth approximately 50 A) has been settled; but it is not yet sufficient, and the sputter - broadening due to the ion-induced damages must be taken into account (broadening function approximately 50 A for approximately 150 A removal). Because of serious difficulties in estimating the broadening function an alternative is to develop non destructive methods, so a new method based on the dependence of the analysed depth with the electron emission angle is presented. The extraction of the concentration profile from angular distribution experiments is achieved, in the framework of a flat-layer model, by minimizing the difference between theoretical and experimental relative intensities. The applicability and limitations of the method are discussed on the basis of computer simulation results. The depth probed is of the order of 3 lambda (lambda being the value of the inelastic mean free path, typically 10-20 A) and the depth-resolution is of the order of lambda/3 [fr

  6. Depth profiling of tritium by neutron time-of-flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.; Anderson, J.D.; Lefevre, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    A method to measure the depth profile of tritium implanted or absorbed in materials was developed. The sample to be analyzed is bombarded with a pulsed proton beam and the energy of neutrons produced by the T(p,n) reaction is measured by the time-of-flight technique. From the neutron energy the depth in the target of the T atoms may be inferred. A sensitivity of 0.1 at. percent T or greater is possible. The technique is non-destructive and may be used with thick or radioactive host materials. Samples up to 20 μm in thickness may be profiled with resolution limited by straggling of the proton beam for depths greater than 1 μm. Deuterium depth profiling has been demonstrated using the D(d,n) reaction. The technique has been used to observe the behavior of an implantation spike of T produced by a 400 keV T + beam stopping at a depth of 3 μm in 11 μm thick layers of Ti and TiH. The presence of H in the Ti lattice is observed to inhibit the diffusion of T through the lattice. Effects of the total hydrogen concentration (H + T) being forced above stochiometry at the implantation site are suggested by the shapes of the implantation spikes

  7. Interpreting Repeated Temperature-Depth Profiles for Groundwater Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, Victor F.; Kurylyk, Barret L.; Daal, van Jonathan; Ploeg, van der Martine J.; Carey, Sean K.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature can be used to trace groundwater flows due to thermal disturbances of subsurface advection. Prior hydrogeological studies that have used temperature-depth profiles to estimate vertical groundwater fluxes have either ignored the influence of climate change by employing steady-state

  8. Nondestructive investigatons of the depth profile of PZT ferroelectric films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deineka, Alexander; Glinchuk, M. D.; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Suchaneck, G.; Gerlach, G.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 264, - (2001), s. 151-156 ISSN 0015-0193 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015; GA ČR GA202/00/1425 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : ferroelectric film * depth profile * interface Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.471, year: 2001

  9. A new method for depth profiling reconstruction in confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Mensitieri, Giuseppe

    2018-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is commonly used to reconstruct depth profiles of chemical species in multicomponent systems and to image nuclear and cellular details in human tissues via image intensity measurements of optical sections. However, the performance of this technique is reduced by inherent effects related to wave diffraction phenomena, refractive index mismatch and finite beam spot size. All these effects distort the optical wave and cause an image to be captured of a small volume around the desired illuminated focal point within the specimen rather than an image of the focal point itself. The size of this small volume increases with depth, thus causing a further loss of resolution and distortion of the profile. Recently, we proposed a theoretical model that accounts for the above wave distortion and allows for a correct reconstruction of the depth profiles for homogeneous samples. In this paper, this theoretical approach has been adapted for describing the profiles measured from non-homogeneous distributions of emitters inside the investigated samples. The intensity image is built by summing the intensities collected from each of the emitters planes belonging to the illuminated volume, weighed by the emitters concentration. The true distribution of the emitters concentration is recovered by a new approach that implements this theoretical model in a numerical algorithm based on the Maximum Entropy Method. Comparisons with experimental data and numerical simulations show that this new approach is able to recover the real unknown concentration distribution from experimental profiles with an accuracy better than 3%.

  10. Tritium depth profiling in carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Pilz, W.; Sun, G.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Bekris, N.; Penzhorn, R.-D.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium depth profiling measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry have been performed at the facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. In order to achieve a uniform erosion at the target surface inside a commercial Cs ion sputtering source and to avoid edge effects, the samples were mechanically scanned and the signals were recorded only during sputtering at the centre of the sputtered area. The sputtered negative ions were mass analysed by the injection magnet of the Tandetron. Hydrogen and deuterium profiles were measured with the Faraday cup between the injection magnet and the accelerator, while the tritium was counted after the accelerator with semiconductor detectors. Depth profiles have been measured for carbon samples which had been exposed to the plasma at the first wall of the Garching fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade and from the European fusion experiment JET, Culham, UK

  11. Design and construction of the facility for neutron depth profiling in research reactor RECH-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutis P, Octavio; Navarro A, Gustavo; Henriquez A, Carlos; Pereda B, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Here is described the experimental facility for Neutron Depth Profiling, NDP, constructed at the CCHEN laboratories, as well as some general aspects of the technique. It is also shown applications to the concentration analysis of 10 B and 6 Li as a function of depth for borophosphosilicate glass, BPSG, and for a thick sinter of 6 Li in a zinc-nickel-manganese oxide. Achieved depth resolution is comparable to that obtained in reference advanced laboratories. (author)

  12. Analysis of small field percent depth dose and profiles: Comparison of measurements with various detectors and effects of detector orientation with different jaw settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Finlay Godson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of modern technologies in radiotherapy poses an increased challenge in the determination of dosimetric parameters of small fields that exhibit a high degree of uncertainty. Percent depth dose and beam profiles were acquired using different detectors in two different orientations. The parameters such as relative surface dose (DS, depth of dose maximum (Dmax, percentage dose at 10 cm (D10, penumbral width, flatness, and symmetry were evaluated with different detectors. The dosimetric data were acquired for fields defined by jaws alone, multileaf collimator (MLC alone, and by MLC while the jaws were positioned at 0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 cm away from MLC leaf-end using a Varian linear accelerator with 6 MV photon beam. The accuracy in the measurement of dosimetric parameters with various detectors for three different field definitions was evaluated. The relative DS(38.1% with photon field diode in parallel orientation was higher than electron field diode (EFD (27.9% values for 1 cm ×1 cm field. An overestimation of 5.7% and 8.6% in D10depth were observed for 1 cm ×1 cm field with RK ion chamber in parallel and perpendicular orientation, respectively, for the fields defined by MLC while jaw positioned at the edge of the field when compared to EFD values in parallel orientation. For this field definition, the in-plane penumbral widths obtained with ion chamber in parallel and perpendicular orientation were 3.9 mm, 5.6 mm for 1 cm ×1 cm field, respectively. Among all detectors used in the study, the unshielded diodes were found to be an appropriate choice of detector for the measurement of beam parameters in small fields.

  13. Tritium depth profiling in carbon samples from fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Pilz, W.; Sun, G.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Bekris, N.; Penzhorn, R.-D.

    2000-01-01

    Tritium depth profiling by accelerator mass spectrometry has been performed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. Tritium particles are counted after the accelerator using a semiconductor detector, while deuterium and other light elements are simultaneously measured with the Faraday cup between the injection magnet and the accelerator. Depth profiles have been measured in carbon samples cut from the first wall tiles of the Garching fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade and of the European fusion experiment JET, Culham/UK. Tritium contents in the JET samples were up to six orders higher than in samples from ASDEX-Upgrade. Tritium beam currents from samples with high tritium content were measured partly in the Faraday cup before the accelerator. A dedicated tritium AMS facility with an air-insulated 100 kV tandem accelerator is under construction

  14. Study of damaged depth profiles of ion-irradiated PEEK

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Červená, Jarmila; Apel, P. Yu.; Posta, S.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 201, 19-20 (2007), s. 8370-8372 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK2/05; GA MŠk 1P04LA213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Oxygen irradiation * Poly-aryl-ether-ether ketone * Thermal neutron depth profiling (TNDP) Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.678, year: 2007

  15. Profile analysis of microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.

    2001-01-01

    Depth resolved analyses of several types of microparticles are presented. Particles for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile analysis were collected in the working environment of glass plant, steelworks and welding station using eight-stage cascade impactor with particle size range of 0.3 μm to 15 μm. Ion beam sputtering and sample rotation technique allowed to describe morphology i.e. the elemental structure of collected sub-micrometer particles. Also model particles Iriodin 221 (Merck) were depth profiled. The core-shell structure is found for all types of investigated particles. Steelworks particles consist mainly of iron and manganese cores. At the shells of these microparticles: lead, chlorine and fluorine are found. The particles collected in the glass-works consist mainly of lead-zirconium glass cores covered by carbon and copper. Stainless-steel welding particles compose of iron, manganese and chromium cores covered by a shell rich in carbon, chlorine and fluorine. Sample rotation technique applied in SIMS appears to be an effective tool for environmental microparticle morphology studies

  16. Metrology aspects of SIMS depth profiling for advanced ULSI processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrevich, Andre; Hunter, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    As the semiconductor industry roadmap passes through the 0.1 μm technology node, the junction depth of the transistor source/drain extension will be required to be less than 20 nm and the well doping will be near 1.0 μm in depth. The development of advanced ULSI processing techniques requires the evolution of new metrology tools to ensure process capability. High sensitivity (ppb) coupled with excellent depth resolution (1 nm) makes SIMS the technique of choice for measuring the in-depth chemical distribution of these dopants with high precision and accuracy. This paper will discuss the issues, which impact the accuracy and precision of SIMS measurements of ion implants (both shallow and deep). First this paper will discuss common uses of the SIMS technique in the technology development and manufacturing of advanced ULSI processes. In the second part of this paper the ability of SIMS to make high precision measurements of ion implant depth profiles will be studied

  17. Pulsed photothermal depth profiling of tattoos undergoing laser removal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2012-02-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of temperature depth profiles induced by pulsed laser irradiation of strongly scattering biological tissues and organs, including human skin. In present study, we evaluate the potential of this technique for investigational characterization and possibly quantitative evaluation of laser tattoo removal. The study involved 5 healthy volunteers (3 males, 2 females), age 20-30 years, undergoing tattoo removal treatment using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. There were four measurement and treatment sessions in total, separated by 2-3 months. Prior to each treatment, PPTR measurements were performed on several tattoo sites and one nearby healthy site in each patient, using a 5 ms Nd:YAG laser at low radiant exposure values and a dedicated radiometric setup. The laser-induced temperature profiles were then reconstructed by applying a custom numerical code. In addition, each tatoo site was documented with a digital camera and measured with a custom colorimetric system (in tristimulus color space), providing an objective evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy to be correlated with our PPTR results. The results show that the laser-induced temperature profile in untreated tattoos is invariably located at a subsurface depth of 300 μm. In tattoo sites that responded well to laser therapy, a significant drop of the temperature peak was observed in the profiles obtained from PPTR record. In several sites that appeared less responsive, as evidenced by colorimetric data, a progressive shift of the temperature profile deeper into the dermis was observed over the course of consecutive laser treatments, indicating that the laser tattoo removal was efficient.

  18. Deuterium depth profiles in metals using imaging field desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitz, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Depth profiles of 80 eV deuterium ions implanted in-situ into (110) tungsten have been measured by Imaging, Field-Desorption Mass Spectrometry. The relative abundance of deuterium was measured from the surface to a depth of 300A with less than 3A depth resolution by controlled field-evaporation of the specimen, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The position of the depth distribution maximum (57 +- 3A from the surface) is shown to be in close agreement with that predicted theoretically for low energy deuterium implants using an amorphous-solid model. Structure in the distribution is attributed to surface morphology and channeling phenomena in the near surface region. Implanted impurity species from the ion source and tungsten surface have also been observed. For C + , C 2+ and 0 + , penetration is limited to less than 30A, with abundance decreasing exponentially from the surface. These results are interpreted in the context of the CTR first-wall impurity problem, and are used to suggest a novel method for in-situ characterization of low energy plasma species in operating CTR devices

  19. Depth profiling of boron implanted silicon by positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oevuenc, S.

    2004-01-01

    Positron depth profiling analyses of low energy implants of silicon aim to observe tbe structure and density of the vacancies generating by implantation and the effect of annealing. This work present the results to several set of data starting S and W parameters. Boron implanted Silicon samples with different implantation energies,20,22,24,and 26 keV are analyzed by Slow positron beam (0-40 keV and 10 5 e + /s )(Variable Energy Positron) at the Positron Centre Delf-HOLLAND

  20. Depth profiling: RBS versus energy-dispersive X-ray imaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is known to be one of the techniques ideal for analysis of thin films. Elemental concentrations of matrix components and impurities can be investigated as well as depth profiles of almost each element of the periodic table. Best of all, RBS has both a high sensitivity and a high depth resolution, and is a non-destructive analysis technique that does not require specific sample preparation. Solid-state samples are mounted without preparation inside a high-vacuum analysis chamber. However, depth-related interpretation of elemental depth profiles requires the material density of the specimen and stopping power values to be taken into consideration. In many cases, these parameters can be estimated with sufficient precision. However, the assumed density can be inaccurate for depth scales in the nanometer range. For example, in the case of Ge nanoclusters in 500 nm thick SiO 2 layers, uncertainty is related to the actual position of a very thin Ge nanocluster band. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission (EDX) spectroscopy, using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can assist in removing this uncertainty. By preparing a thin section of the specimen, EDX can be used to identify the position of the Ge nanocluster band very precisely, by correlating the Ge profile with the depth profiles of silicon and oxygen. However, extraction of the concentration profiles from STEM-EDX spectra is in general not straightforward. Therefore, a combination of the two very different analysis techniques is often the best and only successful way to extract high-resolution concentration profiles

  1. Factors that influence an elemental depth concentration profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of secondary ion mass spectrometry in concentration profiling is discussed. Two classes of factors that influence an elemental concentration profile are instrumental effects and ion-matrix effects. Instrumental factors that must be considered are: (1) uniformity of the primary ion current density, (2) constancy of the primary ion current, (3) redeposition, (4) memory, (5) primary ion beam tailing and the nonfocused component, (6) chemical purity of the primary ion beam, and (7) residual gas impurities. Factors which can be classified as ion matrix effects are: (1) the mean escape depth of secondary ions, (2) recoil implantation, (3) molecular ion interferences, (4) primary ion beam induced diffusion of matrix species, (5) nonuniform sputter removal of matrix layers, and (6) implanted primary ion chemical and lattice damage effects

  2. Depth profiling using C60+ SIMS-Deposition and topography development during bombardment of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, Greg; Batteas, James; Michaels, Chris A.; Chi, Peter; Small, John; Windsor, Eric; Fahey, Albert; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Kim, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    A C 60 + primary ion source has been coupled to an ion microscope secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instrument to examine sputtering of silicon with an emphasis on possible application of C 60 + depth profiling for high depth resolution SIMS analysis of silicon semiconductor materials. Unexpectedly, C 60 + SIMS depth profiling of silicon was found to be complicated by the deposition of an amorphous carbon layer which buries the silicon substrate. Sputtering of the silicon was observed only at the highest accessible beam energies (14.5 keV impact) or by using oxygen backfilling. C 60 + SIMS depth profiling of As delta-doped test samples at 14.5 keV demonstrated a substantial (factor of 5) degradation in depth resolution compared to Cs + SIMS depth profiling. This degradation is thought to result from the formation of an unusual platelet-like grain structure on the SIMS crater bottoms. Other unusual topographical features were also observed on silicon substrates after high primary ion dose C 60 + bombardment

  3. ACCURACY ANALYSIS OF KINECT DEPTH DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khoshelham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of the geometric quality of depth data obtained by the Kinect sensor. Based on the mathematical model of depth measurement by the sensor a theoretical error analysis is presented, which provides an insight into the factors influencing the accuracy of the data. Experimental results show that the random error of depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor, and ranges from a few millimetres up to about 4 cm at the maximum range of the sensor. The accuracy of the data is also found to be influenced by the low resolution of the depth measurements.

  4. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  5. Pulsed glow discharge mass spectrometry for molecular depth profiling of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, L.; Pereiro, R.; Sanz-Medel, A.; Bordel, N.; Pisonero, J.; Licciardello, A.; Tuccitto, N.; Tempez, A.; Chapon, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nowadays thin films of polymeric materials involve a wide range of industrial applications, so techniques capable of providing in-depth profile information are required. Most of the techniques available for this purpose are based on the use of energetic particle beams which interact with polymers producing undesirable physicochemical modifications. Radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge (rf-pulsed-GD) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) could afford the possibility of acquiring both elemental and molecular information creating minimal damage to surfaces and thereby obtaining depth profiles. This work will evaluate rf-GDs coupled to an orthogonal TOFMS for direct analysis of polymers. (author)

  6. A new look at the steel cord-rubber adhesive interphase by chemical depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, G.E.

    2001-01-01

    The adhesive interphase formed between brass plated steel cord and sulfur crosslinked rubber is known to be a complex layer of metal oxides, sulfides, and rubber. Hostile aging of this system produces changes in the structure, morphology, thickness, and mechanical properties of this layer. In a previous publication it has been shown that the overall thickness of the sulfide layer as measured by depth profiling with Auger electron spectroscopy could be used to characterize the degradation of the adhesive bond [G. E. Hammer et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 12, 2388 (1994)]. In this work multivariate statistical analysis of the sulfur Auger electron spectra was used to produce chemical depth profiles of the individual copper and zinc sulfide layers. These chemical depth profiles give new insight into the adhesion degradation mechanism on the nanometer scale. Particularly, the percentage of copper sulfide in the layer was found to be an accurate predictor of adhesion degradation

  7. PDEPTH—A computer program for the geophysical interpretation of magnetic and gravity profiles through Fourier filtering, source-depth analysis, and forward modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.

    2018-01-10

    PDEPTH is an interactive, graphical computer program used to construct interpreted geological source models for observed potential-field geophysical profile data. The current version of PDEPTH has been adapted to the Windows platform from an earlier DOS-based version. The input total-field magnetic anomaly and vertical gravity anomaly profiles can be filtered to produce derivative products such as reduced-to-pole magnetic profiles, pseudogravity profiles, pseudomagnetic profiles, and upward-or-downward-continued profiles. A variety of source-location methods can be applied to the original and filtered profiles to estimate (and display on a cross section) the locations and physical properties of contacts, sheet edges, horizontal line sources, point sources, and interface surfaces. Two-and-a-half-dimensional source bodies having polygonal cross sections can be constructed using a mouse and keyboard. These bodies can then be adjusted until the calculated gravity and magnetic fields of the source bodies are close to the observed profiles. Auxiliary information such as the topographic surface, bathymetric surface, seismic basement, and geologic contact locations can be displayed on the cross section using optional input files. Test data files, used to demonstrate the source location methods in the report, and several utility programs are included.

  8. Radiometric dating and quantitative analysis of elements in depth profiles of sediments by means of nuclear physical as well as X-ray fluorescence and atomic emission spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenburg, M.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of heavy metal concentration in sediments is of great importance for the assessment of water quality. If dating of the different layers of sediment cores is possible, informations about the history of pollution can be inferred. This paper describes the development and practical test of a procedure suitable for the investigation of sediment cores. Both the element analysis and the dating are based on physical methods. For element concentration determination inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are used. The techniques are described and compared. For dating radiometric measurements of 210 Pb and 137 Cs are carried out with a coaxial well-type germanium γ-ray detector in a special low-level arrangement. Results of the systematic investigations are presented and a few individual depth profiles are discussed. (orig.) With 34 figs., 20 tabs [de

  9. Ion-beam-induced topography and compositional changes in depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    When energetic ions penetrate and stop in solids they not only add a new atomic constituent to the matrix but they also create atomic recoils and defects. The fluxes of these entities can give rise to spatial redistribution of atomic components, which may be partly or completely balanced by reordering and relaxation processes. These latter, in turn, may be influenced by fields and gradients induced by the primary relocation processes and by the energy deposited. These will include quasi-thermal, concentration (or chemical potential) and electrostatic gradients and may act to enhance or suppress atomic redistribution. Some, or all, of these processes will operate, depending upon the system under study, when energetic ions are employed to sputter erode a substrate for depth sectioning and, quite generally, can perturb the atomic depth profile that it is intended to evaluate. Theoretical and computational approaches to modelling such processes will be outlined and experimental examples shown which illustrate specific phenomena. In particular the accumulation of implant species and defect generation or redistribution can modify, with increasing ion fluence, the local sputtering mechanism and create further problems in depth profile analysis as a changing surface topography penetrates the solid. Examples of such topographic evolution and its influence on depth profiling analysis will be given and models to explain general and specific behaviour will be outlined. The commonality of models which examine both depth-dependent composition modification and surface topography evolution will be stressed. (author)

  10. Narrow nuclear resonance profiling of Al with subnanometric depth resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, E.B.O. da; Krug, C.; Stedile, F.C.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I.J.R.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the use of the narrow and isolated resonance at 404.9 keV in the cross-section curve of the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si nuclear reaction for profiling Al in ultrathin aluminum oxide films on Si. The samples were characterized as-deposited and after thermal annealing, so that Al transport could be studied. An estimated depth resolution of approximately 0.4 nm near the surface of the films could be obtained owing to: (i) the very small resonance width; (ii) the high stopping power of Al 2 O 3 for 404.9 keV protons; (iii) the high energy stability of the proton beam provided by the 500 kV HVEE ion implanter at Porto Alegre; and (iv) an apparent thickness magnification by a factor between 2.0 and 2.4 with the use of glancing incidence. This technique is compared to other methods for Al profiling like medium energy ion scattering and some sputtering-based techniques

  11. Reconstruction of original indium distribution in InGaAs quantum wells from experimental SIMS depth profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudriavtsev, Yu., E-mail: yuriyk@cinvestav.mx [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica – SEES, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN #2508, D.F., México (Mexico); Asomoza, R. [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica – SEES, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN #2508, D.F., México (Mexico); Gallardo-Hernandez, S.; Ramirez-Lopez, M.; Lopez-Lopez, M. [Departamento de Física, CINVESTAV-IPN, México (Mexico); Nevedomsky, V.; Moiseev, K. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, S-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Depth profiling analysis of InGaAs/GaAs hetero-structures grown by MBE on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates is reported. A novel two-step procedure for de-convolving experimental SIMS depth distribution is employed and the original In distribution in InGaAs quantum wells (QW) is estimated. The QW thickness calculated from the de-convolved profiles is shown to be in good agreement with the cross-sectional TEM images. The experimental In depth profile is shifted from the original In distribution due to the ion mixing process during depth profiling analysis. It is shown that the de-convolution procedure is suitable for reconstruction of the original QW width and depth by SIMS even for relatively high primary ion energies.

  12. Non destructive method of determination of depth profiling with ESCA spectroscopy by angular distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijolat, Michele.

    1979-07-01

    The aim of this study has been to determine the possibilities of photoelectron spectroscopy ESCA for depth profiling in the first hundred angstrom of a compound. First of all, the technique ESCA has been described in an analytical point of view. Then, the common sputter profiling method has been tested, and a model to deduce the concentrations profile has been formulated. However the analysis of the various effects due to the sputtering events showed that this method is able to give only the profile shape with a bad depth resolution. A new non destructive method based on the analysed depth dependence with photoelectrons emission angle is settled. A computational method (simplexe optimization) is used to deduce the concentrations profile. Simulation have revealed the necessity of submitting constraints proper to the system physical properties and allowed to state the applicability range of the method. The interface profiles Ag-Pd, Ag-Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 -Si have been measured, and the surface segregation in CuNi alloy has been studied [fr

  13. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, Arne

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C 2 ). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed

  14. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  15. Counter-diffusion biofilms have lower N2O emissions than co-diffusion biofilms during simultaneous nitrification and denitrification: Insights from depth-profile analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinh, Co Thi; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    geometries, i.e., a MABR and a conventional biofilm reactor (CBR) employing co-current substrate diffusion geometry, were operated to determine depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrous oxide (N2O), functional gene abundance and microbial community structure. Surficial nitrogen removal rate...... (0.011 ± 0.001 mg N2O-N/L) than that in the CBR (1.38 ± 0.25 mg N2O-N/L), resulting in distinct N2O emission factors (0.0058 ± 0.0005% in the MABR vs. 0.72 ± 0.13% in the CBR). Analysis on local net N2O production and consumption rates unveiled that zones for N2O production and consumption were...

  16. Temperature-controlled depth profiling in polymeric materials using cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Christine M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States)]. E-mail: christine.mahoney@nist.gov; Fahey, Albert J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States); Gillen, Greg [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States); Xu Chang [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States); Batteas, James D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8371, Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 (United States)

    2006-07-30

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) employing an SF{sub 5} {sup +} polyatomic primary ion source was used to depth profile through poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) thin films at a series of temperatures from -125 deg. C to 150 deg. C. It was found that for PMMA, reduced temperature analysis produced depth profiles with increased secondary ion stability and reduced interfacial widths as compared to analysis at ambient temperature. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that this improvement in interfacial width may be related to a decrease in sputter-induced topography. Depth profiling at higher temperatures was typically correlated with increased sputter rates. However, the improvements in interfacial widths and overall secondary ion stability were not as prevalent as was observed at low temperature. For PLA, improvements in signal intensities were observed at low temperatures, yet there was no significant change in secondary ion stability, interface widths or sputter rates. High temperatures yielded a significant decrease in secondary ion stability of the resulting profiles. PS films showed rapid degradation of characteristic secondary ion signals under all temperatures examined.

  17. Ion beam techniques for the analysis of light elements in thin films, including depth profiling. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This publication highlights the achievements of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to promote the potential of accelerator-based nuclear techniques of analysis for light elements in thin films. The objectives of this CRP were to develop a coordinated research effort between accelerator laboratories and materials science research groups in order to assist and promote the development of quality assurance methods, to evaluate databases of parameters needed for quantitative analysis, and to develop and apply techniques to selected problems concerning the surface modification of materials and production of thin films. Through various case studies, this publication assesses and demonstrates the effectiveness of accelerator-based nuclear techniques for analysis to provide valuable data and knowledge not readily accessible using other methods

  18. 3D Auger quantitative depth profiling of individual nanoscaled III–V heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourani, W. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Gorbenko, V. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LTM, CNRS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Barnes, J.-P.; Guedj, C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Cipro, R.; Moeyaert, J.; David, S.; Bassani, F.; Baron, T. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LTM, CNRS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Martinez, E., E-mail: eugenie.martinez@cea.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The nanoscale chemical characterization of III–V heterostructures is performed using Auger depth profiling below decananometric spatial resolution. • Reliable indium quantification is achieved on planar structures for thicknesses down to 9 nm. • Quantitative 3D compositional depth profiles are obtained on patterned structures, with sufficient lateral resolution to analyze one single trench. • The Auger intrinsic spatial resolution is estimated around 150–200 nm using a comparison with HAADF-STEM. • Auger and SIMS provide reliable in-depth chemical analysis of such complex 3D heterostructures, in particular regarding indium quantification. - Abstract: The nanoscale chemical characterization of III–V heterostructures is performed using Auger depth profiling below decananometric spatial resolution. This technique is successfully applied to quantify the elemental composition of planar and patterned III–V heterostructures containing InGaAs quantum wells. Reliable indium quantification is achieved on planar structures for thicknesses down to 9 nm. Quantitative 3D compositional depth profiles are obtained on patterned structures, for trench widths down to 200 nm. The elemental distributions obtained in averaged and pointed mode are compared. For this last case, we show that Zalar rotation during sputtering is crucial for a reliable indium quantification. Results are confirmed by comparisons with secondary ion mass spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The Auger intrinsic spatial resolution is quantitatively measured using an original methodology based on the comparison with high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements at the nanometric scale.

  19. Hardness depth profiling of case hardened steels using a three-dimensional photothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Hong; Wang Chinhua; Guo Xinxin; Mandelis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A method of retrieving thermophysical depth profiles of continuously inhomogeneous materials is presented both theoretically and experimentally using the three-dimensional (3-D) photothermal radiometry. A 3-D theoretical model suitable for characterizing solids with arbitrary continuously varying thermophysical property depth profiles and finite (collimated or focused) laser beam spotsize is developed. A numerical fitting algorithm to retrieve the thermophysical profile was demonstrated with three case hardened steel samples. The reconstructed thermal conductivity depth profiles were found to be well anti-correlated with microhardness profiles obtained with the conventional indenter method.

  20. Do different probing depths exhibit striking differences in microbial profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Chaparro, Paula Juliana; McCulloch, John Anthony; Mamizuka, Elsa Masae; Moraes, Aline da Costa Lima; Faveri, Marcelo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Feres, Magda

    2018-01-01

    To perform a thorough characterization of the subgingival microbiota of shallow, moderate and deep sites in subjects with chronic periodontitis (ChP). Subgingival samples were collected from subjects with ChP (n = 3/category of probing depth: ≤3, 4-6 and ≥7 mm) and periodontal health (PH). Individual samples were submitted to 16S rDNA high- throughput sequencing and the analysis was made using mothur and R packages. Nine subjects with ChP and seven with PH were included and 101 samples were evaluated. Thirteen phyla, 118 genera and 211 OTUs were detected. Taxa from Chloroflexi and Spirochaetes phyla were associated with initial stages of disease. Fretibacterium, Eubacterium[XI][G-6], Desulfobulbus, Peptostreptococcaceae[XI][G-1] and [G-3], Bacteroidetes[G-3], Bacteroidaceae[G-1] genera and Filifactor alocis, Fretibacterium fastidiosum, Johnsonella spHOT166, Peptostreptococcaceae[XIII][G-1]HOT113, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Treponema sp. HOT258, which are not conventionally associated with disease, increased with the deepening of the pockets and/or were elevated in ChP; while Streptococcus, Corynebacterium and Bergeyella genera were associated with PH (p oral microorganisms and newly identified periodontal taxa, some of them not-yet-cultured. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Using elastic peak electron spectroscopy for enhanced depth resolution in sputter profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, S.; Kesler, V.

    2002-01-01

    Elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) is an alternative to AES in sputter depth profiling of thin film structures. In contrast to AES, EPES depth profiling is not influenced by chemical effects. The high count rate ensures a good signal to noise ratio, that is lower measurement times and/or higher precision. In addition, because of the elastically scattered electrons travel twice through the sample, the effective escape depth is reduced, an important factor for the depth resolution function. Thus, the depth resolution is increased. EPES depth profiling was successfully applied to a Ge/Si multilayer structure. For an elastic peak energy of 1.0 keV the information depth is considerably lower (0.8 nm) as compared to the Ge (LMM, 1147 eV) peak (1.6 nm) used in AES depth profiling, resulting in a respectively improved depth resolution for EPES profiling under otherwise similar profiling conditions. EPES depth profiling is successfully applied to measure small diffusion lengths at Ge/Si interfaces of the order of 1 nm. (Authors)

  2. Numerical and experimental depth profile analyses of coated and attached layers by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardakani, H. Afkhami [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tavassoli, S.H., E-mail: h-tavassoli@sbu.ac.i [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied for depth profile analysis of different thicknesses of copper foils attached on steel and aluminum substrates. In order to account interfacial effects, depth profile analysis of copper coated on steel is also carried out. Experiments are done at ambient air and at two different wavelengths of 266 and 1064 nm of a Nd:YAG laser with pulse durations of 5 ns. A three-dimensional model of multi-pulse laser ablation is introduced on the base of normal evaporation mechanism and the simulation results are compared with the experiments. A normalized concentration (C{sup N}) is introduced for determination of interface position and results are compared with the usually used normalized intensity (I{sup N}). The effect of coating thickness on average ablation rate and resolution of depth profiling are examined. There is a correlation coefficient higher than 0.95 between the model and experimental depth profiles based on the C{sup N} method. Depth profile analysis on the base of C{sup N} method shows a better depth resolution in comparison with I{sup N} method .Increase in the layer thickness, leads to a decrease in the ablation rate.

  3. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtson, Arne [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, Dr. Kristinas vaeg 48, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: arne.bengtson@kimab.com

    2008-09-15

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C{sub 2}). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed.

  4. Hydrogen analysis depth calibration by CORTEO Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, M., E-mail: marcus.moser@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Fakultät für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Reichart, P.; Bergmaier, A.; Greubel, C. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Fakultät für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Schiettekatte, F. [Université de Montréal, Département de Physique, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Dollinger, G., E-mail: guenther.dollinger@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Fakultät für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Hydrogen imaging with sub-μm lateral resolution and sub-ppm sensitivity has become possible with coincident proton–proton (pp) scattering analysis (Reichart et al., 2004). Depth information is evaluated from the energy sum signal with respect to energy loss of both protons on their path through the sample. In first order, there is no angular dependence due to elastic scattering. In second order, a path length effect due to different energy loss on the paths of the protons causes an angular dependence of the energy sum. Therefore, the energy sum signal has to be de-convoluted depending on the matrix composition, i.e. mainly the atomic number Z, in order to get a depth calibrated hydrogen profile. Although the path effect can be calculated analytically in first order, multiple scattering effects lead to significant deviations in the depth profile. Hence, in our new approach, we use the CORTEO Monte-Carlo code (Schiettekatte, 2008) in order to calculate the depth of a coincidence event depending on the scattering angle. The code takes individual detector geometry into account. In this paper we show, that the code correctly reproduces measured pp-scattering energy spectra with roughness effects considered. With more than 100 μm thick Mylar-sandwich targets (Si, Fe, Ge) we demonstrate the deconvolution of the energy spectra on our current multistrip detector at the microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab. As a result, hydrogen profiles can be evaluated with an accuracy in depth of about 1% of the sample thickness.

  5. Model for hydrogen isotope backscattering, trapping and depth profiles in C and a-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; McCracken, G.M.

    1979-03-01

    A model of low energy hydrogen trapping and backscattering in carbon and a-silicon is described. Depth profiles are calculated and numerical results presented for various incident angular and energy distributions. The calculations yield a relation between depth profiles and the incident ion energy distribution. The use of this model for tokamak plasma diagnosis is discussed

  6. The deconvolution of sputter-etching surface concentration measurements to determine impurity depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Katardjiev, I.V.; Nobes, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The quasi-linear partial differential continuity equations that describe the evolution of the depth profiles and surface concentrations of marker atoms in kinematically equivalent systems undergoing sputtering, ion collection and atomic mixing are solved using the method of characteristics. It is shown how atomic mixing probabilities can be deduced from measurements of ion collection depth profiles with increasing ion fluence, and how this information can be used to predict surface concentration evolution. Even with this information, however, it is shown that it is not possible to deconvolute directly the surface concentration measurements to provide initial depth profiles, except when only ion collection and sputtering from the surface layer alone occur. It is demonstrated further that optimal recovery of initial concentration depth profiles could be ensured if the concentration-measuring analytical probe preferentially sampled depths near and at the maximum depth of bombardment-induced perturbations. (author)

  7. Depth profiling of extended defects in silicon by Rutherford backscattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruska, B.; Goetz, G.

    1981-01-01

    Depth profiling of dislocations and stacking faults is carried out by analyzing axial and planar channeling data from As + -and P + -implanted silicon samples annealed at high temperatures. The analyzing procedure is based on the simple two-beam model. The results show that depth profiling of dislocations using planar channeling data is connected with a broadening of the real distributions. A degradation of the defect concentration and a deformation of the profile result for very high defect concentrations (> 5 x 10 5 cm/cm 2 ). All these effects can be neglected by analyzing axial channeling data. Depth profiling of stacking faults is restricted to the determination of the depth distribution of displaced atomic rows or planes. For both the procedures, axial as well as planar channeling measurements, the same depth profiles of displaced atomic rows are obtained. (author)

  8. Molecular depth profiling of trehalose using a C{sub 60} cluster ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected fullerene ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of depth profiles acquired on a 300-nm trehalose film on Si were studied as a function of the impact kinetic energy and charge state of the C{sub 60} projectile ions. We find that the achieved depth resolution depends only weakly upon energy.

  9. Depth profile of In and As in Si measured by RBS with He and C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q; Fang, Z [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1994-12-31

    The depth profile of As and In implanted into Si have been measured by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) with 2 MeV He ions and 6 MeV C ions. Advantages of enhanced depth and mass resolution with C ions have been demonstrated over the conventional He RBS. More reliable information for the depth profile of In and As in Si has been obtained. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Depth profile of In and As in Si measured by RBS with He and C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q.; Fang, Z. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1993-12-31

    The depth profile of As and In implanted into Si have been measured by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) with 2 MeV He ions and 6 MeV C ions. Advantages of enhanced depth and mass resolution with C ions have been demonstrated over the conventional He RBS. More reliable information for the depth profile of In and As in Si has been obtained. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Optimal depth-based regional frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wazneh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Classical methods of regional frequency analysis (RFA of hydrological variables face two drawbacks: (1 the restriction to a particular region which can lead to a loss of some information and (2 the definition of a region that generates a border effect. To reduce the impact of these drawbacks on regional modeling performance, an iterative method was proposed recently, based on the statistical notion of the depth function and a weight function φ. This depth-based RFA (DBRFA approach was shown to be superior to traditional approaches in terms of flexibility, generality and performance. The main difficulty of the DBRFA approach is the optimal choice of the weight function ϕ (e.g., φ minimizing estimation errors. In order to avoid a subjective choice and naïve selection procedures of φ, the aim of the present paper is to propose an algorithm-based procedure to optimize the DBRFA and automate the choice of ϕ according to objective performance criteria. This procedure is applied to estimate flood quantiles in three different regions in North America. One of the findings from the application is that the optimal weight function depends on the considered region and can also quantify the region's homogeneity. By comparing the DBRFA to the canonical correlation analysis (CCA method, results show that the DBRFA approach leads to better performances both in terms of relative bias and mean square error.

  12. Optimal depth-based regional frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazneh, H.; Chebana, F.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2013-06-01

    Classical methods of regional frequency analysis (RFA) of hydrological variables face two drawbacks: (1) the restriction to a particular region which can lead to a loss of some information and (2) the definition of a region that generates a border effect. To reduce the impact of these drawbacks on regional modeling performance, an iterative method was proposed recently, based on the statistical notion of the depth function and a weight function φ. This depth-based RFA (DBRFA) approach was shown to be superior to traditional approaches in terms of flexibility, generality and performance. The main difficulty of the DBRFA approach is the optimal choice of the weight function ϕ (e.g., φ minimizing estimation errors). In order to avoid a subjective choice and naïve selection procedures of φ, the aim of the present paper is to propose an algorithm-based procedure to optimize the DBRFA and automate the choice of ϕ according to objective performance criteria. This procedure is applied to estimate flood quantiles in three different regions in North America. One of the findings from the application is that the optimal weight function depends on the considered region and can also quantify the region's homogeneity. By comparing the DBRFA to the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method, results show that the DBRFA approach leads to better performances both in terms of relative bias and mean square error.

  13. A small and compact AMS facility for tritium depth profiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Depth profiling measurements of tritium in carbon samples have been performed during the past seven years at the AMS facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. The samples have been cut from the inner walls of the fusion experiments ASDEX-upgrade/Garching and JET/Culham. The tritium content of the ...

  14. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eDattolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in the shallow (-5m and a deep (-25m portions of a single meadow, (i we generated two reciprocal EST (Expressed Sequences Tags libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear o be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed.

  15. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattolo, Emanuela; Gu, Jenny; Bayer, Philipp E; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia A; Spadafora, Antonia; Bernardo, Letizia; Natali, Lucia; Cavallini, Andrea; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in shallow (-5 m) and deep (-25 m) portions of a single meadow, (i) we generated two reciprocal Expressed Sequences Tags (EST) libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii) we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM) engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear to be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed.

  16. Electrochemical depth profiling of multilayer metallic structures: An aluminum brazing sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, F. Norouzi; Ambat, R.; Kwakernaak, C.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Mol, J.M.C.; Terryn, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Localized electrochemical cell and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry were used. ► An electrochemical depth profile of an aluminum brazing sheet was obtained. ► The electrochemical responses were correlated to the microstructural features. - Abstract: Combinatory localized electrochemical cell and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) measurements were performed to obtain a thorough in depth electrochemical characterization of an aluminum brazing sheet. By defining electrochemical criteria i.e. breakdown potential, corrosion potential, cathodic and anodic reactivities, and tracking their changes as a function of depth, the evolution of electrochemical responses through out the material thickness were analyzed and correlated to the corresponding microstructural features. Polarization curves in 1 wt% NaCl solution at pH 2.8 were obtained at different depths from the surface using controlled sputtering in a glow discharge optical emission spectrometer as a sample preparation technique. The anodic and cathodic reactivity of the top surface areas were significantly higher than that of the bulk, thus indicating these areas to be more susceptible to localized attack. Consistent with this, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed a relatively high density of fine intermetallic and silicon particles at these areas. The corrosion mechanism of the top layers was identified to be intergranular and pitting corrosion, while lower sensitivity to these localized attacks were detected toward the brazing sheet core. The results highlight the successful application of the electrochemical depth profiling approach in prediction of the corrosion behavior of the aluminum brazing sheet and the importance of the electrochemical activity of the outer 10 μm in controlling the corrosion performance of the aluminum brazing sheet.

  17. Depth profiling of helium in Ni and Nb; comparison of different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherzer, B.M.U.; Bay, H.L.; Behrisch, R.; Boergesen, P.; Roth, J.

    1978-01-01

    Depth profiles of 30 keV 3 He + and 4 He + implanted in polycrystalline nickel and single crystal niobium have been measured using the nuclear reactions He(p,p)He and 3 He(d,α) 1 H. The formalism for obtaining depth profiles from Rutherford backscattering spectra has been generalized for the application to nuclear reaction spectra. The profiles obtained by the two different methods agree within the errors introduced by the uncertainties of the reaction cross-section and electronic stopping power data. The 3 He(d,α) 1 H method is a factor of 10-100 more sensitive and has about a factor of 5 better depth resolution than the He(p,p)He method. However, the latter method allows to probe much larger depths and is simultaneously applicable to 4 He as well as to 3 He. Within the experimental uncertainties the depth profiles for 3 He and 4 He are identical. (Auth.)

  18. Design and construction of an analytical instrument for neutron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutis, Octavio; Venegas, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Full text: An experimental facility for Neutron Depth Profiling, recently constructed at CCHEN's laboratories is described. The technique allows to measure the mean atomic concentration ρ(x) of certain isotopes as a function of distance x to the surface for the first depth microns. The observation area is about 15 mm in diameter and the range in depth depends on the matrix stopping power and on the energy of the charged particle associated with the A(n,y)B reaction, in which this technique is supported, where A is the isotope to be detected, y is an α particle or a proton and B is the recoil nucleus. The spatial resolution depends upon the characteristics of the detection chain and its geometry and of the thermal spectrum of the beam. An appropriate deconvolution on the merging particle energy spectrum allows to recover the concentration profile. The application of the technique to the analysis of some phospho borosilicate films deposited on s Si substrate, lithium tantalate ceramics deposited on Si substrate and a sintered of lithium and Zn-Ni-Mn oxide are shown here with a resolution comparative to that of advanced laboratories

  19. Depth profiling of superconducting thin films using rare gas ion sputtering with laser postionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallix, J.B.; Becker, C.H.; Missert, N.; Char, K.; Hammond, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) has been used to examine a high-T/sub c/ superconducting thin film of nominal composition YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 deposited on SrTiO 3 (100) by reactive magnetron sputtering. The main focus of this work was to probe the compositional uniformity and the impurity content throughout the 1800 A thick film having critical current densities of 1 to 2 x 10 6 A/cm 2 . SALI depth profiles show this film to be more uniform than thicker films (∼1 μm, prepared by electron beam codeposition) which were studied previously, yet the data show that some additional (non-superconducting) phases derived from Y, Ba, Cu, and O are still present. These additional phases are studied by monitoring the atomic and diatomic-oxide photoion profiles and also the depth profiles of various clusters (e.g. Y 2 O 2 + , Y 2 O 3 + , Y 3 O 4 + , Ba 2 O + , Ba 2 O 2 + , BaCu + , BaCuO + , YBaO 2 + , YSrO 2 + , etc.). A variety of impurities are observed to occur throughout the film including rather large concentrations of Sr. Hydroxides, F, Cl, and CO/sub x/ are evident particularly in the sample's near surface region (the top ∼100 A)

  20. Depth profiling of superconducting thin films using rare gas ion sputtering with laser postionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallix, J. B.; Becker, C. H.; Missert, N.; Char, K.; Hammond, R. H.

    1988-02-01

    Surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) has been used to examine a high-Tc superconducting thin film of nominal composition YBa2Cu3O7 deposited on SrTiO3 (100) by reactive magnetron sputtering. The main focus of this work was to probe the compositional uniformity and the impurity content throughout the 1800 Å thick film having critical current densities of 1 to 2×106 A/cm2. SALI depth profiles show this film to be more uniform than thicker films (˜1 μm, prepared by electron beam codeposition) which were studied previously, yet the data show that some additional (non-superconducting) phases derived from Y, Ba, Cu, and O are still present. These additional phases are studied by monitoring the atomic and diatomic-oxide photoion profiles and also the depth profiles of various clusters (e.g. Y2O2+, Y2O3+, Y3O4+, Ba2O+, Ba2O2+, BaCu+, BaCuO+, YBaO2+, YSrO2+, etc.). A variety of impurities are observed to occur throughout the film including rather large concentrations of Sr. Hydroxides, F, Cl, and COx are evident particularly in the sample's near surface region (the top ˜100 Å).

  1. Objective characterization of bruise evolution using photothermal depth profiling and Monte Carlo modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of laser-induced temperature depth profiles in optically scattering layered structures. The obtained profiles provide information on spatial distribution of selected chromophores such as melanin and hemoglobin in human skin. We apply the described approach to study time evolution of incidental bruises (hematomas) in human subjects. By combining numerical simulations of laser energy deposition in bruised skin with objective fitting of the predicted and measured PPTR signals, we can quantitatively characterize the key processes involved in bruise evolution (i.e., hemoglobin mass diffusion and biochemical decomposition). Simultaneous analysis of PPTR signals obtained at various times post injury provides an insight into the variations of these parameters during the bruise healing process. The presented methodology and results advance our understanding of the bruise evolution and represent an important step toward development of an objective technique for age determination of traumatic bruises in forensic medicine.

  2. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Broekaert, José A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings

  3. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfeld, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.alfeld@desy.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Groenenbrogerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Broekaert, José A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings.

  4. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  6. Breadth and Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge and Their Effects on L2 Vocabulary Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakçi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge have been studied from many different perspectives, but the related literature lacks serious studies dealing with their effects on vocabulary profiles of EFL learners. In this paper, with an aim to fill this gap, the relative effects of breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge on L2 vocabulary profiles…

  7. Refractive index depth profile in PMMA due to proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilasi, S.Z.; Rajta, I.; Budai, J.; Toth, Z.; Petrik, P.; Baradacs, E.

    2006-01-01

    for the determination of optical properties. All irradiations in this work have been performed on the 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institute. The samples were Roehm GS233 type PMMA. The main irradiation parameters were: ∼2 MeV proton energy and 100 nC/mm 2 fluence, because these are typical values for P-beam Writing on PMMA. In this experiment, what we called 'PMMA foil method', the proton energy was varied in the range 1.7-2.1 MeV. A 50 μm thick PMMA foil was attached to the top of bulk PMMA samples in order to decelerate the protons. Depending on the used energy, different energy delivery levels were reached at the bulk PMMA surface (Fig. 1.). The ellipsometric analyses were performed on a Woollam M2000F rotating compensator ellipsometer in Szeged. The measurements were carried out at 476 different wavelengths in the range of 245-1000 nm. The angle of incidence (50 deg, 52 deg, 54 deg, 56 deg, 58 deg) was chosen to be near the Brewster-angle of PMMA. From the ellipsometric measurements the refractive index and the extinction coefficient as a function of the wavelength can be determined by a special modeling procedure. For full details of this work see the complete paper [2]. Here we present one particular visualisation of the results. In the investigated proton energy range the Bragg curves behave similarly, the protons slow down by many collisions of small energy transfer to the electrons of the sample. We calculated the energy loss ΔE/Δx for the 1.7-2.1 MeV protons after passing through 50 μm of PMMA, then we found the same energy loss value on the 2 MeV protons Bragg curve in bulk PMMA. Having the refractive index values at the 1.7-2.1 MeV protons at 50 μm depth, we plotted the refractive index values caused by 2 MeV protons at the calculated depths. Fig. 2. shows these results. In addition we also plotted the Bragg curve of 2 MeV protons on the same depth scale. Since the agreement between the measured refractive indices and the Bragg curve looks

  8. Buoyancy frequency profiles and internal semidiurnal tide turning depths in the oceans

    OpenAIRE

    King, B.; Stone, M.; Zhang, H.P.; Gerkema, T.; Marder, M.; Scott, R.B.; Swinney, H.L.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the possible existence of internal gravity wave "turning depths," depths below which the local buoyancy frequency N(z) becomes smaller than the wave frequency. At a turning depth, incident gravity waves reflect rather than reaching the ocean bottom as is generally assumed. Here we consider internal gravity waves at the lunar semidiurnal (M-2) tidal frequency, omega(M2). Profiles of N-2(z) (the quantity in the equations of motion) are computed using conductivity, temperature, and de...

  9. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM, which uses finely focussed He+ or Ne+ beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 1018 ions/cm2. Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  10. Program analysis and presentation of results of the profiles and depth dose rates obtained with the PTW software MC{sub 2} MEPHYSTO; Programa de analisis y presentacion de resultados de los perfiles y porcentajes de dosis en profundidad adquiridos con el software MEPHYSTO MC2 de PTW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tato de la Cuevas, F.

    2011-07-01

    In the periodic quality control of linear accelerators is usually included acquisition and analysis of profiles and PDDs (percentage depth dose). In the protocol of Quality Control of electron accelerators for clinical use of the proposed analysis SEFM 4 Profiles for each of the energies used clinically. This involves a large number of curves to be analyzed and the subsequent introduction of the parameters in a spreadsheet or similar for your assessment as to the reference state. We have developed a program that analyzes the curves acquired by mcc Mephysto PTW software and presents the results of that analysis in a spreadsheet.

  11. Dual beam organic depth profiling using large argon cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweber, M; Shard, AG; Jungnickel, H; Luch, A; Unger, WES

    2014-01-01

    Argon cluster sputtering of an organic multilayer reference material consisting of two organic components, 4,4′-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl- amino]-biphenyl (NPB) and aluminium tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) (Alq3), materials commonly used in organic light-emitting diodes industry, was carried out using time-of-flight SIMS in dual beam mode. The sample used in this study consists of a ∽400-nm-thick NPB matrix with 3-nm marker layers of Alq3 at depth of ∽50, 100, 200 and 300 nm. Argon cluster sputtering provides a constant sputter yield throughout the depth profiles, and the sputter yield volumes and depth resolution are presented for Ar-cluster sizes of 630, 820, 1000, 1250 and 1660 atoms at a kinetic energy of 2.5 keV. The effect of cluster size in this material and over this range is shown to be negligible. © 2014 The Authors. Surface and Interface Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25892830

  12. Response function during oxygen sputter profiling and its application to deconvolution of ultrashallow B depth profiles in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lin; Liu Jiarui; Wang Chong; Ma, Ki B.; Zhang Jianming; Chen, John; Tang, Daniel; Patel, Sanjay; Chu Weikan

    2003-01-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) response function to a B 'δ surface layer' has been investigated. Using electron-gun evaporation combined with liquid nitrogen cooling of target, we are able to deposit an ultrathin B layer without detectable island formation. The B spatial distribution obtained from SIMS is exponentially decaying with a decay length approximately a linear function of the incident energy of the oxygen during the SIMS analysis. Deconvolution with the response function has been applied to reconstruct the spatial distribution of ultra-low-energy B implants. A correction to depth and yield scales due to transient sputtering near the Si surface region was also applied. Transient erosion shifts the profile shallower, but beam mixing shifts it deeper. These mutually compensating effects make the adjusted distribution almost the same as original data. The one significant difference is a buried B peak observed near the surface region

  13. Application of Depth-Averaged Velocity Profile for Estimation of Longitudinal Dispersion in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Givehchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available River bed profiles and depth-averaged velocities are used as basic data in empirical and analytical equations for estimating the longitudinal dispersion coefficient which has always been a topic of great interest for researchers. The simple model proposed by Maghrebi is capable of predicting the normalized isovel contours in the cross section of rivers and channels as well as the depth-averaged velocity profiles. The required data in Maghrebi’s model are bed profile, shear stress, and roughness distributions. Comparison of depth-averaged velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients observed in the field data and those predicted by Maghrebi’s model revealed that Maghrebi’s model had an acceptable accuracy in predicting depth-averaged velocity.

  14. Depth profiling of hydrogen passivation of boron in Si(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L. J.; Lau, W. M.; Simpson, P. J.; Schultz, P. J.

    1992-08-01

    The properties of SiO2/p-Si were studied using variable-energy positron-annihilation spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide film was formed by ozone oxidation in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at room temperature. Both the positron-annihilation and Raman analyses show that chemical cleaning of boron-doped p-type Si(100) using concentrated hydrofluoric acid prior to the oxide formation leads to hydrogen incorporation in the semiconductor. The incorporated hydrogen passivates the boron dopant by forming a B-H complex, the presence of which increases the broadening of the line shape in the positron-annihilation analysis, and narrows the linewidth of the Raman peak. Annealing of the SiO2/Si sample at a moderate temperature of 220 °C in vacuum was found sufficient to dissociate the complex and reactivate the boron dopant.

  15. Ultra-shallow arsenic implant depth profiling using low-energy nitrogen beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearn, Sarah; Chater, Richard; McPhail, David

    2004-01-01

    Sputtering of silicon by low-energy nitrogen primary ion beams has been studied by a number of authors to characterize the altered layer, ripple formation and the sputtered yields of secondary ions [Surf. Sci. 424 (1999) 299; Appl. Phys. A: Mater. Sci. Process 53 (1991) 179; Appl. Phys. Lett. 73 (1998) 1287]. This study examines the application of low-energy nitrogen primary ion beams for the possible depth profiling of ultra-shallow arsenic implants into silicon. The emphasis of this work is on the matrix silicon signals in the pre-equilibrium surface region that are used for dose calibration. Problems with these aspects of the concentration depth profiling can give significant inconsistencies well outside the error limits of the quoted dose for the arsenic implantation as independently verified by CV profiling. This occurs during depth profiling with either oxygen primary ion beams (with and without oxygen leaks) or cesium primary ion beams

  16. Genetic Algorithm for Opto-thermal Skin Hydration Depth Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Xiao, Perry; Imhof, R. E.

    2013-09-01

    Stratum corneum is the outermost skin layer, and the water content in stratum corneum plays a key role in skin cosmetic properties as well as skin barrier functions. However, to measure the water content, especially the water concentration depth profile, within stratum corneum is very difficult. Opto-thermal emission radiometry, or OTTER, is a promising technique that can be used for such measurements. In this paper, a study on stratum corneum hydration depth profiling by using a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. The pros and cons of a GA compared against other inverse algorithms such as neural networks, maximum entropy, conjugate gradient, and singular value decomposition will be discussed first. Then, it will be shown how to use existing knowledge to optimize a GA for analyzing the opto-thermal signals. Finally, these latest GA results on hydration depth profiling of stratum corneum under different conditions, as well as on the penetration profiles of externally applied solvents, will be shown.

  17. Tailoring the stress-depth profile in thin films; the case of γ'-Fe4N1-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlschloegel, M.; Welzel, U.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneous γ'-Fe 4 N 1-x thin films were produced by gas through-nitriding of iron thin films (thickness 800 nm) deposited onto Al 2 O 3 substrates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The nitriding parameters were chosen such that the nitrogen concentration within the γ' thin films was considerably lower (x ∼ 0.05) than the stoichiometric value (x = 0). X-ray diffraction stress analysis at constant penetration depths performed after the nitriding step revealed the presence of tensile stress parallel to the surface; the tensile stress was shown to be practically constant over the entire film thickness. For further nitriding treatments, the parameters were adjusted such that nitrogen enrichment occurred near the specimen surface. The depth-dependent nitrogen enrichment could be monitored by evaluating the strain-free lattice parameter of γ' as a function of X-ray penetration depth and relating it to the nitrogen concentration employing a direct relation between lattice parameter and nitrogen concentration. The small compositional variations led to distinct characteristic stress-depth profiles. The stress changes non-monotonously with depth in the film as could be shown by non-destructive X-ray diffraction stress analysis at constant penetration depths. This work demonstrates that by a specific choice of a first and a subsequent nitriding treatment (employing different nitriding potentials and/or different temperatures for both treatments) controlled development of residual stress profiles is possible in thin iron-nitride surface layers.

  18. Tritium depth profiling by AMS in carbon samples from fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Pilz, W.; Sun, G.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.

    2001-01-01

    Tritium depth profiling measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry have been performed at a facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. In order to achieve an uniform erosion at the target surface inside of a commercial Cs ion sputtering source and to avoid edge effects, the samples were mechanically scanned inside of a commercial Cs sputter ion source. The sputtered negative ions were mass analysed by the injection magnet of the Tandetron. The tritium ions are counted after the acceleration with semiconductor detectors. Depth profiles have been measured for carbon samples which had been exposed to the plasma at the first wall of the Garching fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade and from the European fusion experiment JET, Culham/UK. A dedicated AMS facility with an air-insulated 100 kV tandem accelerator for depth profiling measurements at samples with high tritium concentration is under construction. First results of test operation are presented. (orig.)

  19. Photothermal radiometric determination of thermal diffusivity depth profiles in a dental resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez-Torres, P; Alvarado-Gil, J J; Mandelis, A

    2010-01-01

    The depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin is studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consists of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic layer is deposited guaranteeing full opacity of the sample. In this case, purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles can be used. Thermal profiles are obtained by heating the coating with a modulated laser beam and performing a modulation frequency scan. Before each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue LED. However due to the fact that dental resins are highly light dispersive materials, the polymerization process depends strongly on the optical absorption coefficient inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusion in the sample. It is shown that using a robust depth profilometric inverse method one can reconstruct the thermal diffusivity profile of the photopolymerized resin.

  20. Quantitative operando visualization of the energy band depth profile in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Li, Yaowen; Kong, Tao; Wu, Na; Ma, Changqi; Bai, Sai; Jin, Yizheng; Wu, Dan; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2015-07-13

    The energy band alignment in solar cell devices is critically important because it largely governs elementary photovoltaic processes, such as the generation, separation, transport, recombination and collection of charge carriers. Despite the expenditure of considerable effort, the measurement of energy band depth profiles across multiple layers has been extremely challenging, especially for operando devices. Here we present direct visualization of the surface potential depth profile over the cross-sections of operando organic photovoltaic devices using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The convolution effect due to finite tip size and cantilever beam crosstalk has previously prohibited quantitative interpretation of scanning Kelvin probe microscopy-measured surface potential depth profiles. We develop a bias voltage-compensation method to address this critical problem and obtain quantitatively accurate measurements of the open-circuit voltage, built-in potential and electrode potential difference.

  1. CREST-SAFE: Snow LST validation, wetness profiler creation, and depth/SWE product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Diaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Munoz Barreto, J.; Yu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    CREST-SAFE: Snow LST validation, wetness profiler creation, and depth/SWE product development The Field Snow Research Station (also referred to as Snow Analysis and Field Experiment, SAFE) is operated by the NOAA Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies (CREST) in the City University of New York (CUNY). The field station is located within the premises of the Caribou Municipal Airport (46°52'59'' N, 68°01'07'' W) and in close proximity to the National Weather Service (NWS) Regional Forecast Office. The station was established in 2010 to support studies in snow physics and snow remote sensing. The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST product (provided by the Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System satellites) were validated using in situ LST (T-skin) and near-surface air temperature (T-air) observations recorded at CREST-SAFE for the winters of 2013 and 2014. Results indicate that T-air correlates better than T-skin with VIIRS LST data and that the accuracy of nighttime LST retrievals is considerably better than that of daytime. Several trends in the MODIS LST data were observed, including the underestimation of daytime values and night-time values. Results indicate that, although all the data sets showed high correlation with ground measurements, day values yielded slightly higher accuracy ( 1°C). Additionally, we created a liquid water content (LWC)-profiling instrument using time-domain reflectometry (TDR) at CREST-SAFE and tested it during the snow melt period (February-April) immediately after installation in 2014. Results displayed high agreement when compared to LWC estimates obtained using empirical formulas developed in previous studies, and minor improvement over wet snow LWC estimates. Lastly, to improve on global snow cover mapping, a snow product capable of estimating snow depth and snow water

  2. Non-destructive microstructural analysis with depth resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotoyabko, E. E-mail: zloto@tx.technion.ac.il; Quintana, J.P

    2003-01-01

    A depth-sensitive X-ray diffraction technique has been developed with the aim of studying microstructural modifications in inhomogeneous polycrystalline materials. In that method, diffraction profiles are measured at different X-ray energies varied by small steps. X-rays at higher energies probe deeper layers of material. Depth-resolved structural information is retrieved by comparing energy-dependent diffraction profiles. The method provides non-destructive depth profiling of the preferred orientation, grain size, microstrain fluctuations and residual strains. This technique is applied to the characterization of seashells. Similarly, energy-variable X-ray diffraction can be used for the non-destructive characterization of different laminated structures and composite materials.

  3. Depth profiling by Raman spectroscopy of high-energy ion irradiated silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yanwen; Liu, Shiyi; Zhao, Ziqiang, E-mail: zqzhao@pku.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    Single crystals of 6H–SiC were irradiated at room temperature with 20 MeV carbon ions at fluences of 1.5 × 10{sup 15} and 6.0 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}. Raman measurements were performed to study irradiation induced damage and the in-depth damage profile of SiC. A clear change of damage from the surface down to the stopping region of carbon ions as simulated by SRIM is exhibited. The affected area as detected by Raman is in good agreement with SRIM predictions while a little shallower dpa profile is observed. The partial disorder defined in the present work as a function of depth is demonstrated. A shift of the position of the TO peak towards lower wavenumbers with in-depth damage and then to higher wavenumbers beyond the most damaged region indicates that tensile strain due to defects has a backward V-curve distribution. The damaged layer is subjected to a compressive in-plane stress associated with the out-of-plane strain and the magnitude of this stress also has a backward V-curve depth profile. The evolution of line width of the TO peak with depth clearly shows the density of defects reaches the higher level at the most damaged region. The Raman spectroscopy scanning technique is proved to be a powerful tool for profiling of crystal damage induced by high-energy ion implantation.

  4. Thermal Depth Profiling Reconstruction by Multilayer Thermal Quadrupole Modeling and Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao-Jiang, Chen; Shu-Yi, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid inversion method for depth profiling reconstruction of thermal conductivities of inhomogeneous solids is proposed based on multilayer quadrupole formalism of thermal waves, particle swarm optimization and sequential quadratic programming. The reconstruction simulations for several thermal conductivity profiles are performed to evaluate the applicability of the method. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the precision and insensitivity to noise of the inversion method are very satisfactory. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  5. Accurate depth profiling for ultra-shallow implants using backside-SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Chie; Tomita, Mitsuhiro; Takenaka, Miyuki

    2004-01-01

    We studied methods for accurate depth profiling for ultra-shallow implants using backside-SIMS. For the measurement of ultra-shallow profiles, the effects of surface transient and atomic mixing are not negligible. Therefore, we applied backside-SIMS to analyze ultra-shallow doping in order to exclude these effects. Backside-SIMS profiles show a sharper ion implantation tail than surface-side-SIMS profiles. In addition, the primary ion energy dependence becomes weaker when backside-SIMS is used [Surf. Interf. Anal. 29 (2000) 362; Appl. Surf. Sci. 203-204 (2003) 264; J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 21 (2003) 1422]. However, the peak concentration of the backside sample was lower than that of the surface-side sample. Therefore, the sample flatness was estimated using the SIMS response function. Furthermore, SIMS profiles were simulated using SIMS response functions. This simulation shows how the sample flatness affects the SIMS profile

  6. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    Ion time-of-flight spectrometry techniques are investigated for applicability to neutron depth profiling. Time-of-flight techniques are used extensively in a wide range of scientific and technological applications including energy and mass spectroscopy. Neutron depth profiling is a near-surface analysis technique that gives concentration distribution versus depth for certain technologically important light elements. The technique uses thermal or sub-thermal neutrons to initiate (n, p) or (n, alpha) reactions. Concentration versus depth distribution is obtained by the transformation of the energy spectrum into depth distribution by using stopping force tables of the projectiles in the substrate, and by converting the number of counts into concentration using a standard sample of known dose value. Conventionally, neutron depth profiling measurements are based on charged particle spectrometry, which employs semiconductor detectors such as a surface barrier detector (SBD) and the associated electronics. Measurements with semiconductor detectors are affected by a number of broadening mechanisms, which result from the interactions between the projectile ion and the detector material as well as fluctuations in the signal generation process. These are inherent features of the detection mechanism that involve the semiconductor detectors and cannot be avoided. Ion time-of-flight spectrometry offers highly precise measurement capabilities, particularly for slow particles. For high-energy low-mass particles, measurement resolution tends to degrade with all other parameters fixed. The threshold for more precise ion energy measurements with respect to conventional techniques, such as direct energy measurement by a surface barrier detector, is directly related to the design and operating parameters of the device. Time-of-flight spectrometry involves correlated detection of two signals by a coincidence unit. In ion time-of-flight spectroscopy, the ion generates the primary input

  7. Nondestructive strain depth profiling with high energy X-ray diffraction: System capabilities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wendt, Scott; Cosentino, Nicholas; Bond, Leonard J.

    2018-04-01

    Limited by photon energy, and penetration capability, traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) strain measurements are only capable of achieving a few microns depth due to the use of copper (Cu Kα1) or molybdenum (Mo Kα1) characteristic radiation. For deeper strain depth profiling, destructive methods are commonly necessary to access layers of interest by removing material. To investigate deeper depth profiles nondestructively, a laboratory bench-top high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) system was previously developed. This HEXRD method uses an industrial 320 kVp X-Ray tube and the Kα1 characteristic peak of tungsten, to produces a higher intensity X-ray beam which enables depth profiling measurement of lattice strain. An aluminum sample was investigated with deformation/load provided using a bending rig. It was shown that the HEXRD method is capable of strain depth profiling to 2.5 mm. The method was validated using an aluminum sample where both the HEXRD method and the traditional X-ray diffraction method gave data compared with that obtained using destructive etching layer removal, performed by a commercial provider. The results demonstrate comparable accuracy up to 0.8 mm depth. Nevertheless, higher attenuation capabilities in heavier metals limit the applications in other materials. Simulations predict that HEXRD works for steel and nickel in material up to 200 µm, but experiment results indicate that the HEXRD strain profile is not practical for steel and nickel material, and the measured diffraction signals are undetectable when compared to the noise.

  8. Depth profiles of H and O in thin films of a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sie, S.H.; Ryan, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed depth profiles of hydrogen and oxygen were measured, in thin film samples of a-Si:H produced under varying conditions, using the reaction 1 H( 19 F,α γ) 16 O in the vicinity of the resonance at E( 19 F) = 6.417 MeV to profile hydrogen, and resonant elastic α scattering near the resonance at Eα = 3.0359 MeV to profile oxygen. Contrasting results reflecting the different fabrication conditions were obtained and these were correlated with the measured electrical properties

  9. On depth profiling of hydrogen and helium isotopes and its application to ion-implantation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, J.

    1979-01-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts, the first being a general review of the experimental methods for depth profiling of light isotopes, where ion beams are used. In the second part, studies of ion implantation of hydrogen and helium isotopes, applying the techniques discussed in the first part, are described. The paper summarizes recent experimental results and discusses recent developments. (Auth.)

  10. Strong-field Photoionization of Sputtered Neutral Molecules for Molecular Depth Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, D; Brenes, D. A.; Wucher, A

    2009-01-01

    Molecular depth profiles of an organic thin film of guanine vapor deposited onto a Ag substrate are obtained using a 40 keV C60 cluster ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometric (ToF-SIMS) detection. Strong-field, femtosecond photoionization of intact guanine molecules is used to probe the neutral component of the profile for direct comparison with the secondary ion component. The ability to simultaneously acquire secondary ions and photoionized neutral molecules reveals new fundamental information about the factors that influence the properties of the depth profile. Results show that there is an increased ionization probability for protonated molecular ions within the first 10 nm due to the generation of free protons within the sample. Moreover, there is a 50% increase in fragment ion signal relative to steady state values 25 nm before reaching the guanine/Ag interface as a result of interfacial chemical damage accumulation. An altered layer thickness of 20 nm is observed as a consequence of ion beam induced chemical mixing. In general, we show that the neutral component of a molecular depth profile using the strong-field photoionization technique can be used to elucidate the effects of variations in ionization probability on the yield of molecular ions as well as to aid in obtaining accurate information about depth dependent chemical composition that cannot be extracted from TOF-SIMS data alone. PMID:20495665

  11. Opto-thermal moisture content and moisture depth profile measurements in organic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, P.; Guo, X.; Cui, Y.Y.; Imhof, R.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements.In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture

  12. Deconvolution of charged particle spectra from neutron depth profiling using Simplex method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Vacík, Jiří; Fink, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2010), 073906/1-073906/7 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : neutron depth profiling * Simplex method * NDP Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010

  13. In situ neutron depth profiling: A powerful method to probe lithium transport in micro-batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, J.F.M.; Labohm, F.; Mulder, M.; Niessen, R.A.H.; Mulder, F.M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    In situ neutron depth profiling (NDP) offers the possibility to observe lithium transport inside micro-batteries during battery operation. It is demonstrated that NDP results are consistent with the results of electrochemical measurements, and that the use of an enriched6LiCoO2 cathode offers more

  14. Characterization of polymer solar cells by TOF-SIMS depth profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulle-Lieuwma, C.W.T.; Gennip, van W.J.H.; Duren, van J.K.J.; Jonkheijm, P.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Solar cells consisting of polymer layers sandwiched between a transparent electrode on glass and a metal top electrode are studied using dynamic time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) in dual-beam mode. Because depth profiling of polymers and polymer-metal stacks is a relatively

  15. Quantitative depth profiling of K-doped fullerene films using XPS and SIMS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oswald, S.; Janda, Pavel; Dunsch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 141, 1-2 (2003), s. 79-85 E-ISSN 1436-5073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : XPS * SIMS * depth profiling * fullerenes * doping Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2003

  16. Ion implantation artifacts observed in depth profiling boron in silicon by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, P.; Simons, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison study of depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) was recently conducted. The specimens were portions of 5 cm diameter single crystal silicon slices in which B-10 had been implanted at various fluences and energies. NDP measurements were made on a 13 mm diameter area at the center of the wafers. SIMS measurements were taken from a 60 μm diameter area approximately 16 mm from the center of the wafer. One observation that emerged from this work was an apparent discrepancy between the profiles of B-10 measured by DNP and SIMS. The peaks of the SIMS profiles were typically deeper than those of NDP by as much as 30 nm, which is 10% of the projected range for a 70 keV implant. Moreover, the profiles could not be made to coincide by either a constant shift or a proportional change of one depth scale with respect to the other. The lateral inhomogeneity of boron that these experiments have demonstrated arises from the variable contribution of ion channeling during implantation

  17. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low fluence irradiations suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model applied to the dechanneling spectra. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects

  18. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion-irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1976-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self-ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single-crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic-scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self-ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low-fluence irradiations, suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects. (Auth.)

  19. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Hatano, Y.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Hara, M.; Calderoni, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  20. Determining concentration depth profiles in fluorinated networks by means of electric force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miccio, Luis A.; Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegria, Angel; Montemartini, Pablo E.; Oyanguren, Patricia A.; Schwartz, Gustavo A.; Colmenero, Juan

    2011-01-01

    By means of electric force microscopy, composition depth profiles were measured with nanometric resolution for a series of fluorinated networks. By mapping the dielectric permittivity along a line going from the surface to the bulk, we were able to experimentally access to the fluorine concentration profile. Obtained data show composition gradient lengths ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm in the near surface area for samples containing from 0.5 to 5 wt. % F, respectively. In contrast, no gradients of concentration were detected in bulk. This method has several advantages over other techniques because it allows profiling directly on a sectional cut of the sample. By combining the obtained results with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we were also able to quantify F/C ratio as a function of depth with nanoscale resolution.

  1. Investigation of the depth profile of ion beam induced nanopatterns on Si with simultaneous metal incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbabaee, Behnam; Arezki, Bahia; Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Cornejo, Marina; Frost, Frank [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Ion beam sputtering of semiconductor surfaces can modify the surface and produce a diversity of surface topographies such as periodic ripples or dot structures depended on sputtering parameters. Well ordered nanostructured surfaces have widely technological applications. Recent experiments have shown that the incorporation of metallic impurity atoms during the sputtering process plays a crucial role in pattern formation on the surfaces. These findings offer a new degree of freedom to control pattern formation. In this contribution we report on surface patterning due to Kr ion beam erosion on silicon surfaces with simultaneous Fe and Cr incorporation. We used X-ray reflectivity (XRR) to determine the depth profiles of metal ions as function of ion beam divergence angles and the mean incidence angle of the ions with respect to the surface normal. Depth profiles are correlated with degree of pattern formation determined by AFM. We show that the mean penetration depth and concentration of metal ions depends on the divergence angle of Kr beam provided by Kaufman source which supports the assumption that metal ions are created due to parasitic interaction of the Kr beam with the steel plate lining. The evaluated depth profile by XRR is in good agreement with SIMS and RBS results.

  2. Spectral Depth Analysis of some Segments of the Bida Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-16

    Dec 16, 2017 ... ABSTRACT: Spectral depth analysis was carried out on ten (10) of the 2009 total magnetic field intensity data sheets covering some segments of the Bida basin, to determine the depth to magnetic basement within the basin. The data was ... groundwater lie concealed beneath the earth surface and the ...

  3. Curie depth and geothermal gradient from spectral analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The resent (2009) aeromagnetic data covering lower part of Benue and upper part of Anambra basins was subjected to one dimensional spectral analysis with the aim of estimating the curie depth and subsequently evaluating both the geothermal gradient and heat flow for the area. Curie point depth estimate obtained were ...

  4. Estimating cumulative soil accumulation rates with in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclide depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical model relating spatially averaged rates of cumulative soil accumulation and hillslope erosion to cosmogenic nuclide distribution in depth profiles is presented. Model predictions are compared with cosmogenic 21 Ne and AMS radiocarbon data from soils of the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico. Rates of soil accumulation and hillslope erosion estimated by cosmogenic 21 Ne are significantly lower than rates indicated by radiocarbon and regional soil-geomorphic studies. The low apparent cosmogenic erosion rates are artifacts of high nuclide inheritance in cumulative soil parent material produced from erosion of old soils on hillslopes. In addition, 21 Ne profiles produced under conditions of rapid accumulation (>0.1 cm/a) are difficult to distinguish from bioturbated soil profiles. Modeling indicates that while 10 Be profiles will share this problem, both bioturbation and anomalous inheritance can be identified with measurement of in situ-produced 14 C

  5. Atomic emission spectroscopic investigations for determining depth profiles at boride layers on iron materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danzer, K.; Marx, G.

    1980-01-01

    A combination of atomic emission spectroscopic surface analysis and mechanical removement of defined surface areas in layers by grinding yields information about the depth distribution of boron in iron. In addition, the evaluation with the aid of the two-dimensional variance analysis leads to statements on the homogeneous distribution within individual layers at different depth. The results obtained in this way are in agreement with those of other methods

  6. Steroid profiling in doping analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, Daniël Henri van de

    2001-01-01

    Profiling androgens in urine samples is used in doping analysis for the detection of abused steroids of endogenous origin. These profiling techniques were originally developed for the analysis of testosterone, mostly by means of the ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio). A study was

  7. Comparison of L-curve and LOOCV depth profiles from TAARXPS data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paynter, R.W., E-mail: royston_paynter@emt.inrs.ca

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Regularized profiles were extracted from TAARXPS data. • The L-curve and LOO cross-validation were used to choose the regularization parameter. • The two parameter choice methods were compared. - Abstract: Time and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TAARXPS) data, obtained from polystyrene samples exposed to an oxygen/helium plasma, have been interpreted using 1st order Tikhonov regularization to smooth the extracted depth profiles. Two methods for the choice of the regularization parameter, namely the L-curve method and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV), are compared and contrasted.

  8. Characterizing contaminant concentrations with depth by using the USGS well profiler in Oklahoma, 2003-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Becker, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Oklahoma Water Science Center has been using the USGS well profiler to characterize changes in water contribution and contaminant concentrations with depth in pumping public-supply wells in selected aquifers. The tools and methods associated with the well profiler, which were first developed by the USGS California Water Science Center, have been used to investigate common problems such as saline water intrusion in high-yield irrigation wells and metals contamination in high-yield public-supply wells.

  9. Long-range depth profiling of camouflaged targets using single-photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Rachael; Halimi, Abderrahim; McCarthy, Aongus; Ren, Ximing; McEwan, Kenneth J.; McLaughlin, Stephen; Buller, Gerald S.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the reconstruction of depth and intensity profiles from data acquired using a custom-designed time-of-flight scanning transceiver based on the time-correlated single-photon counting technique. The system had an operational wavelength of 1550 nm and used a Peltier-cooled InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche diode detector. Measurements were made of human figures, in plain view and obscured by camouflage netting, from a stand-off distance of 230 m in daylight using only submilliwatt average optical powers. These measurements were analyzed using a pixelwise cross correlation approach and compared to analysis using a bespoke algorithm designed for the restoration of multilayered three-dimensional light detection and ranging images. This algorithm is based on the optimization of a convex cost function composed of a data fidelity term and regularization terms, and the results obtained show that it achieves significant improvements in image quality for multidepth scenarios and for reduced acquisition times.

  10. Investigating the Fundamentals of Molecular Depth Profiling Using Strong-field Photoionization of Sputtered Neutrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, D.; Brenes, D. A.; Winograd, N.; Wucher, A.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular depth profiles of model organic thin films were performed using a 40 keV C60+ cluster ion source in concert with TOF-SIMS. Strong-field photoionization of intact neutral molecules sputtered by 40 keV C60+ primary ions was used to analyze changes in the chemical environment of the guanine thin films as a function of ion fluence. Direct comparison of the secondary ion and neutral components of the molecular depth profiles yields valuable information about chemical damage accumulation as well as changes in the molecular ionization probability. An analytical protocol based on the erosion dynamics model is developed and evaluated using guanine and trehalose molecular secondary ion signals with and without comparable laser photoionization data. PMID:26269660

  11. Identification of Chinese medicinal fungus Cordyceps sinensis by depth-profiling mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changwen; Zhou, Jianmin; Liu, Jianfeng

    2017-02-01

    With increased demand for Cordyceps sinensis it needs rapid methods to meet the challenge of identification raised in quality control. In this study Cordyceps sinensis from four typical natural habitats in China was characterized by depth-profiling Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that Cordyceps sinensis samples resulted in typical photoacoustic spectral appearance, but heterogeneity was sensed in the whole sample; due to the heterogeneity Cordyceps sinensis was represented by spectra of four groups including head, body, tail and leaf under a moving mirror velocity of 0.30 cm s- 1. The spectra of the four groups were used as input of a probabilistic neural network (PNN) to identify the source of Cordyceps sinensis, and all the samples were correctly identified by the PNN model. Therefore, depth-profiling Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy provides novel and unique technique to identify Cordyceps sinensis, which shows great potential in quality control of Cordyceps sinensis.

  12. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, R., E-mail: roland.steinberger@jku.at [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Celedón, C.E., E-mail: carlos.celedon@usm.cl [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valaparaíso, Casilla 110-V (Chile); Bruckner, B., E-mail: barbara.bruckner@jku.at [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Roth, D., E-mail: dietmar.roth@jku.at [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Duchoslav, J., E-mail: jiri.duchoslav@jku.at [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Arndt, M., E-mail: martin.arndt@voestalpine.com [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine-Straße 3, 4031 Linz (Austria); Kürnsteiner, P., E-mail: p.kuernsteiner@mpie.de [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); and others

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Investigation on the impact of residual gas prevailing in UHV chambers. • For some metals detrimental oxygen uptake could be observed within shortest time. • Totally different behavior was found: no changes, solely adsorption and oxidation. • The UHV residual gas may severely corrupt results obtained from depth profiling. • A well-considered data acquisition sequence is the key for reliable depth profiles. - Abstract: Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  13. Depth-profiling by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM): data correction by numerical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomba, J Pablo; Eliçabe, Guillermo E; Miguel, María de la Paz; Perez, Claudio J

    2011-03-01

    The data obtained in confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) depth profiling experiments with dry optics are subjected to significant distortions, including an artificial compression of the depth scale, due to the combined influence of diffraction, refraction, and instrumental effects that operate on the measurement. This work explores the use of (1) regularized deconvolution and (2) the application of simple rescaling of the depth scale as methodologies to obtain an improved, more precise, confocal response. The deconvolution scheme is based on a simple predictive model for depth resolution and the use of regularization techniques to minimize the dramatic oscillations in the recovered response typical of problem inversion. That scheme is first evaluated using computer simulations on situations that reproduce smooth and sharp sample transitions between two materials and finally it is applied to correct genuine experimental data, obtained in this case from a sharp transition (planar interface) between two polymeric materials. It is shown that the methodology recovers very well most of the lost profile features in all the analyzed situations. The use of simple rescaling appears to be only useful for correcting smooth transitions, particularly those extended over distances larger than those spanned by the operative depth resolution, which limits the strategy to the study of profiles near the sample surface. However, through computer simulations, it is shown that the use of water immersion objectives may help to reduce optical distortions and to expand the application window of this simple methodology, which could be useful, for instance, to safely monitor Fickean sorption/desorption of penetrants in polymer films/coatings in a nearly noninvasive way.

  14. Effects of Shear Fracture on In-depth Profile Modification of Weak Gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xianjie; Song Xinwang; Yue Xiang'an; Hou Jirui; Fang Lichun; Zhang Huazhen

    2007-01-01

    Two sand packs were filled with fine glass beads and quartz sand respectively. The characteristics of crosslinked polymer flowing through the sand packs as well as the influence of shear fracture of porous media on the in-depth profile modification of the weak gel generated from the crosslinked polymer were investigated. The results indicated that under the dynamic condition crosslinking reaction happened in both sand packs,and the weak gels in these two cases became small gel particles after water flooding. The differences were:the dynamic gelation time in the quartz sand pack was longer than that in the glass bead pack. Residual resistance factor (FRR) caused by the weak gel in the quartz sand pack was smaller than that in the glass bead pack. The weak gel became gel particles after being scoured by subsequent flood water. A weak gel with uniform apparent viscosity and sealing characteristics was generated in every part of the glass bead pack,which could not only move deeply into the sand pack but also seal the high capacity channels again when it reached the deep part. The weak gel performed in-depth profile modification in the glass bead pack,while in the quartz sand pack,the weak gel was concentrated with 100 cm from the entrance of the sand pack. When propelled by the subsequent flood water,the weak gel could move towards the deep part of the sand pack but then became tiny gel particles and could not effectively seal the high capacity channels there. The in-depth profile modification of the weak gel was very weak in the quartz sand pack. It was the shear fracture of porous media that mainly affected the properties and weakened the in-depth profile modification of the weak gel.

  15. Determination of the thickness distribution of a graphene layer grown on a 2″ SiC wafer by means of Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotis, L.; Gurban, S.; Pecz, B.; Menyhard, M.; Yakimova, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The thickness of graphene grown on SiC was determined by AES depth profiling. • The AES depth profiling verified the presence of buffer layer on SiC. • The presence of unsaturated Si bonds in the buffer layer has been shown. • Using multipoint analysis thickness distribution of the graphene on the wafer was determined. - Abstract: Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling was applied for determination of the thickness of a macroscopic size graphene sheet grown on 2 in. 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) by sublimation epitaxy. The measured depth profile deviated from the expected exponential form showing the presence of an additional, buffer layer. The measured depth profile was compared to the simulated one which allowed the derivation of the thicknesses of the graphene and buffer layers and the Si concentration of buffer layer. It has been shown that the graphene-like buffer layer contains about 30% unsaturated Si. The depth profiling was carried out in several points (diameter 50 μm), which permitted the constructing of a thickness distribution characterizing the uniformity of the graphene sheet

  16. Depth Profiles in Maize ( Zea mays L.) Seeds Studied by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Zepeda-Bautista, R.

    2015-06-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) has been used to analyze agricultural seeds and can be applied to the study of seed depth profiles of these complex samples composed of different structures. The sample depth profile can be obtained through the photoacoustic (PA) signal, amplitude, and phase at different light modulation frequencies. The PA signal phase is more sensitive to changes of thermal properties in layered samples than the PA signal amplitude. Hence, the PA signal phase can also be used to characterize layers at different depths. Thus, the objective of the present study was to obtain the optical absorption spectra of maize seeds ( Zea mays L.) by means of PAS at different light modulation frequencies (17 Hz, 30 Hz, and 50 Hz) and comparing these spectra with the ones obtained from the phase-resolved method in order to separate the optical absorption spectra of seed pericarp and endosperm. The results suggest the possibility of using the phase-resolved method to obtain optical absorption spectra of different seed structures, at different depths, without damaging the seed. Thus, PAS could be a nondestructive method for characterization of agricultural seeds and thus improve quality control in the food industry.

  17. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  18. Compositional depth profiles of the type 316 stainless steel undergone the corrosion in liquid lithium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ke, Chuan; Liu, Xiang; Gou, Fujun; Duan, Xuru; Zhao, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Liquid metal lithium cause severe corrosion on the surface of metal structure material that used in the blanket and first wall of fusion device. Fast and accurate compositional depth profile measurement for the boundary layer of the corroded specimen will reveal the clues for the understanding and evaluation of the liquid lithium corrosion process as well as the involved corrosion mechanism. In this work, the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the compositional depth profile analysis of type 316 stainless steel which was corroded by liquid lithium in certain conditions was demonstrated. High sensitivity of LIBS was revealed especially for the corrosion medium Li in addition to the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn by the spectral analysis of the plasma emission. Compositional depth profile analysis for the concerned elements which related to corrosion was carried out on the surface of the corroded specimen. Based on the verified local thermodynamic equilibrium shot-by-shot along the depth profile, the matrix effect was evaluated as negligible by the extracted physical parameter of the plasmas generated by each laser pulse in the longitudinal depth profile. In addition, the emission line intensity ratios were introduced to further reduce the impact on the emission line intensity variations arise from the strong inhomogeneities on the corroded surface. Compositional depth profiles for the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn and the corrosion medium Li were constructed with their measured relative emission line intensities. The distribution and correlations of the concerned elements in depth profile may indicate the clues to the complicated process of composition diffusion and mass transfer. The results obtained demonstrate the potentiality of LIBS as an effective technique to perform spectrochemical measurement in the research fields of liquid metal lithium corrosion.

  19. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, Julia; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F.; Schmid, Moritz S.; Cunsolo, Serena; Brambini, Roberto; Noble, Kimberly; Sirks, Lys-Anne; Linders, Theo E. W.; Schoeneich-Argent, Rosanna I.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2016-10-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of the depth profile of buoyant microplastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, from 0 to 5 m depth. Microplastics were separated into size classes (0.5-1.5 and 1.5-5.0 mm) and types (‘fragments’ and ‘lines’), and associated with a sea state. Microplastic concentrations decreased exponentially with depth, with both sea state and particle properties affecting the steepness of the decrease. Concentrations approached zero within 5 m depth, indicating that most buoyant microplastics are present on or near the surface. Plastic rise velocities were also measured, and were found to differ significantly for different sizes and shapes. Our results suggest that (1) surface samplers such as manta trawls underestimate total buoyant microplastic amounts by a factor of 1.04-30.0 and (2) estimations of depth-integrated buoyant plastic concentrations should be done across different particle sizes and types. Our findings can assist with improving buoyant ocean plastic vertical mixing models, mass balance exercises, impact assessments and mitigation strategies.

  20. Hemispheric aerosol vertical profiles: anthropogenic impacts on optical depth and cloud nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Antony; Kapustin, Vladimir

    2010-09-17

    Understanding the effect of anthropogenic combustion upon aerosol optical depth (AOD), clouds, and their radiative forcing requires regionally representative aerosol profiles. In this work, we examine more than 1000 vertical profiles from 11 major airborne campaigns in the Pacific hemisphere and confirm that regional enhancements in aerosol light scattering, mass, and number are associated with carbon monoxide from combustion and can exceed values in unperturbed regions by more than one order of magnitude. Related regional increases in a proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and AOD imply that direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects are coupled issues linked globally to aged combustion. These profiles constrain the influence of combustion on regional AOD and CCN suitable for challenging climate model performance and informing satellite retrievals.

  1. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Anders J., E-mail: anders.barlow@ncl.ac.uk; Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J. [National EPSRC XPS Users' Service (NEXUS), School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-κ dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025 nm/min (3.95 × 10{sup −2} amu/atom in ion) for 6 keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  2. Depth Profiling of La2O3 ∕ HfO2 Stacked Dielectrics for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Husam N.

    2011-01-03

    Nanoscale La2O3 /HfO2 dielectric stacks have been studied using high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The measured distance of the tail-end of the La signal from the dielectric/Si interface suggests that the origin of the threshold voltage shifts and the carrier mobility degradation may not be the same. Up to 20% drop in mobility and 500 mV shift in threshold voltage was observed as the La signal reached the Si substrate. Possible reasons for these changes are proposed, aided by depth profiling and bonding analysis. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  3. Sediment mixing and accumulation rate effects on radionuclide depth profiles in Hudson estuary sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.R.; Simpson, H.J.; Peng, T.; Bopp, R.F.; Trier, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Measured anthropogenic radionuclide profiles in sediment cores from the Hudson River estuary were compared with profiles computed by using known input histories of radionuclides to the estuary and mixing coefficients which decreased exponentially with depth in the sediment. Observed 134 Cs sediment depth profiles were used in the mixing rate computation because reactor releases were the only significant source for this nuclide, whereas the inputs of 137 Cs and /sup 239.240/Pu to the estuary were complicated by runoff or erosion in upstream areas, in addition to direct fallout from precipitation. Our estimates for the rates of surface sediment mixing in the low salinity reach of the estuary range from 0.25 to 1 cm 2 /yr, or less. In some areas of the harbor adjacent to New York City, were fine-particle accumulation rates are generally >3 cm/yr, and often as high as 10 to 20 cm/yr, sediment mixing rates as high as 10 cm 2 /yr would have little effect on radionuclide peak distributions. Consequently, anthropogenic radionuclide maximum activities in subsurface sediments of the Hudson appear to be useful as time-stratigraphic reference levels, which can be correlated with periods of maximum radionuclide inputs for estimating rates and patterns of sediment accumulation

  4. Novel approach of signal normalization for depth profile of cultural heritage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Detalle, V.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of cultural heritage materials is always complex and specific because unique. Materials are most often heterogeneous and organized in several layers such as mural paintings or corrosion products. The characterization of a complete artwork's stratigraphy is actually one of the questions of science conservation. Indeed, the knowledge of these layers allows completing the history of the work of art and a better understanding of alteration processes in order to set up an appropriate conservation action. The LIBS technique has been employed to study the stratigraphy of an artwork thanks to the ablation laser. However, as we know, atomic information could be insufficient to characterize two materials composed by the same based elements. Therefore, an additional molecular analysis, like Raman spectroscopy; is sometimes necessary for a better identification of the material in particular for organic coatings in cultural heritage. We suggest in this study to use Standard Normal Variate (SNV) as a common normalization for different kinds of spectra (LIBS and Raman spectroscopy) combined with a 3D colour representation for stratigraphic identification of the different layers composing the complex material from artwork. So in this investigation, the SNV method will be applied on LIBS and Raman spectra but also on baseline Raman spectra often considering as nuisance. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the versatility of SNV applied on varied spectra like LIBS, Raman spectra as well as the luminescence background. This original work considers the SNV with a 3D colour representation as a probable new perspective for an easy recognition of a structure layered with a direct overview of the depth profile of the artwork.

  5. Photothermal depth profiling: Comparison between genetic algorithms and thermal wave backscattering (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Voti, R.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal depth profiling has been the subject of many papers in the last years. Inverse problems on different kinds of materials have been identified, classified, and solved. A first classification has been done according to the type of depth profile: the physical quantity to be reconstructed is the optical absorption in the problems of type I, the thermal effusivity for type II, and both of them for type III. Another classification may be done depending on the time scale of the pump beam heating (frequency scan, time scan), or on its geometrical symmetry (one- or three-dimensional). In this work we want to discuss two different approaches, the genetic algorithms (GA) [R. Li Voti, C. Melchiorri, C. Sibilia, and M. Bertolotti, Anal. Sci. 17, 410 (2001); R. Li Voti, Proceedings, IV Int. Workshop on Advances in Signal Processing for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials, Quebec, August 2001] and the thermal wave backscattering (TWBS) [R. Li Voti, G. L. Liakhou, S. Paoloni, C. Sibilia, and M. Bertolotti, Anal. Sci. 17, 414 (2001); J. C. Krapez and R. Li Voti, Anal. Sci. 17, 417 (2001)], showing their performances and limits of validity for several kinds of photothermal depth profiling problems: The two approaches are based on different mechanisms and exhibit obviously different features. GA may be implemented on the exact heat diffusion equation as follows: one chromosome is associated to each profile. The genetic evolution of the chromosome allows one to find better and better profiles, eventually converging towards the solution of the inverse problem. The main advantage is that GA may be applied to any arbitrary profile, but several disadvantages exist; for example, the complexity of the algorithm, the slow convergence, and consequently the computer time consumed. On the contrary, TWBS uses a simplified theoretical model of heat diffusion in inhomogeneous materials. According to such a model, the photothermal signal depends linearly on the thermal effusivity

  6. Quantitative Auger depth profiling of LPCVD and PECVD silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, E.G.; Aite, K.

    1989-01-01

    Thin silicon nitride films (100-210 nm) with refractive indices varying from 1.90 to 2.10 were deposited on silicon substrates by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), ellipsometry, surface profiling measurements and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in combination with Ar + sputtering were used to characterize these films. We have found that the use of (p-p)heights of the Si LVV and N KLL Auger transitions in the first derivative of the energy distribution (dN(E)/dE) leads to an accurate determination of the silicon nitride composition in Auger depth profiles over a wide range of atomic Si/N ratios. Moreover, we have shown that the Si KLL Auger transition, generally considered to be a better probe than the low energy Si LVV Auger transition in determining the chemical composition of silicon nitride layers, leads to deviating results. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of the compositional depth profile in epitaxial submicrometer layers of AIIIBV heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, T.; Bruehl, H.G.; Rhan, H.; Pietsch, U.

    1988-01-01

    The compositional depth profile in semiconductor heterostructures can be determined from X-ray diffraction patterns. Different grading profiles were studied through theoretical simulations with regard to their features in the rocking curve. It was found that the thickness and the grading of a particular layer cannot be determined independently of each other. A linear grading gives rise to an increased peak width of the layer diffraction peak whereas an exponential grading can be detected from the damping of high-order interference fringes. The exponential model can be applied to determine the abruptness of the heterointerfaces. The proposed evaluation method of experimental rocking curves includes the case of overlapping peaks of the layer and the substrate diffraction. The simulation results are discussed for a GaAs/Ga 1-x Al x As/GaAs[100] double heterostructure. When the experimental resolution is taken into account, the sensitivity of the interface width determination was 100-200 A. (orig.)

  8. An analysis of depth dose characteristics of photon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdar, S.A.; Rao, M.A.; Nazir, A.

    2009-01-01

    Photon beam is most widely being used for radiation therapy. Biological effect of radiation is concerned with the evaluation of energy absorbed in the tissues. It was aimed to analyse the depth dose characteristics of x-ray beams of diverse energies to enhance the quality of radiotherapy treatment planning. Depth dose characteristics of different energy photon beams in water have been analysed. Photon beam is attenuated by the medium and the transmitted beam with less intensity causes lesser absorbed dose as depth increases. Relative attenuation on certain points on the beam axis and certain percentage of doses on different depths for available energies has been investigated. Photon beam depth dose characteristics do not show identical attributes as interaction of x-ray with matter is mainly governed by beam quality. Attenuation and penetration parameters of photon show variation with dosimetric parameters like field size due to scattering and Source to Surface Distance due to inverse square law, but the major parameter in photon interactions is its energy. Detailed analysis of photon Depth Dose characteristics helps to select appropriate beam for radiotherapy treatment when variety of beam energies available. Evaluation of this type of characteristics will help to establish theoretical relationships between dosimetric parameters to confirm measured values of dosimetric quantities, and hence to increase accuracy in radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  9. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi [University of California Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Kaneshiro, Kayleigh [University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Schwarzkopf, Ran [University of California Irvine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Irvine, CA (United States); Hara, Takeshi [Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Intelligent Image Information, Division of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  10. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kaneshiro, Kayleigh; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Hara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  11. Molecular depth profiling of multi-layer systems with cluster ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Juan [Department of Chemistry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: nxw@psu.edu

    2006-07-30

    Cluster bombardment of molecular films has created new opportunities for SIMS research. To more quantitatively examine the interaction of cluster beams with organic materials, we have developed a reproducible platform consisting of a well-defined sugar film (trehalose) doped with peptides. Molecular depth profiles have been acquired with these systems using C{sub 60} {sup +} bombardment. In this study, we utilize this platform to determine the feasibility of examining buried interfaces for multi-layer systems. Using C{sub 60} {sup +} at 20 keV, several systems have been tested including Al/trehalose/Si, Al/trehalose/Al/Si, Ag/trehalose/Si and ice/trehalose/Si. The results show that there can be interactions between the layers during the bombardment process that prevent a simple interpretation of the depth profile. We find so far that the best results are obtained when the mass of the overlayer atoms is less than or nearly equal to the mass of the atoms in buried molecules. In general, these observations suggest that C{sub 60} {sup +} bombardment can be successfully applied to interface characterization of multi-layer systems if the systems are carefully chosen.

  12. Sub-keV secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling: comparison of sample rotation and oxygen flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, R.; Wee, A.T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Following the increasingly stringent requirements in the characterization of sub-micron IC devices, an understanding of the various factors affecting ultra shallow depth profiling in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has become crucial. Achieving high depth resolution (of the order of 1 nm) is critical in the semiconductor industry today, and various methods have been developed to optimize depth resolution. In this paper, we will discuss ultra shallow SIMS depth profiling using B and Ge delta-doped Si samples using low energy 0.5 keV O 2 + primary beams. The relationship between depth resolution of the delta layers and surface topography measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is studied. The effect of oxygen flooding and sample rotation, used to suppress surface roughening is also investigated. Oxygen flooding was found to effectively suppress roughening and gives the best depth resolution for B, but sample rotation gives the best resolution for Ge. Possible mechanisms for this are discussed

  13. Individual Profiling Using Text Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0011 Individual Profiling using Text Analysis 140333 Mark Stevenson UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Final...REPORT TYPE      Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)      15 Sep 2014 to 14 Sep 2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Individual Profiling using Text Analysis ...consisted of collections of tweets for a number of Twitter users whose gender, age and personality scores are known. The task was to construct some system

  14. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, R.; Celedón, C. E.; Bruckner, B.; Roth, D.; Duchoslav, J.; Arndt, M.; Kürnsteiner, P.; Steck, T.; Faderl, J.; Riener, C. K.; Angeli, G.; Bauer, P.; Stifter, D.

    2017-07-01

    Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  15. Depth profiling of inks in authentic and counterfeit banknotes by electrospray laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yi-Ying; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cheng, Chu-Nian; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-01-01

    Electrospray laser desorption ionization is an ambient ionization technique that generates neutrals via laser desorption and ionizes those neutrals in an electrospray plume and was utilized to characterize inks in different layers of copy paper and banknotes of various currencies. Depth profiling of inks was performed on overlapping color bands on copy paper by repeatedly scanning the line with a pulsed laser beam operated at a fixed energy. The molecules in the ink on a banknote were desorbed by irradiating the banknote surface with a laser beam operated at different energies, with results indicating that different ions were detected at different depths. The analysis of authentic $US100, $100 RMB and $1000 NTD banknotes indicated that ions detected in 'color-shifting' and 'typography' regions were significantly different. Additionally, the abundances of some ions dramatically changed with the depth of the aforementioned regions. This approach was used to distinguish authentic $1000 NTD banknotes from counterfeits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Iodine-129 depth profiles in soil within 30 km from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Tsuchiya, Y.S.; Nakano, C.; Yamagata, T.; Nagai, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Maejima, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Iodine-129 depth profiles of 13 soil cores were analyzed by AMS to evaluate the distribution and the mobility in soil. The cores were sampled from various fields around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Four cores out of the 13 were collected from almost the same position in Kawauchi village crop field 20 km apart from FDNPP at different times between April 2011 and June 2012 to observe the temporal variation of depth profile of "1"2"9I in soil. On the all of 13 soil cores, clear enhancement of the accident origin "1"2"9I was observed. From the crop field soil cores in Kawauchi village, "1"2"9I inventory was estimated as 43.4±2.7 mBq m"-"2 (3.10x10"1"3 atoms m"-"2). There is positive relationship between relaxation length and the elapsed time since the FDNPP accident. The increase rate of the relaxation length is about 1 cm yr"-"1 which should reflect the downward transfer rate of the Fukushima-derived "1"2"9I. Other 9 cores were collected from various fields including crop fields and man-made soils within 30 km from FDNPP on June 2012. Cumulative "1"2"9I inventory fraction [%] from the surface was calculated. The inventory fraction within top 5 cm varied widely, 65-100% with median 82%. Similarly the inventory fraction within top 10 cm varied 82 to 100% with the median 95%. (author)

  17. Microbial Community Dynamics in Soil Depth Profiles Over 120,000 Years of Ecosystem Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Turner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Along a long-term ecosystem development gradient, soil nutrient contents and mineralogical properties change, therefore probably altering soil microbial communities. However, knowledge about the dynamics of soil microbial communities during long-term ecosystem development including progressive and retrogressive stages is limited, especially in mineral soils. Therefore, microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community composition (pyrosequencing as well as their controlling soil properties were investigated in soil depth profiles along the 120,000 years old Franz Josef chronosequence (New Zealand. Additionally, in a microcosm incubation experiment the effects of particular soil properties, i.e., soil age, soil organic matter fraction (mineral-associated vs. particulate, O2 status, and carbon and phosphorus additions, on microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community patterns (T-RFLP were analyzed. The archaeal to bacterial abundance ratio not only increased with soil depth but also with soil age along the chronosequence, coinciding with mineralogical changes and increasing phosphorus limitation. Results of the incubation experiment indicated that archaeal abundances were less impacted by the tested soil parameters compared to Bacteria suggesting that Archaea may better cope with mineral-induced substrate restrictions in subsoils and older soils. Instead, archaeal communities showed a soil age-related compositional shift with the Bathyarchaeota, that were frequently detected in nutrient-poor, low-energy environments, being dominant at the oldest site. However, bacterial communities remained stable with ongoing soil development. In contrast to the abundances, the archaeal compositional shift was associated with the mineralogical gradient. Our study revealed, that archaeal and bacterial communities in whole soil profiles are differently affected by long-term soil development with archaeal communities probably being better adapted to

  18. Measuring Compositions in Organic Depth Profiling: Results from a VAMAS Interlaboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shard, A. G.; Havelund, Rasmus; Spencer, Steve J.; Gilmore, I. S.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Angerer, Tina B.; Aoyagi, Satoka; Barnes, Jean P.; Benayad, Anass; Bernasik, Andrzej; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D.; Deeks, Christopher; Fletcher, John S.; Graham, Daniel J.; Heuser, Christian; Lee, Tae G.; Marie, Camille; Marzec, Mateusz M.; Mishra, Gautam; Rading, Derk; Renault, Oliver; Scurr, David J.; Shon, Hyun K.; Spampinato, Valentina; Tian, Hua; Wang, Fuyi; Winograd, Nicholas; Wu, Kui; Wucher, Andreas; Zhou, Yufan; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-07-23

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) interlaboratory study on the measurement of composition in organic depth profiling. Layered samples with known binary compositions of Irganox 1010 and either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-L-phenylalanine in each layer were manufactured in a single batch and distributed to more than 20 participating laboratories. The samples were analyzed using argon cluster ion sputtering and either X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) or Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to generate depth profiles. Participants were asked to estimate the volume fractions in two of the layers and were provided with the compositions of all other layers. Participants using XPS provided volume fractions within 0.03 of the nominal values. Participants using ToF-SIMS either made no attempt, or used various methods that gave results ranging in error from 0.02 to over 0.10 in volume fraction, the latter representing a 50% relative error for a nominal volume fraction of 0.2. Error was predominantly caused by inadequacy in the ability to compensate for primary ion intensity variations and the matrix effect in SIMS. Matrix effects in these materials appear to be more pronounced as the number of atoms in both the primary analytical ion and the secondary ion increase. Using the participants’ data we show that organic SIMS matrix effects can be measured and are remarkably consistent between instruments. We provide recommendations for identifying and compensating for matrix effects. Finally we demonstrate, using a simple normalization method, that virtually all ToF-SIMS participants could have obtained estimates of volume fraction that were at least as accurate and consistent as XPS.

  19. Small scale temporal distribution of radiocesium in undisturbed coniferous forest soil: Radiocesium depth distribution profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramage, Mengistu T; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    The depth distribution of pre-Fukushima and Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in undisturbed coniferous forest soil was investigated at four sampling dates from nine months to 18 months after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The migration rate and short-term temporal variability among the sampling profiles were evaluated. Taking the time elapsed since the peak deposition of pre-Fukushima (137)Cs and the median depth of the peaks, its downward displacement rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.67 mm yr(-1) with a mean of 0.46 ± 0.25 mm yr(-1). On the other hand, in each examined profile considerable amount of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs was found in the organic layer (51%-92%). At this moment, the effect of time-distance on the downward distribution of Fukushima-derived (137)Cs seems invisible as its large portion is still found in layers where organic matter is maximal. This indicates that organic matter seems the primary and preferential sorbent of radiocesium that could be associated with the physical blockage of the exchanging sites by organic-rich dusts that act as a buffer against downward propagation of radiocesium, implying radiocesium to be remained in the root zone for considerable time period. As a result, this soil section can be a potential source of radiation dose largely due to high radiocesium concentration coupled with its low density. Generally, such kind of information will be useful to establish a dynamic safety-focused decision support system to ease and assist management actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxygen depth profiling using the 16O(d,α)14N nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khubeis, I.; Al-Rjob, R.

    1997-01-01

    The excitation function of the 16 O(d,α) 14 N nuclear reaction has been determined in the deuteron energy range of 0.88-2.28 MeV. Major resonances are observed at deuteron energies of 0.98, 1.31, 1.53, 1.60, 1.73 and 2.22 MeV. The present results show good agreement with those of Haase and Khubeis, however there is a shift of 60 keV in the first resonance compared with the measurements of Amsel. The use of a thin surface barrier detector (t=22 μm) and a bias voltage of +20 V coupled with a proper pile-up rejection circuit has allowed the determination of the oxygen depth profiling to a resolution of 16 nm for thick targets. This method is efficient in eliminating interferences from other nuclear reactions such as 16 O(d,p) 17 O and 12 C(d,p) 19 C, where emitted protons have severely obscured α-particles from the 16 O(d,α) 14 N reaction. A 1.08 MeV deuteron beam has been employed to increase the α-yield from the target. The target has been tilted at 70 to enhance depth resolution. This reaction is well suited for the determination of oxygen concentration in oxides of high temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  1. Depth analysis of mechanically machined flaws on steam generator tubings using multi-parameter algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam Gung, Chan; Lee, Yoon Sang; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2004-01-01

    The eddy current testing (ECT) is a nondestructive technique. It is used for evaluation of material's integrity, especially, steam generator (SG) tubing in nuclear plants, due to their rapid inspection, safe and easy operation. For depth measurement of defects, we prepared Electro Discharge Machined (EDM) notches that have several of defects and applied multi-parameter (MP) algorithm. It is a crack shape estimation program developed in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). To evaluate the MP algorithm, we compared defect profile with fractography of the defects. In the following sections, we described the basic structure of a computer-aided data analysis algorithm used as means of more accurate and efficient processing of ECT data, and explained the specification of a standard calibration. Finally, we discussed the accuracy of estimated depth profile compared with conventional ECT method

  2. Atom depth analysis delineates mechanisms of protein intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alocci, Davide; Bernini, Andrea; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •3D atom depth analysis is proposed to identify different layers in protein structures. •Amino acid contents for each layers have been analyzed for a large protein dataset. •Charged amino acids in the most external layer are present at very different extents. •Atom depth indexes of K residues reflect their side chains flexibility. •Mobile surface charges can be responsible for long range protein–protein recognition. -- Abstract: The systematic analysis of amino acid distribution, performed inside a large set of resolved protein structures, sheds light on possible mechanisms driving non random protein–protein approaches. Protein Data Bank entries have been selected using as filters a series of restrictions ensuring that the shape of protein surface is not modified by interactions with large or small ligands. 3D atom depth has been evaluated for all the atoms of the 2,410 selected structures. The amino acid relative population in each of the structural layers formed by grouping atoms on the basis of their calculated depths, has been evaluated. We have identified seven structural layers, the inner ones reproducing the core of proteins and the outer one incorporating their most protruding moieties. Quantitative analysis of amino acid contents of structural layers identified, as expected, different behaviors. Atoms of Q, R, K, N, D residues are increasingly more abundant in going from core to surfaces. An opposite trend is observed for V, I, L, A, C, and G. An intermediate behavior is exhibited by P, S, T, M, W, H, F and Y. The outer structural layer hosts predominantly E and K residues whose charged moieties, protruding from outer regions of the protein surface, reorient free from steric hindrances, determining specific electrodynamics maps. This feature may represent a protein signature for long distance effects, driving the formation of encounter complexes and the eventual short distance approaches that are required for protein

  3. Self-consistent depth profiling and imaging of GaN-based transistors using ion microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo-Cubero, A., E-mail: andres.redondo@uam.es [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal); Departamento de Física Aplicada y Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Corregidor, V. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal); Vázquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Alves, L.C. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Using an ion microprobe, a comprehensive lateral and in-depth characterization of a single GaN-based high electron mobility transistor is carried out by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in combination with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Elemental distribution was obtained for every individual section of the device (wafer, gate and source contact), identifying the basic constituents of the transistor (including the detection of the passivant layer) and checking its homogeneity. A self-consistent analysis of each individual regions of the transistor was carried out with a simultaneous fit of RBS and PIXE spectra with two different beam conditions. Following this approach, the quantification of the atomic content and the layer thicknesses was successfully achieved overcoming the mass-depth ambiguity of certain elements.

  4. Profile in various organic soil depth shrimp pond, Tambak Inti Rakyat, Karawang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Puji Hastuti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTOrganic material in the bottom of the pond is part of the land is a complex and dynamic system, which is sourced from the rest of the feed, plants, and or animals found in the soil that continuously change shape, because it is influenced by biology, physics, and chemistry. This study was aimed to see the profile of organic material consisting of C, N, and C/N ratio and phosphate in different depths of pond with different culture systems. Observation were conducted at Tambak Inti Rakyat, Karawang in traditional, semi-intensive and intensive culture systems. Observation at mangrove area was also observed as control. Sediment samples at the inlet and outlet at three different depths (0‒5 cm, 5‒10 cm, and 10‒15 cm was taken every 30 days to measure the content of C, N, C/N ratio, and total phosphate. During the 120 day maintenance period could be known that in all pond systems were used (traditional, semi-intensive, and intensive the concentration of C-organic and organic-N on average was located in the bottom layer which is a layer of 10‒15 cm. The lack of human intervention from ground pond system, the more diverse the type and amount of organic material contained therein.Keywords: organic materials, subgrade, depth, aquaculture systems, long maintenanceABSTRAKBahan organik di dasar tambak merupakan bagian dari tanah yang merupakan suatu sistem kompleks dan dinamis, yang bersumber dari sisa pakan, tanaman, dan atau binatang yang terdapat di dalam tanah yang terus menerus mengalami perubahan bentuk, karena dipengaruhi oleh faktor biologi, fisika, dan kimia. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melihat profil bahan organik yang terdiri dari C, N, dan C/N rasio serta fosfat pada kedalaman tambak yang berbeda dengan sistem budidaya yang berbeda pula. Pengamatan dilakukan di Tambak Inti Rakyat Karawang pada sistem budidaya tradisional, semi intensif, dan intensif. Pengamatan di daerah mangrove diamati pula sebagai kontrol. Sampel sedimen di

  5. Multiscale analysis of depth-dependent soil penetration resistance in a tropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva De Lima, Renato; Santos, Djail; Medeiros Bezerra, Joel; Machado Siqueira, Glécio; Paz González, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used because it is linked to basic soil properties; it is correlated to root growth and plant production and is also used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analyzed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 40 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in north-eastern Brazil. According to the Soil Taxonomy, the studied soil was classified as an Orthic Podsol The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. Singularity and Rènyi spectra showed the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to one indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV) and skewness of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean, maximum and minimum values of PR; these maps showed the multifractal approach also may complete information provided by descriptive statistics at the field scale.

  6. The penetrating depth analysis of Lunar Penetrating Radar onboard Chang’e-3 rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shu-Guo; Su, Yan; Feng, Jian-Qing; Dai, Shun; Xiao, Yuan; Ding, Chun-Yu; Li, Chun-Lai

    2017-04-01

    Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) has successfully been used to acquire a large amount of scientific data during its in-situ detection. The analysis of penetrating depth can help to determine whether the target is within the effective detection range and contribute to distinguishing useful echoes from noise. First, this study introduces two traditional methods, both based on a radar transmission equation, to calculate the penetrating depth. The only difference between the two methods is that the first method adopts system calibration parameters given in the calibration report and the second one uses high-voltage-off radar data. However, some prior knowledge and assumptions are needed in the radar equation and the accuracy of assumptions will directly influence the final results. Therefore, a new method termed the Correlation Coefficient Method (CCM) is provided in this study, which is only based on radar data without any a priori assumptions. The CCM can obtain the penetrating depth according to the different correlation between reflected echoes and noise. To be exact, there is a strong correlation in the useful reflected echoes and a random correlation in the noise between adjacent data traces. In addition, this method can acquire a variable penetrating depth along the profile of the rover, but only one single depth value can be obtained from traditional methods. Through a simulation, the CCM has been verified as an effective method to obtain penetration depth. The comparisons and analysis of the calculation results of these three methods are also implemented in this study. Finally, results show that the ultimate penetrating depth of Channel 1 and the estimated penetrating depth of Channel 2 range from 136.9 m to 165.5 m ({\\varepsilon }r=6.6) and from 13.0 m to 17.5 m ({\\varepsilon }r=2.3), respectively.

  7. What Can Radiocarbon Depth Profiles Tell Us About The LGM Circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, A.; Stewart, A.; Adkins, J. F.; Ferrari, R. M.; Thompson, A. F.; Jansen, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Published reconstructions of radiocarbon in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean indicate that there is a mid-depth maximum in radiocarbon age during the last glacial maximum (LGM). This is in contrast to the modern ocean where intense mixing between water masses along shared density surfaces (isopycnals) results in a relatively homogenous radiocarbon profile. A recent study (Ferrari et al. 2014) suggested that the extended Antarctic sea ice cover during the LGM necessitated a shallower boundary between the upper and lower branches of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). This shoaled boundary lay above major topographic features and their associated strong diapycnal mixing, which isolated dense southern-sourced water in the lower branch of the overturning circulation. This isolation would have allowed radiocarbon to decay, and thus provides a possible explanation for the mid-depth radiocarbon age bulge. We test this hypothesis using an idealized, 2D, residual-mean dynamical model of the global overturning circulation. Concentration distributions of a decaying tracer that is advected by the simulated overturning are compared to published radiocarbon data. We test the sensitivity of the mid-depth radiocarbon age to changes in sea ice extent, wind strength, and isopycnal and diapycnal diffusion. The mid-depth radiocarbon age bulge is most likely caused by the different circulation geometry, associated with increased sea ice extent. In particular, with an LGM-like sea ice extent the upper and lower branches of the MOC no longer share isopycnals, so radiocarbon-rich northern-sourced water is no longer mixed rapidly into the southern-sourced water. However, this process alone cannot explain the magnitude of the glacial radiocarbon anomalies; additional isolation (e.g. from reduced air-sea gas exchange associated with the increased sea ice) is required. Ferrari, R., M. F. Jansen, J. F. Adkins, A. Burke, A. L. Stewart, and A. F. Thompson (2014), Antarctic sea

  8. Modulation depth analysis in fast pulsations of solar radio emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, G.P.; Kurts, Yu.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin

    1990-01-01

    A model of millisecond pulsations due to a pulsation regime of a whistler spectrum is confirmed by the statistical analysis of the modulation depth in five type IV bursts; a modulation depth distribution ΔI/I versus the period (p) grows linearly (with the different slope) up to the maximum at the value ΔI/I ≅ 0.5-0.6. The same dependence ΔI/I(p) for spikes, observed during the same events, testifies also in favour of this model. The overlap on fast pulsations of fiber bursts and of sudden reductions are displayed in the ΔI/I(p) distribution by diffuse tails which are naturally explained by the known models of this fine structure

  9. He, U, and Th Depth Profiling of Apatite and Zircon Using Laser Ablation Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry and SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, B. D.; van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.; Hervig, R.; Boyce, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Conventional (U-Th)/He thermochronology utilizes single or multiple grain analyses of U- and Th-bearing minerals such as apatite and zircon and does not allow for assessment of spatial variation in concentration of He, U, or Th within individual crystals. As such, age calculation and interpretation require assumptions regarding 4He loss through alpha ejection, diffusive redistribution of 4He, and U and Th distribution as an initial condition for these processes. Although models have been developed to predict 4He diffusion parameters, correct for the effect of alpha ejection on calculated cooling ages, and account for the effect of U and Th zonation within apatite and zircon, measurements of 4He, U, and Th distribution have not been combined within a single crystal. We apply ArF excimer laser ablation, combined with noble gas mass spectrometry, to obtain depth profiles within apatite and zircon crystals in order to assess variations in 4He concentration with depth. Our initial results from pre-cut, pre-heated slabs of Durango apatite, each subjected to different T-t schedules, suggest a general agreement of 4He profiles with those predicted by theoretical diffusion models (Farley, 2000). Depth profiles through unpolished grains give reproducible alpha ejection profiles in Durango apatite that deviate from alpha ejection profiles predicted for ideal, homogenous crystals. SIMS depth profiling utilizes an O2 primary beam capable of sputtering tens of microns and measuring sub-micron resolution variation in [U], [Th], and [Sm]. Preliminary results suggest that sufficient [U] and [Th] zonation is present in Durango apatite to influence the form of the 4He alpha ejection profile. Future work will assess the influence of measured [U] and [Th] zonation on previously measured 4He depth profiles. Farley, K.A., 2000. Helium diffusion from apatite; general behavior as illustrated by Durango fluorapatite. J. Geophys. Res., B Solid Earth Planets 105 (2), 2903-2914.

  10. Depth profiling of oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures by slant etching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Kazunari; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Kazunori [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Science and Technology; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the depth profile of trapped charges in an oxide layer on SiC. Using this method, 6H-SiC MOS structures with different oxide thickness were fabricated on the same substrate under the same oxidation condition, and the depth profile of oxide-trapped charges before and after {sup 60}Co-gamma ray irradiation were obtained. It is found, from the depth profiling, that the trapping mechanism of electrons and holes in the oxide strongly depends on the bias polarity during irradiation, and these charges are trapped near 6H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. We believe that this method is very useful for estimation of the oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures. (author)

  11. Depth data research of GIS based on clustering analysis algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Xu, Wenli

    2018-03-01

    The data of GIS have spatial distribution. Geographic data has both spatial characteristics and attribute characteristics, and also changes with time. Therefore, the amount of data is very large. Nowadays, many industries and departments in the society are using GIS. However, without proper data analysis and mining scheme, GIS will not exert its maximum effectiveness and will waste a lot of data. In this paper, we use the geographic information demand of a national security department as the experimental object, combining the characteristics of GIS data, taking into account the characteristics of time, space, attributes and so on, and using cluster analysis algorithm. We further study the mining scheme for depth data, and get the algorithm model. This algorithm can automatically classify sample data, and then carry out exploratory analysis. The research shows that the algorithm model and the information mining scheme can quickly find hidden depth information from the surface data of GIS, thus improving the efficiency of the security department. This algorithm can also be extended to other fields.

  12. On-the-fly depth profiling during ablation with ultrashort laser pulses: A tool for accurate micromachining and laser surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lausten, Rune; Balling, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A method for accurate depth profiling of a region subjected to ablation with ultrashort laser pulses is demonstrated. Time-gated imaging of the backscattered radiation from the ablation region is performed in a geometry, which allows the depth along a chosen axis on the sample to be determined with a single measurement. The profiling system has a spatial resolution of a few micrometers and applications are promoted by the fact that the measurement is performed with the same pulse that undertakes ablation. This also indicates that the method is inherently suited for in situ on-the-fly measurements. Copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  13. Structural and magnetic depth profiles of magneto-ionic heterostructures beyond the interface limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, DA; Grutter, AJ; Arenholz, E; Liu, K; Kirby, BJ; Borchers, JA; Maranville, BB

    2016-07-22

    Electric field control of magnetism provides a promising route towards ultralow power information storage and sensor technologies. The effects of magneto-ionic motion have been prominently featured in the modification of interface characteristics. Here, we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling moderated by voltage-driven oxygen migration beyond the interface in relatively thick AlOx/GdOx/Co(15 nm) films. Oxygen migration and Co magnetization are quantitatively mapped with polarized neutron reflectometry under electro-thermal conditioning. The depth-resolved profiles uniquely identify interfacial and bulk behaviours and a semi-reversible control of the magnetization. Magnetometry measurements suggest changes in the microstructure which disrupt long-range ferromagnetic ordering, resulting in an additional magnetically soft phase. X-ray spectroscopy confirms changes in the Co oxidation state, but not in the Gd, suggesting that the GdOx transmits oxygen but does not source or sink it. These results together provide crucial insight into controlling magnetism via magneto-ionic motion, both at interfaces and throughout the bulk of the films.

  14. Depth profiling of marker layers using x-ray waveguide structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ajay; Rajput, Parasmani; Saraiya, Amit; Reddy, V. R.; Gupta, Mukul; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Amenitsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated that x-ray waveguide structures can be used for depth profiling of a marker layer inside the guiding layer with an accuracy of better than 0.2 nm. A combination of x-ray fluorescence and x-ray reflectivity measurements can provide detailed information about the structure of the guiding layer. The position and thickness of the marker layer affect different aspects of the angle-dependent x-ray fluorescence pattern, thus making it possible to determine the structure of the marker layer in an unambiguous manner. As an example, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation on a Si/M/Si trilayer (M=Fe, W), forming the cavity of the waveguide structure, have been studied. It is found that in accordance with the prediction of thermal spike model, Fe is much more sensitive to swift heavy ion induced modifications as compared to W, even in thin film form. However, a clear evidence of movement of the Fe marker layer towards the surface is observed after irradiation, which cannot be understood in terms of the thermal spike model alone

  15. Depth profiling of marker layers using x-ray waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ajay; Rajput, Parasmani; Saraiya, Amit; Reddy, V. R.; Gupta, Mukul; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Amenitsch, H.

    2005-08-01

    It is demonstrated that x-ray waveguide structures can be used for depth profiling of a marker layer inside the guiding layer with an accuracy of better than 0.2 nm. A combination of x-ray fluorescence and x-ray reflectivity measurements can provide detailed information about the structure of the guiding layer. The position and thickness of the marker layer affect different aspects of the angle-dependent x-ray fluorescence pattern, thus making it possible to determine the structure of the marker layer in an unambiguous manner. As an example, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation on a Si/M/Si trilayer ( M=Fe , W), forming the cavity of the waveguide structure, have been studied. It is found that in accordance with the prediction of thermal spike model, Fe is much more sensitive to swift heavy ion induced modifications as compared to W, even in thin film form. However, a clear evidence of movement of the Fe marker layer towards the surface is observed after irradiation, which cannot be understood in terms of the thermal spike model alone.

  16. Electron beam and optical depth profiling of quasibulk GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, L.; Osinsky, A.; Nootz, G.; Schulte, A.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Look, D. C.; Molnar, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam and optical depth profiling of thick (5.5--64 μm) quasibulk n-type GaN samples, grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy, were carried out using electron beam induced current (EBIC), microphotoluminescence (PL), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minority carrier diffusion length, L, was found to increase linearly from 0.25 μm, at a distance of about 5 μm from the GaN/sapphire interface, to 0.63 μm at the GaN surface, for a 36-μm-thick sample. The increase in L was accompanied by a corresponding increase in PL band-to-band radiative transition intensity as a function of distance from the GaN/sapphire interface. We attribute the latter changes in PL intensity and minority carrier diffusion length to a reduced carrier mobility and lifetime at the interface, due to scattering at threading dislocations. The results of EBIC and PL measurements are in good agreement with the values for dislocation density obtained using TEM

  17. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  18. Arabian Sea GEOSECS stations revisited: Tracer-depth profiles reveal temporal variations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulsow, S.; Povinec, P.P.; Somayajulu, B.L.K.

    2002-01-01

    In March-April 1998, the Physical Research Laboratory and the Regional Research Laboratory (Ahmedabad, India) together with the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory, Monaco, participated in the research mission to visit GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Study) stations in the Arabian Sea. The main objective was to reoccupy these stations which were sampled in the early seventies to observe possible time variations in trace behaviour in this region. It is generally accepted that both natural (climate variations) and anthropogenic (greenhouse effect) changes can cause modifications of the oceanic characteristics and properties of deep waters on yearly and decadal scales. For long time-scales (100 to 1000 years) one needs to look at the sediments where these changes are subtly recorded. Tracers such as 14 C and 3 H (deep waters) and 228 Ra surface waters are useful markers of water circulation patterns and changes. Also man-made radiotracers such as 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 99 Tc, 238 Pu, 239 , 240 Pu and 241 Am, can give information on air-sea exchange as well as penetration (vertical change) rates in the open ocean [2]. We visited GEOSECS stations 415 to 419. In each station, CTD profiles, 3 H, 14 C, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, Pu and Am profiles, nutrients, Be, TOC and oxygen were determined from surface to bottom. Also uranium and trace elements were sampled in function of the oxygen minimum zone. In this paper we report the findings on the physical properties as well as the variations in water circulation patterns and also vertical exchange rates in the Arabian Sea. PSU profiles collected in this mission compared with those PSU profiles measured in 1974 (GEOSECS) showed marked differences in those stations located in the southeast part of the Arabian Sea. In contrast, those located more towards the north (415-416) showed little temporal variation. We think these changes may be real given that the PSU values at depth are comparable and reflect the presence of deep Antarctic bottom

  19. Buoyancy frequency profiles and internal semidiurnal tide turning depths in the oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, B.; Stone, M.; Zhang, H.P.; Gerkema, T.; Marder, M.; Scott, R.B.; Swinney, H.L.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the possible existence of internal gravity wave "turning depths," depths below which the local buoyancy frequency N(z) becomes smaller than the wave frequency. At a turning depth, incident gravity waves reflect rather than reaching the ocean bottom as is generally assumed. Here we

  20. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingerle, D., E-mail: dingerle@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Meirer, F. [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG Utrecht (Netherlands); Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D. [MiNALab, CMM-irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  1. Multicriteria Similarity-Based Anomaly Detection Using Pareto Depth Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ko-Jen; Xu, Kevin S; Calder, Jeff; Hero, Alfred O

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of identifying patterns in a data set that exhibits anomalous behavior, often referred to as anomaly detection. Similarity-based anomaly detection algorithms detect abnormally large amounts of similarity or dissimilarity, e.g., as measured by the nearest neighbor Euclidean distances between a test sample and the training samples. In many application domains, there may not exist a single dissimilarity measure that captures all possible anomalous patterns. In such cases, multiple dissimilarity measures can be defined, including nonmetric measures, and one can test for anomalies by scalarizing using a nonnegative linear combination of them. If the relative importance of the different dissimilarity measures are not known in advance, as in many anomaly detection applications, the anomaly detection algorithm may need to be executed multiple times with different choices of weights in the linear combination. In this paper, we propose a method for similarity-based anomaly detection using a novel multicriteria dissimilarity measure, the Pareto depth. The proposed Pareto depth analysis (PDA) anomaly detection algorithm uses the concept of Pareto optimality to detect anomalies under multiple criteria without having to run an algorithm multiple times with different choices of weights. The proposed PDA approach is provably better than using linear combinations of the criteria, and shows superior performance on experiments with synthetic and real data sets.

  2. Ion beam sputtering and depth profiling: on the characteristics of the induced roughness and the means to cure it at best

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.; Maurice, F.; Zemskoff, A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the present communication is to report the first results of a study devoted to the understanding of the surface roughness due either to statistical fluctuations in sputtering or sample microstructural inhomogeneities. In a second part, we shall propose a new method to correct the experimental profiles from the blurring effect of the sample roughness in typical cases of in-depth analysis

  3. Excess carrier depths profiles in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorbers from spectral photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenne, Nils; Knabe, Sebastian; Bauer, Gottfried H. [Institute of Physics, CvO University Oldenburg (Germany); Witte, Wolfram; Hariskos, Dimitrios [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany); Meeder, Alexander [SULFURCELL Solartechnik GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The polycrystalline structure of chalcopyrite absorbers, such as Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} and their complex metallurgical composition results in lateral and depth dependent inhomogeneities. The spectral photoluminescence (PL) recorded from front and rear side of these chalcopyrite thin-film systems shows a distinct different behavior in particular of the high energy PL-wing which is strongly governed by absorption/emission approaching unity, as well as by re-absorption of emitted PL-photons and their depth dependent origin, say excess carrier depth profile. We define a contrast parameter for the high energy PL-yield of the fluxes recorded from front side and rear side and we proof the origin of the experimental contrast with numerical simulations of spectral PL-yields via Planck's generalized law for different depth profiles of excess carriers and band gap/absorption coefficients. By comparison of experimental contrast parameters with results from numerical simulations we conclude a set of regimes of realistic combinations of depth profiles for excess carriers and band gaps.

  4. Nanometric resolution in glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiling of metal (Cr, Al) nitride multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; Gago, R.; Fornies, E.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Climent Font, A.; Albella, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we address the capability of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) for fast and accurate depth profiling of multilayer nitride coatings down to the nanometer range. This is shown by resolving the particular case of CrN/AlN structures with individual thickness ranging from hundreds to few nanometers. In order to discriminate and identify artefacts in the GDOES depth profile due to the sputtering process, the layered structures were verified by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfaces in the GDOES profiles for CrN/AlN structures are sharper than the ones measured for similar metal multilayers due to the lower sputtering rate of the nitrides. However, as a consequence of the crater shape, there is a linear degradation of the depth resolution with depth (approximately 40 nm/μm), saturating at a value of approximately half the thickness of the thinner layer. This limit is imposed by the simultaneous sputtering of consecutive layers. The ultimate GDOES depth resolution at the near surface region was estimated to be of 4-6 nm

  5. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations : part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; George, Nibu A.; Qiu, Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K.

    2009-01-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is

  6. Leak on a steam generator tube: in-depth analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.; Deotto, G.; Mathon, C.; Madurel, A.; Pitner, P.; Gay, N.; Guivarch, M.

    2015-01-01

    A circumferential through crack was observed on a steam generator tube of the unit 2 of the Fessenheim plant. Destructive tests showed that the crack was due to cycle fatigue combined with the presence of inter-granular corrosion zones. An in-depth analysis based on simulations shows that the combination of 5 elements caused the crack. First, a specific position of the anti-vibration bar near this tube, secondly, a local presence of fouling, these 2 first elements led to an increase of the tube vibratory level. Thirdly, the 600 MA alloy used is known to be susceptible to corrosion. Fourthly, the trapping of chemical species on the secondary circuit side due to the presence of interstices on the crosspiece and fifthly, the presence of spots where inter-granular corrosion developed. (A.C.)

  7. Depth of manual dismantling analysis: A cost–benefit approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achillas, Ch., E-mail: c.achillas@ihu.edu.gr [School of Economics and Business Administration, International Hellenic University, 14th km Thessaloniki-Moudania, 57001 Thermi (Greece); Aidonis, D. [Department of Logistics, Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Branch of Katerini, 60100 Katerini (Greece); Vlachokostas, Ch.; Karagiannidis, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Loulos, V. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Box 483, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A mathematical modeling tool for OEMs. ► The tool can be used by OEMs, recyclers of electr(on)ic equipment or WEEE management systems’ regulators. ► The tool makes use of cost–benefit analysis in order to determine the optimal depth of product disassembly. ► The reusable materials and the quantity of metals and plastics recycled can be quantified in an easy-to-comprehend manner. - Abstract: This paper presents a decision support tool for manufacturers and recyclers towards end-of-life strategies for waste electrical and electronic equipment. A mathematical formulation based on the cost benefit analysis concept is herein analytically described in order to determine the parts and/or components of an obsolete product that should be either non-destructively recovered for reuse or be recycled. The framework optimally determines the depth of disassembly for a given product, taking into account economic considerations. On this basis, it embeds all relevant cost elements to be included in the decision-making process, such as recovered materials and (depreciated) parts/components, labor costs, energy consumption, equipment depreciation, quality control and warehousing. This tool can be part of the strategic decision-making process in order to maximize profitability or minimize end-of-life management costs. A case study to demonstrate the models’ applicability is presented for a typical electronic product in terms of structure and material composition. Taking into account the market values of the pilot product’s components, the manual disassembly is proven profitable with the marginal revenues from recovered reusable materials to be estimated at 2.93–23.06 €, depending on the level of disassembly.

  8. Depth of manual dismantling analysis: A cost–benefit approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achillas, Ch.; Aidonis, D.; Vlachokostas, Ch.; Karagiannidis, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Loulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A mathematical modeling tool for OEMs. ► The tool can be used by OEMs, recyclers of electr(on)ic equipment or WEEE management systems’ regulators. ► The tool makes use of cost–benefit analysis in order to determine the optimal depth of product disassembly. ► The reusable materials and the quantity of metals and plastics recycled can be quantified in an easy-to-comprehend manner. - Abstract: This paper presents a decision support tool for manufacturers and recyclers towards end-of-life strategies for waste electrical and electronic equipment. A mathematical formulation based on the cost benefit analysis concept is herein analytically described in order to determine the parts and/or components of an obsolete product that should be either non-destructively recovered for reuse or be recycled. The framework optimally determines the depth of disassembly for a given product, taking into account economic considerations. On this basis, it embeds all relevant cost elements to be included in the decision-making process, such as recovered materials and (depreciated) parts/components, labor costs, energy consumption, equipment depreciation, quality control and warehousing. This tool can be part of the strategic decision-making process in order to maximize profitability or minimize end-of-life management costs. A case study to demonstrate the models’ applicability is presented for a typical electronic product in terms of structure and material composition. Taking into account the market values of the pilot product’s components, the manual disassembly is proven profitable with the marginal revenues from recovered reusable materials to be estimated at 2.93–23.06 €, depending on the level of disassembly

  9. Micro-Raman depth profile investigations of beveled Al+-ion implanted 6H-SiC samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, J.; Romanek, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2009-01-01

    6H-SiC single crystals were implanted with 450 keV Al + -ions to a fluence of 3.4 x 10 15 cm -2 , and in a separate experiment subjected to multiple Al + implantations with the four energies: 450, 240, 115 and 50 keV and different fluences to obtain rectangular-like depth distributions of Al in SiC. The implantations were performed along [0 0 0 1] channeling and non-channeling ('random') directions. Subsequently, the samples were annealed for 10 min at 1650 deg. C in an argon atmosphere. The depth profiles of the implanted Al atoms were obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Following implantation and annealing, the samples were beveled by mechanical polishing. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopic investigations were performed with a 532 nm wavelength laser beam of a 1 μm focus diameter. The technique was used to determine precisely the depth profiles of TO and LO phonon lines intensity in the beveled samples to a depth of about 2000 nm. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was also found to be useful in monitoring very low levels of disorder remaining in the Al + implanted and annealed 6H-SiC samples. The micro-Raman technique combined with sample beveling also made it possible the determination of optical absorption coefficient profiles in implanted subsurface layers.

  10. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Gardner, D.; Prachuktam, S.; Chang, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdown. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered since the material is non-notch sensitive. Non-linear finite element analyses are carried out to determine the burst pressures of steam generator tubes containing longitudinal cracks located on the outer surface of the tubes. The non-linearities considered herein include elastic-plastic material behaviour and large deformations. A non-proprietary general purpose non-linear finite element program, NFAP was adopted for the analysis. Due to the asymmetric nature of the cracks, two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional finite element analyses, were performed. The analysis clearly shows that for short cracks axial effects play a significant role. For long cracks, they are not important since two-dimensional conditions predominate and failure is governed by circumferential or hoop stress conditions. (Auth.)

  11. Distribution of 137Cs in benthic plants along depth profiles in the outer Puck Bay (Baltic Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamara Zalewska

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted on three macroalgae species: Polysiphonia fucoides and Furcellaria lumbricalis, the species of the red algae division, and Cladophora glomerata, representing the green algae division, as well as Zostera marina, representing vascular plants. The main aim of the study was to recognize the level of 137 Cs concentrations in the plants, which could be used as a measurement of bioaccumulation efficiency in the selected macrophytes at varying depths, and in the seasonal resolution of the vegetation period: spring-summer and autumnal. The plants' biomass clearly showed seasonal variability, as did the 137 Cs concentrations in the plants. Cesium activity also changed with depth. Seasonal variability in radionuclide content in the plants, as well as the differences in its activity determined along the depth profile, were related mainly to the plant biomass and the dilution effect caused by the biomass increment and reflected the growth dynamics. P. fucoides showed much greater bioaccumulation ability at each depth as compared to C. glomerata, a green algae. Lower concentrations of 137 Cs were also identified in F. lumbricalis and in Z. marina, mostly as a result of differences in morphology and physiology. P. fucoides can be recommended as a bioindicator for the monitoring of 137 Cs contamination due to the high efficiency of bioaccumulation and the available biomass along the depth profile, as well as the occurrence throughout the entire vegetation season. (author)

  12. SIMS as a new methodology to depth profile helium in as-implanted and annealed pure bcc metals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorondy-Novak, S. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jomard, F. [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, UVSQ, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles cedex (France); Prima, F. [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech – CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 75005 Paris (France); Lefaix-Jeuland, H., E-mail: helene.lefaix@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-05-01

    Reliable He profiles are highly desirable for better understanding helium behavior in materials for future nuclear applications. Recently, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) allowed the characterization of helium distribution in as-implanted metallic systems. The Cs{sup +} primary ion beam coupled with CsHe{sup +} molecular detector appeared to be a promising technique which overcomes the very high He ionization potential. In this study, {sup 4}He depth profiles in pure body centered cubic (bcc) metals (V, Fe, Ta, Nb and Mo) as-implanted and annealed, were obtained by SIMS. All as-implanted samples exhibited a projected range of around 200 nm, in agreement with SRIM theoretical calculations. After annealing treatment, SIMS measurements evidenced the evolution of helium depth profile with temperature. The latter SIMS results were compared to the helium bubble distribution obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This study confirmed the great potential of this experimental procedure as a He-depth profiling technique in bcc metals. Indeed, the methodology described in this work could be extended to other materials including metallic and non-metallic compounds. Nevertheless, the quantification of helium concentration after annealing treatment by SIMS remains uncertain probably due to the non-uniform ionization efficiency in samples containing large bubbles.

  13. Depth profile investigation of the incorporated iron atoms during Kr{sup +} ion beam sputtering on Si (001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbabaee, B., E-mail: khanbabaee@physik.uni-siegen.de [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Arezki, B.; Biermanns, A. [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Cornejo, M.; Hirsch, D. [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e. V. (IOM), Permoserstraße 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D. [Abteilung Physik, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Frost, F. [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e. V. (IOM), Permoserstraße 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Pietsch, U. [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the incorporation of iron atoms during nano-patterning of Si surfaces induced by 2 keV Kr{sup +} ion beam erosion under an off-normal incidence angle of 15°. Considering the low penetration depth of the ions, we have used X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) under grazing-incidence angles in order to determine the depth profile and phase composition of the incorporated iron atoms in the near surface region, complemented by secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. XRR analysis shows the accumulation of metallic atoms within a near surface layer of a few nanometer thickness. We verify that surface pattern formation takes place only when the co-sputtered Fe concentration exceeds a certain limit. For high Fe concentration, the ripple formation is accompanied by the enhancement of Fe close to the surface, whereas no Fe enhancement is found for low Fe concentration at samples with smooth surfaces. Modeling of the measured XANES spectra reveals the appearance of different silicide phases with decreasing Fe content from the top towards the volume. - Highlights: ► We investigate the incorporation of iron atoms during nano-patterning of Si surfaces. ► Pattern formation occurs when the areal density of Fe exceeds a certain threshold. ► X-ray reflectivity shows a layering at near surface due to incorporated Fe atoms. ► It is shown that the patterning is accompanied with the appearance of Fe-rich silicide.

  14. SIMS of Organic Materials—Interface Location in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles Using Negative Secondary Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, R.; Seah, M. P.; Tiddia, M.; Gilmore, I. S.

    2018-02-01

    A procedure has been established to define the interface position in depth profiles accurately when using secondary ion mass spectrometry and the negative secondary ions. The interface position varies strongly with the extent of the matrix effect and so depends on the secondary ion measured. Intensity profiles have been measured at both fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-uc(l)-pentafluorophenylalanine (FMOC) to Irganox 1010 and Irganox 1010 to FMOC interfaces for many secondary ions. These profiles show separations of the two interfaces that vary over some 10 nm depending on the secondary ion selected. The shapes of these profiles are strongly governed by matrix effects, slightly weakened by a long wavelength roughening. The matrix effects are separately measured using homogeneous, known mixtures of these two materials. Removal of the matrix and roughening effects give consistent compositional profiles for all ions that are described by an integrated exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) profile. Use of a simple integrated Gaussian may lead to significant errors. The average interface positions in the compositional profiles are determined to standard uncertainties of 0.19 and 0.14 nm, respectively, using the integrated EMG function. Alternatively, and more simply, it is shown that interface positions and profiles may be deduced from data for several secondary ions with measured matrix factors by simply extrapolating the result to Ξ = 0. Care must be taken in quoting interface resolutions since those measured for predominantly Gaussian interfaces with Ξ above or below zero, without correction, appear significantly better than the true resolution.

  15. Use of nuclear reactions and ion channeling techniques for depth profiling hydrogen isotopes in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen has always played a preeminent role in materials science because it so readily alters the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, it is often difficult to determine its role because it is one of the most elusive constituents to detect. More recently hydrogen detection has become necessary in numerous energy-related fields. In fusion energy one must understand plasma particle (hydrogen isotope) recycling, trapping and reemission, as well as the effects of hydrogen on the materials properties of first wall structures in plasma devices (i.e., hydrogen embrittlement, sputtering, blistering, etc.). In geology the presence of hydrogen in various forms alters the mechanical properties of many minerals in the earth's crust and enters directly into studies of tectonic processes. Evaluation of hydrogen in moon rocks increases our understanding of solar wind activity. In solar energy, hydrogen plays an important role in amorphous silicon used in fabricating solar cells. Detection of hydrogen is clearly important in the fossil fuel area. Many of the conventional elemental analysis techniques are not directly applicable to hydrogen determination and others can only detect hydrogen when it is in combination with other elements (i.e., H 2 O, OH, etc.). In this paper we discuss the use of ion beam techniques for obtaining quantitative depth information on hydrogen in materials and discuss the application of these techniques to several problems important in some of the areas mentioned

  16. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Gardner, D.; Prachuktam, S.; Chang, T.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdowns. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered since the material is non-notch sensitive. Non-linear finite element analyses are carried out to determine the burst pressures of steam generator tubes containing longitudinal cracks located on the outer surface of the tubes. The non-linearities considered herein include elastic-plastic material behavior and large deformations. A non-proprietary general purpose non-linear finite element program, NFAP was adopted for the analysis. Due to the asymmetric nature of the cracks, two-dimensional, as well as three-dimensional finite element analyses, were performed. The two-dimensional element and its formulations are similar to those of NONSAP. The three-dimensional isoparametric element with elastic-plastic material characteristics together with the large deformation formulations used in NFAP are described in the Report BNL-20684. The numerical accuracy of the program was investigated and checked with known solutions of benchmark problems. In addition to the three-dimensional element which was specifically inserted into NFAP for this problem, other features such as direct pressure inputs for isoparametric elements, automatic load increment adjustments for convergent non-linear solutions, and automatic bandwidth reduction schemes are incorporated into the program thus allowing for a more economical evaluation of three-dimensional inelastic analysis. In summary the analysis clearly shows that for short cracks axial effects play a significant role. For long cracks, they are not important since two-dimensional conditions predominate and failure is governed by circumferential or hoop stress conditions

  17. Curie Depth Analysis of the Salton Sea Region, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickus, Kevin; Hussein, Musa

    2016-02-01

    Aeromagnetic data were analyzed to determine the bottom of magnetic bodies that might be related to the Curie point depth (CPD) by 2D spectral and 3D inversion methods within the Salton Trough and the surrounding region in southern California. The bottom of the magnetic bodies for 55 × 55 km windows varied in depth between 11 and 23 km in depth using 2D spectral methods. Since the 55 × 55 km square window may include both shallow and deep source, a 3D inversion method was used to provide better resolution of the bottom of the magnetic bodies. The 3D models indicate the depth to the bottom of the magnetic bodies varied between 5 and 23 km. Even though both methods produced similar results, the 3D inversion method produced higher resolution of the CPD depths. The shallowest depths (5-8 km) occur along and west of the Brawley Seismic Zone and the southwestern portion of the Imperial Valley. The source of these shallow CPD values may be related to geothermal systems including hydrothermal circulation and/or partially molten material. Additionally, shallow CPD depths (7-12 km) were found in a northwest-trending zone in the center of the Salton Trough. These depths coincide with previous seismic analyses that indicated a lower crustal low velocity region which is believed to be caused by partially molten material. Lower velocity zones in several regions may be related to fracturing and/or hydrothermal fluids. If the majority of these shallow depths are related to temperature, they are likely associated with the CPD, and the partially molten material extends over a wider zone than previously known. Greater depths within the Salton Trough coincide with the base of basaltic material and/or regions of intense metamorphism intruded by mafic material in the middle/lower crust.

  18. Assessment of Zooplankton Community Composition along a Depth Profile in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2015-01-01

    community. The genus Corycaeus had a higher proportion of reads in the epipelagic zone with Pleuromamma becoming increasingly dominant with depth. No significant difference was observed in the community between night and day sampling however there was a

  19. Characterization of oxide layers on amorphous Mg-based alloys by Auger electron spectroscopy with sputter depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baunack, S.; Wolff, U. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstoffforschung Dresden, Postfach 270016, 01171, Dresden (Germany); Subba Rao, R.V. [Indira Ghandi Centre for Atomic Research, 603 102, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2003-04-01

    Amorphous ribbons of Mg-Y-TM-[Ag](TM: Cu, Ni), prepared by melt spinning, were subjected to electrochemical investigations. Oxide layers formed anodically under potentiostatic control in different electrolytes were investigated by AES and sputter depth profiling. Problems and specific features of characterization of the composition of oxide layers and amorphous ternary or quaternary Mg-based alloys have been investigated. In the alloys the Mg(KL{sub 23}L{sub 23}) peak exhibits a different shape compared to that in the pure element. Analysis of the peak of elastically scattered electrons proved the absence of plasmon loss features, characteristic of pure Mg, in the alloy. A different loss feature emerges in Mg(KL{sub 23}L{sub 23}) and Cu(L{sub 23}VV). The system Mg-Y-TM-[Ag] suffers preferential sputtering. Depletion of Mg and enrichment of TM and Y are found. This is attributed mainly to the preferential sputtering of Mg. Thickness and composition of the formed oxide layer depend on the electrochemical treatment. After removing the oxide by sputtering the concentration of the underlying alloy was found to be affected by the treatment. (orig.)

  20. Roughness development in the depth profiling with 500 eV O2+ beam with the combination of oxygen flooding and sample rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui, D.; Xing, Z.X.; Huang, Y.H.; Mo, Z.Q.; Hua, Y.N.; Zhao, S.P.; Cha, L.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Roughness development is one of the most often addressed issues in the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ultra-shallow depth profiling. The effect of oxygen flooding pressure on the roughness development has been investigated under the bombardment of 500 eV O 2 + beam with simultaneous sample rotation. Oxygen flooding had two competing effects on the surface roughening, i.e., enhancement of initiating roughening and suppression of roughening development, which were suggested to be described by the onset depth z on and transient width w tr of surface roughening. Both z on and w tr decreased as oxygen flooding pressure increased. As the result, surface roughening was most pronounced at the intermediate pressure from 4.4E-5 Pa to 5.8E-5 Pa. The surface roughening is negligible while without flooding or with flooding at the saturated pressure. No flooding is preferable for depth profiling ultra-shallow B implantation because of the better B profile shape and short analysis time

  1. Depth profiling of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiO{sub 2} nanolaminates by means of a time-of-flight energy spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, M., E-mail: mikko.i.laitinen@jyu.fi [Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Sajavaara, T., E-mail: timo.sajavaara@jyu.fi [Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rossi, M., E-mail: mikko.rossi@jyu.fi [Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Julin, J., E-mail: jaakko.julin@jyu.fi [Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Puurunen, R.L., E-mail: riikka.puurunen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Suni, T., E-mail: tommi.suni@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tietotie 3, FI-02150 Espoo (Finland); Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, ew304, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8505 Tokyo (Japan); Ishida, T., E-mail: tadashii@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, ew304, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8505 Tokyo (Japan); Fujita, H., E-mail: fujita@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, ew304, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8505 Tokyo (Japan); Arstila, K., E-mail: kai.arstila@imec.be [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, Leuven 3001 (Belgium); Brijs, B., E-mail: bert.brijs@imec.be [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, Leuven 3001 (Belgium); Whitlow, H.J., E-mail: harry.j.whitlow@jyu.fi [Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is currently a widespread method to grow conformal thin films with a sub-nm thickness control. By using ALD for nanolaminate oxides, it is possible to fine tune the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of thin films. In this study the elemental depth profiles and surface roughnesses were determined for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiO{sub 2} nanolaminates with nominal single-layer thicknesses of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 nm and total thickness between 40 nm and 60 nm. The depth profiles were measured by means of a time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-ERDA) spectrometer recently installed at the University of Jyvaeskylae. In TOF-E measurements {sup 63}Cu, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He ions with energies ranging from 0.5 to 10 MeV, were used and depth profiles of the whole nanolaminate film could be analyzed down to 5 nm individual layer thickness.

  2. Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy: The Measurement of VX Depth Profiles in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin and the Evaluation of RSDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    USAMRICD-TR-15-01 Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy: The Measurement of VX Depth Profiles in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin and the Evaluation...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER guinea pig skin and the evaluation of RSDL 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Braue, EH...upper skin layers of hairless guinea pigs and to determine the ability of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) to remove or degrade VX from

  3. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of sputtering induced surface roughness and its influence on AES depth profiles of polycrystalline Ni/Cu multilayer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X.L.; Coetsee, E. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P O Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063, Guangdong (China); Swart, H.C., E-mail: swartHC@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P O Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Terblans, J.J., E-mail: terblansjj@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P O Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Linear Least Square (LLS) method used to separate Ni and Cu Auger spectra. • The depth-dependent ion sputtering induced roughness was quantitatively evaluated. • The depth resolution better when profiling with dual-ion beam vs. a single-ion beam. • AES depth profiling with a lower ion energy results in a better depth resolution. - Abstract: The polycrystalline Ni/Cu multilayer thin films consisting of 8 alternating layers of Ni and Cu were deposited on a SiO{sub 2} substrate by means of electron beam evaporation in a high vacuum. Concentration-depth profiles of the as-deposited multilayered Ni/Cu thin films were determined with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in combination with Ar{sup +} ion sputtering, under various bombardment conditions with the samples been stationary as well as rotating in some cases. The Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI) model used for the fittings of the concentration-depth profiles accounts for the interface broadening of the experimental depth profiling. The interface broadening incorporates the effects of atomic mixing, surface roughness and information depth of the Auger electrons. The roughness values extracted from the MRI model fitting of the depth profiling data agrees well with those measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ion sputtering induced surface roughness during the depth profiling was accordingly quantitatively evaluated from the fitted MRI parameters with sample rotation and stationary conditions. The depth resolutions of the AES depth profiles were derived directly from the values determined by the fitting parameters in the MRI model.

  5. Depth profiling of residual activity of ^{237}U fragments as a range verification technique for ^{238}U primary ion beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and simulation data concerning fragmentation of ^{238}U ion beam in aluminum, copper, and stainless-steel targets with the initial energy 500 and 950  MeV/u are collected in the paper. A range-verification technique based on depth profiling of residual activity is presented. The irradiated targets were constructed in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. One of the purposes of these experiments was depth profiling of residual activity of induced nuclides and projectile fragments. Among the projectile fragments, special attention is paid to the ^{237}U isotope that has a range very close to the range of the primary ^{238}U ions. Therefore, the depth profiling of the ^{237}U isotope can be utilized for experimental verification of the ^{238}U primary-beam range, which is demonstrated and discussed in the paper. The experimental data are compared with computer simulations by FLUKA, SRIM, and ATIMA, as well as with complementary experiments.

  6. Depth profiling of hydrogen in ferritic/martensitic steels by means of a tritium imaging plate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Teppei; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We applied a tritium imaging plate technique to depth profiling of hydrogen in bulk. ► Changes of hydrogen depth profiles in the steel by thermal annealing were examined. ► We proposed a release model of plasma-loaded hydrogen in the steel. ► Hydrogen is trapped at trapping sites newly developed by plasma loading. ► Hydrogen is also trapped at surface oxides and hardly desorbed by thermal annealing. -- Abstract: In order to understand how hydrogen loaded by plasma in F82H is removed by annealing at elevated temperatures in vacuum, depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen were examined by means of a tritium imaging plate technique. Owing to large hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H, the plasma-loaded hydrogen easily penetrates into a deeper region becoming solute hydrogen and desorbs by thermal annealing in vacuum. However the plasma-loading creates new hydrogen trapping sites having larger trapping energy than that for the intrinsic sites beyond the projected range of the loaded hydrogen. Some surface oxides also trap an appreciable amount of hydrogen which is more difficult to remove by the thermal annealing

  7. Condition and biochemical profile of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) cultured at different depths in a cold water coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardi, Daria; Mills, Terry; Donnet, Sebastien; Parrish, Christopher C.; Murray, Harry M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth and health of cultured blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are affected by environmental conditions. Typically, culture sites are situated in sheltered areas near shore (i.e., 20 m depth) mussel culture has been growing. This study evaluated the effect of culture depth on blue mussels in a cold water coastal environment (Newfoundland, Canada). Culture depth was examined over two years from September 2012 to September 2014; mussels from three shallow water (5 m) and three deep water (15 m) sites were compared for growth and biochemical composition; culture depths were compared for temperature and chlorophyll a. Differences between the two years examined were noted, possibly due to harsh winter conditions in the second year of the experiment. In both years shallow and deep water mussels presented similar condition; in year 2 deep water mussels had a significantly better biochemical profile. Lipid and glycogen analyses showed seasonal variations, but no significant differences between shallow and deep water were noted. Fatty acid profiles showed a significantly higher content of omega-3 s (20:5ω3; EPA) and lower content of bacterial fatty acids in deep water sites in year 2. Everything considered, deep water appeared to provide a more favorable environment for mussel growth than shallow water under harsher weather conditions.

  8. Regression analysis of growth responses to water depth in three wetland plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian K; Tanner, Chris C; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    depths from 0 – 0.5 m. Morphological and growth responses to depth were followed for 54 days before harvest, and then analysed by repeated measures analysis of covariance, and non-linear and quantile regression analysis (QRA), to compare flooding tolerances. Principal results Growth responses to depth...

  9. Collaboration in sensor network research: an in-depth longitudinal analysis of assortative mixing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alberto; Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-09-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a relatively small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research centerin the development and application of wireless and sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortative mixing of selected node characteristics, unveiling the researchers' propensity to collaborate preferentially with others with a similar academic profile. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  10. Electrochemical depth profiling of multilayer metallic structures: An aluminum brazing sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, F. Norouzi; Ambat, R.; Kwakernaak, C.

    2012-01-01

    Combinatory localized electrochemical cell and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) measurements were performed to obtain a thorough in depth electrochemical characterization of an aluminum brazing sheet. By defining electrochemical criteria i.e. breakdown potential, corrosion...... potential, cathodic and anodic reactivities, and tracking their changes as a function of depth, the evolution of electrochemical responses through out the material thickness were analyzed and correlated to the corresponding microstructural features. Polarization curves in 1wt% NaCl solution at pH 2.8 were...... obtained at different depths from the surface using controlled sputtering in a glow discharge optical emission spectrometer as a sample preparation technique. The anodic and cathodic reactivity of the top surface areas were significantly higher than that of the bulk, thus indicating these areas to be more...

  11. Quantitative analysis of oxygen depth distribution by means of deuteron reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyumin, A.N.; Eremin, V.K.; Konnikov, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Experimentally are investigated and realized possibilities for using the reaction for quantitative determination of the depth profiles of the oxygen distribution in HTSC structures in layers up to 10 4 A. It is concluded that in the near-surface layers when profiling the oxygen content is achieved the spatial resolution of 150 A

  12. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Christian; Peter, Christiane; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Jörg; Kara, Eugen; Zink, Klemens; Rödel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla

    2009-08-01

    Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm(3) thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm(2) because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector.

  13. Centennial- to millennial-scale hard rock erosion rates deduced from luminescence-depth profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Liu, Jinfeng; Jain, Mayank

    2018-01-01

    to quantify hard rock erosion rates at centennial to millennial timescales. Here we propose a novel technique, based on the solar bleaching of luminescence signals with depth into rock surfaces, to bridge this analytical gap. We apply our technique to glacial and landslide boulders in the Eastern Pamirs...

  14. Depth information in natural environments derived from optic flow by insect motion detection system: A model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eSchwegmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowing the depth structure of the environment is crucial for moving animals in many behavioral contexts, such as collision avoidance, targeting objects, or spatial navigation. An important source of depth information is motion parallax. This powerful cue is generated on the eyes during translatory self-motion with the retinal images of nearby objects moving faster than those of distant ones. To investigate how the visual motion pathway represents motion-based depth information we analyzed its responses to image sequences recorded in natural cluttered environments with a wide range of depth structures. The analysis was done on the basis of an experimentally validated model of the visual motion pathway of insects, with its core elements being correlation-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs. It is the key result of our analysis that the absolute EMD responses, i.e. the motion energy profile, represent the contrast-weighted nearness of environmental structures during translatory self-motion at a roughly constant velocity. In other words, the output of the EMD array highlights contours of nearby objects. This conclusion is largely independent of the scale over which EMDs are spatially pooled and was corroborated by scrutinizing the motion energy profile after eliminating the depth structure from the natural image sequences. Hence, the well-established dependence of correlation-type EMDs on both velocity and textural properties of motion stimuli appears to be advantageous for representing behaviorally relevant information about the environment in a computationally parsimonious way.

  15. Depth Compensation Model for Gaze Estimation in Sport Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batista Narcizo, Fabricio; Hansen, Dan Witzner

    2015-01-01

    is tested in a totally controlled environment with aim to check the influences of eye tracker parameters and ocular biometric parameters on its behavior. We also present a gaze estimation method based on epipolar geometry for binocular eye tracking setups. The depth compensation model has shown very...

  16. Analysis of experimental data sets for local scour depth around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of soft computing techniques to analyse and interpret the experimental data of local scour depth around bridge abutment, measured at different laboratory conditions and environment, is presented. The scour around bridge piers and abutments is, in the majority of cases, the main reason for bridge failures.

  17. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobre, C., E-mail: clement.lobre@cea.fr [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jalabert, D. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR 7588 du CNRS, Universite de Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Mollard, L. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jouneau, P.H. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ballet, P. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-10-15

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg{sub 0.77}Cd{sub 0.23}Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic.

  18. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobre, C.; Jalabert, D.; Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D.; Mollard, L.; Jouneau, P.H.; Ballet, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg 0.77 Cd 0.23 Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic

  19. Positron depth profiling of the structural and electronic structure transformations of hydrogenated Mg-based thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijt, S. W. H.; Kind, R.; Singh, S.; Schut, H.; Legerstee, W. J.; Hendrikx, R. W. A.; Svetchnikov, V. L.; Westerwaal, R. J.; Dam, B.

    2009-02-01

    We report positron depth-profiling studies on the hydrogen sorption behavior and phase evolution of Mg-based thin films. We show that the main changes in the depth profiles resulting from the hydrogenation to the respective metal hydrides are related to a clear broadening in the observed electron momentum densities in both Mg and Mg2Ni films. This shows that positron annihilation methods are capable of monitoring these metal-to-insulator transitions, which form the basis for important applications of these types of films in switchable mirror devices and hydrogen sensors in a depth-sensitive manner. Besides, some of the positrons trap at the boundaries of columnar grains in the otherwise nearly vacancy-free Mg films. The combination of positron annihilation and x-ray diffraction further shows that hydrogen loading at elevated temperatures, in the range of 480-600 K, leads to a clear Pd-Mg alloy formation of the Pd catalyst cap layer. At the highest temperatures, the hydrogenation induces a partial delamination of the ˜5 nm thin capping layer, as sensitively monitored by positron depth profiling of the fraction of ortho-positronium formed at interface with the cap layer. The delamination effectively blocks the hydrogen cycling. In Mg-Si bilayers, we investigated the reactivity upon hydrogen loading and heat treatments near 480 K, which shows that Mg2Si formation is fast relative to MgH2. The combination of positron depth profiling and transmission electron microscopy shows that hydrogenation promotes a complete conversion to Mg2Si for this destabilized metal hydride system, while a partially unreacted, Mg-rich amorphous prelayer remains on top of Mg2Si after a single heat treatment in an inert gas environment. Thin film studies indicate that the difficulty of rehydrogenation of Mg2Si is not primarily the result from slow hydrogen dissociation at surfaces, but is likely hindered by the presence of a barrier for removal of Mg from the readily formed Mg2Si.

  20. Improvement of Depth Profiling into Biotissues Using Micro Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy on a Needle with Selective Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Joho; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-12-21

    A micro electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-on-a-needle for depth profiling (μEoN-DP) with a selective passivation layer (SPL) on a hypodermic needle was recently fabricated to measure the electrical impedance of biotissues along with the penetration depths. The SPL of the μEoN-DP enabled the sensing interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) to contribute predominantly to the measurement by reducing the relative influence of the connection lines on the sensor output. The discrimination capability of the μEoN-DP was verified using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at various concentration levels. The resistance and capacitance extracted through curve fitting were similar to those theoretically estimated based on the mixing ratio of PBS and deionized water; the maximum discrepancies were 8.02% and 1.85%, respectively. Depth profiling was conducted using four-layered porcine tissue to verify the effectiveness of the discrimination capability of the μEoN-DP. The magnitude and phase between dissimilar porcine tissues (fat and muscle) were clearly discriminated at the optimal frequency of 1 MHz. Two kinds of simulations, one with SPL and the other with complete passivation layer (CPL), were performed, and it was verified that the SPL was advantageous over CPL in the discrimination of biotissues in terms of sensor output.

  1. Improvement of Depth Profiling into Biotissues Using Micro Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy on a Needle with Selective Passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joho Yun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A micro electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS-on-a-needle for depth profiling (μEoN-DP with a selective passivation layer (SPL on a hypodermic needle was recently fabricated to measure the electrical impedance of biotissues along with the penetration depths. The SPL of the μEoN-DP enabled the sensing interdigitated electrodes (IDEs to contribute predominantly to the measurement by reducing the relative influence of the connection lines on the sensor output. The discrimination capability of the μEoN-DP was verified using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at various concentration levels. The resistance and capacitance extracted through curve fitting were similar to those theoretically estimated based on the mixing ratio of PBS and deionized water; the maximum discrepancies were 8.02% and 1.85%, respectively. Depth profiling was conducted using four-layered porcine tissue to verify the effectiveness of the discrimination capability of the μEoN-DP. The magnitude and phase between dissimilar porcine tissues (fat and muscle were clearly discriminated at the optimal frequency of 1 MHz. Two kinds of simulations, one with SPL and the other with complete passivation layer (CPL, were performed, and it was verified that the SPL was advantageous over CPL in the discrimination of biotissues in terms of sensor output.

  2. The Pearson IV distribution and its application to ion implanted depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The Pearson IV distribution system is analyzed to determine the regions of validity for the values of the moments that produce convex, concave, more pointed than Gaussian, and more flat-topped than Gaussian distributions; the limits beyond which no significant change in distribution is produced; and excluded regions. These regions are illustrated in a figure that can be used to facilitate the determination of the Pearson IV moments for experimental ion implanted depth distributions. Examples are given of Pearson IV distributions to illustrate the effects of the ranges of skewness, kurtosis, and standard deviation, for both more pointed and more flat-topped than Gaussian distributions. A procedure is described for matching experimental ion implanted depth distributions to computer plotted Pearson IV modified Gaussian distributions. A few experimental curves are given to illustrate the different types of Pearson IV curves, and accuracies of moments are discussed. (author)

  3. Mohorovicic discontinuity depth analysis beneath North Patagonian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Dacal, M. L.; Tocho, C.; Aragón, E.

    2013-05-01

    The North Patagonian Massif is a 100000 km2, sub-rectangular plateau that stands out 500 to 700 m higher in altitude than the surrounding topography. The creation of this plateau took place during the Oligocene through a sudden uplift without noticeable internal deformation. This quite different mechanical response between the massif and the surrounding back arc, the short time in which this process took place and a regional negative Bouguer anomaly in the massif area, raise the question about the isostatic compensation state of the previously mentioned massif. In the present work, a comparison between different results about the depth of the Mohorovicic discontinuity beneath the North Patagonian Massif and a later analysis is made. It has the objective to analyze the crustal thickness in the area to contribute in the determination of the isostatic balance and the better understanding of the Cenozoic evolution of the mentioned area. The comparison is made between four models; two of these were created with seismic information (Feng et al., 2006 and Bassin et al., 2000), another model with gravity information (Barzaghi et al., 2011) and the last one with a combination of both techniques (Tassara y Etchaurren, 2011). The latter was the result of the adaptation to the work area of a three-dimensional density model made with some additional information, mainly seismic, that constrain the surfaces. The work of restriction and adaptation of this model, the later analysis and comparison with the other three models and the combination of both seismic models to cover the lack of resolution in some areas, is presented here. According the different models, the crustal thickness of the study zone would be between 36 and 45 Km. and thicker than the surrounding areas. These results talk us about a crust thicker than normal and that could behave as a rigid and independent block. Moreover, it can be observed that there are noticeable differences between gravimetric and seismic

  4. Advanced carrier depth profiling on Si and Ge with micro four-point probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarysse, Trudo; Eyben, Pierre; Parmentier, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    In order to reach the ITRS goals for future complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies, there is a growing need for the accurate extraction of ultrashallow electrically active dopant (carrier) profiles. In this work, it will be illustrated that this need can be met by the micro four...

  5. Estimating the Soil Temperature Profile from a single Depth Observation: A simple Empirical Heatflow Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, T.R.H.; Owe, M.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Kooi, H.

    2008-01-01

    Two field data sets are used to model near-surface soil temperature profiles in a bare soil. It is shown that the commonly used solutions to the heat flow equations by Van Wijk perform well when applied at deeper soil layers, but result in large errors when applied to near surface layers, where more

  6. Accurate stopping power determination of 15N ions for hydrogen depth profiling by a combination of ion beams and synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, M.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Munnik, F.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen analysis is of particular importance in thin film technology and it is often necessary to obtain a depth profile. The method with the best depth resolution is NRA using the 6385 keV resonance of the 1H( 15N,αγ) 12C nuclear reaction. The correct quantification of the depth and concentration scales in the measured hydrogen profiles relies on accurate stopping power values. We present a method to deduce these values from a combination of two techniques: NRA and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). This method is applied to the determination of the stopping power of ˜6.4 MeV 15N ions in H-containing amorphous Si-layers (a-Si:H). Density-independent stopping powers at different H concentrations are determined by combining the results from NRA and XRR with an overall uncertainty of 3.3%, showing good agreement with SRIM values. This work shows exemplary the methodology for future evaluation of stopping powers for quality assurance in NRA.

  7. Glow discharge depth analysis of metallic elements in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berneron, R.

    The glow discharge lamp designed by Grimm gives new possibilities in the optical spectrometry. The plasma produced is a cool emissive source and its advantages are the following: low spectral background, no reabsorption, linear calibration, very stable emission, very high yield. The sputtering produced by ionic bombardment of the sample enables the depth repartition of several elements to be made in the same run [fr

  8. Depth profile distribution of Cr, Cu, Co, Ni and Pb in the sediment cores of Mumbai Harbour Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhuparna, D.; Hemalatha, P.; Raj, Sanu S.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine and coastal sediments act as ultimate sink for trace metals that are discharged into the aquatic environment. Sources of environmental contaminants to the coastal system are numerous and may enter the estuarine environment via a number of pathways Mumbai Harbour Bay on the western coast of India, receives low level nuclear wastes and industrial and domestic sewage waste from the surrounding dwellings. Also, the bay is extensively exploited for various other local activities. The present study was carried out in the bay sediment cores to investigate the depth profile distribution of trace element concentration. Biologically significant toxic elements such as Cr, Cu, Co, Ni and Pb were estimated in the sediment cores to find out pattern of distribution in the sediment bed to follow the accumulation of elements with respect to depth

  9. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    . In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range......Nitriding of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behaviour. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume expansion...... that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution...

  10. Understanding of CO{sub 2} interaction with thermally grown SiO{sub 2} on Si using IBA depth profiling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deokar, Geetanjali; D’Angelo, Marie; Briand, Emrick [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Deville Cavellin, Catherine, E-mail: deville@univ-paris12.fr [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Faculté des Sciences et Technologie UPEC, 61 Av., De Gaulle, Créteil F-94010 (France)

    2013-06-01

    Interactions between CO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} films thermally grown on Si have been studied using {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as isotopic tracers associated with ion beam analysis (IBA) depth profiling techniques. From secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements no carbon from CO{sub 2} is detected in the silica while it is found in Si. These results suggest that CO{sub 2} diffuses through the silica. Exchanges of oxygen between CO{sub 2} and silica can be observed from {sup 18}O to {sup 16}O SIMS signals variation. The oxygen concentration depth profiles were determined quantitatively using the narrow resonance near 151 keV in the {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N nuclear reaction (Narrow Resonance Profiling, NRP). We demonstrate that two distinct oxygen exchanges processes co-exist and we determine the diffusion coefficient of the CO{sub 2} molecule in the silica at 1100 °C.

  11. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided

  12. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  13. Depth profiling of calcifications in breast tissue using picosecond Kerr-gated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rebecca; Matousek, Pavel; Ronayne, Kate Louise; Parker, Anthony William; Rogers, Keith; Stone, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Breast calcifications are found in both benign and malignant lesions and their composition can indicate the disease state. Calcium oxalate (dihydrate) (COD) is associated with benign lesions, however calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP) is found mainly in proliferative lesions including carcinoma. The diagnostic practices of mammography and histopathology examine the morphology of the specimen. They can not reliably distinguish between the two types of calcification, which may indicate the presence of a cancerous lesion during mammography. We demonstrate for the first time that Kerr-gated Raman spectroscopy is capable of non-destructive probing of sufficient biochemical information from calcifications buried within tissue, and this information can potentially be used as a first step in identifying the type of lesion. The method uses a picosecond pulsed laser combined with fast temporal gating of Raman scattered light to enable spectra to be collected from a specific depth within scattering media by collecting signals emerging from the sample at a given time delay following the laser pulse. Spectra characteristic of both HAP and COD were obtained at depths of up to 0.96 mm, in both chicken breast and fatty tissue; and normal and cancerous human breast by utilising different time delays. This presents great potential for the use of Raman spectroscopy as an adjunct to mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  14. Assessment of Zooplankton Community Composition along a Depth Profile in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-07-17

    The composition of zooplankton in the water column has received limited attention in the main body of the Red Sea and this study investigates the change in the community both spatially and temporally across 11 stations in the central Red Sea. Using molecular methods to target the v9 region of the 18S rRNA gene a total of approximately 11.5 million reads were sequenced resulting in 2528 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% similarity. The phylum Arthropoda dominated in terms of reads accounting for on average 86.2% and 65.3% for neuston nets and vertical multinets respectively. A reduction in the number of OTUs was noticed with depth for both total metazoa and Maxillopoda whilst there was also a significant change in the composition of the Maxillopoda community. The genus Corycaeus had a higher proportion of reads in the epipelagic zone with Pleuromamma becoming increasingly dominant with depth. No significant difference was observed in the community between night and day sampling however there was a significant difference in the zooplankton community between two sampling periods separated by 10 days.

  15. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherf, Christian; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Joerg; Kara, Eugen; Roedel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla; Peter, Christiane; Zink, Klemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. Material and Methods: The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm 3 thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. Results: The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm 2 because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Conclusion: Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector. (orig.)

  16. A statistical approach to plasma profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; McCarthy, P.J.; Lackner, K.; Riedel, K.S.

    1990-05-01

    A general statistical approach to the parameterisation and analysis of tokamak profiles is presented. The modelling of the profile dependence on both the radius and the plasma parameters is discussed, and pertinent, classical as well as robust, methods of estimation are reviewed. Special attention is given to statistical tests for discriminating between the various models, and to the construction of confidence intervals for the parameterised profiles and the associated global quantities. The statistical approach is shown to provide a rigorous approach to the empirical testing of plasma profile invariance. (orig.)

  17. Depth profiling of laser-heated chromophores in biological tissues by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, T.E.; Goodman, D.M.; Tanenbaum, B.S.; Nelson, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A solution method is proposed to the inverse problem of determining the unknown initial temperature distribution in a laser-exposed test material from measurements provided by infrared radiometry. A Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is derived that relates the temporal evolution of the infrared signal amplitude to the unknown initial temperature distribution in the exposed test material. The singular-value decomposition is used to demonstrate the severely ill-posed nature of the derived inverse problem. Three inversion methods are used to estimate solutions for the initial temperature distribution. A nonnegatively constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm using early termination is found superior to unconstrained inversion methods and is applied to image the depth of laser-heated chromophores in human skin. Key words: constrained conjugate gradients, ill-posed problem, infrared radiometry, laser surgery, nonnegative, singular-value decomposition

  18. SIMS depth profiling of rubber-tyre cord bonding layers prepared using 64Zn depleted ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, W.S.; Sykes, D.E.; Smith, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Zinc oxide and copper/zinc sulphide layers are formed during vulcanisation and moulding of rubber to brass-coated steel tyre reinforcing cords. Previous studies have described how zinc diffuses through the rubber-brass interface to form zinc sulphide, and combines with oxygen to create zinc oxide during dezincification. The zinc is usually assumed to originate in the brass of the tyre cord, however, zinc oxide is also present in the rubber formulation. We reveal how zinc from these sources is distributed within the interfacial bonding layers, before and after heat and humidity ageing. Zinc oxide produced using 64 Zn-isotope depleted zinc was mixed in the rubber formulation in place of the natural ZnO and the zinc isotope ratios within the interfacial layers were followed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling. Variations in the relative ratios of the zinc isotopes during depth profiling were measured for unaged, heat-aged and humidity-aged wire samples and in each case a relatively large proportion of the zinc incorporated into the interfacial layer as zinc sulphide was shown to have originated from ZnO in the rubber compound

  19. In-depth analysis of bicycle hydraulic disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Oliver; Györfi, Benedikt; Wrede, Jürgen; Arnold, Timo; Moia, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic Disc Brakes (HDBs) represent the most recent and innovative bicycle braking system. Especially Electric Bicycles (EBs), which are becoming more and more popular, are equipped with this powerful, unaffected by environmental influences, and low-wear type of brakes. As a consequence of the high braking performance, typical bicycle braking errors lead to more serious accidents. This is the starting point for the development of a Braking Dynamics Assistance system (BDA) to prevent front wheel lockup and nose-over (falling over the handlebars). One of the essential prerequisites for the system design is a better understanding of bicycle HDBs' characteristics. A physical simulation model and a test bench have been built for this purpose. The results of the virtual and real experiments conducted show a high correlation and allow valuable insights into HDBs on bicycles, which have not been studied scientifically in any depth so far.

  20. Inelastic analysis of finite length and depth cracked tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Prachuktam, S.; Gardner, D.

    1977-01-01

    Steam generator tube failure can at times result in reactor safety problems and subsequent premature reactor shutdowns. Typical PWR steam generator units contain thousands of long straight tubes with U-bend sections. These tubes are primarily made from alloy 600 and their sizes vary between 3 / 4 '' and 7 / 8 '' (1.905 cm and 2.223 cm) in diameter with nominal thicknesses of 0.043'' to 0.053'' (0.109 cm to 0.135 cm). Since alloy 600 (and the previously used 304-SS tubes) are ductile, high toughness materials LEFM (linear elastic fracture mechanics) criteria do not apply. This paper concerns itself with the prediction of the failure pressures for typical PWR steam generator tubes with longitudinal finite length and finite depth cracks. Only local plastic overload failure is considered

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago in 2013 (NCEI Accession 0161327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  2. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago since 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  3. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARRIOT LANE in the NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 20 February 1987 to 22 February 1987 (NODC Accession 8700096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and TOGA Area - Atlantic Ocean. Data...

  4. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARRIOT LANE in the NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 29 December 1986 to 31 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XTB casts in the NW Atlantic Ocean from the HARRIOT LANE. Data were collected from 29 December...

  5. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  6. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa in 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from TOWERS in the NE Atlantic (limit-180 W) from 06 June 1986 to 29 August 1986 (NODC Accession 8600378)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the TOWERS in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, South China Sea, Philippine Sea, and...

  8. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  9. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS THACH using BT and XBT casts in the Persian Sea for 1987-11-21 (NODC Accession 8800016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS THACH in the Persian Sea. Data were collected from 21 November 1987 to 21...

  10. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from COCHRANE in the South China Sea and other seas from 09 January 1987 to 22 February 1987 (NODC Accession 8700095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the COCHRANE in the South China and other seas. Data were collected from 09 January...

  11. Depth-Profiling Electronic and Structural Properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Thin-Film Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ching-Yu; Hsiao, Sheng-Wei; Wu, Pin-Jiun; Yang, Chu-Shou; Chen, Chia-Hao; Chou, Wu-Ching

    2016-09-14

    Utilizing a scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) and grazing-incidence X-ray powder diffraction (GIXRD), we studied the electronic band structure and the crystalline properties of the pentanary Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) thin-film solar cell as a function of sample depth on measuring the thickness-gradient sample. A novel approach is proposed for studying the depth-dependent information on thin films, which can provide a gradient thickness and a wide cross-section of the sample by polishing process. The results exhibit that the CIGSSe absorber layer possesses four distinct stoichiometries. The growth mechanism of this distinctive compositional distribution formed by a two-stage process is described according to the thermodynamic reaction and the manufacturing process. On the basis of the depth-profiling results, the gradient profiles of the conduction and valence bands were constructed to elucidate the performance of the electrical properties (in this case, Voc = 620 mV, Jsc = 34.6 mA/cm(2), and η = 14.04%); the valence-band maxima (VBM) measured with a SPEM in the spectroscopic mode coincide with this band-structure model, except for a lowering of the VBM observed in the surface region of the absorber layer due to the ordered defect compound (ODC). In addition, the depth-dependent texturing X-ray diffraction pattern presents the crystalline quality and the residual stress for each depth of a thin-film device. We find that the randomly oriented grains in the bottom region of the absorber layer and the different residual stress between the underlying Mo and the absorber interface, which can deteriorate the electrical performance due to peeling-off effect. An anion interstitial defect can be observed on comparing the anion concentration of the elemental distribution with crystalline composition; a few excess sulfur atoms insert in interstitial sites at the front side of the absorber layer, whereas the interstitial selenium atoms insert at the back side.

  12. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B andW 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001)

  13. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manigandan, P.K.; Chandar Shekar, B.

    2017-01-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, "2"3"8U, "2"3"2Th, and "4"0K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of "2"3"2Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for "2"3"2Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  14. Low energy p-Be nuclear reactions for depth-profiling Be in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.; Okamoto, P.R.; Weidersich, H.

    1977-01-01

    Beryllium distributions within the first micron of the surface of nickel- or copper-based alloys were investigated with a 300-keV proton probe utilizing low energy nuclear reactions. Be was segregated in Ni by point defect flows to the surface of the specimen during Ni-ion bombardment of elevated temperatures. The nuclear reactions used are 9 Be(p,d) 8 Be and 9 Be(p,α) 6 Li. The deuteron and alpha groups are simultaneously observable using a standard surface barrier detector. Observations were made at a 150 0 scattering angle; a 2.5 μ mylar filter in front of the detector was used for observing the deuteron yields. The alpha group may be observed with or without the filter depending on whether counting statistics or energy resolution are the more important constraints. Significant Be segregation toward the surface was observed in specimens after irradiation at 625 0 C to 23 dpa with 3.2-MeV Ni ions. Concentrations of Be were nearly doubled within 500 A of the surface and a region depleted of Be extended below the surface layer to a depth of about 3000 A. These results are in agreement with predictions

  15. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, P.K. [Al Musanna College of Technology, Muscat (Oman); Chandar Shekar, B. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India). Kongunadu Arts and Science College

    2017-08-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of {sup 232}Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for {sup 232}Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  16. A perspective on two chemometrics tools: PCA and MCR, and introduction of a new one: Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), as applied to XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles of organic and inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shiladitya; Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Lee, Zheng Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff; Tolley, H. Dennis; Gallagher, Neal B.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) are much used analytical techniques that provide information about the outermost atomic and molecular layers of materials. In this work, we discuss the application of multivariate spectral techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR), to the analysis of XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles. Multivariate analyses often provide insight into data sets that is not easily obtained in a univariate fashion. Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), which has its roots in Shannon's information theory, is also introduced. This approach is not the same as the mutual information/entropy approaches sometimes used in data processing. A discussion of the theory of each technique is presented. PCA, MCR, and PRE are applied to four different data sets obtained from: a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized C3F6 on Si, a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized PNIPAM (poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)) on Si, an XPS depth profile through a film of SiO2 on Si, and an XPS depth profile through a film of Ta2O5 on Ta. PCA, MCR, and PRE reveal the presence of interfaces in the films, and often indicate that the first few scans in the depth profiles are different from those that follow. PRE and backward difference PRE provide this information in a straightforward fashion. Rises in the PRE signals at interfaces suggest greater complexity to the corresponding spectra. Results from PCA, especially for the higher principal components, were sometimes difficult to understand. MCR analyses were generally more interpretable.

  17. Physical mechanisms of thermal-diffusivity depth-profile generation in a hardened low-alloy Mn, Si, Cr, Mo steel reconstructed by photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaides, Lena; Mandelis, Andreas; Beingessner, Clare J.

    2001-01-01

    It is well established that in hardened steels thermal-diffusivity broadly anticorrelates with microhardness, allowing thermal-wave depth profilometry to be used as a tool to measure microhardness profiles. Nevertheless, the physical mechanisms for this anticorrelation have not been well understood. In this work, the thermal-diffusivity profiles of rough, hardened industrial steels were reconstructed after the elimination of roughness effects from the experimental data. Carburizing and quenching are widely used for the heat treatment of steel components, and it is important to understand their effects on thermal-diffusivity profiles. A thorough examination of the actual mechanism by which thermal-diffusivity depth profiles are affected by first carburizing and then quenching AISI-8620 steels was performed. It was concluded that the variation of thermal diffusivity with depth is dominated by the carbon concentration profile, whereas the absolute value of the thermal diffusivity is a function of microstructure. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  18. Contribution to depth profiling by particle induced X-ray emission application to the study of zinc diffusion in AgZn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frontier, J.P.

    1987-08-01

    A contribution of the study of the capacities of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (P.I.X.E.) for depth profiling, in the range of 1 to 10 micrometers and over, is presented here. It is shown that, in a non destructuve way, the concentration profile of a given element can be obtained, in principle, by deconvoluting the X-ray yields of this element, measured in a set of experiments in which the energy of the impinging protons, hence their range, is systematically varied. Direct deconvolution procedure, which leads to the inversion of an ill-conditionned matrix is unsuitable. So we generalized the iterative procedure previously used by Vegh to solve a similar problem. Alternatively we also used a fitting procedure of several parameters which gave us somewhat better than those of the iterative procedure. Both algorithms where applied to a set of X-ray yields induced by protons of energy between 0.45 to 2 MeV, corresponding to the first 6 micrometers of various depletion profiles of zinc in an initially homogeneous Ag-3 at % Zn annealed under vacuum. For investigation of deeper layers, a sectionning technique which consists in analysing thin film hydroxide targets by specific chemistry of tiny turning, was developped with success. Cross-reference of all the obtained profiles was made with electron microprobe determination on transverse section, and with the predictions of the theory of atomic diffusion. In addition, the possibilities of increasing the depth resolution by developping techniques either of controled sanding of the surface, or analysis of the sample is discussed [fr

  19. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Laloy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium, have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1 uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling and (2 accounts (under certain assumptions for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr−1 (1σ is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  20. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloy, Eric; Beerten, Koen; Vanacker, Veerle; Christl, Marcus; Rogiers, Bart; Wouters, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium), have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1) uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and (2) accounts (under certain assumptions) for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP) parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr-1 (1σ) is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-)climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  1. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mul, Frits F M de; George, Nibu A; Qiu Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K [Department of Biomedical Engineering BMSA, Faculty of Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen UMCG, University of Groningen, PO Box 196, 9700 AD Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: ffm@demul.net

    2009-07-07

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents-for the first time-a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  2. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mul, Frits F M de; George, Nibu A; Qiu Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K

    2009-01-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents-for the first time-a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  3. Depth profiling Li in electrode materials of lithium ion battery by {sup 7}Li(p,γ){sup 8}Be and {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunitha, Y., E-mail: sunibarc@gmail.com; Kumar, Sanjiv

    2017-06-01

    A proton induced γ-ray emission method based on {sup 7}Li(p,γ){sup 8}Be proton capture reaction and a nuclear reaction analysis method involving {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He reaction are described for depth profiling Li in the electrode materials, graphite and lithium cobalt oxide for example, of a Li-ion battery. Depth profiling by {sup 7}Li(p,γ){sup 8}Be reaction is accomplished by the resonance at 441 keV and involves the measurement of 14.6 and 17.6 MeV γ-rays, characteristic of the reaction, by a NaI(Tl) detector. The method has a detection sensitivity of ∼0.2 at% and enables profiling up to a depth ≥20 µm with a resolution of ≥150 nm. The profiling to a fairly large depth is facilitated by the absence of any other resonance up to 1800 keV proton energy. The reaction has substantial off-resonance cross-sections. A procedure is outlined for evaluating the off-resonance yields. Interferences from fluorine and aluminium are major limitation of this depth profiling methodology. The depth profile measurement by {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He reaction, on the other hand, utilises 2–3 MeV protons and entails the detection of α-particles at 90° or 150° angles. The reaction exhibits inverse kinematics at 150°. This method, too, suffers interference from fluorine due to the simultaneous occurrence of {sup 19}F(p,α){sup 16}O reaction. Kinematical considerations show that the interference is minimal at 90° and thus is the recommended angle of detection. The method is endowed with a detection sensitivity of ∼0.1 at%, a depth resolution of ∼100 nm and a probing depth of about 30 µm in the absence and 5–8 µm in the presence of fluorine in the material. Both methods yielded comparable depth profiles of Li in the cathode (lithium cobalt oxide) and the anode (graphite) of a Li-ion battery.

  4. Spectrally and spatially resolved photoluminescence. Lateral fluctuations and depth profiles of Cu(In,Ga)Se2-absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the development and refinement of photoluminescence (PL) methods for inhomogeneous absorbers to identify lateral fluctuations and depth-dependent variations of spectroscopic, optical and opto-electronic properties in the submicron/micron range. The first approach deals with the spectral investigation of PL emission from the front and the rear side of an absorber, whereas the second idea is about the analysis of PL spectra from the front side of the absorber for different absorber thicknesses. Another technique for determination of depth-dependent variations are confocal PL measurements at cross sections of absorbers. The last concept pursues the study of lateral fluctuations with an optical near-field microscope on specially prepared absorbers. These four strategies are demonstrated with samples based on Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 .

  5. In-depth resistome analysis by targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Val F; Baquero, Fernando; Martínez, José Luís; Ramos-Ruíz, Ricardo; González-Zorn, Bruno; Andremont, Antoine; Sánchez-Valenzuela, Antonio; Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko; Kennedy, Sean; Ruppé, Etienne; van Schaik, Willem; Willems, Rob J; de la Cruz, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2018-01-15

    Antimicrobial resistance is a major global health challenge. Metagenomics allows analyzing the presence and dynamics of "resistomes" (the ensemble of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance in a given microbiome) in disparate microbial ecosystems. However, the low sensitivity and specificity of available metagenomic methods preclude the detection of minority populations (often present below their detection threshold) and/or the identification of allelic variants that differ in the resulting phenotype. Here, we describe a novel strategy that combines targeted metagenomics using last generation in-solution capture platforms, with novel bioinformatics tools to establish a standardized framework that allows both quantitative and qualitative analyses of resistomes. We developed ResCap, a targeted sequence capture platform based on SeqCapEZ (NimbleGene) technology, which includes probes for 8667 canonical resistance genes (7963 antibiotic resistance genes and 704 genes conferring resistance to metals or biocides), and 2517 relaxase genes (plasmid markers) and 78,600 genes homologous to the previous identified targets (47,806 for antibiotics and 30,794 for biocides or metals). Its performance was compared with metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) for 17 fecal samples (9 humans, 8 swine). ResCap significantly improves MSS to detect "gene abundance" (from 2.0 to 83.2%) and "gene diversity" (26 versus 14.9 genes unequivocally detected per sample per million of reads; the number of reads unequivocally mapped increasing up to 300-fold by using ResCap), which were calculated using novel bioinformatic tools. ResCap also facilitated the analysis of novel genes potentially involved in the resistance to antibiotics, metals, biocides, or any combination thereof. ResCap, the first targeted sequence capture, specifically developed to analyze resistomes, greatly enhances the sensitivity and specificity of available metagenomic methods and offers the possibility to analyze genes

  6. Molar concentration-depth profiles at the solution surface of a cationic surfactant reconstructed with angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuangye; Morgner, Harald

    2011-01-01

    In the current work, we first reconstructed the molar fraction-depth profiles of cation and anion near the surface of tetrabutylammonium iodide dissolved in formamide by a refined calculation procedure, based on angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. In this calculation procedure, both the transmission functions of the core levels and the inelastic mean free paths of the photoelectrons have been taken into account. We have evaluated the partial molar volumes of surfactant and solvent by the densities of such solutions with different bulk concentrations. With those partial molar volumes, the molar concentration-depth profiles of tetrabutylammonium ion and iodide ion were determined. The surface excesses of both surfactant ions were then achieved directly by integrating these depth profiles. The anionic molar concentration-depth profiles and surface excesses have been compared with their counterparts determined by neutral impact ion scattering spectroscopy. The comparisons exhibit good agreements. Being capable of determining molar concentration-depth profiles of surfactant ions by core levels with different kinetic energies may extend the applicable range of ARXPS in investigating solution surfaces.

  7. Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) Daily Snow Depth Analysis Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of a Northern Hemisphere subset of the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) operational global daily snow depth analysis. Data include daily...

  8. Multi-approach analysis of maximum riverbed scour depth above subway tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Chen; Hong-wu Tang; Zui-sen Li; Wen-hong Dai

    2010-01-01

    When subway tunnels are routed underneath rivers, riverbed scour may expose the structure, with potentially severe consequences. Thus, it is important to identify the maximum scour depth to ensure that the designed buried depth is adequate. There are a range of methods that may be applied to this problem, including the fluvial process analysis method, geological structure analysis method, scour formula method, scour model experiment method, and numerical simulation method. However, the applic...

  9. Positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, P.

    2001-01-01

    Wide-ranging studies of defects below the surface of semiconductor structures have been performed at the University of Bath, in collaboration with the University of Surrey Centre for Ion Beam Applications and with members of research teams at a number of UK universities. Positron implantation has been used in conjunction with other spectroscopies such as RBS-channeling and SIMS, and electrical characterisation methods. Research has ranged from the development of a positron-based technique to monitor the in situ annealing of near-surface open-volume defects to the provision of information on defects to comprehensive diagnostic investigations of specific device structures. We have studied Si primarily but not exclusively; e.g., we have investigated ion-implanted SiC and SiO 2 /GaAs structures. Of particular interest are the applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy to ion-implanted semiconductors, where by linking ion dose to vacancy-type defect concentration one can obtain information on ion dose and uniformity with a sensitivity not achievable by standard techniques. A compact, user-friendly positron beam system is currently being developed at Bath, in collaboration with SCRIBA, with the intention of application in an industrial environment. (orig.)

  10. Criminal Justice. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  11. Poultry Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a poultry producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  12. Graphic Communications. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering graphic communications occupations. The…

  13. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  14. Depth profiles of defects in Ar-iondashirradiated steels determined by a least-squares fit of S parameters from variable-energy positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruga, Takeo; Takamura, Saburo; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Ito, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Using a new method for reconstructing the depth profile of defects in an iondashirradiated sample by using slow positrons, the depth profiles of vacancy-type defects in 316 stainless steel samples, irradiated with 250 keV Ar ions to a dose of 7.5 × 10 19 m -2 at room temperature, have been calculated from Doppler-broadening S parameters measured as a function of positron energies up to 16 keV. Without assuming any type of shape for the defect profiles, such as Gaussian, the defect profiling is done using a least-squares fitting method. The resulting profile suggests that in as-irradiated 316 stainless steel samples with lower carbon content, the defect distribution peaks at a depth four times larger than that of the ion range. After annealing at a high temperature of 1253 K for 0.5 h, the fitted profile shows that the peak around the average ion range is highly enhanced. While in the steel added with 0.3 wt% titanium, the profile exhibits almost no peak after annealing at 1073 K. The results indicate that the radiationdashproduced vacancy clusters are stabilized by the implanted Ar atoms more effectively in the Ti-free steel than in the Ti-added steel.

  15. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Ina; Castaing, Jacques; Calligaro, Thomas; Salomon, Joseph; Aucouturier, Marc; Reinholz, Uwe; Weise, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS

  16. Interdiffusion in epitaxial, single-crystalline Au/Ag thin films studied by Auger electron spectroscopy sputter-depth profiling and positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noah, Martin A.; Flötotto, David; Wang, Zumin; Reiner, Markus; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Interdiffusion in epitaxial, single-crystalline Au/Ag bilayered thin films on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) sputter-depth profiling and by in-situ positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS). By the combination of these techniques identification of the role of vacancy sources and sinks on interdiffusion in the Au/Ag films was possible. It was found that with precise knowledge of the concentration-dependent self-diffusion and impurity diffusion coefficients a distinction between the Darken-Manning treatment and Nernst-Planck treatment can be made, which is not possible on the basis of the determined concentration-depth profiles alone.

  17. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Ina [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Castaing, Jacques [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)]. E-mail: jacques.castaing@culture.fr; Calligaro, Thomas [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Salomon, Joseph [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Aucouturier, Marc [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Reinholz, Uwe [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Hans-Peter [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS.

  18. A deep view in cultural heritage - confocal micro X-ray spectroscopy for depth resolved elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanngiesser, B.; Malzer, W.; Mantouvalou, I.; Sokaras, D.; Karydas, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    applications of confocal X-ray microscopy including depth profiling speciation studies by means of confocal X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solid mathematical formulation developed for the quantitative in-depth elemental analysis of stratified materials is exemplified and depth profile reconstruction techniques are discussed. Selected CH applications related to the characterization of painted layers from paintings and decorated artifacts (enamels, glasses and ceramics), but also from the study of corrosion and patina layers in glass and metals, respectively, are presented. The analytical capabilities, limitations and future perspectives of the two variants of the confocal micro X-ray spectroscopy, 3D micro-XRF and 3D micro-PIXE, with respect to CH applications are critically assessed and discussed. (orig.)

  19. Elemental depth profiles and plasma etching rates of positive-tone electron beam resists after sequential infiltration synthesis of alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yuki; Ito, Shunya; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2018-06-01

    By scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM–EDS), we investigated the elemental depth profiles of organic electron beam resist films after the sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) of inorganic alumina. Although a 40-nm-thick poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film was entirely hybridized with alumina, an uneven distribution was observed near the interface between the substrate and the resist as well as near the resist surface. The uneven distribution was observed around the center of a 100-nm-thick PMMA film. The thicknesses of the PMMA and CSAR62 resist films decreased almost linearly as functions of plasma etching period. The comparison of etching rate among oxygen reactive ion etching, C3F8 reactive ion beam etching (RIBE), and Ar ion beam milling suggested that the SIS treatment enhanced the etching resistance of the electron beam resists to chemical reactions rather than to ion collisions. We proposed oxygen- and Ar-assisted C3F8 RIBE for the fabrication of silica imprint molds by electron beam lithography.

  20. Recent changes in Red Lake (Romania) sedimentation rate determined from depth profiles of 210Pb and 137Cs radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begy, R; Cosma, C; Timar, A

    2009-08-01

    This work presents a first estimation of the sedimentation rate for the Red Lake (Romania). The sediment accumulation rates were determined by two well-known methods for recent sediment dating: (210)Pb and (137)Cs methods. Both techniques implied used the gamma emission of the above-mentioned radionuclides. The (210)Pb and (137)Cs concentrations in the sediment were measured using a gamma spectrometer with a HpGe detector, Gamma-X type. Activities ranging from 41+/-7 to 135+/-34Bq/kg were found for (210)Pb and from 3+/-0.5 to 1054+/-150Bq/kg for (137)Cs. The sediment profile indicates acceleration in sedimentation rate in the last 18 years. Thus, the sedimentation process for the Red Lake can be divided in two periods, the last 18 years, and respectively, the period before that. Using the Constant Rate of (210)Pb Supply method values between 0.18+/-0.04 and 1.85+/-0.5g/cm(2) year (0.32+/-0.08 and 2.83+/-0.7cm/year) were obtained. Considering both periods, an average sedimentation rate of 0.87+/-0.17g/cm(2) year (1.17cm/year) was calculated. Considering an average depth of 5.41m for the lake and the sedimentation rate estimated for the last 18 years, it could be estimated that the lake will disappear in 195 years.

  1. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian; Hummel, Helga; Bruns, Michael; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm

    2016-06-01

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  2. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Peters

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl-4,4’-diamine and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline-(4-phenylphenoxyaluminum, originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  3. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.raupp@kit.edu; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm [Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hummel, Helga [Philips Technologie GmbH Innovative Technologies, Aachen (Germany); Bruns, Michael [Institute for Applied Materials and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  4. Time Variations of Observed H α Line Profiles and Precipitation Depths of Nonthermal Electrons in a Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falewicz, Robert; Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Paweł; Berlicki, Arkadiusz, E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: radziszewski@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: berlicki@astro.uni.wroc.pl [Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, 51-622 Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland)

    2017-10-01

    We compare time variations of the H α and X-ray emissions observed during the pre-impulsive and impulsive phases of the C1.1-class solar flare on 2013 June 21 with those of plasma parameters and synthesized X-ray emission from a 1D hydrodynamic numerical model of the flare. The numerical model was calculated assuming that the external energy is delivered to the flaring loop by nonthermal electrons (NTEs). The H α spectra and images were obtained using the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph with a time resolution of 50 ms. The X-ray fluxes and spectra were recorded by RHESSI . Pre-flare geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the model and the delivered energy were estimated using RHESSI data. The time variations of the X-ray light curves in various energy bands and those of the H α intensities and line profiles were well correlated. The timescales of the observed variations agree with the calculated variations of the plasma parameters in the flaring loop footpoints, reflecting the time variations of the vertical extent of the energy deposition layer. Our result shows that the fast time variations of the H α emission of the flaring kernels can be explained by momentary changes of the deposited energy flux and the variations of the penetration depths of the NTEs.

  5. Lithium diffusion in polyether ether ketone and polyimide stimulated by in situ electron irradiation and studied by the neutron depth profiling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Attar, F. M. D.; Mathakari, N. L.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Dhole, S. D.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion of lithium from a LiCl aqueous solution into polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and polyimide (PI) assisted by in situ irradiation with 6.5 MeV electrons was studied by the neutron depth profiling method. The number of the Li atoms was found to be roughly proportional to the diffusion time. Regardless of the diffusion time, the measured depth profiles in PEEK exhibit a nearly exponential form, indicating achievement of a steady-state phase of a diffusion-reaction process specified in the text. The form of the profiles in PI is more complex and it depends strongly on the diffusion time. For the longer diffusion time, the profile consists of near-surface bell-shaped part due to Fickian-like diffusion and deeper exponential part.

  6. Limitations to depth resolution in high-energy, heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Palmer, G.R.; Ophel, T.R.; Timmers, H.

    1998-01-01

    The depth resolution of heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis was examined for Al and Co thin films ranging in thickness from 100 to 400 nm. Measurements were performed with 154 MeV Au ions as the incident beam, and recoils were detected using a gas ionisation detector. Energy spectra were extracted for the Al and Co recoils and the depth resolution determined as a function of film thickness from the width of the high- and low- energy edges. These results were compared with theoretical estimates calculated using the computer program DEPTH. (authors)

  7. Ground-Penetrating-Radar Profiles of Interior Alaska Highways: Interpretation of Stratified Fill, Frost Depths, Water Table, and Thaw Settlement over Ice-Rich Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    along either massive ice surfaces or within sections of segregated ice. The uninsulated ice surface at Tok in Figure 17B is irregular. All of the...ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 14 ERDC’s Center-Directed Research Program Ground -Penetrating-Radar Profiles of Interior Alaska Highways...August 2016 Ground -Penetrating-Radar Profiles of Interior Alaska Highways Interpretation of Stratified Fill, Frost Depths, Water Table, and Thaw

  8. Depth profiling of {sup 14} N and {sup 20} Ne implantation into iron and steel using(p, gamma) reactions. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wriekat, A; Haj-Abdellah, M [Physics Department, University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan)

    1996-03-01

    Depth profiles of {sup 14} N and {sup 20} Ne ions at 800 KeV implanted into iron and by steel samples have been measured by means of the proton induced {gamma}- ray emission (Pige) technique. The range, R, and range straggling, {Delta}R for these profiles were obtained and compared with theoretical calculations. The experimental results did show that pure iron retains more N and Ne than steel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Influence of sampling depth and post-sampling analysis time on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological analysis was carried out for samples taken at water depth and at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-sampling. It was observed that the total and faecal coliform bacteria were significantly higher in the 3 m water depth samples than in the surface water samples (ANOVA, F = 59.41, 26.751, 9.82 (T.C); 46.41, 26.81, ...

  10. Cosmogenic 10Be Depth Profile in top 560 m of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Woodruff, T. E.; Caffee, M. W.; Edwards, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2009-12-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be in polar ice samples are a function of variations in solar activity, geomagnetic field strength, atmospheric mixing and annual snow accumulation rates. The 10Be depth profile in ice cores also provides independent chronological markers to tie Antarctic to Greenland ice cores and to tie Holocene ice cores to the 14C dendrochronology record. We measured 10Be concentrations in 187 samples from depths of 0-560 m of the main WAIS Divide core, WDC06A. The ice samples are typically 1-2 kg and represent 2-4 m of ice, equivalent to an average temporal resolution of ~12 years, based on the preliminary age-depth scale proposed for the WDC core, (McConnell et al., in prep). Be, Al and Cl were separated using ion exchange chromatography techniques and the 10Be concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at PRIME lab. The 10Be concentrations range from 8.1 to 19.1 x 10^3 at/g, yielding an average of (13.1±2.1) x 10^3 at/g. Adopting an average snow accumulation rate of 20.9 cm weq/yr, as derived from the age-depth scale, this value corresponds to an average 10Be flux of (2.7±0.5) x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2. This flux is similar to that of the Holocene part of the Siple Dome (Nishiizumi and Finkel, 2007) and Dome Fuji (Horiuchi et al. 2008) ice cores, but ~30% lower than the value of 4.0 x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2 for GISP2 (Finkel and Nishiizumi, 1997). The periods of low solar activity, known as Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, show ~20% higher 10Be concentrations/fluxes than the periods of average solar activity in the last millennium. The maximum 10Be fluxes during some of these periods of low solar activity are up to ~50% higher than average 10Be fluxes, as seen in other polar ice cores, which makes these peaks suitable as chronologic markers. We will compare the 10Be record in the WAIS Divide ice core with that in other Antarctic as well as Greenland ice cores and with the 14C treering record. Acknowledgment. This

  11. On the analysis of line profile variations: A statistical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCandliss, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study is concerned with the empirical characterization of the line profile variations (LPV), which occur in many of and Wolf-Rayet stars. The goal of the analysis is to gain insight into the physical mechanisms producing the variations. The analytic approach uses a statistical method to quantify the significance of the LPV and to identify those regions in the line profile which are undergoing statistically significant variations. Line positions and flux variations are then measured and subject to temporal and correlative analysis. Previous studies of LPV have for the most part been restricted to observations of a single line. Important information concerning the range and amplitude of the physical mechanisms involved can be obtained by simultaneously observing spectral features formed over a range of depths in the extended mass losing atmospheres of massive, luminous stars. Time series of a Wolf-Rayet and two of stars with nearly complete spectral coverage from 3940 angstrom to 6610 angstrom and with spectral resolution of R = 10,000 are analyzed here. These three stars exhibit a wide range of both spectral and temporal line profile variations. The HeII Pickering lines of HD 191765 show a monotonic increase in the peak rms variation amplitude with lines formed at progressively larger radii in the Wolf-Rayet star wind. Two times scales of variation have been identified in this star: a less than one day variation associated with small scale flickering in the peaks of the line profiles and a greater than one day variation associated with large scale asymmetric changes in the overall line profile shapes. However, no convincing period phenomena are evident at those periods which are well sampled in this time series

  12. Multilayer analysis using SIMS: interpretation of profiles at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucouturier, M.; Grattepain, C.; Tromson-Carli, A.; Barbe, M.; Cohen-Solal, G.; Marfaing, Y.; Chevrier, F.; Gall, H. le; Imhoff, D.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a well adapted analytical method for the chemical characterization of concentration profiles in layered or multilayered materials, particularly concerning the more or less abrupt interfaces bounding those layers. It is known that the fiability and accuracy of the interface characterization may be affected by methodological factors, which alter the depth resolution such as: macroscopical or microscopical initial roughness of the substrate and/or of the layers, ion-induced roughening, effects of differential sputtering of the various elements, transitory stage of the primary ion beam implantation, ion beam induced accelerated diffusion, balistic mixing or segregation; etc.. This communication describes several examples of SIMS analysis performed on metal multilayers (Co/Cu) and on epitaxial semiconductor layers (CdTe/GaAs), focussing the interest on the particular analytical problems raised by the initial roughness and the ion induced roughening effect. The interpretation of the measured profiles, the influence of analytical parameters (such as the nature of the primary ion beam, sputtering conditions, detected ion species), and the limitations of profilometry roughness measurements, are discussed. Solutions are proposed in order to improve the depth resolution of interface characterization, including a tentative modelization of roughness effects. (orig.)

  13. Depth profile of strain and composition in Si/Ge dot multilayers by microscopic phonon Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.H.; Bougeard, D.; Abstreiter, G.; Brunner, K.

    2005-01-01

    We characterized strain and Ge content depending on depth in a self-assembled Si/Ge dot multilayer by scanning a microscopic Raman probe at a (110) cleavage plane. The multilayer structure was deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy on a (001) Si substrate and consisted of 80 periods, each of them composed by 25 nm Si spacers and 8 monolayer Ge forming laterally and vertically uncorrelated islands with a height of 2 nm and a lateral diameter of about 20 nm. An average biaxial strain of -3.5% within the core regions of islands is determined from the splitting of longitudinal and transversal optical Ge-Ge phonon modes observed in polarized Raman measurements. The absolute mode frequencies further enable analysis of a Ge content of 0.82. The analyzed strain and composition of islands are nearly independent from depths below the sample surface. This indicates well-controlled deposition parameters and negligible intermixing during deposition of subsequent layers. These Raman results are in agreement with x-ray diffraction data. Small, local Raman frequency shifts were observed and discussed with respect to partial elastic strain relaxation of the multilayer stack after cleavage, undefined Raman-scattering geometries at the sample edge, and local heating by the laser probe

  14. Classification of Effective Soil Depth by Using Multinomial Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. H.; Chan, H. C.; Chen, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Classification of effective soil depth is a task of determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in Taiwan. The "Slopeland Conservation and Utilization Act" categorizes the slopeland into agriculture and husbandry land, land suitable for forestry and land for enhanced conservation according to the factors including average slope, effective soil depth, soil erosion and parental rock. However, sit investigation of the effective soil depth requires a cost-effective field work. This research aimed to classify the effective soil depth by using multinomial logistic regression with the environmental factors. The Wen-Shui Watershed located at the central Taiwan was selected as the study areas. The analysis of multinomial logistic regression is performed by the assistance of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The effective soil depth was categorized into four levels including deeper, deep, shallow and shallower. The environmental factors of slope, aspect, digital elevation model (DEM), curvature and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were selected for classifying the soil depth. An Error Matrix was then used to assess the model accuracy. The results showed an overall accuracy of 75%. At the end, a map of effective soil depth was produced to help planners and decision makers in determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in the study areas.

  15. Profiling School Shooters: Automatic Text-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair eNeuman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available School shooters present a challenge to both forensic psychiatry and law enforcement agencies. The relatively small number of school shooters, their various charateristics, and the lack of in-depth analysis of all of the shooters prior to the shooting add complexity to our understanding of this problem. In this short paper, we introduce a new methodology for automatically profiling school shooters. The methodology involves automatic analysis of texts and the production of several measures relevant for the identification of the shooters. Comparing texts written by six school shooters to 6056 texts written by a comparison group of male subjects, we found that the shooters' texts scored significantly higher on the Narcissistic Personality dimension as well as on the Humilated and Revengeful dimensions. Using a ranking/priorization procedure, similar to the one used for the automatic identification of sexual predators, we provide support for the validity and relevance of the proposed methodology.

  16. Depth profiling the solid electrolyte interphase on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordh, Tim; Younesi, Reza; Brandell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a surface layer on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO) anodes, which has been a topic of debate in scientific literature, is here investigated with tunable high surface sensitive synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) to obtain a reliable depth profile of the interphase...

  17. Lithium diffusion in polyether ether ketone and polyimide stimulated by in situ electron irradiation and studied by the neutron depth profiling method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Attar, F. M. D.; Mathakari, N. L.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Dhole, S. D.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 169, č. 10 (2014), s. 885-891 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : diffusion * lithium * neutron depth profiling * polymers Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2014

  18. In depth analysis of motivational factors at work in the health industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motivation of health workers is necessary to generate the organizational commitment towards the patients and the hospital and therefore the knowledge about what motivates and satisfies them is very essential.The aim of the project was to investigate and analyze the various factors that help in motivation of the health workers while performing their clinical duties in the hospital. Materials and Methods: A simple random study was conducted among 100 employees of our institute, which included doctors, staff nurses and paramedical staff. One hundred employees from Gian Sagar Institute were chosen randomly for the purpose of our study. All the employees were enquired by the questionnaire method as well as by individual interviews regarding the various motivating and demotivating factors at the work place. Detailed enquiries were performed regarding the various aspects concerning the job factors and work satisfaction. All the answers and findings were observed and recorded. Results: Statistical Analysis Used: Simple non-parametric tests like mean, percentages and chi square tests were employed to analyze the data.The demographic profile of all the employees showed only minor differences which were statistically non-significant. Skills, task identity, task significance, autonomy, feedback, environment, job security and compensation were observed to be the important factors for the motivation of employees. The depth and the extent to which these factors were studied at work in the hospital showed remarkable differences. Conclusion: All the factors studied in this project are essential basis for organizational commitment, but feedback represents the factor with the highest motivation potential especially among the younger population.

  19. Comparison of inverse Laplace and numerical inversion methods for obtaining z-depth profiles of diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaojing Zhu; Predecki, P.; Ballard, B.

    1995-01-01

    Two different inversion methods, the inverse Laplace method and the linear constrained numerical method, for retrieving the z-profiles of diffraction data from experimentally obtained i-profiles were compared using tests with a known function as the original z-profile. Two different real data situations were simulated to determine the effects of specimen thickness and missing τ-profile data at small τ-values on the retrieved z-profiles. The results indicate that although both methods are able to retrieve the z-profiles in the bulk specimens satisfactorily, the numerical method can be used for thin film samples as well. Missing τ-profile data at small τ values causes error in the retrieved z-profiles with both methods, particularly when the trend of the τ-profile at small τ is significantly changed because of the missing data. 6 refs., 3 figs

  20. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0004 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T - Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project is to test the hypothesis that cit-specific CD4 T cells present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients

  1. In-depth 2-DE reference map of Aspergillus fumigatus and its proteomic profiling on exposure to itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Poonam; Mushahary, Dolly; Hassan, Wazid; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Madan, Taruna; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Sundaram, Curam Sreenivasacharlu; Sarma, Puranam Usha

    2016-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is a medically important opportunistic fungus that may lead to invasive aspergillosis in humans with weak immune system. Proteomic profiling of this fungus on exposure to itraconazole (ITC), an azole antifungal drug, may lead to identification of its molecular targets and better understanding on the development of drug resistance against ITC in A. fumigatus. Here, proteome analysis was performed using 2-DE followed by mass spectrometric analysis which resulted in identification of a total of 259 unique proteins. Further, proteome profiling of A. fumigatus was carried out on exposure to ITC, 0.154 μg/ml, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50). Image analysis showed altered levels of 175 proteins (66 upregulated and 109 downregulated) of A. fumigatus treated with ITC as compared to the untreated control. Peptide mass fingerprinting led to the identification of 54 proteins (12 up-regulated and 42 down-regulated). The differentially expressed proteins include proteins related to cell stress, carbohydrate metabolism and amino acid metabolism. We also observed four proteins, including nucleotide phosphate kinase (NDK), that are reported to interact with calcineurin, a protein involved in regulation of cell morphology and fungal virulence. Comparison of differentially expressed proteins on exposure to ITC with artemisinin (ART), an antimalarial drug with antifungal activity(1), revealed a total of 26 proteins to be common among them suggesting that common proteins and pathways are targeted by these two antifungal agents. The proteins targeted by ITC may serve as important leads for development of new antifungal drugs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Uncertainty analysis of depth predictions from seismic reflection data using Bayesian statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelioudakis, Dimitrios G.; Hobbs, Richard W.; Caiado, Camila C. S.

    2018-03-01

    Estimating the depths of target horizons from seismic reflection data is an important task in exploration geophysics. To constrain these depths we need a reliable and accurate velocity model. Here, we build an optimum 2D seismic reflection data processing flow focused on pre - stack deghosting filters and velocity model building and apply Bayesian methods, including Gaussian process emulation and Bayesian History Matching (BHM), to estimate the uncertainties of the depths of key horizons near the borehole DSDP-258 located in the Mentelle Basin, south west of Australia, and compare the results with the drilled core from that well. Following this strategy, the tie between the modelled and observed depths from DSDP-258 core was in accordance with the ± 2σ posterior credibility intervals and predictions for depths to key horizons were made for the two new drill sites, adjacent the existing borehole of the area. The probabilistic analysis allowed us to generate multiple realizations of pre-stack depth migrated images, these can be directly used to better constrain interpretation and identify potential risk at drill sites. The method will be applied to constrain the drilling targets for the upcoming International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), leg 369.

  3. Uncertainty analysis of depth predictions from seismic reflection data using Bayesian statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelioudakis, Dimitrios G.; Hobbs, Richard W.; Caiado, Camila C. S.

    2018-06-01

    Estimating the depths of target horizons from seismic reflection data is an important task in exploration geophysics. To constrain these depths we need a reliable and accurate velocity model. Here, we build an optimum 2-D seismic reflection data processing flow focused on pre-stack deghosting filters and velocity model building and apply Bayesian methods, including Gaussian process emulation and Bayesian History Matching, to estimate the uncertainties of the depths of key horizons near the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) borehole 258 (DSDP-258) located in the Mentelle Basin, southwest of Australia, and compare the results with the drilled core from that well. Following this strategy, the tie between the modelled and observed depths from DSDP-258 core was in accordance with the ±2σ posterior credibility intervals and predictions for depths to key horizons were made for the two new drill sites, adjacent to the existing borehole of the area. The probabilistic analysis allowed us to generate multiple realizations of pre-stack depth migrated images, these can be directly used to better constrain interpretation and identify potential risk at drill sites. The method will be applied to constrain the drilling targets for the upcoming International Ocean Discovery Program, leg 369.

  4. Gene expression analysis of early stage endometrial cancersreveals unique transcripts associated with grade and histologybut not depth of invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eRisinger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States but it remains poorly understood at the molecular level. This investigation was conducted to specifically assess whether gene expression changes underlie the clinical and pathologic factors traditionally used for determining treatment regimens in women with stage I endometrial cancer. These include the effect of tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion and histotype. We utilized oligonucleotide microarrays to assess the transcript expression profile in epithelial glandular cells laser microdissected from 79 endometrioid and 12 serous stage I endometrial cancers with a heterogeneous distribution of grade and depth of myometrial invasion, along with 12 normal post-menopausal endometrial samples. Unsupervised multidimensional scaling analyses revealed that serous and endometrioid stage I cancers have similar transcript expression patterns when compared to normal controls where 900 transcripts were identified to be differentially expressed by at least 4-fold (univariate t-test, p <0.001 between the cancers and normal endometrium. This analysis also identified transcript expression differences between serous and endometrioid cancers and tumor grade, but no apparent differences were identified as a function of depth of myometrial invasion. Four genes were validated by quantitative PCR on an independent set of cancer and normal endometrium samples. These findings indicate that unique gene expression profiles are associated with histologic type and grade, but not myometrial invasion among early stage endometrial cancers. These data provide a comprehensive perspective on the molecular alterations associated with stage I endometrial cancer, particularly those subtypes that have the worst prognosis.

  5. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-04-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg(-1)·year(-1) for SOM, 438.9 mg·g(-1)·year(-1) for C:P, 5.3 mg·g(-1)·year(-1) for C:K, and -3.23 mg·cm(-3)·year(-1) for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0-80-cm soil profile (P: -4.10 mg·kg(-1)·year(-1); pH: -0.0061 unit·year(-1); C:N: 167.1 mg·g(-1)·year(-1); K:P: 371.5 mg·g(-1) year(-1); N:K: -0.242 mg·g(-1)·year(-1); EC: 0.169 μS·cm(-1)·year(-1)), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance.

  6. Study on of Seepage Flow Velocity in Sand Layer Profile as Affected by Water Depth and Slope Gradience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.; Chen, X.

    2017-12-01

    BACKGROUND: The subsurface water flow velocity is of great significance in understanding the hydrodynamic characteristics of soil seepage and the influence of interaction between seepage flow and surface runoff on the soil erosion and sediment transport process. OBJECTIVE: To propose a visualized method and equipment for determining the seepage flow velocity and measuring the actual flow velocity and Darcy velocity as well as the relationship between them.METHOD: A transparent organic glass tank is used as the test soil tank, the white river sand is used as the seepage test material and the fluorescent dye is used as the indicator for tracing water flow, so as to determine the thickness and velocity of water flow in a visualized way. Water is supplied at the same flow rate (0.84 L h-1) to the three parts with an interval of 1m at the bottom of the soil tank and the pore water velocity and the thickness of each water layer are determined under four gradient conditions. The Darcy velocity of each layer is calculated according to the water supply flow and the discharge section area. The effective discharge flow pore is estimated according to the moisture content and porosity and then the relationship between Darcy velocity and the measured velocity is calculated based on the water supply flow and the water layer thickness, and finally the correctness of the calculation results is verified. RESULTS: According to the velocity calculation results, Darcy velocity increases significantly with the increase of gradient; in the sand layer profile, the flow velocity of pore water at different depths increases with the increase of gradient; under the condition of the same gradient, the lower sand layer has the maximum flow velocity of pore water. The air-filled porosity of sand layer determines the proportional relationship between Darcy velocity and pore flow velocity. CONCLUSIONS: The actual flow velocity and Darcy velocity can be measured by a visualized method and the

  7. Highly Resolved Mg/Ca Depth Profiles of Planktic Foraminifer test Walls Using Single shot Measurements of fs-LA-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, K. P.; Schiebel, R.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Haug, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Foraminifers are sensitive archives of changes in climate and marine environment. It has been shown that the Mg/Ca signal is a suitable proxy of seawater temperature, because the incorporation of Mg depends on ambient water temperature. In contrast to most former studies, where this ratio is determined by solution-based bulk analysis of 20 - 30 specimens, we have investigated Mg/Ca in single specimens and single chambers at high resolution. A new fs-200 nm-LA-ICPMS technique was developed for the µm-sized layered calcite shells. To generate depth profiles with a resolution of about 50 nm/shot, we chose a low fluence of about 0.3 Jcm-2 and performed single shot measurements of the double charged 44Ca++ and the single charged 25Mg+ ions together. Precision (RSD) of the Mg/Ca data is about 5 %. Calibration was performed with the carbonate reference material MACS-3 from the USGS. Our results for different species from the Arabian Sea and Caribbean Sea demonstrate that Mg/Ca of different chambers vary and indicate that the foraminifer individuals built their chambers in different water depths and/or experienced seasonal changes in seawater temperature caused, for example, by upwelling (cold) versus stratified (warm) conditions. Typically, the Mg/Ca ratios of the final two chambers of the planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii from a sediment core of the Arabian Sea differ by about 5 mmol/mol from earlier chambers (2 mmol/mol) corresponding to seawater temperatures of 28 °C and 18 °C, respectively. In addition, mass fractions of other elements like Sr, Mn, Fe, Ba, and U have been determined with fs-LA-ICPMS using fast line scans, and thus provide further insights in the ecology of foraminifers.

  8. Spectra from 2.5-15 μm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viator, John A; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 μm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare TM ), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 μm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 μm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 μm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 μm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant μ ir is used. In such cases, overestimating μ ir will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. (note)

  9. Statistical Analysis and Evaluation of the Depth of the Ruts on Lithuanian State Significance Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erinijus Getautis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to gather information about the national flexible pavement roads ruts depth, to determine its statistical dispersijon index and to determine their validity for needed requirements. Analysis of scientific works of ruts apearance in the asphalt and their influence for driving is presented in this work. Dynamical models of ruts in asphalt are presented in the work as well. Experimental outcome data of rut depth dispersijon in the national highway of Lithuania Vilnius – Kaunas is prepared. Conclusions are formulated and presented. Article in Lithuanian

  10. Multi-approach analysis of maximum riverbed scour depth above subway tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When subway tunnels are routed underneath rivers, riverbed scour may expose the structure, with potentially severe consequences. Thus, it is important to identify the maximum scour depth to ensure that the designed buried depth is adequate. There are a range of methods that may be applied to this problem, including the fluvial process analysis method, geological structure analysis method, scour formula method, scour model experiment method, and numerical simulation method. However, the application ranges and forecasting precision of these methods vary considerably. In order to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of the different methods, a subway tunnel passing underneath a river was selected, and the aforementioned five methods were used to forecast the maximum scour depth. The fluvial process analysis method was used to characterize the river regime and evolution trend, which were the baseline for examination of the scour depth of the riverbed. The results obtained from the scour model experiment and the numerical simulation methods are reliable; these two methods are suitable for application to tunnel projects passing underneath rivers. The scour formula method was less accurate than the scour model experiment method; it is suitable for application to lower risk projects such as pipelines. The results of the geological structure analysis had low precision; the method is suitable for use as a secondary method to assist other research methods. To forecast the maximum scour depth of the riverbed above the subway tunnel, a combination of methods is suggested, and the appropriate analysis method should be chosen with respect to the local conditions.

  11. 3D depth image analysis for indoor fall detection of elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new fall detection method of elderly people in a room environment based on shape analysis of 3D depth images captured by a Kinect sensor. Depth images are pre-processed by a median filter both for background and target. The silhouette of moving individual in depth images is achieved by a subtraction method for background frames. The depth images are converted to disparity map, which is obtained by the horizontal and vertical projection histogram statistics. The initial floor plane information is obtained by V disparity map, and the floor plane equation is estimated by the least square method. Shape information of human subject in depth images is analyzed by a set of moment functions. Coefficients of ellipses are calculated to determine the direction of individual. The centroids of the human body are calculated and the angle between the human body and the floor plane is calculated. When both the distance from the centroids of the human body to the floor plane and the angle between the human body and the floor plane are lower than some thresholds, fall incident will be detected. Experiments with different falling direction are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect fall incidents effectively.

  12. Depth profile of production yields of {sup nat}Pb(p, xn) {sup 206,205,204,203,202,201}Bi nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Nam-Suk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Arim; Bae, Oryun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Seock, E-mail: lee@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Experimental and simulation studies on the depth profiles of production yields of {sup nat}Pb(p, xn) {sup 206,205,204,203,202,201}Bi nuclear reactions were carried out. Irradiation experiments were performed at the high-intensity proton linac facility (KOMAC) in Korea. The targets, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, were arranged in a stack consisting of natural Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by activation analysis method using {sup 27}Al(p, 3p1n){sup 24}Na, {sup 197}Au(p, p1n){sup 196}Au, and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au monitor reactions and also by Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in the {sup nat}Pb activation foils and monitor foils were measured by HPGe spectroscopy system. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by FLUKA, PHITS/DCHAIN-SP, and MCNPX/FISPACT codes and the calculated data were compared with the experimental results. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the simulations.

  13. Depth profiles of production yields of natPb(p, xn206,205,204,203,202 Bi reactions using 100-MeV proton beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranj Leila Mokhtari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, results of the experimental study on the depth profiles of production yields of 206,205,204,203,202Bi radio-nuclei in the natural Pb target irradiated by a 100-MeV proton beam are presented. Irradiation was performed at proton linac facility (KOMAC in Korea. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of natural Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by activation analysis method using 27Al(p, 3p1n24Na, 197Au(p, p1n196Au, and 197Au(p, p3n194Au monitor reactions and also using dosimetry method by a Gafchromic film. The production yields of produced Bi radio-nuclei in the natural Pb foils and monitor reactions were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by FLUKA, PHITS, and MCNPX codes and compared with the measurements in order to verify validity of physical models and nuclear data libraries in the Monte Carlo codes. A fairly good agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the simulations by FLUKA, PHITS, and MCNPX. However, physical models and the nuclear data relevant to the end of range of protons in the codes need to be improved.

  14. Effects of recoil-implanted oxygen on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kitano, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Masahito; Kawano, Takao; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1996-04-01

    Effects of oxygen atoms recoiled from SiO{sub 2} films on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For an epitaxial Si specimen, the depth profile of defects was found to be shifted toward the surface by recoil implantation of oxygen atoms. This was attributed to the formation of vacancy-oxygen complexes and a resultant decrease in the diffusion length of vacancy-type defects. The recoiled oxygen atoms stabilized amorphous regions introduced by P{sup +}-implantation, and the annealing of these regions was observed after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 700degC. For a Czochralski-grown Si specimen fabricated by through-oxide implantation, the recoiled oxygen atoms introduced interstitial-type defects upon RTA below the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, and such defects were dissociated by annealing at 1000degC. (author)

  15. Multiaxial stress analysis taking account of penetration depth of x-rays, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto.

    1985-01-01

    In the past X-ray stress analysis in which the effect of stress gradients was taken into account within the penetration depth of X-rays, three assumptions have been made; 1) the stress gradient is linear in respect to the depth from the specimen surface, 2) the penetration depth of X-ray is a function of Sin 2 PSI and 3) the strain measured by X-rays corresponds to the weighted average strain on the intensity of the diffracted X-rays. A problem, however, still remains on the assumption of the X-ray penetration depth. We sometimes observed noticiable errors in the stage of the numerical simulation and these errors depend on the combination of stress components in a stress tensor. In the present paper, we proposed a new X-ray multiaxial stress analysis without using the assumption of the X-ray penetration depth. This analysis is also applicable to both the iso-inclination method ( OHM -goniometer) and the side inclination method (PSI-goniometer). The weighted average strain by X-rays, 1 >(phi), is expressed as a 4th degree function of cosPSI for iso-inclination method and 3rd degree for side inclination method. By rearranging this function as a sum of average strain, ( 1 >(0 0 )+ 1 >(90 0 )), and difference of average strain, ( 1 >(0 0 )- 1 >(90 0 )), we can solve the stress components with sufficient accuracy by a least squares method. The validity of this method was proved through numerical simulations and experiments. (author)

  16. Nuclear Test Depth Determination with Synthetic Modelling: Global Analysis from PNEs to DPRK-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, Mikhail; Stachnik, Joshua; Baker, Ben; Epiphansky, Alexey; Bobrov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Seismic event depth determination is critical for the event screening process at the International Data Center, CTBTO. A thorough determination of the event depth can be conducted mostly through additional special analysis because the IDC's Event Definition Criteria is based, in particular, on depth estimation uncertainties. This causes a large number of events in the Reviewed Event Bulletin to have depth constrained to the surface making the depth screening criterion not applicable. Further it may result in a heavier workload to manually distinguish between subsurface and deeper crustal events. Since the shape of the first few seconds of signal of very shallow events is very sensitive to the depth phases, cross correlation between observed and theoretic seismograms can provide a basis for the event depth estimation, and so an expansion to the screening process. We applied this approach mostly to events at teleseismic and partially regional distances. The approach was found efficient for the seismic event screening process, with certain caveats related mostly to poorly defined source and receiver crustal models which can shift the depth estimate. An adjustable teleseismic attenuation model (t*) for synthetics was used since this characteristic is not known for most of the rays we studied. We studied a wide set of historical records of nuclear explosions, including so called Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) with presumably known depths, and recent DPRK nuclear tests. The teleseismic synthetic approach is based on the stationary phase approximation with hudson96 program, and the regional modelling was done with the generalized ray technique by Vlastislav Cerveny modified to account for the complex source topography. The software prototype is designed to be used for the Expert Technical Analysis at the IDC. With this, the design effectively reuses the NDC-in-a-Box code and can be comfortably utilized by the NDC users. The package uses Geotool as a front-end for data

  17. Bayesian mixture analysis for metagenomic community profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfopoulou, Sofia; Plagnol, Vincent

    2015-09-15

    Deep sequencing of clinical samples is now an established tool for the detection of infectious pathogens, with direct medical applications. The large amount of data generated produces an opportunity to detect species even at very low levels, provided that computational tools can effectively profile the relevant metagenomic communities. Data interpretation is complicated by the fact that short sequencing reads can match multiple organisms and by the lack of completeness of existing databases, in particular for viral pathogens. Here we present metaMix, a Bayesian mixture model framework for resolving complex metagenomic mixtures. We show that the use of parallel Monte Carlo Markov chains for the exploration of the species space enables the identification of the set of species most likely to contribute to the mixture. We demonstrate the greater accuracy of metaMix compared with relevant methods, particularly for profiling complex communities consisting of several related species. We designed metaMix specifically for the analysis of deep transcriptome sequencing datasets, with a focus on viral pathogen detection; however, the principles are generally applicable to all types of metagenomic mixtures. metaMix is implemented as a user friendly R package, freely available on CRAN: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/metaMix sofia.morfopoulou.10@ucl.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bionformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. The use of neutron diffraction for the determination of the in-depth residual stresses profile in weld coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Maria Jose; Batista, A.C.; Nobre, J.P.; Loureiro, Altino; Kornmeier, Joana R.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron diffraction is a non-destructive technique, particularly suitable for the analysis of residual stress fields in welds. The technique is used in this article to study ferritic samples, coated by submerged arc welding using stainless steel filler metals. This procedure is often used for manufacturing process equipment for chemical and nuclear industries, for ease of implementation and economic reasons. The main disadvantage of that processes is the cracking phenomenon that often occurs at the interface between the base material and coatings, which can be minimized by performing post-weld stress relief heat treatments. The samples analyzed in this study were made of carbon steel plates, coated by submerged arc welding two types of stainless steel filler metals. For the first layer was used one EN 12 072 - S 2 U 23 12 electrode, while for the second and third layers were used an EN 12 072 - 19 12 3 S L electrode. After cladding, the samples were submitted to a post-weld heat treatment for 1 hour at 620 deg C. The residual stress profiles obtained by neutron diffraction evidence the relaxation of residual stress given by the heat treatment. (author)

  19. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium—tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekynia, B.; Razavipour, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x = 0 qualitatively. A high threshold energy flux density, i.e., E* = 4.3 × 10 12 J/m 2 , has been reached. Recently, fast ignition by employing clean petawatt—picosecond laser pulses was performed. The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses. The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium—tritium fuel at solid-state density. The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated. Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition. In this paper, the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks, thermonuclear reaction, heat transfer, electron—ion equilibration, stopping power of alpha particles, bremsstrahlung, expansion, density dependence, and fluid dynamics. New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations, including the density profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity. The density is only a function of x and independent of time. The ignition energy flux density, E* t , for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 10 12 J/m 2 . Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x = 0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  20. Defect distribution in low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy grown Si/Si(100), improved depth profiling with monoenergetic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeles, C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Gossmann, H.; Unterwald, F.C.; Boone, T.

    1995-01-01

    The depth distribution of open-volume defects has been studied in Si(100) crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 300 degree C by the variable-energy monoenergetic positron beam technique combined with well-controlled chemical etching. This procedure gave a 10 nm depth resolution which is a significant improvement over the inherent depth resolving power of the positron beam technique. The epitaxial layer was found to grow defect-free up to 80 nm, from the interface, where small vacancy clusters, larger than divacancies, appear. The defect density then sharply increases toward the film surface. The result clearly shows that the nucleation of small open-volume defects is a precursor state to the breakdown of epitaxy and to the evolution of an amorphous film

  1. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    be used to identify and characterize CD4+T cells specific for influenza A, West Nile, Yellow fever , Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis viruses. The...four difference species of Flavivirus using the TGEM approach. These will include: Yellow Fever Virus, West Nile Virus, Dengue Virus and Japanese...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0004 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  2. New Professional Profiles and Skills in the Journalistic Field: A Scoping Review and In-Depth Interviews with Professionals in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Marques-Hayasaki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The professional profiles and skills related to journalism are adapting to a new paradigm as a consequence of the advent of new technologies - the web 2.0, the end of the monopoly of news production by mass media, etc. This study aims to provide a comprehensive critical mapping of new professional profiles and skills demanded in the field of journalism, based on a scoping review and in-depth interviews with professionals and academics in Spain. The results show a great variety of new profiles and nomenclatures. This is in part because of a significant overlapping in the functions emphasized by them. With regards to skills, the traditional ones are still the most valued by the market, although new competencies are becoming more and more important.

  3. Local in-depth analysis of ceramic materials by neutral beam secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchardt, G.; Scherrer, H.; Weber, S.; Scherrer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Local microanalysis of non-conducting surfaces by means of modern physical methods which use charged low-energy primary particles brings about severe problems because of the electrostatic charge accumulated on the sample surface. This is also true of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) where ions are usually used as primary particles. In the present work the basic features for production of neutral primary beams in commercial SIMS instruments by a simple technique are described. With suitably high sputtering rates, surface analyses and in-depth profiles can be made in reasonable measuring times. Results are given for chemical concentration distributions in the near-surface regions of an oxide glass and for the isotopic diffusion of Si-30 in a crystalline silicate with olivine structure (Co 2 SiO 4 ). (orig.)

  4. Analysis of LiSn alloy at several depths using LIBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchoňová, M., E-mail: maria.suchonova@fmph.uniba.sk [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Krištof, J.; Pribula, M. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Veis, M. [Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Science, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, Ilkovičova 6, 842 15 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Tabarés, F.L. [Fusion Department, Ciemat, Av Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Veis, P., E-mail: pavel.veis@fmph.uniba.sk [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-04-15

    The difference between the composition of the surface and the inner part of the LiSn sample was studied using Calibration Free Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) method. The sample was analysed under the low pressure (1330 Pa) in Ar atmosphere. The spectra were record using Echelle spectrometer (Mechelle ME5000). Gate delay and gate width was optimised and set to 300 ns. In order to analyse depth profile the LIBS spectra was recorded after each laser shot. The electron density analysed by laser induced plasma was determined separately for each laser shot, which means for each ablated layer of investigated sample. The difference between the individual shots taken at distinct sites of the sample are shown. The CF-LIBS method was used to determine the elemental composition near the surface and in the central part of the LiSn sample.

  5. Diurnal variations in depth profiles of UV-induced DNA damage and inhibition of bacterioplankton production in tropical coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, PM; Poos, JJ; Scheper, BB; Boelen, P; van Duyl, FC

    2002-01-01

    In this study, diurnal changes in bacterial production and DNA damage in bacterio-plankton (measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPDs) incubated in bags at different depths in tropical coastal waters were investigated. The DNA damage and inhibition of the bacterial production was highest at

  6. Neutron activation and PIXE analysis of oyster tissues cultivated at different ocean depths for trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, M.; Nakano, Y.; Chatt, A.

    2005-01-01

    Difference in trace element concentrations in oyster tissues cultivated in Japan on hanging ropes at different sea depths were investigated using INAA and PIXE. Three groups of oyster were collected from a single rope at 1 m, 6 m, and 11 m depths. From each group, five oysters were chosen and removed from the shell after washing in tap water. Two groups of organ, namely hepatopancreas and muscle, and gill and mantle were separated from soft tissues, freeze-dried, and pulverized. One portion of the powdered samples was irradiated for a short time at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in Canada for Ag and Se analysis. Another portion was irradiated for one hour in Kyoto University Reactor in Osaka, Japan for Fe, Rb, Sc, and Zn analysis. The third portion was digested in a microwave oven after the addition of an indium solution (as an internal standard) and concentrated nitric acid for analysis by PIXE. More than twenty elements were determined by PIXE. The organs in oysters have different roles. For example, hepatopancreas and muscle are thought to accumulate elements after ingestion of plankton from sea water while gill and mantle are always in contact with sea water. As a result, there were differences in levels of some elements between the two groups of organ. In addition, levels of most elements were found to be depth dependent. The variations in Fe and Zn concentrations of the two organ groups at 3 different depths are shown in Table 1. Details of the method and results will be presented.

  7. Microsoft Kinect Visual and Depth Sensors for Breathing and Heart Rate Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Procházka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to a new method of using Microsoft (MS Kinect sensors for non-contact monitoring of breathing and heart rate estimation to detect possible medical and neurological disorders. Video sequences of facial features and thorax movements are recorded by MS Kinect image, depth and infrared sensors to enable their time analysis in selected regions of interest. The proposed methodology includes the use of computational methods and functional transforms for data selection, as well as their denoising, spectral analysis and visualization, in order to determine specific biomedical features. The results that were obtained verify the correspondence between the evaluation of the breathing frequency that was obtained from the image and infrared data of the mouth area and from the thorax movement that was recorded by the depth sensor. Spectral analysis of the time evolution of the mouth area video frames was also used for heart rate estimation. Results estimated from the image and infrared data of the mouth area were compared with those obtained by contact measurements by Garmin sensors (www.garmin.com. The study proves that simple image and depth sensors can be used to efficiently record biomedical multidimensional data with sufficient accuracy to detect selected biomedical features using specific methods of computational intelligence. The achieved accuracy for non-contact detection of breathing rate was 0.26% and the accuracy of heart rate estimation was 1.47% for the infrared sensor. The following results show how video frames with depth data can be used to differentiate different kinds of breathing. The proposed method enables us to obtain and analyse data for diagnostic purposes in the home environment or during physical activities, enabling efficient human–machine interaction.

  8. Curie point depth from spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data for geothermal reconnaissance in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibi, H.; Aboud, E.; Gottsmann, J.

    2015-11-01

    The geologic setting of Afghanistan has the potential to contain significant mineral, petroleum and geothermal resources. However, much of the country's potential remains unknown due to limited exploration surveys. Here, we present countrywide aeromagnetic data to estimate the Curie point depth (CPD) and to evaluate the geothermal exploration potential. CPD is an isothermal surface at which magnetic minerals lose their magnetization and as such outlines an isotherm of about 580 °C. We use spectral analysis on the aeromagnetic data to estimate the CPD spatial distribution and compare our findings with known geothermal fields in the western part of Afghanistan. The results outline four regions with geothermal potential: 1) regions of shallow Curie point depths (∼16-21 km) are located in the Helmand basin. 2) regions of intermediate depths (∼21-27 km) are located in the southern Helmand basin and the Baluchistan area. 3) Regions of great depths (∼25-35 km) are located in the Farad block. 4) Regions of greatest depths (∼35-40 km) are located in the western part of the northern Afghanistan platform. The deduced thermal structure in western Afghanistan relates to the collision of the Eurasian and Indian plates, while the shallow CPDs are related to crustal thinning. This study also shows that the geothermal systems are associated with complex magmatic and tectonic association of major intrusions and fault systems. Our results imply geothermal gradients ranging from 14 °C/km to 36 °C/km and heat-flow values ranging from 36 to 90 mW/m2 for the study area.

  9. In vivo confocal Raman microscopic determination of depth profiles of the stratum corneum lipid organization influenced by application of various oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-08-01

    The intercellular lipids (ICL) of stratum corneum (SC) play an important role in maintaining the skin barrier function. The lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in SC is not homogenous, but rather depth-dependent. This study aimed to analyze the influence of the topically applied mineral-derived (paraffin and petrolatum) and plant-derived (almond oil and jojoba oil) oils on the depth-dependent ICL profile ordering of the SC in vivo. Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), a unique tool to analyze the depth profile of the ICL structure non-invasively, is employed to investigate the interaction between oils and human SC in vivo. The results show that the response of SC to oils' permeation varies in the depths. All oils remain in the upper layers of the SC (0-20% of SC thickness) and show predominated differences of ICL ordering from intact skin. In these depths, skin treated with plant-derived oils shows more disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL than intact skin (p0.1), except plant-derived oils at the depth 30% of SC thickness. In the deeper layers of the SC (60-100% of SC thickness), no difference between ICL lateral packing order of the oil-treated and intact skin can be observed, except that at the depths of 70-90% of the SC thickness, where slight changes with more disorder states are measured for plant-derived oil treated skin (p<0.1), which could be explained by the penetration of free fatty acid fractions in the deep-located SC areas. Both oil types remain in the superficial layers of the SC (0-20% of the SC thickness). Skin treated with mineral- and plant-derived oils shows significantly higher disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in these layers of the SC compared to intact skin. Plant-derived oils significantly changed the ICL ordering in the depths of 30% and 70-90% of the SC thickness, which is likely due to the penetration of free fatty acids in the deeper layers of the SC. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for

  10. Chemical weathering of a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California I: Interpreting rates and controls based on soil concentration-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, David A.; Anderson, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes in element and mineral concentrations in regolith profiles in a chronosequence developed on marine terraces along coastal California are interpreted in terms of chemical weathering rates and processes. In regoliths up to 15 m deep and 226 kyrs old, quartz-normalized mass transfer coefficients indicate non-stoichiometric preferential release of Sr > Ca > Na from plagioclase along with lesser amounts of K, Rb and Ba derived from K-feldspar. Smectite weathering results in the loss of Mg and concurrent incorporation of Al and Fe into secondary kaolinite and Fe-oxides in shallow argillic horizons. Elemental losses from weathering of the Santa Cruz terraces fall within the range of those for other marine terraces along the Pacific Coast of North America. Residual amounts of plagioclase and K-feldspar decrease with terrace depth and increasing age. The gradient of the weathering profile bs is defined by the ratio of the weathering rate, R to the velocity at which the profile penetrates into the protolith. A spreadsheet calculator further refines profile geometries, demonstrating that the non-linear regions at low residual feldspar concentrations at shallow depth are dominated by exponential changes in mineral surface-to-volume ratios and at high residual feldspar concentrations, at greater depth, by the approach to thermodynamic saturation. These parameters are of secondary importance to the fluid flux qh, which in thermodynamically saturated pore water, controls the weathering velocity and mineral losses from the profiles. Long-term fluid fluxes required to reproduce the feldspar weathering profiles are in agreement with contemporary values based on solute Cl balances (qh = 0.025-0.17 m yr-1). During saturation-controlled and solute-limited weathering, the greater loss of plagioclase relative to K-feldspar is dependent on the large difference in their respective solubilities instead of the small difference between their respective

  11. [Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1998-04-25

    During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

  12. Digging a Little Deeper: Microbial Communities, Molecular Composition and Soil Organic Matter Turnover along Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Green, E. A.; Nico, P. S.; Tfaily, M. M.; Wood, T. E.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored in deep soil layers where we know little about its fate or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. Organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears to be associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, including estimates of the turnover times of deep soil C, the sensitivity of this C to global environmental change, and the microorganisms involved. We quantified bulk C pools, microbial communities, molecular composition of soil organic matter, and soil radiocarbon turnover times from surface soils to 1.5m depths in multiple soil pits across the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C concentrations dropped from 5.5% at the surface to communities in surface soils (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) versus those below the active rooting zone (Verrucomicrobia and Thaumarchaea). High resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) analyses suggest a shift in the composition of OM with depth (especially in the water soluble fraction), an increase in oxidation, and decreasing H/C with depth (indicating higher aromaticity). Additionally, surface samples were rich in lignin-like compounds of plant origin that were absent with depth. Soil OM 14C and mean turnover times were variable across replicate horizons, ranging from 3-1500 years at the surface, to 5000-40,000 years at depth. In comparison to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C. Particulate organic matter (free light fraction), with a relatively modern 14C was found in low but measureable concentration in even the deepest soil horizons. Our results indicate these

  13. Pattern and intensity of human impact on coral reefs depend on depth along the reef profile and on the descriptor adopted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepote, Ettore; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica

    2016-09-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by multiple global and local disturbances. The Maldives, already heavily hit by the 1998 mass bleaching event, are currently affected also by growing tourism and coastal development that may add to global impacts. Most of the studies investigating effects of local disturbances on coral reefs assessed the response of communities along a horizontal distance from the impact source. This study investigated the status of a Maldivian coral reef around an island where an international touristic airport has been recently (2009-2011) built, at different depths along the reef profile (5-20 m depth) and considering the change in the percentage of cover of five different non-taxonomic descriptors assessed through underwater visual surveys: hard corals, soft corals, other invertebrates, macroalgae and abiotic attributes. Eight reefs in areas not affected by any coastal development were used as controls and showed a reduction of hard coral cover and an increase of abiotic attributes (i.e. sand, rock, coral rubble) at the impacted reef. However, hard coral cover, the most widely used descriptor of coral reef health, was not sufficient on its own to detect subtle indirect effects that occurred down the reef profile. Selecting an array of descriptors and considering different depths, where corals may find a refuge from climate impacts, could guide the efforts of minimising local human pressures on coral reefs.

  14. Analyzing the trophic link between the mesopelagic microbial loop and zooplankton from observed depth profiles of bacteria and protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanaka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that organic carbon exported to the ocean aphotic layer is significantly consumed by heterotrophic organisms such as bacteria and zooplankton in the mesopelagic layer. However, very little is known for the trophic link between bacteria and zooplankton or the function of the microbial loop in this layer. In the northwestern Mediterranean, recent studies have shown that viruses, bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and ciliates distribute down to 2000 m with group-specific depth-dependent decreases, and that bacterial production decreases with depth down to 1000 m. Here we show that such data can be analyzed using a simple steady-state food chain model to quantify the carbon flow from bacteria to zooplankton over the mesopelagic layer. The model indicates that bacterial mortality by viruses is similar to or 1.5 times greater than that by heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and that heterotrophic nanoflagellates transfer little of bacterial production to higher trophic levels.

  15. A new method to identify the foot of continental slope based on an integrated profile analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Li, Jiabiao; Li, Shoujun; Shang, Jihong; Jin, Xiaobin

    2017-06-01

    A new method is proposed to identify automatically the foot of the continental slope (FOS) based on the integrated analysis of topographic profiles. Based on the extremum points of the second derivative and the Douglas-Peucker algorithm, it simplifies the topographic profiles, then calculates the second derivative of the original profiles and the D-P profiles. Seven steps are proposed to simplify the original profiles. Meanwhile, multiple identification methods are proposed to determine the FOS points, including gradient, water depth and second derivative values of data points, as well as the concave and convex, continuity and segmentation of the topographic profiles. This method can comprehensively and intelligently analyze the topographic profiles and their derived slopes, second derivatives and D-P profiles, based on which, it is capable to analyze the essential properties of every single data point in the profile. Furthermore, it is proposed to remove the concave points of the curve and in addition, to implement six FOS judgment criteria.

  16. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  17. Dielectric analysis of depth dependent curing behavior of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Moeginger, Bernhard; Grossgarten, Mandy; Rosentritt, Martin; Hausnerova, Berenika

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate depth dependent changes of polymerization process and kinetics of visible light-curing (VLC) dental composites in real-time. The measured quantity - "ion viscosity" determined by dielectric analysis (DEA) - provides the depth dependent reaction rate which is correlated to the light intensity available in the corresponding depths derived from light transmission measurements. The ion viscosity curves of two composites (VOCO Arabesk Top and Grandio) were determined during irradiation of 40s with a light-curing unit (LCU) in specimen depths of 0.5/0.75/1.0/1.25/1.5/1.75 and 2.0mm using a dielectric cure analyzer (NETZSCH DEA 231 with Mini IDEX sensors). The thickness dependent light transmission was measured by irradiation composite specimens of various thicknesses on top of a radiometer setup. The shape of the ion viscosity curves depends strongly on the specimen thickness above the sensor. All curves exhibit a range of linear time dependency of the ion viscosity after a certain initiation time. The determined initiation times, the slopes of the linear part of the curves, and the ion viscosities at the end of the irradiation differ significantly with depth within the specimen. The slopes of the ion viscosity curves as well as the light intensity values decrease with depth and fit to the Lambert-Beer law. The corresponding attenuation coefficients are determined for Arabesk Top OA2 to 1.39mm(-1) and 1.48mm(-1), respectively, and for Grandio OA2 with 1.17 and 1.39mm(-1), respectively. For thicknesses exceeding 1.5mm a change in polymerization behavior is observed as the ion viscosity increases subsequent to the linear range indicating some kind of reaction acceleration. The two VLC composites and different specimen thicknesses discriminate significantly in their ion viscosity evolution allowing for a precise characterization of the curing process even with respect to the polymerization mechanism. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  18. Determination of the particulate extinction-coefficient profile and the column-integrated lidar ratios using the backscatter-coefficient and optical-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir A Kovalev; Wei Min Hao; Cyle Wold

    2007-01-01

    A new method is considered that can be used for inverting data obtained from a combined elastic-inelastic lidar or a high spectral resolution lidar operating in a one-directional mode, or an elastic lidar operating in a multiangle mode. The particulate extinction coefficient is retrieved from the simultaneously measured profiles of the particulate backscatter...

  19. First experiences of full-profile analysis with GUISDAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize the theory behind full-profile analysis of IS measurements and report first practical experiences with the GUISDAP (Grand Unified Incoherent Scatter Design and Analysis Package system designed to perform full-profile analysis of any IS measurements efficiently. By fitting whole plasma parameter profiles over the ionosphere, instead of point values of the parameters supposed to be approximately constant over small range intervals, full-profile analysis is free of underlying assumptions about the slow variation of the plasma parameters as a function of range. We define full-profile analysis as a mathematical inversion problem formalism and explain how it differs from the traditional gated analysis. Moreover, we study the bias introduced to traditional analysis results using realistic model ionospheres. By applying the full-profile method to data generated from the model ionospheres, we demonstrate that full-profile analysis is free from this kind of bias. Lastly, an example of analysis of real data by full-profile and gated analyses is shown.

  20. First experiences of full-profile analysis with GUISDAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize the theory behind full-profile analysis of IS measurements and report first practical experiences with the GUISDAP (Grand Unified Incoherent Scatter Design and Analysis Package system designed to perform full-profile analysis of any IS measurements efficiently. By fitting whole plasma parameter profiles over the ionosphere, instead of point values of the parameters supposed to be approximately constant over small range intervals, full-profile analysis is free of underlying assumptions about the slow variation of the plasma parameters as a function of range. We define full-profile analysis as a mathematical inversion problem formalism and explain how it differs from the traditional gated analysis. Moreover, we study the bias introduced to traditional analysis results using realistic model ionospheres. By applying the full-profile method to data generated from the model ionospheres, we demonstrate that full-profile analysis is free from this kind of bias. Lastly, an example of analysis of real data by full-profile and gated analyses is shown.

  1. Load profiles analysis for electricity market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Porumb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of electric power system transition towards smart grids, and the adoption of the electric market schemes, electric utilities are facing the need of a better load profiles understanding for their customers. In this work, some key objectives were addresses, such as definition of the mathematical model for calculating the hourly energy specific, identification of the three target groups for users who have developed consumer profiles, definition of the two types of significant load and assessment of the impact of using consumer profiles on users.

  2. Investigating Surface and Interface Phenomena in LiFeBO3 Electrodes Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy Depth Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibach, Julia; Younesi, Reza; Schwarzburger, Nele

    2014-01-01

    The formation of surface and interface layers at the electrodes is highly important for the performance and stability of lithium ion batteries. To unravel the surface composition of electrode materials, photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is highly suitable as it probes chemical surface and interface...... properties with high surface sensitivity. Additionally, by using synchrotron-generated hard x-rays as excitation source, larger probing depths compared to in-house PES can be achieved. Therefore, the combination of in-house soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy...

  3. Practical In-Depth Analysis of IDS Alerts for Tracing and Identifying Potential Attackers on Darknet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuk Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The darknet (i.e., a set of unused IP addresses is a very useful solution for observing the global trends of cyber threats and analyzing attack activities on the Internet. Since the darknet is not connected with real systems, in most cases, the incoming packets on the darknet (‘the darknet traffic’ do not contain a payload. This means that we are unable to get real malware from the darknet traffic. This situation makes it difficult for security experts (e.g., academic researchers, engineers, operators, etc. to identify whether the source hosts of the darknet traffic are infected by real malware or not. In this paper, we present the overall procedure of the in-depth analysis between the darknet traffic and IDS alerts using real data collected at the Science and Technology Cyber Security Center (S&T CSC in Korea and provide the detailed in-depth analysis results. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide practical experience, insight and know-how to security experts so that they are able to identify and trace the root cause of the darknet traffic. The experimental results show that correlation analysis between the darknet traffic and IDS alerts is very useful to discover potential attack hosts, especially internal hosts, and to find out what kinds of malware infected them.

  4. Depth distribution analysis of martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Chechenin, N.G.; Grabaek, L.; Bohr, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we present results from a depth distribution analysis of the martensitic phase change occurring in Xe implanted single crystals of austenitic stainless steel. Analysis was done by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis, X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) of the implanted surface. It is found that the martensitic transformation of the surface layer occurs for fluences above 1x10 20 m -2 . The thickness of the transformed layer increases with fluence to ≅ 150 nm at 1x10 21 m -2 , which far exceeds the range plus straggling of the implanted Xe as calculated by the TRIM computer simulation code. Simulations using the MARLOWE code indicate that the thickness of the transformed layer coincides with the range of the small fraction of ions channeled under random implantation conditions. Using cross sectional TEM on the Xe implanted crystals, the depth distribution of gas inclusions and defects can be directly observed. Using X-ray diffraction on implanted single crystals, the solid epitaxial nature of the Xe inclusions, induced prior to the martensitic transformation, was established. The lattice constant obtained from the broad diffraction peak indicates that the pressure in the inclusions is ≅ 5 GPa. (orig./BHO)

  5. In-depth analysis of accidental criticality in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.; Gmal, B.

    1989-01-01

    An in-depth-analysis including probabilistic considerations has been performed for a potential criticality excursion in two large vessels in a planned reprocessing plant. Criticality safety of these components is based on limitation of uranium and plutonium concentration. The main intention of this study was to investigate the potential and probable magnitude of a criticality in greater detail and to detect possible weaknesses of criticality safety provisions. The results of the analysis show, that the calculated probability of less than 5 · 10 -4 /a a for a criticality excursion in the most relevant rework tank may be further reduced. The peak power rework tank may be further reduced by design modifications. The peak power and total fissions of the critical excursion as assessed in a preceding analysis for licensing are conservative by factors of 10 and 4, respectively

  6. Depth distribution analysis of Martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, E.; Gerritsen, E.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the implantation of noble gases in metals has been found to induce some exciting phenomena such as formation of inclusions containing solid gas at extremely high pressures. In stainless steels these inclusions are the origin of a stress-induced martensitic fcc → bcc phase...... transformation in the implanted layer. In this work we present results from a depth distribution analysis of the martensitic phase change occurring in Xe implanted single crystals of austenitic stainless steel. Analysis was done by in situ RBS/channeling analysis, X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission...... electron microscopy (XTEM) of the implanted surface. It is found that the martensitic transformation of the surface layer occurs for fluences above 1 × 1020 m−2. The thickness of the transformed layer increases with fluence to ≈ 150 nm at 1 × 10 21 m−2, which far exceeds the range plus straggling...

  7. Fractal Analysis of Rock Joint Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audy, Ondřej; Ficker, Tomáš

    2017-10-01

    Surface reliefs of rock joints are analyzed in geotechnics when shear strength of rocky slopes is estimated. The rock joint profiles actually are self-affine fractal curves and computations of their fractal dimensions require special methods. Many papers devoted to the fractal properties of these profiles were published in the past but only a few of those papers employed a convenient computational method that would have guaranteed a sound value of that dimension. As a consequence, anomalously low dimensions were presented. This contribution deals with two computational modifications that lead to sound fractal dimensions of the self-affine rock joint profiles. These are the modified box-counting method and the modified yard-stick method sometimes called the compass method. Both these methods are frequently applied to self-similar fractal curves but the self-affine profile curves due to their self-affine nature require modified computational procedures implemented in computer programs.

  8. Depth profiling of thin film solar cell components by synchrotron excited Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moenig, Harry; Grimm, Alexander; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Saez-Araoz, Rodrigo; Fischer, Christian-Herbert [Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Baer, Markus [University of Las Vegas (United States); Camus, Christian; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Kaufmann, Christian; Koerber, Paul; Kropp, Timo; Lauermann, Iver; Lehmann, Sebastian; Muenchenberg, Tim; Pistor, Paul; Puttnins, Stefan; Schock, Hans-Werner; Sokoll, Stefan [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin (Germany); Jung, Christian [BESSY GmbH Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Depending on the elemental composition of a material, SXES provides an information depth of 50-1000 nm. For studies of thin multilayer structures tuning of this parameter is highly desirable. One possibility is the variation of the excitation energy, which is accompanied by variation of photoionisation cross sections. Alternatively, we performed angle resolved SXES on the solar cell absorber material Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} covered by CdS or Zn(S,O) buffer layers (10-50 nm). Due to our setup geometry, the emission spectra clearly display increased surface sensitivity at small (grazing exit) and large (grazing incidence) exit angles. A model based on Beer-Lamberts law and setup geometry is in reasonable agreement with our experimental data.The presented results show that angle resolved SXES measurements yield depth-dependent information on multilayer structures. The increased surface sensitivity at grazing exit and grazing incidence angles allows the detection of extremely thin cover layers at reasonable recording times.

  9. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  10. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Siqueira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil penetration resistance (PR is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV, skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  11. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, G. M.; Silva, E. F. F.; Montenegro, A. A. A.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2013-07-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV), skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  12. An in-depth analysis of theoretical frameworks for the study of care coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Van Houdt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complex chronic conditions often require long-term care from various healthcare professionals. Thus, maintaining quality care requires care coordination. Concepts for the study of care coordination require clarification to develop, study and evaluate coordination strategies. In 2007, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality defined care coordination and proposed five theoretical frameworks for exploring care coordination. This study aimed to update current theoretical frameworks and clarify key concepts related to care coordination. Methods: We performed a literature review to update existing theoretical frameworks. An in-depth analysis of these theoretical frameworks was conducted to formulate key concepts related to care coordination.Results: Our literature review found seven previously unidentified theoretical frameworks for studying care coordination. The in-depth analysis identified fourteen key concepts that the theoretical frameworks addressed. These were ‘external factors’, ‘structure’, ‘tasks characteristics’, ‘cultural factors’, ‘knowledge and technology’, ‘need for coordination’, ‘administrative operational processes’, ‘exchange of information’, ‘goals’, ‘roles’, ‘quality of relationship’, ‘patient outcome’, ‘team outcome’, and ‘(interorganizational outcome’.Conclusion: These 14 interrelated key concepts provide a base to develop or choose a framework for studying care coordination. The relational coordination theory and the multi-level framework are interesting as these are the most comprehensive.

  13. Low-cost three-dimensional gait analysis system for mice with an infrared depth sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Funaya, Hiroyuki; Uezono, Naohiro; Nakashima, Kinichi; Ishida, Yasumasa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Shibata, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) open-field gait analysis of mice is an essential procedure in genetic and nerve regeneration research. Existing gait analysis systems are generally expensive and may interfere with the natural behaviors of mice because of optical markers and transparent floors. In contrast, the proposed system captures the subjects shape from beneath using a low-cost infrared depth sensor (Microsoft Kinect) and an opaque infrared pass filter. This means that we can track footprints and 3D paw-tip positions without optical markers or a transparent floor, thereby preventing any behavioral changes. Our experimental results suggest with healthy mice that they are more active on opaque floors and spend more time in the center of the open-field, when compared with transparent floors. The proposed system detected footprints with a comparable performance to existing systems, and precisely tracked the 3D paw-tip positions in the depth image coordinates. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative in-depth state analysis by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and its application to surface Layer of SiC coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, Katsumasa; Yamashina, Toshiro.

    1980-01-01

    An attempt of quantitative state analysis was made on the surface and the depth profile of inorganic compounds by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which was combined by the sputter-etching with argon ions. A masking attachment was designed for an area of sample which is exposed to the non-uniform portion of the ion beam. Uniform sputter-etching could be attained, with the advantages on XPS observation of low background level and less impurity spectra from other origins than the sample. The photoelectron yields were examined for the quantitative analysis by XPS. The method established here was applied to analyze the surface and in-depth composition of SiC coatings onto carbon and molybdenum which are promising candidate materials as the first wall in a controlled thermonuclear reactor. (author)

  15. Absorbed doses profiles vs Synovia tissue depth for the Y-90 and P-32 used in radiosynoviortesis treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres B, M.B.; Ayra P, F.E.; Garcia R, E.; Cornejo D, N.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2006-01-01

    The radiosynoviortesis treatment has been used during more of 40 years as an alternative to the chemical and surgical synovectomy to alleviate the pain and to reduce the inflammation in suffered patients of rheumatic arthropathies, haemophilic arthropathies and other articulation disorders. It consists on the injection of radioactive isotopes inside a synovial cavity. For to evaluate the dosimetry of the radiosynoviortesis treatment is of great interest to know the absorbed dose in the volume of the target (synovia). The precise calculation of the absorbed dose in the inflamed synovia it is difficult, for numerous reasons, since the same one will depend on the thickness of the synovial membrane, the size of the articular space, the structure of the synovial membrane, the distribution in the articulation, the nature of the articular liquid, etc. Also the presence of the bone and the articular cartilage, components also of the articulation, it even complicated more the calculations. The method used to evaluate the dosimetry in radioactive synovectomy is known as the Monte Carlo method. The objective of our work consists on estimating with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B the absorbed dose of the Y-90 and the P-32 in the depth of the synovial tissue. The results are presented as absorbed dose for injected millicurie (Gy/mCi) versus depth of synovial tissue. The simulation one carries out keeping in mind several synovia areas, of 50 cm 2 to 250 cm 2 keeping in mind three states of progression of the illness. Those obtained values of absorbed dose using the MCNP4B code will allow to introduce in our country an optimized method of dose prescription to the patient, to treat the rheumatic arthritis in medium and big articulations using the Y-90 and the P-32, eliminating the fixed doses and fixed radionuclides for each articulation like it happens in many clinics of Europe, as well as the empiric doses. (Author)

  16. An In-Depth Analysis of Tags and Controlled Metadata for Book Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Petras, Vivien

    2017-01-01

    Book search for information needs that go beyond standard bibliographic data is far from a solved problem. Such complex information needs often cover a combination of di erent aspects, such as specific genres or plot elements, engagement or novelty. By design, subject information in controlled...... vocabularies is not always adequate in covering such complex needs, and social tags have been proposed as an alternative. In this paper we present a large-scale empirical comparison and in-depth analysis of the value of controlled vocabularies and tags for book retrieval using a test collection of over 2....... Finally, we perform a detailed failure analysis and show, using tags and controlled vocabulary terms, that some request types are inherently more di cult to solve than others....

  17. Mapping science communication scholarship in China: Content analysis on breadth, depth and agenda of published research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linjia; Huang, Biaowen; Wu, Guosheng

    2015-11-01

    This study attempted to illuminate the cause and relation between government, scholars, disciplines, and societal aspects, presenting data from a content analysis of published research with the key word "science communication" (Symbol: see text) in the title or in the key words, including academic papers published in journals and dissertations from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure database. Of these, 572 articles were coded using categories that identified science topics, theory, authorship, and methods used in each study to examine the breadth and depth that Science Communication has achieved since its inception in China. This study explored the dominance of History and Philosophy of Science scholars rather than Communication scholars. We also explored how science communication research began from theories and concepts instead of science report analysis and the difficulties of the shift from public understanding of science to public engagement in China. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. A one-dimensional Fickian model to predict the Ga depth profiles in three-stage Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, H., E-mail: humberto.rodriguez@helmholtz-berlin.de [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre Jose Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Mainz, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Sadewasser, S. [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre Jose Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-05-28

    We present a one-dimensional Fickian model that predicts the formation of a double Ga gradient during the fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films by three-stage thermal co-evaporation. The model is based on chemical reaction equations, structural data, and effective Ga diffusivities. In the model, the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} surface is depleted from Ga during the deposition of Cu-Se in the second deposition stage, leading to an accumulation of Ga near the back contact. During the third deposition stage, where In-Ga-Se is deposited at the surface, the atomic fluxes within the growing layer are inverted. This results in the formation of a double Ga gradient within the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layer and reproduces experimentally observed Ga distributions. The final shape of the Ga depth profile strongly depends on the temperatures, times and deposition rates used. The model is used to evaluate possible paths to flatten the marked Ga depth profile that is obtained when depositing at low substrate temperatures. We conclude that inserting Ga during the second deposition stage is an effective way to achieve this.

  19. A one-dimensional Fickian model to predict the Ga depth profiles in three-stage Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, H.; Mainz, R.; Sadewasser, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional Fickian model that predicts the formation of a double Ga gradient during the fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 thin films by three-stage thermal co-evaporation. The model is based on chemical reaction equations, structural data, and effective Ga diffusivities. In the model, the Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 surface is depleted from Ga during the deposition of Cu-Se in the second deposition stage, leading to an accumulation of Ga near the back contact. During the third deposition stage, where In-Ga-Se is deposited at the surface, the atomic fluxes within the growing layer are inverted. This results in the formation of a double Ga gradient within the Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 layer and reproduces experimentally observed Ga distributions. The final shape of the Ga depth profile strongly depends on the temperatures, times and deposition rates used. The model is used to evaluate possible paths to flatten the marked Ga depth profile that is obtained when depositing at low substrate temperatures. We conclude that inserting Ga during the second deposition stage is an effective way to achieve this.

  20. Depth profiling of transport properties of in-situ grown YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x films for coated conductor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, William; Huh, J.-U.; Hammond, R. H.; Beasley, M. R.

    2003-03-01

    We report depth profiling of the local critical current density and resistivity of YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x (YBCO) films grown by in-situ electron beam evaporation. The method provides important information on the uniformity of the films, and therefore on the commonly observed property that the critical currents of coated conductor high temperature superconductor films do not scale linearly with thickness. Using a methodology of layer-by-layer etching, depth profiling of critical currents and resistivity of the films has been achieved. We use a Bromine methanol mixture to etch down YBCO films with an etch rate of 60 nm/min. At each step, we also observe surface morphology using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. In this talk, we report further study of the results found earlier that YBCO films deposited at high rates are composed of an upper layer of defected YBCO with a local Jc of 5 - 7 MA/cm^2 and a lower more perfect layer with no critical current capacity. The information derived may be useful in the characterization and optimization of superconducting thin films for electrical power and other applications.

  1. In depth analysis of motivational factors at work in the health industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Virdi, Sandeep Singh; Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Ghai, Gagandeep Kaur; Singh, Kamaljit; Rana, Chandeep Singh; Singh, J P; Raj, Sahil; Puri, Anju

    2010-01-01

    Motivation of health workers is necessary to generate the organizational commitment towards the patients and the hospital and therefore the knowledge about what motivates and satisfies them is very essential.The aim of the project was to investigate and analyze the various factors that help in motivation of the health workers while performing their clinical duties in the hospital. A simple random study was conducted among 100 employees of our institute, which included doctors, staff nurses and paramedical staff. One hundred employees from Gian Sagar Institute were chosen randomly for the purpose of our study. All the employees were enquired by the questionnaire method as well as by individual interviews regarding the various motivating and demotivating factors at the work place. Detailed enquiries were performed regarding the various aspects concerning the job factors and work satisfaction. All the answers and findings were observed and recorded. Simple non-parametric tests like mean, percentages and chi square tests were employed to analyze the data.The demographic profile of all the employees showed only minor differences which were statistically non-significant. Skills, task identity, task significance, autonomy, feedback, environment, job security and compensation were observed to be the important factors for the motivation of employees. The depth and the extent to which these factors were studied at work in the hospital showed remarkable differences. All the factors studied in this project are essential basis for organizational commitment, but feedback represents the factor with the highest motivation potential especially among the younger population.

  2. Quantitative AMS depth profiling of the hydrogen isotopes collected in graphite divertor and wall tiles of the tokamak ASDEX-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, G.Y.; Friedrich, M.; Groetzschel, R.; Buerger, W.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.

    1997-01-01

    The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility at the 3 MV Tandetron in Rossendorf has been applied for quantitative depth profiling of deuterium and tritium in samples cut from graphite protection tiles at the vessel walls of the fusion experiment ASDEX-Upgrade at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik in Garching. The tritium originates from D(d,p)T fusion reactions in the plasma and it is implanted in the vessel walls together with deuterium atoms and ions from the plasma. The T concentrations in the surface layers down to the analyzing depth of about 25 μm are in the range of 10 11 to 5 x 10 15 T-atoms/cm 3 corresponding to a tritium retention of 3 x 10 10 to 3.5 x 10 12 T-atoms/cm 2 . The much higher deuterium concentrations in the samples were simultaneously measured by calibrated conventional SIMS. In the surface layers down to the analyzing depth of about 25 μm the deuterium concentrations are between 3 x 10 18 and 8 x 10 21 atoms/cm 3 , corresponding to a deuterium retention of 2.5 x 10 16 to 2.5 x 10 18 atoms/cm 2 The estimated total amount of tritium in the vessel walls is of the same order of magnitude as the total number of neutrons produced in D(d,n) 3 He reactions. (orig.)

  3. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands from 2015-07-31 to 2015-08-19 (NCEI Accession 0161170)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  4. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-27 (NCEI Accession 0161171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  5. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from ANGO and other platforms using XBT casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic from 14 February 1992 to 13 April 1993 (NODC Accession 9400047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using XBT casts from the ANGO and other platforms in the TOGA - Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 14...

  6. Temperature profile and water depth collected from XIANG YANG HONG 05 in the South China Sea using BT and XBT casts from 16 November 1986 to 03 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth were collected using BT and XBT casts from the XIANG YANG HONG 05 in the South China Sea. Data were collected from 16 November...

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from SAXON STAR and other platforms in a World wide distribution from 09 March 1983 to 12 November 1986 (NODC Accession 8700035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the SAXON STAR and other platforms in a World wide distribution. Data were collected...

  8. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from BROOKE using BT and XBT casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 October 1975 to 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 8900225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the BROOKE in the North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean. Data were...

  9. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from DALE and other platforms using BT and XBT casts in the North / South Pacific Ocean from 09 November 1979 to 25 November 1985 (NODC Accession 8900063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the DALE and other platforms in the North / South Pacific Ocean. Data were...

  10. Temperature profile and water depth collected from ZAMBEZE and other platforms using BT and XBT casts in the Atlantic Ocean from 21 July 1981 to 02 December 1985 (NODC Accession 8600293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the ZAMBEZE and other platforms in the Northeast / Southwest Atlantic Ocean. Data...

  11. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AMERICAN VIKING using BT and XBT casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from 23 September 1986 to 17 September 1987 (NODC Accession 8800048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the AMERICAN VIKING in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 23...

  12. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 01 December 1987 to 05 January 1988 (NODC Accession 8800015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  13. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIET LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 21 July 1988 to 18 August 1988 (NODC Accession 8800256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIET LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  14. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 30 April 1988 to 31 May 1988 (NODC Accession 8800173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Data...

  15. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the NW Atlantic Ocean for 1987-05-31 (NODC Accession 8700225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC Harriot Lane in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and TOGA Area - Atlantic...

  16. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 09 March 1988 to 10 March 1988 (NODC Accession 8800094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC Harriot Lane in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  17. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago from 2014-03-24 to 2014-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0161168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  18. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from SEDCO / BP 471 using BT and XBT casts in the East Indian Archipelago and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 14 November 1988 to 20 December 1988 (NODC Accession 8900043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the SEDCO / BP 471 in the East Indian Archipelago. and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean....

  19. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS BARBEY using BT and XBT casts in the Indian ocean and other seas from 07 January 1989 to 31 January 1989 (NODC Accession 8900034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS BARBEY in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Burma Sea, and Malacca of...

  20. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas from 2015-01-26 to 2015-04-28 (NCEI Accession 0162247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across Wake Island from 2014-03-16 to 2014-03-19 (NCEI Accession 0162248)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  2. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AUSTRALIA STAR and other platforms using XBT casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Pacific Ocean from 05 October 1989 to 21 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9400035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using XBT casts from the AUSTRALIA STAR and other platforms in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Pacific Ocean,...

  3. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS Merrill using BT and XBT casts in the Indian Ocean and other seas from 1988-03-01 to 1988-03-29 (NODC Accession 8800110)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS MERRILL in the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman, and Indian Ocean. Data were...

  4. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS BARBEY using BT and XBT casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean and other areas from 03 November 1988 to 01 December 1988 (NODC Accession 8800327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS BARBEY in the TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean, Bay of Bengal, Indian Ocean,...

  5. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS MERRILL using BT and XBT casts in the Indian Ocean and other seas from 05 April 1988 to 11 April 1988 (NODC Accession 8800140)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS MERRILL in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, and Gulf of Oman. Data were...

  6. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS MERRILL using BT and XBT casts in the Indian Ocean and other seas from 17 May 1988 to 01 June 1988 (NODC Accession 8800181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS MERRILL in Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, Gulf of Oman, Laccadive Sea, and...

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS HENRY B. WILSON using BT and XBT casts in the Indian Ocean and other seas from 22 October 1986 to 26 November 1986 (NODC Accession 8800183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS HENRY B. WILSON in the Indian Ocean, Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Iran, and...

  8. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS BARBEY using BT and XBT casts in the Indian Ocean and other seas from 02 December 1988 to 28 December 1988 (NODC Accession 8900015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS BARBEY in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Iran, and...

  9. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS ROBERT G. BRADLEY using BT and XBT casts in the NE/NW Atlantic Ocean and other seas from 03 May 1988 to 31 May 1988 (NODC Accession 8800213)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS ROBERT G. BRADLEY in the Northwest / Northeast Atlantic Ocean, Arabian...

  10. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS THACH using BT and XBT casts in the Persian Sea from 04 December 1987 to 08 December 1987 (NODC Accession 8800030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS THACH in the Persian Sea. Data were collected from 04 December 1987 to 08...

  11. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across Jarvis Island from 2016-05-19 to 2016-05-23 (NCEI Accession 0162245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  12. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from RATHBURNE in the NW Pacific (limit-180 W) and other areas from 02 February 1986 to 28 February 1986 (NODC Accession 8600093)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the RATHBURNE in the Northwest Pacific Ocean and other areas. Data were collected from...

  13. Temperature profile and water depth data from BT and XBT casts in the Atlantic Ocean from USCGC POLAR SEA from 14 December 1983 to 06 May 1984 (NODC Accession 8600108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC POLAR SEA in the Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 14 December...

  14. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS JOHN RODGERS using BT and XBT casts in the NE/NW Atlantic Ocean and other seas from 03 August 1988 to 03 October 1988 (NODC Accession 8900041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS JOHN RODGERS in the Northeast / Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Ionian Sea,...

  15. Temperature profile and water depth collected from BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from SEDCO BP 471 from 03 November 1985 to 23 December 1985 (NODC Accession 8600138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the SEDCO BP 471 in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 03...

  16. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa from 2015-02-15 to 2015-03-28 (NCEI Accession 0161169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  17. Dislocation loops and their depth profiles in He[sup +] and D[sup +] ion irradiated nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwase, K [Dept. of Physics, Hyogo Univ. of Teacher Education, Yashiro (Japan); Ezawa, T [Dept. of Material Physics, Faculty of Engineering Science, Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan); Tanabe, T [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Kiritani, M [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Fujita, F E [Dept. of Material Physics, Faculty of Engineering Science, Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1993-07-01

    Effects of implanted deuterium and helium on the formation of dislocation loops in Ni have been systematically investigated in terms of the irradiation temperature and dose by means of transmission electron microscopy. Significant enhancement of loop formation is observed only for He[sup +] irradiation. The number density of loops at 200 C for He[sup +] irradiation is about one order of magnitude higher than that of D[sup +] irradiation and the difference increases at higher temperatures. Significant decrease in the density occurs at about 300 C for D[sup +] irradiation, but it appears at about 600 C for He[sup +] irradiation. Below 200 C, continuous nucleation of loops is observed only for He[sup +] irradiation. The change in the loop depth distribution suggests that the nucleation of loops for He[sup +] irradiation is enhanced by some defects with a low mobility such as small He-vacancy complexes. The significant decrease in the loop density above 600 C is explained by the decrease in the concentration of the small He-vacancy complexes due to their absorption by large cavities or their escape to the specimen surface. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of enamel microhardness at various hard tissue states and depth of the microfissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Yarova

    2013-08-01

    micro-hardness of enamel have been identified in the cervical area: the presence of defects of type I - in intact teeth, defects of II and III types - in the teeth with wedge-shaped defect. The least indices, regardless of the depth of micro-cracks in teeth, were diagnosed in cervical caries. In samples with carious and non-carious pathology the largest micro-hardness of enamel in the cervical area were recorded in deep micro-cracks type III, and the lowest - in the teeth with defects type I. In intact samples, conversely, the strength of enamel was higher in minor defects type I, lower - in the presence of micro-cracks type II. Changes in the mechanical properties of the enamel were due to its chemical composition, which was confirmed by microroentgen-spectral analysis. Thus, the content of calcium and phosphorus in the cervical region was significantly different depending on the pathology of hard tissues (p <0,05. The higher content of macro-elements was determined in the wedge-shaped defects. Some discrepancy of the obtained indices with the depth of micro-cracks indicates that complex of adaptive processes occurs not only in the enamel but in the strength of the enamel, depending on the depth of cracks and pathology of hard tissues and demand further investigation. The revealed features should be used for a substantiation of principles of treatment and prophylaxis of the dental hard tissues defects.

  19. Soil depth modelling using terrain analysis and satellite imagery: the case study of Qeshlaq mountainous watershed (Kurdistan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahudin Zahedi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil depth is a major soil characteristic, which is commonly used in distributed hydrological modelling in order to present watershed subsurface attributes. This study aims at developing a statistical model for predicting the spatial pattern of soil depth over the mountainous watershed from environmental variables derived from a digital elevation model (DEM and remote sensing data. Among the explanatory variables used in the models, seven are derived from a 10 m resolution DEM, namely specific catchment area, wetness index, aspect, slope, plan curvature, elevation and sediment transport index. Three variables landuse, NDVI and pca1 are derived from Landsat8 imagery, and are used for predicting soil depth by the models. Soil attributes, soil moisture, topographic curvature, training samples for each landuse and major vegetation types are considered at 429 profiles within four subwatersheds. Random forests (RF, support vector machine (SVM and artificial neural network (ANN are used to predict soil depth using the explanatory variables. The models are run using 336 data points in the calibration dataset with all 31 explanatory variables, and soil depth as the response of the models. Mean decrease permutation accuracy is performed on Variable selection. Testing dataset is done with the model soil depth values at testing locations (93 points using different efficiency criteria. Prediction error is computed for both the calibration and testing datasets. Results show that the variables landuse, specific surface area, slope, pca1, NDVI and aspect are the most important explanatory variables in predicting soil depth. RF and SVM models are appropriate for the mountainous watershed areas that have been limited in the depth of the soil and ANN model is more suitable for watershed with the fields of agricultural and deep soil depth.

  20. In-depth analysis of the causal factors of incidents reported in the Greek petrochemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstandinidou, Myrto; Nivolianitou, Zoe; Kefalogianni, Eirini; Caroni, Chrys

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of all reported incidents in the Greek petrochemical industry from 1997 to 2003. A comprehensive database has been developed to include industrial accidents (fires, explosions and substance releases), occupational accidents, incidents without significant consequences and near misses. The study concentrates on identifying and analyzing the causal factors related to different consequences of incidents, in particular, injury, absence from work and material damage. Methods of analysis include logistic regression with one of these consequences as dependent variable. The causal factors that are considered cover four major categories related to organizational issues, equipment malfunctions, human errors (of commission or omission) and external causes. Further analyses aim to confirm the value of recording near misses by comparing their causal factors with those of more serious incidents. The statistical analysis highlights the connection between the human factor and the underlying causes of accidents or incidents. - Highlights: → The research work is original, based on field data collected directly from the petrochemical industry. → It deals with the in-depth statistical analysis of accident data on human-organizational causes. → It researches underlying causes of accidents and the parameters affecting them. → The causal factors that are considered cover four big taxonomies. → Near misses are worth recording for comparing their causal factors with more serious incidents.

  1. In-depth analysis of the causal factors of incidents reported in the Greek petrochemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandinidou, Myrto [Institute of Nuclear Technology-Radiation Protection, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Nivolianitou, Zoe, E-mail: zoe@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nuclear Technology-Radiation Protection, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Kefalogianni, Eirini; Caroni, Chrys [School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytexneiou Str., Zografou Campus, 157 80 Athens (Greece)

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of all reported incidents in the Greek petrochemical industry from 1997 to 2003. A comprehensive database has been developed to include industrial accidents (fires, explosions and substance releases), occupational accidents, incidents without significant consequences and near misses. The study concentrates on identifying and analyzing the causal factors related to different consequences of incidents, in particular, injury, absence from work and material damage. Methods of analysis include logistic regression with one of these consequences as dependent variable. The causal factors that are considered cover four major categories related to organizational issues, equipment malfunctions, human errors (of commission or omission) and external causes. Further analyses aim to confirm the value of recording near misses by comparing their causal factors with those of more serious incidents. The statistical analysis highlights the connection between the human factor and the underlying causes of accidents or incidents. - Highlights: > The research work is original, based on field data collected directly from the petrochemical industry. > It deals with the in-depth statistical analysis of accident data on human-organizational causes. > It researches underlying causes of accidents and the parameters affecting them. > The causal factors that are considered cover four big taxonomies. > Near misses are worth recording for comparing their causal factors with more serious incidents.

  2. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF TAPERED COMPOSITE PLATE GIRDER WITH A NON-LINEAR VARYING WEB DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. A. HASAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents Finite Element Analysis to determine the ultimate shear capacity of tapered composite plate girder. The effect of degree of taper on the ultimate shear capacity of tapered steel-concrete composite plate girder with a nonlinear varying web depth, effect of slenderness ratio on the ultimate shear capacity, and effect of flange stiffness on the ductility were considered as the parametric studies. Effect of concrete slab on the ultimate shear capacity of tapered plate girders was also considered and it was found to be so effective on the ultimate shear capacity of the tapered plate girder compared with the steel one. The accuracy of the finite element method is established by comparing the finite element with the results existing in the literature. The study was conducted using nonlinear finite element modelling with computer software LUSAS 14.7.

  3. Utilization of Advanced Diagnostic Methods for Texture and Rut Depth Analysis on a Testing Pavement Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slabej Martin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative characteristics of pavement in wide range reflects the pavement serviceability, which is a summary of the characteristics of the pavement, providing a fast, smooth, economical and especially safe driving of motor-vehicles. The target factor of pavement serviceability and safety of roads represents the quality of their surface properties. In the framework of research activities performed in the Research Centre founded under the auspices of University of Žilina, individual parameters of pavement serviceability were monitored by pavement surface scanning. This paper describes the creation of a 3D - road surface model and its analysis and evaluation from the viewpoint of two pavement serviceability parameters - the rut depth and texture. Measurements were performed on an experimental pavement section used contemporary in an Accelerated Pavement Testing experiment. The long-term goal is to ascertain functions predicting degradation of these two pavement serviceability parameters.

  4. Applied satellite remote sensing to runoff analysis: Through the effective depth of soil layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kondoh, T.; Kida, T.; Nishikawa, H.

    2002-01-01

    The thickness of the soil layers in which tree roots are able to develop freely influences forest composition and growth. Trees growing in shallow soil are usually less well supplied with water and mineral nutrients than those growing in deeper soil. A soil may be deep in an absolute sense but, because of a relatively impervious layer, such as hardpan or because of a high water-table, may be shallow in a physiological sense. Penetrability measurements have been found useful in evaluating the influence of different forest types on the physical properties of soils. Commonly the penetrability of soils can be measured by using the Hasegawa-formed soil penetrometer and can be judged as the soil softness content (SSC). Previous studies report soil with more than 1.9 cm/drop of SSC to be highly permeable and therefore roots are more likely to be extensively developed. Based upon this theory the depth of soil layer with more than 1.9 cm/drop of SSC can be defined as the Effective Depth of Soil Layer (EDSL). We examined the relationship between the Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI) and the EDSL and established a 'Runoff Simulation Model (RSM)' based upon the theory of the Storage Function Model method. The conclusions are that (1) a strong positive correlation between the RVI (ground measured) and the EDSL was given, (2) applying results of conclusion (1) to satellite analysis a similar correlation between the RVI (satellite analysis of JERS 1/OPS data) and the EDSL was observed and (3) the simulated storm-runoff hydro graph coincides with the observed one well

  5. Qualitative Analysis of Commercial Social Network Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Lester; Wolfson, Ouri; Adjouadi, Malek; Rishe, Naphtali

    Social-networking sites have become an integral part of many users' daily internet routine. Commercial enterprises have been quick to recognize this and are subsequently creating profiles for many of their products and services. Commercial enterprises use social network profiles to target and interact with potential customers as well as to provide a gateway for users of the product or service to interact with each other. Many commercial enterprises use the statistics from their product or service's social network profile to tout the popularity and success of the product or service being showcased. They will use statistics such as number of friends, number of daily visits, number of interactions, and other similar measurements to quantify their claims. These statistics are often not a clear indication of the true popularity and success of the product. In this chapter the term product is used to refer to any tangible or intangible product, service, celebrity, personality, film, book, or other entity produced by a commercial enterprise.

  6. Non-destructive depth profiling of solid samples by atomic and nuclear interactions induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demortier, Guy

    2003-01-01

    The study of complex materials (non-homogeneous matrices containing medium and/or heavy atoms as major elements) by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) requires the tailoring of the experimental set up to take into account the high X-ray intensity produced by these main elements present at the surface, as well as the expected low intensity from other elements 'buried' in the substrate. The determination of traces is therefore limited and the minimum detection limit is generally higher by at least two orders of magnitude in comparison with those achievable for low Z matrices (Z≤20). Additionally, those high Z matrices, having a high absorption capability, are not always homogeneous. The non-homogeneity may be, on the one hand, a layered structure (which is uneasy to profile by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) if the material contains elements of neighbouring atomic masses or if the layered structure extends on several microns). PIXE measurements at various incident energies (and with various projectiles (p, d, He 3 , He 4 )) are an alternative method to overcome those difficulties. The use of special filters to selectively decrease the intensity of the most intense X-ray lines, the accurate calculation of the characteristic X-ray intensity ratios (Kα/Kβ, Lα/Lβ) of individual elements, the computation of the secondary X-ray fluorescence induced in thick targets are amongst the most important parameters to be investigated in order to solve these analytical problems. Examples of Al, Si, Cu, Ag, Au based alloys as encountered in industrial and archaeological metallurgy are discussed. The non-destructive aspect of the ion beam techniques is proved by applying the method in vivo for the study of fluorine migration in tooth enamel. Preliminary results on the composition of the blocks of the pyramid of Cheops are presented in the scope of a complete revision of the procedure of its construction

  7. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko [National EPSRC XPS User' s Service (NEXUS), School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-28

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  8. Contact traction analysis for profile change during coining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kang, Heung Seok; Song, Kee Nam

    2002-01-01

    Contact tractions are analysed in the case of the change in contact profile occurring during the coining process of a thin strip material. The changed profile is assumed as a concave circular arc in the central part of the contact region which is smoothly connected with convex circular arcs at both sides, referring to the actual measurement of the coined material. The profile is discretized and the known solutions of singular integral equations are used. Since the contact profile affects the contact traction and relevant tribological behaviour (e.g. wear) as well, an accurate definition of the profile is necessary in the analysis of material failure. Parametric study is conducted with the variation of the radii and distance of the arcs, which defines the height difference between the summits of the arcs. Considered is the contact profile, which can give the negligible variation of the traction in comparison with that before the coining process

  9. Consideration of sample heterogeneity and in-depth analysis of individual differences in sensory analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavay, Cécile; Brockhoff, Per B.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    In descriptive sensory analysis, large variations may be observed between scores. Individual differences between assessors have been identified as one cause for these variations. Much work has been done on modeling these differences and accounting for them through analysis of variance (ANOVA). When......, an extended version of the assessor model approach is applied. The data set used in the paper is based on sensory evaluations of three apple samples scored by a panel of 19 assessors using seven descriptors in four replicates. The application of the extended assessor model approach to unbalanced data provides...

  10. Integral Analysis of Seismic Refraction and Ambient Vibration Survey for Subsurface Profile Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Rosli, S.; Fauziah, A.; Akmal, M. A. K.; Aziman, M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Ashraf, M. I. M.; Shaylinda, M. Z. N.; Rais, Y.; Ishak, M. F.; Alel, M. N. A.

    2018-04-01

    Geotechnical site investigation as known as subsurface profile evaluation is the process of subsurface layer characteristics determination which finally used for design and construction phase. Traditionally, site investigation was performed using drilling technique thus suffers from several limitation due to cost, time, data coverage and sustainability. In order to overcome those problems, this study adopted surface techniques using seismic refraction and ambient vibration method for subsurface profile depth evaluation. Seismic refraction data acquisition and processing was performed using ABEM Terraloc and OPTIM software respectively. Meanwhile ambient vibration data acquisition and processing was performed using CityShark II, Lennartz and GEOPSY software respectively. It was found that studied area consist of two layers representing overburden and bedrock geomaterials based on p-wave velocity value (vp = 300 – 2500 m/s and vp > 2500 m/s) and natural frequency value (Fo = 3.37 – 3.90 Hz) analyzed. Further analysis found that both methods show some good similarity in term of depth and thickness with percentage accuracy at 60 – 97%. Consequently, this study has demonstrated that the application of seismic refractin and ambient vibration method was applicable in subsurface profile depth and thickness estimation. Moreover, surface technique which consider as non-destructive method adopted in this study was able to compliment conventional drilling method in term of cost, time, data coverage and environmental sustainaibility.

  11. Analysis of BSRT Profiles in the LHC at Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Papadopoulou, S; Papaphilippou, Y; Redaelli, S

    2017-01-01

    The beam synchrotron radiation telescope (BSRT) at the LHC allows to take profiles of the transverse beam distribution, which can provide useful additional insight in the evolution of the transverse beam distribution. A python class has been developed [1], which allows to read in the BSRT profiles, usually stored in binary format, run different analysis tools and generate plots of the statistical parameters and profiles as well as videos of the the profiles. The detailed analysis will be described in this note. The analysis is based on the data obtained at injection energy (450 GeV) during MD1217 [2] and MD1415 [3] which will be also used as illustrative example. A similar approach is also taken with a MATLAB based analysis described in [4].

  12. The profile analysis of attempted-suicide patients referred to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The profile analysis of attempted-suicide patients referred to Pelonomi ... The main precipitating factors included problematic relationships (55.4%), ... physical – 18.2%), low self-esteem/ worthlessness/hopelessness/humiliation (16.7%), and

  13. ChiMS: Open-source instrument control software platform on LabVIEW for imaging/depth profiling mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yang; Hanley, Luke

    2015-06-01

    ChiMS is an open-source data acquisition and control software program written within LabVIEW for high speed imaging and depth profiling mass spectrometers. ChiMS can also transfer large datasets from a digitizer to computer memory at high repetition rate, save data to hard disk at high throughput, and perform high speed data processing. The data acquisition mode generally simulates a digital oscilloscope, but with peripheral devices integrated for control as well as advanced data sorting and processing capabilities. Customized user-designed experiments can be easily written based on several included templates. ChiMS is additionally well suited to non-laser based mass spectrometers imaging and various other experiments in laser physics, physical chemistry, and surface science.

  14. Microstructural analysis in the depth direction of a heteroepitaxial AlN thick film grown on a trench-patterned template by nanobeam X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Tohei, T.; Miyake, H.; Hiramatsu, K.; Sumitani, K.; Imai, Y.; Kimura, S.; Sakai, A.

    2018-04-01

    This work quantitatively assessed the three-dimensional distribution of crystal lattice distortions in an epitaxial AlN thick film grown on a trench-patterned template, using nanobeam X-ray diffraction. Position-dependent ω-2θ-φ mapping clearly demonstrated local tilting, spacing and twisting of lattice planes as well as fluctuations in these phenomena on a sub-micrometer scale comparable to the pitch of the trench-and-terrace patterning. Analysis of the crystal lattice distortion in the depth direction was performed using a newly developed method in which the X-ray nanobeam diffracted from the sample surface to specific depths can be selectively detected by employing a Pt wire profiler. This technique generated depth-resolved ω-2θ-φ maps confirming that fluctuations in lattice plane tilting and spacing greatly depend on the dislocation distribution and the history of the AlN epitaxial growth on the trench-patterned structure. It was also found that both fluctuations were reduced on approaching the AlN surface and, in particular, were sharply reduced at specific depths in the terrace regions. These sharp reductions are attributed to the formation of sacrificial zones with degraded crystal quality around the trenches and possibly lead to raising the crystal quality near the surface of the AlN film.

  15. Evaluation of carburization depth in service exposed ferritic steel using magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of using magnetic Barkhausen (MBN) measurement for the evaluation of carburization depth in ferritic steels has been reported in this paper. MBN measurements were carried out on samples from service exposed 0.5Cr-0.5Mo ferritic steel tube at different depths (cross section) from carburised ID surface to simulate the variation in carbon concentration gradient within the skin depth of MBN with increasing time of exposure to carburization. It has been observed that the MBN level increases with increasing depth of measurement. An inverse relation between MBN level and carbon content/hardness value has been observed. This study suggests that, the MBN measurements on the carburised surface can be correlated with the concentration gradient within the skin depth of the MBN which would help in predicting the approximate depth of the carburised layer with proper prior calibration. (author)

  16. Depth profiling of Pu, 241Am and 137Cs in soils from southern Belarus measured by ICP-MS and alpha and gamma spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Zoriy, Myroslav; Ketterer, Michael E; Becker, J Sabine

    2003-08-01

    The depth distribution of plutonium, americium, and 137Cs originating from the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was investigated in several soil profiles in the vicinity from Belarus. The vertical migration of transuranic elements in soils typical of the 30 km relocation area around Chernobyl NPP was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), alpha spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry. Transuranic concentrations in upper soil layers ranged from 6 x 10(-12) g g(-1) to 6 x 10(-10) g g(-1) for plutonium and from 1.8 x 10(-13) g g(-1) to 1.6 x 10(-11) g g(-1) for americium. These concentrations correspond to specific activities of (239+240)Pu of 24-2400 Bq kg(-1) and specific activity of 241Am of 23-2000 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Transuranics in turf-podzol soil migrate slowly to the deeper soil layers, thus, 80-95%, of radionuclide inventories were present in the 0-3 cm intervals of turf-podzol soils collected in 1994. In peat-marsh soil migration processes occur more rapidly than in turf-podzol and the maximum concentrations are found beneath the soil surface (down to 3-6 cm). The depth distributions of Pu and Am are essentially identical for a given soil profile. (239+240)Pu/137Cs and 241Am/137Cs activity ratios vary by up to a factor of 5 at some sites while smaller variations in these ratios were observed at a site close to Chernobyl, suggesting that 137Cs is dominantly particle associated close to Chernobyl but volatile species of 137Cs are of relatively greater importance at the distant sites.

  17. Peak position differences observed during XPS sputter depth profiling of the SEI on lithiated and delithiated carbon-based anode material for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, S., E-mail: s.oswald@ifw-dresden.de; Hoffmann, M.; Zier, M.

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • In XPS measurements at graphite anodes for Li-ion batteries specific binding energy variations are observed for the SEI species. • The binding energy variations depend on the charging state of the graphite and not on surface charging effects. • Obviously the presence of elemental Li leads to a potential surface gradient in contact with surface layers. • The energy position of implanted Ar can be used as characteristic feature during sputter depth profiling experiments. - Abstract: The ability of delivering chemical information from peak shift phenomena has ever since made X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) an ideal tool for material characterization in Li-ion batteries (LIB). Upon investigation, charging is inevitable as most of the chemical species involved are non-conducting. Thus, the binding energy (BE) scale must be corrected to allow an accurate interpretation of the results. This is usually done using the peak position of the ubiquitous surface carbon contamination detectable for all Li-ion battery relevant materials. We herein report on the occurrence of peak shift phenomena that can be observed when investigating surface layers on graphite anodes using sputter depth-profiling. These shifts, however, are not related to classical static electric charging, but are depending on the state of charge (lithiation) of the anode material. The observations presented are in agreement with previous findings on other Li-containing materials and are obviously caused by the presence of Li in its elemental state. As aging and failure mechanisms in LIBs are closely linked to electrolyte reaction products on electrode surfaces it is of high importance to draw the correct conclusions on their chemical origin from XP spectra. In order to avoid misinterpretation of the BE positions, implanted Ar can be used for identification of relevant peak positions and species involved in the phenomena observed.

  18. Biomedical application of wavelets: analysis of electroencephalograph signals for monitoring depth of anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Agostino; Nayak, A.; Koay, J.; Roy, R. J.; Das, Pankaj K.

    1996-03-01

    The wavelet transform (WT) has been used to study the nonstationary information in the electroencephalograph (EEG) as an aid in determining the anesthetic depth. A complex analytic mother wavelet is utilized to obtain the time evolution of the various spectral components of the EEG signal. The technique is utilized for the detection and spectral analysis of transient and background processes in the awake and asleep states. It can be observed that the response of both states before the application of the stimulus is similar in amplitude but not in spectral contents, which suggests a background activity of the brain. The brain reacts to the external stimulus in two different modes depending on the state of consciousness of the subject. In the case of awake state, there is an evident increase in response, while for the sleep state a reduction in this activity is observed. This analysis seems to suggest that the brain has an ongoing background process that monitors external stimulus in both the sleep and awake states.

  19. The concept of 'vulnerability' in research ethics: an in-depth analysis of policies and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken-Roche, Dearbhail; Bell, Emily; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Racine, Eric

    2017-02-07

    The concept of vulnerability has held a central place in research ethics guidance since its introduction in the United States Belmont Report in 1979. It signals mindfulness for researchers and research ethics boards to the possibility that some participants may be at higher risk of harm or wrong. Despite its important intended purpose and widespread use, there is considerable disagreement in the scholarly literature about the meaning and delineation of vulnerability, stemming from a perceived lack of guidance within research ethics standards. The aim of this study was to assess the concept of vulnerability as it is employed in major national and international research ethics policies and guidelines. We conducted an in-depth analysis of 11 (five national and six international) research ethics policies and guidelines, exploring their discussions of the definition, application, normative justification and implications of vulnerability. Few policies and guidelines explicitly defined vulnerability, instead relying on implicit assumptions and the delineation of vulnerable groups and sources of vulnerability. On the whole, we found considerable richness in the content on vulnerability across policies, but note that this relies heavily on the structure imposed on the data through our analysis. Our results underscore a need for policymakers to revisit the guidance on vulnerability in research ethics, and we propose that a process of stakeholder engagement would well-support this effort.

  20. Depth profile analysis of non-specific fluorescence and color of tooth tissues after peroxide bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukowska, Malgorzata; Götz, Hermann; White, Donald J; Zoladz, James; Schwarz, Björn-Olaf; Duschner, Heinz

    2013-02-01

    To examine laboratory changes of endogenous non-specific fluorescence and color throughout subsurface of tooth structures prior to and following peroxide bleaching. Extracted human teeth were cross sectioned and mounted on glass slides. Cross sections were examined for internal color (digital camera) and nonspecific fluorescence (microRaman spectroscopy) throughout the tooth structure at specified locations. Surfaces of sections were then saturation bleached for 70 hours with a gel containing 6% hydrogen peroxide. Cross sections were reexamined for color and non-specific fluorescence changes. Unbleached enamel, dentin-enamel junction and dentin exhibit different CIELab color and non-specific fluorescence properties. Bleaching of teeth produced significant changes in color of internal cross sections and substantial reductions of non-specific fluorescence levels within enamel dentin and DEJ. Enamel and dentin non-specific fluorescence were reduced to common values with bleaching with enamel and the DEJ showing larger reductions than dentin.

  1. Degradation effects and Si-depth profiling in photoresists using ion beam analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Schellekens, J.P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of silicon-containing vapour with a photoresist layer, as used in dry developable lithographic processes, was studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Degradation of the polymer layer was observed, but the total amount of incorporated Si was found to be constant during

  2. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  3. Cephalometric profile of Bangladeshis: Tweed's analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Md Rizvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tweed's diagnostic triangle is simple yet provides a definite guideline in treatment planning. The aim of the present study was to establish the Tweed's norms for Bangladeshi people. Methods: The study was conducted for 89 Bangladeshi young adults (45 males and 44 females, aged 19–27 years, having balanced and harmonious facial profiles. Lateral cephalograms taken of these subjects were used for a series of morphometric analyses. Results: All three angular parameters Frankfort-mandibular plane angle (FMA, Frankfort-mandibular incisal angle (FMIA, incise mandibular plane angle (IMPAwere measured and found to be 24.52°, 54.60°, and 100.88°, respectively. The mean FMA has been found to be 24.52° (with a range of 14°–36° which is quite close to Tweed's norm and found to be statistically insignificant. However, IMPA and FMIA values of Bangladeshis found to be statistically significantly different from that of the Caucasians. The linear regression equation of IMPA on FMA was fitted, and the estimated value of IMPA was computed for a given FMA. Conclusion: The results support the idea that treatment objectives of IMPA should be considered according to the facial pattern, i.e., FMA. Ethnic variations of norms cannot be overlooked while outlining goals and planning the treatment.

  4. Dissociative features in posttraumatic stress disorder: A latent profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Műllerová, Jana; Hansen, Maj; Contractor, Ateka A; Elhai, Jon D; Armour, Cherie

    2016-09-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) characterizes the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in terms of the individual meeting the criteria for PTSD and additionally reporting symptoms of depersonalization and/or derealization. The current study aimed to examine whether a dissociative PTSD profile may include alternative features of dissociation and whether it could be differentiated from a nondissociative PTSD profile on certain psychopathologies and demographics. Data from 309 trauma-exposed participants, collected through Amazon Mechanical Turk, were subjected to latent profile analysis. Regression analyses were used to examine the predictors of latent classes. Three discrete profiles named Baseline, PTSD, and Dissociative profile were uncovered. All examined features of dissociation were significantly elevated in the Dissociative profile. Anxiety, male sex, being employed, and having a minority racial background significantly predicted the Dissociative profile relative to the PTSD profile. The study points to the importance of alternative symptoms of dissociation in the dissociative PTSD subtype beyond the symptoms of depersonalization and derealization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Diagnose Test-Taker's Profile in Terms of Core Profile Patterns: Principal Component (PC) vs. Profile Analysis via MDS (PAMS) Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.

    A study was conducted to examine how principal components analysis (PCA) and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) can be used to diagnose individuals observed score profiles in terms of core profile patterns identified by each method. The standardization sample from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition…

  6. Comprehensive analysis of Curie-point depths and lithospheric effective elastic thickness at Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Li, C. F.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic Ocean remains at the forefront of geological exploration. Here we investigate its deep geological structures and geodynamics on the basis of gravity, magnetic and bathymetric data. We estimate Curie-point depth and lithospheric effective elastic thickness to understand deep geothermal structures and Arctic lithospheric evolution. A fractal exponent of 3.0 for the 3D magnetization model is used in the Curie-point depth inversion. The result shows that Curie-point depths are between 5 and 50 km. Curie depths are mostly small near the active mid-ocean ridges, corresponding well to high heat flow and active shallow volcanism. Large curie depths are distributed mainly at continental marginal seas around the Arctic Ocean. We present a map of effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere using a multitaper coherence technique, and Te are between 5 and 110 km. Te primarily depends on geothermal gradient and composition, as well as structures in the lithosphere. We find that Te and Curie-point depths are often correlated. Large Te are distributed mainly at continental region and small Te are distributed at oceanic region. The Alpha-Mendeleyev Ridge (AMR) and The Svalbard Archipelago (SA) are symmetrical with the mid-ocean ridge. AMR and SA were formed before an early stage of Eurasian basin spreading, and they are considered as conjugate large igneous provinces, which show small Te and Curie-point depths. Novaya Zemlya region has large Curie-point depths and small Te. We consider that fault and fracture near the Novaya Zemlya orogenic belt cause small Te. A series of transform faults connect Arctic mid-ocean ridge with North Atlantic mid-ocean ridge. We can see large Te near transform faults, but small Curie-point depths. We consider that although temperature near transform faults is high, but mechanically the lithosphere near transform faults are strengthened.

  7. Depth of magnetic basement in Iran based on fractal spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teknik, Vahid; Ghods, Abdolreza

    2017-06-01

    To estimate the shape of sedimentary basins, a critical parameter in hydrocarbon exploration, we calculated the depth of magnetic basement by applying a fractal spectral method to the aeromagnetic map of Iran. The depth of magnetic basement is a close proxy for the shape of sedimentary basins provided that igneous basement is strongly magnetized relative to the overlying sediments and there is no interbedding magnetic layer in the sediments. The shape of the power spectrum of magnetic anomalies is sensitive to the depth of magnetic basement, the thickness of the magnetic layer, the fractal parameter of magnetization and the size of the window used for the calculation of the power spectrum. Using a suite of synthetic tests, we have shown that the estimation of the depth of magnetic basement of up to 20 km is not very sensitive to the often unknown fractal parameter and thus the spectral method is a reliable tool to calculate the depth of magnetic basement. The depth of magnetic basement is in the range of 7-16 km in the Zagros, east Alborz, Tabas, Jazmurian and Makran regions, showing a close correlation with depths estimated from the maximum thickness of stratigraphic columns. We have also found new sedimentary basins in Bostan Abad, Bijar and south of Orumiyeh Lake. The significant depth of the magnetic basement in the Makran, Jazmurain depression, southeast Caspian Sea, Tabas, Great Kavir, south of Orumiyeh Lake, Bostan Abad and Bijar sedimentary basins makes them future prospects for hydrocarbon explorations. The depth of magnetic basement is strongly reduced over the Neyriz and Kermanshah Ophiolites, but it does not show any meaningful correlation with other outcrops of ophiolitic rocks in Iran.

  8. What Matters in Weight Loss? An In-Depth Analysis of Self-Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stefanie Lynn; Ahmed, Rezwan; Hill, James O; Kushner, Robert F; Lindquist, Richard; Brunning, Scott; Margulies, Amy

    2017-05-12

    Using technology to self-monitor body weight, dietary intake, and physical activity is a common practice used by consumers and health companies to increase awareness of current and desired behaviors in weight loss. Understanding how to best use the information gathered by these relatively new methods needs to be further explored. The purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of self-monitoring to weight loss in participants in a 6-month commercial weight-loss intervention administered by Retrofit and to specifically identify the significant contributors to weight loss that are associated with behavior and outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed using 2113 participants enrolled from 2011 to 2015 in a Retrofit weight-loss program. Participants were males and females aged 18 years or older with a starting body mass index of ≥25 kg/m2, who also provided a weight measurement at the sixth month of the program. Multiple regression analysis was performed using all measures of self-monitoring behaviors involving weight measurements, dietary intake, and physical activity to predict weight loss at 6 months. Each significant predictor was analyzed in depth to reveal the impact on outcome. Participants in the Retrofit Program lost a mean -5.58% (SE 0.12) of their baseline weight with 51.87% (1096/2113) of participants losing at least 5% of their baseline weight. Multiple regression model (R 2 =.197, Pself-monitoring behaviors of self-weigh-in, daily steps, high-intensity activity, and persistent food logging were significant predictors of weight loss during a 6-month intervention. ©Stefanie Lynn Painter, Rezwan Ahmed, James O Hill, Robert F Kushner, Richard Lindquist, Scott Brunning, Amy Margulies. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 12.05.2017.

  9. Confocal Raman microscopy for in depth analysis in the field of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, G.; Striova, J.; Zoppi, A.; Castellucci, E. M.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of cultural heritage, the main concern when a sample is analyzed is its safeguard, and this means that non-destructive techniques are required. In this work, we show how confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) may be successfully applied in the study of works of art as a valuable alternative to other well established techniques. CRM with a metallurgical objective was tested for the in depth study of thin samples that are of interest in the field of cultural heritage. The sensitivity of the instrumentation was first evaluated by analyzing single layers of pure polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films having a thickness of 12, 25, and 50 μm, respectively, and a multilayer sample of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). Subsequently, the technique was applied to the analysis of historical dyed cotton yarns in order to check whether it was possible to achieve a better discrimination of the fibres' signals for an easier identification. A substantial improvement of the signal to noise ratio was found in the confocal arrangement with respect to the non-confocal one, suggesting the use of this technique for this kind of analysis in the field of cultural heritage. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy in confocal configuration was exploited in the evaluation of cleaning performed on the mural painting specimens, treated with acrylic resin (Paraloid B72). Confocal Raman experiments were performed before and after laser cleaning (at different conditions) in order to monitor the presence and to approximate the polymer thickness: the method proved to be a valid comparative tool in assessment of cleaning efficiencies.

  10. Analysis of influence of different pressure and different depth of pvd on soft foundation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wang, XueKui

    2018-02-01

    According to the depth of plastic vertical drainage (pvd), the arrangement mode and the loading mode to analyze the influence of Vacuum preloading near the existing road. An arrangement mode of vacuum preloading to reduce the impact was put forward. The combination of different depth of pvd and loading modes are used to analyze the effect of vacuum preloading treatment and its influence range. The calculations show that the deformation and the influence distance are smaller by using the 40kPa vacuum loading and 41kPa surcharge load preloading. Reducing the depth of the pvd and vacuum combined surcharge preloading can weaken the influence to the existing highway.

  11. Analysis of the Interference Modulation Depth in the Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rilong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principle of the Michelson interferometer, the paper briefly describes the theoretical significance and calculates and deduces three expressions of the interference modulation depth. The influence of the surface shape error of plane mirror on modulation depth is analyzed, and the tolerance of error is also pointed out. Moreover, the dependence of modulation depth on the reflectance change of beam splitter interface is also analyzed, and the curve is given. It is concluded that this paper is of general significance for the Fourier transform spectrometer based on the principle of the Michelson two-beam interference.

  12. Initial development of an automated task analysis profiling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A program for automated task analysis is described. Called TAPS (task analysis profiling system), the program accepts normal English prose and outputs skills, knowledges, attitudes, and abilities (SKAAs) along with specific guidance and recommended ability measurement tests for nuclear power plant operators. A new method for defining SKAAs is presented along with a sample program output

  13. Quantitative and qualitative proteome characteristics extracted from in-depth integrated genomics and proteomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, T.Y.; van Heesch, S.; van den Toorn, H.; Giansanti, P.; Cristobal, A.; Toonen, P.; Schafer, S.; Hubner, N.; van Breukelen, B.; Mohammed, S.; Cuppen, E.; Heck, A.J.R.; Guryev, V.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We

  14. Secchi depth analysis using bio-optical parameters measured in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Naik, P.; Bandishte, M.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    spatial and temporal variability of Secchi depth and their dependence on the optical properties beam attenuation and diffuse attenuation the biological parameter of Chlorophyll. The in-situ measured inherent and apparent optical properties have been used...

  15. Some practical examples of defence in depth analysis for category IV gamma irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2014-01-01

    The Defence in Depth concept provides a major contribution to the safety philosophy of irradiation facilities. But problems occur when somebody tries to understand or analyse a safety system or develop a new one because there is a lack of practical examples in Safety Series 107 or other IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) publications for irradiation facilities. This paper tries to fill this lack of information by providing a series of practical examples and explanations about Defence in Depth concepts. (author)

  16. Some practical examples of defence in depth analysis for category IV gamma irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo, E-mail: aryarj@ig.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    The Defence in Depth concept provides a major contribution to the safety philosophy of irradiation facilities. But problems occur when somebody tries to understand or analyse a safety system or develop a new one because there is a lack of practical examples in Safety Series 107 or other IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) publications for irradiation facilities. This paper tries to fill this lack of information by providing a series of practical examples and explanations about Defence in Depth concepts. (author)

  17. Application of the maximum entropy method to profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, N.; Kalceff, W.; Cline, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A maximum entropy (MaxEnt) method for analysing crystallite size- and strain-induced x-ray profile broadening is presented. This method treats the problems of determining the specimen profile, crystallite size distribution, and strain distribution in a general way by considering them as inverse problems. A common difficulty faced by many experimenters is their inability to determine a well-conditioned solution of the integral equation, which preserves the positivity of the profile or distribution. We show that the MaxEnt method overcomes this problem, while also enabling a priori information, in the form of a model, to be introduced into it. Additionally, we demonstrate that the method is fully quantitative, in that uncertainties in the solution profile or solution distribution can be determined and used in subsequent calculations, including mean particle sizes and rms strain. An outline of the MaxEnt method is presented for the specific problems of determining the specimen profile and crystallite or strain distributions for the correspondingly broadened profiles. This approach offers an alternative to standard methods such as those of Williamson-Hall and Warren-Averbach. An application of the MaxEnt method is demonstrated in the analysis of alumina size-broadened diffraction data (from NIST, Gaithersburg). It is used to determine the specimen profile and column-length distribution of the scattering domains. Finally, these results are compared with the corresponding Williamson-Hall and Warren-Averbach analyses. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  18. Consumer profile analysis for different types of meat in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriba-Perez, Carmen; Baviera-Puig, Amparo; Buitrago-Vera, Juan; Montero-Vicente, Luis

    2017-07-01

    It is important to analyse the consumer profile of each type of meat to better adapt the marketing mix to each one. To this end, we examined the average consumption frequency of different types of meat based on two methodologies: consumer segmentation using the food-related lifestyle (FRL) framework, giving rise to 4 segments, and analysis of socio-demographic profiles. The variables used were: sex, age, educational level, social class, number of people in the household, presence of children younger than 18 in the home, geographical area and habitual residence. Beef was the only meat type significant in both analyses. Turkey meat only appeared as significant in the FRL analysis. The other meats (chicken, pork, rabbit and lamb) were only significant in the sociodemographic variables analysis. From the outcomes we may conclude that there is no single consumer profile, which rather depends on the type of meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of Taipei Basin Response for Earthquakes of Various Depths and Locations Using Empirical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Sokolov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Taipei basin upon earthquake excitation was studied using records of recent earthquakes. The strong-motion database includes records obtained at 32 stations of the Taipei TSMIP net work from 83 deep and 142 shallow earthquakes (M > 4.0 that occurred in 1992 - 2004. The characteristics of frequency-de pendent site response were obtained as spectral ratios between the actual earthquake records (horizontal components and those modelled for a hypothetical Very Hard Rock (VHR condition. The models for VHR spectra of Taiwan earthquakes had been recently proposed by Sokolov et al. (2005b, 2006. Analysis of site response characteristics and comparison with simple 1D models of the soil column resulted in the following conclusions: (1 The spectral ratios through out the basin obtained from deep earth quakes (depth > 35 km exhibit good agreement with the theoretical ratios calculated using the 1D models constructed using avail able geological and geotechnical data. (2 The spectral ratios obtained from shallow earth quakes show influence of: (a surface waves generated when travelling from distant sources to the basin and (b relatively low-frequency (< 1 - 2 Hz waves generated within the basin. (3 Some shallow earth quakes pro duce extremely high amplification at frequencies 0.3 - 1 Hz within the basin that may be dangerous for high-rise buildings and high way bridges. (4 The obtained results may be used in probabilistic seismic microzonation of the basin when many possible earth quakes located at various distances are considered. 2D and 3D simulation is necessary to model the seismic influence from particularly large earthquakes.

  20. Depth of Response in Multiple Myeloma: A Pooled Analysis of Three PETHEMA/GEM Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahuerta, Juan-Jose; Paiva, Bruno; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Cordón, Lourdes; Cedena, Maria-Teresa; Puig, Noemi; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Rosiñol, Laura; Gutierrez, Norma C; Martín-Ramos, María-Luisa; Oriol, Albert; Teruel, Ana-Isabel; Echeveste, María-Asunción; de Paz, Raquel; de Arriba, Felipe; Hernandez, Miguel T; Palomera, Luis; Martinez, Rafael; Martin, Alejandro; Alegre, Adrian; De la Rubia, Javier; Orfao, Alberto; Mateos, María-Victoria; Blade, Joan; San-Miguel, Jesus F

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To perform a critical analysis on the impact of depth of response in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM). Patients and Methods Data were analyzed from 609 patients who were enrolled in the GEM (Grupo Español de Mieloma) 2000 and GEM2005MENOS65 studies for transplant-eligible MM and the GEM2010MAS65 clinical trial for elderly patients with MM who had minimal residual disease (MRD) assessments 9 months after study enrollment. Median follow-up of the series was 71 months. Results Achievement of complete remission (CR) in the absence of MRD negativity was not associated with prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with near-CR or partial response (median PFS, 27, 27, and 29 months, respectively; median OS, 59, 64, and 65 months, respectively). MRD-negative status was strongly associated with prolonged PFS (median, 63 months; P < .001) and OS (median not reached; P < .001) overall and in subgroups defined by prior transplantation, disease stage, and cytogenetics, with prognostic superiority of MRD negativity versus CR particularly evident in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. Accordingly, Harrell C statistics showed higher discrimination for both PFS and OS in Cox models that included MRD (as opposed to CR) for response assessment. Superior MRD-negative rates after different induction regimens anticipated prolonged PFS. Among 34 MRD-negative patients with MM and a phenotypic pattern of bone marrow involvement similar to monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance at diagnosis, the probability of "operational cure" was high; median PFS was 12 years, and the 10-year OS rate was 94%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that MRD-negative status surpasses the prognostic value of CR achievement for PFS and OS across the disease spectrum, regardless of the type of treatment or patient risk group. MRD negativity should be considered as one of the most relevant end points for transplant-eligible and elderly fit patients

  1. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy.

  2. Bruce NGS a loss of flow analysis for effectiveness of level 2 defence-in-depth provisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, W.; Jiang, Y.; Kwee, M.; Xue, J.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of defence-in-depth is applied to CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor designs and operations to provide series of levels of defence to prevent accidents progressing and to provide protection for reactor and public safety. The level 2 defence-in-depth provisions are designed to detect and intercept deviation from normal operation in order to prevent anticipated operating occurrences (AOOs) from escalating to accident conditions, and to return the plant to a state of normal operations, according to the Canada Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulatory document RD-337. Historically, safety analysis has focused on the effectiveness of level 3 defence-in-depth provisions in accident conditions, and the effectiveness of level 2 defence-in-depth has not been assessed. In this study, the effectiveness of Level 2 defence-in-depth is assessed for loss of flow (LOF) events for Bruce Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) A reactors. The level 2 defence-in-depth in Bruce NGS A design is identified to be the stepback function of reactor regulating system (RRS). The behavior of RRS stepback following the initiation of loss of flow event is simulated using RFSP/TUF/RRS - em coupled code. The behavior of full system and single channel is simulated and assessed against the acceptance criteria - fitness for service of systems, structures and components (SSCs). (author)

  3. Bruce NGS a loss of flow analysis for effectiveness of level 2 defence-in-depth provisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, W. [AMEC NSS, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jiang, Y.; Kwee, M.; Xue, J. [Bruce Power, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The concept of defence-in-depth is applied to CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor designs and operations to provide series of levels of defence to prevent accidents progressing and to provide protection for reactor and public safety. The level 2 defence-in-depth provisions are designed to detect and intercept deviation from normal operation in order to prevent anticipated operating occurrences (AOOs) from escalating to accident conditions, and to return the plant to a state of normal operations, according to the Canada Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulatory document RD-337. Historically, safety analysis has focused on the effectiveness of level 3 defence-in-depth provisions in accident conditions, and the effectiveness of level 2 defence-in-depth has not been assessed. In this study, the effectiveness of Level 2 defence-in-depth is assessed for loss of flow (LOF) events for Bruce Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) A reactors. The level 2 defence-in-depth in Bruce NGS A design is identified to be the stepback function of reactor regulating system (RRS). The behavior of RRS stepback following the initiation of loss of flow event is simulated using RFSP/TUF/RRS{sub -}em coupled code. The behavior of full system and single channel is simulated and assessed against the acceptance criteria - fitness for service of systems, structures and components (SSCs). (author)

  4. Defense In-Depth Accident Analysis Evaluation of Tritium Facility Bldgs. 232-H, 233-H, and 234-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    'The primary purpose of this report is to document a Defense-in-Depth (DID) accident analysis evaluation for Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facility Buildings 232-H, 233-H, and 234-H. The purpose of a DID evaluation is to provide a more realistic view of facility radiological risks to the offsite public than the bounding deterministic analysis documented in the Safety Analysis Report, which credits only Safety Class items in the offsite dose evaluation.'

  5. At site and regional analysis of maximum annual and seasonal discharges and precipitation depths in the upper Hron region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohnova, S.; Hlavcova, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors deal with the regional analysis of maximum annual and seasonal discharges and precipitation depths in the upper Hron region (Slovak Republic). This work has two objectives: (1) At site and regional analysis of annual and seasonal maximum design discharges in the upper Hron region; (2) Analysis of annual and seasonal maximum design precipitations in the connection of extreme runoff condition in the upper Hron region

  6. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Morishita, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd 3 Al 2 Ga 3 O 12 (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios—Ce-doped Gd 3 Al 2.6 Ga 2.4 O 12 (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm 3 (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These results indicate that phoswich DOI

  7. Numerical analysis on effective electric field penetration depth for interdigital impedance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chon-ung; Jong, Hakchol; Ro, Cholwu; Pak, Gilhung; Im, Songil; Li, Guofeng; Li, Jie; Song, Yunho

    2013-01-01

    Interdigital (finger-like) electrodes are widely used for electrical impedance and capacitance tomography of composite dielectric materials and complex insulating structures. Because of their advantages, they are now effectively introduced as capacitance sensors into a variety of industrial branches, agriculture, medical science, biological engineering, military branches, etc. In order to effectively apply the so-called interdigital impedance sensors in practice, of great importance is to optimize the sensor design parameters such as the electric field penetration depth, signal strength and so on. The general design principles of the interdigital capacitance sensor have been discussed for a long time by many researchers. However, there is no consensus on the definition of the effective electric field penetration depth of interdigital electrode. This paper discusses how to determine the effective electric field penetration depth of interdigital sensor on the basis of the refractive principle of electric field intensity and the FEM analyses of electric field distribution and capacitance for the sensor model.

  8. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper - Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Sandstroem, Rolf [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 {mu}m from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed.

  9. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper-Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsson, Aasa; Sandstroem, Rolf; Lilja, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 μm from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed

  10. Depth Profile of Impurity Phase in Wide-Bandgap Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2 Film Fabricated by Three-Stage Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghao; Nazuka, Takehiro; Hagiya, Hideki; Takabayashi, Yutaro; Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru; Islam, Muhammad M.; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeaki

    2018-02-01

    For copper indium gallium selenide [Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2, CIGS]-based solar cells, defect states or impurity phase always form due to both the multinary compositions of CIGS film and the difficulty of controlling the growth process, especially for high Ga concentration. To further improve device performance, it is important to understand such formation of impurity phase or defect states during fabrication. In the work presented herein, the formation mechanism of impurity phase Cu2-δ Se and its depth profile in CIGS film with high Ga content, in particular CuGaSe2 (i.e., CGS), were investigated by applying different growth conditions (i.e., normal three-stage process and two-cycle three-stage process). The results suggest that impurity phase Cu2-δ Se is distributed nonuniformly in the film because of lack of Ga diffusion. The formed Cu2-δ Se can be removed by etching the as-deposited CGS film with bromine-methanol solution, resulting in improved device performance.

  11. Team Regulation in a Simulated Medical Emergency: An In-Depth Analysis of Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Affective Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Melissa C.; Azevedo, Roger; Sun, Ning-Zi; Griscom, Sophia E.; Stead, Victoria; Crelinsten, Linda; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Maniatis, Thomas; Lachapelle, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of cognitive, metacognitive, and affective processes among a medical team experiencing difficulty managing a challenging simulated medical emergency case by conducting in-depth analysis of process data. Medical residents participated in a simulation exercise designed to help trainees to develop medical expertise,…

  12. RNA amplification for successful gene profiling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of clinical samples is often limited by the amount of material available to study. While proteins cannot be multiplied in their natural form, DNA and RNA can be amplified from small specimens and used for high-throughput analyses. Therefore, genetic studies offer the best opportunity to screen for novel insights of human pathology when little material is available. Precise estimates of DNA copy numbers in a given specimen are necessary. However, most studies investigate static variables such as the genetic background of patients or mutations within pathological specimens without a need to assess proportionality of expression among different genes throughout the genome. Comparative genomic hybridization of DNA samples represents a crude exception to this rule since genomic amplification or deletion is compared among different specimens directly. For gene expression analysis, however, it is critical to accurately estimate the proportional expression of distinct RNA transcripts since such proportions directly govern cell function by modulating protein expression. Furthermore, comparative estimates of relative RNA expression at different time points portray the response of cells to environmental stimuli, indirectly informing about broader biological events affecting a particular tissue in physiological or pathological conditions. This cognitive reaction of cells is similar to the detection of electroencephalographic patterns which inform about the status of the brain in response to external stimuli. As our need to understand human pathophysiology at the global level increases, the development and refinement of technologies for high fidelity messenger RNA amplification have become the focus of increasing interest during the past decade. The need to increase the abundance of RNA has been met not only for gene specific amplification, but, most importantly for global transcriptome wide, unbiased amplification. Now gene

  13. In-depth proteome analysis of the rubber particle of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Longjun; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Nie, Zhiyi; Duan, Cuifang; Zeng, Rizhong

    2013-05-01

    The rubber particle is a special organelle in which natural rubber is synthesised and stored in the laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis. To better understand the biological functions of rubber particles and to identify the candidate rubber biosynthesis-related proteins, a comprehensive proteome analysis was performed on H. brasiliensis rubber particles using shotgun tandem mass spectrometry profiling approaches-resulting in a thorough report on the rubber particle proteins. A total of 186 rubber particle proteins were identified, with a range in relative molecular mass of 3.9-194.2 kDa and in isoelectric point values of 4.0-11.2. The rubber particle proteins were analysed for gene ontology and could be categorised into eight major groups according to their functions: including rubber biosynthesis, stress- or defence-related responses, protein processing and folding, signal transduction and cellular transport. In addition to well-known rubber biosynthesis-related proteins such as rubber elongation factor (REF), small rubber particle protein (SRPP) and cis-prenyl transferase (CPT), many proteins were firstly identified to be on the rubber particles, including cyclophilin, phospholipase D, cytochrome P450, small GTP-binding protein, clathrin, eukaryotic translation initiation factor, annexin, ABC transporter, translationally controlled tumour protein, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, and several homologues of REF, SRPP and CPT. A procedure of multiple reaction monitoring was established for further protein validation. This comprehensive proteome data of rubber particles would facilitate investigation into molecular mechanisms of biogenesis, self-homeostasis and rubber biosynthesis of the rubber particle, and might serve as valuable biomarkers in molecular breeding studies of H. brasiliensis and other alternative rubber-producing species.

  14. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  15. In-Depth Analysis of Human Neonatal and Adult IgM Antibody Repertoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although high-throughput sequencing and associated bioinformatics technologies have enabled the in-depth, sequence-based characterization of human immune repertoires, only a few studies on a relatively small number of sequences explored the characteristics of antibody repertoires in neonates, with contradictory conclusions. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the human IgM antibody repertoire, we performed Illumina sequencing and IMGT/HighV-QUEST analysis of IgM heavy chain repertoire of the B lymphocytes from the cord blood (CB of neonates, as well as the repertoire from peripheral blood of healthy human adults (HH. The comparative study revealed unexpectedly high levels of similarity between the neonatal and adult repertoires. In both repertoires, the VDJ gene usage showed no significant difference, and the most frequently used VDJ gene was IGHV4-59, IGHD3-10, and IGHJ3. The average amino acid (aa length of CDR1 (CB: 8.5, HH: 8.4 and CDR2 (CB: 7.6, HH: 7.5, as well as the aa composition and the average hydrophobicity of the CDR3 demonstrated no significant difference between the two repertories. However, the average aa length of CDR3 was longer in the HH repertoire than the CB repertoire (CB: 14.5, HH: 15.5. Besides, the frequencies of aa mutations in CDR1 (CB: 19.33%, HH: 25.84% and CDR2 (CB: 9.26%, HH: 17.82% were higher in the HH repertoire compared to the CB repertoire. Interestingly, the most prominent difference between the two repertoires was the occurrence of N2 addition (CB: 64.87%, HH: 85.69%, a process that occurs during V-D-J recombination for introducing random nucleotide additions between D- and J-gene segments. The antibody repertoire of healthy adults was more diverse than that of neonates largely due to the higher occurrence of N2 addition. These findings may lead to a better understanding of antibody development and evolution pathways and may have potential practical value for facilitating the generation of more

  16. Spatial Factor Analysis for Aerosol Optical Depth in Metropolises in China with Regard to Spatial Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies have analyzed how driving factors impact aerosols, but they have been little concerned with the spatial heterogeneity of aerosols and the factors that impact aerosols. The spatial distributions of the aerosol optical depth (AOD retrieved by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS data at 550-nm and 3-km resolution for three highly developed metropolises, the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH region, the Yangtze River Delta (YRD, and the Pearl River Delta (PRD, in China during 2015 were analyzed. Different degrees of spatial heterogeneity of the AOD were found, which were indexed by Moran’s I index giving values of 0.940, 0.715, and 0.680 in BTH, YRD, and PRD, respectively. For the spatial heterogeneity, geographically weighted regression (GWR was employed to carry out a spatial factor analysis, where terrain, climate condition, urban development, and vegetation coverage were taken as the potential driving factors. The results of the GWR imply varying relationships between the AOD and the factors. The results were generally consistent with existing studies, but the results suggest the following: (1 Elevation increase would more likely lead to a strong negative impact on aerosols (with most of the coefficients ranging from −1.5~0 in the BTH, −1.5~0 in the YRD, and −1~0 in the PRD in the places with greater elevations where the R-squared values are always larger than 0.5. However, the variation of elevations cannot explain the variation of aerosols in the places with relatively low elevations (with R-squared values approximately 0.1, ranging from 0 to 0.3, and approximately 0.1 in the BTH, YRD, and PRD, such as urban areas in the BTH and YRD. (2 The density of the built-up areas made a strong and positive impact on aerosols in the urban areas of the BTH (R-squared larger than 0.5, while the R-squared dropped to 0.1 in the places far away from the urban areas. (3 The vegetation coverage led to a stronger

  17. Feasibility Analysis of Improving On-Campus Learning Paths via a Depth Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Fu; Tu, Shih-Chun; Chien, Mei-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to apply a depth sensor to create a human-body-sensing context for outdoor learning paths; it is conducted by incorporating both quasi-experiment and survey to compare students' cognitive learning outcome within the context and understand students' attitudes toward the context created. The result of ANCOVA indicates that the…

  18. Quantitative and Qualitative Proteome Characteristics Extracted from In-Depth Integrated Genomics and Proteomics Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teck Yew; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; van den Toorn, Henk; Giansanti, Piero; Cristobal, Alba; Toonen, Pim; Schafer, Sebastian; Huebner, Norbert; van Breukelen, Bas; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cuppen, Edwin; Heck, Albert J. R.; Guryev, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We

  19. Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance: A Cost-Benefit and Depth of Processing Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horrey, William J; Wickens, Christopher D

    2001-01-01

    ...). For half the trials, an automated system guided their attention to high-threat units. On two trials a memory probe was administered to assess the depth of processing of information, and on the final trial an automation failure was presented...

  20. In-Depth Analysis of Handwriting Curriculum and Instruction in Four Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hart, Nanho; Fitzpatrick, Paula; Cortesa, Cathryn

    2010-01-01

    The quality of handwriting curriculum and instructional practices in actual classrooms was investigated in an in-depth case study of four inner city kindergarten classrooms using quantitative and qualitative methods. The handwriting proficiency of students was also evaluated to assess the impact of the instructional practices observed. The…