WorldWideScience

Sample records for depth profiling analysis

  1. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  2. Depth profile and interface analysis in the nm-range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswald, S.; Reiche, R.; Zier, M.; Baunack, S.; Wetzig, K.

    2005-01-01

    In modern technology, thin films are shrinking more and more to a thickness of few nanometers. Analytical investigations of such thin films using the traditional sputter depth profiling, sputtering in combination with surface-analytical techniques, have limitations due to physical effects especially for very thin films. These limitations are pointed out and some alternatives are discussed. Non-destructive analysis with angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is demonstrated to be a useful method for such investigations. Both qualitative and quantitative results can be obtained even for complex layer structures. Nevertheless, there are also limitations of this method and some alternatives or complementary methods are considered

  3. Ultra-low energy Ar+ beam applied for SIMS depth profile analysis of layered nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Mierzejewska, A.; Iwanejko, I.

    2001-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile analyses of flat layered nanostructures: 10 nm Ta 2 O 3 /Ta and 20 nm (10 x B 4 C/Mo)/Si as well as microparticles of core (illite) - shell (rutile) structure, performed with the use of ultra-low energy ion beam (180-880 eV, Ar + ), are presented. The profiles were obtained using 'mesa' scanning technique and also sample rotation. Depth profile resolution below 1 nanometer was obtained for flat nanostructures. Presented experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo sputtering simulations of analysed structures. A method of finding beam energy, optimal for the best resolution SIMS depth profile analysis, is suggested. (author)

  4. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometric Image Depth Profiling for Three-Dimensional Elemental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    69-74. 18. Hofker, W.K.; et al. Rad. Eff. 1973, 17, 83-90. 19. Lindhard , J .; Scharff, M.; Schiott, H.E. Mat. Fys. Medd. Dan . Vid. Selsk. 1963, 33, 1...7A-A1OS 092 CORNELL UNIV ITHACA NY DEPT OF CHEMISTRY F/9 7/4 SCONARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRIC MAGE DEPTH PROFILING FOR THKf-ETC LW OCT SI A . J PATKIN...SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRIC IMAGE DEPTH PROFILING FOR THREE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS by Adam J . Patkin and George H. Morrison Prepared for

  5. Statistically sound evaluation of trace element depth profiles by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, K.; Toussaint, U. von

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the underlying physics and statistical models that are used in the newly developed program NRADC for fully automated deconvolution of trace level impurity depth profiles from ion beam data. The program applies Bayesian statistics to find the most probable depth profile given ion beam data measured at different energies and angles for a single sample. Limiting the analysis to % level amounts of material allows one to linearize the forward calculation of ion beam data which greatly improves the computation speed. This allows for the first time to apply the maximum likelihood approach to both the fitting of the experimental data and the determination of confidence intervals of the depth profiles for real world applications. The different steps during the automated deconvolution will be exemplified by applying the program to artificial and real experimental data.

  6. A continuous OSL scanning method for analysis of radiation depth-dose profiles in bricks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the development of a method for directly measuring radiation depth-dose profiles from brick, tile and porcelain cores, without the need for sample separation techniques. For the brick cores, examples are shown of the profiles generated by artificial irradiation using...... the different photon energies from Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma sources; comparison is drawn with both the theoretical calculations derived from Monte Carlo simulations, as well as experimental measurements made using more conventional optically stimulated luminescence methods of analysis....

  7. Experimental analysis of bruises in human volunteers using radiometric depth profiling and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-07-01

    We combine pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) depth profiling with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements for a comprehensive analysis of bruise evolution in vivo. While PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin), DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths and thus offers an additional insight into dynamics of the hemoglobin degradation products. Combining the two approaches enables us to quantitatively characterize bruise evolution dynamics. Our results indicate temporal variations of the bruise evolution parameters in the course of bruise self-healing process. The obtained parameter values and trends represent a basis for a future development of an objective technique for bruise age determination.

  8. Depth profile analysis of electrodeposited nanoscale multilayers by Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, G.L.; Berenyi, Z.; Vad, K.; Peter, L.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Nanoscale multilayers have been in the focus of research since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in this family of nanostructures. The first observation of GMR on sputtered magnetic/non-magnetic multilayers was followed by the detection of the same effect in electrodeposited Co-Ni-Cu/Cu multilayers within half a decade. Electrodeposition has long been considered as an inexpensive alternative of the high-vacuum methods to produce multilayers with GMR, although the GMR effect observed for electrodeposited multilayers is usually inferior to multilayers produced by physical methods. Electrochemistry appears to be an exclusive technology to produce multilayered nanowires by using porous templates. In spite of the large number of papers about the multilayers themselves, data on the depth profile of electrodeposited multilayer samples are very scarce. It has long been known that the simultaneous electrodeposition of the iron group metals takes place in the so-called anomalous manner. The diagnostic criterion of the anomalous codeposition is that the metallic component of lower standard potential (the Co in the case of Ni/Co) can be discharged together with the more noble one (Ni) at potentials where the less noble component (Co) alone cannot be deposited onto a substrate composed of the parent metal; moreover, the less noble metal (Co) is deposited preferentially. We have investigated the composition gradient along the growth direction of electrodeposited Co/Cu and CoNiCu/Cu multilayers films using SNMS. Samples were electrodeposited using the single bath method. Commercial Cu sheets and an Cr/Cu layer evaporated onto Si (111) surface were used as substrates with high and low roughness, respectively. The depth profiles of the samples were recorded using SNMS (INA-X, Specs GmbH, Berlin) in the Direct Bombardment Mode. Depth profile analysis of electrodeposited magnetic/nonmagnetic layered structures on

  9. An automatic analysis of strain-depth profile in X-ray microdiffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagomarsino, S.; Giannini, C.; Guagliardi, A.; Cedola, A.; Scarinci, F.; Aruta, C.

    2004-01-01

    The increased demanding of high spatial resolution analysis for local strain/stress measurements gave an impulse for developing new X-ray microdiffraction technique. In particular spatial resolution of the order of 100-300 nm can be recently obtained using an X-ray waveguides as optical element. However, the great number of datasets which must be acquired and analyzed to probe the full field of strain variations renders the high-resolution technique not suitable for systematic analysis. In this communication, we present a data treatment procedure for an automatic analysis of microdiffraction profiles measured with X-ray waveguide to obtain quantitative information about local strain variations. The presented procedure allows to extract a depth-dependent strain profile directly from the measured data to be used as initial guess for calculating the diffraction profile by means of the dynamical theory in the Takagi-Taupin recursive formalism. Then a Monte Carlo fitting data refinement is applied to optimize the strain profile

  10. Quantitative depth profiling of near surface semiconductor structures using ultra low energy SIMS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliner, D.I.

    1999-09-01

    The continual reduction in size of semiconductor structures and depths of junctions is putting a greater strain on characterization techniques. Accurate device and process modelling requires quantified electrical and dopant profiles from the topmost few nanometres. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an analytical technique commonly used in the semiconductor industry to measure concentration depth profiles. To allow the quantification of the features that are closer to the surface, lower energy ions are employed, which also improves the available depth resolution. The development of the floating ion gun (FLIG) has made it possible to use sub keV beam energies on a routine basis, allowing quantified dopant profiles to be obtained within the first few nanometres of the surface. This thesis demonstrates that, when profiling with oxygen ion beams, greatest certainty in the retained dose is achieved at normal incidence, and when analysing boron accurate profile shapes are only obtained when the primary beam energy is less than half that of the implant. It was shown that it is now possible to profile, though with slower erosion rates and a limited dynamic range, with 100 eV oxygen (0 2 + ) ion beams. Profile features that had developed during rapid thermal annealing, that could only be observed when ultra low energy ion beams were used, were investigated using various analytical techniques. Explanations of the apparently inactive dopant were proposed, and included suggestions for cluster molecules. The oxide thickness of fully formed altered layers has also been investigated. The results indicate that a fundamental change in the mechanism of oxide formation occurs, and interfaces that are sharper than those grown by thermal oxidation can be produced using sub-keV ion beams. (author)

  11. Quantitative considerations in medium energy ion scattering depth profiling analysis of nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalm, P.C.; Bailey, P. [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Reading, M.A. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Rossall, A.K. [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Berg, J.A. van den, E-mail: j.vandenberg@hud.ac.uk [International Institute for Accelerator Applications, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The high depth resolution capability of medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) is becoming increasingly relevant to the characterisation of nanolayers in e.g. microelectronics. In this paper we examine the attainable quantitative accuracy of MEIS depth profiling. Transparent but reliable analytical calculations are used to illustrate what can ultimately be achieved for dilute impurities in a silicon matrix and the significant element-dependence of the depth scale, for instance, is illustrated this way. Furthermore, the signal intensity-to-concentration conversion and its dependence on the depth of scattering is addressed. Notably, deviations from the Rutherford scattering cross section due to screening effects resulting in a non-coulombic interaction potential and the reduction of the yield owing to neutralization of the exiting, backscattered H{sup +} and He{sup +} projectiles are evaluated. The former mainly affects the scattering off heavy target atoms while the latter is most severe for scattering off light target atoms and can be less accurately predicted. However, a pragmatic approach employing an extensive data set of measured ion fractions for both H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions scattered off a range of surfaces, allows its parameterization. This has enabled the combination of both effects, which provides essential information regarding the yield dependence both on the projectile energy and the mass of the scattering atom. Although, absolute quantification, especially when using He{sup +}, may not always be achievable, relative quantification in which the sum of all species in a layer adds up to 100%, is generally possible. This conclusion is supported by the provision of some examples of MEIS derived depth profiles of nanolayers. Finally, the relative benefits of either using H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions are briefly considered.

  12. Depth Profiling Analysis of Aluminum Oxidation During Film Deposition in a Conventional High Vacuum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmin; Weimer, Jeffrey J.; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of aluminum thin films deposited in a conventional high vacuum chamber has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and depth profiling. The state of the Al layer was preserved by coating it with a protective MgF2 layer in the deposition chamber. Oxygen concentrations in the film layers were determined as a function of sputter time (depth into the film). The results show that an oxidized layer is formed at the start of Al deposition and that a less extensively oxidized Al layer is deposited if the deposition rate is fast. The top surface of the Al layer oxidizes very quickly. This top oxidized layer may be thicker than has been previously reported by optical methods. Maximum oxygen concentrations measured by XPS at each Al interface are related to pressure to rate ratios determined during the Al layer deposition.

  13. Determination of rare earth elements concentration at different depth profile of Precambrian pegmatites using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq Aliyu, Abubakar; Musa, Yahaya; Liman, M S; Abba, Habu T; Chaanda, Mohammed S; Ngene, Nnamani C; Garba, N N

    2018-01-01

    The Keffi area hosts abundant pegmatite bodies as a result of the surrounding granitic intrusions. Keffi is part of areas that are geologically classified as North Central Basement Complex. Data on the mineralogy and mineralogical zonation of the Keffi pegmatite are scanty. Hence the need to understand the geology and mineralogical zonation of Keffi pegmatites especially at different depth profiles is relevant as a study of the elemental composition of the pegmatite is essential for the estimation of its economic viability. Here, the relative standardization method of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been used to investigate the vertical deviations of the elemental concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) at different depth profile of Keffi pegmatite. This study adopted the following metrics in investigating the vertical variations of REEs concentrations. Namely, the total contents of rare earth elements (∑REE); ratio of light to heavy rare earth elements (LREE/HREE), which defines the enrichment or depletion of REEs; europium anomaly (Eu/Sm); La/Lu ratio relative to chondritic meteorites. The study showed no significant variations in the total content of rare elements between the vertical depth profiles (100-250m). However, higher total concentrations of REEs (~ 92.65ppm) were recorded at the upper depth of the pegmatite and the europium anomaly was consistently negative at all the depth profiles suggesting that the Keffi pegmatite is enriched with light REEs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Applications of positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM)

  15. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  16. XPS investigation of depth profiling induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Quinn; Skinner, Charles; Koel, Bruce; Chen, Zhu

    2017-10-01

    Surface analysis is an important tool for understanding plasma-material interactions. Depth profiles are typically generated by etching with a monatomic argon ion beam, however this can induce unintended chemical changes in the sample. Tantalum pentoxide, a sputtering standard, and PEDOT:PSS, a polymer that was used to mimic the response of amorphous carbon-hydrogen co-deposits, were studied. We compare depth profiles generated with monatomic and gas cluster argon ion beams (GCIB) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to quantify chemical changes. In both samples, monatomic ion bombardment led to beam-induced chemical changes. Tantalum pentoxide exhibited preferential sputtering of oxygen and the polymer experienced significant bond modification. Depth profiling with clusters is shown to mitigate these effects. We present sputtering rates for Ta2O5 and PEDOT:PSS as a function of incident energy and flux. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. P{sup 2}IMS depth profile analysis of high temperature boron oxynitride dielectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badi, N., E-mail: nbadi@uh.edu [Center for Advanced Materials (CAM), University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5004 (United States); Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Vijayaraghavan, S. [Center for Advanced Materials (CAM), University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5004 (United States); Benqaoula, A. [Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Tempez, A.; Tauziède, C.; Chapon, P. [Horiba Jobin Yvon, Longjumeau, F-91160 Paris (France)

    2014-02-15

    Existing silicon oxynitride (SiON) dielectric can only provide a very near term solution for the metal oxide semiconductor technology. The emerging high-k dielectric materials have a limited thermal stability and are prone to electrical behavior degradation which is associated with unwanted chemical reactions with silicon (Si). We investigated here applicability of amorphous boron oxynitride (BON) thin films as an emerging dielectric for high temperature capacitors. BON samples of thickness varying from 200 nm down to 10 nm were deposited in a high vacuum reactor using ion source assisted physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. Plasma profiling ion mass spectrometry (P{sup 2}IMS) was utilized to specifically determine the interface quality and best capacitor performance as a function of growth temperatures of a graded sample with alternate layers of deposited titanium (Ti) and BON layers on Si. P{sup 2}IMS depth profiling of these layers were also performed to evaluate the stability of the dielectric layers and their efficacy against B dopant diffusion simulating processes occurring in activated polySi-based devices. For this purpose, BON layers were deposited on boron-isotope 10 (B{sup 10}) implanted Si substrates and subsequently annealed at high temperatures up to 1050 °C for about 10 s. Results comparing inter-diffusion of B{sup 10} intensities at the interfaces of BON–Si and SiON–Si samples suggest suitability of BON as barrier layers against boron diffusion at high temperature. Stable Ti/BON/Ti capacitor behavior was achieved at optimum growth temperature of 600 °C of the BON dielectric layer. Capacitance change with frequency (10 kHz to 2 MHz) and temperature up to 400 °C is about 1% and 10%, respectively.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Human Pluripotency and Neural Specification by In-Depth (PhosphoProteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Singec

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can be utilized for precise analysis of cell type identities during early development. We established a highly efficient neural induction strategy and an improved analytical platform, and determined proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of hESCs and their specified multipotent neural stem cell derivatives (hNSCs. This quantitative dataset (nearly 13,000 proteins and 60,000 phosphorylation sites provides unique molecular insights into pluripotency and neural lineage entry. Systems-level comparative analysis of proteins (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, kinase families, phosphorylation sites, and numerous biological pathways allowed the identification of distinct signatures in pluripotent and multipotent cells. Furthermore, as predicted by the dataset, we functionally validated an autocrine/paracrine mechanism by demonstrating that the secreted protein midkine is a regulator of neural specification. This resource is freely available to the scientific community, including a searchable website, PluriProt.

  19. Hydrogen depth profiling at IRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, L.; Hult, M.; Giorginis, G.; Crametz, A.

    1997-02-01

    At the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) a facility for hydrogen profiling has been implemented. Two techniques are being used; Nuclear Resonant Reaction Analysis (NRRA) using the 1H(15N,αγ)12C reaction and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) using a He+ ion beam. The ERDA chamber is a common type of scattering chamber with a load lock system for quick changing of the samples. NRRA is performed in a UHV chamber in which the samples can be cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature and sputter cleaned with a 5 kV ion gun. The 4.43 MeV γ rays are detected using a 4 in.×4 in. BGO detector. Using only passive shielding a detection limit of hydrogen in silicon of 5×1018atoms/cm3 has been achieved. Experimental results which exemplify the major features of the facility are presented.

  20. Quantitative analysis of Si1-xGex alloy films by SIMS and XPS depth profiling using a reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won Jin; Jang, Jong Shik; Lee, Youn Seoung; Kim, Ansoon; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative analysis methods of multi-element alloy films were compared. The atomic fractions of Si1-xGex alloy films were measured by depth profiling analysis with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Intensity-to-composition conversion factor (ICF) was used as a mean to convert the intensities to compositions instead of the relative sensitivity factors. The ICFs were determined from a reference Si1-xGex alloy film by the conventional method, average intensity (AI) method and total number counting (TNC) method. In the case of SIMS, although the atomic fractions measured by oxygen ion beams were not quantitative due to severe matrix effect, the results by cesium ion beam were very quantitative. The quantitative analysis results by SIMS using MCs2+ ions are comparable to the results by XPS. In the case of XPS, the measurement uncertainty was highly improved by the AI method and TNC method.

  1. Measurement and Analysis of Composition and Depth Profile of H in Amorphous Si1−xCx:H Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hua; Shu-De, Yao; Kun, Wang; Zhi-Bo, Ding

    2008-01-01

    Composition in amorphous Si 1−X C x :H heteroepitaxial thin films on Si (100) by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is analysed. The unknown x (0.45–0.57) and the depth profile of hydrogen in the thin films are characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrum (RBS), resonance-nuclear reaction analysis (R-NRA) and elastic recoil detection (ERD), respectively. In addition, the depth profile of hydrogen in the unannealed thin films is compared to that of the annealed thin films with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) or laser spike annealing (LSA) in nitrogen atmosphere. The results indicate that the stoichiometric amorphous SiC can be produced by PECVD when the ratio of CH 4 /SiH 4 is approximately equal to 25. The content of hydrogen decreases suddenly from 35% to 1% after 1150° C annealing. RTA can reduce hydrogen in SiC films effectively than LSA. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  3. The national psychological/personality profile of Romanians: An in depth analysis of the regional national psychological/personality profile of Romanians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David, D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we perform an in depth analysis of the national psychological/personality profile of Romanians. Following recent developments in the field (see Rentfrow et al., 2013; 2015, we study the regional national psychological/personality profile of Romanians, based on the Big Five model (i.e., NEO PI/R. Using a representative sample (N1 = 1000, we performed a cluster analysis and identified two bipolar personality profiles in the population: cluster 1, called “Factor X-”, characterized by high neuroticism and low levels of extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and cluster 2, called “Factor X+”, characterized by the opposite configuration in personality traits, low neuroticism and high levels of extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. The same two cluster pattern/solution emerged in other samples (N = 2200, with other Big Five-based instruments, and by using various methods of data (e.g., direct vs. reversed item score, controlling for item desirability and cluster (i.e., with and without “running means” analyses. These two profiles are quite evenly distributed in the overall population, but also across all geographical regions. Moreover, comparing the distribution of the five personality traits, we found just few small differences between the eight geographical divisions that we used for our analysis. These results suggest that the regional national psychological/personality profile of Romania is quite homogenous. Directions for harnessing the potential of both personality profiles are presented to the reader. Other implications based on the bipolar and fractal structure of the personality profile are discussed from an interdisciplinary perspective.

  4. [A real-time determination method with laser measurement for depth profile analysis of GD-OES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Yong-Qing; Shi, Ning; Sun, Rong-Xia

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the traditional methods of GD depth analysis method and also its limitations, and the earlier studies of real-time depth measurement technology. A new method of real-time depth determination by laser technology for GD-OES depth analysis is proposed. The real-time depth measurement system is composed of laser displacement sensor and new designed Grimm-type GD source based on laser measurement method, and the system design and technical principles are described in detail. Sputtering depth measurement signal and element spectrum signal can be synchronously collected by this system. The displacement phenomenon of glow discharge source during real-time sputtering depth measurement process is analyzed. The real-time sputtering depth measurement curve of zinc alloy standard sample was tested by two laser displacement sensors measurement system. The actual value of sputtering depth was obtained by adding the depth measurement curve of sputtering surface and the reference plane curve, and the actual depth result is in line with Dektak8-type surface profilometer.

  5. Sputtering as a means of depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitton, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Probably the most common technique for determination of depth profiles by sputtering is that of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Many problems occur in the important step of converting the time (of sputtering) scale to a depth scale and these problems arise before the secondary ions are ejected. An attempt is made to present a comprehensive list of the effects that should be taken into consideration in the use of sputtering as a means of depth profiling. The various parameters liable to affect the depth profile measurements are listed in four sections: beam conditions; target conditions; experimental environment; and beam-target interactions. The effects are discussed and where interplay occurs, cross-reference is made and examples are provided where possible. (B.R.H.)

  6. DS86 neutron dose. Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of {sup 152}Eu activity in a large stone sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fujita, Shoichiro; Hasai, Hiromi

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of {sup 152}Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and {sup 152}Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation. (author)

  7. Modeling detector response for neutron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Downing, R.G. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lamaze, G.P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Hofsaess, H.C. [Konstanz Univ. (Germany); Biegel, J. [Konstanz Univ. (Germany); Ronning, C. [Konstanz Univ. (Germany)

    1995-11-21

    In Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP), inferences about the concentration profile of an element in a material are based on the energy spectrum of charged particles emitted due to specific nuclear reactions. The detector response function relates the depth of emission to the expected energy spectrum of the emitted particles. Here, the detector response function is modeled for arbitrary source and detector geometries based on a model for the stopping power of the material, energy straggling, multiple scattering and random detector measurement error. At the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility, a NDP spectrum was collected for a diamond-like carbon (DLC) sample doped with boron. A vertical slit was placed in front of the detector for collimation. Based on the computed detector response function, a model for the depth profile of boron is fit to the observed NDP spectrum. The contribution of straggling to overall variability was increased by multiplying the Bohr Model prediction by a ramp factor. The adjustable parameter in the ramp was selected to give the best agreement between the fitted profile and the expected shape of the profile. The expected shape is determined from experimental process control measurements. (orig.).

  8. Possibilities of LA-ICP-MS technique for the spatial elemental analysis of the recent fish scales: Line scan vs. depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kalvoda, Jiri, E-mail: jkalvoda@centrum.cz [Department of Geological Sciences, Masaryk University of Brno, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Novakova, Hana [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Skoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Masaryk University of Brno, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-01

    LA-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS in combination with electron microprobe are presented as a method for the determination of the elemental spatial distribution in fish scales which represent an example of a heterogeneous layered bone structure. Two different LA-ICP-MS techniques were tested on recent common carp (Cyprinus carpio) scales: (a)A line scan through the whole fish scale perpendicular to the growth rings. The ablation crater of 55 {mu}m width and 50 {mu}m depth allowed analysis of the elemental distribution in the external layer. Suitable ablation conditions providing a deeper ablation crater gave average values from the external HAP layer and the collagen basal plate. (b)Depth profiling using spot analysis was tested in fish scales for the first time. Spot analysis allows information to be obtained about the depth profile of the elements at the selected position on the sample. The combination of all mentioned laser ablation techniques provides complete information about the elemental distribution in the fish scale samples. The results were compared with the solution based ICP-MS and EMP analyses. The fact that the results of depth profiling are in a good agreement both with EMP and PIXE results and, with the assumed ways of incorporation of the studied elements in the HAP structure, suggests a very good potential for this method.

  9. Investigation of Arctic and Antarctic spatial and depth patterns of sea water in CTD profiles using chemometric data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotwa, Ewelina Katarzyna; Lacorte, Silvia; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine 2- and 3-way chemometric methods for analysis of Arctic and Antarctic water samples. Standard CTD (conductivity–temperature–depth) sensor devices were used during two oceanographic expeditions (July 2007 in the Arctic; February 2009 in the Antarctic) covering a total of 1...... properties of the water samples; and 4) we confirm the ability to predict fluorescence values from physical measurements when the 3-way data structure is used in N-way PLS regression.......In this paper we examine 2- and 3-way chemometric methods for analysis of Arctic and Antarctic water samples. Standard CTD (conductivity–temperature–depth) sensor devices were used during two oceanographic expeditions (July 2007 in the Arctic; February 2009 in the Antarctic) covering a total of 174...... locations. The output from these devices can be arranged in a 3-way data structure (according to sea water depth, measured variables, and geographical location). We used and compared 2- and 3-way statistical tools including PCA, PARAFAC, PLS, and N-PLS for exploratory analysis, spatial patterns discovery...

  10. Analysis of components depth profile at the interface of Ti6242 alloy and TiNi coatings after high temperature oxidation in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdikas, A. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kaunas University of Medicine (Lithuania); Riviere, J.P.; Pichon, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, University of Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Petraitiene, A.; Moskalioviene, T. [Physics Department, Kaunas University of Technology, 50 Studentu st., Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2010-11-15

    We have analyzed the interfacial elemental depth profile evolution after high temperature isothermal oxidation of NiTi coatings deposited by dynamic ion mixing on a Ti6242 alloy (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo). NiTi coatings (thickness 0.4 {mu}m) were deposited at room temperature (RT) by ion beam sputtering. High temperature isothermal oxidation tests in 1 atm flowing synthetic air (80% N{sub 2}, 20% O{sub 2}) have been conducted at 500 C and 600 C during 100 hours. We have observed a non-monotonous depth distribution of nickel in GDOES depth profiles after oxidation of TiNi/Ti6242: nickel segregates to the surface of TiNi coating and to the interface between TiNi coating and Ti6242 alloy. We propose a kinetic model based on rate equations for analyzing the depth profile. This model includes microprocesses taking place during oxidation in air such as: adsorption of nitrogen and oxygen, diffusion of components through the film and interface, formation of chemical compounds. It is shown by modeling that non-monotonous depth profile of nickel occurs because nickel from TiNi coating is forming a nickel oxide compound when oxygen atoms reach the film/alloy interface. XRD analysis confirms the presence of nickel oxide in the TiNi/Ti6242 interface after oxidation at both temperatures 500 C and 600 C (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  12. {sup 14}N depth profiles in Ti and Ti6Al4V nitrided by various methods, measured by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickridge, I.; Trompetter, B. [Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Brown, I. [Industrial Research Ltd, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Titanium alloys have desirable mechanical properties for applications in many areas, but their surface properties, such as friction coefficient, hardness, and wear and corrosion resistance often need to be enhanced. This may be accomplished by forming a thin layer of titanium nitride on the surface, by such methods as thermal nitriding, Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), sol-gel technology, or ion implantation. Ion Beam Analysis is assuming an increasing importance for characterising the composition of the outer few microns since it is the only technique that can rapidly yield quantitative concentration depth profiles of {sup 14}N with minimal disruption of the analysed region. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Molecular depth profiling of organic and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, John S. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Fletcher@manchester.ac.uk; Conlan, Xavier A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Lockyer, Nicholas P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    Atomic depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is common in the field micro-electronics; however, the generation of molecular information as a function of sample depth is difficult due to the accumulation of damage both on and beneath the sample surface. The introduction of polyatomic ion beams such as SF{sub 5} and C{sub 60} have raised the possibility of overcoming this problem as they deposit the majority of their energy in the upper surface of the sample resulting in increased sputter yields but with a complimentary reduction in sub-surface damage accumulation. In this paper we report the depth profile analysis of the bio-polymer polycaprolactone, PCL, using the polyatomic ions Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} and the monoatomic Au{sup +}. Results are compared to recent analysis of a similar sample using SF{sub 5}{sup +}. C{sub 60}{sup +} depth profiling of cellulose is also demonstrated, an experiment that has been reported as unsuccessful when attempted with SF{sub 5}{sup +} implications for biological analysis are discussed.

  14. Depth profiling of aluminium metal using slow positron beam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Slow positron beam Doppler-broadening technique was used to study depth profiling of aluminium metals sample. The variation of the line-shape parameters with incident positron energy was studied. Also, the depth profile of the S parameter was investigated. The positron implantation profile and backscattering fraction for ...

  15. Calculation of concentration depth profiles in electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrae, M.

    1996-03-01

    The intention of this thesis is to calculate concentration depth-profiles with Electron Probe Microanalysis. In order to conclude the structure of the sample from the measured intensity of radiation, it is necessary to have an accurate correction procedure. In the first part of the thesis all physical quantities needed for the multiple reflection model are described in detail. There will be more possibilities to compare theoretical predictions with the experiment, if the correction procedure is also valid for tilted specimens. Therefore the model hat to generalize for oblique electron incidence. Several quantities in the multiple reflection model tilted specimens (transmission, coefficient, angular distribution of transmitted electrons most probable angle of transmitted electrons etc.) had to be derived. The possibility extending this model comparatively easily to the analysis of layered specimens is one advantage of this model. The alteration of the important quantities in this case is described. Measurements of some specimens with one layer on a substrate proved that the mean deviation of calculated thicknesses is about 10 %. In order to calculate depth profiles gold and copper were evaporated with Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) on silver foils. The thicknesses of evaporated films for gold were 50 nm and 100 nm and for copper 65 nm and 130 nm. Then the specimens were annealed with a temperature of approximately 400 degree C. Finally the concentration depth profiles were quantified with Electron Probe Microanalysis. The shape of the profiles was derived from a simple diffusion model valid for the samples under consideration. In order to check the shape of obtained functions a comparison with measurement by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) was performed. Errors of calculated, depth profiles resulting from approximations of the multiple reflection model and the unknown mass of diffused substances of the samples, are estimated. (author)

  16. Counter-diffusion biofilms have lower N2O emissions than co-diffusion biofilms during simultaneous nitrification and denitrification: Insights from depth-profile analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinh, Co Thi; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    geometries, i.e., a MABR and a conventional biofilm reactor (CBR) employing co-current substrate diffusion geometry, were operated to determine depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrous oxide (N2O), functional gene abundance and microbial community structure. Surficial nitrogen removal rate...... (0.011 ± 0.001 mg N2O-N/L) than that in the CBR (1.38 ± 0.25 mg N2O-N/L), resulting in distinct N2O emission factors (0.0058 ± 0.0005% in the MABR vs. 0.72 ± 0.13% in the CBR). Analysis on local net N2O production and consumption rates unveiled that zones for N2O production and consumption were...

  17. Electron Microscopy Studies, Surface Analysis and Microbial Culturing Experiments on a Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, J. K. W.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Griffin, C.; Whitby, C.; Avci, R.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Combined electron microscopy studies and culturing experiments have shown that Nakhla became contaminated with recent terrestrial microorganisms. Additional surface analysis detected an as yet unknown organic species which may represent a biomarker.

  18. Recovery of SIMS depth profiles with account for nonstationary effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunin, Pavel Andreevich; Drozdov, Yurii Nikolaevich; Drozdov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Yurasov, Dmitry Vladimirovich

    2014-01-01

    In this work we consider a method of accounting for the nonstationary effects in recovery of SIMS depth profiles. The depth resolution function (DRF) is described by Hofmann's nonstationary MRI (mixing-roughness-information depth) model using the depth-dependent parameters. The effects in question include the nonstationary atomic mixing and development of surface roughness. A mathematical description of the nonstationary depth profiling process by the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is proposed. The inverse problem is solved using an algorithm based on the Tikhonov regularization method. The proposed nonstationary recovery method is tested on both model and real structures. The development of surface roughness in SIMS depth profiling of the real structure was observed. Grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (XRR) technique was used to verify the results of SIMS profiles restoration for periodic structure containing thin Ge layers in the Si matrix. The advantages of the proposed recovery algorithm to allow for the nonstationary effects are shown.

  19. Magnetic depth profiles by neutron reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.; Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Brodsky, M.B.

    1985-09-01

    Fresnel reflection of polarized neutrons was used to measure the dependence of magnetic induction B in materials as a function of depth from the surface. The penetration depth of a magnetic field is superconductors was investigated, as well as the remnant superconducting surface sheath when the applied field exceeded the critical value (H/sub c2/ < H < H/sub c3/ in type II superconductors). In addition ferromagnets in bulk and in thin layers were examined. The prototype instrument with which the measurements were made was described. 19 refs., 5 figs

  20. Interpreting Repeated Temperature-Depth Profiles for Groundwater Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, Victor F.; Kurylyk, Barret L.; van Daal, Jonathan; van der Ploeg, Martine J.; Carey, Sean K.

    2017-10-01

    Temperature can be used to trace groundwater flows due to thermal disturbances of subsurface advection. Prior hydrogeological studies that have used temperature-depth profiles to estimate vertical groundwater fluxes have either ignored the influence of climate change by employing steady-state analytical solutions or applied transient techniques to study temperature-depth profiles recorded at only a single point in time. Transient analyses of a single profile are predicated on the accurate determination of an unknown profile at some time in the past to form the initial condition. In this study, we use both analytical solutions and a numerical model to demonstrate that boreholes with temperature-depth profiles recorded at multiple times can be analyzed to either overcome the uncertainty associated with estimating unknown initial conditions or to form an additional check for the profile fitting. We further illustrate that the common approach of assuming a linear initial temperature-depth profile can result in significant errors for groundwater flux estimates. Profiles obtained from a borehole in the Veluwe area, Netherlands in both 1978 and 2016 are analyzed for an illustrative example. Since many temperature-depth profiles were collected in the late 1970s and 1980s, these previously profiled boreholes represent a significant and underexploited opportunity to obtain repeat measurements that can be used for similar analyses at other sites around the world.

  1. Depth resolution and preferential sputtering in depth profiling of sharp interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S. [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Han, Y.S. [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Interfacial depth resolution from MRI model depends on sputtering rate differences. • Depth resolution critically depends on the dominance of roughness or atomic mixing. • True (depth scale) and apparent (time scale) depth resolutions are different. • Average sputtering rate approximately yields true from apparent depth resolution. • Profiles by SIMS and XPS are different but similar to surface concentrations. - Abstract: The influence of preferential sputtering on depth resolution of sputter depth profiles is studied for different sputtering rates of the two components at an A/B interface. Surface concentration and intensity depth profiles on both the sputtering time scale (as measured) and the depth scale are obtained by calculations with an extended Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI)-model. The results show a clear difference for the two extreme cases (a) preponderant roughness and (b) preponderant atomic mixing. In case (a), the interface width on the time scale (Δt(16–84%)) increases with preferential sputtering if the faster sputtering component is on top of the slower sputtering component, but the true resolution on the depth scale (Δz(16–84%)) stays constant. In case (b), the interface width on the time scale stays constant but the true resolution on the depth scale varies with preferential sputtering. For similar order of magnitude of the atomic mixing and the roughness parameters, a transition state between the two extremes is obtained. While the normalized intensity profile of SIMS represents that of the surface concentration, an additional broadening effect is encountered in XPS or AES by the influence of the mean electron escape depth which may even cause an additional matrix effect at the interface.

  2. A small and compact AMS facility for tritium depth profiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed measurements of the concentration and depth profiles of hydrogen and other light elements have been .... Profiles of hydrogen cannot be obtained due to the hydrogen ion current from the resid- ual gas, which is of the same ... samples measured by AMS and by the full combustion method. Full combustion coupled ...

  3. Development and Applications of Time of Flight Neutron Depth Profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, Bingham; Unlu, Kenan

    2005-01-01

    The depth profiles of intentional or intrinsic constituents of a sample provide valuable information for the characterization of materials. For example, the subtle differences in spatial distribution and composition of many chemical species in the near surface region and across interfacial boundaries can significantly alter the electronic and optical properties of materials. A number of analytical techniques for depth profiling have been developed during the last two decades. neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is one of the leading analytical techniques. The NDP is a nondestructive near surface technique that utilizes thermal/cold neutron beam to measure the concentration of specific light elements versus their depth in materials. The depth is obtained from the energy loss of protons, alphas or recoil atoms in substrate materials. Since the charged particle energy determination using surface barrier detector is used for NDP, the depth resolution is highly dependent on the detectors an d detection instruments. The depth resolutions of a few tens of nm are achieved with available NDP facilities in the world. However, the performance of NDP needs to be improved in order to obtain a few A depth resolutions

  4. Neutron depth profiling: Overview and description of NIST facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, R.G.; Lamaze, G.P.; Langland, J.K.; Hwang, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Cold Neutron Depth Profiling (CNDP) instrument at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) is now operational. The neutron beam originates from a 16 L D 2 O ice cold source and passes through a filter of 135mm of single crystal sapphire. The neutron energy spectrum may be described by a 65 K Maxwellian distribution. The sample chamber configuration allows for remote controlled scanning of 150 x 150 mm sample areas including the varying of both sample and detector angle. The improved sensitivity over the current thermal depth profiling instrument has permitted the first nondestructive measurements of 17 O profiles. This paper describes the CNDP instrument, illustrates the neutron depth profiling (NDP) technique with examples, and gives a separate bibliography of NDP publications

  5. Calibration of a stopping power model for silicon based on analysis of neutron depth profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.gov; Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Lamaze, G.P.; Simons, D.S.; Thompson, P.E

    2002-06-01

    We measure the boron concentration versus depth profile within a silicon sample with four delta-doped planes by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In a neutron depth profiling (NDP) experiment, we illuminate the sample with a neutron beam. Nuclear reactions between the boron nuclei and neutrons produce alpha particles. Based on the measured boron concentration profile and models for the stopping power of the silicon sample, energy straggling, multiple scattering, and the observed energy resolution of the alpha particle detector, we predict the observed energy spectrum of the detected alpha particles. We predict the stopping power of silicon using the stopping and range of ions in matter code SRIM-2000. The predicted locations of the NDP energy peaks are consistently at lower energies than the locations of the observed peaks. This discrepancy is consistent with the claim that SRIM-2000 overestimates the actual stopping power of silicon. Empirically, we estimate a stopping power reduction factor to be 5.06%{+-}1.06%. When we reduce the SRIM-2000 prediction by this factor, we get good agreement between the observed and predicted NDP measurements.

  6. An optical fiber expendable seawater temperature/depth profile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Shizhe; Zhang, Keke; Yan, Xingkui; Yang, Xianglong; Bai, Xuejiao; Liu, Shixuan

    2017-10-01

    Marine expendable temperature/depth profiler (XBT) is a disposable measuring instrument which can obtain temperature/depth profile data quickly in large area waters and mainly used for marine surveys, scientific research, military application. The temperature measuring device is a thermistor in the conventional XBT probe (CXBT)and the depth data is only a calculated value by speed and time depth calculation formula which is not an accurate measurement result. Firstly, an optical fiber expendable temperature/depth sensor based on the FBG-LPG cascaded structure is proposed to solve the problems of the CXBT, namely the use of LPG and FBG were used to detect the water temperature and depth, respectively. Secondly, the fiber end reflective mirror is used to simplify optical cascade structure and optimize the system performance. Finally, the optical path is designed and optimized using the reflective optical fiber end mirror. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of temperature and depth sensing based on FBG-LPG cascade structure is about 0.0030C and 0.1%F.S. respectively, which can meet the requirements of the sea water temperature/depth observation. The reflectivity of reflection mirror is in the range from 48.8% to 72.5%, the resonant peak of FBG and LPG are reasonable and the whole spectrum are suitable for demodulation. Through research on the optical fiber XBT (FXBT), the direct measurement of deep-sea temperature/depth profile data can be obtained simultaneously, quickly and accurately. The FXBT is a new all-optical seawater temperature/depth sensor, which has important academic value and broad application prospect and is expected to replace the CXBT in the future.

  7. Development of Cold Neutron Depth Profiling System at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B. G.; Choi, H. D.; Sun, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The depth profiles of intentional or intrinsic constituents of a sample provide valuable information for the characterization of materials. A number of analytical techniques for depth profiling have been developed. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) system which was developed by Ziegler et al. is one of the leading analytical techniques. In NDP, a thermal or cold neutron beam passes through a material and interacts with certain isotopes that are known to emit monoenergetic-charged particle remaining a recoil nucleus after neutron absorption. The depth is obtained from the energy loss of those charged particles escaping surface of substrate material. For various applications of NDP technique, the Cold Neutron Depth Profiling System (CN-NDP) was developed at a neutron guide CG1 installed at the HANARO cold neutron source. In this study the design features of the cold neutron beam and target chamber for the CN-NDP system are given. Also, some experiments for the performance tests of the CN-NDP system are described

  8. Depth-profiling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijolat, M.; Hollinger, G.

    1980-12-01

    The possibilities of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (or ESCA) for depth-profiling into shallow depths (approximately 10-100 A) have been studied. The method of ion-sputtering removal has first been investigated in order to improve its depth-resolution (approximately 50-150 A). A procedure which eliminates the effects due to the resolution function of the instrumental probe (analysed depth approximately 50 A) has been settled; but it is not yet sufficient, and the sputter - broadening due to the ion-induced damages must be taken into account (broadening function approximately 50 A for approximately 150 A removal). Because of serious difficulties in estimating the broadening function an alternative is to develop non destructive methods, so a new method based on the dependence of the analysed depth with the electron emission angle is presented. The extraction of the concentration profile from angular distribution experiments is achieved, in the framework of a flat-layer model, by minimizing the difference between theoretical and experimental relative intensities. The applicability and limitations of the method are discussed on the basis of computer simulation results. The depth probed is of the order of 3 lambda (lambda being the value of the inelastic mean free path, typically 10-20 A) and the depth-resolution is of the order of lambda/3 [fr

  9. Composite delamination depth profiling in sonic-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Selina X.; Han, Xiaoyan; Favro, Lawrence D.; Newaz, Golam; Thomas, Robert L.

    2012-05-01

    Impact damage remains a major issue for aerospace composite structures. Considerable internal damage can occur in laminated composites from external impact loads in service with only minimal visual detectability from the surface of the structure. Damage can occur at any ply depth without visual indications on the front surface. Accurate depth measurements can aid repair assessments. This method is focused on investigating depth profiling of composite delamination by using Sonic-IR, which is a nondestructive evaluation method (NDE) technique that makes images of defects using an infrared camera with an ultrasonic transducer as a stimulation source. The depth profiling relies on the time delays of the temperature increases at the surface from the different defect depths. To process the time vs. temperature data captured from the camera, polynomial curve fitting was used. A mathematical model has been built to calculated time vs. second derivative of temperature curves for depth measurements. The samples used to calibrate the mathematical model data are carbon fiber composite panels with ply thickness variance and inserts with known depths.

  10. Interpreting Repeated Temperature-Depth Profiles for Groundwater Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, Victor F.; Kurylyk, Barret L.; Daal, van Jonathan; Ploeg, van der Martine J.; Carey, Sean K.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature can be used to trace groundwater flows due to thermal disturbances of subsurface advection. Prior hydrogeological studies that have used temperature-depth profiles to estimate vertical groundwater fluxes have either ignored the influence of climate change by employing steady-state

  11. A new method for depth profiling reconstruction in confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Mensitieri, Giuseppe

    2018-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is commonly used to reconstruct depth profiles of chemical species in multicomponent systems and to image nuclear and cellular details in human tissues via image intensity measurements of optical sections. However, the performance of this technique is reduced by inherent effects related to wave diffraction phenomena, refractive index mismatch and finite beam spot size. All these effects distort the optical wave and cause an image to be captured of a small volume around the desired illuminated focal point within the specimen rather than an image of the focal point itself. The size of this small volume increases with depth, thus causing a further loss of resolution and distortion of the profile. Recently, we proposed a theoretical model that accounts for the above wave distortion and allows for a correct reconstruction of the depth profiles for homogeneous samples. In this paper, this theoretical approach has been adapted for describing the profiles measured from non-homogeneous distributions of emitters inside the investigated samples. The intensity image is built by summing the intensities collected from each of the emitters planes belonging to the illuminated volume, weighed by the emitters concentration. The true distribution of the emitters concentration is recovered by a new approach that implements this theoretical model in a numerical algorithm based on the Maximum Entropy Method. Comparisons with experimental data and numerical simulations show that this new approach is able to recover the real unknown concentration distribution from experimental profiles with an accuracy better than 3%.

  12. Mercury cadmium telluride implanted junction profile measurement and depth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Songmin; Lin, Chun; Li, Haibin; Wei, Yanfeng; Ye, Zhenhua; Ding, Ruijun; He, Li

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a novel junction profile measurement method is proposed. A serial of junctions were fabricated by B+ implantation. Then a beveled bar which was about 10mm long and several micrometers deep was formed by carefully controlled wet-etching. The remaining depth of n region changes from the full depth that is about 5.3mm after ion implantation to zero depending on its lateral position and the slope of the etching bar. Voltage-current and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) measurements were applied to determine the HgCdTe junction edge. The LBIC signal orrectification characteristic indicates the existence of a PN junction. The junction depth is extracted from the position where the PN junction disappears and the slope of the etching bar. The junction depth of intrinsic doped HgCdTe was measured, which is about 2.4μm. A significant 0.4mm thick N-region was observed. Moreover, junction depths of samples annealed for different time were also investigated. By this method, it's possible to measure the three dimensional profile of a planar PN junction.

  13. Studies on depth profiling of proton damage by channeling and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashiyama, Isamu

    1982-01-01

    A new method to analyze backscattering spectra with improved accuracy and a new experimental method to determine the depth profile of irradiation damage distribution, which uses the channeling backscattering on both front and back surfaces, are reported. In this analysis, the conventional concept of one-to-one correspondence between energy and depth cannot be applied. Both energy to depth scale conversions and damage calculations are performed at the same time by using an integral equation, where the energy spreading of random particles dechanneled at various depths is taken into account. Next, a new experimental technique, ''front- and back-surface channeling backscattering'', has been developed. Shortcomings of existing dechanneling theories have been experimentally overcome by employing the new technique, and depth profiles of proton irradiation damage in silicon have been measured at room temperature. Then, a ''simple damage profile'' model is presented in order to approximate the experimental profile obtained. The model is based on empirical range-energy relationship, Lindhard power law potential and Kinchin-Pease damage theory. It reproduces the characteristic sharp perk in the experimental damage profile better than LSS (Lindhard Scharff Schiphitt) theory. Using these methods, the depth profile of the proton irradiation damage in silicon single crystals was determined. The mechanism of the complicated degradation in the performance of silicon solar cells after proton irradiation was clarified, utilizing the knowledge thus obtained. (J.P.N.)

  14. Study of damaged depth profiles of ion-irradiated PEEK

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Červená, Jarmila; Apel, P. Yu.; Posta, S.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 201, 19-20 (2007), s. 8370-8372 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK2/05; GA MŠk 1P04LA213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Oxygen irradiation * Poly-aryl-ether-ether ketone * Thermal neutron depth profiling (TNDP) Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.678, year: 2007

  15. Profile analysis of microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.

    2001-01-01

    Depth resolved analyses of several types of microparticles are presented. Particles for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile analysis were collected in the working environment of glass plant, steelworks and welding station using eight-stage cascade impactor with particle size range of 0.3 μm to 15 μm. Ion beam sputtering and sample rotation technique allowed to describe morphology i.e. the elemental structure of collected sub-micrometer particles. Also model particles Iriodin 221 (Merck) were depth profiled. The core-shell structure is found for all types of investigated particles. Steelworks particles consist mainly of iron and manganese cores. At the shells of these microparticles: lead, chlorine and fluorine are found. The particles collected in the glass-works consist mainly of lead-zirconium glass cores covered by carbon and copper. Stainless-steel welding particles compose of iron, manganese and chromium cores covered by a shell rich in carbon, chlorine and fluorine. Sample rotation technique applied in SIMS appears to be an effective tool for environmental microparticle morphology studies

  16. Pulsed photothermal depth profiling of tattoos undergoing laser removal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2012-02-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of temperature depth profiles induced by pulsed laser irradiation of strongly scattering biological tissues and organs, including human skin. In present study, we evaluate the potential of this technique for investigational characterization and possibly quantitative evaluation of laser tattoo removal. The study involved 5 healthy volunteers (3 males, 2 females), age 20-30 years, undergoing tattoo removal treatment using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. There were four measurement and treatment sessions in total, separated by 2-3 months. Prior to each treatment, PPTR measurements were performed on several tattoo sites and one nearby healthy site in each patient, using a 5 ms Nd:YAG laser at low radiant exposure values and a dedicated radiometric setup. The laser-induced temperature profiles were then reconstructed by applying a custom numerical code. In addition, each tatoo site was documented with a digital camera and measured with a custom colorimetric system (in tristimulus color space), providing an objective evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy to be correlated with our PPTR results. The results show that the laser-induced temperature profile in untreated tattoos is invariably located at a subsurface depth of 300 μm. In tattoo sites that responded well to laser therapy, a significant drop of the temperature peak was observed in the profiles obtained from PPTR record. In several sites that appeared less responsive, as evidenced by colorimetric data, a progressive shift of the temperature profile deeper into the dermis was observed over the course of consecutive laser treatments, indicating that the laser tattoo removal was efficient.

  17. Comparison of Earthquake Damage Patterns and Shallow-Depth Vs Structure Across the Napa Valley, Inferred From Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and Multichannel Analysis of Love Waves (MALW) Modeling of Basin-Wide Seismic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J. H.; Catchings, R.; Strayer, L. M.; Goldman, M.; Criley, C.; Sickler, R. R.; Boatwright, J.

    2017-12-01

    We conducted an active-source seismic investigation across the Napa Valley (Napa Valley Seismic Investigation-16) in September of 2016 consisting of two basin-wide seismic profiles; one profile was 20 km long and N-S-trending (338°), and the other 15 km long and E-W-trending (80°) (see Catchings et al., 2017). Data from the NVSI-16 seismic investigation were recorded using a total of 666 vertical- and horizontal-component seismographs, spaced 100 m apart on both seismic profiles. Seismic sources were generated by a total of 36 buried explosions spaced 1 km apart. The two seismic profiles intersected in downtown Napa, where a large number of buildings were red-tagged by the City following the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. From the recorded Rayleigh and Love waves, we developed 2-Dimensional S-wave velocity models to depths of about 0.5 km using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method. Our MASW (Rayleigh) and MALW (Love) models show two prominent low-velocity (Vs = 350 to 1300 m/s) sub-basins that were also previously identified from gravity studies (Langenheim et al., 2010). These basins trend N-W and also coincide with the locations of more than 1500 red- and yellow-tagged buildings within the City of Napa that were tagged after the 2014 South Napa earthquake. The observed correlation between low-Vs, deep basins, and the red-and yellow-tagged buildings in Napa suggests similar large-scale seismic investigations can be performed. These correlations provide insights into the likely locations of significant structural damage resulting from future earthquakes that occur adjacent to or within sedimentary basins.

  18. ACCURACY ANALYSIS OF KINECT DEPTH DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khoshelham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of the geometric quality of depth data obtained by the Kinect sensor. Based on the mathematical model of depth measurement by the sensor a theoretical error analysis is presented, which provides an insight into the factors influencing the accuracy of the data. Experimental results show that the random error of depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor, and ranges from a few millimetres up to about 4 cm at the maximum range of the sensor. The accuracy of the data is also found to be influenced by the low resolution of the depth measurements.

  19. Depth profiling using C60+ SIMS-Deposition and topography development during bombardment of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, Greg; Batteas, James; Michaels, Chris A.; Chi, Peter; Small, John; Windsor, Eric; Fahey, Albert; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Kim, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    A C 60 + primary ion source has been coupled to an ion microscope secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instrument to examine sputtering of silicon with an emphasis on possible application of C 60 + depth profiling for high depth resolution SIMS analysis of silicon semiconductor materials. Unexpectedly, C 60 + SIMS depth profiling of silicon was found to be complicated by the deposition of an amorphous carbon layer which buries the silicon substrate. Sputtering of the silicon was observed only at the highest accessible beam energies (14.5 keV impact) or by using oxygen backfilling. C 60 + SIMS depth profiling of As delta-doped test samples at 14.5 keV demonstrated a substantial (factor of 5) degradation in depth resolution compared to Cs + SIMS depth profiling. This degradation is thought to result from the formation of an unusual platelet-like grain structure on the SIMS crater bottoms. Other unusual topographical features were also observed on silicon substrates after high primary ion dose C 60 + bombardment

  20. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  1. Pulsed glow discharge mass spectrometry for molecular depth profiling of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, L.; Pereiro, R.; Sanz-Medel, A.; Bordel, N.; Pisonero, J.; Licciardello, A.; Tuccitto, N.; Tempez, A.; Chapon, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nowadays thin films of polymeric materials involve a wide range of industrial applications, so techniques capable of providing in-depth profile information are required. Most of the techniques available for this purpose are based on the use of energetic particle beams which interact with polymers producing undesirable physicochemical modifications. Radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge (rf-pulsed-GD) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) could afford the possibility of acquiring both elemental and molecular information creating minimal damage to surfaces and thereby obtaining depth profiles. This work will evaluate rf-GDs coupled to an orthogonal TOFMS for direct analysis of polymers. (author)

  2. A new look at the steel cord-rubber adhesive interphase by chemical depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, G.E.

    2001-01-01

    The adhesive interphase formed between brass plated steel cord and sulfur crosslinked rubber is known to be a complex layer of metal oxides, sulfides, and rubber. Hostile aging of this system produces changes in the structure, morphology, thickness, and mechanical properties of this layer. In a previous publication it has been shown that the overall thickness of the sulfide layer as measured by depth profiling with Auger electron spectroscopy could be used to characterize the degradation of the adhesive bond [G. E. Hammer et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 12, 2388 (1994)]. In this work multivariate statistical analysis of the sulfur Auger electron spectra was used to produce chemical depth profiles of the individual copper and zinc sulfide layers. These chemical depth profiles give new insight into the adhesion degradation mechanism on the nanometer scale. Particularly, the percentage of copper sulfide in the layer was found to be an accurate predictor of adhesion degradation

  3. PDEPTH—A computer program for the geophysical interpretation of magnetic and gravity profiles through Fourier filtering, source-depth analysis, and forward modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.

    2018-01-10

    PDEPTH is an interactive, graphical computer program used to construct interpreted geological source models for observed potential-field geophysical profile data. The current version of PDEPTH has been adapted to the Windows platform from an earlier DOS-based version. The input total-field magnetic anomaly and vertical gravity anomaly profiles can be filtered to produce derivative products such as reduced-to-pole magnetic profiles, pseudogravity profiles, pseudomagnetic profiles, and upward-or-downward-continued profiles. A variety of source-location methods can be applied to the original and filtered profiles to estimate (and display on a cross section) the locations and physical properties of contacts, sheet edges, horizontal line sources, point sources, and interface surfaces. Two-and-a-half-dimensional source bodies having polygonal cross sections can be constructed using a mouse and keyboard. These bodies can then be adjusted until the calculated gravity and magnetic fields of the source bodies are close to the observed profiles. Auxiliary information such as the topographic surface, bathymetric surface, seismic basement, and geologic contact locations can be displayed on the cross section using optional input files. Test data files, used to demonstrate the source location methods in the report, and several utility programs are included.

  4. Ion-beam-induced topography and compositional changes in depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    When energetic ions penetrate and stop in solids they not only add a new atomic constituent to the matrix but they also create atomic recoils and defects. The fluxes of these entities can give rise to spatial redistribution of atomic components, which may be partly or completely balanced by reordering and relaxation processes. These latter, in turn, may be influenced by fields and gradients induced by the primary relocation processes and by the energy deposited. These will include quasi-thermal, concentration (or chemical potential) and electrostatic gradients and may act to enhance or suppress atomic redistribution. Some, or all, of these processes will operate, depending upon the system under study, when energetic ions are employed to sputter erode a substrate for depth sectioning and, quite generally, can perturb the atomic depth profile that it is intended to evaluate. Theoretical and computational approaches to modelling such processes will be outlined and experimental examples shown which illustrate specific phenomena. In particular the accumulation of implant species and defect generation or redistribution can modify, with increasing ion fluence, the local sputtering mechanism and create further problems in depth profile analysis as a changing surface topography penetrates the solid. Examples of such topographic evolution and its influence on depth profiling analysis will be given and models to explain general and specific behaviour will be outlined. The commonality of models which examine both depth-dependent composition modification and surface topography evolution will be stressed. (author)

  5. Narrow nuclear resonance profiling of Al with subnanometric depth resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, E.B.O. da; Krug, C.; Stedile, F.C.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I.J.R.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the use of the narrow and isolated resonance at 404.9 keV in the cross-section curve of the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si nuclear reaction for profiling Al in ultrathin aluminum oxide films on Si. The samples were characterized as-deposited and after thermal annealing, so that Al transport could be studied. An estimated depth resolution of approximately 0.4 nm near the surface of the films could be obtained owing to: (i) the very small resonance width; (ii) the high stopping power of Al 2 O 3 for 404.9 keV protons; (iii) the high energy stability of the proton beam provided by the 500 kV HVEE ion implanter at Porto Alegre; and (iv) an apparent thickness magnification by a factor between 2.0 and 2.4 with the use of glancing incidence. This technique is compared to other methods for Al profiling like medium energy ion scattering and some sputtering-based techniques

  6. In-depth qualitative and quantitative analysis of composite glycosylation profiles and other micro-heterogeneity on intact monoclonal antibodies by high-resolution native mass spectrometry using a modified Orbitrap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, S; van den Bremer, E.T.J.; Schuurman, J.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Kamerling, J.P.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe a fast, easy-to-use, and sensitive method to profile in-depth structural micro-heterogeneity, including intricate N-glycosylation profiles, of monoclonal antibodies at the native intact protein level by means of mass spectrometry using a recently introduced modified Orbitrap

  7. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, Arne

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C 2 ). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed

  8. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  9. Ion beam techniques for the analysis of light elements in thin films, including depth profiling. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This publication highlights the achievements of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to promote the potential of accelerator-based nuclear techniques of analysis for light elements in thin films. The objectives of this CRP were to develop a coordinated research effort between accelerator laboratories and materials science research groups in order to assist and promote the development of quality assurance methods, to evaluate databases of parameters needed for quantitative analysis, and to develop and apply techniques to selected problems concerning the surface modification of materials and production of thin films. Through various case studies, this publication assesses and demonstrates the effectiveness of accelerator-based nuclear techniques for analysis to provide valuable data and knowledge not readily accessible using other methods

  10. Ion beam analysis with monolayer depth resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstanjen, H. D.

    1998-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the analysis of surfaces and near-surface layers with monolayer depth resolution by means of high resolution Rutherford backscattering (HRBS) and elastic recoil detection (HERDA) of ions with an energy of a few MeV, in combination with an electrostatic spectrometer. With this instrument, which has recently been set up at the 6 MV Pelletron accelerator of the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung in Stuttgart, depth resolutions of 0.1 nm are obtained in HRBS and 0.3 nm in HERDA experiments. This paper gives a short outline of the design and performance of the spectrometer followed by various examples of applications. These comprise examples showing the analyzing power of the instrument, the analysis of an X-ray mirror by HRBS, the study of the initial oxidation of surfaces of aluminum single crystals by HERDA and recent results concerning charge exchange in ion backscattering.

  11. Characterization of titanium hydride films covered by nanoscale evaporated Au layers: ToF-SIMS, XPS and AES depth profile analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Leonard, D.; Mathieu, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Thin titanium hydride (TiHy) films, covered by ultrathin gold layers, have been compared with the corresponding titanium films after analysis using a combination of time-of-flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS), XPS and AES. The TiHy layers were prepared under UHV conditions by precisely controlled hydrogen

  12. A Total Variation regulator for the extraction of step function depth profiles from ARXPS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paynter, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A Total Variation (TV) regulator for the inversion of ARXPS data was evaluated. • Simulations were performed to compare the TV regulator with a 1st-order Tikhonov regulator. • The TV regulator performed well on single step-function depth profiles. - Abstract: Simulations were conducted to generate and invert noisy ARXPS data, starting from known pseudo-step-function depth profiles. In the recovery of the depth profiles, a 1st-order Tikhonov regulator was compared with a Total Variation regulator. It was found that the profiles extracted using the Total Variation regulator tended to better resemble the true profile in the case of a single step function.

  13. Hydrogen analysis depth calibration by CORTEO Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, M., E-mail: marcus.moser@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Fakultät für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Reichart, P.; Bergmaier, A.; Greubel, C. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Fakultät für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Schiettekatte, F. [Université de Montréal, Département de Physique, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Dollinger, G., E-mail: guenther.dollinger@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Fakultät für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Hydrogen imaging with sub-μm lateral resolution and sub-ppm sensitivity has become possible with coincident proton–proton (pp) scattering analysis (Reichart et al., 2004). Depth information is evaluated from the energy sum signal with respect to energy loss of both protons on their path through the sample. In first order, there is no angular dependence due to elastic scattering. In second order, a path length effect due to different energy loss on the paths of the protons causes an angular dependence of the energy sum. Therefore, the energy sum signal has to be de-convoluted depending on the matrix composition, i.e. mainly the atomic number Z, in order to get a depth calibrated hydrogen profile. Although the path effect can be calculated analytically in first order, multiple scattering effects lead to significant deviations in the depth profile. Hence, in our new approach, we use the CORTEO Monte-Carlo code (Schiettekatte, 2008) in order to calculate the depth of a coincidence event depending on the scattering angle. The code takes individual detector geometry into account. In this paper we show, that the code correctly reproduces measured pp-scattering energy spectra with roughness effects considered. With more than 100 μm thick Mylar-sandwich targets (Si, Fe, Ge) we demonstrate the deconvolution of the energy spectra on our current multistrip detector at the microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab. As a result, hydrogen profiles can be evaluated with an accuracy in depth of about 1% of the sample thickness.

  14. Accurate ultra-low energy SIMS depth profiling of silicon semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ormsby, T J

    2000-01-01

    surface topography has two detrimental effects, a loss in depth resolution and a variation in the sputter yield, both of which have been quantified. A wide range of analysis conditions were investigated, at O sub 2 sup + beam energies up to 1 keV, the only angles where ripples do not develop within the top 200 nm of a profile are those using near-normal incidence (theta sub p <= 30 deg) ion bombardment. Since the invention of the bipolar transistor in 1947, lateral dimensions of semiconductor devices have reduced by a factor of 4 and in-depth dimensions by some two orders of magnitude. This size reduction is continually making the accurate measurement of the latest generation of semiconductor devices more difficult. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a highly effective analytical technique, traditionally used to measure concentration depth profiles, due to its high sensitivity and good depth resolution. The development of the floating ion gun (FLIG) at Warwick, allows the routine use of sub-keV beam...

  15. In-depth proteomic profiling of the uveal melanoma secretome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Samuel; Simpson, Deborah; Hammond, Dean E.; Madigan, Michele C.; Beynon, Robert J.; Coupland, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM), the most common primary intraocular tumour in adults, is characterised by a high frequency of metastases to the liver, typically with a fatal outcome. Proteins secreted from cancer cells (‘secretome’) are biologically important molecules thought to contribute to tumour progression. We examined the UM secretome by applying a label-free nanoLCMS/MS proteomic approach to profile proteins secreted into culture media by primary UM tumours with a high− (HR; n = 11) or low− (LR; n = 4) metastatic risk, compared to normal choroidal melanocytes (NCM) from unaffected post-mortem eyes. Across the three groups, 1843 proteins were identified at a 1% false discovery rate; 758 of these by at least 3 unique peptides, and quantified. The majority (539/758, 71%) of proteins were classified as secreted either by classical (144, 19%), non-classical (43, 6%) or exosomal (352, 46%) mechanisms. Bioinformatic analyzes showed that the secretome composition reflects biological differences and similarities of the samples. Ingenuity® pathway analysis of the secreted protein dataset identified abundant proteins involved in cell proliferation-, growth- and movement. Hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation and the mTORC1-S6K signalling axis were among the most differentially regulated biological processes in UM as compared with NCM. Further analysis of proteins upregulated ≥ 2 in HR-UM only, identified exosomal proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodelling and cancer cell migration/invasion; as well as classically secreted proteins, possibly representing novel biomarkers of metastatic disease. In conclusion, UM secretome analysis identifies novel proteins and pathways that may contribute to metastatic development at distant sites, particularly in the liver. PMID:27391064

  16. Optimal depth-based regional frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wazneh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Classical methods of regional frequency analysis (RFA of hydrological variables face two drawbacks: (1 the restriction to a particular region which can lead to a loss of some information and (2 the definition of a region that generates a border effect. To reduce the impact of these drawbacks on regional modeling performance, an iterative method was proposed recently, based on the statistical notion of the depth function and a weight function φ. This depth-based RFA (DBRFA approach was shown to be superior to traditional approaches in terms of flexibility, generality and performance. The main difficulty of the DBRFA approach is the optimal choice of the weight function ϕ (e.g., φ minimizing estimation errors. In order to avoid a subjective choice and naïve selection procedures of φ, the aim of the present paper is to propose an algorithm-based procedure to optimize the DBRFA and automate the choice of ϕ according to objective performance criteria. This procedure is applied to estimate flood quantiles in three different regions in North America. One of the findings from the application is that the optimal weight function depends on the considered region and can also quantify the region's homogeneity. By comparing the DBRFA to the canonical correlation analysis (CCA method, results show that the DBRFA approach leads to better performances both in terms of relative bias and mean square error.

  17. Optimal depth-based regional frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazneh, H.; Chebana, F.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2013-06-01

    Classical methods of regional frequency analysis (RFA) of hydrological variables face two drawbacks: (1) the restriction to a particular region which can lead to a loss of some information and (2) the definition of a region that generates a border effect. To reduce the impact of these drawbacks on regional modeling performance, an iterative method was proposed recently, based on the statistical notion of the depth function and a weight function φ. This depth-based RFA (DBRFA) approach was shown to be superior to traditional approaches in terms of flexibility, generality and performance. The main difficulty of the DBRFA approach is the optimal choice of the weight function ϕ (e.g., φ minimizing estimation errors). In order to avoid a subjective choice and naïve selection procedures of φ, the aim of the present paper is to propose an algorithm-based procedure to optimize the DBRFA and automate the choice of ϕ according to objective performance criteria. This procedure is applied to estimate flood quantiles in three different regions in North America. One of the findings from the application is that the optimal weight function depends on the considered region and can also quantify the region's homogeneity. By comparing the DBRFA to the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method, results show that the DBRFA approach leads to better performances both in terms of relative bias and mean square error.

  18. Variations in bacterial and fungal community composition along the soil depth profiles determined by pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, D.; Yoo, G.; Jun, S. C.; Yun, S. T.; Chung, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play key roles in nutrient cycling, and are distributed throughout the soil profile. Currently, there is little information about the characteristics of the microbial communities along the soil depth because most studies focus on microorganisms inhabiting the soil surface. To better understand the functions and composition of microbial communities and the biogeochemical factors that shape them at different soil depth, we analyzed soil microbial activities and bacterial and fungal community composition in a soil profile of a fallow field located in central Korea. Soil samples were taken using 120-cm soil cores. To analyze the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, barcoded pyrosequnecing analysis of 16S rRNA genes (bacteria) and ITS region (fungi) was conducted. Among the bacterial groups, the abundance of Proteobacteria (38.5, 23.2, 23.3, 26.1 and 17.5%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively) and Firmicutes (12.8, 11.3, 8.6, 4.3 and 0.4%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively) decreased with soil depth. On the other hand, the abundance of Ascomycota (51.2, 48.6, 65.7, 46.1, and 45.7%, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively), a dominant fungal group at this site, showed no significant difference along the soil profile. To examine the vertical difference of microbial activities, activity of five extracellular enzymes that take part in cycling of C, N, and P in soil ecosystems, beta-1,4-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-1,4-xylosidase, beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase were analyzed. The soil enzyme activity declined with soil depth. For example, acid phosphatase activity was 88.5 (± 14.6 (± 1 SE)), 30.0 (± 5.9), 18.0 (± 3.5), 14.1 (± 3.7), and 10.7 (± 3.8) nmol g-1 hr-1, at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-cm depth, respectively. These metagenomics studies, along with other studies on microbial functions, are expected to enhance our understanding on the complexity of

  19. Model for hydrogen isotope backscattering, trapping and depth profiles in C and a-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; McCracken, G.M.

    1979-03-01

    A model of low energy hydrogen trapping and backscattering in carbon and a-silicon is described. Depth profiles are calculated and numerical results presented for various incident angular and energy distributions. The calculations yield a relation between depth profiles and the incident ion energy distribution. The use of this model for tokamak plasma diagnosis is discussed

  20. Simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles in low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model is presented, which simulates nitrogen concentration-depth profiles as obtained with low temperature gaseous nitriding of stainless steel. The evolution of the calculated nitrogen concentration-depth profiles is compared with experimental nitriding kinetics. It is shown...

  1. The deconvolution of sputter-etching surface concentration measurements to determine impurity depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Katardjiev, I.V.; Nobes, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The quasi-linear partial differential continuity equations that describe the evolution of the depth profiles and surface concentrations of marker atoms in kinematically equivalent systems undergoing sputtering, ion collection and atomic mixing are solved using the method of characteristics. It is shown how atomic mixing probabilities can be deduced from measurements of ion collection depth profiles with increasing ion fluence, and how this information can be used to predict surface concentration evolution. Even with this information, however, it is shown that it is not possible to deconvolute directly the surface concentration measurements to provide initial depth profiles, except when only ion collection and sputtering from the surface layer alone occur. It is demonstrated further that optimal recovery of initial concentration depth profiles could be ensured if the concentration-measuring analytical probe preferentially sampled depths near and at the maximum depth of bombardment-induced perturbations. (author)

  2. Molecular depth profiling of trehalose using a C{sub 60} cluster ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected fullerene ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of depth profiles acquired on a 300-nm trehalose film on Si were studied as a function of the impact kinetic energy and charge state of the C{sub 60} projectile ions. We find that the achieved depth resolution depends only weakly upon energy.

  3. Depth profile of In and As in Si measured by RBS with He and C ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q.; Fang, Z. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1993-12-31

    The depth profile of As and In implanted into Si have been measured by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) with 2 MeV He ions and 6 MeV C ions. Advantages of enhanced depth and mass resolution with C ions have been demonstrated over the conventional He RBS. More reliable information for the depth profile of In and As in Si has been obtained. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Magnetic depth profiling of Fe/Au multilayer using neutron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Au multilayer sample for characterizing the layer structure and magnetic moment density profile. Fe/Au multilayer shows strong spin-dependent scattering at interfaces, making it a prospective GMR material. Fe/Au multilayer with bilayer ...

  5. Depth profiles of 129I species in the Bothnian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, P.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.

    2013-01-01

    The Bothnian Sea which is located between Finland and Sweden represents an important source of fresh water to the Baltic Sea. We here present new data on the radioactive isotope 129I species from water samples collected in December 2009 at different depths in the Bothnian Sea. Concentrations of 1...

  6. A small and compact AMS facility for tritium depth profiling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Depth profiling measurements of tritium in carbon samples have been performed during the past seven years at the AMS facility installed at the Rossendorf 3 MV Tandetron. The samples have been cut from the inner walls of the fusion experiments ASDEX-upgrade/Garching and JET/Culham. The tritium content of the ...

  7. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eDattolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in the shallow (-5m and a deep (-25m portions of a single meadow, (i we generated two reciprocal EST (Expressed Sequences Tags libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear o be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed.

  8. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattolo, Emanuela; Gu, Jenny; Bayer, Philipp E.; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia A.; Spadafora, Antonia; Bernardo, Letizia; Natali, Lucia; Cavallini, Andrea; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in shallow (−5 m) and deep (−25 m) portions of a single meadow, (i) we generated two reciprocal Expressed Sequences Tags (EST) libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii) we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM) engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear to be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed. PMID:23785376

  9. Design and construction of an analytical instrument for neutron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutis, Octavio; Venegas, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Full text: An experimental facility for Neutron Depth Profiling, recently constructed at CCHEN's laboratories is described. The technique allows to measure the mean atomic concentration ρ(x) of certain isotopes as a function of distance x to the surface for the first depth microns. The observation area is about 15 mm in diameter and the range in depth depends on the matrix stopping power and on the energy of the charged particle associated with the A(n,y)B reaction, in which this technique is supported, where A is the isotope to be detected, y is an α particle or a proton and B is the recoil nucleus. The spatial resolution depends upon the characteristics of the detection chain and its geometry and of the thermal spectrum of the beam. An appropriate deconvolution on the merging particle energy spectrum allows to recover the concentration profile. The application of the technique to the analysis of some phospho borosilicate films deposited on s Si substrate, lithium tantalate ceramics deposited on Si substrate and a sintered of lithium and Zn-Ni-Mn oxide are shown here with a resolution comparative to that of advanced laboratories

  10. Magnetic depth profiling of Fe/Au multilayer using neutron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present unpolarized and polarized neutron reflectometry data on Fe/Au multilayer sample for characterizing the layer structure and magnetic moment density profile. Fe/Au multilayer shows strong spin-dependent scattering at interfaces, making it a prospective GMR material. Fe/Au multilayer with bilayer thickness of 130 ...

  11. Objective characterization of bruise evolution using photothermal depth profiling and Monte Carlo modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of laser-induced temperature depth profiles in optically scattering layered structures. The obtained profiles provide information on spatial distribution of selected chromophores such as melanin and hemoglobin in human skin. We apply the described approach to study time evolution of incidental bruises (hematomas) in human subjects. By combining numerical simulations of laser energy deposition in bruised skin with objective fitting of the predicted and measured PPTR signals, we can quantitatively characterize the key processes involved in bruise evolution (i.e., hemoglobin mass diffusion and biochemical decomposition). Simultaneous analysis of PPTR signals obtained at various times post injury provides an insight into the variations of these parameters during the bruise healing process. The presented methodology and results advance our understanding of the bruise evolution and represent an important step toward development of an objective technique for age determination of traumatic bruises in forensic medicine.

  12. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfeld, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.alfeld@desy.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Groenenbrogerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Broekaert, José A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings.

  14. SIMS depth profiling of metallization contact layers for AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, A.; Drzik, M.; Michalka, M.; Bruncko, J.; Vallo, M.; Vanko, G.; Lalinsky, T.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution deals with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling for metallic structure characterization as well as the electrical and capacitance measurements for evaluation of the electric parameters of prepared metallic contacts. (authors)

  15. Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) Daily Snow Depth Analysis Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of Northern Hemisphere snow depth analysis data processed by the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC). Snow depth data obtained from surface...

  16. Breadth and Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge and Their Effects on L2 Vocabulary Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakçi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge have been studied from many different perspectives, but the related literature lacks serious studies dealing with their effects on vocabulary profiles of EFL learners. In this paper, with an aim to fill this gap, the relative effects of breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge on L2 vocabulary profiles…

  17. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM, which uses finely focussed He+ or Ne+ beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 1018 ions/cm2. Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  18. Program analysis and presentation of results of the profiles and depth dose rates obtained with the PTW software MC{sub 2} MEPHYSTO; Programa de analisis y presentacion de resultados de los perfiles y porcentajes de dosis en profundidad adquiridos con el software MEPHYSTO MC2 de PTW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tato de la Cuevas, F.

    2011-07-01

    In the periodic quality control of linear accelerators is usually included acquisition and analysis of profiles and PDDs (percentage depth dose). In the protocol of Quality Control of electron accelerators for clinical use of the proposed analysis SEFM 4 Profiles for each of the energies used clinically. This involves a large number of curves to be analyzed and the subsequent introduction of the parameters in a spreadsheet or similar for your assessment as to the reference state. We have developed a program that analyzes the curves acquired by mcc Mephysto PTW software and presents the results of that analysis in a spreadsheet.

  19. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  20. Diffusion of lithium-6 isotopes in lithium aluminate ceramics using neutron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhinney, H.G. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); James, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Chemical Characterization and Analysis); Schweikert, E.A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Chemical Characterization and Analysis); Williams, J.R. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Hollenberg, G. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Nuclear Reactor Material Group, US Dept. of Energy, Hanford, WA (United States)); Welsh, J. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Chemical Characterization and Analysis); Sereatan, W. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-07-01

    Lithium Ceramics offer tremendous potential as a source for the production of tritium ([sup 3]H) for fusion power reactors. Their successful application will depend to a great extent upon the diffusion properties of the [sup 6]Li within the matrix. Consequently knowledge of [sup 6]Li concentration gradients in the ceramic matrices is an important requirement in the continued development of the technology. In this investigation, the neutron depth profile (NDP) technique has been applied to the study of concentration profiles of [sup 6]Li in lithium aluminate ceramics, doped with 1.8%, 50% and 95% [sup 6]Li isotopic concentrations. Specimen for analysis were prepared at Battelle (PNL) as pellet discs. Samples for diffusion studies were arranged as diffusion couples in the following manner: 1.8% [sup 6]Li discs/85% [sup 6]Li powder. Experiments were performed at the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor Building, utilizing 1 MW equivalent thermal neutron fluxes 3x10[sup 11] n/m[sup 2] s. The depth probed by the technique is approximately 15 [mu]m. Diffusion coefficients are in the range of 2.1x10[sup -12] to 7.0x10[sup -11] m[sup 2] s[sup -1] for 1.8% [sup 6]Li-doped ceramics annealed at 1200 and 1400 C, for 4 to 48-h anneal times. (orig.)

  1. Depth profiling of hydrogen under an atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemura, H.; Kitaoka, Y.; Sekiba, D.; Matsuzaki, H.; Ogura, S.; Matsumoto, M.; Iwamura, Y.; Ito, T.; Narusawa, T.; Fukutani, K.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen with a use of the 1 H( 15 N,αγ) 12 C reaction was performed under a atmospheric condition. A 100 nm-thick silicon nitride membrane coated with gold of 10 nm was used for the extraction of the 15 N beam into the sample chamber filled with gas molecules. Hydrogen contained in a Y film with a thickness of 80 nm was detected in N 2 of 10 5 Pa. This nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) setup was also applied to H 2 gas, and the yield curve revealed a plateau feature. The plateau level was, furthermore, found to be constant independent of the H 2 pressure. We show that this plateau intensity can be used to obtain the detection efficiency of a NRA setup.

  2. Depth profiling of metal overlayers on organic substrates with cluster SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kan; Mao, Dan; Garrison, Barbara J; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2013-11-05

    Molecular depth profiling of organic thin films by erosion with energetic cluster ion beams is a unique aspect of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) experiments. Although depth profiles of complex multilayer organic structures can be acquired with little damage accumulation and with depth resolution of gold layer of 1.4 to 3.5 nm deposited either on top of or sandwiched within a cholesterol thin film matrix which is several hundred nanometers thick. For these systems, the results show that by erosion with a 40 keV C60(+) beam, reliable depth profiles can always be acquired as indicated by the presence of a steady state molecular ion signal. During the erosion process, however, gold atoms from the gold overlayer are implanted into the cholesterol matrix beneath it, resulting in a reduced sputter yield, an increase in the amount of cholesterol fragmentation and an increase in the thickness of the cluster ion-induced altered layer. The results also show that the effects of the metal film on the organic substrate are independent of the gold film thickness once the film thickness exceeds 1.4 nm. In general, this model study provides mechanistic insight into the depth profiling of heterogeneous thin film structures and offers a possible path for improving the quality of the depth profiles by employing low energy atomic ion sputtering in the region of the metal layer.

  3. Application of Depth-Averaged Velocity Profile for Estimation of Longitudinal Dispersion in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Givehchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available River bed profiles and depth-averaged velocities are used as basic data in empirical and analytical equations for estimating the longitudinal dispersion coefficient which has always been a topic of great interest for researchers. The simple model proposed by Maghrebi is capable of predicting the normalized isovel contours in the cross section of rivers and channels as well as the depth-averaged velocity profiles. The required data in Maghrebi’s model are bed profile, shear stress, and roughness distributions. Comparison of depth-averaged velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients observed in the field data and those predicted by Maghrebi’s model revealed that Maghrebi’s model had an acceptable accuracy in predicting depth-averaged velocity.

  4. Response function during oxygen sputter profiling and its application to deconvolution of ultrashallow B depth profiles in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lin; Liu Jiarui; Wang Chong; Ma, Ki B.; Zhang Jianming; Chen, John; Tang, Daniel; Patel, Sanjay; Chu Weikan

    2003-01-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) response function to a B 'δ surface layer' has been investigated. Using electron-gun evaporation combined with liquid nitrogen cooling of target, we are able to deposit an ultrathin B layer without detectable island formation. The B spatial distribution obtained from SIMS is exponentially decaying with a decay length approximately a linear function of the incident energy of the oxygen during the SIMS analysis. Deconvolution with the response function has been applied to reconstruct the spatial distribution of ultra-low-energy B implants. A correction to depth and yield scales due to transient sputtering near the Si surface region was also applied. Transient erosion shifts the profile shallower, but beam mixing shifts it deeper. These mutually compensating effects make the adjusted distribution almost the same as original data. The one significant difference is a buried B peak observed near the surface region

  5. Dynamic measurements of depth profiles of hydrogen implanted into graphite at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Ohtsuka, K.; Hasebe, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Time variations of depth profiles of hydrogen retained in graphite during and after implantation of 3 keV H 2 + ions have been studied from dynamic measurements by means of elastic recoil detection at temperatures between 300 and 1000 K and at ion fluxes of 4x10 13 , 2x10 14 and 4x10 14 /cm 2 s. It is shown that the maximum steady state concentration of hydrogens is about 6x10 22 /cm 3 at room temperature and is by a factor of 1.7 higher than the maximum static concentration after implantation. It is also shown that the depth profiles have the maximum at the projected range of implanted ions, the width of the profile broadens gradually inwards as the fluence and the temperature increase and the shapes of steady state profiles are almost the same as those of static profiles. By analytically solving mass balance equations for hydrogens, in which diffusion, trapping, ion-induced detrapping and recession of the surface are taken into account, the experimental steady state depth profiles are demonstrated to be well reproduced. The diffusion constants of hydrogen are determined as a function of temperature by fitting the calculated to the experimental depth profiles. (orig.)

  6. Characterization of depth-related changes in bacterial community compositions and functions of a paddy soil profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Sheng, Xiafang; He, Linyan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhendong

    2013-10-01

    Depth-related changes in bacterial community structures and functions were analyzed in a paddy soil profile using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and a metabolic profiling technique (BIOLOG ECO plates). Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to analyze the correlations between the relative abundance of bacterial groups and soil-available elements. DGGE and sequencing analysis revealed 12 classes and one unknown bacterial group. At the family level, Comamonadaceae and Moraxellaceae dominated through the soil profile, while Acidobacteriaceae and Nitrospiraceae dominated in the deepest layer. In addition, Streptococcaceae dominated and was only observed in the deeper layers. Metabolic profiles revealed the greatest carbon source utilization capacity in the surface layer, and no significant differences between upper and deeper soil layers. The carbon sources utilized by microorganisms were different among the different layers. CCA indicated that soil-available Mn, Ca, Cu, Al, and K concentrations were positively correlated with the relative abundance of Comamonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Streptococcaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Nocardioidaceae, and Nitrospiraceae in the profile. The results showed that the paddy soil profile harbored diverse bacterial communities and experienced depth-related changes in community structure and carbon source utilization. The bacterial communities and functions might be shaped by the soil edaphic characteristics along the soil profile. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Photothermal radiometric determination of thermal diffusivity depth profiles in a dental resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez-Torres, P; Alvarado-Gil, J J; Mandelis, A

    2010-01-01

    The depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin is studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consists of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic layer is deposited guaranteeing full opacity of the sample. In this case, purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles can be used. Thermal profiles are obtained by heating the coating with a modulated laser beam and performing a modulation frequency scan. Before each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue LED. However due to the fact that dental resins are highly light dispersive materials, the polymerization process depends strongly on the optical absorption coefficient inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusion in the sample. It is shown that using a robust depth profilometric inverse method one can reconstruct the thermal diffusivity profile of the photopolymerized resin.

  8. CREST-SAFE: Snow LST validation, wetness profiler creation, and depth/SWE product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Diaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Munoz Barreto, J.; Yu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    CREST-SAFE: Snow LST validation, wetness profiler creation, and depth/SWE product development The Field Snow Research Station (also referred to as Snow Analysis and Field Experiment, SAFE) is operated by the NOAA Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies (CREST) in the City University of New York (CUNY). The field station is located within the premises of the Caribou Municipal Airport (46°52'59'' N, 68°01'07'' W) and in close proximity to the National Weather Service (NWS) Regional Forecast Office. The station was established in 2010 to support studies in snow physics and snow remote sensing. The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST product (provided by the Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System satellites) were validated using in situ LST (T-skin) and near-surface air temperature (T-air) observations recorded at CREST-SAFE for the winters of 2013 and 2014. Results indicate that T-air correlates better than T-skin with VIIRS LST data and that the accuracy of nighttime LST retrievals is considerably better than that of daytime. Several trends in the MODIS LST data were observed, including the underestimation of daytime values and night-time values. Results indicate that, although all the data sets showed high correlation with ground measurements, day values yielded slightly higher accuracy ( 1°C). Additionally, we created a liquid water content (LWC)-profiling instrument using time-domain reflectometry (TDR) at CREST-SAFE and tested it during the snow melt period (February-April) immediately after installation in 2014. Results displayed high agreement when compared to LWC estimates obtained using empirical formulas developed in previous studies, and minor improvement over wet snow LWC estimates. Lastly, to improve on global snow cover mapping, a snow product capable of estimating snow depth and snow water

  9. Multiscale analysis of depth images from natural scenes: Scaling in the depth of the woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chéné, Yann; Belin, Étienne; Rousseau, David; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2013-01-01

    We analyze an ensemble of images from outdoor natural scenes and consisting of pairs of a standard gray-level luminance image associated with a depth image of the same scene, delivered by a recently introduced low-cost sensor for joint imaging of depth and luminance. We specially focus on statistical analysis of multiscale and fractal properties in the natural images. Two methodologies are implemented for this purpose, and examining the distribution of contrast upon coarse-graining at increasing scales, and the orientationally averaged power spectrum tied to spatial frequencies. Both methodologies confirm, on another independent dataset here, the presence of fractal scale invariance in the luminance natural images, as previously reported. Both methodologies here also reveal the presence of fractal scale invariance in the novel data formed by depth images from natural scenes. The multiscale analysis is confronted on luminance images and on the novel depth images together with an analysis of their statistical correlation. The results, especially the new results on the multiscale analysis of depth images, consolidate the importance and extend the multiplicity of aspects of self-similarity and fractal scale invariance properties observable in the constitution of images from natural scenes. Such results are useful to better understanding and modeling of the (multiscale) structure of images from natural scenes, with relevance to image processing algorithms and to visual perception. The approach also contains potentialities for the fractal characterization of three-dimensional natural structures and their interaction with light

  10. Gradually varied open-channel flow profiles normalized by critical depth and analytically solved by using Gaussian hypergeometric functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-D. Jan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The equation of one-dimensional gradually varied flow (GVF in sustaining and non-sustaining open channels is normalized using the critical depth, yc, and then analytically solved by the direct integration method with the use of the Gaussian hypergeometric function (GHF. The GHF-based solution so obtained from the yc-based dimensionless GVF equation is more useful and versatile than its counterpart from the GVF equation normalized by the normal depth, yn, because the GHF-based solutions of the yc-based dimensionless GVF equation for the mild (M and adverse (A profiles can asymptotically reduce to the yc-based dimensionless horizontal (H profiles as yc/yn → 0. An in-depth analysis of the yc-based dimensionless profiles expressed in terms of the GHF for GVF in sustaining and adverse wide channels has been conducted to discuss the effects of yc/yn and the hydraulic exponent N on the profiles. This paper has laid the foundation to compute at one sweep the yc-based dimensionless GVF profiles in a series of sustaining and adverse channels, which have horizontal slopes sandwiched in between them, by using the GHF-based solutions.

  11. Hardness depth profile of lattice strained cemented carbide modified by high-energy boron ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y.; Matsumura, A.; Higeta, K.; Inoue, T.; Shimizu, S.; Motonami, Y.; Sato, M.; Sadahiro, T.; Fujii, K.

    1991-07-01

    The hardness depth profiles of cemented carbides which were implanted with high-energy B + ions have been estimated using a dynamic microhardness tester. The B + implantations into (16% Co)-cemented WC alloys were carried out under conditions where the implantation energies were 1-3 MeV and the fluences 1 × 10 17-1 × 10 18ions/cm 2. The profiles show that the implanted layer becomes harder as fluences are chosen at higher values and there is a peak at a certain depth which depends on the implantation energy. In X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of the implanted surface the broadened refraction peaks of only WC and Co are detected and the increments of lattice strain and of residual stress in the near-surface region are observed. It is supposed that the hardening effect should be induced by an increase in residual stress produced by lattice strain. The hardness depth profile in successive implantation of ions with different energies agrees with the compounded profile of each one of the implantations. It is concluded that the hardness depth profile can be controlled under adequate conditions of implantation.

  12. Quantitative SIMS depth profiling of diffusion barrier gate-oxynitride structures in TFT-LCDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreer, Sabine; Wilhartitz, Peter; Piplits, Kurt; Mayerhofer, Karl; Foisner, Johann; Hutter, Herbert

    2004-06-01

    Gate oxynitride structures of TFT-LCDs were investigated by SIMS, and successful solutions are demonstrated to overcome difficulties arising due to the charging effects of the multilayer systems, the matrix effect of the method, and the small pattern sizes of the samples. Because of the excellent reproducibility achieved by applying exponential relative sensitivity functions for quantitative analysis, minor differences in the barrier gate-oxynitride composition deposited on molybdenum capped aluminium-neodymium metallisation electrodes were determined between the centre and the edge of the TFT-LCD substrates. No differences were found for molybdenum-tungsten metallisations. Furthermore, at the edge of the glass substrates, aluminium, neodymium, and molybdenum SIMS depth profiles show an exponential trend. With TEM micrographs an inhomogeneous thickness of the molybdenum capping is revealed as the source of this effect, which influences the electrical behaviour of the device. The production process was improved after these results and the aging behaviour of TFT-LCDs was investigated in order to explain the change in control voltage occurring during the lifetime of the displays. SIMS and TEM show an enrichment of neodymium at the interface to the molybdenum layer, confirming good diffusion protection of the molybdenum barrier during accelerated aging. The reason for the shift of the control voltage was finally located by semi-quantitative depth profiling of the sodium diffusion originating from the glass substrate. Molybdenum-tungsten was a much better buffer for the highly-mobile charge carriers than aluminium-neodymium. Best results were achieved with PVD silicon oxynitride as diffusion barrier and gate insulator deposited on aluminium-neodymium metallisation layers.

  13. Relaxation of vacancy depth profiles in silicon wafers: A low apparent diffusivity of vacancy species

    OpenAIRE

    Voronkov, Vladimir V.; Falster, Robert; Pichler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Vacancy depth profiles in silicon wafersinstalled by Rapid Thermal Annealing and monitored by Pt diffusionshow, upon subsequent annealing at 975 or 950 °C, a peculiar evolution: the concentration profile goes down without any trace of vacancy out-diffusion. The estimated apparent diffusivity is less than 1E7 cm2/s at 975 °C. The monitored vacancy species is tentatively identified as a "slow vacancy" that was recently concluded to exist along with other (highly mobile) vacancy species.

  14. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    Ion time-of-flight spectrometry techniques are investigated for applicability to neutron depth profiling. Time-of-flight techniques are used extensively in a wide range of scientific and technological applications including energy and mass spectroscopy. Neutron depth profiling is a near-surface analysis technique that gives concentration distribution versus depth for certain technologically important light elements. The technique uses thermal or sub-thermal neutrons to initiate (n, p) or (n, alpha) reactions. Concentration versus depth distribution is obtained by the transformation of the energy spectrum into depth distribution by using stopping force tables of the projectiles in the substrate, and by converting the number of counts into concentration using a standard sample of known dose value. Conventionally, neutron depth profiling measurements are based on charged particle spectrometry, which employs semiconductor detectors such as a surface barrier detector (SBD) and the associated electronics. Measurements with semiconductor detectors are affected by a number of broadening mechanisms, which result from the interactions between the projectile ion and the detector material as well as fluctuations in the signal generation process. These are inherent features of the detection mechanism that involve the semiconductor detectors and cannot be avoided. Ion time-of-flight spectrometry offers highly precise measurement capabilities, particularly for slow particles. For high-energy low-mass particles, measurement resolution tends to degrade with all other parameters fixed. The threshold for more precise ion energy measurements with respect to conventional techniques, such as direct energy measurement by a surface barrier detector, is directly related to the design and operating parameters of the device. Time-of-flight spectrometry involves correlated detection of two signals by a coincidence unit. In ion time-of-flight spectroscopy, the ion generates the primary input

  15. Opto-thermal moisture content and moisture depth profile measurements in organic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, P.; Guo, X.; Cui, Y.Y.; Imhof, R.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements.In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture

  16. Quantitative depth profiling of K-doped fullerene films using XPS and SIMS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oswald, S.; Janda, Pavel; Dunsch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 141, 1-2 (2003), s. 79-85 E-ISSN 1436-5073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : XPS * SIMS * depth profiling * fullerenes * doping Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2003

  17. Electrochemical depth profiling of multilayer metallic structures: An aluminum brazing sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, F. Norouzi; Ambat, R.; Kwakernaak, C.

    2012-01-01

    , while lower sensitivity to these localized attacks were detected toward the brazing sheet core. The results highlight the successful application of the electrochemical depth profiling approach in prediction of the corrosion behavior of the aluminum brazing sheet and the importance of the electrochemical...

  18. Deconvolution of charged particle spectra from neutron depth profiling using Simplex method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Vacík, Jiří; Fink, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2010), 073906/1-073906/7 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : neutron depth profiling * Simplex method * NDP Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010

  19. In situ neutron depth profiling: A powerful method to probe lithium transport in micro-batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, J.F.M.; Labohm, F.; Mulder, M.; Niessen, R.A.H.; Mulder, F.M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    In situ neutron depth profiling (NDP) offers the possibility to observe lithium transport inside micro-batteries during battery operation. It is demonstrated that NDP results are consistent with the results of electrochemical measurements, and that the use of an enriched6LiCoO2 cathode offers more

  20. Depth profiles of H and O in thin films of a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sie, S.H.; Ryan, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed depth profiles of hydrogen and oxygen were measured, in thin film samples of a-Si:H produced under varying conditions, using the reaction 1 H( 19 F,α γ) 16 O in the vicinity of the resonance at E( 19 F) = 6.417 MeV to profile hydrogen, and resonant elastic α scattering near the resonance at Eα = 3.0359 MeV to profile oxygen. Contrasting results reflecting the different fabrication conditions were obtained and these were correlated with the measured electrical properties

  1. Simultaneous depth profiling of constituents and impurities by elastic proton scattering in amorphous hydrogenated silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, R.; Kolodzey, J. S.; Wagner, S.; Kouzes, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Depth profiles of various constituents and impurities of thin films were obtained simultaneously by a nuclear coincidence method. The energy spectrum of elastically scattered 12 MeV protons, measured by a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer, was used for constituent identification and total content determination. Constituents of interest were selected by software pulse height discrimination and their depth profiles were obtained from the recoil energy spectrum, measured by a surface barrier detector telescope. Thin films of Teflon, of carbon, and of amorphous hydrogenated silicon were measured. The best possible depth resolution is about 20 nm for carbon and is limited by the beam energy spread and the energy resolution of the solid state detectors.

  2. Spectral Depth Analysis of some Segments of the Bida Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-16

    Dec 16, 2017 ... ABSTRACT: Spectral depth analysis was carried out on ten (10) of the 2009 total magnetic field intensity data sheets covering some segments of the Bida basin, to determine the depth to magnetic basement within the basin. The data was obtained from the Nigerian Geological Survey Agency and used to ...

  3. Curie depth and geothermal gradient from spectral analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The resent (2009) aeromagnetic data covering lower part of Benue and upper part of Anambra basins was subjected to one dimensional spectral analysis with the aim of estimating the curie depth and subsequently evaluating both the geothermal gradient and heat flow for the area. Curie point depth estimate obtained were ...

  4. Ion implantation artifacts observed in depth profiling boron in silicon by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, P.; Simons, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison study of depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) was recently conducted. The specimens were portions of 5 cm diameter single crystal silicon slices in which B-10 had been implanted at various fluences and energies. NDP measurements were made on a 13 mm diameter area at the center of the wafers. SIMS measurements were taken from a 60 μm diameter area approximately 16 mm from the center of the wafer. One observation that emerged from this work was an apparent discrepancy between the profiles of B-10 measured by DNP and SIMS. The peaks of the SIMS profiles were typically deeper than those of NDP by as much as 30 nm, which is 10% of the projected range for a 70 keV implant. Moreover, the profiles could not be made to coincide by either a constant shift or a proportional change of one depth scale with respect to the other. The lateral inhomogeneity of boron that these experiments have demonstrated arises from the variable contribution of ion channeling during implantation

  5. Cathodoluminescence depth profiling in SiO sub 2 Ge layers

    CERN Document Server

    Barfels, T; Fitting, H J; Schmidt, B

    2002-01-01

    For investigation of the luminescent center profile cathodoluminescence measurements are used under variation of the primary electron energy E sub 0 2/dots30 keV. Applying a constant incident power regime (E sub 0 x I sub 0 = const), the depth profiles of luminescent centers are deduced from the range of the electron energy transfer profiles dE/dx. Thermally grown SiO sub 2 layers of thickness d = 500 nm have been implanted by Ge sup + -ions of energy 350 keV and doses (0.5-5)10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2. Thus Ge profiles with a concentration maximum of (0.4 - 4) at% at the depth of d sub m /cong240 nm are expected. Afterwards the layers have been partially annealed up to T sub a = 1100 sup o C for one hour in dry nitrogen. After thermal annealing, not only the typical violet luminescence (lambda = 400 nm) of the Ge centers is strongly increased but also the luminescent center profiles are shifted from about 250 nm to 170 nm depth towards the surface. This process should be described by Ge diffusion processes...

  6. Determining concentration depth profiles in fluorinated networks by means of electric force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miccio, Luis A. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology (INTEMA), University of Mar del Plata and National Research Council (CONICET), JB. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegria, Angel [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU, Facultad de Quimica, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Montemartini, Pablo E.; Oyanguren, Patricia A. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology (INTEMA), University of Mar del Plata and National Research Council (CONICET), JB. Justo 4302, Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schwartz, Gustavo A. [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Colmenero, Juan [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Materials Physics Center (MPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales UPV/EHU, Facultad de Quimica, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-08-14

    By means of electric force microscopy, composition depth profiles were measured with nanometric resolution for a series of fluorinated networks. By mapping the dielectric permittivity along a line going from the surface to the bulk, we were able to experimentally access to the fluorine concentration profile. Obtained data show composition gradient lengths ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm in the near surface area for samples containing from 0.5 to 5 wt. % F, respectively. In contrast, no gradients of concentration were detected in bulk. This method has several advantages over other techniques because it allows profiling directly on a sectional cut of the sample. By combining the obtained results with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we were also able to quantify F/C ratio as a function of depth with nanoscale resolution.

  7. SIMS-AMS depth profiles for NASA Genesis samples: Preliminary measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetina, C. [Nova Research, Inc., Alexandria, VA 22308 (United States)], E-mail: Catalina.Cetina@nrl.navy.mil; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Demoranville, L.T. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    A wide variety of elements present in solar wind were collected during a 2-year space flight by the NASA Genesis Discovery mission. The high-value Genesis samples are presently analyzed by a few groups using SIMS and other techniques. For some of the more challenging measurements a combined SIMS-AMS facility may provide the advantages of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to SIMS analysis, including molecular fragmentation and low-background detection. Initial results from simulating standards are presented here, demonstrating the capability of the system for this kind of surface analysis. Measurements were performed on internally produced standards consisting of Si wafers implanted with 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} doses of Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn. At the ion source stage, crater-edge effects were filtered by position gating, while at the spectrograph focal plane, possible interferences were rejected by coincidence position-energy detection. Thus, SIMS-like depth profiles were obtained and will be used for estimating system-specific relative sensitivity factors.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of the column station with depth variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D. Petrenko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the results of complex analysis of the columnar station with variation of depth contour interval with research of mobile loading influencing on ceiling are represented.

  9. Modeling the kinematic effect of horizontal strain rates on firn depth-density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlings, A. N.; Stevens, C. M.; Holschuh, N.; Christianson, K. A.; Waddington, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    Firn compaction must be considered in interpretation of satellite repeat-altimetry measurements for ice-sheet mass balance estimates that are used to determine land-ice contribution to sea-level change. Firn compaction models remain the largest source of uncertainty in determining ice-sheet mass balance from repeat altimetry because the physical processes responsible for firn compaction are not fully understood. Most commonly used firn compaction models are 1-D, empirical or semi-empirical, and built on steady-state assumptions. These assumptions may be inappropriate in some regions, particularly areas of dynamic flow. In many of these regions, the horizontal strain rate due to dynamic ice flow can be similar in magnitude to the vertical strain rate from firn compaction. Therefore, horizontal stresses are important to consider in calculating firn depth-density profiles, yet are not represented in the current generation of firn compaction models. Here, we incorporate the kinematic effect of longitudinal strain on firn depth-density profiles in the dry snow zone. In every time step, the firn first densifies and consequently thins via a firn densification model; then, the firn stretches (thins) as stipulated by an imposed longitudinal strain rate without further density changes. Idealized tests show that the kinematic effect for longitudinal strain rates larger than 10-4 yr-1 can significantly decrease the depth-integrated porosity (> 0.5m) for climatic conditions representative of northeast Greenland. For conditions common on Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica, results indicate that the kinematic effect on the firn column can shallow the bubble close-off depth by 20m and decrease the depth-integrated porosity by 7m. These results suggest that incorporating horizontal stresses into firn compaction models is essential to accurately model firn depth-density profiles in regions of ice sheets with high horizontal strain rates.

  10. A multi-detector, digitizer based neutron depth profiling device for characterizing thin film materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, P. L.; Cao, L. R.; Turkoglu, D. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) is a mature, nondestructive technique used to characterize the concentration of certain light isotopes in a material as a function of depth by measuring the residual energy of charged particles in neutron induced reactions. Historically, NDP has been performed using a single detector, resulting in low intrinsic detection efficiency, and limiting the technique largely to high flux research reactors. In this work, we describe a new NDP instrument design with higher detection efficiency by way of spectrum summing across multiple detectors. Such a design is capable of acquiring a statistically significant charged particle spectrum at facilities limited in neutron flux and operation time.

  11. Advanced carrier depth profiling on Si and Ge with micro four-point probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarysse, Trudo; Eyben, Pierre; Parmentier, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    In order to reach the ITRS goals for future complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies, there is a growing need for the accurate extraction of ultrashallow electrically active dopant (carrier) profiles. In this work, it will be illustrated that this need can be met by the micro four-point...... probe (M4PP) tool. M4PP sheet resistance measurements taken along beveled Si and Ge blanket shallow structures will be investigated. From the differential sheet resistance changes, the underlying carrier profile can be reconstructed without the need to rely on a complicated contact modeling, i.e., M4PP...... carrier profiling is an absolute carrier depth profiling technique. On Si, it is found that the more sensitive a structure is to carrier spilling along the bevel, the better the M4PP system performs relative to conventional spreading resistance probe (SRP) due to its much lower probe pressure...

  12. In-depth cDNA library sequencing provides quantitative gene expression profiling in cancer biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanling; Ying, Dingge; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative gene expression analysis plays an important role in identifying differentially expressed genes in various pathological states, gene expression regulation and co-regulation, shedding light on gene functions. Although microarray is widely used as a powerful tool in this regard, it is suboptimal quantitatively and unable to detect unknown gene variants. Here we demonstrated effective detection of differential expression and co-regulation of certain genes by expressed sequence tag analysis using a selected subset of cDNA libraries. We discussed the issues of sequencing depth and library preparation, and propose that increased sequencing depth and improved preparation procedures may allow detection of many expression features for less abundant gene variants. With the reduction of sequencing cost and the emerging of new generation sequencing technology, in-depth sequencing of cDNA pools or libraries may represent a better and powerful tool in gene expression profiling and cancer biomarker detection. We also propose using sequence-specific subtraction to remove hundreds of the most abundant housekeeping genes to increase sequencing depth without affecting relative expression ratio of other genes, as transcripts from as few as 300 most abundantly expressed genes constitute about 20% of the total transcriptome. In-depth sequencing also represents a unique advantage of detecting unknown forms of transcripts, such as alternative splicing variants, fusion genes, and regulatory RNAs, as well as detecting mutations and polymorphisms that may play important roles in disease pathogenesis.

  13. Characterizing contaminant concentrations with depth by using the USGS well profiler in Oklahoma, 2003-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Becker, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Oklahoma Water Science Center has been using the USGS well profiler to characterize changes in water contribution and contaminant concentrations with depth in pumping public-supply wells in selected aquifers. The tools and methods associated with the well profiler, which were first developed by the USGS California Water Science Center, have been used to investigate common problems such as saline water intrusion in high-yield irrigation wells and metals contamination in high-yield public-supply wells.

  14. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, R., E-mail: roland.steinberger@jku.at [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Celedón, C.E., E-mail: carlos.celedon@usm.cl [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valaparaíso, Casilla 110-V (Chile); Bruckner, B., E-mail: barbara.bruckner@jku.at [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Roth, D., E-mail: dietmar.roth@jku.at [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Abteilung für Atom- und Oberflächenphysik, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Duchoslav, J., E-mail: jiri.duchoslav@jku.at [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Arndt, M., E-mail: martin.arndt@voestalpine.com [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine-Straße 3, 4031 Linz (Austria); Kürnsteiner, P., E-mail: p.kuernsteiner@mpie.de [Center for Surface and Nanoanalytics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); and others

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Investigation on the impact of residual gas prevailing in UHV chambers. • For some metals detrimental oxygen uptake could be observed within shortest time. • Totally different behavior was found: no changes, solely adsorption and oxidation. • The UHV residual gas may severely corrupt results obtained from depth profiling. • A well-considered data acquisition sequence is the key for reliable depth profiles. - Abstract: Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  15. Investigating the Fundamentals of Molecular Depth Profiling Using Strong-field Photoionization of Sputtered Neutrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, D; Brenes, D A; Winograd, N; Wucher, A

    2011-01-01

    Molecular depth profiles of model organic thin films were performed using a 40 keV C 60 + cluster ion source in concert with TOF-SIMS. Strong-field photoionization of intact neutral molecules sputtered by 40 keV C 60 + primary ions was used to analyze changes in the chemical environment of the guanine thin films as a function of ion fluence. Direct comparison of the secondary ion and neutral components of the molecular depth profiles yields valuable information about chemical damage accumulation as well as changes in the molecular ionization probability. An analytical protocol based on the erosion dynamics model is developed and evaluated using guanine and trehalose molecular secondary ion signals with and without comparable laser photoionization data.

  16. Identification of Chinese medicinal fungus Cordyceps sinensis by depth-profiling mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changwen; Zhou, Jianmin; Liu, Jianfeng

    2017-02-01

    With increased demand for Cordyceps sinensis it needs rapid methods to meet the challenge of identification raised in quality control. In this study Cordyceps sinensis from four typical natural habitats in China was characterized by depth-profiling Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that Cordyceps sinensis samples resulted in typical photoacoustic spectral appearance, but heterogeneity was sensed in the whole sample; due to the heterogeneity Cordyceps sinensis was represented by spectra of four groups including head, body, tail and leaf under a moving mirror velocity of 0.30 cm s- 1. The spectra of the four groups were used as input of a probabilistic neural network (PNN) to identify the source of Cordyceps sinensis, and all the samples were correctly identified by the PNN model. Therefore, depth-profiling Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy provides novel and unique technique to identify Cordyceps sinensis, which shows great potential in quality control of Cordyceps sinensis.

  17. Depth-profiling by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM): data correction by numerical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomba, J Pablo; Eliçabe, Guillermo E; Miguel, María de la Paz; Perez, Claudio J

    2011-03-01

    The data obtained in confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) depth profiling experiments with dry optics are subjected to significant distortions, including an artificial compression of the depth scale, due to the combined influence of diffraction, refraction, and instrumental effects that operate on the measurement. This work explores the use of (1) regularized deconvolution and (2) the application of simple rescaling of the depth scale as methodologies to obtain an improved, more precise, confocal response. The deconvolution scheme is based on a simple predictive model for depth resolution and the use of regularization techniques to minimize the dramatic oscillations in the recovered response typical of problem inversion. That scheme is first evaluated using computer simulations on situations that reproduce smooth and sharp sample transitions between two materials and finally it is applied to correct genuine experimental data, obtained in this case from a sharp transition (planar interface) between two polymeric materials. It is shown that the methodology recovers very well most of the lost profile features in all the analyzed situations. The use of simple rescaling appears to be only useful for correcting smooth transitions, particularly those extended over distances larger than those spanned by the operative depth resolution, which limits the strategy to the study of profiles near the sample surface. However, through computer simulations, it is shown that the use of water immersion objectives may help to reduce optical distortions and to expand the application window of this simple methodology, which could be useful, for instance, to safely monitor Fickean sorption/desorption of penetrants in polymer films/coatings in a nearly noninvasive way.

  18. Determination of the thickness distribution of a graphene layer grown on a 2″ SiC wafer by means of Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotis, L.; Gurban, S.; Pecz, B.; Menyhard, M.; Yakimova, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The thickness of graphene grown on SiC was determined by AES depth profiling. • The AES depth profiling verified the presence of buffer layer on SiC. • The presence of unsaturated Si bonds in the buffer layer has been shown. • Using multipoint analysis thickness distribution of the graphene on the wafer was determined. - Abstract: Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling was applied for determination of the thickness of a macroscopic size graphene sheet grown on 2 in. 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) by sublimation epitaxy. The measured depth profile deviated from the expected exponential form showing the presence of an additional, buffer layer. The measured depth profile was compared to the simulated one which allowed the derivation of the thicknesses of the graphene and buffer layers and the Si concentration of buffer layer. It has been shown that the graphene-like buffer layer contains about 30% unsaturated Si. The depth profiling was carried out in several points (diameter 50 μm), which permitted the constructing of a thickness distribution characterizing the uniformity of the graphene sheet

  19. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  20. Molecular depth profiling and imaging using cluster ion beams with femtosecond laser postionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, D.; Kucher, A.; Winograd, N.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of cluster ion sources as viable SIMS probes has opened new possibilities for detection of neutral molecules by laser postionization. Previous studies have shown that with atomic bombardment multiphoton ionization using high-power femtosecond pulses leads to photofragmentation. The large amount of photofragmentation can be mostly attributed to high amounts of internal energy imparted to the sputtered molecules during the desorption process. Several pieces of preliminary data suggest that molecules subjected to cluster beam bombardment are desorbed with lower internal energies than those subjected to atomic beam bombardment. Lower energy molecules may then be less likely to photodissociate creating less photofragments in the laser postionization spectra. Here we present data taken from coronene films prepared by physical vapor deposition comparing a 40 keV C 60 + ion source with a 20 keV Au + ion source, which supports this hypothesis. Furthermore, the depth profiling capabilities of cluster beams may be combined with laser postionization to obtain molecular depth profiles by monitoring the neutral flux. In addition, imaging and depth profiling may be combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to provide three-dimensional molecular images.

  1. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; /Utah U.; Chen,; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2005-10-07

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  2. Positron depth profiling of the structural and electronic structure transformations of hydrogenated Mg-based thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijt, S.W.H.; Kind, R.; Singh, S.; Schut, H.; Legerstee, W.J.; Hendrikx, R.W.A.; Svetchnikov, V.L.; Westerwaal, R.J.; Dam, B.

    2009-01-01

    We report positron depth-profiling studies on the hydrogen sorption behavior and phase evolution of Mg-based thin films. We show that the main changes in the depth profiles resulting from the hydrogenation to the respective metal hydrides are related to a clear broadening in the observed electron

  3. Nitrogen diffusion and nitrogen depth profiles in expanded austenite: experimental assessment, numerical simulation and role of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper addresses the experimental assessment of the concentration dependent nitrogen diffusion coefficient in stress free expanded austenite foils from thermogravimetry, the numerical simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles on growth of expanded austenite into stainless steel...... to composition-depth profiles....

  4. Implication of Land Use and Belowground Weather on Nitrous Oxide Soil Depth Profiles and Denitrification Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.; Song, B.; Saliendra, N.; Liebig, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    oxygen profiles followed similar patterns for cropland and prairie, ranging from 12 to 21%, with median values of 19 and 20% at both depths. We did not observe linear concentration gradients between 15 and 90 cm depths, likely due to differences in rates of production and consumption throughout the soil profile. Potential rates of denitrification at 0-15 cm were over two times higher in the cropland, as compared to prairie. We conclude that N2O production occurs not only close to the surface but also nearly a meter beneath both undisturbed prairie and cropland. Greater surface fluxes and N2O concentrations at all depths in the cropland under variable conditions point to enhanced N2O production in the absence of synthetic N addition from 2009-2013. While denitrification potential in the laboratory was greater beneath this alfalfa field, the soil oxygen profile measurements indicated conditions favorable for complete denitrification of N to N2 were rare at near-surface and sub-surface soil depths. Microbial N2O production and consumption processes vary with soil depth and land use in the absence of synthetic N inputs, and further investigation is warranted.

  5. Reconstruction of GaAs/AlAs supperlattice multilayer structure by quantification of AES and SIMS sputter depth profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H.L.; Lao, J.B. [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Li, Z.P.; Yao, W.Q. [Analysis Center of Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, C. [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • GaAs/AlAs superlattice multilayered structure is reconstructed. • Measured depth profiling data are quantitatively analyzed. • Depth resolution and interface roughness values are quantitatively evaluated. - Abstract: The GaAs/AlAs superlattice multilayer structures were deposited on GaAs (1 0 0) substrates by molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) technique. The as-prepared samples were characterized respectively by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling techniques. The measured depth profiles were then fitted by the Mixing-Roughness-Information (MRI) model. The depth resolution values for both depth profiling techniques were evaluated quantitatively from the fitted MRI parameters and the as-prepared GaAs/AlAs multilayer structure was determined accordingly.

  6. Steroid profiling in doping analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, Daniël Henri van de

    2001-01-01

    Profiling androgens in urine samples is used in doping analysis for the detection of abused steroids of endogenous origin. These profiling techniques were originally developed for the analysis of testosterone, mostly by means of the ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio). A study was

  7. Compositional depth profiles of the type 316 stainless steel undergone the corrosion in liquid lithium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ke, Chuan; Liu, Xiang; Gou, Fujun; Duan, Xuru; Zhao, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Liquid metal lithium cause severe corrosion on the surface of metal structure material that used in the blanket and first wall of fusion device. Fast and accurate compositional depth profile measurement for the boundary layer of the corroded specimen will reveal the clues for the understanding and evaluation of the liquid lithium corrosion process as well as the involved corrosion mechanism. In this work, the feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the compositional depth profile analysis of type 316 stainless steel which was corroded by liquid lithium in certain conditions was demonstrated. High sensitivity of LIBS was revealed especially for the corrosion medium Li in addition to the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni and Mn by the spectral analysis of the plasma emission. Compositional depth profile analysis for the concerned elements which related to corrosion was carried out on the surface of the corroded specimen. Based on the verified local thermodynamic equilibrium shot-by-shot along the depth profile, the matrix effect was evaluated as negligible by the extracted physical parameter of the plasmas generated by each laser pulse in the longitudinal depth profile. In addition, the emission line intensity ratios were introduced to further reduce the impact on the emission line intensity variations arise from the strong inhomogeneities on the corroded surface. Compositional depth profiles for the matrix elements of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn and the corrosion medium Li were constructed with their measured relative emission line intensities. The distribution and correlations of the concerned elements in depth profile may indicate the clues to the complicated process of composition diffusion and mass transfer. The results obtained demonstrate the potentiality of LIBS as an effective technique to perform spectrochemical measurement in the research fields of liquid metal lithium corrosion.

  8. Dealloying evidence on corroded brass by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy mapping and depth profiling measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, R.; Casal, A.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2017-04-01

    The dealloying phenomenon, also called demetalification, is a; consequence of a corrosion problem found in binary alloys where an enrichment of one of the two main elements of the alloy is produced at the expense of the leaching of the other element. In the present work, the ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection and characterization of dealloying films formed on metal has been tested. For this purpose, specific areas of brass specimens have been subjected to a chemical attack of the surface in order to produce a selective leaching of zinc or dezincification. For the lateral and in-depth characterization of the dealloyed areas by LIBS, depth profiles, 2D and 3D maps have been generated from the treated samples and from a reference non-treated sample. The differences in the maps and depth profiles between the corroded and non-corroded regions have allowed to reveal the localization and extension of the dealloying process along the brass sample surface and to estimate the thickness of the dezincification layers, demonstrating the capability of LIBS technique for the characterization of dealloying phenomena.

  9. Depth Profiling of La2O3 ∕ HfO2 Stacked Dielectrics for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Husam N.

    2011-01-03

    Nanoscale La2O3 /HfO2 dielectric stacks have been studied using high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The measured distance of the tail-end of the La signal from the dielectric/Si interface suggests that the origin of the threshold voltage shifts and the carrier mobility degradation may not be the same. Up to 20% drop in mobility and 500 mV shift in threshold voltage was observed as the La signal reached the Si substrate. Possible reasons for these changes are proposed, aided by depth profiling and bonding analysis. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  10. Novel approach of signal normalization for depth profile of cultural heritage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Detalle, V.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of cultural heritage materials is always complex and specific because unique. Materials are most often heterogeneous and organized in several layers such as mural paintings or corrosion products. The characterization of a complete artwork's stratigraphy is actually one of the questions of science conservation. Indeed, the knowledge of these layers allows completing the history of the work of art and a better understanding of alteration processes in order to set up an appropriate conservation action. The LIBS technique has been employed to study the stratigraphy of an artwork thanks to the ablation laser. However, as we know, atomic information could be insufficient to characterize two materials composed by the same based elements. Therefore, an additional molecular analysis, like Raman spectroscopy; is sometimes necessary for a better identification of the material in particular for organic coatings in cultural heritage. We suggest in this study to use Standard Normal Variate (SNV) as a common normalization for different kinds of spectra (LIBS and Raman spectroscopy) combined with a 3D colour representation for stratigraphic identification of the different layers composing the complex material from artwork. So in this investigation, the SNV method will be applied on LIBS and Raman spectra but also on baseline Raman spectra often considering as nuisance. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the versatility of SNV applied on varied spectra like LIBS, Raman spectra as well as the luminescence background. This original work considers the SNV with a 3D colour representation as a probable new perspective for an easy recognition of a structure layered with a direct overview of the depth profile of the artwork.

  11. Nondestructive depth profiling of rare-earth and actinide zeolites via Rutherford backscattering methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, S.A.; Strathman, M.D.; Suib, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering (RBS) methods have been used to study rare-earth and actinide-ion-exchanged small pore (A) and large pore (Y) zeolites. A theoretical discussion of the RBS method and a novel method of data treatment are given. Experimental data for zeolites have been simulated and theoretical depth profiles have been determined. Both experimental and theoretical data suggest that uranyl-exchanged A zeolite has a large uranium to oxygen surface ratio while the corresponding Y zeolite has a large uranium to oxygen bulk ratio. Relative atomic fractions of all zeolite elements are also given

  12. XPS depth profiling of derivatized amine and anhydride plasma polymers: Evidence of limitations of the derivatization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manakhov, Anton, E-mail: ant-manahov@ya.ru [National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC – Masaryk University, Purkyňova 123, Brno 61200 (Czech Republic); Michlíček, Miroslav [RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC – Masaryk University, Purkyňova 123, Brno 61200 (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská, 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic); Felten, Alexandre; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques [LISE, Department of Physics, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, Namur B5000 (Belgium); Nečas, David [RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC – Masaryk University, Purkyňova 123, Brno 61200 (Czech Republic); Zajíčková, Lenka [RG Plasma Technologies, CEITEC – Masaryk University, Purkyňova 123, Brno 61200 (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská, 2, Brno 61137 (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • TFBA derivatizatized amine plasma layers exhibited heterogeneous profile of [F] due to low diffusion (permeability) of TFBA • Anhydride layers derivatized by trifluoroethylamine exhibited relatively homogenous profile as this molecule is smaller • The results of TFBA derivatization will depend on XPS take-off angle, polymer crosslinking and density - Abstract: The quantitative analysis of the chemistry at the surface of functional plasma polymers is highly important for the optimization of their deposition conditions and, therefore, for their subsequent applications. The chemical derivatization of amine and carboxyl-anhydride layers is a well-known technique already applied by many researchers, notwithstanding the known drawback of the derivatization procedures like side or uncomplete reactions that could lead to “unreliable” results. In this work, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with depth profiling with argon clusters is applied for the first time to study derivatized amine and carboxyl-anhydride plasma polymer layers. It revealed an additional important parameter affecting the derivatization reliability, namely the permeation of the derivatizing molecule through the target analysed layer, i.e. the composite effect of the probe molecule size and the layer porosity. Amine-rich films prepared by RF low pressure plasma polymerization of cyclopropylamine were derivatized with trifluoromethyl benzaldehide (TFBA) and it was observed by that the XPS-determined NH{sub 2} concentration depth profile is rapidly decreasing over top ten nanometers of the layer. The anhydride-rich films prepared by atmospheric plasma co-polymerization of maleic anhydride and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} have been reacted with, parafluoroaniline and trifluoroethyl amine. The decrease of the F signal in top surface layer of the anhydride films derivatized by the “large” parafluoroaniline was observed similarly as for the amine films but the derivatization with

  13. Extracting inter-diffusion parameters of TiC from AES depth profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swart, H.C.; Jonker, A.J.; Claassens, C.H.; Chen, R.; Venter, L.A.; Ramoshebe, P.; Wurth, E.; Terblans, J.J.; Roos, W.D

    2002-01-31

    The excellent corrosion and wear resistance of titanium carbide gives it a wide range of technological applications. Thin layers Ti (2300 Angst) and C (2020 Angst), were deposited onto SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by means of electron beam evaporation in high vacuum. These films were annealed at different temperatures and times (temperatures ranging between 525 and 625 deg. C and annealing times between 4 and 121 min) to grow thin films of TiC. Ar{sup +} sputter depth profiling, with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), provided the depth composition of the annealed films. A comparison between AES spectra of C in the graphite and carbide chemical states showed significant differences in both shape and energy of the differentiated peaks. A positive restricted linear least squares (PRLLS) method was used to separate the graphite and carbide contributions from the C profile. The TiC layer thickness for each specimen was obtained. With known TiC thickness and annealing times, the diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature were calculated. An Arrhenius plot yielded an activation energy Q of 207{+-}4 kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor D{sub 0} of 4.1x10{sup -8} m{sup 2} s{sup -1}.

  14. Thermal depth profiling of materials for defect detection using hot disk technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Mihiretie

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel application of the hot disk transient plane source technique is described. The new application yields the thermal conductivity of materials as a function of the thermal penetration depth which opens up opportunities in nondestructive testing of inhomogeneous materials. The system uses the hot disk sensor placed on the material surface to create a time varying temperature field. The thermal conductivity is then deduced from temperature evolution of the sensor, whereas the probing depth (the distance the heat front advanced away from the source is related to the product of measurement time and thermal diffusivity. The presence of inhomogeneity in the structure is manifested in thermal conductivity versus probing depth plot. Such a plot for homogeneous materials provides fairly constant value. The deviation from the homogeneous curve caused by defects in the structure is used for inhomogeneity detection. The size and location of the defect in the structure determines the sensitivity and possibility of detection. In addition, a complementary finite element numerical simulation through COMSOL Multiphysics is employed to solve the heat transfer equation. Temperature field profile of a model material is obtained from these simulations. The average rise in temperature of the heat source is calculated and used to demonstrate the effect of the presence of inhomogeneity in the system.

  15. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. I. Measurements at energies above 10(17.8) eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-01-01

    We report a study of the distributions of the depth of maximum, X-max, of extensive air-shower profiles with energies above 10(17.8) eV as observed with the fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The analysis method for selecting a data sample with minimal sampling bias is

  16. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, R.; Celedón, C. E.; Bruckner, B.; Roth, D.; Duchoslav, J.; Arndt, M.; Kürnsteiner, P.; Steck, T.; Faderl, J.; Riener, C. K.; Angeli, G.; Bauer, P.; Stifter, D.

    2017-07-01

    Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  17. Atom depth analysis delineates mechanisms of protein intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alocci, Davide; Bernini, Andrea; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •3D atom depth analysis is proposed to identify different layers in protein structures. •Amino acid contents for each layers have been analyzed for a large protein dataset. •Charged amino acids in the most external layer are present at very different extents. •Atom depth indexes of K residues reflect their side chains flexibility. •Mobile surface charges can be responsible for long range protein–protein recognition. -- Abstract: The systematic analysis of amino acid distribution, performed inside a large set of resolved protein structures, sheds light on possible mechanisms driving non random protein–protein approaches. Protein Data Bank entries have been selected using as filters a series of restrictions ensuring that the shape of protein surface is not modified by interactions with large or small ligands. 3D atom depth has been evaluated for all the atoms of the 2,410 selected structures. The amino acid relative population in each of the structural layers formed by grouping atoms on the basis of their calculated depths, has been evaluated. We have identified seven structural layers, the inner ones reproducing the core of proteins and the outer one incorporating their most protruding moieties. Quantitative analysis of amino acid contents of structural layers identified, as expected, different behaviors. Atoms of Q, R, K, N, D residues are increasingly more abundant in going from core to surfaces. An opposite trend is observed for V, I, L, A, C, and G. An intermediate behavior is exhibited by P, S, T, M, W, H, F and Y. The outer structural layer hosts predominantly E and K residues whose charged moieties, protruding from outer regions of the protein surface, reorient free from steric hindrances, determining specific electrodynamics maps. This feature may represent a protein signature for long distance effects, driving the formation of encounter complexes and the eventual short distance approaches that are required for protein

  18. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF), and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment) in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1) respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  19. Reliability of multiresolution deconvolution for improving depth resolution in SIMS analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulakroune, M’Hamed, E-mail: Boulakroune.mhamed@univ-ouargla.dz

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Recovery of SIMS profiles by enhancement of depth resolution using multiresolution deconvolution. • The multiresolution deconvolution is based on Tikhonov Miller regularization and wavelet analysis. • Local application of the regularization parameter at each resolution level provided to smoothed signals without artifacts related to noise. • The aim is to show the ability of multiresolution deconvolution to restore two extremely different structures large and thin. • On thin structure the multiresolution deconvolution by zone was successfully applied. - Abstract: This paper deals the effectiveness and reliability of multiresolution deconvolution algorithm for recovery Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, SIMS, profiles altered by the measurement. This new algorithm is characterized as a regularized wavelet transform. It combines ideas from Tikhonov Miller regularization, wavelet analysis and deconvolution algorithms in order to benefit from the advantages of each. The SIMS profiles were obtained by analysis of two structures of boron in a silicon matrix using a Cameca-Ims6f instrument at oblique incidence. The first structure is large consisting of two distant wide boxes and the second one is thin structure containing ten delta-layers in which the deconvolution by zone was applied. It is shown that this new multiresolution algorithm gives best results. In particular, local application of the regularization parameter of blurred and estimated solutions at each resolution level provided to smoothed signals without creating artifacts related to noise content in the profile. This led to a significant improvement in the depth resolution and peaks’ maximums.

  20. Depth profiling of inks in authentic and counterfeit banknotes by electrospray laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yi-Ying; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cheng, Chu-Nian; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-01-01

    Electrospray laser desorption ionization is an ambient ionization technique that generates neutrals via laser desorption and ionizes those neutrals in an electrospray plume and was utilized to characterize inks in different layers of copy paper and banknotes of various currencies. Depth profiling of inks was performed on overlapping color bands on copy paper by repeatedly scanning the line with a pulsed laser beam operated at a fixed energy. The molecules in the ink on a banknote were desorbed by irradiating the banknote surface with a laser beam operated at different energies, with results indicating that different ions were detected at different depths. The analysis of authentic $US100, $100 RMB and $1000 NTD banknotes indicated that ions detected in 'color-shifting' and 'typography' regions were significantly different. Additionally, the abundances of some ions dramatically changed with the depth of the aforementioned regions. This approach was used to distinguish authentic $1000 NTD banknotes from counterfeits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Multiscale analysis of depth-dependent soil penetration resistance in a tropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva De Lima, Renato; Santos, Djail; Medeiros Bezerra, Joel; Machado Siqueira, Glécio; Paz González, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used because it is linked to basic soil properties; it is correlated to root growth and plant production and is also used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analyzed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 40 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in north-eastern Brazil. According to the Soil Taxonomy, the studied soil was classified as an Orthic Podsol The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. Singularity and Rènyi spectra showed the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to one indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV) and skewness of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean, maximum and minimum values of PR; these maps showed the multifractal approach also may complete information provided by descriptive statistics at the field scale.

  2. The penetrating depth analysis of Lunar Penetrating Radar onboard Chang’e-3 rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shu-Guo; Su, Yan; Feng, Jian-Qing; Dai, Shun; Xiao, Yuan; Ding, Chun-Yu; Li, Chun-Lai

    2017-04-01

    Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) has successfully been used to acquire a large amount of scientific data during its in-situ detection. The analysis of penetrating depth can help to determine whether the target is within the effective detection range and contribute to distinguishing useful echoes from noise. First, this study introduces two traditional methods, both based on a radar transmission equation, to calculate the penetrating depth. The only difference between the two methods is that the first method adopts system calibration parameters given in the calibration report and the second one uses high-voltage-off radar data. However, some prior knowledge and assumptions are needed in the radar equation and the accuracy of assumptions will directly influence the final results. Therefore, a new method termed the Correlation Coefficient Method (CCM) is provided in this study, which is only based on radar data without any a priori assumptions. The CCM can obtain the penetrating depth according to the different correlation between reflected echoes and noise. To be exact, there is a strong correlation in the useful reflected echoes and a random correlation in the noise between adjacent data traces. In addition, this method can acquire a variable penetrating depth along the profile of the rover, but only one single depth value can be obtained from traditional methods. Through a simulation, the CCM has been verified as an effective method to obtain penetration depth. The comparisons and analysis of the calculation results of these three methods are also implemented in this study. Finally, results show that the ultimate penetrating depth of Channel 1 and the estimated penetrating depth of Channel 2 range from 136.9 m to 165.5 m ({\\varepsilon }r=6.6) and from 13.0 m to 17.5 m ({\\varepsilon }r=2.3), respectively.

  3. Microbial Community Dynamics in Soil Depth Profiles Over 120,000 Years of Ecosystem Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Turner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Along a long-term ecosystem development gradient, soil nutrient contents and mineralogical properties change, therefore probably altering soil microbial communities. However, knowledge about the dynamics of soil microbial communities during long-term ecosystem development including progressive and retrogressive stages is limited, especially in mineral soils. Therefore, microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community composition (pyrosequencing as well as their controlling soil properties were investigated in soil depth profiles along the 120,000 years old Franz Josef chronosequence (New Zealand. Additionally, in a microcosm incubation experiment the effects of particular soil properties, i.e., soil age, soil organic matter fraction (mineral-associated vs. particulate, O2 status, and carbon and phosphorus additions, on microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community patterns (T-RFLP were analyzed. The archaeal to bacterial abundance ratio not only increased with soil depth but also with soil age along the chronosequence, coinciding with mineralogical changes and increasing phosphorus limitation. Results of the incubation experiment indicated that archaeal abundances were less impacted by the tested soil parameters compared to Bacteria suggesting that Archaea may better cope with mineral-induced substrate restrictions in subsoils and older soils. Instead, archaeal communities showed a soil age-related compositional shift with the Bathyarchaeota, that were frequently detected in nutrient-poor, low-energy environments, being dominant at the oldest site. However, bacterial communities remained stable with ongoing soil development. In contrast to the abundances, the archaeal compositional shift was associated with the mineralogical gradient. Our study revealed, that archaeal and bacterial communities in whole soil profiles are differently affected by long-term soil development with archaeal communities probably being better adapted to

  4. Small scale temporal distribution of radiocesium in undisturbed coniferous forest soil: Radiocesium depth distribution profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramage, Mengistu T; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    The depth distribution of pre-Fukushima and Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in undisturbed coniferous forest soil was investigated at four sampling dates from nine months to 18 months after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The migration rate and short-term temporal variability among the sampling profiles were evaluated. Taking the time elapsed since the peak deposition of pre-Fukushima (137)Cs and the median depth of the peaks, its downward displacement rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.67 mm yr(-1) with a mean of 0.46 ± 0.25 mm yr(-1). On the other hand, in each examined profile considerable amount of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs was found in the organic layer (51%-92%). At this moment, the effect of time-distance on the downward distribution of Fukushima-derived (137)Cs seems invisible as its large portion is still found in layers where organic matter is maximal. This indicates that organic matter seems the primary and preferential sorbent of radiocesium that could be associated with the physical blockage of the exchanging sites by organic-rich dusts that act as a buffer against downward propagation of radiocesium, implying radiocesium to be remained in the root zone for considerable time period. As a result, this soil section can be a potential source of radiation dose largely due to high radiocesium concentration coupled with its low density. Generally, such kind of information will be useful to establish a dynamic safety-focused decision support system to ease and assist management actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optoelectronic properties and depth profile of charge transport in nanocrystal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Willi; Bienek, Oliver; Desta, Derese; Wiggers, Hartmut; Stutzmann, Martin; Pereira, Rui N.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the charge transport in nanocrystal (NC) films using field effect transistors (FETs) of silicon NCs. By studying films with various thicknesses in the dark and under illumination with photons with different penetration depths (UV and red light), we are able to predictably change the spatial distribution of charge carriers across the films' profile. The experimental data are compared with photoinduced charge carrier generation rates computed using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations complemented with optical measurements. This enables us to understand the optoelectronic properties of NC films and the depth profile dependence of the charge transport properties. From electrical measurements, we extract the total (bulk) photoinduced charge carrier densities (nphoto) and the photoinduced charge carrier densities in the FETs channel (nphoto*). We observe that the values of nphoto and their dependence on film thickness are similar for UV and red light illumination, whereas a significant difference is observed for the values of nphoto*. The dependencies of nphoto and nphoto* on film thickness and illumination wavelength are compared with data from FDTD simulations. Combining experimental data and simulation results, we find that charge carriers in the top rough surface of the films cannot contribute to the macroscopic charge transport. Moreover, we conclude that below the top rough surface of NC films, the efficiency of charge transport, including the charge carrier mobility, is homogeneous across the film thickness. Our work shows that the use of NC films as photoactive layers in applications requiring harvesting of strongly absorbed photons such as photodetectors and photovoltaics demands a very rigorous control over the films' roughness.

  6. Magnetic properties of epitaxial CoCr films with depth-dependent exchange-coupling profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, Lorenzo; Kirby, Brian J.; Pancaldi, Matteo; Riego, Patricia; Balk, Andrew L.; Miller, Casey W.; Vavassori, Paolo; Berger, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We present a study of the compositional and temperature-dependent magnetic properties of epitaxial CoCr thin films whose composition has a bathtublike depth profile Co /C o1 →1 -xcC r0 →xc/C o1 -xcC rxc/Co1 -x c→1C rxc→0/Co with the highest Cr concentration (xc) at the center of the sample. Polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) shows that the effective Curie temperature varies as a function of depth and exhibits a minimum in the center of the structure. Correspondingly, we observe that the effective coupling between the two outer Co layers is strongly dependent on the magnetization of the graded CoCr spacer and can be continuously tuned via xc and temperature T . In particular, for xc=0.28 , magnetometry reveals a transition from one-step to two-step reversal behavior for temperatures T > 260 K, indicating a transition from a fully correlated magnetic film structure to an uncoupled system containing effectively two independent magnetic sublayers. Corroborating evidence of the temperature-dependent coupling of the top and bottom regions for xc=0.28 was revealed by PNR, which demonstrated the field-dependent occurrence of antiparallel magnetization alignment on opposite interfaces at sufficiently high temperatures only.

  7. Oxygen depth profiling using the 16O(d,α)14N nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khubeis, I.; Al-Rjob, R.

    1997-01-01

    The excitation function of the 16 O(d,α) 14 N nuclear reaction has been determined in the deuteron energy range of 0.88-2.28 MeV. Major resonances are observed at deuteron energies of 0.98, 1.31, 1.53, 1.60, 1.73 and 2.22 MeV. The present results show good agreement with those of Haase and Khubeis, however there is a shift of 60 keV in the first resonance compared with the measurements of Amsel. The use of a thin surface barrier detector (t=22 μm) and a bias voltage of +20 V coupled with a proper pile-up rejection circuit has allowed the determination of the oxygen depth profiling to a resolution of 16 nm for thick targets. This method is efficient in eliminating interferences from other nuclear reactions such as 16 O(d,p) 17 O and 12 C(d,p) 19 C, where emitted protons have severely obscured α-particles from the 16 O(d,α) 14 N reaction. A 1.08 MeV deuteron beam has been employed to increase the α-yield from the target. The target has been tilted at 70 to enhance depth resolution. This reaction is well suited for the determination of oxygen concentration in oxides of high temperature superconductors. (orig.)

  8. Self-consistent depth profiling and imaging of GaN-based transistors using ion microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo-Cubero, A., E-mail: andres.redondo@uam.es [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal); Departamento de Física Aplicada y Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Corregidor, V. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal); Vázquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Alves, L.C. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 2686-953 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Using an ion microprobe, a comprehensive lateral and in-depth characterization of a single GaN-based high electron mobility transistor is carried out by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in combination with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Elemental distribution was obtained for every individual section of the device (wafer, gate and source contact), identifying the basic constituents of the transistor (including the detection of the passivant layer) and checking its homogeneity. A self-consistent analysis of each individual regions of the transistor was carried out with a simultaneous fit of RBS and PIXE spectra with two different beam conditions. Following this approach, the quantification of the atomic content and the layer thicknesses was successfully achieved overcoming the mass-depth ambiguity of certain elements.

  9. Organic carbon biolabilty increases with depth in a yedoma permafrost profile in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, J. K.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Spencer, R.; Winkel, M.; Zhang, M.; Liebner, S.; Podgorski, D. C.; Zito, P.; Kholodov, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost organic carbon (OC) biolability is known to be controlled by both the OC molecular composition and redox state and the microbial community structure and its response to permafrost thaw. However, due to their complexity, both these mechanisms remain poorly understood. A substantial portion ( 16%) of global permafrost OC is stored in particularly deep, ice-rich permafrost deposits known as yedoma. We anaerobically incubated sediment from four depths in a 12-m yedoma profile in Interior Alaska with three treatments: control without amendment, inoculated with sediment from an adjacent thermokarst lake, and inoculated with sterilized lake sediment. We quantified CO2 and CH4 as end products of C mineralization, used qPCR to characterize the initial methanogenic communities, and used FT-ICR-MS to characterize the molecular composition of water-extractable organic matter at the beginning and end of the 154-d incubation. Proportions of aliphatics and peptides increased with depth in the permafrost profile, which would be consistent with long-term accumulation of anaerobic fermentation end products in yedoma-type permafrost. Moreover, these compounds positively correlated with anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production and their degradation rates corresponded to high proportions (53.3 ±41.9%) of OC mineralization, suggesting increasing proportions of these compounds with depth correspond to increasing OC quality and increased C mineralization per unit OC. Methanogenic communities were below detection limits in all controls. Following exposure to modern lake sediment microbial communities with detectable methanogens, we observed increases in anaerobic CO2 (65.1% ±75.2%) and CH4 (1,197% ±914%) production. The treatments with sterilized lake sediment did not contain detectable methanogens, and had increased anaerobic CO2 (52.6% ±69.2%) production but decreased CH4 (-74.1% ±33.8%) production. These preliminary results suggest anaerobic CH4 production is limited by ancient

  10. What Can Radiocarbon Depth Profiles Tell Us About The LGM Circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, A.; Stewart, A.; Adkins, J. F.; Ferrari, R. M.; Thompson, A. F.; Jansen, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Published reconstructions of radiocarbon in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean indicate that there is a mid-depth maximum in radiocarbon age during the last glacial maximum (LGM). This is in contrast to the modern ocean where intense mixing between water masses along shared density surfaces (isopycnals) results in a relatively homogenous radiocarbon profile. A recent study (Ferrari et al. 2014) suggested that the extended Antarctic sea ice cover during the LGM necessitated a shallower boundary between the upper and lower branches of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). This shoaled boundary lay above major topographic features and their associated strong diapycnal mixing, which isolated dense southern-sourced water in the lower branch of the overturning circulation. This isolation would have allowed radiocarbon to decay, and thus provides a possible explanation for the mid-depth radiocarbon age bulge. We test this hypothesis using an idealized, 2D, residual-mean dynamical model of the global overturning circulation. Concentration distributions of a decaying tracer that is advected by the simulated overturning are compared to published radiocarbon data. We test the sensitivity of the mid-depth radiocarbon age to changes in sea ice extent, wind strength, and isopycnal and diapycnal diffusion. The mid-depth radiocarbon age bulge is most likely caused by the different circulation geometry, associated with increased sea ice extent. In particular, with an LGM-like sea ice extent the upper and lower branches of the MOC no longer share isopycnals, so radiocarbon-rich northern-sourced water is no longer mixed rapidly into the southern-sourced water. However, this process alone cannot explain the magnitude of the glacial radiocarbon anomalies; additional isolation (e.g. from reduced air-sea gas exchange associated with the increased sea ice) is required. Ferrari, R., M. F. Jansen, J. F. Adkins, A. Burke, A. L. Stewart, and A. F. Thompson (2014), Antarctic sea

  11. Depth data research of GIS based on clustering analysis algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Xu, Wenli

    2018-03-01

    The data of GIS have spatial distribution. Geographic data has both spatial characteristics and attribute characteristics, and also changes with time. Therefore, the amount of data is very large. Nowadays, many industries and departments in the society are using GIS. However, without proper data analysis and mining scheme, GIS will not exert its maximum effectiveness and will waste a lot of data. In this paper, we use the geographic information demand of a national security department as the experimental object, combining the characteristics of GIS data, taking into account the characteristics of time, space, attributes and so on, and using cluster analysis algorithm. We further study the mining scheme for depth data, and get the algorithm model. This algorithm can automatically classify sample data, and then carry out exploratory analysis. The research shows that the algorithm model and the information mining scheme can quickly find hidden depth information from the surface data of GIS, thus improving the efficiency of the security department. This algorithm can also be extended to other fields.

  12. Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) as a tool for in-depth quantitative gene expression profiling in all organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinartz, Jeanette; Bruyns, Eddy; Lin, Jing-Zhong; Burcham, Tim; Brenner, Sydney; Bowen, Ben; Kramer, Michael; Woychik, Rick

    2002-02-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) is one of the newest tools available for conducting in-depth expression profiling. MPSS is an open-ended platform that analyses the level of expression of virtually all genes in a sample by counting the number of individual mRNA molecules produced from each gene. There is no requirement that genes be identified and characterised prior to conducting an experiment. MPSS has a routine sensitivity at a level of a few molecules of mRNA per cell, and the datasets are in a digital format that simplifies the management and analysis of the data. Therefore, of the various microarray and non-microarray technologies currently available, MPSS provides many advantages for generating the type of complete datasets that will help to facilitate hypothesis-driven experiments in the era of digital biology.

  13. Rapid and in-depth analysis for seismic risk evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Astuti, Novi; Anta Alvita, Meli; Sangadji, Senot; Rahmadi, AP; Purwanto, Edy

    2017-11-01

    The high public demand on housing in urban areas requires the government of Indonesia to adopt a policy of encouraging the development of vertical housing. Cilacap has been allocated Rusunawa (low-income apartment) development in 2006. Evident from some earthquakes occurrence in recent years, however, Cilacap may be seen as an earthquake prone region which posing some risk to this type of vertical structures. The Appropriate strategy should be performed to evaluate the seismic risks of this local government owned four stories low-income apartment. This paper demonstrates two tier evaluation strategy; rapid evaluation and in-depth analysis and compares both results. First evaluation was conducted by means of Building Rapid Visual Screening (RVS) of FEMA 154 of the Rusunawa block A and B. The result was used further to calculate seismic risk score (SR) which exhibit the probability of the building damage given the Maximum Considered Earthquake (MCER) that will occur during the Rusunawa service life. The in-depth analysis was conducted by developing fragility function expressed in the form of fragility curves for the Rusunawa. The fragility shows the probability that certain damage states will be exceeded given the intensity of earthquakes which will occur during building service life. The fragility was developed as lognormal curves in which the building response to earthquake input was analyzed by means of pushover.

  14. He, U, and Th Depth Profiling of Apatite and Zircon Using Laser Ablation Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry and SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, B. D.; van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.; Hervig, R.; Boyce, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Conventional (U-Th)/He thermochronology utilizes single or multiple grain analyses of U- and Th-bearing minerals such as apatite and zircon and does not allow for assessment of spatial variation in concentration of He, U, or Th within individual crystals. As such, age calculation and interpretation require assumptions regarding 4He loss through alpha ejection, diffusive redistribution of 4He, and U and Th distribution as an initial condition for these processes. Although models have been developed to predict 4He diffusion parameters, correct for the effect of alpha ejection on calculated cooling ages, and account for the effect of U and Th zonation within apatite and zircon, measurements of 4He, U, and Th distribution have not been combined within a single crystal. We apply ArF excimer laser ablation, combined with noble gas mass spectrometry, to obtain depth profiles within apatite and zircon crystals in order to assess variations in 4He concentration with depth. Our initial results from pre-cut, pre-heated slabs of Durango apatite, each subjected to different T-t schedules, suggest a general agreement of 4He profiles with those predicted by theoretical diffusion models (Farley, 2000). Depth profiles through unpolished grains give reproducible alpha ejection profiles in Durango apatite that deviate from alpha ejection profiles predicted for ideal, homogenous crystals. SIMS depth profiling utilizes an O2 primary beam capable of sputtering tens of microns and measuring sub-micron resolution variation in [U], [Th], and [Sm]. Preliminary results suggest that sufficient [U] and [Th] zonation is present in Durango apatite to influence the form of the 4He alpha ejection profile. Future work will assess the influence of measured [U] and [Th] zonation on previously measured 4He depth profiles. Farley, K.A., 2000. Helium diffusion from apatite; general behavior as illustrated by Durango fluorapatite. J. Geophys. Res., B Solid Earth Planets 105 (2), 2903-2914.

  15. Linking zircon age to metamorphic stage using U-Pb/REE depth-profiling of zircon combined with Lu-Hf garnet geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sophie; Cottle, John; Smit, Matthijs; Arnush, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    The relatively novel approach of LASS-ICP-MS depth-profiling in zircon has enabled the analysis of sub-micrometer, isotopically/geochemically distinct zircon domains which are too thin to be analyzed by other in situ methods. The depth-profiling approach has proven to be particularly useful in targeting thin and discontinuous metamorphic zircon overgrowths, which are evidently capable of recording multiple short-duration tectonothermal events. Based on our knowledge of rare earth element (REE) partitioning between equilibrium zircon and garnet, it is possible to link LASS depth-profile data to specific metamorphic events, and discern the timing of garnet growth versus garnet breakdown. Here we test the potential of this approach by applying LASS-ICP-MS depth profiling in zircon to samples from the Alpine Schist (New Zealand) that have been dated previously by Lu-Hf garnet geochronology. Our results show that thin (Zealandia microcontinent from East Gondwana during 83 - 52 Ma. These results provide constraints on the P-T-t conditions recorded in the Alpine Schist during this period, with implications for the geodynamic processes involved in microcontinent formation.

  16. Depth profiling of oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures by slant etching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Kazunari; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Kazunori [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Science and Technology; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Nashiyama, Isamu

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the depth profile of trapped charges in an oxide layer on SiC. Using this method, 6H-SiC MOS structures with different oxide thickness were fabricated on the same substrate under the same oxidation condition, and the depth profile of oxide-trapped charges before and after {sup 60}Co-gamma ray irradiation were obtained. It is found, from the depth profiling, that the trapping mechanism of electrons and holes in the oxide strongly depends on the bias polarity during irradiation, and these charges are trapped near 6H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. We believe that this method is very useful for estimation of the oxide-trapped charges in 6H-SiC MOS structures. (author)

  17. Millennial-scale hard rock erosion rates deduced from luminescence-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohbati, R.; Liu, J.; Murray, A. S.; Jain, M.; Pederson, J. L.; Guralnik, B.; Egholm, D. L.; Gupta, S.

    2015-12-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a well-established Quaternary dating method that is conventionally used to determine the time when sedimentary grains were last exposed to daylight. Recently, a very different approach to this concept has helped develop a new technique to estimate the length of time a rock surface was exposed to daylight. When a rock surface is first exposed to daylight the charge population (and so the latent luminescence signal) trapped in its constituent minerals (e.g. quartz and feldspar) starts to decrease. This charge had accumulated due to previous exposure to natural ionizing radiation. As the surface is exposed to light for longer periods, the latent luminescence signal is reduced farther into the rock. In a rock surface which has been exposed to light for a prolonged period (decades to millennia), the remaining luminescence will be zero (fully bleached) at the surface and then increase, initially exponentially, before approaching saturation at a depth where charge detrapping due to light penetration is negligible compared to the rate of charge trapping due to the environmental dose rate. By modelling the characteristic shape of luminescence resetting with depth into rock surfaces, Sohbati et al. (2012) proposed a new surface-exposure dating technique based on OSL. Here we further develop the current model to include the effect of erosion rate on luminescence-depth profiles. By fitting the model to local known-age calibration samples, we first determine the site-specific resetting rates of the luminescence signal at rock surfaces. We then use the calibration values in a numerical model to derive the steady-state erosion rate for rocks of different mineralogy and different geological settings. The preliminary erosion rates obtained from glacial and landslide granite boulders from the Chinese Pamir Plateau are ~1 mm.ka-1, whereas active streambeds of Permian sandstone in the Grabens district of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, are

  18. Multicriteria Similarity-Based Anomaly Detection Using Pareto Depth Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ko-Jen; Xu, Kevin S; Calder, Jeff; Hero, Alfred O

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of identifying patterns in a data set that exhibits anomalous behavior, often referred to as anomaly detection. Similarity-based anomaly detection algorithms detect abnormally large amounts of similarity or dissimilarity, e.g., as measured by the nearest neighbor Euclidean distances between a test sample and the training samples. In many application domains, there may not exist a single dissimilarity measure that captures all possible anomalous patterns. In such cases, multiple dissimilarity measures can be defined, including nonmetric measures, and one can test for anomalies by scalarizing using a nonnegative linear combination of them. If the relative importance of the different dissimilarity measures are not known in advance, as in many anomaly detection applications, the anomaly detection algorithm may need to be executed multiple times with different choices of weights in the linear combination. In this paper, we propose a method for similarity-based anomaly detection using a novel multicriteria dissimilarity measure, the Pareto depth. The proposed Pareto depth analysis (PDA) anomaly detection algorithm uses the concept of Pareto optimality to detect anomalies under multiple criteria without having to run an algorithm multiple times with different choices of weights. The proposed PDA approach is provably better than using linear combinations of the criteria, and shows superior performance on experiments with synthetic and real data sets.

  19. Molecular depth profiling in ice matrices using C{sub 60} projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, A.; Sun, S.; Szakal, C.; Winograd, N

    2004-06-15

    The prospects of molecular sputter depth profiling using C{sub 60}{sup +} projectiles were investigated on thick ice layers prepared by freezing aqueous solutions of histamine onto a metal substrate. The samples were analyzed in a ToF-SIMS spectrometer equipped with a liquid metal Ga{sup +} ion source and a newly developed fullerene ion source. The C{sub 60}{sup +} beam was used to erode the surface, while static ToF-SIMS spectra were taken with both ion beams alternatively between sputtering cycles. We find that the signals both related to the ice matrix and to the histamine are about two orders of magnitude higher under 20-keV C{sub 60} than under 15-keV Ga bombardment. Histamine related molecular signals are found to increase drastically if the freshly introduced surface is pre-sputtered with C{sub 60} ions, until at a total ion fluence of about 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} the spectra are completely dominated by the molecular ion and characteristic fragments of histamine. At larger fluence, the signal is found to decrease with a disappearance cross section of approximately 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}, until at total fluences of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} a steady state with stable molecular signals is reached. In contrast, no appreciable molecular signal could be observed if Ga{sup +} ions were used to erode the surface.

  20. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  1. Defect production in ion-implanted yttria-stabilized zirconia investigated by positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saude, S.; Grynszpan, R.I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G

    2004-11-17

    The presence and evolution of free-volume defects induced during ion-implantation in solids can be a critical issue in micro- and nano-technology processes. Using a slow positron beam and measuring the energy-line Doppler broadening (DB) of the annihilation radiation, sub-surface investigations were carried out on single crystals of yttria-fully stabilized zirconia (Y-FSZ), following implantation of 210 keV oxygen-ions at fluences ranging from 1.0 x 10{sup 13} to 2.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Depth profiles of the DB-lineshape S reveal a defect peak at 60 % of the oxygen-ion projected range R{sub p}, i.e., closer to the surface than the vacancy distribution derived from Monte-Carlo calculations. The S-dependence on the fluence exhibits three defect-production stages already identified after implantation with noble gas ions. The intermediate stage (0.1-1 displacements per atom (dpa)) displays a trapping saturation plateau, which rises with increasing ion mass, suggesting a specific critical size for the relevant dominant defect. A slight drop in defect concentration that follows indicates that defects of the last stage (above 2 dpa), are formed at the expense of former ones. No particular effect due to the self-ion is found.

  2. Structural and magnetic depth profiles of magneto-ionic heterostructures beyond the interface limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, DA; Grutter, AJ; Arenholz, E; Liu, K; Kirby, BJ; Borchers, JA; Maranville, BB

    2016-07-22

    Electric field control of magnetism provides a promising route towards ultralow power information storage and sensor technologies. The effects of magneto-ionic motion have been prominently featured in the modification of interface characteristics. Here, we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling moderated by voltage-driven oxygen migration beyond the interface in relatively thick AlOx/GdOx/Co(15 nm) films. Oxygen migration and Co magnetization are quantitatively mapped with polarized neutron reflectometry under electro-thermal conditioning. The depth-resolved profiles uniquely identify interfacial and bulk behaviours and a semi-reversible control of the magnetization. Magnetometry measurements suggest changes in the microstructure which disrupt long-range ferromagnetic ordering, resulting in an additional magnetically soft phase. X-ray spectroscopy confirms changes in the Co oxidation state, but not in the Gd, suggesting that the GdOx transmits oxygen but does not source or sink it. These results together provide crucial insight into controlling magnetism via magneto-ionic motion, both at interfaces and throughout the bulk of the films.

  3. Gallium In-Depth Profile in Bromine- Etched Copper-Indium-Galium-(Di)selenide (CIGS) Thin Films Inspected Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravicini, Jacopo; Acciarri, Maurizio; Lomuscio, Alberto; Murabito, Matteo; Le Donne, Alessia; Gasparotto, Andrea; Binetti, Simona

    2017-06-01

    In the thin film solar cells domain, copper indium galium (di)selenide (CIGS) is a material with well-established photovoltaic purpose. Here the presence of a suitable [Ga]/([Ga]+[In]) (GGI) in-depth profile has proved to play a key role in the performance of cells. The implementation of a routine method based on reliable but easily available experimental techniques is mandatory to obtain information on the GGI profile of any CIGS layer, in order to achieve high efficiency chalcogenide layers. In this vein, we here propose and systematically test a simple method for the GGI profile determination based on repeated bromine etching of CIGS thin films followed by Raman analysis of the A 1 peak position. The reliability of the proposed approach is verified using a methodical comparison with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles, showing a good agreement with the GGI in-depth profiles determined using Raman analysis on bromine etched samples.

  4. Depth of manual dismantling analysis: A cost–benefit approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achillas, Ch.; Aidonis, D.; Vlachokostas, Ch.; Karagiannidis, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Loulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A mathematical modeling tool for OEMs. ► The tool can be used by OEMs, recyclers of electr(on)ic equipment or WEEE management systems’ regulators. ► The tool makes use of cost–benefit analysis in order to determine the optimal depth of product disassembly. ► The reusable materials and the quantity of metals and plastics recycled can be quantified in an easy-to-comprehend manner. - Abstract: This paper presents a decision support tool for manufacturers and recyclers towards end-of-life strategies for waste electrical and electronic equipment. A mathematical formulation based on the cost benefit analysis concept is herein analytically described in order to determine the parts and/or components of an obsolete product that should be either non-destructively recovered for reuse or be recycled. The framework optimally determines the depth of disassembly for a given product, taking into account economic considerations. On this basis, it embeds all relevant cost elements to be included in the decision-making process, such as recovered materials and (depreciated) parts/components, labor costs, energy consumption, equipment depreciation, quality control and warehousing. This tool can be part of the strategic decision-making process in order to maximize profitability or minimize end-of-life management costs. A case study to demonstrate the models’ applicability is presented for a typical electronic product in terms of structure and material composition. Taking into account the market values of the pilot product’s components, the manual disassembly is proven profitable with the marginal revenues from recovered reusable materials to be estimated at 2.93–23.06 €, depending on the level of disassembly

  5. Dating of archaeological flints by fluorine depth profiling: new insights into the mechanism of fluorine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, P.; Menu, M.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    To understand the mechanism underlying fluorination of buried archaeological flints, samples of amorphous silica have been subjected to fluorine incorporation either by aqueous treatment or by ion implantation. The nuclear reaction analysis technique using the resonant 19 F(p, αγ) 16 O reaction at 872 keV has been used to obtain profiles of fluorine with an automated electrostatic energy scanning system. Our results emphasize the role of defects for F uptake and allow us to propose a tentative mechanism for F diffusion. The use of synthetic hydrated silica appears promising to simulate the geochemical weathering of chalcedony. (orig.)

  6. Nanometric resolution in glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiling of metal (Cr, Al) nitride multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; Gago, R.; Fornies, E.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Climent Font, A.; Albella, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we address the capability of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) for fast and accurate depth profiling of multilayer nitride coatings down to the nanometer range. This is shown by resolving the particular case of CrN/AlN structures with individual thickness ranging from hundreds to few nanometers. In order to discriminate and identify artefacts in the GDOES depth profile due to the sputtering process, the layered structures were verified by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfaces in the GDOES profiles for CrN/AlN structures are sharper than the ones measured for similar metal multilayers due to the lower sputtering rate of the nitrides. However, as a consequence of the crater shape, there is a linear degradation of the depth resolution with depth (approximately 40 nm/μm), saturating at a value of approximately half the thickness of the thinner layer. This limit is imposed by the simultaneous sputtering of consecutive layers. The ultimate GDOES depth resolution at the near surface region was estimated to be of 4-6 nm

  7. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations : part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; George, Nibu A.; Qiu, Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K.

    2009-01-01

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is

  8. Quantitative depth profiling of photoacid generators in photoresist materials by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Vivek M.; Sambasivan, Sharadha; Fischer, Daniel; Sundberg, Linda K.; Allen, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to quantify the surface composition and depth profiling of photoacid generators in thin film photoresist materials by varying the entrance-grid bias of a partial electron yield detector. By considering model compositional profiles, NEXAFS distinguishes the surface molar excess within the top 6 nm from the bulk. A surface enriched system, triphenylsulfonium perfluorooctanesulfonate, is contrasted with a perfluorobutanesulfonate photoacid generator, which displays an appreciable surface profile within a 6 nm segregation length scale. These results, while applied to 193-nm photoresist materials, highlight a general approach to quantify NEXAFS partial electron yield data

  9. SIMS as a new methodology to depth profile helium in as-implanted and annealed pure bcc metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorondy-Novak, S.; Jomard, F.; Prima, F.; Lefaix-Jeuland, H.

    2017-05-01

    Reliable He profiles are highly desirable for better understanding helium behavior in materials for future nuclear applications. Recently, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) allowed the characterization of helium distribution in as-implanted metallic systems. The Cs+ primary ion beam coupled with CsHe+ molecular detector appeared to be a promising technique which overcomes the very high He ionization potential. In this study, 4He depth profiles in pure body centered cubic (bcc) metals (V, Fe, Ta, Nb and Mo) as-implanted and annealed, were obtained by SIMS. All as-implanted samples exhibited a projected range of around 200 nm, in agreement with SRIM theoretical calculations. After annealing treatment, SIMS measurements evidenced the evolution of helium depth profile with temperature. The latter SIMS results were compared to the helium bubble distribution obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This study confirmed the great potential of this experimental procedure as a He-depth profiling technique in bcc metals. Indeed, the methodology described in this work could be extended to other materials including metallic and non-metallic compounds. Nevertheless, the quantification of helium concentration after annealing treatment by SIMS remains uncertain probably due to the non-uniform ionization efficiency in samples containing large bubbles.

  10. SIMS as a new methodology to depth profile helium in as-implanted and annealed pure bcc metals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorondy-Novak, S. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jomard, F. [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, UVSQ, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles cedex (France); Prima, F. [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech – CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 75005 Paris (France); Lefaix-Jeuland, H., E-mail: helene.lefaix@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-05-01

    Reliable He profiles are highly desirable for better understanding helium behavior in materials for future nuclear applications. Recently, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) allowed the characterization of helium distribution in as-implanted metallic systems. The Cs{sup +} primary ion beam coupled with CsHe{sup +} molecular detector appeared to be a promising technique which overcomes the very high He ionization potential. In this study, {sup 4}He depth profiles in pure body centered cubic (bcc) metals (V, Fe, Ta, Nb and Mo) as-implanted and annealed, were obtained by SIMS. All as-implanted samples exhibited a projected range of around 200 nm, in agreement with SRIM theoretical calculations. After annealing treatment, SIMS measurements evidenced the evolution of helium depth profile with temperature. The latter SIMS results were compared to the helium bubble distribution obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This study confirmed the great potential of this experimental procedure as a He-depth profiling technique in bcc metals. Indeed, the methodology described in this work could be extended to other materials including metallic and non-metallic compounds. Nevertheless, the quantification of helium concentration after annealing treatment by SIMS remains uncertain probably due to the non-uniform ionization efficiency in samples containing large bubbles.

  11. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution....... In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range...

  12. SIMS of Organic Materials—Interface Location in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles Using Negative Secondary Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, R.; Seah, M. P.; Tiddia, M.; Gilmore, I. S.

    2018-02-01

    A procedure has been established to define the interface position in depth profiles accurately when using secondary ion mass spectrometry and the negative secondary ions. The interface position varies strongly with the extent of the matrix effect and so depends on the secondary ion measured. Intensity profiles have been measured at both fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-uc(l)-pentafluorophenylalanine (FMOC) to Irganox 1010 and Irganox 1010 to FMOC interfaces for many secondary ions. These profiles show separations of the two interfaces that vary over some 10 nm depending on the secondary ion selected. The shapes of these profiles are strongly governed by matrix effects, slightly weakened by a long wavelength roughening. The matrix effects are separately measured using homogeneous, known mixtures of these two materials. Removal of the matrix and roughening effects give consistent compositional profiles for all ions that are described by an integrated exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) profile. Use of a simple integrated Gaussian may lead to significant errors. The average interface positions in the compositional profiles are determined to standard uncertainties of 0.19 and 0.14 nm, respectively, using the integrated EMG function. Alternatively, and more simply, it is shown that interface positions and profiles may be deduced from data for several secondary ions with measured matrix factors by simply extrapolating the result to Ξ = 0. Care must be taken in quoting interface resolutions since those measured for predominantly Gaussian interfaces with Ξ above or below zero, without correction, appear significantly better than the true resolution.

  13. Collaboration in sensor network research: an in-depth longitudinal analysis of assortative mixing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alberto; Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-09-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a relatively small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research centerin the development and application of wireless and sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortative mixing of selected node characteristics, unveiling the researchers' propensity to collaborate preferentially with others with a similar academic profile. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  14. Collecting optical coherence elastography depth profiles with a micromachined cantilever probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavan, D.C.; Mo, J.; de Groot, M.; Meijering, A.E.C.; de Boer, J.F.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental setup that combines optical coherence elastography depth sensing with atomic force microscope indentation. The instrument relies on a miniaturized cantilever probe that compresses a sample with a small footprint force and simultaneously collects an optical coherence

  15. Quantification of groundwater-stream water interactions based on temperature depth profiles under strong upwelling conditions in a sand-bed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, Jaime; Lewandowski, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of groundwater-surface water interactions is not only required for budgets but also for an understanding of the complex relations between hyporheic exchange flows (HEF) and the associated chemical and biological processes that take place in hyporheic zones (HZ). Thus, there is a strong need to improve methods for flux estimation.The present study aims to quantify the vertical fluxes across the riverbed from data of temperature depth profiles recorded at the River Schlaube in East Brandenburg, Germany. In order to test the capabilities and limitations of existing methods, fluxes were calculated with an analytical (VFLUX, based on the amplitude attenuation and phase shift analysis) and a numerical (1DTempPro, parametrization based on observed values) approach for heat conduction. We conclude that the strong limitations of the flux estimates are caused by thermal and hydraulic heterogeneities of the sediment properties. Consequently, upscaling of fluxes must include other thermal techniques able to portray the spatial variability of thermal patterns, along with further developments of methods to link thermal depth profiles, thermal patterns of the surface of the streambed and all the other factors involved. Considering time and costs of temperature depth profiles of riverbeds, and the need for multiple devices to cover larger areas, it is additionally tested whether vertical fluxes can be infered from the uppermost temperature sensors of a data set. That would ease hyporheic investigations at larger scales.

  16. Silver/oxygen depth profile in coins by using laser ablation, mass quadrupole spectrometer and X-rays fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Sayed, R.; Gentile, C.; Mondio, G.; Serafino, T.; Castrizio, E.D.

    2013-01-01

    Silver coins belonging to different historical periods were investigated to determine the Ag/O atomic ratio depth profiles. Laser ablation has been employed to remove, in high vacuum, the first superficial layers of the coins. Mass quadrupole spectrometry has been used to detect the Ag and the O atomic elements vaporized from the coin surface. The depth profile allowed to determine the thickness of the oxidation layer indicating that, in general, it is high in old coins. A complementary technique, using scanning electron microscope and the associated XRF microprobe, have been devoted to confirm the measurements of Ag/O atomic ratio measured with the laser-coupled mass spectrometry. The oxidation layer thicknesses range between about 25 and 250 microns.

  17. Quantitative analysis of oxygen depth distribution by means of deuteron reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyumin, A.N.; Eremin, V.K.; Konnikov, S.G.

    1993-01-01

    Experimentally are investigated and realized possibilities for using the reaction for quantitative determination of the depth profiles of the oxygen distribution in HTSC structures in layers up to 10 4 A. It is concluded that in the near-surface layers when profiling the oxygen content is achieved the spatial resolution of 150 A

  18. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of sputtering induced surface roughness and its influence on AES depth profiles of polycrystalline Ni/Cu multilayer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X.L.; Coetsee, E. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P O Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063, Guangdong (China); Swart, H.C., E-mail: swartHC@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P O Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Terblans, J.J., E-mail: terblansjj@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P O Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Linear Least Square (LLS) method used to separate Ni and Cu Auger spectra. • The depth-dependent ion sputtering induced roughness was quantitatively evaluated. • The depth resolution better when profiling with dual-ion beam vs. a single-ion beam. • AES depth profiling with a lower ion energy results in a better depth resolution. - Abstract: The polycrystalline Ni/Cu multilayer thin films consisting of 8 alternating layers of Ni and Cu were deposited on a SiO{sub 2} substrate by means of electron beam evaporation in a high vacuum. Concentration-depth profiles of the as-deposited multilayered Ni/Cu thin films were determined with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in combination with Ar{sup +} ion sputtering, under various bombardment conditions with the samples been stationary as well as rotating in some cases. The Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI) model used for the fittings of the concentration-depth profiles accounts for the interface broadening of the experimental depth profiling. The interface broadening incorporates the effects of atomic mixing, surface roughness and information depth of the Auger electrons. The roughness values extracted from the MRI model fitting of the depth profiling data agrees well with those measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ion sputtering induced surface roughness during the depth profiling was accordingly quantitatively evaluated from the fitted MRI parameters with sample rotation and stationary conditions. The depth resolutions of the AES depth profiles were derived directly from the values determined by the fitting parameters in the MRI model.

  20. Quantitative estimation of nonmonotonic residual stress depth-profiles using an extended Kypris-Jiles model of the magnetic Barkhausen noise spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaosa, Aitor; Gurruchaga, Kizkitza; Arizti, Fernando; Martínez-de-Guerenu, Ane

    2018-01-01

    Using nondestructive techniques to quantitatively estimate residual stresses along the depth is necessary to improve the ability to predict the real fatigue life of pieces for many applications. Magnetic Barkhausen noise has been proven to successfully estimate the residual stress at the surface produced by machining, plastic deformation, phase transformation or surface treatments such as shot peening, also allowing one to obtain information of the residual stress depth-profile in shot peened pieces which presented similar depth-profile shapes. However, residual stress depth-profiles with nonmonotonic or different shapes have not been successfully estimated. In the present study, an extended approach is developed in order to estimate these stresses independent of the shape of the residual stress depth-profile. The approach proposed here improves an existing model of the Barkhausen noise spectrum (Kypris-Jiles model) by adding the effect of the attenuation of the applied magnetic field on the Barkhausen noise. This extended approach is used to estimate the residual stress depth-profiles of samples with different depth-profiles using a calibration process. The approach is validated by estimating the residual stress depth-profiles, with errors smaller than 70 MPa in a depth of 130 μm, in all the samples studied.

  1. Condition and biochemical profile of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) cultured at different depths in a cold water coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardi, Daria; Mills, Terry; Donnet, Sebastien; Parrish, Christopher C.; Murray, Harry M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth and health of cultured blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are affected by environmental conditions. Typically, culture sites are situated in sheltered areas near shore (i.e., 20 m depth) mussel culture has been growing. This study evaluated the effect of culture depth on blue mussels in a cold water coastal environment (Newfoundland, Canada). Culture depth was examined over two years from September 2012 to September 2014; mussels from three shallow water (5 m) and three deep water (15 m) sites were compared for growth and biochemical composition; culture depths were compared for temperature and chlorophyll a. Differences between the two years examined were noted, possibly due to harsh winter conditions in the second year of the experiment. In both years shallow and deep water mussels presented similar condition; in year 2 deep water mussels had a significantly better biochemical profile. Lipid and glycogen analyses showed seasonal variations, but no significant differences between shallow and deep water were noted. Fatty acid profiles showed a significantly higher content of omega-3 s (20:5ω3; EPA) and lower content of bacterial fatty acids in deep water sites in year 2. Everything considered, deep water appeared to provide a more favorable environment for mussel growth than shallow water under harsher weather conditions.

  2. Depth profiling of hydrogen in ferritic/martensitic steels by means of a tritium imaging plate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Teppei; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We applied a tritium imaging plate technique to depth profiling of hydrogen in bulk. ► Changes of hydrogen depth profiles in the steel by thermal annealing were examined. ► We proposed a release model of plasma-loaded hydrogen in the steel. ► Hydrogen is trapped at trapping sites newly developed by plasma loading. ► Hydrogen is also trapped at surface oxides and hardly desorbed by thermal annealing. -- Abstract: In order to understand how hydrogen loaded by plasma in F82H is removed by annealing at elevated temperatures in vacuum, depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen were examined by means of a tritium imaging plate technique. Owing to large hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H, the plasma-loaded hydrogen easily penetrates into a deeper region becoming solute hydrogen and desorbs by thermal annealing in vacuum. However the plasma-loading creates new hydrogen trapping sites having larger trapping energy than that for the intrinsic sites beyond the projected range of the loaded hydrogen. Some surface oxides also trap an appreciable amount of hydrogen which is more difficult to remove by the thermal annealing

  3. Depth profiling of residual activity of ^{237}U fragments as a range verification technique for ^{238}U primary ion beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and simulation data concerning fragmentation of ^{238}U ion beam in aluminum, copper, and stainless-steel targets with the initial energy 500 and 950  MeV/u are collected in the paper. A range-verification technique based on depth profiling of residual activity is presented. The irradiated targets were constructed in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. One of the purposes of these experiments was depth profiling of residual activity of induced nuclides and projectile fragments. Among the projectile fragments, special attention is paid to the ^{237}U isotope that has a range very close to the range of the primary ^{238}U ions. Therefore, the depth profiling of the ^{237}U isotope can be utilized for experimental verification of the ^{238}U primary-beam range, which is demonstrated and discussed in the paper. The experimental data are compared with computer simulations by FLUKA, SRIM, and ATIMA, as well as with complementary experiments.

  4. Modal depth function estimation using time-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, J; Gervaise, C; Roux, P; Nicolas, B; Mars, J I

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic propagation in shallow water is characterized by a set of depth-dependent modes, the modal depth functions, which propagate in range according to their horizontal wavenumbers. For inversion purposes, modal depth function estimation in shallow water is an issue when the environment is not known. Classical methods that provide blind mode estimation rely on the singular value decomposition of the received field at different frequencies over a vertical array of transducers. These methods require that the vertical array spans the full water column. This is obviously a strong limitation for the application of such methods in an operational context. To overcome these shortcomings, this study proposes to replace the spatial diversity constraint by a frequency diversity condition, and thus considers the case of a field emanating from an impulsive source. Indeed, because of the discrete nature of the wavenumber spectrum and due to their dispersive behavior, the modes are separated in the time-frequency domain. This phenomenon enables the design of a modal filtering scheme for signals received on a single receiver. In the case of a vertical receiver array, the modal contributions can be isolated for each receiver even when using a partial water column spanning array. This method thus eliminates the receiving constraints of classical methods of modal depth function estimation, although it imposes the use of an impulsive source. The developed algorithm is benchmarked on numerical simulations and validated on laboratory experimental data recorded in an ultrasonic waveguide. Practical applications are also discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  5. Spectral Depth Analysis of some Segments of the Bida Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-16

    Dec 16, 2017 ... lateral discontinuities in the basement and other features differing in magnetic susceptibilities such as dykes, faults, ... Commercial License (CC-BY-NC), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original .... developed the depth determination method which.

  6. Depth Compensation Model for Gaze Estimation in Sport Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batista Narcizo, Fabricio; Hansen, Dan Witzner

    2015-01-01

    A depth compensation model is presented as a novel approach to reduce the effects of parallax error for head-mounted eye trackers. The method can reduce the parallax error when the distance between the user and the target is prior known. The model is geometrically presented and its performance is...

  7. Analysis of experimental data sets for local scour depth around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of soft computing techniques to analyse and interpret the experimental data of local scour depth around bridge abutment, measured at different laboratory conditions and environment, is presented. The scour around bridge piers and abutments is, in the majority of cases, the main reason for bridge failures.

  8. Depth information in natural environments derived from optic flow by insect motion detection system: A model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eSchwegmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowing the depth structure of the environment is crucial for moving animals in many behavioral contexts, such as collision avoidance, targeting objects, or spatial navigation. An important source of depth information is motion parallax. This powerful cue is generated on the eyes during translatory self-motion with the retinal images of nearby objects moving faster than those of distant ones. To investigate how the visual motion pathway represents motion-based depth information we analyzed its responses to image sequences recorded in natural cluttered environments with a wide range of depth structures. The analysis was done on the basis of an experimentally validated model of the visual motion pathway of insects, with its core elements being correlation-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs. It is the key result of our analysis that the absolute EMD responses, i.e. the motion energy profile, represent the contrast-weighted nearness of environmental structures during translatory self-motion at a roughly constant velocity. In other words, the output of the EMD array highlights contours of nearby objects. This conclusion is largely independent of the scale over which EMDs are spatially pooled and was corroborated by scrutinizing the motion energy profile after eliminating the depth structure from the natural image sequences. Hence, the well-established dependence of correlation-type EMDs on both velocity and textural properties of motion stimuli appears to be advantageous for representing behaviorally relevant information about the environment in a computationally parsimonious way.

  9. Unperturbed, high spatial resolution measurement of Radon-222 in soil-gas depth profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitev, K; Dutsov, Ch; Georgiev, S; Boshkova, T; Pressyanov, D

    2018-02-15

    This work presents a method for measuring the depth distribution of 222 Rn activity in soil gas. The method is based on the capacity of polycarbonates to absorb 222 Rn and on the possibility of performing sensitive measurements of 222 Rn absorbed by the polycarbonates via liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The method is the following: cylindrical holes are drilled along a metal rod and Makrofol ® N polycarbonate foils enclosed in polyethylene envelopes are placed in each hole. The rod is driven into the soil and kept for a certain time. As long as the rod is in the soil, the polycarbonate foils are exposed to the 222 Rn concentration at their depth. At the end of the exposure the rod is pulled out and the foils are transferred to liquid scintillation (LS) vials filled with liquid scintillator. The 222 Rn absorbed in the foils is then measured with a LS analyzer. The rod with the polycarbonate foils acts as a passive probe which senses the 222 Rn concentration at different depths beneath the ground surface. The achievable minimum detectable 222 Rn activity concentration with the equipment and conditions used in this study is around 12.5 kBq/m 3 . It can easily be lowered below 1 kBq/m 3 if larger foils and low-background LS analyzers are used. Since the method does not require air sampling the depth distribution of 222 Rn in the soil is unperturbed by the sampling. The spatial distribution and the maximum measurement depth are set by the distance between the holes and the depth to which the rod can be fixed into the ground. Results from in situ applications of the method in terrains with high 222 Rn in soil-gas are reported, which demonstrate the feasibility and the usefulness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertania, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-01-01

    Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (X-max), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the

  11. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobre, C., E-mail: clement.lobre@cea.fr [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jalabert, D. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UMR 7588 du CNRS, Universite de Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Mollard, L. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Jouneau, P.H. [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble 1 UMR-E, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ballet, P. [CEA-Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-10-15

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg{sub 0.77}Cd{sub 0.23}Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic.

  12. Quantitative damage depth profiles in arsenic implanted HgCdTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobre, C.; Jalabert, D.; Vickridge, I.; Briand, E.; Benzeggouta, D.; Mollard, L.; Jouneau, P.H.; Ballet, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering experiments under channeling conditions (RBS-c) have been carried out on Hg 0.77 Cd 0.23 Te (MCT) layers implanted with arsenic. Accurate damage profiles have been extracted through a simple formalism for implanted and annealed layers. Quantitative damage profiles are correlated with structural defects observed by bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and chemical composition measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Evolution of damage for increasing ion implantation fluence has been investigated by these three complementary techniques. Evidence is found of irradiation induced annealing during implantation. A fast damage recovery has been observed for post-implantation thermal anneals. In the case of an implanted layer annealed during 1 h, the damage profile, associated with arsenic concentration measurements, indicates the presence of complexes involving arsenic

  13. Improvement of Depth Profiling into Biotissues Using Micro Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy on a Needle with Selective Passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joho Yun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A micro electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS-on-a-needle for depth profiling (μEoN-DP with a selective passivation layer (SPL on a hypodermic needle was recently fabricated to measure the electrical impedance of biotissues along with the penetration depths. The SPL of the μEoN-DP enabled the sensing interdigitated electrodes (IDEs to contribute predominantly to the measurement by reducing the relative influence of the connection lines on the sensor output. The discrimination capability of the μEoN-DP was verified using phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at various concentration levels. The resistance and capacitance extracted through curve fitting were similar to those theoretically estimated based on the mixing ratio of PBS and deionized water; the maximum discrepancies were 8.02% and 1.85%, respectively. Depth profiling was conducted using four-layered porcine tissue to verify the effectiveness of the discrimination capability of the μEoN-DP. The magnitude and phase between dissimilar porcine tissues (fat and muscle were clearly discriminated at the optimal frequency of 1 MHz. Two kinds of simulations, one with SPL and the other with complete passivation layer (CPL, were performed, and it was verified that the SPL was advantageous over CPL in the discrimination of biotissues in terms of sensor output.

  14. The Pearson IV distribution and its application to ion implanted depth profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The Pearson IV distribution system is analyzed to determine the regions of validity for the values of the moments that produce convex, concave, more pointed than Gaussian, and more flat-topped than Gaussian distributions; the limits beyond which no significant change in distribution is produced; and excluded regions. These regions are illustrated in a figure that can be used to facilitate the determination of the Pearson IV moments for experimental ion implanted depth distributions. Examples are given of Pearson IV distributions to illustrate the effects of the ranges of skewness, kurtosis, and standard deviation, for both more pointed and more flat-topped than Gaussian distributions. A procedure is described for matching experimental ion implanted depth distributions to computer plotted Pearson IV modified Gaussian distributions. A few experimental curves are given to illustrate the different types of Pearson IV curves, and accuracies of moments are discussed. (author)

  15. A search for thermal excursions from ancient extraterrestrial impacts using Hadean zircon Ti-U-Th-Pb depth profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Sunshine S; Harrison, T Mark; Schmitt, Axel K; Mojzsis, Stephen J

    2012-08-21

    Few terrestrial localities preserve more than a trace lithic record prior to ca. 3.8 Ga greatly limiting our understanding of the first 700 Ma of Earth history, a period inferred to have included a spike in the bolide flux to the inner solar system at ca. 3.85-3.95 Ga (the Late Heavy Bombardment, LHB). An accessible record of this era may be found in Hadean detrital zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia, in the form of μm-scale epitaxial overgrowths. By comparing crystallization temperatures of pre-3.8 Ga zircon overgrowths to the archive of zircon temperature spectra, it should, in principle, be possible to identify a distinctive impact signature. We have developed Ti-U-Th-Pb ion microprobe depth profiling to obtain age and temperature information within these zircon overgrowths and undertaken a feasibility study of its possible use in identifying impact events. Of eight grains profiled in this fashion, four have overgrowths of LHB-era age. Age vs. temperature profiles reveal a period between ca. 3.85-3.95 Ga (i.e., LHB era) characterized by significantly higher temperatures (approximately 840-875 °C) than do older or younger zircons or zircon domains (approximately 630-750 °C). However, temperatures approaching 900 °C can result in Pb isotopic exchange rendering interpretation of these profiles nonunique. Coupled age-temperature depth profiling shows promise in this role, and the preliminary data we report could represent the first terrestrial evidence for impact-related heating during the LHB.

  16. SIMS depth profile correction for the study of the first step of the diffusion of boron in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, B.; Dupuy, J. C.; Semmache, B.; Prudon, G.

    1998-07-01

    The analysis by secondary ions mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a powerful tool for the study of the diffusion of boron in silicon. It has been extensively used in order to determine diffusion coefficients. Most of the time, the SIMS profiles used to calculate the diffusion coefficients are sufficiently large so that the SIMS analysis do not modify the real concentration distribution in a significant manner. But more and more, the first steps of the diffusion are to be considered in order to obtain very thin diffused structures. In that case, where very thin layers are analyzed by SIMS, it is no more possible to measure directly the real concentration distribution because the SIMS analysis modify it rather significantly. When the real width or the real shape of the analyzed layers is needed, the measured profile has to be corrected in some way. We show that in the case of Gaussian original profiles, the SIMS profiles can be efficiently corrected, and the exact second order moment of the profile determined from the measured profile until the original second order moment is as low as 20 Å. This can be done by the study of the properties of the convolution of the profiles by the SIMS analysis response function. In the case of non-Gaussian profiles, the real shape and width of the profiles can be determined by a deconvolution procedure that we have previously described. (B. Gautier, J.C. Dupuy, G. Prudon, J.P. Vallard, C. Dubois, Proceedings of SIMS X, The International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy and Related Techniques, Wiley, Chichester, 1996, pp. 443; B. Gautier, R. Prost, J.C. Dupuy, G. Prudon, Surface and Interface Analysis 24 (11) (1996) 733). This procedure is applied to the case of the SIMS measurement of δ-doped layers of boron in silicon before and after rapid thermal annealing (RTA).

  17. Individual Profiling Using Text Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    for author profiling techniques, many of which give rise to deep ethical considerations. A company or organisation could use an author profiling tool...characteristics. Law enforcement could potentially use such a system to link on-line criminal behaviour with individuals. Studies have already investigated the...positive demeanour [17]. Conversational elements have also been shown to be useful [16, 14, 15]. It is also possible to code for behaviour in online media

  18. Depth profile distribution of Cr, Cu, Co, Ni and Pb in the sediment cores of Mumbai Harbour Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhuparna, D.; Hemalatha, P.; Raj, Sanu S.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine and coastal sediments act as ultimate sink for trace metals that are discharged into the aquatic environment. Sources of environmental contaminants to the coastal system are numerous and may enter the estuarine environment via a number of pathways Mumbai Harbour Bay on the western coast of India, receives low level nuclear wastes and industrial and domestic sewage waste from the surrounding dwellings. Also, the bay is extensively exploited for various other local activities. The present study was carried out in the bay sediment cores to investigate the depth profile distribution of trace element concentration. Biologically significant toxic elements such as Cr, Cu, Co, Ni and Pb were estimated in the sediment cores to find out pattern of distribution in the sediment bed to follow the accumulation of elements with respect to depth

  19. Magnetic depth profiling of an exchange bias system: X-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity of FeMn/Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueck, Sebastian; Ferreras-Paz, Valeriano; Goering, Eberhard; Schuetz, Gisela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    X-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity (XRMR) extends reflectivity by the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism as additional contrast thus providing element selective magnetic depth information. This makes it a perfect tool to investigate magnetic coupling effects in multi-layered systems. Such systems are for example ferromagnet-antiferromagnet bilayers which can show an exchange coupling between the two layers, the so called exchange bias effect. We present results on Co/FeMn bilayers which have been investigated by XRMR at the BESSY II synchrotron, Berlin. The bilayers were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on a Cu(100) single crystal which ensures epitaxial growth of both FeMn (in the antiferromagnetic phase) and Co. The magnetic depth profile for room temperature and for 120 K is investigated with respect to changes of the exchange coupling.

  20. Regression analysis of growth responses to water depth in three wetland plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian K; Tanner, Chris C; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    ) differing in depth preferences in wetlands, using non-linear and quantile regression analyses to establish how flooding tolerance can explain field zonation. Methodology Plants were established for 8 months in outdoor cultures in waterlogged soil without standing water, and then randomly allocated to water...... depths from 0 – 0.5 m. Morphological and growth responses to depth were followed for 54 days before harvest, and then analysed by repeated measures analysis of covariance, and non-linear and quantile regression analysis (QRA), to compare flooding tolerances. Principal results Growth responses to depth...... differed between the three species, and were non-linear. P. tenax growth rapidly decreased in standing water > 0.25 m depth, C. secta growth increased initially with depth but then decreased at depths > 0.30 m, accompanied by increased shoot height and decreased shoot density, and T. orientalis...

  1. Understanding of CO{sub 2} interaction with thermally grown SiO{sub 2} on Si using IBA depth profiling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deokar, Geetanjali; D’Angelo, Marie; Briand, Emrick [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Deville Cavellin, Catherine, E-mail: deville@univ-paris12.fr [INSP, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris F-75005 (France); Faculté des Sciences et Technologie UPEC, 61 Av., De Gaulle, Créteil F-94010 (France)

    2013-06-01

    Interactions between CO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} films thermally grown on Si have been studied using {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as isotopic tracers associated with ion beam analysis (IBA) depth profiling techniques. From secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements no carbon from CO{sub 2} is detected in the silica while it is found in Si. These results suggest that CO{sub 2} diffuses through the silica. Exchanges of oxygen between CO{sub 2} and silica can be observed from {sup 18}O to {sup 16}O SIMS signals variation. The oxygen concentration depth profiles were determined quantitatively using the narrow resonance near 151 keV in the {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N nuclear reaction (Narrow Resonance Profiling, NRP). We demonstrate that two distinct oxygen exchanges processes co-exist and we determine the diffusion coefficient of the CO{sub 2} molecule in the silica at 1100 °C.

  2. In-depth analysis of bicycle hydraulic disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Oliver; Györfi, Benedikt; Wrede, Jürgen; Arnold, Timo; Moia, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic Disc Brakes (HDBs) represent the most recent and innovative bicycle braking system. Especially Electric Bicycles (EBs), which are becoming more and more popular, are equipped with this powerful, unaffected by environmental influences, and low-wear type of brakes. As a consequence of the high braking performance, typical bicycle braking errors lead to more serious accidents. This is the starting point for the development of a Braking Dynamics Assistance system (BDA) to prevent front wheel lockup and nose-over (falling over the handlebars). One of the essential prerequisites for the system design is a better understanding of bicycle HDBs' characteristics. A physical simulation model and a test bench have been built for this purpose. The results of the virtual and real experiments conducted show a high correlation and allow valuable insights into HDBs on bicycles, which have not been studied scientifically in any depth so far.

  3. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided

  4. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  5. Determination of the refractive index depth profile of an UV-laser generated waveguide in a planar polymer chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shams-el-Din, M.A.; Wochnowski, C.; Metev, S.; Hamza, A.A.; Jueptner, W

    2004-09-15

    In this paper the optical-functional properties of integrated-optical waveguides in a planar polymer chip prepared by UV-laser irradiation have been investigated. Particularly the refractive index distribution of the waveguide is examined by a two-beam interferometric method. Also the waveguiding effect of this integrated-optical structure has been proved. The study shows that the refractive index depth profile strongly depends on the UV-irradiation dose. Several mostly independently occurring photochemical processes competing with one another can explain the formation and shape of the refractive index distribution.

  6. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerle, D; Meirer, F; Pepponi, G; Demenev, E; Giubertoni, D; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  7. Assessment of Zooplankton Community Composition along a Depth Profile in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-07-17

    The composition of zooplankton in the water column has received limited attention in the main body of the Red Sea and this study investigates the change in the community both spatially and temporally across 11 stations in the central Red Sea. Using molecular methods to target the v9 region of the 18S rRNA gene a total of approximately 11.5 million reads were sequenced resulting in 2528 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% similarity. The phylum Arthropoda dominated in terms of reads accounting for on average 86.2% and 65.3% for neuston nets and vertical multinets respectively. A reduction in the number of OTUs was noticed with depth for both total metazoa and Maxillopoda whilst there was also a significant change in the composition of the Maxillopoda community. The genus Corycaeus had a higher proportion of reads in the epipelagic zone with Pleuromamma becoming increasingly dominant with depth. No significant difference was observed in the community between night and day sampling however there was a significant difference in the zooplankton community between two sampling periods separated by 10 days.

  8. A cross-validation procedure for stopping the EM algorithm and deconvolution of neutron depth profiling spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Statistical Engineering Div., Gaithersburg, MD (US))

    1991-02-01

    The iterative EM algorithm is used to deconvolve neutron depth profiling spectra. Because of statistical noise in the data, artifacts in the estimated particle emission rate profile appear after too many iterations of the EM algorithm. To avoid artifacts, the EM algorithm is stopped using a cross-validation procedure. The data are split into two independent halves. The EM algorithm is applied to one half of the data to get an estimate of the emission rates. The algorithm is stopped when the conditional likelihood of the other half of the data passes through its maximum. The roles of the two halves of the data are then switched to get a second estimate of the emission rates. The two estimates are then averaged.

  9. LIDAR measurements of the vertical aerosol profile and optical depth during the ACE-Asia 2001 IOP, at Gosan, Jeju Island, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chun S; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Young J; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2004-03-01

    In order to investigate the characteristic of optical properties of Asian dust particles, the atmospheric aerosol vertical profile was measured with the multi-wavelength LIDAR system, at the Gosan super site (33 degrees 17'N, 126 degrees 10'E) in Jeju Island, Korea, during the ACE-Asia intensive observation period, 11 March-4 May 2001. An air mass backward trajectory analysis, using Hysplit-4, was carried out to track the aerosol plume, with high mass loading, from the Chinese desert regions during the period of Asian dust storm events. Vertical atmospheric aerosol profiles on three major Asian dust storm event days, 22 March and 13 and 26 April 2001, have been analyzed. The LIDAR-derived aerosol optical depth values were compared with those measured by a collocated sunphotometer.

  10. Accurate on-line depth calibration with a laser interferometer during SIMS profiling on the Cameca IMS WF instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkulov, A.; Merkulova, O.; Chambost, E. de; Schuhmacher, M

    2004-06-15

    The presence of shallow interfaces in the crater bottom surface can lead to the appearance of several reflected beams from different depths that can distort the calibration close to these interfaces. A multi-beam scattering model has been developed. The results of this simulation are compared with experimental data and allow interpretation of the laser interferometer data for multi-layer structures. Statistical analysis of data from different types of structures show that even with the presence of measurement artifacts, the laser interferometer can be used for improving the depth scale calibration accuracy.

  11. SIMS depth profiling of rubber-tyre cord bonding layers prepared using 64Zn depleted ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, W.S.; Sykes, D.E.; Smith, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Zinc oxide and copper/zinc sulphide layers are formed during vulcanisation and moulding of rubber to brass-coated steel tyre reinforcing cords. Previous studies have described how zinc diffuses through the rubber-brass interface to form zinc sulphide, and combines with oxygen to create zinc oxide during dezincification. The zinc is usually assumed to originate in the brass of the tyre cord, however, zinc oxide is also present in the rubber formulation. We reveal how zinc from these sources is distributed within the interfacial bonding layers, before and after heat and humidity ageing. Zinc oxide produced using 64 Zn-isotope depleted zinc was mixed in the rubber formulation in place of the natural ZnO and the zinc isotope ratios within the interfacial layers were followed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling. Variations in the relative ratios of the zinc isotopes during depth profiling were measured for unaged, heat-aged and humidity-aged wire samples and in each case a relatively large proportion of the zinc incorporated into the interfacial layer as zinc sulphide was shown to have originated from ZnO in the rubber compound

  12. Comparison of stratum corneum thickness between two proposed methods of calculation using Raman spectroscopic depth profiling of skin water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Won, K; Kim, E J; Hwang, J S; Lee, H K

    2018-02-20

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the most important layer for the barrier function of skin, so investigation of the SC is very important in cosmetic and medical research. Here, we calculated the SC thickness using the depth profile of the skin's water concentration based on previously described methods, and then compared the results. Seven Korean women in their 30s participated in this study. Raman spectroscopy was used to measure the in vivo depth profile of skin water concentration. A total of 21 areas were measured at forearm. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used to calculate SC thickness based on the slope and intersection methods. The slope method and the intersection method gave a forearm SC thickness calculated at 21.3 ± 2.6 μm and 17.6 ± 2.8 μm, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two calculation methods but the two methods showed strong correlation of SC thickness results (r = .899). Although there was a difference in calculated SC thickness of about 20% between the two methods, these results reveal that the two SC thickness calculation methods using Raman spectroscopy were suitable for measuring SC thickness, a finding consistent with other published results. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from FARRAGUT in the Mediterranean Sea from 20 May 1986 to 30 June 1986 (NODC Accession 8700046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the FARRAGUT in the Mediterranean Sea. Data were collected from 20 May 1986 to 30 June...

  14. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa in 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  15. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARRIOT LANE in the NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 20 February 1987 to 22 February 1987 (NODC Accession 8700096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and TOGA Area - Atlantic Ocean. Data...

  16. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARRIOT LANE in the NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 29 December 1986 to 31 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XTB casts in the NW Atlantic Ocean from the HARRIOT LANE. Data were collected from 29 December...

  17. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  18. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  19. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago since 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  20. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HARKNESS in the Indian Ocean from 15 December 1986 to 14 January 1987 (NODC Accession 8700087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the HARKNESS in the Indian Ocean and TOGA Area - India Ocean. Data were collected...

  1. A statistical approach to plasma profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; McCarthy, P.J.; Lackner, K.; Riedel, K.S.

    1990-05-01

    A general statistical approach to the parameterisation and analysis of tokamak profiles is presented. The modelling of the profile dependence on both the radius and the plasma parameters is discussed, and pertinent, classical as well as robust, methods of estimation are reviewed. Special attention is given to statistical tests for discriminating between the various models, and to the construction of confidence intervals for the parameterised profiles and the associated global quantities. The statistical approach is shown to provide a rigorous approach to the empirical testing of plasma profile invariance. (orig.)

  2. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, P.K. [Al Musanna College of Technology, Muscat (Oman); Chandar Shekar, B. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India). Kongunadu Arts and Science College

    2017-08-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of {sup 232}Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for {sup 232}Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  3. A perspective on two chemometrics tools: PCA and MCR, and introduction of a new one: Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), as applied to XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles of organic and inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shiladitya; Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Lee, Zheng Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff; Tolley, H. Dennis; Gallagher, Neal B.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) are much used analytical techniques that provide information about the outermost atomic and molecular layers of materials. In this work, we discuss the application of multivariate spectral techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR), to the analysis of XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles. Multivariate analyses often provide insight into data sets that is not easily obtained in a univariate fashion. Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), which has its roots in Shannon's information theory, is also introduced. This approach is not the same as the mutual information/entropy approaches sometimes used in data processing. A discussion of the theory of each technique is presented. PCA, MCR, and PRE are applied to four different data sets obtained from: a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized C3F6 on Si, a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized PNIPAM (poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)) on Si, an XPS depth profile through a film of SiO2 on Si, and an XPS depth profile through a film of Ta2O5 on Ta. PCA, MCR, and PRE reveal the presence of interfaces in the films, and often indicate that the first few scans in the depth profiles are different from those that follow. PRE and backward difference PRE provide this information in a straightforward fashion. Rises in the PRE signals at interfaces suggest greater complexity to the corresponding spectra. Results from PCA, especially for the higher principal components, were sometimes difficult to understand. MCR analyses were generally more interpretable.

  4. SIMS depth profiling of SiGe:C structures in test pattern areas using low energy cesium with a Cameca IMS Wf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhel, M.; Laugier, F

    2004-06-15

    In this paper, we describe our utilization of SIMS to support development of new SiGe:C structures for BiCMOS industrial processes. The goal is to perform quantitative germanium and carbon depth profiles in test areas of 300 {mu}mx300 {mu}m with optimum depth resolution and detection limits.

  5. Contribution to depth profiling by particle induced X-ray emission application to the study of zinc diffusion in AgZn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frontier, J.P.

    1987-08-01

    A contribution of the study of the capacities of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (P.I.X.E.) for depth profiling, in the range of 1 to 10 micrometers and over, is presented here. It is shown that, in a non destructuve way, the concentration profile of a given element can be obtained, in principle, by deconvoluting the X-ray yields of this element, measured in a set of experiments in which the energy of the impinging protons, hence their range, is systematically varied. Direct deconvolution procedure, which leads to the inversion of an ill-conditionned matrix is unsuitable. So we generalized the iterative procedure previously used by Vegh to solve a similar problem. Alternatively we also used a fitting procedure of several parameters which gave us somewhat better than those of the iterative procedure. Both algorithms where applied to a set of X-ray yields induced by protons of energy between 0.45 to 2 MeV, corresponding to the first 6 micrometers of various depletion profiles of zinc in an initially homogeneous Ag-3 at % Zn annealed under vacuum. For investigation of deeper layers, a sectionning technique which consists in analysing thin film hydroxide targets by specific chemistry of tiny turning, was developped with success. Cross-reference of all the obtained profiles was made with electron microprobe determination on transverse section, and with the predictions of the theory of atomic diffusion. In addition, the possibilities of increasing the depth resolution by developping techniques either of controled sanding of the surface, or analysis of the sample is discussed [fr

  6. Physical mechanisms of thermal-diffusivity depth-profile generation in a hardened low-alloy Mn, Si, Cr, Mo steel reconstructed by photothermal radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaides, Lena; Mandelis, Andreas; Beingessner, Clare J.

    2001-06-15

    It is well established that in hardened steels thermal-diffusivity broadly anticorrelates with microhardness, allowing thermal-wave depth profilometry to be used as a tool to measure microhardness profiles. Nevertheless, the physical mechanisms for this anticorrelation have not been well understood. In this work, the thermal-diffusivity profiles of rough, hardened industrial steels were reconstructed after the elimination of roughness effects from the experimental data. Carburizing and quenching are widely used for the heat treatment of steel components, and it is important to understand their effects on thermal-diffusivity profiles. A thorough examination of the actual mechanism by which thermal-diffusivity depth profiles are affected by first carburizing and then quenching AISI-8620 steels was performed. It was concluded that the variation of thermal diffusivity with depth is dominated by the carbon concentration profile, whereas the absolute value of the thermal diffusivity is a function of microstructure. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Surface morphology and depth profile study of Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te alloy nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ercan, E-mail: yilmaz@ibu.edu.tr [Physics Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Tugay, Evrin [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications (GUeNAM), Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Aktag, Aliekber [Physics Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Yildiz, Ilker [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Parlak, Mehmet; Turan, Rasit [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications (GUeNAM), Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-12-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) films were grown on heated glass at 400 Degree-Sign C from a single target. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CZT films were annealed at 300 and 450 Degree-Sign C for 1 h under N{sub 2} gas at atm. pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and optical properties of CZT films were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Better structural stability and reproducibility in CZT films were succeeded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniform and stoichiometric CZT films with required compositions were fabricated. - Abstract: Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te thin films with thickness of 200 nm were deposited on glass substrates from a single sputtering target. During the deposition process, the substrates were heated at 400 Degree-Sign C and deposited films were subjected to an annealing process at 300 and 450 Degree-Sign C for an hour under flowing N{sub 2} gas at atmospheric pressure. Influence of in situ heating and post-deposition annealing treatments on the structural and optical evolution of Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te nanostructures were investigated by diagnostic techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-transmission spectroscopy. The transmission spectra in the region of the optical absorption band edge were measured for as-deposited and heat-treated of CdZnTe samples. Band gap of the deposited films were found to be in the range of 1.59-1.66 eV. The XRD studies revealed that heated Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te films have a cubic oriented (1 1 1), (2 2 0) and (3 1 1) polycrystalline structure whereas unheated films are mostly amorphous. The effects of annealing temperature on the composition of the thin films were discussed. XPS measurements were performed in the depth profiling mode in order to understand the variation in the chemical composition of the films

  8. The gait profile score and movement analysis profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard; McGinley, Jennifer L; Schwartz, Michael H; Beynon, Sarah; Rozumalski, Adam; Graham, H Kerr; Tirosh, Oren

    2009-10-01

    The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) has been proposed as an index of overall gait pathology. This study proposes an interpretation of the difference measure upon which the GDI is based, which naturally leads to the definition of a similar index, the Gait Profile Score (GPS). The GPS can be calculated independently of the feature analysis upon which the GDI is based. Understanding what the underlying difference measure represents also suggests that reporting a raw score, as the GPS does, may have advantages over the logarithmic transformation and z-scaling incorporated in the GDI. It also leads to the concept of a Movement Analysis Profile (MAP) to summarise much of the information contained within kinematic data. A validation study on all children attending a paediatric gait analysis service over 3 years (407 children) provides evidence to support the use of the GPS through analysis of its frequency distribution across different Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) categories, investigation of intra-session variability, and correlation with the square root of GGI. Correlation with GDI confirms the strong relationship between the two measures. The study concludes that GDI and GPS are alternative and closely related measures. The GDI has prior art and is particularly useful in applications arising out of feature analysis such as cluster analysis or subject matching. The GPS will be easier to calculate for new models where a large reference dataset is not available and in association with applications using the MAP.

  9. Spectral depth analysis of some segments of the Bida Basin, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spectral depth analysis of some segments of the Bida Basin, Nigeria, using aeromagnetic data. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... of the 2009 total magnetic field intensity data sheets covering some segments of the Bida basin, to determine the depth to magnetic basement within the basin.

  10. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the impact on ablation depth of microchannel milling using femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Chen; Pan, Zhang; Jianxiong, Chen; Tu, Yiliu

    2018-04-01

    The plasma brightness cannot be used as a direct indicator of ablation depth detection by femtosecond laser was experimentally demonstrated, which led to the difficulty of depth measurement in the maching process. The tests of microchannel milling on the silicon wafer were carried out in the micromachining center in order to obtain the influences of parameters on the ablation depth. The test results showed that the defocusing distance had no significant impact on ablation depth in LAV effective range. Meanwhile, the reason of this was explained in this paper based on the theoretical analysis and simulation calculation. Then it was proven that the ablation depth mainly depends on laser fluence, step distance and scanning velocity. Finally, a research was further carried out to study the laser parameters which relate with the microchannel ablation depth inside the quartz glass for more efficiency and less cost in processing by femtosecond laser.

  11. The investigation of the depth profile of the beam damage in silicon after ion implantation by means of the MOS-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferretti, R.

    1980-01-01

    The depth profile of the beam damage and the ion profile was measured in Silicon after ion implantation by MOS structures. For helium implantation deep acceptor-like centers are found. The damage range is determined for all samples and the theory is discussed. (BHO)

  12. An in-depth analysis of the RZ Piscium atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Grinin, V. P.; Ilyin, I. V.; Shakhovskoy, D. N.

    2014-03-01

    The star RZ Psc is one of the most unusual members of the UX Ori star family. It demonstrates all properties that are typical of these stars (the light variability, high linear polarization in deep minima, the blueing effect), but until recently there has been no obvious evidence of its youth. Recently, we have shown that RZ Psc is in the transitional evolutionary stage between stars with the primordial and debris disks. In this paper we present the results of the quantitative analysis of the star's spectrum. Using the high-resolution (R = 46 000) spectrum of RZ Psc obtained with Nordic Optical Telescope, we determined Teff = 5350 ± 150 K, log g = 4.2 ± 0.2, [M/H] = -0.3 ± 0.05. These parameters agree well with the same ones as for the stars recently passed the T Tauri star evolutionary stage. This supports our previous suggestion about the evolutionary status of RZ Psc as the post-T Tauri and post-UX Ori star.

  13. Conformational behaviour of humic substances at different depths along a profile of a Lithosol under loblolly (Pinus taeda) plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, P.; Maia, C. M. B. F.; de Pasquale, C.; Alonzo, G.

    2009-04-01

    The conformation of natural organic matter (NOM) plays a key role in many physical and chemical processes including interactions with organic and inorganic pollutants and soil aggregates stability thus directly influencing soil quality. NOM conformation can be studied by solid state NMR spectroscopy with cross polarization and magic angle spinning (CPMAS NMR). In the present study we applied CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy on three humic acid fractions (HA) each extracted from a different horizon in a Lithosol profile under Pinus taeda. Results showed that the most superficial HA was also the most aliphatic in character. Amount of aromatic moieties and hydrophilic HA constituents increased along the profile. Cross polarization (TCH) and longitudinal relaxation protons times in the rotating frame (T1rho(H)) were measured and compared only for the NMR signals generated by carboxyls and alkyls. This because the signal intensity for the aromatic, C-O and C-N systems was very low, thereby preventing suitable evaluation of TCH and T1rho(H) values for such systems. The cross polarization times of carboxyls decreased, whereas those of the alkyl moieties increased with depth. Conversely, T1rho(H) values increased for both COOH and alkyl groups along the profile. Polarization transfer from protons to carbons is affected by the dipolar interactions among the nuclei. The stronger the H-C dipolar interaction, the faster is the rate of the energy exchange. All the factors affecting the dipolar interaction strength also influence the rate of magnetization transfer. Among the others, fast molecular tumbling and poor proton density around the carbons are responsible for long TCH values. Molecular tumbling and proton density also affect T1rho(H) values. Namely, the larger the molecular tumbling and the proton density, the faster is the proton longitudinal relaxation rate in the rotating frame (shorter T1rho(H) values). The decrease of TCH values of COOH groups along the profile was

  14. DMD-based software-configurable spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy for spectral depth-profiling of optically turbid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhiyu; Sinjab, Faris; Gibson, Graham; Padgett, Miles; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-06-13

    Spectral depth-profiling of optically turbid samples is of high interest to a broad range of applications. We present a method for measuring spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) over a range of length scales by incorporating a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) into a sample-conjugate plane in the detection optical path. The DMD can be arbitrarily programmed to collect/reject light at spatial positions in the 2D sample-conjugate plane, allowing spatially offset Raman measurements. We demonstrate several detection geometries, including annular and simultaneous multi-offset modalities, for both macro- and micro-SORS measurements, all on the same instrument. Compared to other SORS modalities, DMD-based SORS provides more flexibility with only minimal additional experimental complexity for subsurface Raman collection.

  15. Depth profile characterization of electrodeposited multi-thin-film structures by low angle of incidence X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauer, M.; Ernst, K.; Kautek, W.; Neumann-Spallart, M.

    2005-01-01

    Typical structures of heterojunction photovoltaic cells were prepared by sequential electrodeposition of II-VI semiconductor thin films on a transparent conductor, SnO 2 on glass. The structures comprised a wide bandgap window, ZnSe or ZnTe, a medium bandgap light absorber, CdTe, and an ohmic back contact. It is demonstrated that low incidence angle X-ray diffraction (LIXD) can be successfully used as a process monitoring tool, featuring non-destructive depth profiling and phase characterization of such thin film structures. LIXD results are compared to Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) data. Both, SIMS and SEM, corroborate the LIXD results as to layer sequence and presence/absence of intermixing

  16. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloy, Eric; Beerten, Koen; Vanacker, Veerle; Christl, Marcus; Rogiers, Bart; Wouters, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium), have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1) uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and (2) accounts (under certain assumptions) for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP) parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr-1 (1σ) is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-)climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  17. Bayesian inversion of a CRN depth profile to infer Quaternary erosion of the northwestern Campine Plateau (NE Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Laloy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which low-lying sandy areas in temperate regions, such as the Campine Plateau (NE Belgium, have been eroding during the Quaternary is a matter of debate. Current knowledge on the average pace of landscape evolution in the Campine area is largely based on geological inferences and modern analogies. We performed a Bayesian inversion of an in situ-produced 10Be concentration depth profile to infer the average long-term erosion rate together with two other parameters: the surface exposure age and the inherited 10Be concentration. Compared to the latest advances in probabilistic inversion of cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN data, our approach has the following two innovative components: it (1 uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling and (2 accounts (under certain assumptions for the contribution of model errors to posterior uncertainty. To investigate to what extent our approach differs from the state of the art in practice, a comparison against the Bayesian inversion method implemented in the CRONUScalc program is made. Both approaches identify similar maximum a posteriori (MAP parameter values, but posterior parameter and predictive uncertainty derived using the method taken in CRONUScalc is moderately underestimated. A simple way for producing more consistent uncertainty estimates with the CRONUScalc-like method in the presence of model errors is therefore suggested. Our inferred erosion rate of 39 ± 8. 9 mm kyr−1 (1σ is relatively large in comparison with landforms that erode under comparable (paleo-climates elsewhere in the world. We evaluate this value in the light of the erodibility of the substrate and sudden base level lowering during the Middle Pleistocene. A denser sampling scheme of a two-nuclide concentration depth profile would allow for better inferred erosion rate resolution, and including more uncertain parameters in the MCMC inversion.

  18. Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) Daily Snow Depth Analysis Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of a Northern Hemisphere subset of the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) operational global daily snow depth analysis. Data include daily...

  19. Wind profiles for Space Shuttle loads analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    The small scale wind velocity perturbations in vertical wind profiles at Cape Kennedy, Florida were analyzed in order to derive information for simulations of space shuttle ascent through the perturbed atmosphere. The available statistical data does not permit specification of various aspects of idealized singularities and wavelike perturbations with a reasonable degree of confidence. The information developed as a result of the analysis described in Section 3 of this report is suitable for the further development of idealized models. The term perturbation is used instead of the more common term, gust. According to the conventional approach, a gust profile is calculated by applying a high pass digital filter to a Jimsphere profile; all the speeds in the filtered profile are defined as gusts. The high pass filtered profile is defined as a residual profile and the maximum residual in the vicinity of a specified reference height is defined as the gust. Gusts defined in this manner represent the perturbation peaks. A detailed discussion of the calculation of residual profiles and gusts is given. The meteorological coordinate system, the data sample, and Jimsphere profiles are also described. Recommendations and conclusions are presented.

  20. Depth profiling Li in electrode materials of lithium ion battery by {sup 7}Li(p,γ){sup 8}Be and {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunitha, Y., E-mail: sunibarc@gmail.com; Kumar, Sanjiv

    2017-06-01

    A proton induced γ-ray emission method based on {sup 7}Li(p,γ){sup 8}Be proton capture reaction and a nuclear reaction analysis method involving {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He reaction are described for depth profiling Li in the electrode materials, graphite and lithium cobalt oxide for example, of a Li-ion battery. Depth profiling by {sup 7}Li(p,γ){sup 8}Be reaction is accomplished by the resonance at 441 keV and involves the measurement of 14.6 and 17.6 MeV γ-rays, characteristic of the reaction, by a NaI(Tl) detector. The method has a detection sensitivity of ∼0.2 at% and enables profiling up to a depth ≥20 µm with a resolution of ≥150 nm. The profiling to a fairly large depth is facilitated by the absence of any other resonance up to 1800 keV proton energy. The reaction has substantial off-resonance cross-sections. A procedure is outlined for evaluating the off-resonance yields. Interferences from fluorine and aluminium are major limitation of this depth profiling methodology. The depth profile measurement by {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He reaction, on the other hand, utilises 2–3 MeV protons and entails the detection of α-particles at 90° or 150° angles. The reaction exhibits inverse kinematics at 150°. This method, too, suffers interference from fluorine due to the simultaneous occurrence of {sup 19}F(p,α){sup 16}O reaction. Kinematical considerations show that the interference is minimal at 90° and thus is the recommended angle of detection. The method is endowed with a detection sensitivity of ∼0.1 at%, a depth resolution of ∼100 nm and a probing depth of about 30 µm in the absence and 5–8 µm in the presence of fluorine in the material. Both methods yielded comparable depth profiles of Li in the cathode (lithium cobalt oxide) and the anode (graphite) of a Li-ion battery.

  1. Multi-approach analysis of maximum riverbed scour depth above subway tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Chen; Hong-wu Tang; Zui-sen Li; Wen-hong Dai

    2010-01-01

    When subway tunnels are routed underneath rivers, riverbed scour may expose the structure, with potentially severe consequences. Thus, it is important to identify the maximum scour depth to ensure that the designed buried depth is adequate. There are a range of methods that may be applied to this problem, including the fluvial process analysis method, geological structure analysis method, scour formula method, scour model experiment method, and numerical simulation method. However, the applic...

  2. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison and fine-mode fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations and fine-mode fraction. Arctic haze observed in <2 km and 2–4 km over Alaska in April 2008 originated mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively, according to aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements. The Ångström exponent for these air masses is 1.4 ± 0.3 and 1.7 ± 0.1, respectively, when derived at 499 nm from a second-order polynomial fit to the AOD spectra measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 over 354–2139 nm. We examine 55 vertical profiles selected from all phases of the experiment. For two thirds of them, the AOD spectra are within 3% + 0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes from local biomass burning observed in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Ångström exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD > 0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference (in both directions from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within ±0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements between 340–1640 nm for five overpass events.

  3. Pharmacodynamic analysis of hematologic profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, G.L. [Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Mueller, P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1994-12-01

    We discuss the analysis of the myelosuppressive effects of chemotherapy. Such analyses examine hematologic data that arise by monitoring patients after treatment with high doses of chemotherapy. We propose a flexible approach for modeling such information and, using data collected as part of a Phase I study of an anticancer agent, show some interesting aspects of the data that become available after fitting models this way. 29 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Depth profiles, projected ranges, and secondary ion mass spectrometry relative sensitivity factors for more than 50 elements from hydrogen to uranium implanted into metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.G.; Stevie, F.A.; Lux, G.E.; Kirschbaum, C.L.; Frank, S.; Pallix, J.

    1992-01-01

    More than 50 elements from hydrogen to uranium were implanted into beryllium, aluminum, titanium, nickel, tungsten and gold at energies up to 0.6 MeV and at fluences from 3x10 13 to 5x10 15 cm -2 to create standards appropriate for depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS depth profiling was performed for these combinations using both oxygen and cesium primary ions and positive and negative secondary ions respectively. SIMS relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) were determined from these data to allow quantification of impurity densities and depth profiles in these metals and possibly other metals through the use of systematics. Implantation ranges were determined from the experimental profiles, and are compared with the corresponding results of TRIM89/91 and Implant Sciences Profile Code calculations. The agreement between the two calculations and between both calculations and most of the experimental results is within 15%-20%. The experimental error is about 15%. This work establishes a quantified SIMS methodology for measuring impurity densities and implantation depth profiles in metals. (orig.)

  5. Limitations to depth resolution in high-energy, heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Palmer, G.R.; Ophel, T.R.; Timmers, H.

    1998-01-01

    The depth resolution of heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis was examined for Al and Co thin films ranging in thickness from 100 to 400 nm. Measurements were performed with 154 MeV Au ions as the incident beam, and recoils were detected using a gas ionisation detector. Energy spectra were extracted for the Al and Co recoils and the depth resolution determined as a function of film thickness from the width of the high- and low- energy edges. These results were compared with theoretical estimates calculated using the computer program DEPTH. (authors)

  6. Influence of sampling depth and post-sampling analysis time on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological analysis was carried out for samples taken at water depth and at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-sampling. It was observed that the total and faecal coliform bacteria were significantly higher in the 3 m water depth samples than in the surface water samples (ANOVA, F = 59.41, 26.751, 9.82 (T.C); 46.41, 26.81, ...

  7. Depth profiles of Al impurities implanted in Si wafers determined by means of the high-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Y., E-mail: yves.kayser@unifr.c [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Banas, D. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Jagodzinski, P. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Kavcic, M. [J. Stefan Institute, SI-1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kubala-Kukus, A. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Nowak, S. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Szlachetko, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-15

    The synchrotron radiation based high-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique was used to extract the distribution of Al ions implanted with a dose of 10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 2} in Si wafers with energies ranging between 1 and 100 keV. The depth distributions of the implanted ions were deduced from the measured angular profiles of the Al-K{alpha} X-ray fluorescence line with nanometer-scale precision. The experimental results were compared to theoretical predictions of the depth distributions resulting from ion implantation. A good agreement between experiment and theory was found which proved that the presented high-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence technique is well suited to perform depth profiling measurements of impurities located within the extinction depth, provided the overall shape of the distribution can be assumed a priori.

  8. Characteristic differences in barrier and hygroscopic properties between normal and cosmetic dry skin. II. Depth profile of natural moisturizing factor and cohesivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, L; Chandar, P; Lu, N; Vincent, C; Bajor, J; McGuiness, H

    2014-06-01

    In a previous paper (Lu et al., International Journal of Cosmetic Science, in press), we reported that in comparison with normal skin, cosmetic dry skin characteristically has a thicker stratum corneum (SC) with weaker barrier quality. Our goal here was to obtain a more complete picture of the difference between normal and cosmetic dry skin, by further analysing the data collected from the same clinical study to address two additional aspects of skin: the amount and depth profile of natural moisturizing factor (NMF) and the cohesivity of the SC. The SC samples were collected by sequential tape stripping in a clinical study consisting of 64 healthy Caucasian female subjects with either normal or cosmetic dry skin. Protein and free amino acids (FAA) on tape strips were extracted and analysed using high-throughput methods. The level of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), the prominent component of NMF, was detected using HPLC analysis. It was found that dry skin had significantly lower ratios of FAA/protein and PCA/protein across the stripped SC depth, corresponding to a lower hydration level compared with the normal skin. Our results indicated that filaggrin to FAA hydrolysis occurred deeper in dry skin and at a lower level compared with normal skin. In addition, the mass of proteins stripped from dry skin subjects was significantly higher than that from the normal skin counterpart, especially for the first 10-12 tape strips. Our results showed that, compared with normal skin, cosmetic dry skin had a lower NMF level across the SC depth and a lower cohesivity. Such results suggested that NMF levels are critical for cosmetic skin conditions, and lower NMF production may be associated with dry skin. In addition, the NMF level and its depth profile and the SC cohesivity are useful clinical end points for assessing the efficacy of dry skin treatments such as skin moisturizers. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  9. Depth profiles of defects in Ar-iondashirradiated steels determined by a least-squares fit of S parameters from variable-energy positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruga, Takeo; Takamura, Saburo; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Ito, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Using a new method for reconstructing the depth profile of defects in an iondashirradiated sample by using slow positrons, the depth profiles of vacancy-type defects in 316 stainless steel samples, irradiated with 250 keV Ar ions to a dose of 7.5 × 10 19 m -2 at room temperature, have been calculated from Doppler-broadening S parameters measured as a function of positron energies up to 16 keV. Without assuming any type of shape for the defect profiles, such as Gaussian, the defect profiling is done using a least-squares fitting method. The resulting profile suggests that in as-irradiated 316 stainless steel samples with lower carbon content, the defect distribution peaks at a depth four times larger than that of the ion range. After annealing at a high temperature of 1253 K for 0.5 h, the fitted profile shows that the peak around the average ion range is highly enhanced. While in the steel added with 0.3 wt% titanium, the profile exhibits almost no peak after annealing at 1073 K. The results indicate that the radiationdashproduced vacancy clusters are stabilized by the implanted Ar atoms more effectively in the Ti-free steel than in the Ti-added steel.

  10. Machine Trades. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for machine trades. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  11. Precision Machining Technologies. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of precision machinist. The…

  12. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Ina; Castaing, Jacques; Calligaro, Thomas; Salomon, Joseph; Aucouturier, Marc; Reinholz, Uwe; Weise, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS

  13. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Ina [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Castaing, Jacques [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)]. E-mail: jacques.castaing@culture.fr; Calligaro, Thomas [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Salomon, Joseph [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Aucouturier, Marc [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Reinholz, Uwe [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Hans-Peter [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS.

  14. Classification of Effective Soil Depth by Using Multinomial Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. H.; Chan, H. C.; Chen, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Classification of effective soil depth is a task of determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in Taiwan. The "Slopeland Conservation and Utilization Act" categorizes the slopeland into agriculture and husbandry land, land suitable for forestry and land for enhanced conservation according to the factors including average slope, effective soil depth, soil erosion and parental rock. However, sit investigation of the effective soil depth requires a cost-effective field work. This research aimed to classify the effective soil depth by using multinomial logistic regression with the environmental factors. The Wen-Shui Watershed located at the central Taiwan was selected as the study areas. The analysis of multinomial logistic regression is performed by the assistance of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The effective soil depth was categorized into four levels including deeper, deep, shallow and shallower. The environmental factors of slope, aspect, digital elevation model (DEM), curvature and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were selected for classifying the soil depth. An Error Matrix was then used to assess the model accuracy. The results showed an overall accuracy of 75%. At the end, a map of effective soil depth was produced to help planners and decision makers in determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in the study areas.

  15. Depth profiles of H, C, O, Al and Si implants in a GaN substrate using trace element accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Ravi Prasad, G. V.; Pelicon, Primoz; Smith, Eric B.; McDaniel, Floyd D.

    2004-06-01

    The compound semiconductor GaN has become the electronic material for many semiconductor applications because of its high-power, high-temperature and high-frequency characteristics. The introduction of impurities to GaN, either by direct doping or by contamination of unwanted impurities during fabrication leads to changes in its electronic properties [CAARI 2002: 17th International Conference on the Application of Accelerators in Research and Industry, American Institute of Physics, Vol. 680, 2002, p. 369]. There are a number of techniques routinely used to analyze the depth profiles of impurities in semiconductor substrates, but they lack the sensitivity required for today's applications. For example, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has molecular interferences which obscure analysis of some elements. Trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS), which is a combination of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and SIMS, removes molecular interferences by breaking apart the molecules in an accelerator. Like SIMS, secondary ions are sputtered from a target, the negative ions are then extracted and injected into a 3 MV tandem accelerator. As they pass through a gas at the center of the terminal, molecular breakup is achieved via a coulomb explosion due to electron stripping. The ions are then passed through momentum/charge and energy/charge filters, which are used to separate out many of the unwanted interferences. In most cases, TEAMS is a complimentary technique to SIMS and can eliminate the interferences that may not be resolvable by SIMS. The purpose of this work is to examine the depth profiles and detection limits of various impurities implanted into a GaN substrate.

  16. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Hongliang; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass, SON68, and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems due to their fundamental and practical significance. Our study shows that if the size of analysis areas is same, the highest sputter rate of argon cluster sputtering can be 2-3 times faster than the highest sputter rates of oxygen or cesium sputtering. More importantly, high quality data and high sputter rates can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering while this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, for deep depth profiling of insulating samples, the measurement efficiency of argon cluster sputtering can be about 6-15 times better than traditional cesium and oxygen sputtering. Moreover, for a SrTiO3/SrCrO3 bi-layer thin film on a SrTiO3 substrate, the true 18O/16O isotopic distribution at the interface is better revealed when using the argon cluster sputtering source. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the measurement efficiency of insulating materials, and thus can expand the application of ToF-SIMS to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin films, and many other potential systems.

  17. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.raupp@kit.edu; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm [Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hummel, Helga [Philips Technologie GmbH Innovative Technologies, Aachen (Germany); Bruns, Michael [Institute for Applied Materials and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  18. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Peters

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl-4,4’-diamine and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline-(4-phenylphenoxyaluminum, originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  19. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  20. Cosmogenic 10Be Depth Profile in top 560 m of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Woodruff, T. E.; Caffee, M. W.; Edwards, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2009-12-01

    Concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be in polar ice samples are a function of variations in solar activity, geomagnetic field strength, atmospheric mixing and annual snow accumulation rates. The 10Be depth profile in ice cores also provides independent chronological markers to tie Antarctic to Greenland ice cores and to tie Holocene ice cores to the 14C dendrochronology record. We measured 10Be concentrations in 187 samples from depths of 0-560 m of the main WAIS Divide core, WDC06A. The ice samples are typically 1-2 kg and represent 2-4 m of ice, equivalent to an average temporal resolution of ~12 years, based on the preliminary age-depth scale proposed for the WDC core, (McConnell et al., in prep). Be, Al and Cl were separated using ion exchange chromatography techniques and the 10Be concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at PRIME lab. The 10Be concentrations range from 8.1 to 19.1 x 10^3 at/g, yielding an average of (13.1±2.1) x 10^3 at/g. Adopting an average snow accumulation rate of 20.9 cm weq/yr, as derived from the age-depth scale, this value corresponds to an average 10Be flux of (2.7±0.5) x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2. This flux is similar to that of the Holocene part of the Siple Dome (Nishiizumi and Finkel, 2007) and Dome Fuji (Horiuchi et al. 2008) ice cores, but ~30% lower than the value of 4.0 x 10^5 atoms/yr/cm2 for GISP2 (Finkel and Nishiizumi, 1997). The periods of low solar activity, known as Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, show ~20% higher 10Be concentrations/fluxes than the periods of average solar activity in the last millennium. The maximum 10Be fluxes during some of these periods of low solar activity are up to ~50% higher than average 10Be fluxes, as seen in other polar ice cores, which makes these peaks suitable as chronologic markers. We will compare the 10Be record in the WAIS Divide ice core with that in other Antarctic as well as Greenland ice cores and with the 14C treering record. Acknowledgment. This

  1. Gyral Folding Pattern Analysis via Surface Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Faraco, Carlos; Cui, Guangbin; Zhao, Qun; Miller, L. Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    Folding is an essential shape characteristic of the human cerebral cortex. Descriptors of cortical folding patterns have been studied for decades. However, many previous studies are either based on local shape descriptors such as curvature, or based on global descriptors such as gyrification index or spherical wavelets. This paper proposes a gyrus-scale folding pattern analysis technique via cortical surface profiling. Firstly, we sample the cortical surface into 2D profiles and model them using a power function. This step provides both the flexibility of representing arbitrary shape by profiling and the compactness of representing shape by parametric modeling. Secondly, based on the estimated model parameters, we extract affine-invariant features on the cortical surface, and apply the affinity propagation clustering algorithm to parcellate the cortex into cortical regions with strict hierarchy and smooth transitions among them. Finally, a second-round surface profiling is performed on the parcellated cortical surface, and the number of hinges is detected to describe the gyral folding pattern. We have applied the surface profiling method to two normal brain datasets and a Schizophrenia patient dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately classify human gyri into 2-hinge, 3-hinge and 4-hinge patterns. The distribution of these folding patterns on brain lobes and the relationship between fiber density and gyral folding patterns are further investigated. Results from the Schizophrenia dataset are consistent with commonly found abnormality in former studies by others, which demonstrates the potential clinical applications of the proposed technique. PMID:20472071

  2. In depth analysis of motivational factors at work in the health industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motivation of health workers is necessary to generate the organizational commitment towards the patients and the hospital and therefore the knowledge about what motivates and satisfies them is very essential.The aim of the project was to investigate and analyze the various factors that help in motivation of the health workers while performing their clinical duties in the hospital. Materials and Methods: A simple random study was conducted among 100 employees of our institute, which included doctors, staff nurses and paramedical staff. One hundred employees from Gian Sagar Institute were chosen randomly for the purpose of our study. All the employees were enquired by the questionnaire method as well as by individual interviews regarding the various motivating and demotivating factors at the work place. Detailed enquiries were performed regarding the various aspects concerning the job factors and work satisfaction. All the answers and findings were observed and recorded. Results: Statistical Analysis Used: Simple non-parametric tests like mean, percentages and chi square tests were employed to analyze the data.The demographic profile of all the employees showed only minor differences which were statistically non-significant. Skills, task identity, task significance, autonomy, feedback, environment, job security and compensation were observed to be the important factors for the motivation of employees. The depth and the extent to which these factors were studied at work in the hospital showed remarkable differences. Conclusion: All the factors studied in this project are essential basis for organizational commitment, but feedback represents the factor with the highest motivation potential especially among the younger population.

  3. Depth and source mechanism estimation for special event analysis, event screening, and regional calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, P; Dodge, D; Ichinose, Rodgers, A; Bhattacharyya, B; Leach, R

    1999-07-23

    We have summarized the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of techniques for depth and mechanism estimation and suggest that significant work remains to be done for events with magnitudes of interest for test ban monitoring. We also describe a new, waveform modeling-based tool for fast and accurate, high-resolution depth and mechanism estimation. Significant features of this tool include its speed and accuracy and its applicability at relatively high frequencies. These features allow a user to rapidly determine accurate, high-resolution depth estimates and constraints on source mechanism for relatively small magnitude (mb-4.5) events. Based on the accuracy of depth estimates obtained with this tool, we conclude it is useful for both the analysis of unusual or suspect events and for event screening. We also find that this tool provides significant constraints on source mechanism and have used it to develop ''ground-truth'' estimates of depth and mechanism for a set of events in the Middle East and North Africa. These ''ground-truth'' depths and mechanisms should be useful for regional calibration.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of depth predictions from seismic reflection data using Bayesian statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelioudakis, Dimitrios G.; Hobbs, Richard W.; Caiado, Camila C. S.

    2018-03-01

    Estimating the depths of target horizons from seismic reflection data is an important task in exploration geophysics. To constrain these depths we need a reliable and accurate velocity model. Here, we build an optimum 2D seismic reflection data processing flow focused on pre - stack deghosting filters and velocity model building and apply Bayesian methods, including Gaussian process emulation and Bayesian History Matching (BHM), to estimate the uncertainties of the depths of key horizons near the borehole DSDP-258 located in the Mentelle Basin, south west of Australia, and compare the results with the drilled core from that well. Following this strategy, the tie between the modelled and observed depths from DSDP-258 core was in accordance with the ± 2σ posterior credibility intervals and predictions for depths to key horizons were made for the two new drill sites, adjacent the existing borehole of the area. The probabilistic analysis allowed us to generate multiple realizations of pre-stack depth migrated images, these can be directly used to better constrain interpretation and identify potential risk at drill sites. The method will be applied to constrain the drilling targets for the upcoming International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), leg 369.

  5. On the analysis of line profile variations: A statistical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCandliss, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study is concerned with the empirical characterization of the line profile variations (LPV), which occur in many of and Wolf-Rayet stars. The goal of the analysis is to gain insight into the physical mechanisms producing the variations. The analytic approach uses a statistical method to quantify the significance of the LPV and to identify those regions in the line profile which are undergoing statistically significant variations. Line positions and flux variations are then measured and subject to temporal and correlative analysis. Previous studies of LPV have for the most part been restricted to observations of a single line. Important information concerning the range and amplitude of the physical mechanisms involved can be obtained by simultaneously observing spectral features formed over a range of depths in the extended mass losing atmospheres of massive, luminous stars. Time series of a Wolf-Rayet and two of stars with nearly complete spectral coverage from 3940 angstrom to 6610 angstrom and with spectral resolution of R = 10,000 are analyzed here. These three stars exhibit a wide range of both spectral and temporal line profile variations. The HeII Pickering lines of HD 191765 show a monotonic increase in the peak rms variation amplitude with lines formed at progressively larger radii in the Wolf-Rayet star wind. Two times scales of variation have been identified in this star: a less than one day variation associated with small scale flickering in the peaks of the line profiles and a greater than one day variation associated with large scale asymmetric changes in the overall line profile shapes. However, no convincing period phenomena are evident at those periods which are well sampled in this time series

  6. Depth profiling the solid electrolyte interphase on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) using synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordh, Tim; Younesi, Reza; Brandell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a surface layer on lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO) anodes, which has been a topic of debate in scientific literature, is here investigated with tunable high surface sensitive synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) to obtain a reliable depth profile of the interphase...

  7. Lithium diffusion in polyether ether ketone and polyimide stimulated by in situ electron irradiation and studied by the neutron depth profiling method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Attar, F. M. D.; Mathakari, N. L.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Dhole, S. D.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 169, č. 10 (2014), s. 885-891 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : diffusion * lithium * neutron depth profiling * polymers Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2014

  8. Profiling School Shooters: Automatic Text-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair eNeuman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available School shooters present a challenge to both forensic psychiatry and law enforcement agencies. The relatively small number of school shooters, their various charateristics, and the lack of in-depth analysis of all of the shooters prior to the shooting add complexity to our understanding of this problem. In this short paper, we introduce a new methodology for automatically profiling school shooters. The methodology involves automatic analysis of texts and the production of several measures relevant for the identification of the shooters. Comparing texts written by six school shooters to 6056 texts written by a comparison group of male subjects, we found that the shooters' texts scored significantly higher on the Narcissistic Personality dimension as well as on the Humilated and Revengeful dimensions. Using a ranking/priorization procedure, similar to the one used for the automatic identification of sexual predators, we provide support for the validity and relevance of the proposed methodology.

  9. Cold-neutron depth profiling as a research tool for the study of surface oxides on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tun, Z.; Bohdanowicz, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The shiny surface of most metals, with the exceptions of gold and platinum, is actually coated with a thin layer of oxide. Although typically only a few nanometres (nm) thick, the oxide layer is key for the metal's survival in our 02-containing atmosphere. Consequently, there is a continuing need to develop experimental techniques to study oxide layers on metals. The need for a technique that could track the movement of an oxygen-containing layer first came to our attention when we studied the growth of anodic oxide on Ti with neutron reflectometry. As new oxide grew with oxygen ions derived from an aqueous solution, a small amount of hydrogen was found to be incorporated into the oxide layer, and remained adjacent to the oxide/water interface. Whether the H remains attached to its companion 0, i.e., as an OH ion, or if the ion dissociates once inside the oxide layer is unknown. Whether the original air-grown oxide acts as a passive screen during anodization, or if it plays an active in the hopping of ions from site to site is also unknown. These questions could be answered unambiguously only if we can somehow label the original 0 atoms. Isotopic labeling combined with neutron scattering is not an option since the coherent scattering lengths of all three 0 isotopes are very similar. Fortunately, one of the isotopes, 170, is sensitive to neutron depth-profiling via the (n,a) reaction (1). We hereby report encouraging results obtained by a preliminary experiment carried out to assess the potential of this technique.

  10. Comparison of inverse Laplace and numerical inversion methods for obtaining z-depth profiles of diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaojing Zhu; Predecki, P.; Ballard, B.

    1995-01-01

    Two different inversion methods, the inverse Laplace method and the linear constrained numerical method, for retrieving the z-profiles of diffraction data from experimentally obtained i-profiles were compared using tests with a known function as the original z-profile. Two different real data situations were simulated to determine the effects of specimen thickness and missing τ-profile data at small τ-values on the retrieved z-profiles. The results indicate that although both methods are able to retrieve the z-profiles in the bulk specimens satisfactorily, the numerical method can be used for thin film samples as well. Missing τ-profile data at small τ values causes error in the retrieved z-profiles with both methods, particularly when the trend of the τ-profile at small τ is significantly changed because of the missing data. 6 refs., 3 figs

  11. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-04-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg(-1)·year(-1) for SOM, 438.9 mg·g(-1)·year(-1) for C:P, 5.3 mg·g(-1)·year(-1) for C:K, and -3.23 mg·cm(-3)·year(-1) for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0-80-cm soil profile (P: -4.10 mg·kg(-1)·year(-1); pH: -0.0061 unit·year(-1); C:N: 167.1 mg·g(-1)·year(-1); K:P: 371.5 mg·g(-1) year(-1); N:K: -0.242 mg·g(-1)·year(-1); EC: 0.169 μS·cm(-1)·year(-1)), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance.

  12. Multi-approach analysis of maximum riverbed scour depth above subway tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When subway tunnels are routed underneath rivers, riverbed scour may expose the structure, with potentially severe consequences. Thus, it is important to identify the maximum scour depth to ensure that the designed buried depth is adequate. There are a range of methods that may be applied to this problem, including the fluvial process analysis method, geological structure analysis method, scour formula method, scour model experiment method, and numerical simulation method. However, the application ranges and forecasting precision of these methods vary considerably. In order to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of the different methods, a subway tunnel passing underneath a river was selected, and the aforementioned five methods were used to forecast the maximum scour depth. The fluvial process analysis method was used to characterize the river regime and evolution trend, which were the baseline for examination of the scour depth of the riverbed. The results obtained from the scour model experiment and the numerical simulation methods are reliable; these two methods are suitable for application to tunnel projects passing underneath rivers. The scour formula method was less accurate than the scour model experiment method; it is suitable for application to lower risk projects such as pipelines. The results of the geological structure analysis had low precision; the method is suitable for use as a secondary method to assist other research methods. To forecast the maximum scour depth of the riverbed above the subway tunnel, a combination of methods is suggested, and the appropriate analysis method should be chosen with respect to the local conditions.

  13. [Analysis of the color changes in teeth at different depths preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryakhovsky, A N; Tikhon, Yu V

    Spectrophotometric analysis of the extract and intact teeth revealed the color characteristic of teeth ranged from the cervical area to the cutting edge, as well as by preparation of dental hard tissue to 0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm depth. Lightness increased as preparation approached dentine. The intensity of the Lightness was more pronounced in the cervical region which is associated with a thin layer of enamel performing the lens function. It is found that Hue values weakly depend on the depth and location of the preparation, the tooth reflecting a relatively constant range of visible wavelengths. During preparation of the hard tissue at different depths the color difference δE* was greater than 2.6 meaning that the color must be registered before and after preparation.

  14. 3D depth image analysis for indoor fall detection of elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new fall detection method of elderly people in a room environment based on shape analysis of 3D depth images captured by a Kinect sensor. Depth images are pre-processed by a median filter both for background and target. The silhouette of moving individual in depth images is achieved by a subtraction method for background frames. The depth images are converted to disparity map, which is obtained by the horizontal and vertical projection histogram statistics. The initial floor plane information is obtained by V disparity map, and the floor plane equation is estimated by the least square method. Shape information of human subject in depth images is analyzed by a set of moment functions. Coefficients of ellipses are calculated to determine the direction of individual. The centroids of the human body are calculated and the angle between the human body and the floor plane is calculated. When both the distance from the centroids of the human body to the floor plane and the angle between the human body and the floor plane are lower than some thresholds, fall incident will be detected. Experiments with different falling direction are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect fall incidents effectively.

  15. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eBeman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, NO3- profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock and within Catalina Harbor, oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 x 107 genes g-1 varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in Bird Rock cores, and Catalina Harbor cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated Catalina Harbor sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria.

  16. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J M; Bertics, Victoria J; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another - yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O(2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 10(7) genes g(-) (1)) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

  17. Spectra from 2.5-15 μm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viator, John A; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 μm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare TM ), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 μm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 μm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 μm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 μm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant μ ir is used. In such cases, overestimating μ ir will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. (note)

  18. Highly Resolved Mg/Ca Depth Profiles of Planktic Foraminifer test Walls Using Single shot Measurements of fs-LA-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, K. P.; Schiebel, R.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Haug, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Foraminifers are sensitive archives of changes in climate and marine environment. It has been shown that the Mg/Ca signal is a suitable proxy of seawater temperature, because the incorporation of Mg depends on ambient water temperature. In contrast to most former studies, where this ratio is determined by solution-based bulk analysis of 20 - 30 specimens, we have investigated Mg/Ca in single specimens and single chambers at high resolution. A new fs-200 nm-LA-ICPMS technique was developed for the µm-sized layered calcite shells. To generate depth profiles with a resolution of about 50 nm/shot, we chose a low fluence of about 0.3 Jcm-2 and performed single shot measurements of the double charged 44Ca++ and the single charged 25Mg+ ions together. Precision (RSD) of the Mg/Ca data is about 5 %. Calibration was performed with the carbonate reference material MACS-3 from the USGS. Our results for different species from the Arabian Sea and Caribbean Sea demonstrate that Mg/Ca of different chambers vary and indicate that the foraminifer individuals built their chambers in different water depths and/or experienced seasonal changes in seawater temperature caused, for example, by upwelling (cold) versus stratified (warm) conditions. Typically, the Mg/Ca ratios of the final two chambers of the planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii from a sediment core of the Arabian Sea differ by about 5 mmol/mol from earlier chambers (2 mmol/mol) corresponding to seawater temperatures of 28 °C and 18 °C, respectively. In addition, mass fractions of other elements like Sr, Mn, Fe, Ba, and U have been determined with fs-LA-ICPMS using fast line scans, and thus provide further insights in the ecology of foraminifers.

  19. Depth profile of production yields of {sup nat}Pb(p, xn) {sup 206,205,204,203,202,201}Bi nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Nam-Suk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Arim; Bae, Oryun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Seock, E-mail: lee@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Experimental and simulation studies on the depth profiles of production yields of {sup nat}Pb(p, xn) {sup 206,205,204,203,202,201}Bi nuclear reactions were carried out. Irradiation experiments were performed at the high-intensity proton linac facility (KOMAC) in Korea. The targets, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, were arranged in a stack consisting of natural Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by activation analysis method using {sup 27}Al(p, 3p1n){sup 24}Na, {sup 197}Au(p, p1n){sup 196}Au, and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au monitor reactions and also by Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in the {sup nat}Pb activation foils and monitor foils were measured by HPGe spectroscopy system. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by FLUKA, PHITS/DCHAIN-SP, and MCNPX/FISPACT codes and the calculated data were compared with the experimental results. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the simulations.

  20. Depth profiles of production yields of natPb(p, xn206,205,204,203,202 Bi reactions using 100-MeV proton beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranj Leila Mokhtari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, results of the experimental study on the depth profiles of production yields of 206,205,204,203,202Bi radio-nuclei in the natural Pb target irradiated by a 100-MeV proton beam are presented. Irradiation was performed at proton linac facility (KOMAC in Korea. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of natural Pb, Al, Au foils and Pb plates. The proton beam intensity was determined by activation analysis method using 27Al(p, 3p1n24Na, 197Au(p, p1n196Au, and 197Au(p, p3n194Au monitor reactions and also using dosimetry method by a Gafchromic film. The production yields of produced Bi radio-nuclei in the natural Pb foils and monitor reactions were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by FLUKA, PHITS, and MCNPX codes and compared with the measurements in order to verify validity of physical models and nuclear data libraries in the Monte Carlo codes. A fairly good agreement was observed between the present experimental data and the simulations by FLUKA, PHITS, and MCNPX. However, physical models and the nuclear data relevant to the end of range of protons in the codes need to be improved.

  1. Effects of recoil-implanted oxygen on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kitano, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Masahito; Kawano, Takao; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa

    1996-04-01

    Effects of oxygen atoms recoiled from SiO{sub 2} films on depth profiles of defects and annealing processes in P{sup +}-implanted Si were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For an epitaxial Si specimen, the depth profile of defects was found to be shifted toward the surface by recoil implantation of oxygen atoms. This was attributed to the formation of vacancy-oxygen complexes and a resultant decrease in the diffusion length of vacancy-type defects. The recoiled oxygen atoms stabilized amorphous regions introduced by P{sup +}-implantation, and the annealing of these regions was observed after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 700degC. For a Czochralski-grown Si specimen fabricated by through-oxide implantation, the recoiled oxygen atoms introduced interstitial-type defects upon RTA below the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, and such defects were dissociated by annealing at 1000degC. (author)

  2. Two aspects of thin film analysis: boron profile and scattering length density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen-Mayer, H.H. E-mail: chen-mayer@nist.gov; Lamaze, G.P.; Coakley, K.J.; Satija, S.K

    2003-06-01

    Boron/phosphorus-doped silicate glass (BPSG) thin films are widely used in microelectronic circuit devices. We employ two neutron techniques to investigate a 200-nm thick BPSG film: neutron depth profiling (NDP) and neutron reflectometry (NR) to obtain complementary information on the boron containing layer.

  3. The use of neutron diffraction for the determination of the in-depth residual stresses profile in weld coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Maria Jose; Batista, A.C.; Nobre, J.P.; Loureiro, Altino; Kornmeier, Joana R.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron diffraction is a non-destructive technique, particularly suitable for the analysis of residual stress fields in welds. The technique is used in this article to study ferritic samples, coated by submerged arc welding using stainless steel filler metals. This procedure is often used for manufacturing process equipment for chemical and nuclear industries, for ease of implementation and economic reasons. The main disadvantage of that processes is the cracking phenomenon that often occurs at the interface between the base material and coatings, which can be minimized by performing post-weld stress relief heat treatments. The samples analyzed in this study were made of carbon steel plates, coated by submerged arc welding two types of stainless steel filler metals. For the first layer was used one EN 12 072 - S 2 U 23 12 electrode, while for the second and third layers were used an EN 12 072 - 19 12 3 S L electrode. After cladding, the samples were submitted to a post-weld heat treatment for 1 hour at 620 deg C. The residual stress profiles obtained by neutron diffraction evidence the relaxation of residual stress given by the heat treatment. (author)

  4. Analysis of LiSn alloy at several depths using LIBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchoňová, M., E-mail: maria.suchonova@fmph.uniba.sk [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Krištof, J.; Pribula, M. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Veis, M. [Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Science, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, Ilkovičova 6, 842 15 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Tabarés, F.L. [Fusion Department, Ciemat, Av Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Veis, P., E-mail: pavel.veis@fmph.uniba.sk [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-04-15

    The difference between the composition of the surface and the inner part of the LiSn sample was studied using Calibration Free Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) method. The sample was analysed under the low pressure (1330 Pa) in Ar atmosphere. The spectra were record using Echelle spectrometer (Mechelle ME5000). Gate delay and gate width was optimised and set to 300 ns. In order to analyse depth profile the LIBS spectra was recorded after each laser shot. The electron density analysed by laser induced plasma was determined separately for each laser shot, which means for each ablated layer of investigated sample. The difference between the individual shots taken at distinct sites of the sample are shown. The CF-LIBS method was used to determine the elemental composition near the surface and in the central part of the LiSn sample.

  5. Microsoft Kinect Visual and Depth Sensors for Breathing and Heart Rate Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Procházka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to a new method of using Microsoft (MS Kinect sensors for non-contact monitoring of breathing and heart rate estimation to detect possible medical and neurological disorders. Video sequences of facial features and thorax movements are recorded by MS Kinect image, depth and infrared sensors to enable their time analysis in selected regions of interest. The proposed methodology includes the use of computational methods and functional transforms for data selection, as well as their denoising, spectral analysis and visualization, in order to determine specific biomedical features. The results that were obtained verify the correspondence between the evaluation of the breathing frequency that was obtained from the image and infrared data of the mouth area and from the thorax movement that was recorded by the depth sensor. Spectral analysis of the time evolution of the mouth area video frames was also used for heart rate estimation. Results estimated from the image and infrared data of the mouth area were compared with those obtained by contact measurements by Garmin sensors (www.garmin.com. The study proves that simple image and depth sensors can be used to efficiently record biomedical multidimensional data with sufficient accuracy to detect selected biomedical features using specific methods of computational intelligence. The achieved accuracy for non-contact detection of breathing rate was 0.26% and the accuracy of heart rate estimation was 1.47% for the infrared sensor. The following results show how video frames with depth data can be used to differentiate different kinds of breathing. The proposed method enables us to obtain and analyse data for diagnostic purposes in the home environment or during physical activities, enabling efficient human–machine interaction.

  6. Regional fringe analysis for improving depth measurement in phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Kuang-Che Chang; Tu, Han-Yen; Hsieh, Ching-Huang; Cheng, Chau-Jern; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a regional fringe analysis (RFA) method to detect the regions of a target object in captured shifted images to improve depth measurement in phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry (PS-FPP). In the RFA method, region-based segmentation is exploited to segment the de-fringed image of a target object, and a multi-level fuzzy-based classification with five presented features is used to analyze and discriminate the regions of an object from the segmented regions, which were associated with explicit fringe information. Then, in the experiment, the performance of the proposed method is tested and evaluated on 26 test cases made of five types of materials. The qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate that the proposed RFA method can effectively detect the desired regions of an object to improve depth measurement in the PS-FPP system.

  7. [Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1998-04-25

    During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

  8. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to identify core profiles from the WMS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-03-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile approximates the shape and scatter of latent core profiles. The PAMS procedure was applied to index scores of nonreplicated participants from the standardization sample (N = 1,033) for the Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition (D. Tulsky, J. Zhu, & M. F. Ledbetter, 2002). PAMS extracted discrepant visual memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the complete 16- to 89-year-old sample and discrepant working memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the 75- to 89-year-old cohort. Implications for use of PAMS in future research are discussed.

  9. Depth profiles of temperature, specific conductance and oxygen concentration in Lake Powell, Arizona-Utah, 1992-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolf, G. Richard; Hart, Robert J.; Stephens, Doyle W.

    1998-01-01

    The depth distribution of temperature in lakes and reservoirs establishes vertical-density gradients that regulate the distribution of a wide array of chemical and biological features. In Lake Powell, the depth at which inflowing river water enters the reservoir is controlled by the water temperature of the river compared to the vertical-thermal structure of the reservoir in late spring and early summer. The measurements reported here document the longitudinal and vertical pattern of temperature, specific conductance, and oxygen concentration on several dates in 1992, 1994, and 1995.

  10. Analysis of implanted silicon dopant profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosa, T.J., E-mail: ty.prosa@ametek.com [Cameca Instruments Inc., Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Olson, D.; Geiser, B.; Larson, D.J. [Cameca Instruments Inc., Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Henry, K.; Steel, E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Atom probe tomography implant dose measurements are reported for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2134 (arsenic implant). Efforts were taken to manufacture specimens with limited variation in size and shape to minimize variation in physical reconstruction parameters. A tip profile reconstruction was utilized where measurements of tip profile, post-analysis specimen radius and sphere-to-cone radius ratio were required as inputs into the reconstruction process. A variation of 4% is observed in the dose measurement under these conditions. Various considerations necessary to narrow the observed variation in measured dose, toward the limit imposed by counting statistics, are discussed. - Highlights: ► Multiple APT measurements were made on a NIST standard reference implant material. ► Accuracy and precision of APT was assessed on implant dose measurements. ► Dose standard deviations of ∼2% (∼2× counting statistics limit) were achieved. ► SEM exposure was found to affect the ability to successfully analyze these specimens.

  11. New Professional Profiles and Skills in the Journalistic Field: A Scoping Review and In-Depth Interviews with Professionals in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Marques-Hayasaki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The professional profiles and skills related to journalism are adapting to a new paradigm as a consequence of the advent of new technologies - the web 2.0, the end of the monopoly of news production by mass media, etc. This study aims to provide a comprehensive critical mapping of new professional profiles and skills demanded in the field of journalism, based on a scoping review and in-depth interviews with professionals and academics in Spain. The results show a great variety of new profiles and nomenclatures. This is in part because of a significant overlapping in the functions emphasized by them. With regards to skills, the traditional ones are still the most valued by the market, although new competencies are becoming more and more important.

  12. Profile analysis of treatment effect changes in eating disorder indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kang; Annunziato, Rachel A; Olatunji, Bunmi O

    2017-11-23

    We investigated differential treatment effects on specific eating disorder (ED) indicators to enhance conclusions about treatment efficacy. Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling, which identifies core profiles in a population and interprets person profiles with core profile information, was utilized to identify core profiles from a sample of 5,177 patients who were repeatedly measured with the ED inventory-2 at admission and at discharge. To assess differential treatment effects for individual ED indicators, we compared the core profiles at admission with those at discharge. Three core profiles were identified and labeled as High Body Dissatisfaction with Low Bulimia (Core Profile 1), High Interoceptive Awareness with Low Body Dissatisfaction (Core Profile 2), and High Ineffectiveness with Low Bulimia (Core Profile 3). Treatment had the greatest effects on Core Profile 2. The patients whose profile patterns were similar to that of Core Profiles 1 and 2 were positively related with weight gain. However, treatment was least on Core Profile 3, and the patients whose profile patterns were like that of Core Profile 3 were negatively related with weight gain. In conclusion, those patients who fit Core Profile 3 may benefit from different treatment modalities than those that are standard in inpatient settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. In vivo confocal Raman microscopic determination of depth profiles of the stratum corneum lipid organization influenced by application of various oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-08-01

    The intercellular lipids (ICL) of stratum corneum (SC) play an important role in maintaining the skin barrier function. The lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in SC is not homogenous, but rather depth-dependent. This study aimed to analyze the influence of the topically applied mineral-derived (paraffin and petrolatum) and plant-derived (almond oil and jojoba oil) oils on the depth-dependent ICL profile ordering of the SC in vivo. Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), a unique tool to analyze the depth profile of the ICL structure non-invasively, is employed to investigate the interaction between oils and human SC in vivo. The results show that the response of SC to oils' permeation varies in the depths. All oils remain in the upper layers of the SC (0-20% of SC thickness) and show predominated differences of ICL ordering from intact skin. In these depths, skin treated with plant-derived oils shows more disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL than intact skin (poils do not influence the lateral packing order of SC ICL (p>0.1), except plant-derived oils at the depth 30% of SC thickness. In the deeper layers of the SC (60-100% of SC thickness), no difference between ICL lateral packing order of the oil-treated and intact skin can be observed, except that at the depths of 70-90% of the SC thickness, where slight changes with more disorder states are measured for plant-derived oil treated skin (poil types remain in the superficial layers of the SC (0-20% of the SC thickness). Skin treated with mineral- and plant-derived oils shows significantly higher disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in these layers of the SC compared to intact skin. Plant-derived oils significantly changed the ICL ordering in the depths of 30% and 70-90% of the SC thickness, which is likely due to the penetration of free fatty acids in the deeper layers of the SC. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  14. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  15. Dielectric analysis of depth dependent curing behavior of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Moeginger, Bernhard; Grossgarten, Mandy; Rosentritt, Martin; Hausnerova, Berenika

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate depth dependent changes of polymerization process and kinetics of visible light-curing (VLC) dental composites in real-time. The measured quantity - "ion viscosity" determined by dielectric analysis (DEA) - provides the depth dependent reaction rate which is correlated to the light intensity available in the corresponding depths derived from light transmission measurements. The ion viscosity curves of two composites (VOCO Arabesk Top and Grandio) were determined during irradiation of 40s with a light-curing unit (LCU) in specimen depths of 0.5/0.75/1.0/1.25/1.5/1.75 and 2.0mm using a dielectric cure analyzer (NETZSCH DEA 231 with Mini IDEX sensors). The thickness dependent light transmission was measured by irradiation composite specimens of various thicknesses on top of a radiometer setup. The shape of the ion viscosity curves depends strongly on the specimen thickness above the sensor. All curves exhibit a range of linear time dependency of the ion viscosity after a certain initiation time. The determined initiation times, the slopes of the linear part of the curves, and the ion viscosities at the end of the irradiation differ significantly with depth within the specimen. The slopes of the ion viscosity curves as well as the light intensity values decrease with depth and fit to the Lambert-Beer law. The corresponding attenuation coefficients are determined for Arabesk Top OA2 to 1.39mm(-1) and 1.48mm(-1), respectively, and for Grandio OA2 with 1.17 and 1.39mm(-1), respectively. For thicknesses exceeding 1.5mm a change in polymerization behavior is observed as the ion viscosity increases subsequent to the linear range indicating some kind of reaction acceleration. The two VLC composites and different specimen thicknesses discriminate significantly in their ion viscosity evolution allowing for a precise characterization of the curing process even with respect to the polymerization mechanism. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  16. Digging a Little Deeper: Microbial Communities, Molecular Composition and Soil Organic Matter Turnover along Tropical Forest Soil Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Heckman, K. A.; Reed, S.; Green, E. A.; Nico, P. S.; Tfaily, M. M.; Wood, T. E.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store more carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem and exchange vast amounts of CO2, water, and energy with the atmosphere. Much of this C is leached and stored in deep soil layers where we know little about its fate or the microbial communities that drive deep soil biogeochemistry. Organic matter (OM) in tropical soils appears to be associated with mineral particles, suggesting deep soils may provide greater C stabilization. However, few studies have evaluated sub-surface soils in tropical ecosystems, including estimates of the turnover times of deep soil C, the sensitivity of this C to global environmental change, and the microorganisms involved. We quantified bulk C pools, microbial communities, molecular composition of soil organic matter, and soil radiocarbon turnover times from surface soils to 1.5m depths in multiple soil pits across the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Soil C, nitrogen, and root and microbial biomass all declined exponentially with depth; total C concentrations dropped from 5.5% at the surface to soils (Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria) versus those below the active rooting zone (Verrucomicrobia and Thaumarchaea). High resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) analyses suggest a shift in the composition of OM with depth (especially in the water soluble fraction), an increase in oxidation, and decreasing H/C with depth (indicating higher aromaticity). Additionally, surface samples were rich in lignin-like compounds of plant origin that were absent with depth. Soil OM 14C and mean turnover times were variable across replicate horizons, ranging from 3-1500 years at the surface, to 5000-40,000 years at depth. In comparison to temperate deciduous forests, these 14C values reflect far older soil C. Particulate organic matter (free light fraction), with a relatively modern 14C was found in low but measureable concentration in even the deepest soil horizons. Our results indicate these tropical subsoils contain

  17. Depth distribution analysis of martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Chechenin, N.G.; Grabaek, L.; Bohr, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we present results from a depth distribution analysis of the martensitic phase change occurring in Xe implanted single crystals of austenitic stainless steel. Analysis was done by 'in situ' RBS/channeling analysis, X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) of the implanted surface. It is found that the martensitic transformation of the surface layer occurs for fluences above 1x10 20 m -2 . The thickness of the transformed layer increases with fluence to ≅ 150 nm at 1x10 21 m -2 , which far exceeds the range plus straggling of the implanted Xe as calculated by the TRIM computer simulation code. Simulations using the MARLOWE code indicate that the thickness of the transformed layer coincides with the range of the small fraction of ions channeled under random implantation conditions. Using cross sectional TEM on the Xe implanted crystals, the depth distribution of gas inclusions and defects can be directly observed. Using X-ray diffraction on implanted single crystals, the solid epitaxial nature of the Xe inclusions, induced prior to the martensitic transformation, was established. The lattice constant obtained from the broad diffraction peak indicates that the pressure in the inclusions is ≅ 5 GPa. (orig./BHO)

  18. Practical In-Depth Analysis of IDS Alerts for Tracing and Identifying Potential Attackers on Darknet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuk Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The darknet (i.e., a set of unused IP addresses is a very useful solution for observing the global trends of cyber threats and analyzing attack activities on the Internet. Since the darknet is not connected with real systems, in most cases, the incoming packets on the darknet (‘the darknet traffic’ do not contain a payload. This means that we are unable to get real malware from the darknet traffic. This situation makes it difficult for security experts (e.g., academic researchers, engineers, operators, etc. to identify whether the source hosts of the darknet traffic are infected by real malware or not. In this paper, we present the overall procedure of the in-depth analysis between the darknet traffic and IDS alerts using real data collected at the Science and Technology Cyber Security Center (S&T CSC in Korea and provide the detailed in-depth analysis results. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide practical experience, insight and know-how to security experts so that they are able to identify and trace the root cause of the darknet traffic. The experimental results show that correlation analysis between the darknet traffic and IDS alerts is very useful to discover potential attack hosts, especially internal hosts, and to find out what kinds of malware infected them.

  19. Analyzing the trophic link between the mesopelagic microbial loop and zooplankton from observed depth profiles of bacteria and protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanaka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that organic carbon exported to the ocean aphotic layer is significantly consumed by heterotrophic organisms such as bacteria and zooplankton in the mesopelagic layer. However, very little is known for the trophic link between bacteria and zooplankton or the function of the microbial loop in this layer. In the northwestern Mediterranean, recent studies have shown that viruses, bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and ciliates distribute down to 2000 m with group-specific depth-dependent decreases, and that bacterial production decreases with depth down to 1000 m. Here we show that such data can be analyzed using a simple steady-state food chain model to quantify the carbon flow from bacteria to zooplankton over the mesopelagic layer. The model indicates that bacterial mortality by viruses is similar to or 1.5 times greater than that by heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and that heterotrophic nanoflagellates transfer little of bacterial production to higher trophic levels.

  20. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  1. An in-depth analysis of theoretical frameworks for the study of care coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Van Houdt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complex chronic conditions often require long-term care from various healthcare professionals. Thus, maintaining quality care requires care coordination. Concepts for the study of care coordination require clarification to develop, study and evaluate coordination strategies. In 2007, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality defined care coordination and proposed five theoretical frameworks for exploring care coordination. This study aimed to update current theoretical frameworks and clarify key concepts related to care coordination. Methods: We performed a literature review to update existing theoretical frameworks. An in-depth analysis of these theoretical frameworks was conducted to formulate key concepts related to care coordination.Results: Our literature review found seven previously unidentified theoretical frameworks for studying care coordination. The in-depth analysis identified fourteen key concepts that the theoretical frameworks addressed. These were ‘external factors’, ‘structure’, ‘tasks characteristics’, ‘cultural factors’, ‘knowledge and technology’, ‘need for coordination’, ‘administrative operational processes’, ‘exchange of information’, ‘goals’, ‘roles’, ‘quality of relationship’, ‘patient outcome’, ‘team outcome’, and ‘(interorganizational outcome’.Conclusion: These 14 interrelated key concepts provide a base to develop or choose a framework for studying care coordination. The relational coordination theory and the multi-level framework are interesting as these are the most comprehensive.

  2. A new method to identify the foot of continental slope based on an integrated profile analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Li, Jiabiao; Li, Shoujun; Shang, Jihong; Jin, Xiaobin

    2017-06-01

    A new method is proposed to identify automatically the foot of the continental slope (FOS) based on the integrated analysis of topographic profiles. Based on the extremum points of the second derivative and the Douglas-Peucker algorithm, it simplifies the topographic profiles, then calculates the second derivative of the original profiles and the D-P profiles. Seven steps are proposed to simplify the original profiles. Meanwhile, multiple identification methods are proposed to determine the FOS points, including gradient, water depth and second derivative values of data points, as well as the concave and convex, continuity and segmentation of the topographic profiles. This method can comprehensively and intelligently analyze the topographic profiles and their derived slopes, second derivatives and D-P profiles, based on which, it is capable to analyze the essential properties of every single data point in the profile. Furthermore, it is proposed to remove the concave points of the curve and in addition, to implement six FOS judgment criteria.

  3. Mapping science communication scholarship in China: Content analysis on breadth, depth and agenda of published research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linjia; Huang, Biaowen; Wu, Guosheng

    2015-11-01

    This study attempted to illuminate the cause and relation between government, scholars, disciplines, and societal aspects, presenting data from a content analysis of published research with the key word "science communication" (Symbol: see text) in the title or in the key words, including academic papers published in journals and dissertations from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure database. Of these, 572 articles were coded using categories that identified science topics, theory, authorship, and methods used in each study to examine the breadth and depth that Science Communication has achieved since its inception in China. This study explored the dominance of History and Philosophy of Science scholars rather than Communication scholars. We also explored how science communication research began from theories and concepts instead of science report analysis and the difficulties of the shift from public understanding of science to public engagement in China. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Determination of the particulate extinction-coefficient profile and the column-integrated lidar ratios using the backscatter-coefficient and optical-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir A Kovalev; Wei Min Hao; Cyle Wold

    2007-01-01

    A new method is considered that can be used for inverting data obtained from a combined elastic-inelastic lidar or a high spectral resolution lidar operating in a one-directional mode, or an elastic lidar operating in a multiangle mode. The particulate extinction coefficient is retrieved from the simultaneously measured profiles of the particulate backscatter...

  5. Depth profiling of thin film solar cell components by synchrotron excited Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moenig, Harry; Grimm, Alexander; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Saez-Araoz, Rodrigo; Fischer, Christian-Herbert [Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Baer, Markus [University of Las Vegas (United States); Camus, Christian; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Kaufmann, Christian; Koerber, Paul; Kropp, Timo; Lauermann, Iver; Lehmann, Sebastian; Muenchenberg, Tim; Pistor, Paul; Puttnins, Stefan; Schock, Hans-Werner; Sokoll, Stefan [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin (Germany); Jung, Christian [BESSY GmbH Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Depending on the elemental composition of a material, SXES provides an information depth of 50-1000 nm. For studies of thin multilayer structures tuning of this parameter is highly desirable. One possibility is the variation of the excitation energy, which is accompanied by variation of photoionisation cross sections. Alternatively, we performed angle resolved SXES on the solar cell absorber material Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} covered by CdS or Zn(S,O) buffer layers (10-50 nm). Due to our setup geometry, the emission spectra clearly display increased surface sensitivity at small (grazing exit) and large (grazing incidence) exit angles. A model based on Beer-Lamberts law and setup geometry is in reasonable agreement with our experimental data.The presented results show that angle resolved SXES measurements yield depth-dependent information on multilayer structures. The increased surface sensitivity at grazing exit and grazing incidence angles allows the detection of extremely thin cover layers at reasonable recording times.

  6. Identification of candidate domestication regions in the radish genome based on high-depth resequencing analysis of 17 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namshin; Jeong, Young-Min; Jeong, Seongmun; Kim, Goon-Bo; Baek, Seunghoon; Kwon, Young-Eun; Cho, Ara; Choi, Sang-Bong; Kim, Jiwoong; Lim, Won-Jun; Kim, Kyoung Hyoun; Park, Won; Kim, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Yim, Bomi; Lee, Young Joon; Chun, Byung-Moon; Lee, Young-Pyo; Park, Beom-Seok; Yu, Hee-Ju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    This study provides high-quality variation data of diverse radish genotypes. Genome-wide SNP comparison along with RNA-seq analysis identified candidate genes related to domestication that have potential as trait-related markers for genetics and breeding of radish. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an annual root vegetable crop that also encompasses diverse wild species. Radish has a long history of domestication, but the origins and selective sweep of cultivated radishes remain controversial. Here, we present comprehensive whole-genome resequencing analysis of radish to explore genomic variation between the radish genotypes and to identify genetic bottlenecks due to domestication in Asian cultivars. High-depth resequencing and multi-sample genotyping analysis of ten cultivated and seven wild accessions obtained 4.0 million high-quality homozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/insertions or deletions. Variation analysis revealed that Asian cultivated radish types are closely related to wild Asian accessions, but are distinct from European/American cultivated radishes, supporting the notion that Asian cultivars were domesticated from wild Asian genotypes. SNP comparison between Asian genotypes identified 153 candidate domestication regions (CDRs) containing 512 genes. Network analysis of the genes in CDRs functioning in plant signaling pathways and biochemical processes identified group of genes related to root architecture, cell wall, sugar metabolism, and glucosinolate biosynthesis. Expression profiling of the genes during root development suggested that domestication-related selective advantages included a main taproot with few branched lateral roots, reduced cell wall rigidity and favorable taste. Overall, this study provides evolutionary insights into domestication-related genetic selection in radish as well as identification of gene candidates with the potential to act as trait-related markers for background selection of elite lines in molecular

  7. Secchi depth analysis using bio-optical parameters measured in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Naik, P.; Bandishte, M.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    Secchi depth provides the oceanographer with the first hand information about transparency and penetration of light in the water. Results of the Secchi depth and the optical properties measured in the Arabian Sea is presented. Our analyses show...

  8. First experiences of full-profile analysis with GUISDAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize the theory behind full-profile analysis of IS measurements and report first practical experiences with the GUISDAP (Grand Unified Incoherent Scatter Design and Analysis Package system designed to perform full-profile analysis of any IS measurements efficiently. By fitting whole plasma parameter profiles over the ionosphere, instead of point values of the parameters supposed to be approximately constant over small range intervals, full-profile analysis is free of underlying assumptions about the slow variation of the plasma parameters as a function of range. We define full-profile analysis as a mathematical inversion problem formalism and explain how it differs from the traditional gated analysis. Moreover, we study the bias introduced to traditional analysis results using realistic model ionospheres. By applying the full-profile method to data generated from the model ionospheres, we demonstrate that full-profile analysis is free from this kind of bias. Lastly, an example of analysis of real data by full-profile and gated analyses is shown.

  9. First experiences of full-profile analysis with GUISDAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Lehtinen

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize the theory behind full-profile analysis of IS measurements and report first practical experiences with the GUISDAP (Grand Unified Incoherent Scatter Design and Analysis Package system designed to perform full-profile analysis of any IS measurements efficiently. By fitting whole plasma parameter profiles over the ionosphere, instead of point values of the parameters supposed to be approximately constant over small range intervals, full-profile analysis is free of underlying assumptions about the slow variation of the plasma parameters as a function of range. We define full-profile analysis as a mathematical inversion problem formalism and explain how it differs from the traditional gated analysis. Moreover, we study the bias introduced to traditional analysis results using realistic model ionospheres. By applying the full-profile method to data generated from the model ionospheres, we demonstrate that full-profile analysis is free from this kind of bias. Lastly, an example of analysis of real data by full-profile and gated analyses is shown.

  10. The Hopkins Verbal Learning Test: an in-depth analysis of recall patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell-Essam, Rachel; Hogervorst, Eef; W Rahardjo, Tri Budi

    2018-04-01

    One of the earliest signs of dementia is memory issues and verbal word lists, such as the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT), are successfully used for screening. To gain insight in how memory is affected in dementia, and to further improve the efficacy of the HVLT, in-depth analysis of the recall patterns of dementia cases and controls was conducted. Dementia cases and controls were matched for factors that can affect performance, such as age, gender and education level. Word frequency, syllable length, and orthographic neighbourhood size did not differ in the Indonesian version of the HVLT, nor did these characteristics affect recall. However dementia cases showed consistent and poor recall across the three trials; with the worst recall for the "human shelter" category and best recall for the "animals" category. Dementia cases also showed impaired accessibility of all categories with reduced subsequent recall from accessed categories and reduced primacy and recency levels. Finally, dementia cases exhibited lower levels of re-remembering and recalling new words, and higher levels of immediate forgetting and never recalling words. It was concluded that utilising the extra information provided by the in-depth analyses of the recall patterns could be beneficial to improve dementia screening.

  11. Analysis of enamel microhardness at various hard tissue states and depth of the microfissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Yarova

    2013-08-01

    micro-hardness of enamel have been identified in the cervical area: the presence of defects of type I - in intact teeth, defects of II and III types - in the teeth with wedge-shaped defect. The least indices, regardless of the depth of micro-cracks in teeth, were diagnosed in cervical caries. In samples with carious and non-carious pathology the largest micro-hardness of enamel in the cervical area were recorded in deep micro-cracks type III, and the lowest - in the teeth with defects type I. In intact samples, conversely, the strength of enamel was higher in minor defects type I, lower - in the presence of micro-cracks type II. Changes in the mechanical properties of the enamel were due to its chemical composition, which was confirmed by microroentgen-spectral analysis. Thus, the content of calcium and phosphorus in the cervical region was significantly different depending on the pathology of hard tissues (p <0,05. The higher content of macro-elements was determined in the wedge-shaped defects. Some discrepancy of the obtained indices with the depth of micro-cracks indicates that complex of adaptive processes occurs not only in the enamel but in the strength of the enamel, depending on the depth of cracks and pathology of hard tissues and demand further investigation. The revealed features should be used for a substantiation of principles of treatment and prophylaxis of the dental hard tissues defects.

  12. Absorbed doses profiles vs Synovia tissue depth for the Y-90 and P-32 used in radiosynoviortesis treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres B, M.B.; Ayra P, F.E.; Garcia R, E.; Cornejo D, N.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2006-01-01

    The radiosynoviortesis treatment has been used during more of 40 years as an alternative to the chemical and surgical synovectomy to alleviate the pain and to reduce the inflammation in suffered patients of rheumatic arthropathies, haemophilic arthropathies and other articulation disorders. It consists on the injection of radioactive isotopes inside a synovial cavity. For to evaluate the dosimetry of the radiosynoviortesis treatment is of great interest to know the absorbed dose in the volume of the target (synovia). The precise calculation of the absorbed dose in the inflamed synovia it is difficult, for numerous reasons, since the same one will depend on the thickness of the synovial membrane, the size of the articular space, the structure of the synovial membrane, the distribution in the articulation, the nature of the articular liquid, etc. Also the presence of the bone and the articular cartilage, components also of the articulation, it even complicated more the calculations. The method used to evaluate the dosimetry in radioactive synovectomy is known as the Monte Carlo method. The objective of our work consists on estimating with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B the absorbed dose of the Y-90 and the P-32 in the depth of the synovial tissue. The results are presented as absorbed dose for injected millicurie (Gy/mCi) versus depth of synovial tissue. The simulation one carries out keeping in mind several synovia areas, of 50 cm 2 to 250 cm 2 keeping in mind three states of progression of the illness. Those obtained values of absorbed dose using the MCNP4B code will allow to introduce in our country an optimized method of dose prescription to the patient, to treat the rheumatic arthritis in medium and big articulations using the Y-90 and the P-32, eliminating the fixed doses and fixed radionuclides for each articulation like it happens in many clinics of Europe, as well as the empiric doses. (Author)

  13. Load profiles analysis for electricity market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Porumb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of electric power system transition towards smart grids, and the adoption of the electric market schemes, electric utilities are facing the need of a better load profiles understanding for their customers. In this work, some key objectives were addresses, such as definition of the mathematical model for calculating the hourly energy specific, identification of the three target groups for users who have developed consumer profiles, definition of the two types of significant load and assessment of the impact of using consumer profiles on users.

  14. Soil depth modelling using terrain analysis and satellite imagery: the case study of Qeshlaq mountainous watershed (Kurdistan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahudin Zahedi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil depth is a major soil characteristic, which is commonly used in distributed hydrological modelling in order to present watershed subsurface attributes. This study aims at developing a statistical model for predicting the spatial pattern of soil depth over the mountainous watershed from environmental variables derived from a digital elevation model (DEM and remote sensing data. Among the explanatory variables used in the models, seven are derived from a 10 m resolution DEM, namely specific catchment area, wetness index, aspect, slope, plan curvature, elevation and sediment transport index. Three variables landuse, NDVI and pca1 are derived from Landsat8 imagery, and are used for predicting soil depth by the models. Soil attributes, soil moisture, topographic curvature, training samples for each landuse and major vegetation types are considered at 429 profiles within four subwatersheds. Random forests (RF, support vector machine (SVM and artificial neural network (ANN are used to predict soil depth using the explanatory variables. The models are run using 336 data points in the calibration dataset with all 31 explanatory variables, and soil depth as the response of the models. Mean decrease permutation accuracy is performed on Variable selection. Testing dataset is done with the model soil depth values at testing locations (93 points using different efficiency criteria. Prediction error is computed for both the calibration and testing datasets. Results show that the variables landuse, specific surface area, slope, pca1, NDVI and aspect are the most important explanatory variables in predicting soil depth. RF and SVM models are appropriate for the mountainous watershed areas that have been limited in the depth of the soil and ANN model is more suitable for watershed with the fields of agricultural and deep soil depth.

  15. Consideration of sample heterogeneity and in-depth analysis of individual differences in sensory analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavay, Cécile; Brockhoff, Per B.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    In descriptive sensory analysis, large variations may be observed between scores. Individual differences between assessors have been identified as one cause for these variations. Much work has been done on modeling these differences and accounting for them through analysis of variance (ANOVA). Wh...

  16. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Siqueira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil penetration resistance (PR is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV, skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  17. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, G. M.; Silva, E. F. F.; Montenegro, A. A. A.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2013-07-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV), skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  18. Depth profiling of transport properties of in-situ grown YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x films for coated conductor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, William; Huh, J.-U.; Hammond, R. H.; Beasley, M. R.

    2003-03-01

    We report depth profiling of the local critical current density and resistivity of YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x (YBCO) films grown by in-situ electron beam evaporation. The method provides important information on the uniformity of the films, and therefore on the commonly observed property that the critical currents of coated conductor high temperature superconductor films do not scale linearly with thickness. Using a methodology of layer-by-layer etching, depth profiling of critical currents and resistivity of the films has been achieved. We use a Bromine methanol mixture to etch down YBCO films with an etch rate of 60 nm/min. At each step, we also observe surface morphology using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. In this talk, we report further study of the results found earlier that YBCO films deposited at high rates are composed of an upper layer of defected YBCO with a local Jc of 5 - 7 MA/cm^2 and a lower more perfect layer with no critical current capacity. The information derived may be useful in the characterization and optimization of superconducting thin films for electrical power and other applications.

  19. Fractal Analysis of Rock Joint Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audy, Ondřej; Ficker, Tomáš

    2017-10-01

    Surface reliefs of rock joints are analyzed in geotechnics when shear strength of rocky slopes is estimated. The rock joint profiles actually are self-affine fractal curves and computations of their fractal dimensions require special methods. Many papers devoted to the fractal properties of these profiles were published in the past but only a few of those papers employed a convenient computational method that would have guaranteed a sound value of that dimension. As a consequence, anomalously low dimensions were presented. This contribution deals with two computational modifications that lead to sound fractal dimensions of the self-affine rock joint profiles. These are the modified box-counting method and the modified yard-stick method sometimes called the compass method. Both these methods are frequently applied to self-similar fractal curves but the self-affine profile curves due to their self-affine nature require modified computational procedures implemented in computer programs.

  20. [Xenophobia and experienced abandonment--a depth-hermeneutic analysis of a single case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, Svenja; Hasper, Fritz; Wahl, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    A single case study is presented from a feasibility study on social, psychic and neurobiological causes of violence in adolescence focusing on right-wing extremist and xenophobic youth. Results from psychological assessments and a structured biografical reconstruction are analyzed. The case illustrates a typical developmental path of a right-wing, xenophobic and violent male adolescent who experienced early and repeated exclusion and social marginalization. Results from psychological testing demonstrated additional developmental risk factors, such as disorganized attachment representations and low mentalizing abilities. A depth-hermeneutic analysis ofa sequence during the attachment interview as well as a reflection of the research setting further illustrates how experiences of exclusion are re-enacted by a combination of fear of abandonment and aggression.

  1. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AMERICAN RESERVIST using BT and XBT casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 January 1974 to 29 September 1977 (NODC Accession 8900287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the AMERICAN RESERVIST in the North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean....

  2. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC GLACIER using BT and XBT casts in the NW / SW Pacific Ocean from 25 October 1986 to 31 January 1987 (NODC Accession 8700140)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts in the NW / SW Pacific Ocean from USCGC GLACIER. Data were collected from 25 October...

  3. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC GLACIER in the NW/SE Pacific Ocean and other seas from 31 January 1987 to 08 April 1987 (NODC Accession 8700183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC GLACIER in the Northwest/Southeast Pacific Ocean and other seas. Data...

  4. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS JOHN RODGERS using BT and XBT casts in the NE/NW Atlantic Ocean and other seas from 03 August 1988 to 03 October 1988 (NODC Accession 8900041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS JOHN RODGERS in the Northeast / Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Ionian Sea,...

  5. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USGC FORWARD using BT and XBT casts in the Gulf of Mexico from 11 March 1992 to 01 April 1992 (NODC Accession 9200086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC FORWARD in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were collected from 11 March 1992...

  6. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS BARBEY using BT and XBT casts in the Indian ocean and other seas from 07 January 1989 to 31 January 1989 (NODC Accession 8900034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS BARBEY in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Burma Sea, and Malacca of...

  7. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AMERICAN VIKING using BT and XBT casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from 23 September 1986 to 17 September 1987 (NODC Accession 8800048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the AMERICAN VIKING in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 23...

  8. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AUSTRALIA STAR and other platforms using XBT casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Pacific Ocean from 05 October 1989 to 21 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9400035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using XBT casts from the AUSTRALIA STAR and other platforms in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Pacific Ocean,...

  9. Temperature profile and water depth collected from XIANG YANG HONG 05 in the South China Sea using BT and XBT casts from 16 November 1986 to 03 December 1986 (NODC Accession 8700009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth were collected using BT and XBT casts from the XIANG YANG HONG 05 in the South China Sea. Data were collected from 16 November...

  10. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 01 December 1987 to 05 January 1988 (NODC Accession 8800015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  11. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIET LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 21 July 1988 to 18 August 1988 (NODC Accession 8800256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIET LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  12. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 30 April 1988 to 31 May 1988 (NODC Accession 8800173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC HARRIOT LANE in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Data...

  13. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the NW Atlantic Ocean for 1987-05-31 (NODC Accession 8700225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC Harriot Lane in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and TOGA Area - Atlantic...

  14. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USCGC HARRIOT LANE using BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 09 March 1988 to 10 March 1988 (NODC Accession 8800094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC Harriot Lane in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from...

  15. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS MCCLUSKY using BT and XBT casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean and other seas from 24 July 1992 to 10 December 1992 (NODC Accession 9300003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS MCCLUSKY in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea, East / South...

  16. Temperature profile and water depth data from BT and XBT casts in the Atlantic Ocean from USCGC POLAR SEA from 14 December 1983 to 06 May 1984 (NODC Accession 8600108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USCGC POLAR SEA in the Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 14 December...

  17. Temperature profile and water depth collected from ZAMBEZE and other platforms using BT and XBT casts in the Atlantic Ocean from 21 July 1981 to 02 December 1985 (NODC Accession 8600293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the ZAMBEZE and other platforms in the Northeast / Southwest Atlantic Ocean. Data...

  18. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS GALLERY using BT and XBT casts in the N/S Pacific Ocean from 25 June 1979 to 29 April 1986 (NODC Accession 8800225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS GALLERY in the North / South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from 25...

  19. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from HMAS DARWIN and other platforms using BT and XBT casts in the North / South Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean from 29 April 1985 to 12 April 1988 (NODC Accession 8800166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the HMAS DARWIN and other platforms in the North / South Pacific Ocean and Indian...

  20. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS COCHRANE using BT and XBT casts in the Inland Sea and other seas from 30 October 1988 to 26 March 1989 (NODC Accession 8900122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS COCHRANE in the Inland Sea, Philippine Sea, South / East China Sea, and...

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago from 2014-03-24 to 2014-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0161168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  2. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from SAXON STAR and other platforms in a World wide distribution from 09 March 1983 to 12 November 1986 (NODC Accession 8700035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the SAXON STAR and other platforms in a World wide distribution. Data were collected...

  3. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa from 2015-02-15 to 2015-03-28 (NCEI Accession 0161169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  4. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-27 (NCEI Accession 0161171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  5. An in-depth analysis of pharmaceutical regulation in the Republic of Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Alessandra; Sautenkova, Nina; Bezverhni, Zinaida; Seicas, Rita; Habicht, Jarno; Kanavos, Panos; Safta, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of the pharmaceutical system is a crucial, yet often neglected, component in ensuring access to safe and effective medicines. The aim of this study was to provide an in-depth analysis of the existing pharmaceutical regulation, including recent changes, in the Republic of Moldova. Data from field work conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) together with a review of policy documents and quantitative secondary data analysis was used to achieve this aim. This analysis identified several ways in which pharmaceutical regulation affects availability of quality medicines in the Republic of Moldova. These include lack of full implementation bioequivalence requirements for generics registration, incomplete implementation of good manufacturing practices and no implementation of good distribution practices, use of quality control instead of quality assurance as a method to ensure quality of medicines, frequent change of power within the Medicines and Medical Devices Agency (MMDA) leading to lack of long-term strategy and plans, conflict of interest between the different functions of the MMDA, the lack of sufficient funding for the MMDA to conduct its activities and to invest in continuous training of its staff (particularly inspectors) and very weak post-marketing control. Notably, several improvements have been recently introduced, including a roadmap for change for the MMDA, the introduction of good manufacturing practices and the drafting of a quality manual for the Agency. Based on these findings the authors propose a set of priority actions to address existing gaps and draw lessons learned from other countries.

  6. Microstructural analysis in the depth direction of a heteroepitaxial AlN thick film grown on a trench-patterned template by nanobeam X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Tohei, T.; Miyake, H.; Hiramatsu, K.; Sumitani, K.; Imai, Y.; Kimura, S.; Sakai, A.

    2018-04-01

    This work quantitatively assessed the three-dimensional distribution of crystal lattice distortions in an epitaxial AlN thick film grown on a trench-patterned template, using nanobeam X-ray diffraction. Position-dependent ω-2θ-φ mapping clearly demonstrated local tilting, spacing and twisting of lattice planes as well as fluctuations in these phenomena on a sub-micrometer scale comparable to the pitch of the trench-and-terrace patterning. Analysis of the crystal lattice distortion in the depth direction was performed using a newly developed method in which the X-ray nanobeam diffracted from the sample surface to specific depths can be selectively detected by employing a Pt wire profiler. This technique generated depth-resolved ω-2θ-φ maps confirming that fluctuations in lattice plane tilting and spacing greatly depend on the dislocation distribution and the history of the AlN epitaxial growth on the trench-patterned structure. It was also found that both fluctuations were reduced on approaching the AlN surface and, in particular, were sharply reduced at specific depths in the terrace regions. These sharp reductions are attributed to the formation of sacrificial zones with degraded crystal quality around the trenches and possibly lead to raising the crystal quality near the surface of the AlN film.

  7. The concept of 'vulnerability' in research ethics: an in-depth analysis of policies and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken-Roche, Dearbhail; Bell, Emily; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Racine, Eric

    2017-02-07

    The concept of vulnerability has held a central place in research ethics guidance since its introduction in the United States Belmont Report in 1979. It signals mindfulness for researchers and research ethics boards to the possibility that some participants may be at higher risk of harm or wrong. Despite its important intended purpose and widespread use, there is considerable disagreement in the scholarly literature about the meaning and delineation of vulnerability, stemming from a perceived lack of guidance within research ethics standards. The aim of this study was to assess the concept of vulnerability as it is employed in major national and international research ethics policies and guidelines. We conducted an in-depth analysis of 11 (five national and six international) research ethics policies and guidelines, exploring their discussions of the definition, application, normative justification and implications of vulnerability. Few policies and guidelines explicitly defined vulnerability, instead relying on implicit assumptions and the delineation of vulnerable groups and sources of vulnerability. On the whole, we found considerable richness in the content on vulnerability across policies, but note that this relies heavily on the structure imposed on the data through our analysis. Our results underscore a need for policymakers to revisit the guidance on vulnerability in research ethics, and we propose that a process of stakeholder engagement would well-support this effort.

  8. Indian nuclear literature - contribution to INIS data base : an in-depth analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaraman, Kamala

    1981-01-01

    An attempt has been made to analyse the Indian nuclear literature that has gone to form part of the INIS (International Nuclear Information System) Data Base as the contribution from India over the last five years. The in-depth analysis is based on the subject-wise statistics collected over the period 1975-1979 and gives a good idea of the wide coverage of nuclear literature published in the country. The inputs have been drawn from about 150 to 170 journals, 8 to 10 proceedings of conferences and symposia, 100 reports and other types of literature while the topics of symposia, reports and journal articles vary from pure physics and chemistry to any branch of engineering and biology. India has emerged as one of the most consistent inputters to the INIS Data Base, besides being the topmost amongst the developing countries. Though no claims or absolute statements are made on the actual state of Indian Scientific literature or its R and D activities, the analysis yet enables one to get a broad overall view of the same with the data available with the INIS group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. (K.B.)

  9. An In-Depth Analysis of Tags and Controlled Metadata for Book Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Petras, Vivien

    2017-01-01

    Book search for information needs that go beyond standard bibliographic data is far from a solved problem. Such complex information needs often cover a combination of di erent aspects, such as specific genres or plot elements, engagement or novelty. By design, subject information in controlled vo....... Finally, we perform a detailed failure analysis and show, using tags and controlled vocabulary terms, that some request types are inherently more di cult to solve than others....... vocabularies is not always adequate in covering such complex needs, and social tags have been proposed as an alternative. In this paper we present a large-scale empirical comparison and in-depth analysis of the value of controlled vocabularies and tags for book retrieval using a test collection of over 2...... million book records and over 330 real-world book information needs. We find that while tags and controlled vocabulary terms provide complementary performance, tags perform better overall. However, this is not due to a popularity e ect; instead, tags are better at matching the language of regular users...

  10. Non-destructive depth profiling of solid samples by atomic and nuclear interactions induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demortier, Guy

    2003-01-01

    The study of complex materials (non-homogeneous matrices containing medium and/or heavy atoms as major elements) by Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) requires the tailoring of the experimental set up to take into account the high X-ray intensity produced by these main elements present at the surface, as well as the expected low intensity from other elements 'buried' in the substrate. The determination of traces is therefore limited and the minimum detection limit is generally higher by at least two orders of magnitude in comparison with those achievable for low Z matrices (Z≤20). Additionally, those high Z matrices, having a high absorption capability, are not always homogeneous. The non-homogeneity may be, on the one hand, a layered structure (which is uneasy to profile by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) if the material contains elements of neighbouring atomic masses or if the layered structure extends on several microns). PIXE measurements at various incident energies (and with various projectiles (p, d, He 3 , He 4 )) are an alternative method to overcome those difficulties. The use of special filters to selectively decrease the intensity of the most intense X-ray lines, the accurate calculation of the characteristic X-ray intensity ratios (Kα/Kβ, Lα/Lβ) of individual elements, the computation of the secondary X-ray fluorescence induced in thick targets are amongst the most important parameters to be investigated in order to solve these analytical problems. Examples of Al, Si, Cu, Ag, Au based alloys as encountered in industrial and archaeological metallurgy are discussed. The non-destructive aspect of the ion beam techniques is proved by applying the method in vivo for the study of fluorine migration in tooth enamel. Preliminary results on the composition of the blocks of the pyramid of Cheops are presented in the scope of a complete revision of the procedure of its construction

  11. Characterization of titanium hydride film after long-term air interaction: SEM, ARXPS and AES depth profile studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, M.

    1998-01-01

    Thin titanium hydride (TiHy) films are compared with thin titanium films after analysis using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). The TiHy films were prepared under ultrahigh vacuum

  12. Production of 21Ne in depth-profiled olivine from a 54 Ma basalt sequence, Eastern Highlands (37° S), Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchan, Erin L.; Honda, Masahiko; Barrows, Timothy T.; Phillips, David; Chivas, Allan R.; Fifield, L. Keith; Fabel, Derek

    2018-01-01

    In this study we investigate the cosmogenic neon component in olivine samples from a vertical profile in order to quantify muogenic 21Ne production in this mineral. Samples were collected from an 11 m thick Eocene basalt profile in the Eastern Highlands of southeastern Australia. An eruption age of 54.15 ± 0.36 Ma (2σ) was determined from 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments (n = 6) on three whole-rock samples. A 36Cl profile on the section indicated an apparent steady state erosion rate of 4.7 ± 0.5 m Ma-1. The eruption age was used to calculate in situ produced radiogenic 4He and nucleogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations in olivine. Olivine mineral separates (n = 4), extracted from the upper two metres of the studied profile, reveal cosmogenic 21Ne concentrations that attenuate exponentially with depth. However, olivine (Fo68) extracted from below 2 m does not contain discernible 21Ne aside from magmatic and nucleogenic components, with the exception of one sample that apparently contained equal proportions of nucleogenic and muogenic neon. Modelling results suggest a muogenic neon sea-level high-latitude production rate of 0.02 ± 0.04 to 0.9 ± 1.3 atoms g-1 a-1 (1σ), or <2.5% of spallogenic cosmogenic 21Ne production at Earth's surface. These data support a key implicit assumption in the literature that accumulation of muogenic 21Ne in olivine in surface samples is likely to be negligible/minimal compared to spallogenic 21Ne.

  13. ExPASy: The proteomics server for in-depth protein knowledge and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Gattiker, Alexandre; Hoogland, Christine; Ivanyi, Ivan; Appel, Ron D; Bairoch, Amos

    2003-07-01

    The ExPASy (the Expert Protein Analysis System) World Wide Web server (http://www.expasy.org), is provided as a service to the life science community by a multidisciplinary team at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB). It provides access to a variety of databases and analytical tools dedicated to proteins and proteomics. ExPASy databases include SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL, SWISS-2DPAGE, PROSITE, ENZYME and the SWISS-MODEL repository. Analysis tools are available for specific tasks relevant to proteomics, similarity searches, pattern and profile searches, post-translational modification prediction, topology prediction, primary, secondary and tertiary structure analysis and sequence alignment. These databases and tools are tightly interlinked: a special emphasis is placed on integration of database entries with related resources developed at the SIB and elsewhere, and the proteomics tools have been designed to read the annotations in SWISS-PROT in order to enhance their predictions. ExPASy started to operate in 1993, as the first WWW server in the field of life sciences. In addition to the main site in Switzerland, seven mirror sites in different continents currently serve the user community.

  14. Time-depth and velocity trend analysis of the Wasagu field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is known in the North Sea basin that depths to major reflectors as determined from surface seismic data are often larger than the well depths. From this study of data sets from Wasagu field in the Niger Delta, it has been found that this statement might not hold in an area where rapid lateral variations in the subsurface ...

  15. Analysis of marine aerosol optical depth retrieved from IRS-P4 OCM ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aerosol optical depth is regularly derived from SeaWiFS and MODIS sensor and used by the sci- entific community in various climatic studies. In the present study an attempt has been made to retrieve the aerosol optical depth using the IRS-P4 OCM sensor data and a comparison has been carried out using few ...

  16. Depth profiling of ion-implanted AlInN using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and cathodoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.W.; Nogales, E.; Amabile, D.; Wang, K.; Katchkanov, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.; O'Donnell, K.P.; Rading, D.; Kersting, R.; Tallarek, E.; Watson, I.M.; Matias, V.; Vantomme, A.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of the depth profiles and luminescence of Eu and Er-ions implanted into AlInN/GaN bilayers differentiates between ions located in the two different III-N hosts. Differences between samples implanted using channeling or off-axis geometries are studied using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. A fraction of ions have crossed the AlInN layer (either 130 or 250 nm thick) and reached the underlying GaN. Cathodoluminescence spectra as a function of incident electron energy and photoluminescence excitation data distinguish between ions within AlInN and GaN. The RE emission from the AlInN is broader and red-shifted and the dependence of the intensity on host is discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Depth profiling of ion-implanted AlInN using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.W.; Nogales, E.; Amabile, D.; Wang, K.; Katchkanov, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.; O' Donnell, K.P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rading, D. [ION-TOF GmbH, Gievenbecker Weg 15, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Kersting, R.; Tallarek, E. [Tascon GmbH, Gievenbecker Weg 15, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Watson, I.M. [Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Matias, V.; Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U. Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lorenz, K.; Alves, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, EN10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2006-06-15

    Investigation of the depth profiles and luminescence of Eu and Er-ions implanted into AlInN/GaN bilayers differentiates between ions located in the two different III-N hosts. Differences between samples implanted using channeling or off-axis geometries are studied using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. A fraction of ions have crossed the AlInN layer (either 130 or 250 nm thick) and reached the underlying GaN. Cathodoluminescence spectra as a function of incident electron energy and photoluminescence excitation data distinguish between ions within AlInN and GaN. The RE emission from the AlInN is broader and red-shifted and the dependence of the intensity on host is discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Revealing Chemical Processes Involved in Electrochemical (De)Lithiation of Al with in Situ Neutron Depth Profiling and X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Danny X; Co, Anne C

    2016-01-13

    Herein we report a direct measurement of Li transport in real-time during charge and discharge process within an Al matrix using neutron depth profiling (NDP). In situ NDP was used to reveal and quantify parasitic losses during the first 25 mAhr/g of lithiation, followed by the formation of LiAl protrusions from the surface of pristine Al. Evidence of Li entrapment is also reported during delithiation. Subsequent lithiation and delithiation showed electrochemical charge passed to be equivalent to the amount of lithium incorporated into the Al matrix with negligible difference, suggesting that the parasitic losses including the formation of the solid electrolyte layer may be confined to the first lithiation. Parallel in situ XRD measurements also confirm the transformation of β-LiAl from a solid solution of α-LiAl, revealing solid solution-mediated crystallization of β-LiAl.

  19. ChiMS: Open-source instrument control software platform on LabVIEW for imaging/depth profiling mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yang; Hanley, Luke

    2015-06-01

    ChiMS is an open-source data acquisition and control software program written within LabVIEW for high speed imaging and depth profiling mass spectrometers. ChiMS can also transfer large datasets from a digitizer to computer memory at high repetition rate, save data to hard disk at high throughput, and perform high speed data processing. The data acquisition mode generally simulates a digital oscilloscope, but with peripheral devices integrated for control as well as advanced data sorting and processing capabilities. Customized user-designed experiments can be easily written based on several included templates. ChiMS is additionally well suited to non-laser based mass spectrometers imaging and various other experiments in laser physics, physical chemistry, and surface science.

  20. An Excel™-VBA programme for the analysis of current velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. P.; Brodalka, M.

    2004-10-01

    VPA is an Excel spreadsheet to facilitate the analysis of current velocity profiles and its application to sediment transport studies in steady, uniform, open-channel flows. The program requires input values such as the water temperature (from which the density and dynamic viscosity are calculated), the channel depth and slope, current velocities as measured at different heights above the bed, bedform length and height, as well as the sediment density and median size. The latter can be provided as sieve diameters, fall diameters or as phi values. The velocity profiles are plotted on two graphs, one being a traditional plot of velocity versus height or distance from the bed and the other comparing the observed profile with theoretical profiles for smooth, transitional and rough boundary conditions. VBA macros are provided to clear the spreadsheet before new profiles are analysed, update the formulas, straighten out the velocity profiles, calculate the shear velocity, and save the data on a separate sheet for further analysis. The programme is applied to a new and more accurate method to determine the shear velocity, which can be used to predict the bedload discharge over plane beds and is also incorporated into a dimensionally correct suspended load transport equation combining the parameters most important in sediment transport. A dimensionally correct bedload discharge equation based upon the mean excess flow velocity is also proposed for plane beds, ripples and dunes.

  1. Integral Analysis of Seismic Refraction and Ambient Vibration Survey for Subsurface Profile Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Rosli, S.; Fauziah, A.; Akmal, M. A. K.; Aziman, M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Ashraf, M. I. M.; Shaylinda, M. Z. N.; Rais, Y.; Ishak, M. F.; Alel, M. N. A.

    2018-04-01

    Geotechnical site investigation as known as subsurface profile evaluation is the process of subsurface layer characteristics determination which finally used for design and construction phase. Traditionally, site investigation was performed using drilling technique thus suffers from several limitation due to cost, time, data coverage and sustainability. In order to overcome those problems, this study adopted surface techniques using seismic refraction and ambient vibration method for subsurface profile depth evaluation. Seismic refraction data acquisition and processing was performed using ABEM Terraloc and OPTIM software respectively. Meanwhile ambient vibration data acquisition and processing was performed using CityShark II, Lennartz and GEOPSY software respectively. It was found that studied area consist of two layers representing overburden and bedrock geomaterials based on p-wave velocity value (vp = 300 – 2500 m/s and vp > 2500 m/s) and natural frequency value (Fo = 3.37 – 3.90 Hz) analyzed. Further analysis found that both methods show some good similarity in term of depth and thickness with percentage accuracy at 60 – 97%. Consequently, this study has demonstrated that the application of seismic refractin and ambient vibration method was applicable in subsurface profile depth and thickness estimation. Moreover, surface technique which consider as non-destructive method adopted in this study was able to compliment conventional drilling method in term of cost, time, data coverage and environmental sustainaibility.

  2. Contact traction analysis for profile change during coining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kang, Heung Seok; Song, Kee Nam

    2002-01-01

    Contact tractions are analysed in the case of the change in contact profile occurring during the coining process of a thin strip material. The changed profile is assumed as a concave circular arc in the central part of the contact region which is smoothly connected with convex circular arcs at both sides, referring to the actual measurement of the coined material. The profile is discretized and the known solutions of singular integral equations are used. Since the contact profile affects the contact traction and relevant tribological behaviour (e.g. wear) as well, an accurate definition of the profile is necessary in the analysis of material failure. Parametric study is conducted with the variation of the radii and distance of the arcs, which defines the height difference between the summits of the arcs. Considered is the contact profile, which can give the negligible variation of the traction in comparison with that before the coining process

  3. Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Residential Buildings: Sensitivity Analysis and Guidance on Model Inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Jason D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Winkler, Jonathan M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Moisture buffering of building materials has a significant impact on the building's indoor humidity, and building energy simulations need to model this buffering to accurately predict the humidity. Researchers requiring a simple moisture-buffering approach typically rely on the effective-capacitance model, which has been shown to be a poor predictor of actual indoor humidity. This paper describes an alternative two-layer effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model and its inputs. While this model has been used previously, there is a need to understand the sensitivity of this model to uncertain inputs. In this paper, we use the moisture-adsorbent materials exposed to the interior air: drywall, wood, and carpet. We use a global sensitivity analysis to determine which inputs are most influential and how the model's prediction capability degrades due to uncertainty in these inputs. We then compare the model's humidity prediction with measured data from five houses, which shows that this model, and a set of simple inputs, can give reasonable prediction of the indoor humidity.

  4. Automated Analysis and Quantification of Human Mobility Using a Depth Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leightley, Daniel; McPhee, Jamie S; Yap, Moi Hoon

    2017-07-01

    Analysis and quantification of human motion to support clinicians in the decision-making process is the desired outcome for many clinical-based approaches. However, generating statistical models that are free from human interpretation and yet representative is a difficult task. In this paper, we propose a framework that automatically recognizes and evaluates human mobility impairments using the Microsoft Kinect One depth sensor. The framework is composed of two parts. First, it recognizes motions, such as sit-to-stand or walking 4 m, using abstract feature representation techniques and machine learning. Second, evaluation of the motion sequence in the temporal domain by comparing the test participant with a statistical mobility model, generated from tracking movements of healthy people. To complement the framework, we propose an automatic method to enable a fairer, unbiased approach to label motion capture data. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of the framework to recognize and provide clinically relevant feedback to highlight mobility concerns, hence providing a route toward stratified rehabilitation pathways and clinician-led interventions.

  5. A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO VOICE RANGE PROFILE (PHONETOGRAM) ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULTER, AM; WIT, HP; SCHUTTE, HK; MILLER, DG

    1994-01-01

    A new method to analyze voice range profiles (phonetograms) is described. The structured analysis is based on quantitatively determining the features: shape, area, and ''speaking range'' dynamics, without distorting the shape of phonetograms. The parameter sets describing these features are

  6. Preprocessing and exploratory analysis of chromatographic profiles of plant extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Cruz-Juarez, L.; Bont, de D.; Hall, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of herbal extracts to compare samples from different origin is important for robust production and quality control strategies. This characterization is now mainly performed by analysis of selected marker compounds. Metabolic fingerprinting of full metabolite profiles of plant

  7. Analysis of influence factors on anterior chamber volume by corneal horizontal diameter and anterior chamber depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hua Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlative factors of corneal horizontal diameter(CHDand anterior chamber depth(ACDand discuss the affecting factors of anterior chamber volume(ACV.METHODS: A total of 241 cases(482 eyesof myopia aged 6-47 years were collected on randomly. There were 124(248 eyesmale subjects and 117(234 eyesfemale subjects. CHD and ACD were measured with the Orbscan ⅡZ system, and each measurement was repeated three times. SPSS 17.0 software was used to analyze the correlation data. Mathematical model was set up to research anterior chamber volume. RESULTS: The average of CHD is(11.69±0.51mm, with diameter of(11.74±0.49mm in male and(11.64±0.53mm in female.The average of ACD was(3.04±0.30mm, with depth of(3.07±0.30mm in male and(3.02±0.29in female. Differences in gender of CHD and ACD were significant in the t-test for independent samples(t= -2.265, -1.971; P=0.024, 0.05, these size of male were both larger than that of female. Through person correlation analysis, a negative correlation was found between CHD and age, ACD and age(r= -0.260,-0.246; P=0, 0; a positive correlation was found between CHD and ACD(r=0.297; P=0, the regression equation between CHD and ACD in myopia population was Y=1.025+0.173X(F=46.440,P=0, R2=0.088, where Y represents ACD and X represents CHD. CONCLUSION: There are statistically significant difference between male and female in CHD, ACD and ACV. The size of these in male is larger than in female. The CHD is positively correlated with the ACD, and CHD, ACD and ACV are negatively correlated with age and are not associated with the degree of myopia.

  8. Depth of magnetic basement in Iran based on fractal spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teknik, Vahid; Ghods, Abdolreza

    2017-06-01

    To estimate the shape of sedimentary basins, a critical parameter in hydrocarbon exploration, we calculated the depth of magnetic basement by applying a fractal spectral method to the aeromagnetic map of Iran. The depth of magnetic basement is a close proxy for the shape of sedimentary basins provided that igneous basement is strongly magnetized relative to the overlying sediments and there is no interbedding magnetic layer in the sediments. The shape of the power spectrum of magnetic anomalies is sensitive to the depth of magnetic basement, the thickness of the magnetic layer, the fractal parameter of magnetization and the size of the window used for the calculation of the power spectrum. Using a suite of synthetic tests, we have shown that the estimation of the depth of magnetic basement of up to 20 km is not very sensitive to the often unknown fractal parameter and thus the spectral method is a reliable tool to calculate the depth of magnetic basement. The depth of magnetic basement is in the range of 7-16 km in the Zagros, east Alborz, Tabas, Jazmurian and Makran regions, showing a close correlation with depths estimated from the maximum thickness of stratigraphic columns. We have also found new sedimentary basins in Bostan Abad, Bijar and south of Orumiyeh Lake. The significant depth of the magnetic basement in the Makran, Jazmurain depression, southeast Caspian Sea, Tabas, Great Kavir, south of Orumiyeh Lake, Bostan Abad and Bijar sedimentary basins makes them future prospects for hydrocarbon explorations. The depth of magnetic basement is strongly reduced over the Neyriz and Kermanshah Ophiolites, but it does not show any meaningful correlation with other outcrops of ophiolitic rocks in Iran.

  9. What Matters in Weight Loss? An In-Depth Analysis of Self-Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stefanie Lynn; Ahmed, Rezwan; Hill, James O; Kushner, Robert F; Lindquist, Richard; Brunning, Scott; Margulies, Amy

    2017-05-12

    Using technology to self-monitor body weight, dietary intake, and physical activity is a common practice used by consumers and health companies to increase awareness of current and desired behaviors in weight loss. Understanding how to best use the information gathered by these relatively new methods needs to be further explored. The purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of self-monitoring to weight loss in participants in a 6-month commercial weight-loss intervention administered by Retrofit and to specifically identify the significant contributors to weight loss that are associated with behavior and outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed using 2113 participants enrolled from 2011 to 2015 in a Retrofit weight-loss program. Participants were males and females aged 18 years or older with a starting body mass index of ≥25 kg/m2, who also provided a weight measurement at the sixth month of the program. Multiple regression analysis was performed using all measures of self-monitoring behaviors involving weight measurements, dietary intake, and physical activity to predict weight loss at 6 months. Each significant predictor was analyzed in depth to reveal the impact on outcome. Participants in the Retrofit Program lost a mean -5.58% (SE 0.12) of their baseline weight with 51.87% (1096/2113) of participants losing at least 5% of their baseline weight. Multiple regression model (R 2 =.197, Pself-monitoring behaviors of self-weigh-in, daily steps, high-intensity activity, and persistent food logging were significant predictors of weight loss during a 6-month intervention. ©Stefanie Lynn Painter, Rezwan Ahmed, James O Hill, Robert F Kushner, Richard Lindquist, Scott Brunning, Amy Margulies. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 12.05.2017.

  10. Confocal Raman microscopy for in depth analysis in the field of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, G.; Striova, J.; Zoppi, A.; Castellucci, E. M.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of cultural heritage, the main concern when a sample is analyzed is its safeguard, and this means that non-destructive techniques are required. In this work, we show how confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) may be successfully applied in the study of works of art as a valuable alternative to other well established techniques. CRM with a metallurgical objective was tested for the in depth study of thin samples that are of interest in the field of cultural heritage. The sensitivity of the instrumentation was first evaluated by analyzing single layers of pure polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films having a thickness of 12, 25, and 50 μm, respectively, and a multilayer sample of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). Subsequently, the technique was applied to the analysis of historical dyed cotton yarns in order to check whether it was possible to achieve a better discrimination of the fibres' signals for an easier identification. A substantial improvement of the signal to noise ratio was found in the confocal arrangement with respect to the non-confocal one, suggesting the use of this technique for this kind of analysis in the field of cultural heritage. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy in confocal configuration was exploited in the evaluation of cleaning performed on the mural painting specimens, treated with acrylic resin (Paraloid B72). Confocal Raman experiments were performed before and after laser cleaning (at different conditions) in order to monitor the presence and to approximate the polymer thickness: the method proved to be a valid comparative tool in assessment of cleaning efficiencies.

  11. Analysis of the Interference Modulation Depth in the Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rilong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principle of the Michelson interferometer, the paper briefly describes the theoretical significance and calculates and deduces three expressions of the interference modulation depth. The influence of the surface shape error of plane mirror on modulation depth is analyzed, and the tolerance of error is also pointed out. Moreover, the dependence of modulation depth on the reflectance change of beam splitter interface is also analyzed, and the curve is given. It is concluded that this paper is of general significance for the Fourier transform spectrometer based on the principle of the Michelson two-beam interference.

  12. Direct evidence of flat band voltage shift for TiN/LaO or ZrO/SiO2stack structure via work function depth profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sung; Park, Hyoungsun; Ko, Dong-Su; Kim, Yong Su; Kyoung, Yong Koo; Lee, Hyung-Ik; Cho, Eunae; Lee, Hyo Sug; Park, Gyung-Su; Shin, Jai Kwang; Lee, Dongjin; Lee, Jieun; Jung, Kyoungho; Jeong, Moonyoung; Yamada, Satoru; Kang, Hee Jae; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2017-03-02

    We demonstrated that a flat band voltage (V FB ) shift could be controlled in TiN/(LaO or ZrO)/SiO 2 stack structures. The V FB shift described in term of metal diffusion into the TiN film and silicate formation in the inserted (LaO or ZrO)/SiO 2 interface layer. The metal doping and silicate formation confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) line profiling, respectively. The direct work function measurement technique allowed us to make direct estimate of a variety of flat band voltages (V FB ). As a function of composition ratio of La or Zr to Ti in the region of a TiN/(LaO or ZrO)/SiO 2 /Si stack, direct work function modulation driven by La and Zr doping was confirmed with the work functions obtained from the cutoff value of secondary electron emission by auger electron spectroscopy (AES). We also suggested an analytical method to determine the interface dipole via work function depth profiling.

  13. Quantitative and qualitative proteome characteristics extracted from in-depth integrated genomics and proteomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, T.Y.; van Heesch, S.; van den Toorn, H.; Giansanti, P.; Cristobal, A.; Toonen, P.; Schafer, S.; Hubner, N.; van Breukelen, B.; Mohammed, S.; Cuppen, E.; Heck, A.J.R.; Guryev, V.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We

  14. Some practical examples of defence in depth analysis for category IV gamma irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo, E-mail: aryarj@ig.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    The Defence in Depth concept provides a major contribution to the safety philosophy of irradiation facilities. But problems occur when somebody tries to understand or analyse a safety system or develop a new one because there is a lack of practical examples in Safety Series 107 or other IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) publications for irradiation facilities. This paper tries to fill this lack of information by providing a series of practical examples and explanations about Defence in Depth concepts. (author)

  15. Some practical examples of defence in depth analysis for category IV gamma irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2014-01-01

    The Defence in Depth concept provides a major contribution to the safety philosophy of irradiation facilities. But problems occur when somebody tries to understand or analyse a safety system or develop a new one because there is a lack of practical examples in Safety Series 107 or other IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) publications for irradiation facilities. This paper tries to fill this lack of information by providing a series of practical examples and explanations about Defence in Depth concepts. (author)

  16. Depth of Response in Multiple Myeloma: A Pooled Analysis of Three PETHEMA/GEM Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahuerta, Juan-Jose; Paiva, Bruno; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Cordón, Lourdes; Cedena, Maria-Teresa; Puig, Noemi; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Rosiñol, Laura; Gutierrez, Norma C; Martín-Ramos, María-Luisa; Oriol, Albert; Teruel, Ana-Isabel; Echeveste, María-Asunción; de Paz, Raquel; de Arriba, Felipe; Hernandez, Miguel T; Palomera, Luis; Martinez, Rafael; Martin, Alejandro; Alegre, Adrian; De la Rubia, Javier; Orfao, Alberto; Mateos, María-Victoria; Blade, Joan; San-Miguel, Jesus F

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To perform a critical analysis on the impact of depth of response in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM). Patients and Methods Data were analyzed from 609 patients who were enrolled in the GEM (Grupo Español de Mieloma) 2000 and GEM2005MENOS65 studies for transplant-eligible MM and the GEM2010MAS65 clinical trial for elderly patients with MM who had minimal residual disease (MRD) assessments 9 months after study enrollment. Median follow-up of the series was 71 months. Results Achievement of complete remission (CR) in the absence of MRD negativity was not associated with prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with near-CR or partial response (median PFS, 27, 27, and 29 months, respectively; median OS, 59, 64, and 65 months, respectively). MRD-negative status was strongly associated with prolonged PFS (median, 63 months; P < .001) and OS (median not reached; P < .001) overall and in subgroups defined by prior transplantation, disease stage, and cytogenetics, with prognostic superiority of MRD negativity versus CR particularly evident in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. Accordingly, Harrell C statistics showed higher discrimination for both PFS and OS in Cox models that included MRD (as opposed to CR) for response assessment. Superior MRD-negative rates after different induction regimens anticipated prolonged PFS. Among 34 MRD-negative patients with MM and a phenotypic pattern of bone marrow involvement similar to monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance at diagnosis, the probability of "operational cure" was high; median PFS was 12 years, and the 10-year OS rate was 94%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that MRD-negative status surpasses the prognostic value of CR achievement for PFS and OS across the disease spectrum, regardless of the type of treatment or patient risk group. MRD negativity should be considered as one of the most relevant end points for transplant-eligible and elderly fit patients

  17. Analysis of Taipei Basin Response for Earthquakes of Various Depths and Locations Using Empirical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Sokolov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Taipei basin upon earthquake excitation was studied using records of recent earthquakes. The strong-motion database includes records obtained at 32 stations of the Taipei TSMIP net work from 83 deep and 142 shallow earthquakes (M > 4.0 that occurred in 1992 - 2004. The characteristics of frequency-de pendent site response were obtained as spectral ratios between the actual earthquake records (horizontal components and those modelled for a hypothetical Very Hard Rock (VHR condition. The models for VHR spectra of Taiwan earthquakes had been recently proposed by Sokolov et al. (2005b, 2006. Analysis of site response characteristics and comparison with simple 1D models of the soil column resulted in the following conclusions: (1 The spectral ratios through out the basin obtained from deep earth quakes (depth > 35 km exhibit good agreement with the theoretical ratios calculated using the 1D models constructed using avail able geological and geotechnical data. (2 The spectral ratios obtained from shallow earth quakes show influence of: (a surface waves generated when travelling from distant sources to the basin and (b relatively low-frequency (< 1 - 2 Hz waves generated within the basin. (3 Some shallow earth quakes pro duce extremely high amplification at frequencies 0.3 - 1 Hz within the basin that may be dangerous for high-rise buildings and high way bridges. (4 The obtained results may be used in probabilistic seismic microzonation of the basin when many possible earth quakes located at various distances are considered. 2D and 3D simulation is necessary to model the seismic influence from particularly large earthquakes.

  18. Defense In-Depth Accident Analysis Evaluation of Tritium Facility Bldgs. 232-H, 233-H, and 234-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    'The primary purpose of this report is to document a Defense-in-Depth (DID) accident analysis evaluation for Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facility Buildings 232-H, 233-H, and 234-H. The purpose of a DID evaluation is to provide a more realistic view of facility radiological risks to the offsite public than the bounding deterministic analysis documented in the Safety Analysis Report, which credits only Safety Class items in the offsite dose evaluation.'

  19. Engineering Task Plan for Development and Fabrication and Deployment of a mobile, variable depth sampling At-Tank Analysis Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    This engineering task plan identifies the resources, responsibilities, and schedules for the development and deployment of a mobile, variable depth sampling system and an at-tank analysis system. The mobile, variable depth sampling system concept was developed after a cost assessment indicated a high cost for multiple deployments of the nested, fixed-depth sampling system. The sampling will provide double-shell tank (DST) staging tank waste samples for assuring the readiness of the waste for shipment to the LAW/HLW plant for treatment and immobilization. The at-tank analysis system will provide ''real-time'' assessments of the samples' chemical and physical properties. These systems support the Hanford Phase 1B vitrification project

  20. Analysis of River Profiles in northwestern Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Palézieux, Larissa; Leith, Kerry; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    With large alluvial plains, narrow gorges, prominent knick points, and chains of terraces or cut-off ridges, the deeply-incised valleys in Bhutan reflect an environment of diverse erosional activity. Topography ranges from 97 m to 7570 m, with characteristic postglacial landscapes typically located above ca 4200 m. The lower latitudes below ca 3000 m show high relief and terraced or linear hillslopes indicative of a fluvial origin. Although full channel analyses in the region suggest significant local tectonic contributions to longitudinal river profiles (Adams et al., 2016), we develop a method to isolate rivers in an apparently homogeneous tectonic block in the mid- to upper- elevations. Profiles of rivers in this region show a consistent pattern with a marked topographic step covering 2000 m of elevation change within 10 km. Field observations of knick points, terraces and cut-off ridges associated with the step suggest a regionally consistent signal resulting from changes in relative uplift or erosion rate. Chi plots correlate well for all channels when the base level is chosen to isolate rivers below the main alluvial plain, suggesting similar fluvial erosion histories in upstream regions. Employing third order topographic derivatives (Minár et al., 2013), we identify low angle slope sections/plateaus corresponding to terraces and/or extrapolated ridges that project onto former valley floor levels. Employing similar methods as those used to correlate fluvial knickpoints, these will be used to test for regionally consistent changes in fluvial and hillslope activity that may be tied to major tectonic or climatic changes. REFERENCES Adams, B., Whipple, K. X., Hodges, K. V. & Heimsath, A. M. 2016: In situ development of high-elevation, low-relief landscapes via duplex deformation in the Eastern Himalayan hinterland, Bhutan, in Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 925-938. Minár, J., Jenčo, M., Evans, I. S., Minár, J., Kadlec, M., Krcho, J., Pacina

  1. Numerical analysis on effective electric field penetration depth for interdigital impedance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chon-ung; Jong, Hakchol; Ro, Cholwu; Pak, Gilhung; Im, Songil; Li, Guofeng; Li, Jie; Song, Yunho

    2013-01-01

    Interdigital (finger-like) electrodes are widely used for electrical impedance and capacitance tomography of composite dielectric materials and complex insulating structures. Because of their advantages, they are now effectively introduced as capacitance sensors into a variety of industrial branches, agriculture, medical science, biological engineering, military branches, etc. In order to effectively apply the so-called interdigital impedance sensors in practice, of great importance is to optimize the sensor design parameters such as the electric field penetration depth, signal strength and so on. The general design principles of the interdigital capacitance sensor have been discussed for a long time by many researchers. However, there is no consensus on the definition of the effective electric field penetration depth of interdigital electrode. This paper discusses how to determine the effective electric field penetration depth of interdigital sensor on the basis of the refractive principle of electric field intensity and the FEM analyses of electric field distribution and capacitance for the sensor model.

  2. Dissociative features in posttraumatic stress disorder: A latent profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Műllerová, Jana; Hansen, Maj; Contractor, Ateka A; Elhai, Jon D; Armour, Cherie

    2016-09-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) characterizes the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in terms of the individual meeting the criteria for PTSD and additionally reporting symptoms of depersonalization and/or derealization. The current study aimed to examine whether a dissociative PTSD profile may include alternative features of dissociation and whether it could be differentiated from a nondissociative PTSD profile on certain psychopathologies and demographics. Data from 309 trauma-exposed participants, collected through Amazon Mechanical Turk, were subjected to latent profile analysis. Regression analyses were used to examine the predictors of latent classes. Three discrete profiles named Baseline, PTSD, and Dissociative profile were uncovered. All examined features of dissociation were significantly elevated in the Dissociative profile. Anxiety, male sex, being employed, and having a minority racial background significantly predicted the Dissociative profile relative to the PTSD profile. The study points to the importance of alternative symptoms of dissociation in the dissociative PTSD subtype beyond the symptoms of depersonalization and derealization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Family functioning and adolescent internalizing symptoms: A latent profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Emily G; Vannucci, Anna; Ohannessian, Christine McCauley

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize adolescent family functioning typologies using latent profile analysis (LPA). A secondary aim was to examine profile associations with adolescent internalizing symptoms at one-year follow-up. Students (N = 1029; 53% female; mean age = 16.14, SD = .75 years) completed measures of family functioning, anxiety, and depressive symptoms at two time points. LPA was conducted to characterize family functioning typologies at Time 1, revealing five profiles: 1) Low Family Functioning, 2) Only Close to Father, 3) Average Family Functioning, 4) Only Close to Mother, and 5) High Family Functioning. Results indicated that the Low and Only Close to Mother profiles had greater depressive symptoms at Time 2, compared with the Average profile. The High profile had fewer depressive symptoms at Time 2. The Low and Only Close to Mother profiles also had significantly more anxiety symptoms at Time 2. Findings highlight the utility of examining family functioning profiles. Copyright © 2018 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The passivating effect of cadmium in PbS/CdS colloidal quantum dots probed by nm-scale depth profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Pip C J; Radtke, Hanna; Pengpad, Atip; Williamson, Andrew I; Spencer, Ben F; Hardman, Samantha J O; Leontiadou, Marina A; Neo, Darren C J; Fairclough, Simon M; Watt, Andrew A R; Pis, Igor; Nappini, Silvia; Bondino, Federica; Magnano, Elena; Handrup, Karsten; Schulte, Karina; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Flavell, Wendy R

    2017-05-11

    Achieving control of the surface chemistry of colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is essential to fully exploit their properties in solar cells, but direct measurement of the chemistry and electronic structure in the outermost atomic layers is challenging. Here we probe the surface oxidation and passivation of cation-exchanged PbS/CdS core/shell CQDs with sub nm-scale precision using synchrotron-radiation-excited depth-profiling photoemission. We investigate the surface composition of the topmost 1-2.5 nm of the CQDs as a function of depth, for CQDs of varying CdS shell thickness, and examine how the surface changes after prolonged air exposure. We demonstrate that the Cd is localized at the surface of the CQDs. The surface-localized products of oxidation are identified, and the extent of oxidation quantified. We show that oxidised sulfur species are progressively eliminated as Cd replaces Pb at the surface. A sub-monolayer surface 'decoration' of Cd is found to be effective in passivating the CQDs. We show that the measured energy-level alignments at PbS/CdS colloidal quantum dot surfaces differ from those expected on the basis of bulk band offsets, and are strongly affected by the oxidation products. We develop a model for the passivating action of Cd. The optimum shell thickness (of around 0.1 nm, previously found to give maximised power conversion efficiency in PbS/CdS solar cells) is found to correspond to a trade-off between the rate of oxidation and the introduction of a surface barrier to charge transport.

  5. Depth profile and mobility of (129)I and (137)Cs in soil originating from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Maki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Yasuto; Maejima, Yuji; Yamagata, Takeyasu; Nagai, Hisao

    2015-08-01

    The (129)I derived from the FDNPP accident were clearly identified near the surface and showed a trend of rapid decrease with depth. The FDNPP (129)I and (137)Cs was 51.6 ± 1.7 mBq cm(-2) and 88.2 ± 27.1 kBq cm(-2) (average of four cores inventory) respectively. On average, 91% of the FDNPP (129)I existed within the top 5 g cm(-2) and 98% within the top 10 g cm(-2) and average of 100% of the FDNPP (137)Cs existed within the top 5 g cm(-2). From the observation of the temporal variation of depth profiles from the same upland field (Kawauchi village, 20 km away from the FDNPP to the southwest direction), downward migration rates of 0.81 ± 0.32 g cm(-2) yr(-1) for the FDNPP (129)I and 0.19 ± 0.17 g cm(-2) yr(-1) for the FDNPP (137)Cs were estimated. A simple diffusion model was introduced to evaluate the downward mobility of the FDNPP-derived (129)I and (137)Cs. The apparent diffusion coefficients D of 0.0086 ± 0.0034 and 0.0011 ± 0.0010 g(2) cm(-)(4) d(-)(1) were obtained for (129)I and (137)Cs, respectively. These values might be representative for Haplic Gray lowland soils in near the steady state under humid temperate climate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cephalometric profile of Bangladeshis: Tweed's analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Md Rizvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tweed's diagnostic triangle is simple yet provides a definite guideline in treatment planning. The aim of the present study was to establish the Tweed's norms for Bangladeshi people. Methods: The study was conducted for 89 Bangladeshi young adults (45 males and 44 females, aged 19–27 years, having balanced and harmonious facial profiles. Lateral cephalograms taken of these subjects were used for a series of morphometric analyses. Results: All three angular parameters Frankfort-mandibular plane angle (FMA, Frankfort-mandibular incisal angle (FMIA, incise mandibular plane angle (IMPAwere measured and found to be 24.52°, 54.60°, and 100.88°, respectively. The mean FMA has been found to be 24.52° (with a range of 14°–36° which is quite close to Tweed's norm and found to be statistically insignificant. However, IMPA and FMIA values of Bangladeshis found to be statistically significantly different from that of the Caucasians. The linear regression equation of IMPA on FMA was fitted, and the estimated value of IMPA was computed for a given FMA. Conclusion: The results support the idea that treatment objectives of IMPA should be considered according to the facial pattern, i.e., FMA. Ethnic variations of norms cannot be overlooked while outlining goals and planning the treatment.

  7. Diagnose Test-Taker's Profile in Terms of Core Profile Patterns: Principal Component (PC) vs. Profile Analysis via MDS (PAMS) Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.

    A study was conducted to examine how principal components analysis (PCA) and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) can be used to diagnose individuals observed score profiles in terms of core profile patterns identified by each method. The standardization sample from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition…

  8. Initial development of an automated task analysis profiling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A program for automated task analysis is described. Called TAPS (task analysis profiling system), the program accepts normal English prose and outputs skills, knowledges, attitudes, and abilities (SKAAs) along with specific guidance and recommended ability measurement tests for nuclear power plant operators. A new method for defining SKAAs is presented along with a sample program output

  9. Analysis of paediatric prescribing profiles in two health-funding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective.To investigate the adequacy of two large South. African medical administrative databases in providing prescribing profiles for paediatricians and general practitioners (GPs) respectively. Design. Statistical analysis of data captured during. 1994. Data were analysed retrospectively with frequency analysis and ...

  10. In-Depth Analysis of Human Neonatal and Adult IgM Antibody Repertoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although high-throughput sequencing and associated bioinformatics technologies have enabled the in-depth, sequence-based characterization of human immune repertoires, only a few studies on a relatively small number of sequences explored the characteristics of antibody repertoires in neonates, with contradictory conclusions. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the human IgM antibody repertoire, we performed Illumina sequencing and IMGT/HighV-QUEST analysis of IgM heavy chain repertoire of the B lymphocytes from the cord blood (CB of neonates, as well as the repertoire from peripheral blood of healthy human adults (HH. The comparative study revealed unexpectedly high levels of similarity between the neonatal and adult repertoires. In both repertoires, the VDJ gene usage showed no significant difference, and the most frequently used VDJ gene was IGHV4-59, IGHD3-10, and IGHJ3. The average amino acid (aa length of CDR1 (CB: 8.5, HH: 8.4 and CDR2 (CB: 7.6, HH: 7.5, as well as the aa composition and the average hydrophobicity of the CDR3 demonstrated no significant difference between the two repertories. However, the average aa length of CDR3 was longer in the HH repertoire than the CB repertoire (CB: 14.5, HH: 15.5. Besides, the frequencies of aa mutations in CDR1 (CB: 19.33%, HH: 25.84% and CDR2 (CB: 9.26%, HH: 17.82% were higher in the HH repertoire compared to the CB repertoire. Interestingly, the most prominent difference between the two repertoires was the occurrence of N2 addition (CB: 64.87%, HH: 85.69%, a process that occurs during V-D-J recombination for introducing random nucleotide additions between D- and J-gene segments. The antibody repertoire of healthy adults was more diverse than that of neonates largely due to the higher occurrence of N2 addition. These findings may lead to a better understanding of antibody development and evolution pathways and may have potential practical value for facilitating the generation of more

  11. In-Depth Analysis of Human Neonatal and Adult IgM Antibody Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Binbin; Wu, Yanling; Li, Wei; Wang, Xun; Wen, Yumei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ying, Tianlei

    2018-01-01

    Although high-throughput sequencing and associated bioinformatics technologies have enabled the in-depth, sequence-based characterization of human immune repertoires, only a few studies on a relatively small number of sequences explored the characteristics of antibody repertoires in neonates, with contradictory conclusions. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the human IgM antibody repertoire, we performed Illumina sequencing and IMGT/HighV-QUEST analysis of IgM heavy chain repertoire of the B lymphocytes from the cord blood (CB) of neonates, as well as the repertoire from peripheral blood of healthy human adults (HH). The comparative study revealed unexpectedly high levels of similarity between the neonatal and adult repertoires. In both repertoires, the VDJ gene usage showed no significant difference, and the most frequently used VDJ gene was IGHV4-59, IGHD3-10, and IGHJ3. The average amino acid (aa) length of CDR1 (CB: 8.5, HH: 8.4) and CDR2 (CB: 7.6, HH: 7.5), as well as the aa composition and the average hydrophobicity of the CDR3 demonstrated no significant difference between the two repertories. However, the average aa length of CDR3 was longer in the HH repertoire than the CB repertoire (CB: 14.5, HH: 15.5). Besides, the frequencies of aa mutations in CDR1 (CB: 19.33%, HH: 25.84%) and CDR2 (CB: 9.26%, HH: 17.82%) were higher in the HH repertoire compared to the CB repertoire. Interestingly, the most prominent difference between the two repertoires was the occurrence of N2 addition (CB: 64.87%, HH: 85.69%), a process that occurs during V-D-J recombination for introducing random nucleotide additions between D- and J-gene segments. The antibody repertoire of healthy adults was more diverse than that of neonates largely due to the higher occurrence of N2 addition. These findings may lead to a better understanding of antibody development and evolution pathways and may have potential practical value for facilitating the generation of more effective

  12. Spatial Factor Analysis for Aerosol Optical Depth in Metropolises in China with Regard to Spatial Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies have analyzed how driving factors impact aerosols, but they have been little concerned with the spatial heterogeneity of aerosols and the factors that impact aerosols. The spatial distributions of the aerosol optical depth (AOD retrieved by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS data at 550-nm and 3-km resolution for three highly developed metropolises, the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH region, the Yangtze River Delta (YRD, and the Pearl River Delta (PRD, in China during 2015 were analyzed. Different degrees of spatial heterogeneity of the AOD were found, which were indexed by Moran’s I index giving values of 0.940, 0.715, and 0.680 in BTH, YRD, and PRD, respectively. For the spatial heterogeneity, geographically weighted regression (GWR was employed to carry out a spatial factor analysis, where terrain, climate condition, urban development, and vegetation coverage were taken as the potential driving factors. The results of the GWR imply varying relationships between the AOD and the factors. The results were generally consistent with existing studies, but the results suggest the following: (1 Elevation increase would more likely lead to a strong negative impact on aerosols (with most of the coefficients ranging from −1.5~0 in the BTH, −1.5~0 in the YRD, and −1~0 in the PRD in the places with greater elevations where the R-squared values are always larger than 0.5. However, the variation of elevations cannot explain the variation of aerosols in the places with relatively low elevations (with R-squared values approximately 0.1, ranging from 0 to 0.3, and approximately 0.1 in the BTH, YRD, and PRD, such as urban areas in the BTH and YRD. (2 The density of the built-up areas made a strong and positive impact on aerosols in the urban areas of the BTH (R-squared larger than 0.5, while the R-squared dropped to 0.1 in the places far away from the urban areas. (3 The vegetation coverage led to a stronger

  13. Spatial analysis of MODIS aerosol optical depth, PM2.5, and chronic coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zhiyong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have found adverse health effects of acute and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5. Air pollution epidemiological studies relying on ground measurements provided by monitoring networks are often limited by sparse and unbalanced spatial distribution of the monitors. Studies have found correlations between satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD and PM2.5 in some land regions. Satellite aerosol data may be used to extend the spatial coverage of PM2.5 exposure assessment. This study was to investigate correlation between PM2.5 and AOD in the conterminous USA, to derive a spatially complete PM2.5 surface by merging satellite AOD data and ground measurements based on the potential correlation, and to examine if there is an association of coronary heart disease with PM2.5. Results Years 2003 and 2004 daily MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Level 2 AOD images were collated with US EPA PM2.5 data covering the conterminous USA. Pearson's correlation analysis and geographically weighted regression (GWR found that the relationship between PM2.5 and AOD is not spatially consistent across the conterminous states. The average correlation is 0.67 in the east and 0.22 in the west. GWR predicts well in the east and poorly in the west. The GWR model was used to derive a PM2.5 grid surface using the mean AOD raster calculated using the daily AOD data (RMSE = 1.67 μg/m3. Fitting of a Bayesian hierarchical model linking PM2.5 with age-race standardized mortality rates (SMRs of chronic coronary heart disease found that areas with higher values of PM2.5 also show high rates of CCHD mortality: = 0.802, posterior 95% Bayesian credible interval (CI = (0.386, 1.225. Conclusion There is a spatial variation of the relationship between PM2.5 and AOD in the conterminous USA. In the eastern USA where AOD correlates well with PM2.5, AOD can be merged with ground PM2.5 data to derive a PM2.5 surface for

  14. Quantitative and Qualitative Proteome Characteristics Extracted from In-Depth Integrated Genomics and Proteomics Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teck Yew; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; van den Toorn, Henk; Giansanti, Piero; Cristobal, Alba; Toonen, Pim; Schafer, Sebastian; Huebner, Norbert; van Breukelen, Bas; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cuppen, Edwin; Heck, Albert J. R.; Guryev, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We

  15. Feasibility Analysis of Improving On-Campus Learning Paths via a Depth Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Fu; Tu, Shih-Chun; Chien, Mei-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to apply a depth sensor to create a human-body-sensing context for outdoor learning paths; it is conducted by incorporating both quasi-experiment and survey to compare students' cognitive learning outcome within the context and understand students' attitudes toward the context created. The result of ANCOVA indicates that the…

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Bacterial Expression Profiles Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial proteins were then extracted from the cell pellets and culture supernatants, using bacterial protein extraction reagent (Thermo Scientific) and ammonium sulfate precipitation. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and protein sequence analysis. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis was performed using 12 % resolving gel [1.5 ...

  17. An Uncertainty Analysis for Predicting Soil Profile Salinity Using EM Induction Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyi; Monteiro Santos, Fernando; Triantafilis, John

    2016-04-01

    Proximal soil sensing techniques such as electromagnetic (EM) induction have been used to identify and map the areal variation of average soil properties. However, soil varies with depth owing to the action of various soil forming factors (e.g., parent material and topography). In this work we collected EM data using an EM38 and EM34 meter along a 22-km transect in the Trangie District, Australia.We jointly inverted these data using EM4Soil software and compare our 2-dimensional model of true electrical conductivity (sigma - mS/m) with depth against measured electrical conductivity of a saturated soil-paste extract (ECe - dS/m) at depth of 0-16 m. Through the use of a linear regression (LR) model and by varying forward modelling algorithms (cumulative function and full solution), inversion algorithms (S1 and S2), and damping factor (lambda) we determined a suitable electromagnetic conductivity image (EMCI) which was optimal when using the full solution, S2 and lambda = 0.6. To evaluate uncertainty of the inversion process and the LR model, we conducted an uncertainty analysis. The distribution of the model misfit shows the largest uncertainty caused by inversion (mostly due to EM34-40) occurs at deeper profiles while the largest uncertainty of the LR model occurs where the soil profile is most saline. These uncertainty maps also illustrate us how the model accuracy can be improved in the future.

  18. Low-temperature growth of Au on H-terminated Si(111): instability of hydrogen at the Au/Si interface revealed by non-destructive ultra-shallow H-depth profiling

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, M

    2003-01-01

    The initial stage of Au/Si(111)-interface formation has been investigated by hydrogen-specific ultra-shallow depth profiling using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N, alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C reaction in grazing incidence, which achieves submonolayer depth resolution. Gold was deposited on the H-terminated Si(111)(1 x 1) substrate at 110K to suppress Au-silicide formation known to occur at room temperature. The experimental NRA spectrum clearly rules out the prevalence of H at the Au/Si (111) interface, even though the reactive Au-Si segregation is inhibited at the low deposition temperature. Nevertheless only approx 30% of the initial H termination layer is desorbed upon deposition of 4.1 A Au. The shading of the remaining H from the incident sup 1 sup 5 N ions by the Au film is analyzed with aid of NRA spectrum simulations, which allows estimating the average of the Au particle size distribution and for exclusion of layer-by-layer growth of Au independent from morphological inf...

  19. Depth Profile of Impurity Phase in Wide-Bandgap Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2 Film Fabricated by Three-Stage Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghao; Nazuka, Takehiro; Hagiya, Hideki; Takabayashi, Yutaro; Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru; Islam, Muhammad M.; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeaki

    2018-02-01

    For copper indium gallium selenide [Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2, CIGS]-based solar cells, defect states or impurity phase always form due to both the multinary compositions of CIGS film and the difficulty of controlling the growth process, especially for high Ga concentration. To further improve device performance, it is important to understand such formation of impurity phase or defect states during fabrication. In the work presented herein, the formation mechanism of impurity phase Cu2-δ Se and its depth profile in CIGS film with high Ga content, in particular CuGaSe2 (i.e., CGS), were investigated by applying different growth conditions (i.e., normal three-stage process and two-cycle three-stage process). The results suggest that impurity phase Cu2-δ Se is distributed nonuniformly in the film because of lack of Ga diffusion. The formed Cu2-δ Se can be removed by etching the as-deposited CGS film with bromine-methanol solution, resulting in improved device performance.

  20. In vivo rat brain measurements of changes in signal intensity depth profiles as a function of temperature using wide-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Nomura, Daisuke; Tsunenari, Takashi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2010-10-20

    In our previous study, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reported an increase in signal intensity of depth profiles between euthanasia injection and cardiac arrest (CA), demonstrating the potential as a tool for monitoring/diagnosing brain tissue viability [Appl. Opt.48, 4354 (2009)]. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we measured three-dimensional (3D) OCT images through a thinned skull changing temperatures in the rat brain. The measurements were made at 10 min intervals for 210 min to evaluate correlations of temperature with heart rate and ratios of signal intensity (RSI). The 3D image area was 4 mm × 4 mm × 2.8 mm. When the temperature was decreased from 28°C to 18°C to reduce tissue viability, the heart rate was found to decrease with an increase in RSI. Negative correlation coefficients (CCs) between temperatures and RSIs, and between heart rate and RSIs, were obtained. This indicates that OCT signals increase with reductions of viability caused by decreases in heart rates and temperatures in tissues. These observations correspond to estimations obtained by multiwavelength diffuse reflectance spectroscopy [Appl. Opt.47, 4164 (2008)]. CCs and stationary RSIs would depend upon measured positions in tissues. Without injections for euthanasia, a similar rapid increase in RSI has also been measured before CA.

  1. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper - Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Sandstroem, Rolf [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 {mu}m from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed.

  2. Consumer profile analysis for different types of meat in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriba-Perez, Carmen; Baviera-Puig, Amparo; Buitrago-Vera, Juan; Montero-Vicente, Luis

    2017-07-01

    It is important to analyse the consumer profile of each type of meat to better adapt the marketing mix to each one. To this end, we examined the average consumption frequency of different types of meat based on two methodologies: consumer segmentation using the food-related lifestyle (FRL) framework, giving rise to 4 segments, and analysis of socio-demographic profiles. The variables used were: sex, age, educational level, social class, number of people in the household, presence of children younger than 18 in the home, geographical area and habitual residence. Beef was the only meat type significant in both analyses. Turkey meat only appeared as significant in the FRL analysis. The other meats (chicken, pork, rabbit and lamb) were only significant in the sociodemographic variables analysis. From the outcomes we may conclude that there is no single consumer profile, which rather depends on the type of meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  4. A preliminary assessment of using a white light confocal imaging profiler for cut mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christopher W; Moore, Christopher R; Leifheit, Randell

    2012-01-01

    White light confocal microscopy creates detailed 3D representations of microsurfaces that can be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The study describes its application to the analysis of cut marks on bone, particularly when discerning cuts made by steel tools from those made by stone. The process described comes from a study where cuts were manually made on a cow rib with seven cutting tools, four stone (an unmodified chert flake, a chert biface, a bifacially ground slate fragment, and an unsharpened piece of slate), and three steel (a Swiss Army Knife, a serrate steak knife, and a serrate saw). Kerfs were magnified ×20 and 3D data clouds were generated using a Sensofar(®) White Light Confocal Profiler (WLCP). Kerf profiles and surface areas, volumes, mean depths, and maximum depths were calculated with proprietary software (SensoScan(®) and SolarMap(®)). For the most part, the stone tools make shallower and wider cuts. Kerf floors can be studied at higher magnifications; they were viewed at ×100. When comparing the kerf floors of the unsharpened slate and the serrate steak knife it was found that the slate floor was more uneven, but the serrate steak knife generated more overall relief. Although preliminary, the approach described here successfully distinguishes stone and steel tools; the authors conclude that the WLCP is a promising technology for cut mark analysis because of the very detailed 3D representations it creates and the numerous avenues of analysis it provides.

  5. Application of Microtremor Array Analysis to Estimate the Bedrock Depth in the Beijing Plain area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P.; Ling, S.; Liu, J.; Su, W.

    2013-12-01

    With the rapid expansion of large cities around the world, urban geological survey provides key information regarding resource development and urban construction. Among the major cities of the world, China's capital city Beijing is among the largest cities possessing complex geological structures. The urban geological survey and study in Beijing involves the following aspects: (1) estimating the thickness of the Cenozoic deposit; (2) mapping the three-dimensional structure of the underlying bedrock, as well as its relations to faults and tectonic settings; and (3) assessing the capacity of the city's geological resources in order to support its urban development and operation safety. The geological study of Beijing in general was also intended to provide basic data regarding the urban development and appraisal of engineering and environment geological conditions, as well as underground space resources. In this work, we utilized the microtremor exploration method to estimate the thickness of the bedrock depth, in order to delineate the geological interfaces and improve the accuracy of the bedrock depth map. The microtremor observation sites were located in the Beijing Plain area. Traditional geophysical or geological survey methods were not effective in these areas due to the heavy traffic and dense buildings in the highly-populated urban area. The microtremor exploration method is a Rayleigh-wave inversion technique which extracts its phase velocity dispersion curve from the vertical component of the microtremor array records using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method, then inverts the shear-wave velocity structure. A triple-circular array was adopted for acquiring microtremor data, with the observation radius in ranging from 40 to 300 m, properly adjusted depending on the geological conditions (depth of the bedrock). The collected microtremor data are used to: (1) estimation of phase velocities of Rayleigh-wave from the vertical components of the microtremor

  6. The Superficial Dermis May Initiate Keloid Formation: Histological Analysis of the Keloid Dermis at Different Depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported on certain aspects of the characteristics of different sites within a keloid lesion, but detailed studies on the keloid dermis at different depths within a keloid lesion are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the histology of the keloid dermis at different depths. This study included 19 keloid tissue samples that were collected from 19 patients and 19 normal skin samples, which were harvested from subjects without keloids or hypertrophic scar. Samples were studied by light microscopy using routine hematoxylin and eosin histochemical staining, and immunohistochemistry to detect CD20-positive B-lymphocytes and CD3-positive T-lymphocytes. Sirius Red histochemical staining was used to determine the type of collagen in keloid tissue and normal skin samples. The migratory properties of fibroblasts within the keloid dermis at different depths was compared, using an in vitro migration assay. The findings of this study showed that although the papillary and reticular dermis could be clearly distinguished in normal skin, three tissue layers were identified in the keloid dermis. The superficial dermis of keloid was characterized by active fibroblasts and lymphocytes; the middle dermis contained dense extracellular matrix (ECM with large numbers fibroblasts, and the deep dermis was poorly cellular and characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles. In the keloid samples, from the superficial to the deep dermis, type I collagen increased and type III collagen decreased, and fibroblasts from the superficial dermis of the keloid were found to migrate more rapidly. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed that different depths within the keloid dermis displayed different biological features. The superficial dermis may initiate keloid formation, in which layer intralesional injection of pharmaceuticals and other treatments should be performed for keloid.

  7. Comparative Analysis of ANN and SVM Models Combined with Wavelet Preprocess for Groundwater Depth Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prediction of groundwater depth fluctuations has been an important component in sustainable water resources management. In this study, a data-driven prediction model combining discrete wavelet transform (DWT preprocess and support vector machine (SVM was proposed for groundwater depth forecasting. Regular artificial neural networks (ANN, regular SVM, and wavelet preprocessed artificial neural networks (WANN models were also developed for comparison. These methods were applied to the monthly groundwater depth records over a period of 37 years from ten wells in the Mengcheng County, China. Relative absolute error (RAE, Pearson correlation coefficient (r, root mean square error (RMSE, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE were adopted for model evaluation. The results indicate that wavelet preprocess extremely improved the training and test performance of ANN and SVM models. The WSVM model provided the most precise and reliable groundwater depth prediction compared with ANN, SVM, and WSVM models. The criterion of RAE, r, RMSE, and NSE values for proposed WSVM model are 0.20, 0.97, 0.18 and 0.94, respectively. Comprehensive comparisons and discussion revealed that wavelet preprocess extremely improves the prediction precision and reliability for both SVM and ANN models. The prediction result of SVM model is superior to ANN model in generalization ability and precision. Nevertheless, the performance of WANN is superior to SVM model, which further validates the power of data preprocess in data-driven prediction models. Finally, the optimal model, WSVM, is discussed by comparing its subseries performances as well as model performance stability, revealing the efficiency and universality of WSVM model in data driven prediction field.

  8. Analysis of aerosol optical depth evaluation in polar regions and associated uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ortiz de Galisteo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some available processing algorithms used to calculate the aerosol optical depth from radiometric measurements were tested. The aim was to evaluate the associated uncertainties in polar regions due to the data processing, in order to adjust the methodology of the calculation and illustrate the importance of these error sources. The measurements were obtained during a sun photometer campaign in Ny-Ålesund within the framework of the POLAR-AOD project.

  9. Chloride ingress profiles measured by electron probe micro analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Coats, Alison M.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1996-01-01

    Traditional techniques for measuring chloride ingress profiles do not apply well to high performance cement paste systems; the geometric resolution of the traditional measuring techniques is too low. In this paper measurements by Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) are presented. EPMA is demonst......Traditional techniques for measuring chloride ingress profiles do not apply well to high performance cement paste systems; the geometric resolution of the traditional measuring techniques is too low. In this paper measurements by Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) are presented. EPMA...

  10. Chemical analysis of solids with sub-nm depth resolution by using a miniature LIMS system designed for in situ space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Sensitive elemental and isotope analysis of solid samples are of considerable interest in nowadays in situ space research. For context in situ analysis, high spatial resolution is also of substantial importance. While the measurements conducted with high lateral resolution can provide compositional details of the surface of highly heterogeneous materials, depth profiling measurements yield information on compositional details of surface and subsurface. The mass spectrometric analysis with the vertical resolution at sub-µm levels is of special consideration and can deliver important information on processes, which may have modified the surface. Information on space weathering effects can be readily determined when the sample composition of the surface and sub-surface is studied with high vertical resolution. In this contribution we will present vertical depth resolution measurements conducted by our sensitive miniature laser ablation ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (160mm x Ø 60mm) designed for in situ space research [1-3]. The mass spectrometer is equipped with a fs-laser system (~190fs pulse width, λ = 775nm), which is used for ablation and ionization of the sample material [2]. Laser radiation is focussed on the target material to a spot size of about 10-20 µm in diameter. Mass spectrometric measurements are conducted with a mass resolution (m/Δm) of about 400-500 (at 56Fe mass peak) and with a superior dynamic range of more than eight orders of magnitude. The depth profiling performance studies were conducted on 10µm thick Cu films that were deposited by an additive-assisted electrochemical procedure on Si-wafers. The presented measurement study will show that the current instrument prototype is able to conduct quantitative chemical (elemental and isotope) analysis of solids with a vertical resolution at sub-nm level. Contaminants, incorporated by using additives (polymers containing e.g. C, N, O, S) and with layer thickness of a few nanometres

  11. Identify the Effective Wells in Determination of Groundwater Depth in Urmia Plain Using Principle Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Babaei Hessar

    2017-06-01

    observations (n, here it is the number of years. So, for each well there are a 10 * 10 matrix. It should be noted in monitoring adjacent wells to a specific well, its dataset is not used. To quantify the effect of each well according to the number of its participation in the analysis and frequency of its effectiveness, each well is ranked. In the next step, the ineffective wells were recognized and eliminated using both the variation coefficient and Error criteria. Following, the procedure will be discussed. Results Discussion: In this study, at first step using PCA technique wells were identified with a more than 0.9 correlation coefficient. Then each well ranked based on the relative importance and according to the specified thresholds, the variation coefficient and error of monitoring was estimated. The wells remain in threshold 1 led to the lowest variation coefficient, considered as effective wells in the evaluation of aquifer parameters. By eliminating ineffective wells at each threshold, the variation coefficient is reduced because of the elimination of wells with a greater difference in water depth compared to the average of whole wells. To check the certainty of obtained results, the error criteria were calculated for each threshold. According to the results, both variation coefficient and standard error of monitoring in threshold 1 come to be at least. Thus, 12 wells remain in the threshold 1 are considered as the important wells in monitoring the water table of plain Urmia. Monitoring error for these 12 wells is equal to 5.1 % which is negligible and can be introduced as index wells in sampling and estimation of groundwater table in plain Urmia. Using this method, instead measurements of water table in 51 wells it can be performed exclusively in the 12 wells. Conclusion: Due to reduction of precipitation and unauthorized uses of groundwater resources, water table monitoring is very important in the accurate management of these resources. Because of extensive

  12. Plumbing the depths: Utilizing O and G reserve profiles to develop forward-looking risk assessments for exploration and production activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Tatiana; Magrini, Alessandra; Schaeffer, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The deepwater horizon accident may have shaken the sustainability ratings and indices credibility, but it also reinforced their importance. The objective of this article is to contribute to the improvement of corporate sustainability valuations by investigating if reserves profiles can affect the environmental risk exposure of an Oil and Gas (O and G) corporation. Data on reserves from 2009 to 2012 of 24 listed O and G companies were used to test six hypotheses, addressing how these profiles could relate to the four material environmental risks: climate change, accidents, sensitive area/access, water. The frequency with which companies reported these risks was evaluated using key word in context (KWIC) content analysis. Analysis of variance (Anova) and Student's t tests were applied to each of the hypotheses. This study shows environmental risks are embedded with the oil and gas reserves. We found the following relationships: (1) companies with heavy oil reserves report more exposure to climate change risks, particularly emissions control; (2) water is more of an issue with companies with higher bitumen and natural gas reserves; and (3) there is significant regional bias in the reporting of the environmental risk factors. These findings have broad implications for the financial industry, governments, investors and lenders alike. - Highlights: • We explored if reserve profile can also be used as a factor to evaluate environmental risk. • Companies with heavy oil reserves report more exposure to climate change risks. • Water is more of an issue with companies with higher bitumen and natural gas reserves. • There is significant regional bias in the reporting of the environmental risk factors

  13. RNA amplification for successful gene profiling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of clinical samples is often limited by the amount of material available to study. While proteins cannot be multiplied in their natural form, DNA and RNA can be amplified from small specimens and used for high-throughput analyses. Therefore, genetic studies offer the best opportunity to screen for novel insights of human pathology when little material is available. Precise estimates of DNA copy numbers in a given specimen are necessary. However, most studies investigate static variables such as the genetic background of patients or mutations within pathological specimens without a need to assess proportionality of expression among different genes throughout the genome. Comparative genomic hybridization of DNA samples represents a crude exception to this rule since genomic amplification or deletion is compared among different specimens directly. For gene expression analysis, however, it is critical to accurately estimate the proportional expression of distinct RNA transcripts since such proportions directly govern cell function by modulating protein expression. Furthermore, comparative estimates of relative RNA expression at different time points portray the response of cells to environmental stimuli, indirectly informing about broader biological events affecting a particular tissue in physiological or pathological conditions. This cognitive reaction of cells is similar to the detection of electroencephalographic patterns which inform about the status of the brain in response to external stimuli. As our need to understand human pathophysiology at the global level increases, the development and refinement of technologies for high fidelity messenger RNA amplification have become the focus of increasing interest during the past decade. The need to increase the abundance of RNA has been met not only for gene specific amplification, but, most importantly for global transcriptome wide, unbiased amplification. Now gene

  14. Mosaicism in segmental darier disease: an in-depth molecular analysis quantifying proportions of mutated alleles in various tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Theresa Larriba; Willems, Patrick; Jespersgaard, Cathrine

    2011-01-01

    , peripheral leukocytes and hair revealed an uneven distribution of the mutated allele, from 14% in semen to 37% in affected skin. We suggest a model for segmental manifestation expression where a threshold number of mutated cells is needed for manifestation development. We further recommend molecular analysis...... of transmitting a nonsegmental phenotype to offspring is of unknown magnitude. We present the first in-depth molecular analysis of a mosaic patient with segmental disease, quantifying proportions of mutated and normal alleles in various tissues. Pyrosequence analysis of DNA from semen, affected and normal skin...

  15. Moho depth and Vp/Vs in Ireland from teleseismic receiver functions analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, A.; Agostinetti, N. Piana; Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Readman, P. W.; Horan, C.

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a teleseismic P-wave receiver function study on 34 stations deployed across Ireland in order to determine the first-order crustal properties, thickness (H) and mean crustal Vp/Vs, over the entire island. We apply the H - Vp/Vs stacking method, which exploits the information contained in both the Ps and the multiple phases from the free-surface. In this way, we obtain the first Moho depth and Vp/Vs maps of Ireland based on a uniform distribution of measurements. The results are used to examine in detail the lateral variation of crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio across the major terrane boundaries in Ireland. Our results show a good agreement with the available previous estimates from onshore wide-angle/refraction experiments and add new information in poorly constrained areas such as Northern Ireland and the NW coast of Ireland. The mean Vp/Vs ratio is 1.73 ± 0.05 with a consistently low (≈1.70) value in the Leinster domain and in central Ireland. The mean crustal thickness is 30.9 ± 2.3 km. The southern portion of the island shows a nearly flat Moho at a depth of 32-33 km, while north of the Southern Uplands Fault, a relatively higher spatial frequency variation in Moho topography exists with values ranging from 28 to 32 km. This reflects the complex history of multiphase terranes accretion during the Caledonian orogeny, although locally, the superposition of more recent geological processes is not excluded. Crossing the Iapetus Suture Zone, our results support the presence of a `transitional' Moho, that is, a 3-4 km smooth seismic transition between crust and mantle, while Moho depth remains constant. Anomalous values in Northern Ireland are interpreted as evidence of a 5- to 6-km-thick high S-wave velocity layer just above the Moho.

  16. THE IMPACT OF IFRS ON REPORTING FOR BUSINESS COMBINATIONS: AN IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS USING THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Garry M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mandatory use of IFRS by all publicly listed companies in the European Union created challenges for accounting and reporting of business combinations, goodwill impairment and disclosures for these items. Major issues are allocation of amounts to goodwill and specific intangible assets arising from acquisition. This study presents an in-depth exploration of compliance with IFRS 3 and IAS 36 using content analysis methodology of annual reports of eight European telecommunications that were chose because the industry is well known for significant acquisitions involving intangibles. The results show only partial compliance with little change over the four year period since mandatory IFRS adoption. While results cannot be generalized outside this group, the in-depth analysis yielded important insights for continued research using broader research methods.

  17. Seminal Fluid Analysis And Biophysical Profile: Findings And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seminal Fluid Analysis And Biophysical Profile: Findings And Relevance In Infertile Males In Ilorin, Nigeria. EK Oghagbon, AAG Jimoh, SA Adebisi. Abstract. To determine if there was a bearing of body mass index (BMI) on male infertility, a cross-sectional study of males of infertile couples, attending our infertility clinic was ...

  18. Microarray analysis of the gene expression profile in triethylene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microarray analysis of the gene expression profile in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate-treated human dental pulp cells. ... Conclusions: Our results suggest that TEGDMA can change the many functions of hDPCs through large changes in gene expression levels and complex interactions with different signaling pathways.

  19. Depth of the main crustal and mantle interfaces beneath the Gorely volcano (Kamchatka) based on the receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Arseny; Woelbern, Ingo; Nikulin, Alex; Koulakov, Ivan; Jakovlev, Andrey; Gordeev, Evgeny; Abkadyrov, Ilyas

    2016-04-01

    Gorely volcano is located in the southern part of the Kamchatka peninsula. It is two-tier structure with an old shield volcano at the base and a younger edifice on the top. The subducting Pacific oceanic Plate is located at the depth of 120 km beneath the volcano. The receiver function method was used to investigate the 1D structure beneath the volcano. From the continuous yearly seismograms recorded by a temporary network consisting of 16 seismic stations, we selected more than 600 records corresponding to teleseismic events which were used for the receiver function analysis. Based on the method by Zhu and Kanamory, we have determined the depth of the Moho interface at 38 km and that of the Conrad discontinuity at 26 km. These values correspond to the well exposed continental crust. The receiver functions also provide a rather prominent signal corresponding to a discontinuity at ~300 km depth; however, no clear signatures of deeper interfaces and slab interfaces are determined in this study. This study is the first attempt to determine the depth of the major interfaces beneath the Gorely volcano.

  20. Why bother about depth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Obrador, Biel; Christensen, Jesper Philip

    We present results from a newly developed method to determine depth specific rates of GPP, NEP and R using frequent automated profiles of DO and temperature. Metabolic rate calculations were made for three lakes of different trophic status using a diel DO methodology that integrates rates across...

  1. Binary similarity measures for fingerprint analysis of qualitative metabolomic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Anita; Andrić, Filip; Bajusz, Dávid; Héberger, Károly

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary metabolomic fingerprinting is based on multiple spectrometric and chromatographic signals, used either alone or combined with structural and chemical information of metabolic markers at the qualitative and semiquantitative level. However, signal shifting, convolution, and matrix effects may compromise metabolomic patterns. Recent increase in the use of qualitative metabolomic data, described by the presence (1) or absence (0) of particular metabolites, demonstrates great potential in the field of metabolomic profiling and fingerprint analysis. The aim of this study is a comprehensive evaluation of binary similarity measures for the elucidation of patterns among samples of different botanical origin and various metabolomic profiles. Nine qualitative metabolomic data sets covering a wide range of natural products and metabolomic profiles were applied to assess 44 binary similarity measures for the fingerprinting of plant extracts and natural products. The measures were analyzed by the novel sum of ranking differences method (SRD), searching for the most promising candidates. Baroni-Urbani-Buser (BUB) and Hawkins-Dotson (HD) similarity coefficients were selected as the best measures by SRD and analysis of variance (ANOVA), while Dice (Di1), Yule, Russel-Rao, and Consonni-Todeschini 3 ranked the worst. ANOVA revealed that concordantly and intermediately symmetric similarity coefficients are better candidates for metabolomic fingerprinting than the asymmetric and correlation based ones. The fingerprint analysis based on the BUB and HD coefficients and qualitative metabolomic data performed equally well as the quantitative metabolomic profile analysis. Fingerprint analysis based on the qualitative metabolomic profiles and binary similarity measures proved to be a reliable way in finding the same/similar patterns in metabolomic data as that extracted from quantitative data.

  2. Engineering task plan for development, fabrication, and deployment of nested, fixed depth fluidic sampling and at-tank analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    An engineering task plan was developed that presents the resources, responsibilities, and schedules for the development, test, and deployment of the nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling and at-tank analysis system. The sampling system, deployed in the privatization contract double-shell tank feed tank, will provide waste samples for assuring the readiness of the tank for shipment to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The at-tank analysis system will provide ''real-time'' assessments of the sampled wastes' chemical and physical properties. These systems support the Hanford Phase 1B Privatization Contract

  3. Strength analysis of welded corners of PVC window profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postawa, P.; Stachowiak, T.; Gnatowski, A.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of researches which main purpose was to define the influence of welding parameters on strength of welded corners of PVC window profile. PVC profiles of a branded name GENEO® produced by Rehau Company were used for this research. The profiles were made by using a co-extrusion method. The surface of the profile was made of PVC mixture with no additives. Its main task was to get a smooth surface resistant to a smudge. The use of an unfilled polyester provides an aesthetic look and improves the resistance of extrudate to water getting into inner layers. The profile's inner layers have been filled up with glass fibre in order to improve its stiffness and mechanical properties. Window frames with cut corners used for this research, were produced on technological line of EUROCOLOR Company based in Pyskowice (Poland). The main goal of this analysis was to evaluate the influence of the main welding parameter (temperature upsetting) on hardness of welds we received in whole process. A universal testing machine was used for the research.

  4. Error analysis for mesospheric temperature profiling by absorptive occultation sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rieder

    Full Text Available An error analysis for mesospheric profiles retrieved from absorptive occultation data has been performed, starting with realistic error assumptions as would apply to intensity data collected by available high-precision UV photodiode sensors. Propagation of statistical errors was investigated through the complete retrieval chain from measured intensity profiles to atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature profiles. We assumed unbiased errors as the occultation method is essentially self-calibrating and straight-line propagation of occulted signals as we focus on heights of 50–100 km, where refractive bending of the sensed radiation is negligible. Throughout the analysis the errors were characterized at each retrieval step by their mean profile, their covariance matrix and their probability density function (pdf. This furnishes, compared to a variance-only estimation, a much improved insight into the error propagation mechanism. We applied the procedure to a baseline analysis of the performance of a recently proposed solar UV occultation sensor (SMAS – Sun Monitor and Atmospheric Sounder and provide, using a reasonable exponential atmospheric model as background, results on error standard deviations and error correlation functions of density, pressure, and temperature profiles. Two different sensor photodiode assumptions are discussed, respectively, diamond diodes (DD with 0.03% and silicon diodes (SD with 0.1% (unattenuated intensity measurement noise at 10 Hz sampling rate. A factor-of-2 margin was applied to these noise values in order to roughly account for unmodeled cross section uncertainties. Within the entire height domain (50–100 km we find temperature to be retrieved to better than 0.3 K (DD / 1 K (SD accuracy, respectively, at 2 km height resolution. The results indicate that absorptive occultations acquired by a SMAS-type sensor could provide mesospheric profiles of fundamental variables such as temperature with

  5. DNA profiling, telomere analysis and antioxidant properties as tools for monitoring ex situ seed longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, M; Balestrazzi, A; Mondoni, A; Rossi, G; Ventura, L; Buttafava, A; Macovei, A; Sabatini, M E; Valassi, A; Carbonera, D

    2013-05-01

    The germination test currently represents the most used method to assess seed viability in germplasm banks, despite the difficulties caused by the occurrence of seed dormancy. Furthermore, seed longevity can vary considerably across species and populations from different environments, and studies related to the eco-physiological processes underlying such variations are still limited in their depth. The aim of the present work was the identification of reliable molecular markers that might help in monitoring seed deterioration. Dry seeds were subjected to artificial ageing and collected at different time points for molecular/biochemical analyses. DNA damage was measured using the RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) approach while the seed antioxidant profile was obtained using both the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl, 2-picrylhydrazyl) assay and the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provided profiles of free radicals. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) was used to assess the expression profiles of the antioxidant genes MT2 (type 2 metallothionein) and SOD (superoxide dismutase). A modified QRT-PCR protocol was used to determine telomere length. The RAPD profiles highlighted different capacities of the two Silene species to overcome DNA damage induced by artificial ageing. The antioxidant profiles of dry and rehydrated seeds revealed that the high-altitude taxon Silene acaulis was characterized by a lower antioxidant specific activity. Significant upregulation of the MT2 and SOD genes was observed only in the rehydrated seeds of the low-altitude species. Rehydration resulted in telomere lengthening in both Silene species. Different seed viability markers have been selected for plant species showing inherent variation of seed longevity. RAPD analysis, quantification of redox activity of non-enzymatic antioxidant compounds and gene expression profiling provide deeper insights to study seed viability during storage

  6. Derivative component analysis for mass spectral serum proteomic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As a promising way to transform medicine, mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have seen a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, there is a lack of effective feature selection methods that are able to capture essential data behaviors to achieve clinical level disease diagnosis. Moreover, it faces a challenge from data reproducibility, which means that no two independent studies have been found to produce same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issue causes the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevents it from real clinical usage. Methods In this work, we propose a novel machine-learning algorithm: derivative component analysis (DCA) for high-dimensional mass spectral proteomic profiles. As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis examines input proteomics data in a multi-resolution approach by seeking its derivatives to capture latent data characteristics and conduct de-noising. We further demonstrate DCA's advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input proteomics data as a profile biomarker via integrating it with support vector machines to tackle the reproducibility issue, besides comparing it with state-of-the-art peers. Results Our results show that high-dimensional proteomics data are actually linearly separable under proposed derivative component analysis (DCA). As a novel multi-resolution feature selection algorithm, DCA not only overcomes the weakness of the traditional methods in subtle data behavior discovery, but also suggests an effective resolution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem and provides new techniques and insights in translational bioinformatics and machine learning. The DCA-based profile biomarker diagnosis makes clinical level diagnostic performances reproducible across different proteomic data, which is more robust and systematic than the existing biomarker discovery based

  7. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingerle, D.; Meirer, F.; Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and

  8. How a submarine returns to periscope depth: analysing complex socio-technical systems using Cognitive Work Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Neville A; Bessell, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the application of Cognitive Work Analysis to the description of the functions, situations, activities, decisions, strategies, and competencies of a Trafalgar class submarine when performing the function of returning to periscope depth. All five phases of Cognitive Work Analysis are presented, namely: Work Domain Analysis, Control Task Analysis, Strategies Analysis, Social Organisation and Cooperation Analysis, and Worker Competencies Analysis. Complex socio-technical systems are difficult to analyse but Cognitive Work Analysis offers an integrated way of analysing complex systems with the core of functional means-ends analysis underlying all of the other representations. The joined-up analysis offers a coherent framework for understanding how socio-technical systems work. Data were collected through observation and interviews at different sites across the UK. The resultant representations present a statement of how the work domain and current activities are configured in this complex socio-technical system. This is intended to provide a baseline, from which all future conceptions of the domain may be compared. The strength of the analysis is in the multiple representations from which the constraints acting on the work may be analysed. Future research needs to challenge the assumptions behind these constraints in order to develop new ways of working. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Further Examining Berry’s Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2017-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A 3-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in advance. PMID:28819336

  10. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  11. Drill bit seismic, vertical seismic profiling, and seismic depth imaging to aid drilling decisions in the Tho Tinh structure, Nam Con Son basin, Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, W.; Hayashida, N.; Kusaka, H.; Leaney, W.; Nakanishi, S.

    1996-10-01

    This paper reviews the problem of overpressure, a common reason for acquiring look-ahead VSPs, and the seismic trace inversion problem, a fundamental issue in look-ahead prediction. The essential components of intermediate VSPs were examined from acquisition through processing to inversion, and recently acquired real data were provided, which were indicative of the advances being made toward developing an exclusive high resolution VSP service. A simple interpretation method and an end product of predicted mud weight versus depth were also presented, which were obtained from the inverted acoustic impedance and empirical relations. Of paramount importance in predicting the depth to a target was the velocity function used below the intermediate TD. The use of empirical or assumed density functions was an obvious weak link in the procedure. The advent of real-time time-depth measurements from drill bit seismic allowed a continuously updated predicted target depth below the present bit depth. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Estimation of the depth of faulting in the northeast margin of Argyre basin (Mars) by structural analysis of lobate scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Gil, Andrea; Ruiz, Javier; Egea-González, Isabel; Romeo, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Lobate scarps are tectonic structures considered as the topographic expression of thrust faults. For this study we have chosen three large lobate scarps (Ogygis Rupes, Bosporos Rupes and a third unnamed one) located in Aonia Terra, in the southern hemisphere of Mars near the northeast margin of the Argyre impact basin. These lobate scarps strike parallel to the edge of Thaumasia in this area, showing a roughly arcuate to linear form and an asymmetric cross section with a steeply frontal scarp and a gently dipping back scarp. The asymmetry in the cross sections suggests that the three lobate scarps were generated by ESE-vergent thrust faults. Two complementary methods were used to analyze the faults underlying these lobate scarps based on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data and the Mars imagery available: (i) analyzing topographic profiles together with the horizontal shortening estimations from cross-cut craters to create balanced cross sections on the basis of thrust fault propagation folding [1]; (ii) using a forward mechanical dislocation method [2], which predicts fault geometry by comparing model outputs with real topography. The objective is to obtain fault geometry parameters as the minimum value for the horizontal offset, dip angle and depth of faulting of each underlying fault. By comparing the results obtained by both methods we estimate a preliminary depth of faulting value between 15 and 26 kilometers for this zone between Thaumasia and Argyre basin. The significant sizes of the faults underlying these three lobate scarps suggest that their detachments are located at a main rheological change. Estimates of the depth of faulting in similar lobate scarps on Mars or Mercury [3] have been associated to the depth of the brittle-ductile transition. [1] Suppe (1983), Am. J. Sci., 283, 648-721; Seeber and Sorlien (2000), Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 112, 1067-1079. [2] Toda et al. (1998) JGR, 103, 24543-24565. [3] i.e. Schultz and Watters (2001) Geophys. Res. Lett., 28

  13. Precipitation Depth-Duration-Frequency Analysis for the Nevada National Security Site and Surrounding Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Li [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences; Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences

    2016-08-01

    Accurate precipitation frequency data are important for Environmental Management Soils Activities on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are important for environmental assessments performed for regulatory closure of Soils Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Sites, as well as engineering mitigation designs and post-closure monitoring strategies to assess and minimize potential contaminant migration from Soils CAU Sites. Although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Atlas 14 (Bonnin et al., 2011) provides precipitation frequency data for the NNSS area, the NNSS-specific observed precipitation data were not consistent with the NOAA Atlas 14 predicted data. This is primarily due to the NOAA Atlas 14 products being produced from analyses without including the approximately 30 NNSS precipitation gage records, several of which approach or exceed 50 year of record. Therefore, a study of precipitation frequency that incorporated the NNSS precipitation gage records into the NOAA Atlas 14 dataset, was performed specifically for the NNSS to derive more accurate site-specific precipitation data products. Precipitation frequency information, such as the depth-duration-frequency (DDF) relationships, are required to generate synthetic standard design storm hydrographs and assess actual precipitation events. In this study, the actual long-term NNSS precipitation gage records, some of which are the longest gage records in southern and central Nevada, were analyzed to allow for more accurate precipitation DDF estimates to be developed for the NNSS. Gridded maps of precipitation frequency for the NNSS and surrounding areas were then produced.

  14. Wind wave analysis in depth limited water using OCEANLYZ, A MATLAB toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpour, Arash; Chen, Qin

    2017-09-01

    There are a number of well established methods in the literature describing how to assess and analyze measured wind wave data. However, obtaining reliable results from these methods requires adequate knowledge on their behavior, strengths and weaknesses. A proper implementation of these methods requires a series of procedures including a pretreatment of the raw measurements, and adjustment and refinement of the processed data to provide quality assurance of the outcomes, otherwise it can lead to untrustworthy results. This paper discusses potential issues in these procedures, explains what parameters are influential for the outcomes and suggests practical solutions to avoid and minimize the errors in the wave results. The procedure of converting the water pressure data into the water surface elevation data, treating the high frequency data with a low signal-to-noise ratio, partitioning swell energy from wind sea, and estimating the peak wave frequency from the weighted integral of the wave power spectrum are described. Conversion and recovery of the data acquired by a pressure transducer, particularly in depth-limited water like estuaries and lakes, are explained in detail. To provide researchers with tools for a reliable estimation of wind wave parameters, the Ocean Wave Analyzing toolbox, OCEANLYZ, is introduced. The toolbox contains a number of MATLAB functions for estimation of the wave properties in time and frequency domains. The toolbox has been developed and examined during a number of the field study projects in Louisiana's estuaries.

  15. In-depth proteomic analysis of banana (Musa spp.) fruit with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Musa ssp. is among the world's leading fruit crops. Although a strong interest on banana biochemistry exists in the scientific community, focused on metabolite composition, proteins have been scarcely investigated even if they play an important role in food allergy and stability, are a source of biologically active peptides, and can provide information about nutritional aspects of this fruit. In this work we have employed the combinatorial peptide ligand libraries after different types of protein extractions, for searching the very low-abundance proteins in banana. The use of advanced MS techniques and Musa ssp. mRNAs database in combination with the Uniprot_viridiplantae database allowed us to identify 1131 proteins. Among this huge amount of proteins we found several already known allergens such as Mus a 1, pectinesterase, superoxide dismutase, and potentially new allergens. Additionally several enzymes involved in degradation of starch granules and strictly correlated to ripening stage were identified. This is the first in-depth exploration of the banana fruit proteome and one of the largest descriptions of the proteome of any vegetable system. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF FACTORS IN ROAD ACCIDENTS THROUGH IN-DEPTH ACCIDENT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouyid BIN ISLAM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The rising trend of motorization and improving socio-economic status of Thai people directly influences the aggravating road safety situation with fatalities and permanently disabled injuries of about 130,000 and 500,000 respectively over the past decades. An estimated annual cost from road crashes amounts to about US$2,500 million, 3.4 percent of Gross National Product (GNP, undoubtedly inflicts Thailand with a burning public health concern in the South East Asian region. This paper addresses an in-depth study through crash investigation and reconstruction which has not yet been practised in Thailand to identify the contributory factors in road crashes by the concerned authorities. This research attempts to establish the linkage between the causes and consequences with event classification of an investigated case by highlighting the dynamic driving situation with initial traveling speed, pre-impact and post-impact speed of the involved vehicles to describe the crash scenario. Moreover, inaccurate risk assessment and late evasive action, absence of street-light facilities, inadequate lane marking and visibility were also outlined as major risk factors increasing the severity of crash and injury in this investigated case.

  17. Comparative Finite Element Method Analysis of Spiroid Worm Gear Drives Having Arched Profile and Having Linear Profile in Axial Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor BODZÁS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the knowledge of the advantageous characteristics of the cylindrical worm gear drives having arched profile in axial section and the conical worm gear drives having linear profile in axial section, a new geometric type conical worm gear drive has been designed and then manufactured, that is the conical worm gear drive having arched profile in axial section. Beside similar charging and marginal conditions in case of the same geometric spiroid worm gear drives having arched profile and having linear profile in axial section we have done comparative finite element method analysis for awarding of the strains, deformations and stresses of this gear drives.

  18. Determining the COB location along the Iberian margin and Galicia Bank from gravity anomaly inversion, residual depth anomaly and subsidence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge and understanding of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) structure, continent-ocean boundary (COB) location and crustal type are of critical importance in evaluating rifted continental margin formation and evolution. OCT structure, COB location and magmatic type also have important implications for the understanding of the geodynamics of continental breakup and in the evaluation of petroleum systems in deep-water frontier oil and gas exploration at rifted continental margins. Mapping the distribution of thinned continental crust and lithosphere, its distal extent and the start of unequivocal oceanic crust and hence determining the OCT structure and COB location at rifted continental margins is therefore a generic global problem. In order to assist in the determination of the OCT structure and COB location, we present methodologies using gravity anomaly inversion, residual depth anomaly (RDA) analysis and subsidence analysis, which we apply to the west Iberian rifted continental margin. The west Iberian margin has one of the most complete data sets available for deep magma-poor rifted margins, so there is abundant data to which the results can be calibrated. Gravity anomaly inversion has been used to determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness and continental lithosphere thinning; subsidence analysis has been used to determine the distribution of continental lithosphere thinning; and RDAs have been used to investigate the OCT bathymetric anomalies with respect to expected oceanic bathymetries at rifted continental margins. These quantitative analytical techniques have been applied to the west Iberian rifted continental margin along profiles IAM9, Lusigal 12 (with the TGS-extension) and ISE-01. Our predictions of OCT structure, COB location and magmatic type (i.e. the volume of magmatic addition, whether the margin is `normal' magmatic, magma-starved or magma-rich) have been tested and validated using ODP wells (Legs 103, 149 and 173), which provide

  19. The Beryllium 7 Depth Distribution Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalal Sharib; Zainudin Othman; Dainee Nor Fardzila Ahmad Tugi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the evolution of 7Be depth distribution in a soil profile. The soil samples have been collected by using plastic core in bare area in Bangi, Malaysia. Each of the soil core samples has been sectioned into 2 mm increments to a depth of 4 cm and the samples are subsequently oven dried at 45°C and gently disaggregated. The sample is passed through a < 2 mm sieve and packed into plastic pot for 7Be analysis using gamma spectrometry with a 24 hour count time. From the findings, show the 7Be depth penetration from this study decreases exponentially with depth and is confined within the top few centimeters and similar with other works been reported. The further discussion for this findings will be presented in full paper. (author)

  20. THE AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE PROFILES FOR FLYING WINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using an un-piloted aerial vector is determined by the aerodynamic characteristics and performances. The design for a tailless unmanned aerial vehicles starts from defining the aerial vector mission and implies o series of geometrical and aerodynamic aspects for stability. This article proposes to remark the aerodynamic characteristics of three profiles used at flying wing airship through 2D software analysis.

  1. A structured approach to voice range profile (phonetogram) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulter, A M; Wit, H P; Schutte, H K; Miller, D G

    1994-10-01

    A new method to analyze voice range profiles (phonetograms) is described. The structured analysis is based on quantitatively determining the features: shape, area, and "speaking range" dynamics, without distorting the shape of phonetograms. The parameter sets describing these features are calculated independently of fundamental frequency, which makes it possible to compare phonetograms. Two phonetograms representing a normal and a pathological example are used to illustrate the proposed method. The process provides a tool for establishing normative data for specified groups.

  2. Anterior chamber depth and refractive change in late postoperative capsular bag distension syndrome: a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyu Yang

    Full Text Available To assess the characteristic findings and effects of laser capsulotomy in patients with late postoperative capsular bag distension syndrome (CBDS.Twenty patients diagnosed with late postoperative CBDS between July 2010 and August 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Before and 1 week after capsulotomy, changes in the anterior chamber depth (ACD were assessed using ultrasound biomicroscopy. Changes in the refractive status and uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA were also measured 1 week and 1 month after capsulotomy. For patients who received bilateral cataract surgery, preoperative ACD and axial length measured by IOLMaster were compared between the two eyes.Twenty-two eyes from 20 patients who had undergone laser capsulotomy showed a mean UCVA improvement of 0.27 ± 0.24 logMAR (range, 0.00-0.90. ACD was increased by an average of +0.04 mm (95% confidence interval, +0.01 to +0.06 mm, p = 0.034, equivalent to predicted refractive change of +0.10 D. The discrepancy between actual (+1.33 D and predicted refractive change after capsulotomy suggests that refractive change may not be generated from IOL displacement in late postoperative CBDS. Preoperative ACD was deeper in the eye with late postoperative CBDS in all bilaterally pseudophakic patients (mean, 3.68 mm vs. 3.44 mm in the fellow eye, p = 0.068.Late postoperative CBDS showed refractive changes that were resolved successfully after laser capsulotomy. The convex lens effects of opalescent material in the distended capsular bag may play a major role in myopic shift. A larger preoperative ACD is possibly associated with the development of late postoperative CBDS.

  3. In-depth analysis of solvent effects on bulk heterojunction solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohourian Aboutorabi, Reihaneh; Joodaki, Mojtaba; Shahbazi, Kowsar

    2014-05-01

    Efficiency of an organic solar cell is very sensitive to fabrication procedure. One of the most important parameters is active layer morphology which radically influences several cell properties such as generation rate, layer resistance, charge carrier motilities etc. Meantime, in P3HT:fullerene based solar cells, using PCBM would improve the morphology and increase the cost simultaneously. On the other hand, C60 is way less expensive, but its limited solubility in common solvents would influence cell performance. To benefit from its cost and as the formation of C60 aggregates and P3HT crystallinity significantly depend on the solvent which would influence several cell properties, one should find a proper solvent. To make an in-depth investigation of solvent effects, experimental investigations will not suffice and using a precise model to fit the data and extract hidden parameters would help us to have a deep understanding of the cells physical basis. In this work, an optimization algorithm is employed to fit a numerical model simulation results with experiments and the model benefits from a field dependent series resistance. Simulation results indicate that a suitable solvent mainly improves the cell performance by changing 3 basic parameters which are G, μn and μp. Additionally, although parameters such as Eg and DC dielectric constant are very crucial in determining power conversion efficiency, they cannot be effectively improved changing the solvent. It is reported that the cell prepared by Cl-naph:CB performs better than the other cells. Considering our results, it can be attributed to its larger G, μn and μp. It also has the least Rs and the largest Rsh among all other P3HT:C60 based cells (which is caused by its higher mobility-carrier density product). This work gives experimentalists an idea of how they should choose a solvent. The results can also be generalized to find a proper solvent for other active layer materials.

  4. Blade profile optimization of kaplan turbine using cfd analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjua, A.B.; Khalil, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of hydro-power as renewable energy source is of prime importance in the world now. Hydropower energy is available in abundant in form of falls, canals rivers, dams etc. It means, there are various types of sites with different parameters like flow rate, heads, etc. Depending upon the sites, water turbines are designed and manufactured to avail hydro-power energy. Low head turbines on runof-river are widely used for the purpose. Low head turbines are classified as reaction turbines. For runof-river, depending upon the variety of site data, low head Kaplan turbines are selected, designed and manufactured. For any given site requirement, it becomes very essential to design the turbine runner blades through optimization of the CAD model of blades profile. This paper presents the optimization technique carried out on a complex geometry of blade profile through static and dynamic computational analysis. It is used through change of the blade profile geometry at five different angles in the 3D (Three Dimensional) CAD model. Blade complex geometry and design have been developed by using the coordinates point system on the blade in PRO-E /CREO software. Five different blade models are developed for analysis purpose. Based on the flow rate and heads, blade profiles are analyzed using ANSYS software to check and compare the output results for optimization of the blades for improved results which show that by changing blade profile angle and its geometry, different blade sizes and geometry can be optimized using the computational techniques with changes in CAD models. (author)

  5. Blade Profile Optimization of Kaplan Turbine Using CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz Bashir Janjua

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of hydro-power as renewable energy source is of prime importance in the world now. Hydropower energy is available in abundant in form of falls, canals rivers, dams etc. It means, there are various types of sites with different parameters like flow rate, heads, etc. Depending upon the sites, water turbines are designed and manufactured to avail hydro-power energy. Low head turbines on runof-river are widely used for the purpose. Low head turbines are classified as reaction turbines. For runof river, depending upon the variety of site data, low head Kaplan turbines are selected, designed and manufactured. For any given site requirement, it becomes very essential to design the turbine runner blades through optimization of the CAD model of blades profile. This paper presents the optimization technique carried out on a complex geometry of blade profile through static and dynamic computational analysis. It is used through change of the blade profile geometry at five different angles in the 3D (Three Dimensional CAD model. Blade complex geometry and design have been developed by using the coordinates point system on the blade in PRO-E /CREO software. Five different blade models are developed for analysis purpose. Based on the flow rate and heads, blade profiles are analyzed using ANSYS software to check and compare the output results for optimization of the blades for improved results which show that by changing blade profile angle and its geometry, different blade sizes and geometry can be optimized using the computational techniques with changes in CAD models.

  6. Optimization of plasma sampling depth and aerosol gas flow rates for single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kálomista, Ildikó; Kéri, Albert; Galbács, Gábor

    2017-09-01

    We performed experiments to assess the separate and also the combined effect of the sampling depth and the aerosol gas flow rates on the signal formation in single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) measurements by using dispersions containing Ag and Au NPs. It was found that the NP signal can significantly be improved by the optimization of the sampling depth. With respect to the "robust" setting, a signal improvement of nearly 100% could be achieved, which translates into a 25-30% improvement in size detection limits. It was also found that the shape of the spICP-MS signal histograms also change with the change of the plasma sampling depth. It was demonstrated that nanoparticle peak separation can also be significantly enhanced by using sampling depth optimization. The effect of the aerosol dilution gas flow, now standard in most ICP-MS instruments, on the spICP-MS signal formation was also studied for the first time in the literature, as this flow was hoped to make spICP-MS measurements more practical and faster via the on-line dilution of the aerosol generated from nano-dispersions. Our experimental results revealed that the dilution gas flow can only be used for a moderate aerosol dilution in spICP-MS measurements, if the gas flow going to the pneumatic nebulizer is proportionally lowered at the same time. This however was found to cause a significant worsening in the operation of the sample introduction system, which gives rise to a strong NP signal loss. Thus it was concluded that the use of the aerosol dilution gas flow, in its present form, can not be suggested for spICP-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Forecasting of bioplastics market development in Russia based on in-depth analysis and data minimg

    OpenAIRE

    BAZHANOV N.N.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the research of market opportunities for potential participants of Russian bioplastics market and with strategic market opportunities evaluation based on data analysis. The paper is aimed at is developing of model and methods of strategic forecasting based on data analysis for Russian bioplastics market. World’s and Russia’s market drivers, development trends and market opportunities for potential market participants were brought to light and analyzed in this research.

  8. In depth compositional analysis of ceramic (Bi2O3)0.75(Er2O3)0.25 by AES and XPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekamp, L.J.; Hanekamp, Lambertus J.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; van den Berg, Albert; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.; Sasse, Antonius G.B.M.; Kruidhof, H.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical composition of dense ceramics of erbia-stabilized δ-Bi2O3 was analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling using Ar+ ion sputtering. The relative sensitivity factors (rsf) and sputter rates of bismuth and erbium in this material have been determined by electron probe

  9. Gait profile score and movement analysis profile in patients with Parkinson's disease during concurrent cognitive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, Danielli S.; Oliveira, Elaine M.; Cardoso, Jefferson R.; Correa, João C. F.; Baker, Richard; Lucareli, Paulo R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gait disorders are common in individuals with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and the concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can have marked effects on gait. The Gait Profile Score (GPS) and the Movement Analysis Profile (MAP) were developed in order to summarize the data of kinematics and facilitate understanding of the results of gait analysis. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of the GPS and MAP in the quantification of changes in gait during a concurrent cognitive load while walking in adults with and without PD. Method: Fourteen patients with idiopathic PD and nine healthy subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed single and dual walking tasks. The GPS/MAP was computed from three-dimensional gait analysis data. Results: Differences were found between tasks for GPS (PGait Variable Score (GVS) (pelvic rotation, knee flexion-extension and ankle dorsiflexion-plantarflexion) (Pgait impairment during the dual task and suggest that GPS/MAP may be used to evaluate the effects of concurrent cognitive load while walking in patients with PD. PMID:25054382

  10. Depth profiles of 230Th excess, transition metals and mineralogy of ferromanganese crusts of the Central Indian Ocean basin and implications for palaeoceanographic influence on crust genesis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Borole, D.V.

    /Fe ratios ( 1-l .6), &MnO, as the main Mn mineral phase and a smooth exponential decay pattern of 23”Th clcw and “@Th cxen./232Th activities with depth indicate that these crusts have not recorded any palaeoceano- graphic events of the past u 0.4 Ma...; Banakar, 1988). The Central In- dian basin crusts occur at greater water depths, well below the present-day carbonate compen- sation depth (CCD ), in sharp contrast to the 0 168-9622/9 l/$03.50 0 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. All rights...

  11. Motivation with Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an illusional arena by offering experience in optical illusions in which students must apply critical analysis to their innate information gathering systems. Introduces different types of depth illusions for students to experience. (ASK)

  12. Monitoring sleep depth: analysis of bispectral index (BIS) based on polysomnographic recordings and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Sandra; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miguel Ángel; Pujol, Anna; Baxarias, Pilar; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria

    2017-02-01

    The assessment and management of sleep are increasingly recommended in the clinical practice. Polysomnography (PSG) is considered the gold standard test to monitor sleep objectively, but some practical and technical constraints exist due to environmental and patient considerations. Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring is commonly used in clinical practice for guiding anesthetic administration and provides an index based on relationships between EEG components. Due to similarities in EEG synchronization between anesthesia and sleep, several studies have assessed BIS as a sleep monitor with contradictory results. The aim of this study was to evaluate objectively both the feasibility and reliability of BIS for sleep monitoring through a robust methodology, which included full PSG recordings at a baseline situation and after 40 h of sleep deprivation. Results confirmed that the BIS index was highly correlated with the hypnogram (0.89 ± 0.02), showing a progressive decrease as sleep deepened, and an increase during REM sleep (awake: 91.77 ± 8.42; stage N1: 83.95 ± 11.05; stage N2: 71.71 ± 11.99; stage N3: 42.41 ± 9.14; REM: 80.11 ± 8.73). Mean and median BIS values were lower in the post-deprivation night than in the baseline night, showing statistical differences for the slow wave sleep (baseline: 42.41 ± 9.14 vs. post-deprivation: 39.49 ± 10.27; p = 0.02). BIS scores were able to discriminate properly between deep (N3) and light (N1, N2) sleep. BIS values during REM overlapped those of other sleep stages, although EMG activity provided by the BIS monitor could help to identify REM sleep if needed. In conclusion, BIS monitors could provide a useful measure of sleep depth in especially particular situations such as intensive care units, and they could be used as an alternative for sleep monitoring in order to reduce PSG-derived costs and to increase capacity in ambulatory care.

  13. Micron Scale Mapping and Depth Profiling of Organic Compounds in Geologic Material: Femtosecond - Laser Desorption Laser Postionization - Mass Spectrometry (fs-LDPI-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasterski, M. J.; Barry, G. E.; Hanley, L.; Kenig, F. P. H.

    2017-12-01

    One of the major challenges within the field of organic geochemistry is to determine whether an observed biomarker signature is indigenous (emplaced during sedimentation), non-indigenous (emplaced after sedimentation) or contaminant (incorporated during sampling, storage or analysis). The challenge of determining the mode of emplacement of an observed biomarker signature is accentuated in analyses of Precambrian samples, and may be an issue upon Mars sample return. Current geochemical techniques (e.g. gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS, GC×GC-MS) can determine the composition and structure of the organic constituents of a sample. However, the preparatory steps necessary prior to GC-MS analysis (sample crushing, solvent extraction) make it impossible to determine the precise spatial distribution of organic molecules within rocks and sediments. Here, we will present data from the first set of micron (2-5 μm width × 8 μm depth) resolution MS-images of organic compounds in geologic material. Fs-LDPI-MS was utilized to create MS-images of organic compounds in four samples: (1) an Antarctic igneous dike used as a sample blank; (2) a 93 million year-old (Ma) burrowed carbonate collected near Pueblo, CO; (3) a 164 Ma organic rich mudstone collected in central England; and (4) a 2680 Ma metasediment collected in Timmins, ON, Canada. Prior to this study, all samples had been analyzed via GC-MS to determine the bulk hydrocarbon composition. For this study, thick sections (70-100 μm thick) were prepared in-house using custom-designed clean preparation techniques. Petrographic maps of the thick sections were created to highlight geologic features such as burrows (sample 2), particulate organic matter (sample 3) and hydrothermal veins (sample 4). Fs-LDPI-MS analysis was performed on the mapped thick sections. MS-images of targeted organic compounds were created, and the MS-images were overlain with the petrographic maps to determine the spatial distribution of the

  14. GeLCMS for in-depth protein characterization and advanced analysis of proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Olsen, Jesper V

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the array of mass spectrometry (MS) applications to address questions in molecular and cellular biology has greatly expanded and continues to grow. Modern mass spectrometers allow for identification, characterization, as well as quantification of protein compositions...... spectrometry (MS/MS). All steps of the sample preparation are explained in detail, and the procedure is compatible with downstream analysis on any mass spectrometer available. With minor adjustments the protocol can be used with 2D gels as well. The protocol provided can be applied to analyze specific proteins...... and their modifications in complex biological samples. Prior to MS analysis any biological sample needs to be properly prepared for the experiment. Here we present a protocol that combines pre-separation of proteins by 1D gel electrophoresis followed by analysis of in situ digested protein products by tandem mass...

  15. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medel B, E.; Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  16. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  17. An In-Depth Analysis of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the latent structure of scores on the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) and analyzes the relationship between this structure and students' academic performance. Two independent samples of college freshmen (n = 527) and seniors (n = 429) completed the LASSI. Data analysis of the first sample revealed acceptable…

  18. Effect-directed analysis supporting monitoring of aquatic environments — An in-depth overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brack, W.; Ait-Aissa, S.; Burgess, R.M.; Creusot, N.; Di Paolo, C.; Escher, B.I.; Hewitt, L.M.; Hilscherova, K.; Hollender, J.; Hollert, H.; Jonker, W.; Kool, J.; Lamoree, M.H.; Muschket, M.; Neumann, S.; Rostkowski, P.; Ruttkies, C.; Schollee, J.; Schymanski, E.L.; Schulze, T.; Seiler, T.; Tindall, A.J.; De Aragão Umbuzeiro, G.; Vrana, B.; Krauss, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic environments are often contaminated with complex mixtures of chemicals that may pose a risk to ecosystems and human health. This contamination cannot be addressed with target analysis alone but tools are required to reduce this complexity and identify those chemicals that might cause adverse

  19. In-depth analysis of the adipocyte proteome by mass spectrometry and bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adachi, Jun; Kumar, Chanchal; Zhang, Yanling

    2007-01-01

    , mitochondria, membrane, and cytosol of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We identified 3,287 proteins while essentially eliminating false positives, making this one of the largest high confidence proteomes reported to date. Comprehensive bioinformatics analysis revealed that the adipocyte proteome, despite its specialized...

  20. Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Profiles is a synthetic overview of more than 100 national energy markets in the world, providing insightful facts and key energy statistics. A Profile is structured around 6 main items and completed by key statistics: Ministries, public agencies, energy policy are concerned; main companies in the oil, gas, electricity and coal sectors, status, shareholders; reserve, production, imports and exports, electricity and refining capacities; deregulation of prices, subsidies, taxes; consumption trends by sector, energy market shares; main energy projects, production and consumption prospects. Statistical Profiles are present in about 3 pages the main data and indicators on oil, gas, coal and electricity. (A.L.B.)

  1. Analysis for the depth of underground resistivity structure by using MT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Koichi; Yokoi, Koichi; Negi, Tateyuki; Kasagi, Toshio; Takahashi, Takeharu; Teshima, Minoru

    2005-03-01

    The present document is to report the result of resistivity monitoring by using MT (Magnetotelluric) method near the site proposed for the Horonobe Underground Research Program at the Horonobe-cho, Hokkaido by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. The stationary MT observation system, installed near the HDB-1 borehole on November 2002, was moved to a site at the Hokusei-en, 4 km west of the first site. This system is monitoring for the depth of underground resistivity. Observation data at the Hokusei-en from February 1st 2004 to January 31st 2005 was added to the investigation in 2004 fiscal year. But, data cannot be obtained from July 8th to November 11th of 2004 due to the disconnection trouble of the optical fiber cable for data transfer. The results were as follows; 1) Telluric and magnetic time series data measured by MT unit were transferred to a PC installed in an observation through optical fiber cable and processed and edited automatically. 2) The standard deviation of the apparent resistivity depends on range of frequency, 3% or less in the vicinity of the Schumann resonance frequency. The Standard deviation of data from 80 Hz to 0.56 Hz was less or 13%. But the standard deviation of low frequency data was more or 15%. 3) Amplitude of telluric and magnetic spectra below 1 Hz is coincident with Geomagnetic Activity K-index. Clear correlation was not admitted in resistivity and K-index. 4) Data quality was studied compared with weather data. Clear correlation was not admitted for windy day and rainy day. 5) Data was edited by the new criterion of K-index 1.3 or more, wind 6 m/s or less, precipitation 6 mm or less. As a result, the improvement of the data quality was admitted by 5 frequencies of 9 frequencies. Only one side of resistivity Rxy and Ryx was improved by 4 frequencies of the remainder. 6) In addition, data was edited by the new criterion of the coherence of the electric-magnetic amplitude. As a result, the improvement of the data quality

  2. Impact of crystallisation processes on depth profile formation in sol-gel PbZr.sub.0·52./sub.Ti.sub.0·48./sub.O.sub.3./sub. thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aulika, I.; Mergen, S.; Bencan, A.; Zhang, Q.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kosec, M.; Kundzins, K.; Demarchi, D.; Civera, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 1 (2013), s. 53-58 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010517; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : compositional and optical gradien * PZT * spectroscopic ellipsometry * crystallisation proces * sol-gel * XRD * thin film s * depth profile * spectroscopic elipsometry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.107, year: 2013

  3. In-depth, reproducible analysis of human plasma using IgY 14 and SuperMix Immunodepletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Lynn A.; Ky, Bonnie; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of cancer and other disease biomarkers in human plasma has been exceptionally challenging due to the complex nature of plasma, and the presence of a moderate number of high- and medium- abundance proteins which mask low abundance proteins of interest. As a result, immunoaffinity depletion formats combining multiple antibodies to target the most abundant plasma proteins have become the first stage in most plasma proteome discovery schemes. This protocol describes the use of tandem IgY 14 and SuperMix immunoaffinity depletion to reproducibly remove > 99% of total plasma protein. This greatly increases the depth of analysis of human plasma proteomes. Depleted plasma samples can then be analyzed in a single high resolution LC-MS/MS run on a Q-Exactive Plus mass spectrometer, followed by label-free quantitation. If greater depth of analysis is desired the depleted plasma can be further fractionated by separating the sample for a short distance on a 1D SDS gel and cuting the gel into uniform slices prior to trypsin digestion. Alternatively, the depleted plasma can be reduced, alkylated, digested with trypsin followed by high pH reverse phase HPLC separation. PMID:28674879

  4. In-depth motivic analysis based on multiparametric closed pattern and cyclic sequence mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lartillot, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a computational system for exhaustive but compact description of repeated motivic patterns in symbolic representations of music. The approach follows a method based on closed heterogeneous pattern mining in multiparametrical space with control of pattern cyclicity. This paper...... presents a much simpler description and justification of this general strategy, as well as significant simplifications of the model, in particular concerning the management of pattern cyclicity. A new method for automated bundling of patterns belonging to same motivic or thematic classes is also presented......Suite, a new open-source framework for audio and music analysis....

  5. Managing the delivery of bad news: an in-depth analysis of doctors' delivery style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joanne; Dunn, Stewart; Heinrich, Paul

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the delivery styles doctors typically use when breaking bad news (BBN). Thirty one doctors were recruited to participate in two standardised BBN consultations involving a sudden death. Delivery styles were determined using time to deliver the bad news as a standardised differentiation as well as qualitative analysis of interaction content and language style. Communication performance was also assessed. Analysis of BBN interactions revealed three typical delivery styles. A blunt style characterised by doctors delivering news within the first 30 s of the interaction; Forecasting, a staged delivery of the news within the first 2 min and a stalling approach, delaying news delivery for more than 2 min. This latter avoidant style relies on the news recipient reaching a conclusion about event outcome without the doctor explicitly conveying the news. Three typical bad news delivery styles used by doctors when BBN were confirmed both semantically and operationally in the study. The relationship between delivery style and the overall quality of BBN interactions was also investigated. This research provides a new template for approaching BBN training and provides evidence for a need for greater flexibility when communicating bad news. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In-Depth Analysis on Influencing Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Cervical Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chaojie; Mu, Xiaoping; Wei, Jianxun; Chu, Ye; Liang, Bin

    2016-12-14

    BACKGROUND To explore the related influencing factors of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of 263 patients who underwent ACDF was carried out. Cervical x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were required before operation, after operation, and at the last follow-up. General information and some radiographic parameters of all patients were measured and recorded. According to the imaging data, patients were put into one of two groups: non-ASD group and ASD group. The differences between the two groups were compared by t-test and χ²-test, and the related influencing factors of ASD were analyzed by logistic regression. RESULTS In all, 138 patients had imaging ASD. Comparing the age, the postoperative cervical arc chord distance (po-CACD), and the plate to disc distance (PDD) of the two groups, differences were statistically significant (p0.05). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that there were significant correlations in the following characteristics: age, postoperative po-CACD, and the PDD (p<0.05). Of all these characteristics, the correlation of age was the highest (R=1.820). CONCLUSIONS Age, po-CACD, and PDD were risk factors for ASD after ACDF. The older the operation age, the worse the recovery was of postoperative physiological curvature of cervical spine, and a PDD < 5 mm was more likely to lead to ASD.

  7. In-Depth Analysis on Influencing Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Cervical Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chaojie; Mu, Xiaoping; Wei, Jianxun; Chu, Ye; Liang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the related influencing factors of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of 263 patients who underwent ACDF was carried out. Cervical x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were required before operation, after operation, and at the last follow-up. General information and some radiographic parameters of all patients were measured and recorded. According to the imaging data, patients were put into one of two groups: non-ASD group and ASD group. The differences between the two groups were compared by t-test and χ2-test, and the related influencing factors of ASD were analyzed by logistic regression. Results In all, 138 patients had imaging ASD. Comparing the age, the postoperative cervical arc chord distance (po-CACD), and the plate to disc distance (PDD) of the two groups, differences were statistically significant (pfusion segment number, the pre-CACD, the pre-and-po CACD, the preoperative cervical spinal canal ratio, and the upper and lower disc height (DH) showed no statistical difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that there were significant correlations in the following characteristics: age, postoperative po-CACD, and the PDD (pspine, and a PDD < 5 mm was more likely to lead to ASD. PMID:27965512

  8. Assessment of anaesthetic depth by clustering analysis and autoregressive modelling of electroencephalograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C E; Rosenfalck, A; Nørregaard Christensen, K

    1991-01-01

    The brain activity electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 30 healthy women scheduled for hysterectomy. The patients were anaesthetized with isoflurane, halothane or etomidate/fentanyl. A multiparametric method was used for extraction of amplitude and frequency information from the EEG....... The method applied autoregressive modelling of the signal, segmented in 2 s fixed intervals. The features from the EEG segments were used for learning and for classification. The learning process was unsupervised and hierarchical clustering analysis was used to construct a learning set of EEG amplitude......-frequency patterns for each of the three anaesthetic drugs. These EEG patterns were assigned to a colour code corresponding to similar clinical states. A common learning set could be used for all patients anaesthetized with the same drug. The classification process could be performed on-line and the results were...

  9. Garment needs of pregnant women based on content analysis of in-depth interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Simone S M; Yu, Winnie W M; Lao, Terence T; Chow, Daniel H K; Chung, Joanne W Y; Li, Yi

    2009-09-01

    This study aims to identify the needs, concerns and problems of pregnant women when using maternity support garments. Maternity support belt is regarded as helpful in reducing low back pain during pregnancy. However, several garment-related problems exist which might lead to poor adherence behaviour undermining the benefit of garment therapy. A qualitative exploratory study. METHODS. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 pregnant Chinese women who experienced low back pain during pregnancy. All the interviews followed an interview guide and different maternity support garments were shown to the participants as a method of tangible objects to stimulate responses. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results showed that 60% of pregnant women discontinued using maternity support garments due to excessive heat, perceived ineffectiveness, itchiness, excessive pressure around the abdomen and inconvenience of adjustment. The content analysis generated five main themes of needs including effective function, safety, skin comfort, ease to put on and take off and aesthetics of maternity support garments. The findings of the five main themes of needs were largely consistent with previous studies examining medical garments for overall satisfaction and compliance. The results revealed that women's physiological and psychological changes during pregnancy influenced their clothing preferences on both functional and aesthetical values. Maternity support garments are convenient and easily-accessible therapy to manage LBP during pregnancy and are frequently recommended and worn by pregnant women. However, inappropriate choice of garment therapy not only led to ineffectiveness but also undesirable effects. The key findings of the five main themes of garment needs in pregnant women will facilitate healthcare professionals in providing evidence-based advice to assist patients in the selection of an appropriate and optimal maternity support garment. These

  10. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  11. Friedel's salt profiles from thermogravimetric analysis and thermodynamic modelling of Portland cement-based mortars exposed to sodium chloride solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhenguo; Geiker, Mette Rica; Lothenbach, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    indicates that only a minor part of the chloride ions is bound in Friedel's in the studied Portland cement (P) and limestone blended (L) cement. The chloride binding capacity with respect to the formation of Friedel's salt by consumption of monocarbonate is reached for the P and L mortars, where only...... a fraction of about 20% of the amount of C3A is found to contribute to formation of Friedel's salt. Higher amounts of Friedel's salt are formed in the metakaolin containing mortars. However, the limited chloride ingress depths prevent quantification of the potential full chloride binding capacity of Friedel......Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermodynamic modelling have been used to obtain Friedel's salt profiles for saturated mortar cylinders exposed to a 2.8 M NaCl solution. Comparison of the measured Friedel's salt profiles with the total chloride profiles...

  12. Gait profile score and movement analysis profile in patients with Parkinson's disease during concurrent cognitive load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielli S. Speciali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gait disorders are common in individuals with Parkinson's Disease (PD and the concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can have marked effects on gait. The Gait Profile Score (GPS and the Movement Analysis Profile (MAP were developed in order to summarize the data of kinematics and facilitate understanding of the results of gait analysis. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of the GPS and MAP in the quantification of changes in gait during a concurrent cognitive load while walking in adults with and without PD. Method: Fourteen patients with idiopathic PD and nine healthy subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed single and dual walking tasks. The GPS/MAP was computed from three-dimensional gait analysis data. Results: Differences were found between tasks for GPS (P<0.05 and Gait Variable Score (GVS (pelvic rotation, knee flexion-extension and ankle dorsiflexion-plantarflexion (P<0.05 in the PD group. An interaction between task and group was observed for GPS (P<0.01 for the right side (Cohen's ¯d=0.99, left side (Cohen's ¯d=0.91, and overall (Cohen's ¯d=0.88. No interaction was observed only for hip internal-external rotation and foot internal-external progression GVS variables in the PD group. Conclusions: The results showed gait impairment during the dual task and suggest that GPS/MAP may be used to evaluate the effects of concurrent cognitive load while walking in patients with PD.

  13. The design and analysis of channel transmission communication system of XCTD profiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Jin, Xiang-Yu; Song, Guo-Min; Shang, Ying-Sheng; Li, Hong-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a channel transmission communication system of expendable conductivity-temperature-depth is established in accordance to the operation characteristics of the transmission line to more accurately assess the characteristics of deep-sea abandoned profiler channel. The wrapping inductance is eliminated to maximum extent through the wrapping pattern of the underwater spool and the overwater spool and the calculation of the wrapping diameter. The feasibility of the proposed channel transmission communication system is verified through theoretical analysis and practical measurement of the transmission signal error rate in the amplitude shift keying (ASK) modulation. The proposed design provides a new research method for the channel assessment of complex abandoned measuring instrument and an important experiment evidence for the rapid development of the deep-sea abandoned measuring instrument.

  14. Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler and analysis system. Deployment strategy and plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasper, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Under the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization strategy, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requires the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) Team to supply tank wastes to the Privatization Contractor for separation, treatment and immobilization (verification). Three low-activity waste (LAW) envelopes represent the range of the liquid wastes in the large underground waste-storage tank at the Hanford Site. The PHMC Team also is expected to supply high-level waste (HLW) to the Privatization Contractor. The LAW envelope is an aqueous slurry of insoluble suspended solids (sludge). The Phase 1 demonstration period will extend over 10-plus years. Wastes processed during this period will result in 6% to 13% of the total Hanford Site tank waste being treated. The purpose of this document is to provide a strategy and top-level implementation plan for the demonstration and deployment of an alternative sampling technology as an improvement to the current grab sampling approach to support the TWRS privatization. Included in this work is the addition of the capability for some at-tank analysis to enhance the use of this technology for meeting the PHMC Team's needs. The first application of this technology is to LAW feed staging, then to HLW feed staging, and finally to cross-site transfer to support feed staging from 200 West Area tanks. The TWRS retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed activities in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 identified the primary uncertainties and risks that must be managed to successfully carry out the support of the TWRS Phase 1 activities. Four of the critical risks could be mitigated, at least partially, by the use of an improved alternative to grab sampling. In addition, eight of the risks with the Waste Feed Delivery Project were associated with the sampling activities. Over 25 logic elements, Technical Basis Reviews (TBR), were reviewed and found to be relevant to risk mitigation using an

  15. Reliability, Validity, and Reader Acceptance of LI-RADS-An In-depth Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Borna K; Donati, Olivio F; Fischer, Michael A; Ulbrich, Erika J; Karlo, Christoph A; Becker, Anton; Seifert, Burkhard; Reiner, Caecilia S

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze interreader agreement and diagnostic accuracy of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) in comparison to a nonstandardized 5-point scale and to assess reader acceptance of LI-RADS for clinical routine. Eighty-four consecutive patients at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent liver magnetic resonance imaging were included in this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study. Four readers rated the likelihood of hepatocellular carcinoma for 104 liver observations using LI-RADS criteria and a 5-point Likert scale (LIKERT) based on subjective impression in two separate reading sessions. Interreader agreement was assessed using kappa statistics (κ). Diagnostic accuracy was assessed with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Reader acceptance was evaluated with a questionnaire. A sub-analysis of LI-RADS's major features (arterial phase hyper-enhancement, washout, capsule appearance, and threshold growth) and scores for lesions 1.5 cm was performed. LI-RADS showed similar overall interreader agreement compared to LIKERT (κ, 0.44 [95%CI: 0.37, 0.52] and 0.35 [95%CI: 0.27, 0.43]) with a tendency toward higher interreader agreement for LI-RADS. Interreader agreement (κ) was 0.51 (95%CI: 0.38, 0.65) for arterial phase hyper-enhancement, 0.52 (95%CI: 0.39, 0.65) for washout, 0.37 (95%CI: 0.23, 0.52) for capsule appearance, and 0.50 (95%CI: 0.38, 0.61) for threshold growth. Overall interreader agreement for LI-RADS categories was similar between observations 1.5 cm. Overall diagnostic accuracy for LIKERT and LI-RADS was comparable (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.86 and 0.87). Readers fully agreed with the statement "A short version of LI-RADS would facilitate the use in clinical routine" (median, 5.0; interquartile range, 2.25). LI-RADS showed similar interreader agreement and diagnostic accuracy compared to nonstandardized reporting. However, further

  16. In-depth proteomic analysis of mammalian mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Chloe N; Krishnan, Srinivasan C; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene R

    2013-02-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria communicate via contact sites known as mitochondria-associated ER membranes or MAM. The region has emerged as the primary area of Ca(2+) traffic between the two organelles, and as such, has been implicated in the regulation of protein folding, oxidative phosphorylation, and Ca(2+)-mediated apoptosis. In order to better understand biological processes and molecular functions at the MAM, we report a global mass spectrometry-based proteomic evaluation of the MAM obtained from mouse brain samples. Gel-assisted sample preparation in conjunction with our two-dimensional chromatography approach allowed for the identification of 1,212 high confidence proteins. Bioinformatic interrogation of this protein catalogue using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed new potential connections between our list of MAM proteins and neurodegenerative diseases in addition to anticipated biological processes. Based on our results, we postulate that proteins of the MAM may play essential roles in dysfunctions responsible for several neurological disorders in addition to facilitating key cellular survival processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding product cost vs. performance through an in-depth system Monte Carlo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Mark C.

    2017-08-01

    The manner in which an optical system is toleranced and compensated greatly affects the cost to build it. By having a detailed understanding of different tolerance and compensation methods, the end user can decide on the balance of cost and performance. A detailed phased approach Monte Carlo analysis can be used to demonstrate the tradeoffs between cost and performance. In complex high performance optical systems, performance is fine-tuned by making adjustments to the optical systems after they are initially built. This process enables the overall best system performance, without the need for fabricating components to stringent tolerance levels that often can be outside of a fabricator's manufacturing capabilities. A good performance simulation of as built performance can interrogate different steps of the fabrication and build process. Such a simulation may aid the evaluation of whether the measured parameters are within the acceptable range of system performance at that stage of the build process. Finding errors before an optical system progresses further into the build process saves both time and money. Having the appropriate tolerances and compensation strategy tied to a specific performance level will optimize the overall product cost.

  18. In-depth analysis of the chicken egg white proteome using an LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hen's egg white has been the subject of intensive chemical, biochemical and food technological research for many decades, because of its importance in human nutrition, its importance as a source of easily accessible model proteins, and its potential use in biotechnological processes. Recently the arsenal of tools used to study the protein components of egg white has been complemented by mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies. Application of these fast and sensitive methods has already enabled the identification of a large number of new egg white proteins. Recent technological advances may be expected to further expand the egg white protein inventory. Results Using a dual pressure linear ion trap Orbitrap instrument, the LTQ Orbitrap Velos, in conjunction with data analysis in the MaxQuant software package, we identified 158 proteins in chicken egg white with two or more sequence unique peptides. This group of proteins identified with very high confidence included 79 proteins identified in egg white for the first time. In addition, 44 proteins were identified tentatively. Conclusions Our results, apart from identifying many new egg white components, indicate that current mass spectrometry technology is sufficiently advanced to permit direct identification of minor components of proteomes dominated by a few major proteins without resorting to indirect techniques, such as chromatographic depletion or peptide library binding, which change the composition of the proteome.

  19. Detergent-Assisted Glycoprotein Capture: A Versatile Tool for In-Depth N-Glycoproteome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zou, Hanfa; Figeys, Daniel

    2016-06-03

    Large-scale N-glycoproteome studies have been hindered by poor solubility of hydrophobic membrane proteins and the complexity of proteome samples. Herein, we developed a detergent-assisted glycoprotein capture method to reduce these issues by conducting hydrazide chemistry-based glycoprotein capture in the presence of strong detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100. The strong detergents helped to solubilize hydrophobic membrane proteins and then increased the access of hydrazide groups to oxidized glycoproteins, thus increasing the coverage of the N-glycoproteome. Compared with the conventional glycopeptide capture method, the detergent-assisted glycoprotein capture approach nearly doubled the number of N-glycosylation sites identified from HEK 293T cells with improved specificity. Application of this approach in the larger scale N-glycoproteomics analysis of the HEK 293T cell membrane led to the identification of 2253 unique N-glycosites from 953 proteins. Furthermore, the application of this approach to human serum resulted in the identification of 850 N-glycosylation sites without any immunodepletion or fractionation. Overall, the detergent-assisted glycoprotein capture method simplified the capture process, and it increased the number of sites observed on both hydrophobic membrane proteins and hydrophilic secreted proteins.

  20. Nested Fixed-Depth Fluidic Sampler and At Tank Analysis System Deployment Strategy and Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REICH, F.R.

    2000-01-01

    Under the Hanford Site River Protection Project (RPP) privatization strategy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) requires the CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) to supply tank waste to the privatization contractor, BNFL Inc. (BNFL), for separation and/or treatment and immobilization (vitrification). Three low-activity waste (LAW) specification envelopes represent the range of liquid waste types in the large, Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. The CHG also is expected to supply high-level waste (HLW) separation and/or treatment and disposal. The HLW envelope is an aqueous slurry of insoluble suspended solids (sludge). The Phase 1 demonstration will extend over 24 years (1996 through 2019) and will be used to resolve technical uncertainties. About one-tenth of the total Hanford Site tank waste, by mass, will be processed during this period. This document provides a strategy and top-level implementation plan for demonstrating and deploying an alternative sampling technology. The alternative technology is an improvement to the current grab sampling and core sampling approaches that are planned to be used to support the RPP privatization contract. This work also includes adding the capability for some at-tank analysis to enhance the potential of this new technology to meet CHG needs. The first application is to LAW and HLW feed staging for privatization; the next is to support cross-site waste transfer from 200 West Area tanks