WorldWideScience

Sample records for depression systematic review

  1. Childhood depression: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NNR

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Luiz Carlos de Abreu,1,3 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Medicina. Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Departamento de Saúde Materno Infantil, Faculdade de Saúde Pública, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: As an important public health issue, childhood depression deserves special attention, considering the serious and lasting consequences of the disease to child development. Taking this into consideration, the present study was based on the following question: what practical contributions to clinicians and researchers does the current literature on childhood depression have to offer? The objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic review of articles regarding childhood depression. To accomplish this purpose, a systematic review of articles on childhood depression, published from January 1, 2010 to November 24, 2012, on MEDLINE and SciELO databases was carried out. Search terms were “depression” (medical subject headings [MeSH], “child” (MeSH, and "childhood depression" (keyword. Of the 180 retrieved studies, 25 met the eligibility criteria. Retrieved studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding childhood depression, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention and prognosis. Recent scientific literature regarding childhood depression converge to, directly or indirectly, highlight the negative impacts of depressive disorders to the children's quality of life. Unfortunately, the retrieved studies show that childhood depression commonly grows in a background of vulnerability and poverty, where individual and familiar needs

  2. Subthreshold depression in adolescence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertha, Eszter A; Balázs, Judit

    2013-10-01

    In adolescence, the number of depressive symptoms is rising notably. Individuals may have relevant depressive symptoms without meeting the full criteria of a major depressive episode (MDE), a condition referred to as subthreshold depression (sD). This article presents a review on adolescent sD examining the prevalence, the quality of life (QoL), the risk of developing MDE, and preventive programs available for adolescents living with sD. A systematic literature search from the year of the introduction of Diagnostic and Statistic Manual for Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) until 2012 (18 years) was conducted with a special focus on adolescent sD. Data from 27 studies were included into this review. The results show high prevalence of sD among adolescents, with a negative impact on QoL, and provide evidence that sD is a significant risk indicator of later MDE; therefore, individuals with sD represent good targets for preventive interventions. Our review highlights the fact that sD is a significant health problem among adolescents indeed, and adolescents with sD could be a subgroup of youth, who need further help to reduce their clinically significant depressive symptoms for the successful prevention of a later MDE.

  3. Depression Screening and Patient Outcomes in Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Milette, Katherine; Coyne, James C.; Stefanek, Michael E.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Arthurs, Erin; Leavens, Allison; Palmer, Steven C.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Thombs, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several practice guidelines recommend screening for depression in cancer care, but no systematic reviews have examined whether there is evidence that depression screening benefits cancer patients. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in cancer

  4. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy for Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda Isabel; Ngai, Shirley Pui-Ching; He, Wanjia; Chow, Jason Ka-Wing; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Tsang, Hector Wing-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background. Depression is one of the greatest health concerns affecting 350 million people globally. Aromatherapy is a popular CAM intervention chosen by people with depression. Due to the growing popularity of aromatherapy for alleviating depressive symptoms, in-depth evaluation of the evidence-based clinical efficacy of aromatherapy is urgently needed. Purpose. This systematic review aims to provide an analysis of the clinical evidence on the efficacy of aromatherapy for depressive symptoms...

  5. Serum markers related to depression: A systematic review | Tavakoli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum markers related to depression: A systematic review. ... is one of the most common neurological and psychiatric disorders that are associated with imbalance in ... Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science databases were retrieved using the depression, serum markers, ... A total of 89 articles were included in final analysis.

  6. Systematic Review of Intervention Practices for Depression in the Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furlan, Andrea D.; Gnam, William H.; Carnide, Nancy; Irvin, Emma; Amick, Benjamin C.; DeRango, Kelly; McMaster, Robert; Cullen, Kimberley; Slack, Tesha; Brouwer, Sandra; Bultmann, Ute; Benjamin, C.

    Design Systematic Review. Objective To determine which intervention approaches to manage depression in the workplace have been successful and yielded value for employers in developed economies. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Central, PsycINFO, and Business Source Premier up to

  7. Depression and frailty in later life: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leslie Vaughan,1 Akeesha L Corbin,1 Joseph S Goveas2 1Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, MI, USA Abstract: Frailty and depression are important issues affecting older adults. Depressive syndrome may be difficult to clinically disambiguate from frailty in advanced old age. Current reviews on the topic include studies with wide methodological variation. This review examined the published literature on cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between frailty and depressive symptomatology with either syndrome as the outcome, moderators of this relationship, construct overlap, and related medical and behavioral interventions. Prevalence of both was reported. A systematic review of studies published from 2000 to 2015 was conducted in PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PsychInfo. Key search terms were “frailty”, “frail”, “frail elderly”, “depressive”, “depressive disorder”, and “depression”. Participants of included studies were ≥55 years old and community dwelling. Included studies used an explicit biological definition of frailty based on Fried et al’s criteria and a screening measure to identify depressive symptomatology. Fourteen studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. The prevalence of depressive symptomatology, frailty, or their co-occurrence was greater than 10% in older adults ≥55 years old, and these rates varied widely, but less in large epidemiological studies of incident frailty. The prospective relationship between depressive symptomatology and increased risk of incident frailty was robust, while the opposite relationship was less conclusive. The presence of comorbidities that interact with depressive symptomatology increased incident frailty risk. Measurement variability of depressive symptomatology and inclusion of older adults

  8. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy for Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Shirley Pui-Ching; He, Wanjia; Chow, Jason Ka-Wing; Tsang, Hector Wing-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background. Depression is one of the greatest health concerns affecting 350 million people globally. Aromatherapy is a popular CAM intervention chosen by people with depression. Due to the growing popularity of aromatherapy for alleviating depressive symptoms, in-depth evaluation of the evidence-based clinical efficacy of aromatherapy is urgently needed. Purpose. This systematic review aims to provide an analysis of the clinical evidence on the efficacy of aromatherapy for depressive symptoms on any type of patients. Methods. A systematic database search was carried out using predefined search terms in 5 databases: AMED, CINHAL, CCRCT, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. Outcome measures included scales measuring depressive symptoms levels. Results. Twelve randomized controlled trials were included and two administration methods for the aromatherapy intervention including inhaled aromatherapy (5 studies) and massage aromatherapy (7 studies) were identified. Seven studies showed improvement in depressive symptoms. Limitations. The quality of half of the studies included is low, and the administration protocols among the studies varied considerably. Different assessment tools were also employed among the studies. Conclusions. Aromatherapy showed potential to be used as an effective therapeutic option for the relief of depressive symptoms in a wide variety of subjects. Particularly, aromatherapy massage showed to have more beneficial effects than inhalation aromatherapy. PMID:28133489

  9. [Physical Exercise and Depression in the Elderly : A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño Villada, Fredy Alonso; Arango Vélez, Elkin Fernando; Baena, Lucidia Zuleta

    2013-06-01

    The literature supports the benefits of exercise in people with depressive disorders, but there is controversy over these benefits in depressed elderly. To determine the effect of different types of exercise on depression in older adults using a systematic review of clinical trials. The Cochrane Library; PubMed-MEDLINE (1966-dic 2010); EMBASE (1980-dic 2010); LILACS (1986-dic 2010); SCIELO (1998-dic 2010); Register of Controlled Trials; manual search in other sources. Clinical trials with people >60 years with diagnosis of depression were included, without restriction by year of publication, language and sex, with exercise intervention structures, controlled with usual care (medication, psychotherapy, electric shock therapy), placebo or non-intervention. Three independent reviewers conducted the search, applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, assessed methodological quality and extracted data; discrepancies were resolved by consensus. The primary outcome was the score for depressive symptoms. A total of 11 studies (n=7195) were identified. In general, exercise produces an improvement in depression in older adults with more evidence in the short-term (3 months) and strength training at high intensity. Exercise is beneficial for older persons with depression, but studies that support this are of low methodological quality and heterogeneous, which makes it necessary to develop clinical trials to clarify the magnitude of the effect and the levels at which it is beneficial. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Subthreshold depression in children and adolescents - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselhoeft, Rikke; Sørensen, Merete J; Heiervang, Einar R; Bilenberg, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Depressive disorders are disabling conditions striking at all ages. In adults, subthreshold depression (SD) is viewed as being on a continuum with major depressive disorder (MDD). Whether this holds for children and adolescents, is still unclear. We performed the first systematic review of SD in subjects below 18 years, in order to explore if childhood SD and MDD share causal pathways, phenomenology and outcomes, supporting a dimensional view. A critical systematic review in accordance with preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. A review protocol was developed a priori, and all reports were assessed by two reviewers. The literature search generated 941 eligible references and 24 studies were included. Although diagnostic criteria for SD showed great variability, similarities for SD and MDD were striking. Both were common conditions with similar risk factor patterns. Clinical characteristics in both groups were depressed mood, suicidal ideation and high comorbidity. Outcomes were almost equally poor, with increased psychiatric morbidity and health service use. SD intervention studies showed promising results. Reports with data on SD not reported in keywords or abstract may have been missed by the search strategy. A dimensional view of depressive disorders is also supported in children and adolescents, suggesting SD to be a precursor to MDD. Although SD is a somewhat milder condition than MDD, it has severe outcomes with psychopathology and impairment. There is a need of identifying cost-efficient and longlasting interventions in order to prevent development of early SD into MDD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Social Networking Sites, Depression, and Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Seabrook, Elizabeth M; Kern, Margaret L; Rickard, Nikki S

    2016-01-01

    Background Social networking sites (SNSs) have become a pervasive part of modern culture, which may also affect mental health. Objective The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarize research examining depression and anxiety in the context of SNSs. It also aimed to identify studies that complement the assessment of mental illness with measures of well-being and examine moderators and mediators that add to the complexity of this environment. Methods A multidatabase search was...

  12. A systematic review of perinatal depression interventions for adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Kate; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F

    2014-12-01

    Poor, adolescent, racial/ethnic minority women are at great risk for developing perinatal depression. However, little research has been conducted evaluating interventions for this population. We conducted a systematic review of preventive and treatment interventions for perinatal depression tested with adolescents, with a focus on low income, minority populations. Nine research-based articles (including one that reported on two studies) were reviewed systematically, and quality ratings were assigned based on a validated measure assessing randomization, double-blinding, and reporting of participant withdrawals. Two treatment studies were identified, both of which were successful in reducing depression. Eight prevention studies were located, of which four were more efficacious than control conditions in preventing depression. Studies sampled mostly minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents. No consistent characteristics across efficacious interventions could be identified. This review underscores the need for researchers to further investigate and build an evidence base. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Social Networking Sites, Depression, and Anxiety: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Elizabeth M; Kern, Margaret L; Rickard, Nikki S

    2016-11-23

    Social networking sites (SNSs) have become a pervasive part of modern culture, which may also affect mental health. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarize research examining depression and anxiety in the context of SNSs. It also aimed to identify studies that complement the assessment of mental illness with measures of well-being and examine moderators and mediators that add to the complexity of this environment. A multidatabase search was performed. Papers published between January 2005 and June 2016 relevant to mental illness (depression and anxiety only) were extracted and reviewed. Positive interactions, social support, and social connectedness on SNSs were consistently related to lower levels of depression and anxiety, whereas negative interaction and social comparisons on SNSs were related to higher levels of depression and anxiety. SNS use related to less loneliness and greater self-esteem and life satisfaction. Findings were mixed for frequency of SNS use and number of SNS friends. Different patterns in the way individuals with depression and individuals with social anxiety engage with SNSs are beginning to emerge. The systematic review revealed many mixed findings between depression, anxiety, and SNS use. Methodology has predominantly focused on self-report cross-sectional approaches; future research will benefit from leveraging real-time SNS data over time. The evidence suggests that SNS use correlates with mental illness and well-being; however, whether this effect is beneficial or detrimental depends at least partly on the quality of social factors in the SNS environment. Understanding these relationships will lead to better utilization of SNSs in their potential to positively influence mental health. ©Elizabeth M Seabrook, Margaret L Kern, Nikki S Rickard. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 23.11.2016.

  14. Social Networking Sites, Depression, and Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Margaret L; Rickard, Nikki S

    2016-01-01

    Background Social networking sites (SNSs) have become a pervasive part of modern culture, which may also affect mental health. Objective The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarize research examining depression and anxiety in the context of SNSs. It also aimed to identify studies that complement the assessment of mental illness with measures of well-being and examine moderators and mediators that add to the complexity of this environment. Methods A multidatabase search was performed. Papers published between January 2005 and June 2016 relevant to mental illness (depression and anxiety only) were extracted and reviewed. Results Positive interactions, social support, and social connectedness on SNSs were consistently related to lower levels of depression and anxiety, whereas negative interaction and social comparisons on SNSs were related to higher levels of depression and anxiety. SNS use related to less loneliness and greater self-esteem and life satisfaction. Findings were mixed for frequency of SNS use and number of SNS friends. Different patterns in the way individuals with depression and individuals with social anxiety engage with SNSs are beginning to emerge. Conclusions The systematic review revealed many mixed findings between depression, anxiety, and SNS use. Methodology has predominantly focused on self-report cross-sectional approaches; future research will benefit from leveraging real-time SNS data over time. The evidence suggests that SNS use correlates with mental illness and well-being; however, whether this effect is beneficial or detrimental depends at least partly on the quality of social factors in the SNS environment. Understanding these relationships will lead to better utilization of SNSs in their potential to positively influence mental health. PMID:27881357

  15. Depression screening and patient outcomes in pregnancy or postpartum : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Arthurs, Erin; Coronado-Montoya, Stephanie; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Leavens, Allison; Levis, Brooke; Azoulay, Laurent; Smith, Cheri; Ciofani, Luisa; Coyne, James C.; Feeley, Nancy; Gilbody, Simon; Schinazi, Joy; Stewart, Donna E.; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    Objective: Clinical practice guidelines disagree on whether health care professionals should screen women for depression during pregnancy or postpartum. The objective of this systematic review was to determine whether depression screening improves depression outcomes among women during pregnancy or

  16. Research on depression in adolescents in Peru: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonatan Steeven Navarro-Loli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression in adolescents is a multicausal phenomenon and a predictor of social problems and other disorders. Thus, it is considered a public health problem. This investigation aims to systematically review the characteristics of the scientific articles about depression in Peruvian adolescents published in Peruvian and non-Peruvian journals. The search was performed in the databases of SciELO, Latindex, Redalyc, Scopus, PubMed, and through Google, using a combination of keywords related to the construct, the sample and its origin. The unit of analysis consisted of 21 articles. The reviewed articles showed inconsistency in the reporting and bibliographic support of the research designs, sampling procedures, psychometric properties of the instruments, instruments used to assess the construct which were not evaluated in our context, and cut-off points obtained in other countries’ samples. Therefore, we can state that the reviewed articles do not fully comply with the publication standards proposed by the American Psychological Association.

  17. The effects of psychological treatments for adult depression on physical activity: A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; de Wit, L.M.; Taylor, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Physical activity and depression have been consistently shown to be inversely associated in epidemiological surveys. It is not clear, however, whether successful treatment of depression results in increases in physical activity. Method Systematic review of randomized trials examining

  18. Prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms among outpatients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghui; Wu, Xiaohang; Lai, Weiyi; Long, Erping; Zhang, Xiayin; Li, Wangting; Zhu, Yi; Chen, Chuan; Zhong, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Dongni; Lin, Haotian

    2017-08-23

    Depression and depressive symptoms are common mental disorders that have a considerable effect on patients' health-related quality of life and satisfaction with medical care, but the prevalence of these conditions varies substantially between published studies. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a precise estimate of the prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms among outpatients in different clinical specialties. Systematic review and meta-analysis. The PubMed and PsycINFO, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify observational studies that contained information on the prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in outpatients. All studies included were published before January 2016. Data characteristics were extracted independently by two investigators. The point prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms was measured using validated self-report questionnaires or structured interviews. Assessments were pooled using a random-effects model. Differences in study-level characteristics were estimated by meta-regression analysis. Heterogeneity was assessed using standard χ 2 tests and the I 2 statistic. The study protocol has been registered with PROSPERO under number CRD42017054738. Eighty-three cross-sectional studies involving 41 344 individuals were included in this study. The overall pooled prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms was 27.0% (10 943/41 344 individuals; 95% CI 24.0% to 29.0%), with significant heterogeneity between studies (pdepression and depressive symptoms was observed in outpatients than in the healthy controls (OR 3.16, 95% CI 2.66 to 3.76, I 2 =72.0%, χ 2 =25.33). The highest depression/depressive symptom prevalence estimates occurred in studies of outpatients from otolaryngology clinics (53.0%), followed by dermatology clinics (39.0%) and neurology clinics (35.0%). Subgroup analyses showed that the prevalence of depression and depressive

  19. Self-help interventions for depressive disorders and depressive symptoms: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that depressive disorders exist on a continuum, with subthreshold symptoms causing considerable population burden and increasing individual risk of developing major depressive disorder. An alternative strategy to professional treatment of subthreshold depression is population promotion of effective self-help interventions that can be easily applied by an individual without professional guidance. The evidence for self-help interventions for depressive symptoms is reviewed in the present work, with the aim of identifying promising interventions that could inform future health promotion campaigns or stimulate further research. Methods A literature search for randomised controlled trials investigating self-help interventions for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms was performed using PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Reference lists and citations of included studies were also checked. Studies were grouped into those involving participants with depressive disorders or a high level of depressive symptoms, or non-clinically depressed participants not selected for depression. A number of exclusion criteria were applied, including trials with small sample sizes and where the intervention was adjunctive to antidepressants or psychotherapy. Results The majority of interventions searched had no relevant evidence to review. Of the 38 interventions reviewed, the ones with the best evidence of efficacy in depressive disorders were S-adenosylmethionine, St John's wort, bibliotherapy, computerised interventions, distraction, relaxation training, exercise, pleasant activities, sleep deprivation, and light therapy. A number of other interventions showed promise but had received less research attention. Research in non-clinical samples indicated immediate beneficial effects on depressed mood for distraction, exercise, humour, music, negative air ionisation, and singing; while potential

  20. Mental Health in Women With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review on Depression and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    OYESANYA, TOLU O.; WARD, EARLISE C.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in women has recently increased from 25% to 40%. Current literature inadequately captures challenges women face after injury, including depression. The limited focus on depression is problematic as rates of depression are increasing simultaneously with rates of TBI. A disabling symptom of depression is lack of hope; thus, depression, comorbid with TBI, leads to disability among women. Unfortunately, depression and hope among women with TBI has yet to be systematically examined. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine and synthesize current literature focusing on women with TBI, comorbid with depression, and hope. PMID:25635844

  1. Onset and Recurrence of Depression as Predictors of Cardiovascular Prognosis in Depressed Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidersma, Marij; Thombs, Brett D.; de Jonge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is associated with worse cardiac outcomes. This systematic review evaluated whether depressed ACS patients are at differential risk depending on the recurrence and timing of onset of depressive episodes. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO

  2. Multimorbidity and depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jennifer R; Sharpe, Louise; Modini, Matthew; Dear, Blake F

    2017-10-15

    Multimorbidity, the presence of two or more chronic conditions, is increasingly common and complicates the assessment and management of depression. The aim was to investigate the relationship between multimorbidity and depression. A systematic literature search was conducted using the databases; PsychINFO, Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane Central. Results were meta-analysed to determine risk for a depressive disorder or depressive symptoms in people with multimorbidity. Forty articles were identified as eligible (n = 381527). The risk for depressive disorder was twice as great for people with multimorbidity compared to those without multimorbidity [RR: 2.13 (95% CI 1.62-2.80) pdepressive disorder with each additional chronic condition compared to the odds of having a depressive disorder with no chronic physical condition [OR: 1.45 (95% CI 1.28-1.64) pdepressive symptoms [r = 0.26 (95% CI 0.18-0.33) p depression were used in these studies, the majority assessed the presence or absence of multimorbidity by self-report measures. Depression is two to three times more likely in people with multimorbidity compared to people without multimorbidity or those who have no chronic physical condition. Greater knowledge of this risk supports identification and management of depression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Systematic review on Internet Support Groups (ISGs) and depression (2): What is known about depression ISGs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Calear, Alison L; Banfield, Michelle; Tam, Ada

    2009-09-30

    Internet support groups (ISGs) are a popular means by which consumers with depression communicate online. A number of studies have evaluated the nature and impact of depression-specific ISGs. However, to date there have been no published systematic reviews of this evidence. The aim was to systematically identify and summarize the available evidence concerning the scope and findings of studies of depression ISGs. Three databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane) were searched using over 150 search terms extracted from relevant papers, abstracts, and a thesaurus. Papers were included if they employed an online peer-to-peer depression-specific support group and reported either quantitative or qualitative empirical data. The objective of each study was coded according to a 20-category classification system, which included the effect on depression and other outcomes, including help seeking; user characteristics, activity, satisfaction, perceived benefits, perceived disadvantages; the reason for using the ISG; the nature of ISG posts; characteristics of depression ISGs compared to other ISG types, face-to-face groups, and face-to-face counseling; ISG structure and longitudinal changes; and predictors of ISG adherence. Thirteen papers satisfied the inclusion criteria from an initial pool of 12,692 abstracts. Of these, three collected data using survey questionnaires, nine analyzed samples of posts, and one both collected survey data and analyzed a sample of posts. The quality of most studies was not high, and little data were collected on most key aspects of depression ISGs. The most common objective of the studies was to analyze the nature of the posts (eight studies) and to describe site usage (six studies) and user characteristics (five studies). The most prevalent types of social support were emotional, informational, and social companionship. Given the popularity of depression ISGs and the paucity of available evidence about them, there is a need for high

  4. The association between social relationships and depression: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ziggi Ivan; Koyanagi, Ai; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Mason, Catherine; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-04-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental disorders globally and has implications for various aspects of everyday-life. To date, studies assessing the association between social relationships and depression have provided conflicting results. The aim of this paper was to review the evidence on associations between social relationships and depression in the general population. Studies investigating the association of social support, social networks, or social connectedness with depression were retrieved and summarized (searches using Pubmed, ScienceDirect, PsycNet were conducted in May 2014). Fifty-one studies were included in this review. The strongest and most consistent findings were significant protective effects of perceived emotional support, perceived instrumental support, and large, diverse social networks. Little evidence was found on whether social connectedness is related to depression, as was also the case for negative interactions. Due to the strict inclusion criteria relating to study quality and the availability of papers in the domain of interest, the review did not capture 'gray literature' and qualitative studies. Future research is warranted to account for potential bias introduced by the use of subjective measures as compared to objective measures of received support and actual networks. Due to the heterogeneity between available studies on the measure of social relationships, the inclusion of comparable measures across studies would allow for more valid comparisons. In addition, well-designed prospective studies will provide more insight into causality. Future research should address how social support and networks interact and together affect risks for depression. Social connectedness and negative interactions appear to be underutilized as measures in population-based studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Depression in HIV and HCV co-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Renata; Pereira, Marco; Rusted, Jennifer; Whale, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the differences in the prevalence of depression and presence of depressive symptoms between HIV/HCV co-infection, HIV mono-infection, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection. A systematic electronic search of bibliographic databases was performed to locate articles published from the earliest available online until December 2014. Outcomes of depression were based on clinical interviews and validated self-reported measures of depression/depressive symptoms. Of the 188 records initially screened, 29 articles were included in the descriptive systematic review and six were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analytic results indicated that, as measured by self-reported measures of depression, HIV/HCV co-infected patients were significantly more likely to report depressive symptoms than either HIV (SMD = .24, 95% CI: .03-.46, p = .02) or HCV mono-infected (SMD = .55, 95% CI: .17-.94, p = .005) patients. The variability of the results of the reviewed studies, largely dependent on the samples' characteristics and the methods of assessment of depression, suggests that a clear interpretation of how depression outcomes are affected by the presence of HIV/HCV co-infection is still needed. Failing to diagnose depression or to early screen depressive symptoms may have a significant impact on patients' overall functioning and compromise treatments' outcomes.

  6. Systematic review of universal and targeted workplace interventions for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Mohd Yunus, Wan Mohd Azam; Musiat, Peter; Brown, June S L

    2018-01-01

    Depression is increasingly being recognised as a significant mental health problem in the workplace contributing to productivity loss and economic burden to organisations. This paper reviews recently published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of universal and targeted interventions to reduce depression in the workplace. Studies were identified through searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES Full Text, and Global Health and Social Policy and Practice databases. Studies were included if they included an RCT of a workplace intervention for employees targeting depression as the primary outcome. Twenty-two published RCTs investigating interventions utilising various therapeutic approaches were identified. The cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approach is the most frequently used in the workplace, while interventions that combine different therapeutic approaches showed the most promising results. A universal intervention in the workplace that combines CBT and coping flexibility recorded the highest effect size (d=1.45 at 4 months' follow-up). Most interventions were delivered in group format and showed low attrition rates compared with other delivery formats. Although all studies reviewed were RCTs, the quality of reporting is low. Interventions using different therapeutic approaches with different modes of delivery have been used. Most of these interventions were shown to reduce depression levels among employees in the workplace, particularly those that combine more than one therapeutic approaches. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Severe Intellectual Disability: Systematic Review of the Prevalence and Nature of Presentation of Unipolar Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Catherine; Kerr, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of depression in severe and profound intellectual disability is challenging. Without adequate skills in verbal self-expression, standardized diagnostic criteria cannot be used with confidence. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the assessment and diagnosis of unipolar depression in severe and…

  8. Assessment of depression in medical patients: a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Pang; Gorenstein, Clarice

    2013-09-01

    To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II), which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions.

  9. Family dissolution and offspring depression and depressive symptoms: A systematic review of moderation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Manno, Laura; Macdonald, Jacqui A; Knight, Tess

    2015-12-01

    Parental separation is associated with increased risk for offspring depression; however, depression outcomes are divergent. Knowledge of moderators could assist in understanding idiosyncratic outcomes and developing appropriately targeted prevention programs for those at heightened risk of depression following parental separation. Therefore, the objective of the review was to identify and evaluate studies that examined moderators of the relationship between parental separation and offspring depression A search of scientific, medical and psychological databases was conducted in April 2015 for longitudinal research that had evaluated any moderator/s of the relationship between parental separation or divorce and offspring depression or depressive symptoms. Papers were assessed for quality by evaluating the study's sample, attrition rates, methodology and measurement characteristics. Fourteen quantitative studies from five countries assessed sixteen moderating factors of the relationship between parental separation and offspring depression or depressive symptoms. A number of factors were found to moderate this relationship, including offspring gender, age (at assessment and at depression onset), genotype, preadolescent temperament, IQ, emotional problems in childhood and maternal sensitivity. While robust longitudinal research was selected for inclusion, common issues with longitudinal studies such as low rates of participation and attrition were among the methodological concerns evident in some of the reviewed papers. The current review is the first to assess interaction effects of the relationship between parental separation and offspring depression or depressive symptoms. While further research is recommended, this assessment is critical in understanding variation in heterogeneous populations and can inform targeted policy and prevention.

  10. Intimate partner violence against adult women and its association with major depressive disorder, depressive symptoms and postpartum depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, Hind A; Beydoun, May A; Kaufman, Jay S; Lo, Bruce; Zonderman, Alan B

    2012-09-01

    To date, few systematic reviews of observational studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate the co-morbidity of intimate partner violence (IPV) and specific depression outcomes in women. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we summarize the extant literature and estimate the magnitude of the association between IPV and key depressive outcomes (elevated depressive symptoms, diagnosed major depressive disorder and postpartum depression). PubMed (January 1, 1980-December 31, 2010) searches of English-language observational studies were conducted. Most of the selected 37 studies had cross-sectional population-based designs, focused on elevated depressive symptoms and were conducted in the United States. Most studies suggested moderate or strong positive associations between IPV and depression. Our meta-analysis suggested two to three-fold increased risk of major depressive disorder and 1.5-2-fold increased risk of elevated depressive symptoms and postpartum depression among women exposed to intimate partner violence relative to non-exposed women. A sizable proportion (9%-28%) of major depressive disorder, elevated depressive symptoms, and postpartum depression can be attributed to lifetime exposure to IPV. In an effort to reduce the burden of depression, continued research is recommended for evaluating IPV preventive strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of exercise therapy on depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with ischemic heart disease: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Suzanne; Eskes, Anne M.; Maaskant, Jolanda M.; Roest, Annelieke M.; Latour, Corine H. M.; Scholte Op Reimer, Wilma

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Depressive and anxiety symptoms are associated with Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Exercise interventions might improve both depressive and anxiety symptoms, but an overview of the evidence is lacking. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the existing literature on the effectiveness of

  12. The effect of exercise therapy on depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with ischemic heart disease : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Suzanne; Eskes, Anne M; Maaskant, Jolanda M; Roest, Annelieke M; Latour, Corine H M; Op Reimer, Wilma Scholte

    OBJECTIVE: Depressive and anxiety symptoms are associated with Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Exercise interventions might improve both depressive and anxiety symptoms, but an overview of the evidence is lacking. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the existing literature on the effectiveness of

  13. The effects of psychotherapy for adult depression on suicidality and hopelessness: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; de Beurs, D.P.; van Spijker, B.A.J.; Berking, M.; Andersson, G.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although treatment guidelines suggest that suicidal patients with depression should be treated for depression with psychotherapy, it is not clear whether these psychological treatments actually reduce suicidal ideation or suicide risk. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and

  14. Effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, and combined treatments for chronic depression: a systematic review (METACHRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Wolff Alessa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic depressions represent a substantial part of depressive disorders and are associated with severe consequences. Several studies were performed addressing the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, and combined treatments for chronic depressions. Yet, a systematic review comparing the effectiveness of multiple treatment options and considering all subtypes of chronic depressions is still missing. Methods/Design Aim of this project is to summarize empirical evidence on efficacy and effectiveness of treatments for chronic depression by means of a systematic review. The primary objectives of the study are to examine, which interventions are effective; to examine, if any differences in effectiveness between active treatment options exist; and to find possible treatment effect modifiers. Psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, and combined treatments will be considered as experimental interventions and no treatment, wait-list, psychological/pharmacological placebo, treatment as usual, and other active treatments will be seen as comparators. The population of patients will include adults with chronic major depression, dysthymia, double depression, or recurrent depression without complete remission between episodes. Outcomes of the analyses are depressive symptoms, associated consequences, adverse events, and study discontinuation. Only randomized controlled trials will be considered. Discussion Given the high prevalence and serious consequences of chronic depression and a considerable amount of existing primary studies addressing the effectiveness of different treatments the present systematic review may be of high relevance. Special attention will be given to the use of current methodological standards. Findings are likely to provide crucial information that may help clinicians to choose the appropriate treatment for chronically depressed patients.

  15. Comorbid depression and associated factors in PNES versus epilepsy: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sean; Levita, Liat; Reuber, Markus

    2018-05-24

    This systematic review aims to contrast levels, manifestations and associations of depression in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and those with epilepsy. ScienceDirect and Web of Science were searched for primary research reports describing quantitative studies involving separate epilepsy and PNES samples (age 16+) and using a validated measure of depression. While 34 studies were identified, most were of low quality and had small sample sizes. Studies consistently found higher levels of self-reported depression in the PNES than epilepsy groups, with a meta-analysis demonstrating a significant difference between the groups. Although patients with PNES were also more likely to have a clinical diagnosis of depression than those with epilepsy, the difference between the groups was less pronounced in studies based on such diagnoses rather than self-report. Patients with PNES were more likely to report physical symptoms of depression than those with epilepsy. Interpersonal factors explained more variation in depression levels in patients with PNES than those with epilepsy, for whom illness related factors were more influential, but in both patient groups, depression had a significant impact on health related quality of life. This systematic review demonstrates a higher prevalence of depression in patients with PNES compared to patients with epilepsy and suggests differences in the expression and possible causes of depression between these groups. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Perinatal maternal depression and cortisol function in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Sunaina; Lewis, Andrew J; Galbally, Megan

    2016-05-31

    Perinatal depression has a significant impact on both mother and child. However, the influence of hormonal changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period remains unclear. This article provides a systematic review of studies examining the effects of maternal cortisol function on perinatal depression. A systematic search was conducted of six electronic databases for published research on the relationship between cortisol and perinatal depression. The databases included; MEDLINE complete, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, Science Direct and EBSCO, for the years 1960 to May 2015. Risk of bias was assessed and data extraction verified by two investigators. In total, 47 studies met criteria and studies showed considerable variation in terms of methodology including sample size, cortisol assays, cortisol substrates, sampling processes and outcome measures. Those studies identified as higher quality found that the cortisol awakening response is positively associated with momentary mood states but is blunted in cases of major maternal depression. Furthermore, results indicate that hypercortisolemia is linked to transient depressive states while hypocortisolemia is related to chronic postpartum depression. Future research should aim to improve the accuracy of cortisol measurement over time, obtain multiple cortisol samples in a day and utilise diagnostic measures of depression. Future studies should also consider both antenatal and postnatal depression and the differential impact of atypical versus melancholic depression on cortisol levels, as this can help to further clarify the relationship between perinatal depression and maternal cortisol function across pregnancy and the postpartum period.

  17. Living environment and its relationship to depressive mood: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, Nina; Filatova, Svetlana; Lehtiniemi, Heli; Miettunen, Jouko

    2018-02-01

    The notion that environment affects mental health has a long history; in this systematic review, we aimed to study whether the living environment is related to depressive mood. We searched databases of PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science for population-based original studies prior to October 2016. We included studies that measured depressive symptoms or depression and had measures of urbanization, population density, aesthetics of living environment, house/built environment, green areas, walkability, noise, air pollution or services. Out of 1,578 articles found, 44 studies met our inclusion criteria. Manual searches of the references yielded 13 articles, resulting in 57 articles being included in the systematic review. Most of the studies showed statistically significant associations with at least one of the characteristics of living environment and depressive mood. House and built environment with, for example, poor housing quality and non-functioning, lack of green areas, noise and air pollution were more clearly related to depressive mood even after adjustment for different individual characteristics. On the contrary, the results in relation to population density, aesthetics and walkability of living environment, and availability of services and depressive mood were more inconsistent. Adverse house/built environment, including poor housing quality and non-functioning, lack of green spaces, noise and air pollution are related to depressive mood and should be taken into account during planning in order to prevent depressive mood.

  18. The prevalence of long-term symptoms of depression and anxiety after breast cancer treatment: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, S.W.M.C.; Roorda, C.; Berendsen, A.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bock, G.H. de

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: It is unclear whether breast cancer survivors have a higher risk of long-term symptoms of depression or anxiety. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence about long-term symptoms of depression and anxiety in breast cancer survivors. Study design: Systematic review.

  19. The prevalence of long-term symptoms of depression and anxiety after breast cancer treatment : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, S. W. M. C.; Roorda, C.; Berendsen, A. J.; Verhaak, P. F. M.; de Bock, G. H.

    Objectives: It is unclear whether breast cancer survivors have a higher risk of long-term symptoms of depression or anxiety. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence about long-term symptoms of depression and anxiety in breast cancer survivors. Study design: Systematic review.

  20. The prevalence of long-term symptoms of depression and anxiety after breast cancer treatment : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, S.W.M.C.; Roorda, Carriene; Berendsen, A.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; de Bock, G.H.

    Objectives It is unclear whether breast cancer survivors have a higher risk of long-term symptoms of depression or anxiety. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence about long-term symptoms of depression and anxiety in breast cancer survivors. Study design Systematic review.

  1. Schizophrenia and depression: A systematic review of the effectiveness and the working mechanisms behind acupuncture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This systematic review assessed clinical evidence for the use of acupuncture as an add-on treatment in patients with depression and schizophrenia and for its underlying working mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: Four databases (Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library) were searched with a

  2. Postpartum Depression among Rural Women from Developed and Developing Countries: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Laura; McKay, Katherine; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Ross, Lori E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Postpartum depression (PPD) is a significant public health problem, with significant consequences for the mother, infant, and family. Available research has not adequately examined the potential impact of sociodemographic characteristics, such as place of residence, on risk for PPD. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis…

  3. A Systematic Review of Depression Treatments in Primary Care for Latino Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing depression treatments in primary care for Latinos is conducted. The authors rate the methodological quality of studies, examine cultural and linguistic adaptations, summarize clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness findings, and draw conclusions for improving…

  4. Vitamin D and Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Comparing Studies with and without Biological Flaws

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Spedding

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of Vitamin D supplements in depression is controversial, awaiting further literature analysis. Biological flaws in primary studies is a possible reason meta-analyses of Vitamin D have failed to demonstrate efficacy. This systematic review and meta-analysis of Vitamin D and depression compared studies with and without biological flaws. The systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The literature search was un...

  5. A systematic review of instruments to measure depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lako, Irene M.; Bruggeman, R.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.; Schoevers, R. A.; Slooff, C. J.; Taxis, K.

    Background: Depressive symptoms require accurate recognition and monitoring in clinical practice of patients with schizophrenia. Depression instruments developed for use in depressed patients may not discriminate depressive symptoms from negative psychotic symptoms. Objective: We reviewed depression

  6. Effect of Probiotics on Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixue Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that gut probiotics play a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Probiotics may be essential to people with depression, which remains a global health challenge, as depression is a metabolic brain disorder. However, the efficacy of probiotics for depression is controversial. This study aimed to systematically review the existing evidence on the effect of probiotics-based interventions on depression. Randomized, controlled trials, identified through screening multiple databases and grey literature, were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 software using a fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis showed that probiotics significantly decreased the depression scale score (MD (depressive disorder = −0.30, 95% CI (−0.51–−0.09, p = 0.005 in the subjects. Probiotics had an effect on both the healthy population (MD = −0.25, 95% CI (−0.47–−0.03, p = 0.03 and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD (MD = −0.73, 95% CI (−1.37–−0.09, p = 0.03. Probiotics had an effect on the population aged under 60 (MD = −0.43, 95% CI (−0.72–−0.13, p = 0.005, while it had no effect on people aged over 65 (MD = −0.18, 95% CI (−0.47–0.11, p = 0.22. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis with the goal of determining the effect of probiotics on depression. We found that probiotics were associated with a significant reduction in depression, underscoring the need for additional research on this potential preventive strategy for depression.

  7. Effect of Probiotics on Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixue; Wang, Ke; Hu, Jianan

    2016-08-06

    It has been reported that gut probiotics play a major role in the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Probiotics may be essential to people with depression, which remains a global health challenge, as depression is a metabolic brain disorder. However, the efficacy of probiotics for depression is controversial. This study aimed to systematically review the existing evidence on the effect of probiotics-based interventions on depression. Randomized, controlled trials, identified through screening multiple databases and grey literature, were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 software using a fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis showed that probiotics significantly decreased the depression scale score (MD (depressive disorder) = -0.30, 95% CI (-0.51--0.09), p = 0.005) in the subjects. Probiotics had an effect on both the healthy population (MD = -0.25, 95% CI (-0.47--0.03), p = 0.03) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (MD = -0.73, 95% CI (-1.37--0.09), p = 0.03). Probiotics had an effect on the population aged under 60 (MD = -0.43, 95% CI (-0.72--0.13), p = 0.005), while it had no effect on people aged over 65 (MD = -0.18, 95% CI (-0.47-0.11), p = 0.22). This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis with the goal of determining the effect of probiotics on depression. We found that probiotics were associated with a significant reduction in depression, underscoring the need for additional research on this potential preventive strategy for depression.

  8. The association between diet quality, dietary patterns and depression in adults: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that diet modifies key biological factors associated with the development of depression; however, associations between diet quality and depression are not fully understood. We performed a systematic review to evaluate existing evidence regarding the association between diet quality and depression. Method A computer-aided literature search was conducted using Medline, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, January 1965 to October 2011, and a best-evidence analysis performed. Results Twenty-five studies from nine countries met eligibility criteria. Our best-evidence analyses found limited evidence to support an association between traditional diets (Mediterranean or Norwegian diets) and depression. We also observed a conflicting level of evidence for associations between (i) a traditional Japanese diet and depression, (ii) a “healthy” diet and depression, (iii) a Western diet and depression, and (iv) individuals with depression and the likelihood of eating a less healthy diet. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first review to synthesize and critically analyze evidence regarding diet quality, dietary patterns and depression. Further studies are urgently required to elucidate whether a true causal association exists. PMID:23802679

  9. Depression in the workplace: a systematic review of evidence-based prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Sandra; Deckert, Stefanie; Ceynowa, Martin; Hegerl, Ulrich; Stengler, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common mental disorders, causing enormous personal and economic burden. In its early stages, however, it is the most manageable of mental disorders. The workplace, where a large proportion of the adult population can be reached, might be a good setting for prevention interventions that target depression directly. Identify evidence-based indicated/secondary prevention strategies for depression in the workplace. Systematic review of articles published until February 2010 using PubMed, EbscoHost and the Cochrane Library. Studies were selected based on different inclusion criteria, such as diagnosis of depression with validated screening instruments and presence of a control group. A total of 9,173 articles were found. One evaluated intervention study in the workplace met all inclusion criteria (French APRAND programme). The intervention, which combined the provision of diagnosis and psychoeducation, had a positive effect on people with depression, with a significant trend towards chances of recovery or remission after 1 year. The remaining studies did not meet the predefined inclusion criteria of this systematic review. The findings are quite sobering given the high prevalence of depression and the individual and societal burden caused by it. More tailor-made interventions in the workplace targeting depression directly are needed.

  10. Cigarette smoking and depression comorbidity: systematic review and proposed theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Amanda R; Hogarth, Lee; Leventhal, Adam M; Cook, Jessica W; Hitsman, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Despite decades of research on co-occurring smoking and depression, cessation rates remain consistently lower for depressed smokers than for smokers in the general population, highlighting the need for theory-driven models of smoking and depression. This paper provides a systematic review with a particular focus upon psychological states that disproportionately motivate smoking in depression, and frame an incentive learning theory account of smoking-depression co-occurrence. We searched PubMed, Scopus, PsychINFO and CINAHL to December 2014, which yielded 852 papers. Using pre-established eligibility criteria, we identified papers focused on clinical issues and motivational mechanisms underlying smoking in established, adult smokers (i.e. maintenance, quit attempts and cessation/relapse) with elevated symptoms of depression. Two reviewers determined independently whether papers met review criteria. We included 297 papers in qualitative synthesis. Our review identified three primary mechanisms that underlie persistent smoking among depressed smokers: low positive affect, high negative affect and cognitive impairment. We propose a novel application of incentive learning theory which posits that depressed smokers experience greater increases in the expected value of smoking in the face of these three motivational states, which promotes goal-directed choice of smoking behavior over alternative actions. The incentive learning theory accounts for current evidence on how depression primes smoking behavior and provides a unique framework for conceptualizing psychological mechanisms of smoking maintenance among depressed smokers. Treatment should focus upon correcting adverse internal states and beliefs about the high value of smoking in those states to improve cessation outcomes for depressed smokers. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Influence of personality on the outcome of treatment in depression: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton-Howes, Giles; Tyrer, Peter; Johnson, Tony; Mulder, Roger; Kool, Simone; Dekker, Jack; Schoevers, Robert

    2014-08-01

    There continues to be debate about the influence of personality disorder on the outcome of depressive disorders and is relative interactions with treatment. To determine whether personality disorder, both generically and in terms of individual clusters, leads to a worse outcome in patients with depressive disorders and whether this is influenced by type of treatment, a systematic electronic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO from 1966, 1982, and 1882, respectively, until February 2007 was undertaken. The keyword terms depression, mental illness, and personality disorder were used. All references were reviewed and personal correspondence was undertaken. Only English language papers were considered. Any English language paper studying a depressed adult population was considered for inclusion. Studies needed to clearly define depression and personality disorder using peer-reviewed instruments or International Classification of Disease/Diagnostic Statistical Manual criteria. Outcome assessment at greater than 3 weeks was necessary. Final inclusion papers were agreed on by consensus by at least two reviewers. All data were extracted using predetermined criteria for depression by at least two reviewers in parallel. Disagreement was settled by consensus. Complex data extraction was confirmed within the study group. Data were synthesized using log odds ratios in the Cochrane RevMan 5 program. The finding of comorbid personality disorder and depression was associated with a more than double the odds of a poor outcome for depression compared with those with no personality disorder (OR 2.16, CI 1.83-2.56). This effect was not ameliorated by the treatment modality used for the depressive disorder. This finding led to the conclusion that personality disorder has a negative impact on the outcome of depression. This finding is important in considering prognosis in depressive disorders.

  12. Severe Intellectual Disability: Systematic Review of the Prevalence and Nature of Presentation of Unipolar Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Catherine; Kerr, Mike

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of depression in severe and profound intellectual disability is challenging. Without adequate skills in verbal self-expression, standardized diagnostic criteria cannot be used with confidence. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the assessment and diagnosis of unipolar depression in severe and profound intellectual disability. The review aimed to examine the methods used to assess for depression. The secondary aim was to explore the frequency and symptoms of depression. The PRISMA (2009) Checklist for systematic review was followed, and a search of electronic databases was undertaken. Nine studies were included in the qualitative synthesis from over 2000 records identified. The quality of the studies was assessed and scored, with a wide range of results. Individual studies scored between 2 and 7 of a maximum possible score of 8. The diagnostic tools utilized by each of the studies were assessed and compared. In terms of the methods used to assess for depression, results were varied. This was due to the heterogeneous nature of the individual study designs. The Aberrant Behaviour Checklist consistently showed promise, in particular when combined with other instruments or clinical examination. Qualitative analysis of the selected studies has shown a wide variation in the quality of primary research in this field, with more required to make firm conclusions regarding the diagnosis, frequency and presentation of depression in severe and profound intellectual disability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Depression and type 2 diabetes in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Emily; Norris, Shane A; Shidhaye, Rahul; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2014-02-01

    Eighty percent of people with type 2 diabetes reside in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Yet much of the research around depression among people with diabetes has been conducted in high-income countries (HICs). In this systematic review we searched Ovid Medline, PubMed, and PsychINFO for studies that assessed depression among people with type 2 diabetes in LMICs. Our focus on quantitative studies provided a prevalence of comorbid depression among those with diabetes. We reviewed 48 studies from 1,091 references. We found that this research has been conducted primarily in middle-income countries, including India (n = 8), Mexico (n = 8), Brazil (n = 5), and China (n = 5). There was variation in prevalence of comorbid depression across studies, but these differences did not reveal regional differences and seemed to result from study sample (e.g., urban vs rural and clinical vs population-based samples). Fifteen depression inventories were administered across the studies. We concluded that despite substantial diabetes burden in LMICs, few studies have reviewed comorbid depression and diabetes. Our review suggests depression among people with diabetes in LMICs may be higher than in HICs. Evidence from these 48 studies underscores the need for comprehensive mental health care that can be integrated into diabetes care within LMIC health systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression in Parkinson's disease: systematic review of evidence and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Bryson, William Culbertson; Buchholz, Jonathan; Samii, Ali; Borson, Soo

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic review of evidence regarding treatment of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) utilizing electroconvulsive therapy. The search led to the inclusion of 43 articles, mainly case reports or case series, with the largest number of patients totaling 19. The analysis included 116 patients with depression and PD; depression improved in 93.1%. Where motor symptoms' severity was reported, 83% of patients improved. Cognition did not worsen in the majority (94%). Many patients experienced delirium or transient confusion, sometimes necessitating discontinuation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Little is known about maintenance ECT in this population. ECT can benefit patients suffering from PD and depression. We recommend an algorithm for treatment of depression in PD, utilizing ECT sooner rather than later.

  15. Prevalence of depression in granted and refused requests for euthanasia and assisted suicide: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Ilana; Parker, Michael

    2011-04-01

    There is an established link between depression and interest in hastened death in patients who are seriously ill. Concern exists over the extent of depression in patients who actively request euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and those who have their requests granted. To estimate the prevalence of depression in refused and granted requests for euthanasia/PAS and discuss these findings. Methods A systematic review was performed in MEDLINE and PsycINFO in July 2010, identifying studies reporting rates of depression in requests for and cases of euthanasia/PAS. One author critically appraised the strength of the data using published criteria. 21 studies were included covering four countries. There was considerable heterogeneity in methods of assessing depression and selecting patients. In the highest quality studies, in the Netherlands and Oregon, 8-47% of patients requesting euthanasia/PAS had depressive symptoms and 2-17% of completed euthanasia/PAS cases had depressive symptoms. In the Netherlands, depression was significantly higher in refused than granted requests, and there was no significant difference in the rate of depression between euthanasia cases and similar patients who had not made a request for euthanasia. It is unclear whether depression increases the probability of making a request for euthanasia/PAS, but in the Netherlands most requests in depressed patients are rejected, leaving a depression rate in cases that is similar to the surrounding population. Less evidence is available elsewhere, but some level of depression has been identified in patients undergoing euthanasia/PAS in all the countries studied. Whether the presence of depression is ever compatible with an ethical decision on euthanasia/PAS is discussed.

  16. Social support and protection from depression: systematic review of current findings in Western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Geneviève; Honkaniemi, Helena; Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies report an association between social support and protection from depression, but no systematic review or meta-analysis exists on this topic. To review systematically the characteristics of social support (types and source) associated with protection from depression across life periods (childhood and adolescence; adulthood; older age) and by study design (cross-sectional v cohort studies). A systematic literature search conducted in February 2015 yielded 100 eligible studies. Study quality was assessed using a critical appraisal checklist, followed by meta-analyses. Sources of support varied across life periods, with parental support being most important among children and adolescents, whereas adults and older adults relied more on spouses, followed by family and then friends. Significant heterogeneity in social support measurement was noted. Effects were weaker in both magnitude and significance in cohort studies. Knowledge gaps remain due to social support measurement heterogeneity and to evidence of reverse causality bias. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  17. Association between depression and periodontitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Milena Moreira; Martins, Carolina Castro; Costa, Lidiane Cristina Machado; Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Faria, Rodrigo Lamounier Araújo Melo; Cunha, Fabiano Araújo; Costa, Fernando Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the scientific evidence on the association between depression and periodontitis. An electronic search was conducted in three databases until October 2015 (PROSPERO-CRD42014006451). Hand searches and grey literature were also included. Search retrieved 423 potentially studies. Two independent reviewers selected the studies, extracted data and assessed risk bias through a modified version of Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Meta-analysis was performed for the presence/absence of periodontitis (dichotomic). Summary effect measures and odds ratio (OR) 95% CI were calculated. After selecting the studies, 15 were included in the systematic review (eight cross-sectional, six case-control and one cohort study). Six studies reported that depression was associated with periodontitis, whereas nine studies did not. The majority of studies had low risk of bias by methodological quality assessment. Meta-analysis of seven cross-sectional studies showed no significant association between depression and periodontitis (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.75-1.41). Findings from the present systematic review showed a great heterogeneity among the studies and the summary effect measure of the meta-analysis cannot affirm an association between depression and periodontitis. Future studies with different designs in distinct populations should be conducted to investigate this association. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Restoring function in major depressive disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, David V; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Asami, Yuko; Pappadopulos, Elizabeth A; Boucher, Matthieu

    2017-06-01

    Functional impairment contributes to significant disability and economic burden in major depressive disorder (MDD). Treatment response is measured by improvement in depressive symptoms, but functional improvement often lags behind symptomatic improvement. Residual deficits are associated with relapse of depressive symptoms. A literature search was conducted using the following terms: "major depressive disorder," "functional impairment," "functional outcomes," "recovery of function," "treatment outcome," "outcome assessment," "social functioning," "presenteeism," "absenteeism," "psychiatric status rating scales," and "quality of life." Search limits included publication date (January 1, 1995 to August 31, 2016), English language, and human clinical trials. Controlled, acute-phase, nonrecurrent MDD treatment studies in adults were included if a functional outcome was measured at baseline and endpoint. The qualitative analysis included 35 controlled studies. The Sheehan Disability Scale was the most commonly used functional assessment. Antidepressant treatments significantly improved functional outcomes. Early treatment response predicted functional improvement, while baseline disease severity did not. Clinical studies utilized various methodologies and assessments for functional impairment, and were not standardized or adequately powered. The lack of synchronicity between symptomatic and functional improvement highlights an unmet need for MDD. Treatment guided by routine monitoring of symptoms and functionality may minimize residual functional impairments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Systematic review of interventions addressing social isolation and depression in aged care clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linél; Molyneux, Natalie; Parkinson, Lynne

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review was undertaken of studies reporting interventions for reducing social isolation and depression in older people receiving aged care services (community or residential). Gray literature and relevant electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published in English between January 2009 and December 2013. Two reviewers independently screened studies for selection using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria and independently completed methodological quality review at study level. Studies of poor methodological quality were excluded. Data were extracted at study level by one reviewer and independently checked by a second reviewer, using a standardized form. The results across studies were qualitatively synthesized with outcomes described and summarized at last follow-up. Although the original objective was to review rural studies, no intervention studies based in rural areas met criteria for inclusion in the review, and only urban studies could be reviewed. Of 403 articles, six articles representing five studies with moderate-to-low risk of bias were included for review. All study participants were older adults ranging in age from 77 to 86 years. All studies had small sample sizes, ranging from 26 to 113 participants. Three of the five included intervention studies successfully reduced social isolation; one also successfully reduced depression. Only one intervention, group-based reminiscence therapy, was reported as successful in reducing both social isolation and depression in older people within an urban aged care setting. More research is needed to explore transferability of interventions across different aged care settings and into rural areas.

  20. Exercise improves depressive symptoms in older adults: An umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Gomez-Conesa, Antonia; Stubbs, Brendon; Vancampfort, Davy

    2016-10-30

    Late-life depression is a growing public health concern. Exercise may be of added value but the literature remains equivocal. We conducted a systematic overview of meta-analyses and an exploratory pooled analysis of previous meta-analyses to determine the effect of exercise on depression in older adults. Two independent researchers searched Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane Plus, PsycArticles, and PsycInfo for meta-analyses on exercise in late-life depression. Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) Instrument. We pooled effect sizes from previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials to determine the effect of exercise on depression in older adults. The systematic review yielded 3 meta-analyses. In total, 16 unique cohorts of 1487 participants were included. The quality of the three included meta-analyses was considered as "moderate" according to AMSTAR scores. No serious adverse events were reported. Compared to controls (n=583), those exercising (n=541) significantly reduced depressive symptoms. Our umbrella review indicates that exercise is safe and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms in older people. Since exercise has many other known health benefits, it should be considered as a core intervention in the multidisciplinary treatment of older adults experiencing depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Depression in diabetes mellitus-A comprehensive systematic review of literature from an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Subrata; Victor, Robin; Nath, Kamal

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes and depression are rapidly growing chronic health conditions that have significant negative impact upon the physical, psychological, social and occupational functioning, quality of life and often leads to socio-economic burden. Presence of both these comorbid diseases results in various short term and long term complications and increases the mortality as compared to those with depression or diabetes alone. Systematic review of the epidemiological data, risk factors and relationship between depression and glycaemic control among the Indian studies. We searched Pubmed, Pubmed Central, Google Scholar and Directory of Open Access Journal (DOAJ) databases to identify relevant Indian studies. Substantial variation in the prevalence of depression in people with diabetes was found across the 41 selected studies; according to this review the range is 2% to 84% (T1DM - 2-7%; T2DM - 8%-84%). Correlates of depression in diabetic patients are advancing age, female gender, low literacy rate, burden of being from a lower socioeconomic status, rural domicile, marriage and duration of diabetes of >2years, diabetes related complications and poor glycaemic control. Sedentary life without adequate physical activities, lack of self-care are often the factors that precipitates depression in a T2DM patient and vice versa. According to this review, among Indian population there is a significant association between depression and diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) to treat depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jasmyn E A; Shapiro, Colin M

    2018-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is one of the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric illnesses, and it has a profound negative impact on an individual's ability to function. Up to 90% of individuals suffering from depression also report sleep and circadian disruptions. If these disruptions are not effectively resolved over the course of treatment, the likelihood of relapse into depression is greatly increased. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) has shown promise in treating these sleep and circadian disturbances associated with depression, and may be effective as a stand-alone treatment for depression. This may be particularly relevant in cases where antidepressant medications are not ideal (e.g. due to contraindications, cost, or treatment resistance). A systematic literature review was conducted of trials investigating the use of CBT-I to treat depression in adults. Therapy included in-person CBT-I, as well as telehealth and group CBT-I. CBT-I presents a promising treatment for depression comorbid with insomnia. In-person therapy has the most supporting evidence for its efficacy, though treatment effects may not be additive with those of antidepressant medications. Insomnia improvement due to CBT-I may mediate the improvement in depressive symptoms. There is less evidence for the use of telehealth, though a stepped-care approach is indicated based on baseline depressive severity. More research on group therapy and telehealth modalities of delivering CBT-I are required before making recommendations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of masculinity in men's help-seeking for depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Zac E; Dawes, Alexei J; Rice, Simon M; Oliffe, John L; Dhillon, Haryana M

    2016-11-01

    Conformity to traditional masculine gender norms may deter men's help-seeking and/or impact the services men engage. Despite proliferating research, current evidence has not been evaluated systematically. This review summarises findings related to the role of masculinity on men's help-seeking for depression. Six electronic databases were searched using terms related to masculinity, depression and help-seeking. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and data systematically extracted and examined for methodological quality. Of 1927 citations identified, 37 met inclusion criteria. Seventeen (46%) studies reported qualitative research; eighteen (49%) employed quantitative methods, and two (5%) mixed methods. Findings suggest conformity to traditional masculine norms has a threefold effect on men experiencing depression, impacting: i) their symptoms and expression of symptoms; ii) their attitudes to, intention, and, actual help-seeking behaviour; and, iii) their symptom management. Results demonstrate the problematic impact of conformity to traditional masculine norms on the way men experience and seek help for depression. Tailoring and targeting clinical interventions may increase men's service uptake and the efficacy of treatments. Future research examining factors associated with men's access to, and engagement with depression care will be critical to increasing help-seeking, treatment uptake, and effectual self-management among men experiencing depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Statins use and risk of depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Singh, Balwinder; Murad, M Hassan; Singh, Kuljit; Mascarenhas, Soniya S; Williams, Mark D; Lapid, Maria I; Richardson, Jarrett W; West, Colin P; Rummans, Teresa A

    2014-05-01

    Statin use has been associated with depression; however studies of the association between statin use and depression have yielded mixed results. To determine whether statin use is associated with depression and to evaluate the evidence supporting this association. Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus were searched through December 28, 2012. We included studies that evaluated exposure to statins, reported the development of depression, and relative risks or odds ratios (ORs) or provided data for their estimation. Two reviewers screened 981 abstracts independently using a standardized form, reviewed full text of 59 selected articles, and included 7 studies in this metaanalysis. Study design, statin exposure, development of depression, and study quality were extracted by 2 independent reviewers. A pooled OR with 95% confidence interval (CI) was estimated using the random-effects model and heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q test and the I(2) statistic. Seven observational studies (4 cohort, 2 nested case-control, and 1 cross-sectional) from 5 countries enrolling 9187 patients were included. Statin users were 32% less likely to develop depression than nonusers (adjusted OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.52-0.89). Modest heterogeneity was observed between the studies (I(2)=55%, P=0.01), which could be accounted for by one study, exclusion of which removed the heterogeneity (P=0.40, I(2)=2%) and further strengthened the antidepressant effect of statin (adjusted OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.93). Heterogeneity could not be explained by study design or study population. The quality of supporting evidence was fair. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that statin use is associated with lower risk for depression. However, higher-quality studies are needed to confirm the magnitude of this association. Copyright © 2013

  5. Effect of Exergames on Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Theng, Yin-Leng; Foo, Schubert

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a major public health concern in current society. In recent years many studies began to investigate the potential benefits of exergames on depression. The current study aimed to provide a systematic review to synthesize the existing studies and discover the overall effect size of exergames on treating depression. A comprehensive literature search was conducted among major bibliographic databases in computer technology, psychology, and medical science. Key study characteristics of participants, interventions, and experiment were extracted in the systematic review. Both studies using independent groups and matched groups were included in meta-analysis. Overall effect size of Hedges' g was calculated, followed by subgroup analyses. Nine studies included in the review, while eight studies applying exergames of Nintendo's Wii or Wii Fit. A random effects meta-analysis on eight studies resulted an overall significant effect size of g = 0.21. Demographic factors, depression severity, number of session, and game type were found to be significant moderators for the effectiveness. The study has not only supported the positive effect of exergames on alleviating depression, but also provided many theoretical and practical implications for health professionals and police makers. More rigorous experimental controlled studies are needed in this new research field.

  6. Healthcare team training programs aimed at improving depression management in primary care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Castro, Ariel; Martínez, Pablo; Tala, Álvaro; Medina, Simón; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    Although evidence from Latin America and the Caribbean suggests that depression can be effectively treated in primary care settings, depression management remains unevenly performed. This systematic review evaluates all the international evidence on healthcare team training programs aimed at improving the outcomes of patients with depression. Three databases were searched for articles in English or Spanish indexed up to November 20, 2014. Studies were included if they fulfilled the following conditions: clinical trials, meta-analyses, or systematic reviews; and if they evaluated a training or educational program intended to improve the management of depression by primary healthcare teams, and assessed change in depressive symptoms, diagnosis or response rates, referral rates, patients' satisfaction and/or quality of life, and the effectiveness of treatments. Nine studies were included in this systematic review. Five trials tested the effectiveness of multi-component interventions (training included), and the remaining studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific training programs for depression management. All the studies that implemented multi-component interventions were efficacious, and half of the training trials were shown to be effective. Contribution of training programs alone to the effectiveness of multi-component interventions is yet to be established. The lack of specificity regarding health providers' characteristics might be a confounding factor. The review conducted suggests that stand-alone training programs are less effective than multi-component interventions. In applying the evidence gathered from developed countries to Latin America and the Caribbean, these training programs must consider and address local conditions of mental health systems, and therefore multi-component interventions may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Systematic Review of the Rates of Depression in Children and Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigham, Sarah; Barton, Stephen; Parr, Jeremy R.; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2017-01-01

    Accurate population rates of depression can inform allocation of health resources and service planning, to counter the impact of depression on quality of life and morbidity. A systematic review of the rates of depression in children and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and without intellectual disability (high-functioning [HF] ASD) was…

  8. Association between Depressive Symptoms and Cognitive Function in Persons with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia M Danna

    Full Text Available Depression and diabetes are independent risk factors for one another, and both are associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Diabetes patients with lower cognitive function are more likely to suffer poorer health outcomes. However, the role of depression in cognitive decline among people with diabetes is not well understood. This systematic review assessed whether adults with comorbid diabetes and depression or depressive symptoms exhibit greater cognitive decline relative to individuals with diabetes alone. Searches were run in CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed (MEDLINE with no time or language restrictions. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were of any quantitative study design, included participants aged 18 years or older with diabetes mellitus of which some must have presented with current depression, and measured cognition as an outcome. The Cochrane Collaboration's Risk Of Bias In Non-randomized Studies-of Interventions tool was used for quality assessment of each study and its collected outcome. Fifteen articles were included in the final analysis. The high degree of heterogeneity in exposures, outcomes, and participant characteristics precluded a meta-analysis of any of the studies, and the risk of bias observed in these studies limits the strength of the evidence. Nonetheless, this review found the presence of comorbid depression was associated with poorer cognitive outcomes than for persons with diabetes alone. While large-scale preventive efforts must address epidemic levels of diabetes and its comorbidities, on the patient level healthcare professionals must be cognizant of the added difficulties that depression poses to patients and the extra support required to management diabetes in these cases. This systematic review is registered with the University of York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination under registration number 2015:CRD42015025122.

  9. Acculturation and Postpartum Depressive Symptoms among Hispanic Women in the United States: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhasanat, Dalia; Giurgescu, Carmen

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate studies that examined the relationship between acculturation and postpartum depression (PPD) among immigrant and/or refugee women in the United States. A systematic, computer-assisted search of quantitative, English-language, peer-reviewed, published research articles was conducted in the Scopus, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Maternity and Infant Care databases using the keyword terms of "postpartum depression" and "perinatal depression" in combination with "acculturation." Studies were included if they were conducted in the United States. Seven studies met inclusion criteria. Three studies used longitudinal designs and four used cross-sectional designs. All were conducted with Hispanic women. Only one study used a diagnostic tool to measure PPD; the remaining studies used screening tools to measure postpartum depressive symptoms. Most studies used country of birth, country of residence, and language preferences to measure acculturation. Five studies reported acculturation was positively related to risk of postpartum depressive symptoms, and two studies reported no relationship. Higher levels of acculturation were related to higher risk of postpartum depressive symptoms in Hispanic women living in the United States. Nurses should have an understanding of stressors of immigrant women to guide their assessment and screening for postpartum depressive symptoms and make appropriate referrals. More research is needed to confirm the relationship between acculturation and PPD among immigrant women from different cultural backgrounds.

  10. Emotion regulation as a mediator in the relationship between attachment and depressive symptomatology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sonia; Wells, Adrian; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-02-01

    Attachment theory has been conceptualised as an emotion regulation theory. Research attributes the occurrence of depressive symptoms to a dysfunction of emotion regulation. Anxious attachment and avoidant attachment, which are two dimensions of insecure attachment, are hypothesised to lead to the development of hyperactivating and deactivating emotion regulation strategies. This systematic review examines the literature on the role of emotion regulation and its relationship with attachment and depressive symptomatology. Furthermore, we examined evidence for hyperactivating and deactivating strategies. Nineteen papers were identified. Adolescent studies demonstrated associations of varying strength and found unreliable and contradictory results for emotion regulation as a mediator. Conversely, adult studies provided strong evidence for emotion regulation as a mediator. The hypothesis that hyperactivating strategies mediate anxious attachment and depressive symptoms was consistently supported. Mixed evidence was provided for deactivating strategies as mediators to avoidant attachment and depressive symptomatology. Limitations of methodology and quality of studies are identified with particular attention drawn to problems with conceptual singularity and multicollinearity. Despite mixed variable findings, this review indicates that emotion regulation is a mediator between attachment and depression. Hyperactivating strategies, in particular, have been consistently noted as mediators for anxious attachment and depressive symptomatology, whereas evidence for deactivating strategies as mediators between avoidant attachment and depressive symptoms has been mixed. Future research should test the mediators of attachment and symptoms and examine theoretically grounded models of psychopathology, such as metacognitive and cognitive models using clinical samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Is sarcopenia associated with depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hsu, Tsai-Hsuan; Wu, Wei-Ting; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Han, Der-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    to explore whether sarcopenia is associated with depression. electronic literature databases from PubMed, Scopus, Embase and Google Scholar were searched. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was conducted. community and outpatient clinic. people with and without diagnoses of sarcopenia. outcome measures of depression. about 15 articles were included, 5 of which were retrieved for narrative review. The crude odds ratios (ORs) between sarcopenia and depression were extracted from the remaining 10 studies, 6 of which also included adjusted ORs. Sarcopenia was associated with depression without adjusting covariates (crude OR, 1.640; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.247-2.155). After adjusting for potential confounders such as age, gender, cognitive performance and physical activity, sarcopenia still demonstrated a significant positive association with depression (adjusted OR, 1.821; 95% CI, 1.160-2.859). A stratified analysis showed that the studies that used bioelectrical impedance analysis for measurement of body composition tended to have an elevated association between sarcopenia and depression compared with those that used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry or equation estimation. sarcopenia was independently associated with depression. The causal relationship between the two clinical conditions requires future validation with cohort studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Reflecting on the Germanwings Disaster: A Systematic Review of Depression and Suicide in Commercial Airline Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Terouz; Stokes, Paul R A

    2018-01-01

    The 2015 Germanwings Flight 9525 disaster, in which 150 people were killed after the co-pilot may have intentionally crashed the plane in a suicide attempt, highlights the importance of better understanding the mental health of commercial airline pilots. However, there have been few systematic reviews investigating the topic of mental health in commercial aviation. This systematic review aims to identify the types and prevalence of mental health disorders that commercial airline pilots experience with a focus on mood disorders and suicide risk. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases. Eligible studies were assessed and data was extracted and analyzed. 20 studies were identified. The prevalence of depression experienced by commercial airline pilots in this review ranged from 1.9% to 12.6%. Factors that negatively impacted the mental health of pilots included substance abuse, experiencing verbal or sexual abuse, disruption in sleep circadian rhythms and fatigue. This systematic review identifies that commercial airline pilots may experience depression at least as frequently as the general population. Commercial airline pilots experience occupational stressors, such as disrupted circadian rhythms and fatigue which may increase risks of developing mood disorders. Most studies identified in this review were cross-sectional in nature with substantial limitations. There is a clear need for further higher quality longitudinal studies to better understand the mental health of commercial airline pilots.

  13. Comparison between herbal medicine and fluoxetine for depression: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Zhu, Chenjun; Wu, Jianjun; Zheng, Ruwen; Cao, Huijaun

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) versus fluoxetine on depression. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). RCT with two parallel groups that compared CHM and fluoxetine on treatment of depression with reported decreased Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) and adverse events during treatment were included after searching through six electric-databases. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 software with pooled mean difference (MD) or risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) if no significant heterogeneity was detected. A SOF table was generated using GRADEPro software to evaluate the overall quality of the evidence. Twenty-six trials with 3294 participants were included in the review. Most of them had high risk of bias during conducting and reporting. The results achieved weak evidence which showed CHM had similar effect to fluoxetine (20mg/day) on relieving depression according to HAMD assessment (for primary depression: MD=-0.08, 95%CI -0.98-0.82; for secondary depression: MD=-0.36, 95%CI -1.55-0.83), but fewer incidences of adverse events than the drug (for primary depression: RR=0.31, 95%CI 0.17-0.59; for post-stroke depression: RR=0.04, 95%CI 0.00-0.25). No serious adverse event was found in neither CHM nor fluoxetine group. Due to the poor quality of included trials and the potential publication bias of this review, no confirmed conclusion could be draw to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CHM for depression compared with fluoxetine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The relationship between online social networking and depression : a systematic review of quantitative studies

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, David; Perez Algorta, Guillermo Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Online social networking sites (SNSs) such as Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace are used by billions of people every day to communicate and interact with others. There has been increasing interest in the potential impact of online social networking on wellbeing, with a broadening body of new research into factors associated with both positive and negative mental health outcomes such as depression. This systematic review of empirical studies (n=30) adds to existing research in this field by exami...

  15. Depression after Stroke in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojagbemi, Akin; Akpa, Onoja; Elugbadebo, Fisayo; Owolabi, Mayowa; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence and characteristics of poststroke depression (PSD) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We searched Medline, PsycINFO, and African Journals OnLine using keywords for stroke and depression and the .mp. operator for all 54 SSA countries/regions. Further information was retrieved through a manual search of references from relevant published and unpublished articles. We included only peer-reviewed original studies with epidemiological or experimental designs, conducted random-effect meta-analysis, and identified the most commonly associated factors by weight (inverse of variance method). Seventeen studies, comprising 1483 stroke survivors, met the criteria for syntheses. The pooled frequency of clinically diagnosed PSD was 31% (95% CI = 26%-36%), versus 13.9% in healthy control pairs. Prevalence did not vary much across healthcare settings but was affected by methods of depression ascertainment. PSD was significantly associated with low education, cognitive impairment, physical disability, poor quality of life, and divorced marital status. Almost 1 in 3 individuals with stroke in SSA has clinical depression. Despite limitations around quality of identified studies, results of the present systematic review overlap with findings in the global literature and highlight useful targets for the design and trial of tailored intervention for PSD in SSA.

  16. Depression after Stroke in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Ojagbemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence and characteristics of poststroke depression (PSD in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Methods. We searched Medline, PsycINFO, and African Journals OnLine using keywords for stroke and depression and the .mp. operator for all 54 SSA countries/regions. Further information was retrieved through a manual search of references from relevant published and unpublished articles. We included only peer-reviewed original studies with epidemiological or experimental designs, conducted random-effect meta-analysis, and identified the most commonly associated factors by weight (inverse of variance method. Results. Seventeen studies, comprising 1483 stroke survivors, met the criteria for syntheses. The pooled frequency of clinically diagnosed PSD was 31% (95% CI = 26%–36%, versus 13.9% in healthy control pairs. Prevalence did not vary much across healthcare settings but was affected by methods of depression ascertainment. PSD was significantly associated with low education, cognitive impairment, physical disability, poor quality of life, and divorced marital status. Conclusion. Almost 1 in 3 individuals with stroke in SSA has clinical depression. Despite limitations around quality of identified studies, results of the present systematic review overlap with findings in the global literature and highlight useful targets for the design and trial of tailored intervention for PSD in SSA.

  17. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legere, Laura E; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-07-24

    Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of educational and professional development needs and strategies for health-care providers in perinatal depression. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in seven academic health databases using selected keywords. The search was limited to primary studies and reviews published in English between January 2006 and May/June 2015, with a focus on perinatal depression education and professional development for health-care providers. Studies were screened for inclusion by two reviewers and tie-broken by a third. Studies that met inclusion criteria were quality appraised and data extracted. Results from the studies are reported through narrative synthesis. Two thousand one hundred five studies were returned from the search, with 1790 remaining after duplicate removal. Ultimately, 12 studies of moderate and weak quality met inclusion criteria. The studies encompassed quantitative (n = 11) and qualitative (n = 1) designs, none of which were reviews, and addressed educational needs identified by health-care providers (n = 5) and strategies for professional development in perinatal mental health (n = 7). Consistently, providers identified a lack of formal education in perinatal mental health and the need for further professional development. Although the professional development interventions were diverse, the majority focused on promoting identification of perinatal depression and demonstrated modest effectiveness in improving various outcomes. This systematic review reveals a

  18. Systematic Review of Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated With Depression and Its Treatment in Iranian Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homeira Sajadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Depression is the most common mood and psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to provide a clear picture of the prevalence, risk factors and interventions of depression in Iranian elderly. Methods & Materials: This study is a systematic review. Statistic population included Farsi and English studies with various aspects of depression in elderly. Keywords "Depression, Dysthymia, Melancholia, mood disorder, Iran and elderly" in Medline, SID, Iran doc, Iran medex, Mag iran and Iran psych database were searched. Then, repeated articles and articles outside the study period (1997 to 2011 were excluded. In the first stage of screening, titles and in the second stage, abstracts were reviewed by two experts. Afterwards papers were evaluated qualitatively based on Critical Appraisal Skills Program site. Results: After searching, screening and qualitative evaluation studies, the final synthesis was performed on 26 articles. Synthesis papers related to aging showed that the prevalence of depressive disorder in elderly residents at home with the back is 95.64% and with the GDS 81.85%. The prevalence of depression in the elderly living at home with the GDS was 57.58%. The most important factors associated with depression in Iranian studies were, female gender, marring status, living in a nursing home, education level, age and socio-economic status. Also, the most interventions in this age group were respectively psychotherapy, medication and exercise. Conclusions: The high prevalence of depression in elderly in Iranian studies, the need for further Investigation and intervention, regard to factors associated with depression in this period.

  19. Prevalence of depression among nursing students: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yi-Jung; Lo, Kenneth K H; Ho, Roger C M; Tam, Wai San Wilson

    2018-04-01

    To examine the global prevalence of depression among nursing students and the variation in depression rates influenced by demographic and educational factors. Depression affects approximately 350 million people worldwide and is the world's leading cause of disability. Nursing students struggle to cope with not only stressors common in higher education institutions but also anxiety towards clinical placements. Evidence has suggested high prevalence of depression among them, but no reviews have been conducted to report a consolidated prevalence. Systematic review and meta-analysis. A search was conducted from November 2015 to January 2016 on CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline OVID, Medline ProQuest, PsycINFO, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and SCOPUS, using a combination of keywords "depression", "nursing students", "mood disorder", "affective disorder", 'undergraduate nursing', "nursing education", "nursing undergraduate", and "nursing diploma". A total of 27 cross-sectional studies were included. The sample comprised 8918 nursing students and the mean age ranged from 17.4 to 28.4 years. Among these studies, the proportion of female students ranged from 79.0% to 100.0%. A high pooled prevalence of depression of 34.0% was reported among nursing students. Significant differences in depression prevalence were noted for different subgroups of age, with a higher prevalence noted in younger students (41.0%), and for different geographical regions, with Asian nursing students experiencing a higher prevalence of depression (43.0%). No significant difference was noted between nursing and non-nursing students. The findings suggest a high prevalence of depression among nursing students. This serves as an impetus for educational reforms in nursing schools and proposes for further research to aid prospective nurses in safeguarding their psychological wellbeing. In the long run, it is imperative that competent nurses be nurtured to improve the standards of healthcare and patients' quality of life

  20. N-Acetylcysteine in depressive symptoms and functionality: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Brisa S; Dean, Olivia M; Dodd, Seetal; Malhi, Gin S; Berk, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To assess the utility of N-acetylcysteine administration for depressive symptoms in subjects with psychiatric conditions using a systematic review and meta-analysis. A computerized literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, SciELO, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge. No year or country restrictions were used. The Boolean terms used for the electronic database search were (NAC OR N-acetylcysteine OR acetylcysteine) AND (depression OR depressive OR depressed) AND (trial). The last search was performed in November 2014. The literature was searched for double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials using N-acetylcysteine for depressive symptoms regardless of the main psychiatric condition. Using keywords and cross-referenced bibliographies, 38 studies were identified and examined in depth. Of those, 33 articles were rejected because inclusion criteria were not met. Finally, 5 studies were included. Data were extracted independently by 2 investigators. The primary outcome measure was change in depressive symptoms. Functionality, quality of life, and manic and anxiety symptoms were also examined. A full review and meta-analysis were performed. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were calculated. Five studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis, providing data on 574 participants, of whom 291 were randomized to receive N-acetylcysteine and 283 to placebo. The follow-up varied from 12 to 24 weeks. Two studies included subjects with bipolar disorder and current depressive symptoms, 1 included subjects with MDD in a current depressive episode, and 2 included subjects with depressive symptoms in the context of other psychiatric conditions (1 trichotillomania and 1 heavy smoking). Treatment with N-acetylcysteine improved depressive symptoms as assessed by Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale when compared to placebo (SMD = 0.37; 95% CI = 0

  1. Collaborative care for depression in European countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Sighinolfi, Cecilia; Nespeca, Claudia; Menchetti, Marco; Levantesi, Paolo; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Berardi, Domenico

    2014-10-01

    This is a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effectiveness of collaborative care compared to Primary Care Physician's (PCP's) usual care in the treatment of depression, focusing on European countries. A systematic review of English and non-English articles, from inception to March 2014, was performed using database PubMed, British Nursing Index and Archive, Ovid Medline (R), PsychINFO, Books@Ovid, PsycARTICLES Full Text, EMBASE Classic+Embase, DARE (Database of Abstract of Reviews of Effectiveness) and the Cochrane Library electronic database. Search term included depression, collaborative care, physician family and allied health professional. RCTs comparing collaborative care to usual care for depression in primary care were included. Titles and abstracts were independently examined by two reviewers, who extracted from the included trials information on participants' characteristics, type of intervention, features of collaborative care and type of outcome measure. The 17 papers included, regarding 15 RCTs, involved 3240 participants. Primary analyses showed that collaborative care models were associated with greater improvement in depression outcomes in the short term, within 3 months (standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.19, 95% CI=-0.33; -0.05; p=0.006), medium term, between 4 and 11 months (SMD -0.24, 95% CI=-0.39; -0.09; p=0.001) and medium-long term, from 12 months and over (SMD -0.21, 95% CI=-0.37; -0.04; p=0.01), compared to usual care. The present review, specifically focusing on European countries, shows that collaborative care is more effective than treatment as usual in improving depression outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors affecting recruitment into depression trials: Systematic review, meta-synthesis and conceptual framework.

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    Hughes-Morley, Adwoa; Young, Bridget; Waheed, Waquas; Small, Nicola; Bower, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Depression is common and clinical trials are crucial for evaluating treatments. Difficulties in recruiting participants into depression trials are well-documented, yet no study has examined the factors affecting recruitment. This review aims to identify the factors affecting recruitment into depression trials and to develop a conceptual framework through systematic assessment of published qualitative research. Systematic review and meta-synthesis of published qualitative studies. Meta-synthesis involves a synthesis of themes across a number of qualitative studies to produce findings that are "greater than the sum of the parts". ASSIA, CINAHL, Embase, Medline and PsychInfo were searched up to April 2013. Reference lists of included studies, key publications and relevant reviews were also searched. Quality appraisal adopted the "prompts for appraising qualitative research". 7977 citations were identified, and 15 studies were included. Findings indicate that the decision to enter a depression trial is made by patients and gatekeepers based on the patient׳s health state at the time of being approached to participate; on their attitude towards the research and trial interventions; and on the extent to which patients become engaged with the trial. Our conceptual framework highlights that the decision to participate by both the patient and the gatekeeper involves a judgement between risk and reward. Only English language publications were included in this review. Findings from this review have implications for the design of interventions to improve recruitment into depression trials. Such interventions may aim to diminish the perceived risks and increase the perceived rewards of participation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Is good insight associated with depression among patients with schizophrenia? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Belvederi Murri, Martino; Respino, Matteo; Innamorati, Marco; Cervetti, Alice; Calcagno, Pietro; Pompili, Maurizio; Lamis, Dorian A; Ghio, Lucio; Amore, Mario

    2015-03-01

    Among patients with schizophrenia, better insight may be associated with depression, but the findings on this issue are mixed. We examined the association between insight and depression in schizophrenia by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis was based on 59 correlational studies and showed that global clinical insight was associated weakly, but significantly with depression (effect size r=0.14), as were the insight into the mental disorder (r=0.14), insight into symptoms (r=0.14), and symptoms' attributions (r=0.17). Conversely, neither insight into the social consequences of the disorder nor into the need for treatment was associated with symptoms of depression. Better cognitive insight was significantly associated with higher levels of depression. The exploratory meta-regression showed that methodological factors (e.g. the instrument used to assess depression and the phase of the illness) can significantly influence the magnitude of the association between insight and depression. Moreover, results from longitudinal studies suggest that the relation between insight and depression might be stronger than what is observed at the cross-sectional level. Finally, internalized stigma, illness perception, recovery attitudes, ruminative style, and premorbid adjustment seem to be relevant moderators and/or mediators of the association between insight and depression. In conclusion, literature indicates that among patients with schizophrenia, better insight is associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Thus, interventions aimed at promoting patients' insight should take into account the clinical implications of these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identifying the women at risk of antenatal anxiety and depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaggi, Alessandra; Conroy, Susan; Pawlby, Susan; Pariante, Carmine M

    2016-02-01

    Pregnancy is a time of increased vulnerability for the development of anxiety and depression. This systematic review aims to identify the main risk factors involved in the onset of antenatal anxiety and depression. A systematic literature analysis was conducted, using PubMed, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Library. Original papers were included if they were written in English and published between 1st January 2003 and 31st August 2015, while literature reviews and meta-analyses were consulted regardless of publication date. A final number of 97 papers were selected. The most relevant factors associated with antenatal depression or anxiety were: lack of partner or of social support; history of abuse or of domestic violence; personal history of mental illness; unplanned or unwanted pregnancy; adverse events in life and high perceived stress; present/past pregnancy complications; and pregnancy loss. The review does not include a meta-analysis, which may have added additional information about the differential impact of each risk factor. Moreover, it does not specifically examine factors that may influence different types of anxiety disorders, or the recurrence or persistence of depression or anxiety from pregnancy to the postpartum period. The results show the complex aetiology of antenatal depression and anxiety. The administration of a screening tool to identify women at risk of anxiety and depression during pregnancy should be universal practice in order to promote the long-term wellbeing of mothers and babies, and the knowledge of specific risk factors may help creating such screening tool targeting women at higher risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intimate partner violence and incident depressive symptoms and suicide attempts: a systematic review of longitudinal studies.

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    Karen M Devries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression and suicide are responsible for a substantial burden of disease globally. Evidence suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV experience is associated with increased risk of depression, but also that people with mental disorders are at increased risk of violence. We aimed to investigate the extent to which IPV experience is associated with incident depression and suicide attempts, and vice versa, in both women and men. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies published before February 1, 2013. More than 22,000 records from 20 databases were searched for studies examining physical and/or sexual intimate partner or dating violence and symptoms of depression, diagnosed major depressive disorder, dysthymia, mild depression, or suicide attempts. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate pooled odds ratios (ORs. Sixteen studies with 36,163 participants met our inclusion criteria. All studies included female participants; four studies also included male participants. Few controlled for key potential confounders other than demographics. All but one depression study measured only depressive symptoms. For women, there was clear evidence of an association between IPV and incident depressive symptoms, with 12 of 13 studies showing a positive direction of association and 11 reaching statistical significance; pooled OR from six studies = 1.97 (95% CI 1.56-2.48, I²  =  50.4%, p(heterogeneity = 0.073. There was also evidence of an association in the reverse direction between depressive symptoms and incident IPV (pooled OR from four studies = 1.93, 95% CI 1.51-2.48, I²  =  0%, p = 0.481. IPV was also associated with incident suicide attempts. For men, evidence suggested that IPV was associated with incident depressive symptoms, but there was no clear evidence of an association between IPV and suicide attempts or depression and incident IPV

  6. Intimate Partner Violence and Incident Depressive Symptoms and Suicide Attempts: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Karen M.; Mak, Joelle Y.; Bacchus, Loraine J.; Child, Jennifer C.; Falder, Gail; Petzold, Max; Astbury, Jill; Watts, Charlotte H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and suicide are responsible for a substantial burden of disease globally. Evidence suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV) experience is associated with increased risk of depression, but also that people with mental disorders are at increased risk of violence. We aimed to investigate the extent to which IPV experience is associated with incident depression and suicide attempts, and vice versa, in both women and men. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies published before February 1, 2013. More than 22,000 records from 20 databases were searched for studies examining physical and/or sexual intimate partner or dating violence and symptoms of depression, diagnosed major depressive disorder, dysthymia, mild depression, or suicide attempts. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate pooled odds ratios (ORs). Sixteen studies with 36,163 participants met our inclusion criteria. All studies included female participants; four studies also included male participants. Few controlled for key potential confounders other than demographics. All but one depression study measured only depressive symptoms. For women, there was clear evidence of an association between IPV and incident depressive symptoms, with 12 of 13 studies showing a positive direction of association and 11 reaching statistical significance; pooled OR from six studies = 1.97 (95% CI 1.56–2.48, I 2 = 50.4%, p heterogeneity = 0.073). There was also evidence of an association in the reverse direction between depressive symptoms and incident IPV (pooled OR from four studies = 1.93, 95% CI 1.51–2.48, I 2 = 0%, p = 0.481). IPV was also associated with incident suicide attempts. For men, evidence suggested that IPV was associated with incident depressive symptoms, but there was no clear evidence of an association between IPV and suicide attempts or depression and incident IPV. Conclusions In women, IPV

  7. Effectiveness of physical activity on patients with depression and Parkinson's disease: A systematic review.

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    Pei-Ling Wu

    Full Text Available In this paper we aimed to systematically review the literature on physical activity's effect on depressive symptoms in Parkinson disease.Depression is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease and is associated with increased disability, rapid progression of motor symptoms, mortality, and adverse effects on Quality of Life.A systematic review of primary research was undertaken and conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews.Databases Scopus, Psycho-info, CINAHL, PubMed, and ProQuest Cochrance were searched from January 2006 to June 2017. The language was restricted to English.Abstracts were screened and reviewed against the eligibility criteria (participants' mean age were ≥ 60 with PD, PA interventions, depression as one of outcome variables, and Randomized Control Trail or quasi-experimental design. Two reviewers appraised the quality of the data extracted. The modified Jadad scale assessed the quality of the methodology of the published papers.The database search yielded 769 abstracts, 11 of which were included in this review and awarded scores ranging from 3 to 8 (Scale scores range from 0 to 8 points, higher scores indicated better quality by the raters. These 11 studies included 342 patients and executed 17 kinds of physical activity programs. Results of this review show empirical evidence to support the efficacy of physical activity for the population with Parkinson's disease. Aerobic training exercise significantly improved the participants' scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Quality of Life of the patients. Qigong improved scores in UPDRS-III and decreased incidences of multiple non-motor symptoms and depression. Furthermore, a balance-training program, such as Tai Chi, can improve postural stability and Quality of Life.Physical activity may assuage the degeneration of motor skills and depression as well as increase the Quality of Life of

  8. The effects of probiotics on depressive symptoms in humans: a systematic review

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    Caroline J. K. Wallace

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from depression experience significant mood, anxiety, and cognitive symptoms. Currently, most antidepressants work by altering neurotransmitter activity in the brain to improve these symptoms. However, in the last decade, research has revealed an extensive bidirectional communication network between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system, referred to as the “gut–brain axis.” Advances in this field have linked psychiatric disorders to changes in the microbiome, making it a potential target for novel antidepressant treatments. The aim of this review is to analyze the current body of research assessing the effects of probiotics, on symptoms of depression in humans. Methods A systematic search of five databases was performed and study selection was completed using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses process. Results Ten studies met criteria and were analyzed for effects on mood, anxiety, and cognition. Five studies assessed mood symptoms, seven studies assessed anxiety symptoms, and three studies assessed cognition. The majority of the studies found positive results on all measures of depressive symptoms; however, the strain of probiotic, the dosing, and duration of treatment varied widely and no studies assessed sleep. Conclusion The evidence for probiotics alleviating depressive symptoms is compelling but additional double-blind randomized control trials in clinical populations are warranted to further assess efficacy.

  9. A systematic review of interventions for anxiety, depression, and PTSD in adult offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh-Hunt, Nicholas; Perry, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    There is a high prevalence of anxiety and depression in offender populations but with no recent systematic review of interventions to identify what is effective. This systematic review was undertaken to identify randomised controlled trials of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in adult offenders in prison or community settings. A search of five databases identified 14 studies meeting inclusion criteria, which considered the impact of psychological interventions, pharmacological agents, or exercise on levels of depression and anxiety. A narrative synthesis was undertaken and Hedges g effect sizes calculated to allow comparison between studies. Effect sizes for depression interventions ranged from 0.17 to 1.41, for anxiety 0.61 to 0.71 and for posttraumatic stress disorder 0 to 1.41. Cognitive behavioural therapy interventions for the reduction of depression and anxiety in adult offenders appear effective in the short term, though a large-scale trial of sufficient duration is needed to confirm this finding. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Social determinants of depression and suicidal behaviour in the Caribbean: a systematic review

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    Catherine R Brown

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorder is the largest contributor to years lived with disability in the Caribbean, adding 948 per 100,000 in 2013. Depression is also a major risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Social inequalities influence the occurrence of depression, yet little is known about the social inequalities of this condition in the Caribbean. In support of the 2011 Rio Political Declaration on addressing health inequities, this article presents a systematic review of the role of social determinants on depression and its suicidal behaviours in the Caribbean. Methods Eight databases were searched for observational studies reporting associations between social determinants and depression frequency, severity, or outcomes. Based on the PROGRESS-plus checklist, we considered 9 social determinant groups (of 15 endpoints for 6 depression endpoints, totalling 90 possible ways (‘relationship groups’ to explore the role of social determinants on depression. Studies with ≥50 participants conducted in Caribbean territories between 2004 and 2014 were eligible. The review was conducted according to STROBE and PRISMA guidelines. Results were planned as a narrative synthesis, with meta-analysis if possible. Results From 3951 citations, 55 articles from 45 studies were included. Most were classified as serious risk of bias. Fifty-seven relationship groups were reported by the 55 included articles, leaving 33 relationship groups (37% without an evidence base. Most associations were reported for gender, age, residence, marital status, and education. Depression, its severity, and its outcomes were more common among females (except suicide which was more common among males, early and middle adolescents (among youth, and those with lower levels of education. Marriage emerged as both a risk and protective factor for depression score and prevalence, while several inequality relationships in Haiti were in contrast to typical trends. Conclusion The risk

  11. Sexual minority youth and depressive symptoms or depressive disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Mathijs Fg; Stasiak, Karolina; Samra, Rajvinder; Frampton, Christopher Ma; Merry, Sally N

    2017-08-01

    Research has suggested that sexual minority young people are more likely to have depressive symptoms or depressive disorder, but to date most studies in the field have relied on convenience-based samples. This study overcomes this limitation by systematically reviewing the literature from population-based studies and conducting a meta-analysis to identify whether depressive disorder and depressive symptoms are elevated in sexual minority youth. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted and informed by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement to determine if rates of depressive symptoms or depressive disorder differ for sexual minority youth, relative to heterosexual adolescents. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE and ERIC databases were searched. Studies reporting depressive symptom data or the prevalence of depressive disorder in population-based samples of adolescents, which included sexual minority youth and heterosexual young people, were included in the review. A meta-analysis was conducted to examine differences between groups. Twenty-three articles met the inclusion criteria. The proportion of sexual minority youth in the studies ranged from 2.3% to 12%. Sexual minority youth reported higher rates of depressive symptoms and depressive disorder (odds ratio = 2.94, p depressive symptoms when compared to male sexual minority youth (standardized mean difference, d = 0.34, p depressive symptoms or depressive disorder was measured. There is robust evidence that rates of depressive disorder and depressive symptoms are elevated in sexual minority youth in comparison to heterosexual young people. Despite the elevated risk of depressive symptoms or depressive disorder for sexual minority youth, the treatment for this group of young people has received little attention.

  12. A systematic review including meta-analysis of work environment and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theorell, Töres; Hammarström, Anne; Aronsson, Gunnar; Träskman Bendz, Lil; Grape, Tom; Hogstedt, Christer; Marteinsdottir, Ina; Skoog, Ingmar; Hall, Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    Depressive symptoms are potential outcomes of poorly functioning work environments. Such symptoms are frequent and cause considerable suffering for the employees as well as financial loss for the employers. Accordingly good prospective studies of psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms are valuable. Scientific reviews of such studies have pointed at methodological difficulties but still established a few job risk factors. Those reviews were published some years ago. There is need for an updated systematic review using the GRADE system. In addition, gender related questions have been insufficiently reviewed. Inclusion criteria for the studies published 1990 to June 2013: 1. European and English speaking countries. 2. Quantified results describing the relationship between exposure (psychosocial or physical/chemical) and outcome (standardized questionnaire assessment of depressive symptoms or interview-based clinical depression). 3. Prospective or comparable case-control design with at least 100 participants. 4. Assessments of exposure (working conditions) and outcome at baseline and outcome (depressive symptoms) once again after follow-up 1-5 years later. 5. Adjustment for age and adjustment or stratification for gender. Studies filling inclusion criteria were subjected to assessment of 1.) relevance and 2.) quality using predefined criteria. Systematic review of the evidence was made using the GRADE system. When applicable, meta-analysis of the magnitude of associations was made. Consistency of findings was examined for a number of possible confounders and publication bias was discussed. Fifty-nine articles of high or medium high scientific quality were included. Moderately strong evidence (grade three out of four) was found for job strain (high psychological demands and low decision latitude), low decision latitude and bullying having significant impact on development of depressive symptoms. Limited evidence (grade two) was shown for psychological

  13. Psychological Predictors of Anxiety and Depression in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlovsky, Jack K; Overton, Paul G; Simpson, Jane

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, affecting the motor system with psychological difficulties also frequently reported. While explanations for psychological difficulties are historically situated within a biomedical framework, more recently the relevance of psychological determinants has become a research focus. This review therefore examines this relationship with the two most commonly reported psychological difficulties (anxiety and depression) in people with PD. Databases were systematically searched up to December 17, 2013, identifying 24 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Significant predictors of heightened anxiety and depression included increased emotion-focused coping; less problem-focused coping; lower perceived control; more dominant beliefs about PD as part of a person's identity and influence on life; less social support and more avoidant personality types. Relationships between some specific psychological predictors and depression and anxiety seem well supported. The complexity of relationships between these psychological determinants should be taken into consideration when delivering psychological interventions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Depression in Women with Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review of Cross-Sectional Studies in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Azar; Goudarzian, Amir Hossein; Bagheri Nesami, Masoumeh

    2018-01-27

    Objective: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women and has more severe mental and emotional effects than other types. Depression as a mental disorder affects people’s mental well-being, physical symptoms, occupational performance, and finally quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine depression levels in Iranian women with breast cancer. Methods: A systematic review study was conducted in 2017. English and Persian databases (PubMed, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, SID, Magiran) were searched with key words such as Depression Or Depressive Disorders AND Women AND Breast Cancer OR Tumor OR Neoplasm OR Malignancy AND Iran. Inclusion criteria allowed for cross-sectional studies conducted in Iran (published in English or Persian language journals), studies that had key words in their keywords or their titles and standard instruments for measuring depression in patients. Of the 160 publications found, eight were selected after reviewing the title, abstract and full article. Results: Age of women with breast cancer in selected studies ranged from 43.8 (SD = 47.1) to 55.9 (SD = 14.6) years. Duration of cancer in most studies was about 1-2 years. In most studies, mild levels of depression for women with breast cancer were present. However, in one study it was stated that 69.4% of participants had serious levels of depression. Conclusions: There is increase in the risk of depression in women with breast cancer. Therefore, it seems necessary to plan preventive and therapeutic measures in order to improve the mental health and quality of life of the affected patients. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Light therapy for non-seasonal depression: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Stefan; Eisen, Rebecca; Bhatt, Meha; Bhatnagar, Neera; de Souza, Russell; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2016-03-01

    Light therapy is a known treatment for patients with seasonal affective disorder. However, the efficacy of light therapy in treating patients with non-seasonal depression remains inconclusive. To provide the current state of evidence for efficacy of light therapy in non-seasonal depressive disorders. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and CENTRAL from their inception to September 2015. Study selection, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment were independently conducted in duplicate. Meta-analyses were performed to provide a summary statistic for the included RCTs. The reporting of this systematic review follows the PRISMA guidelines. A meta-analysis including 881 participants from 20 RCTs demonstrated a beneficial effect of light therapy in non-seasonal depression (standardised mean difference in depression score -0.41 (95% CI -0.64 to -0.18)). This estimate was associated with significant heterogeneity ( I 2 =60%, P =0.0003) that was not sufficiently explained by subgroup analyses. There was also high risk of bias in the included trials limiting the study interpretation. The overall quality of evidence is poor due to high risk of bias and inconsistency. However, considering that light therapy has minimal side-effects and our meta-analysis demonstrated that a significant proportion of patients achieved a clinically significant response, light therapy may be effective for patients with non-seasonal depression and can be a helpful additional therapeutic intervention for depression. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  16. Effect of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea on depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Povitz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and decreased quality of life. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP or mandibular advancement devices (MADs is effective for many symptoms of OSA. However, it remains controversial whether treatment with CPAP or MAD also improves depressive symptoms. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that examined the effect of CPAP or MADs on depressive symptoms in patients with OSA. We searched Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, and PsycINFO from the inception of the databases until August 15, 2014, for relevant articles. In a random effects meta-analysis of 19 identified trials, CPAP treatment resulted in an improvement in depressive symptoms compared to control, but with significant heterogeneity between trials (Q statistic, p<0.001; I(2 = 71.3%, 95% CI: 54%, 82%. CPAP treatment resulted in significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms in the two trials with a higher burden of depression at baseline (meta-regression, p<0.001. The pooled standardized mean difference (SMD in depressive symptoms with CPAP treatment in these two trial populations with baseline depression was 2.004 (95% CI: 1.387, 2.621, compared to 0.197 (95% CI: 0.059, 0.334 for 15 trials of populations without depression at baseline. Pooled estimates of the treatment effect of CPAP were greater in parallel arm trials than in crossover trials (meta-regression, p = 0.076. Random effects meta-analysis of five trials of MADs showed a significant improvement in depressive symptoms with MADs versus controls: SMD = 0.214 (95% CI: 0.026, 0.401 without significant heterogeneity (I(2 = 0%, 95% CI: 0%, 79%. Studies were limited by the use of depressive symptom scales that have not been validated specifically in people with OSA. CONCLUSIONS: CPAP and MADs may be useful

  17. The Relationship Between Online Social Networking and Depression: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David A; Algorta, Guillermo Perez

    2016-11-01

    Online social networking sites (SNSs) such as Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace are used by billions of people every day to communicate and interact with others. There has been increasing interest in the potential impact of online social networking on wellbeing, with a broadening body of new research into factors associated with both positive and negative mental health outcomes such as depression. This systematic review of empirical studies (n = 30) adds to existing research in this field by examining current quantitative studies focused on the relationship between online social networking and symptoms of depression. The academic databases PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched systematically using terms related to online social networking and depression. Reporting quality was critically appraised and the findings discussed with reference to their wider implications. The findings suggest that the relationship between online social networking and symptoms of depression may be complex and associated with multiple psychological, social, behavioral, and individual factors. Furthermore, the impact of online social networking on wellbeing may be both positive and negative, highlighting the need for future research to determine the impact of candidate mediators and moderators underlying these heterogeneous outcomes across evolving networks.

  18. Stress, burnout and depression: A systematic review on DNA methylation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakusic, Jelena; Schaufeli, Wilmar; Claes, Stephan; Godderis, Lode

    2017-01-01

    Despite that burnout presents a serious burden for modern society, there are no diagnostic criteria. Additional difficulty is the differential diagnosis with depression. Consequently, there is a need to dispose of a burnout biomarker. Epigenetic studies suggest that DNA methylation is a possible mediator linking individual response to stress and psychopathology and could be considered as a potential biomarker of stress-related mental disorders. Thus, the aim of this review is to provide an overview of DNA methylation mechanisms in stress, burnout and depression. In addition to state-of-the-art overview, the goal of this review is to provide a scientific base for burnout biomarker research. We performed a systematic literature search and identified 25 pertinent articles. Among these, 15 focused on depression, 7 on chronic stress and only 3 on work stress/burnout. Three epigenome-wide studies were identified and the majority of studies used the candidate-gene approach, assessing 12 different genes. The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) displayed different methylation patterns in chronic stress and depression. The serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) methylation was similarly affected in stress, depression and burnout. Work-related stress and depressive symptoms were associated with different methylation patterns of the brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) in the same human sample. The tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) methylation was correlated with work stress in a single study. Additional, thoroughly designed longitudinal studies are necessary for revealing the cause-effect relationship of work stress, epigenetics and burnout, including its overlap with depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Working hours and the onset of depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Kotaro; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-12-01

    : This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to examine whether working beyond the standard working hours was associated with a greater risk of depressive disorder among workers included in published prospective studies. This manuscript was prepared according to the PRISMA guideline checklist. A database search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed), PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES using a relevant set of keywords. The eligibility criteria were as follows: (1) participants were adult workers; (2) exposure was defined as overtime work; (3) outcome were depressive disorders clinically diagnosed or assessed by a structured interview and (4) the study design was prospective or cohort. 7 studies were identified in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Overtime work was associated with a small, non-significant, elevated risk of depressive disorder (pooled relative risk=1.075; 95% CI 0.834 to 1.387; p=0.575) in a random effects model. The association tended to be greater for women. The risk of working 50 or more hours per week was slightly but not significantly increased (pooled relative risk=1.241; 95% CI 0.880 to 1.750; p=0.218). The effect of overtime work on depressive disorder remains inconclusive and may be small if not negligible. Sex differences and the effect of longer working hours on depressive disorder should be addressed in the future. Prospero CRD42015020003; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Depression and anxiety among left-behind children in China: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J; Sun, Y-H

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to systematically review evidence of the prevalence and predictors of depression and anxiety among 'left-behind children' in rural China. The electronic databases PubMed/MEDLINE and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure/Wanfang (Chinese) were utilized to search for terms including 'depression' or 'depressive disorder', 'anxiety' or 'mental health', combined with 'left behind', 'children' and 'China'. High rates of psychological depression/anxiety have been reported among left-behind children compared with their age-matched peers. Prevalence rates of depression are reported to range from 12.1 to 51.4% and of anxiety are reported to range from 13.2 to 57.6%. Variability between studies is likely attributable to methodological variations relating to measures used and research setting. Potential predictors measured in studies include age and gender, types of being left, age/years of separation, socio-economic status, etc. These high rates of reported psychological problems among this group of young people suggest the need to develop more effective approaches to prevention and management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Magnetic Seizure Therapy for Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Cretaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST is a novel, experimental therapeutic intervention, which combines therapeutic aspects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and transcranial magnetic stimulation, in order to achieve the efficacy of the former with the safety of the latter. MST might prove to be a valuable tool in the treatment of mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar disorder. Our aim is to review current literature on MST. Methods. OVID and MEDLINE databases were used to systematically search for clinical studies on MST. The terms “magnetic seizure therapy,” “depression,” and “bipolar” were employed. Results. Out of 74 studies, 8 met eligibility criteria. There was considerable variability in the methods employed and samples sizes were small, limiting the generalization of the results. All studies focused on depressive episodes, but few included patients with bipolar disorder. The studies found reported significant antidepressant effects, with remission rates ranging from 30% to 40%. No significant cognitive side effects related to MST were found, with a better cognitive profile when compared to ECT. Conclusion. MST was effective in reducing depressive symptoms in mood disorders, with generally less side effects than ECT. No study focused on comparing MST to ECT on bipolar depression specifically.

  2. The Role of Positive Emotion and Contributions of Positive Psychology in Depression Treatment: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Veruska; Paes, Flavia; Pereira, Valeska; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to conduct a systematic review of the literature by checking the impact of positive emotion in the treatment of depression and on the use of strategies of positive psychology which involves positive emotion to treat and reduce symptoms of depression. For this purpose, we conducted searches in databases ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO and PubMed and found a total of 3400 studies. After inclusion application and exclusion criteria, 28 articles remained, presented and discussed in this study. The studies have important relations between humor and positive emotion as well as a significant improvement in signs and symptoms of depression using differents strategies of positive psychology. Another relevant aspect is the preventative character of the proposed interventions by positive psychology by the fact that increase well-being and produce elements such as resilience and coping resources that reduce the recurrent relapses in the treatment of depression. The strategies of positive psychology, such as increasing positive emotions, develop personal strengths: seeking direction, meaning and engagement for the day-to-day life of the patients, appear as potentially tools for the prophylaxis and treatment of depression, helping to reduce signs and symptoms as well as for prevention of relapses. PMID:24358052

  3. [Anxiety, Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Refugees - A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Jutta; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S; Wehrwein, Annette; Brähler, Elmar; Schäfer, Ingo

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder are the main psychopathological symptoms shown by refugees. We conducted a systematic review. First, we identified key-words for a systematic search in PUBMED. We included original articles since 2009 with 1) a non-clinical sample of refugees, 2) refugees living at maximum 5 years in the host country, 4) with the outcomes anxiety, depression, and PTSD and 5) a sample with >100 participants. Then we read titles, abstracts and fulltexts. We identified 1 877 studies. Based on this screening procedure, we included in our review 15 studies. 52% of the refugees are from Africa (Somalia, Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra-Leon and Togo), 33% from Asia (Syria, Bhutan, Vietnam, Cambodia, Iraq) and 16% are from more than one continent. In those studies n=6 769 refugees participated in the studies. The number of participants varied from n=117 to n=1,422 (Median: n=366 refugees). Prevalence rates for PTBS varied from 5-71% (mean prevalence rate: 32%) rates for depression varied from 11-54% (mean prevalence rate: 35%). Sensitivity analyses suggest that refugees, which come from countries with intense human rights violations according to the Political Terror Scale, have an increased rate of psychopathological symptoms. Heterogeneity of prevalence rate is related both 1) to methodological and 2) to difference in the refugee populations according to the human rights violations in the countries of origin of refugees. It is necessary to include further databases in a systematic review. There is an urgent need for representative studies on refugees needs for psychosocial and medical care, especially for those refugees coming from countries with intense human rights violations. Psychosocial and medical services for these refugees are urgently needed to enhance and enable a perspective in the host country Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Depression Case Finding in Individuals with Dementia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Zahra S; Mele, Bria S; Roberts, Derek J; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna

    2017-05-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of depression case finding tools with a criterion standard in the outpatient setting among adults with dementia. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies of older outpatients with dementia. Elderly outpatients (clinic and long-term care) with dementia (N = 3,035). Prevalence of major depression and diagnostic accuracy measures including sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. From the 11,539 citations, 20 studies were included for qualitative synthesis and 15 for a meta-analysis. Tools included were the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Single Question, Nijmegen Observer-Rated Depression Scale, and Even Briefer Assessment Scale-Depression. The pooled prevalence of depression in individuals with dementia was 30.3% (95% CI = 22.1-38.5). The average age was 75.2 (95% CI = 71.7-78.7), and mean Mini-Mental State Examination scores ranged from 11.2 to 24. The diagnostic accuracy of the individual tools was pooled for the best-reported cutoffs and for each cutoff, if available. The CSDD had a sensitivity of 0.84 (95% CI = 0.73-0.91) and a specificity of 0.80 (95% CI = 0.65-0.90), the 30-item GDS (GDS-30) had a sensitivity of 0.62 (95% CI = 0.45-0.76) and a specificity 0.81 (95% CI = 0.75-0.85), and the HDRS had a sensitivity of 0.86 (95% CI = 0.63-0.96) and a specificity of 0.84 (95% CI = 0.76-0.90). Summary statistics for all tools across best-reported cutoffs had significant heterogeneity. There are many validated tools for the detection of depression in individuals with dementia. Tools that incorporate a physician interview with patient and collateral histories, the CSDD and HDRS, have higher sensitivities, which would ensure fewer false-negatives. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics

  5. A Systematic Review of Depression and Anxiety in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: The Mind-Heart Link

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Dimpi; Mc Conkey, Nathaniel D.; Sohaney, Ryann; Mc Neil, Ashley; Jedrzejczyk, Andy; Armaganijan, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly seen arrhythmia in clinical practice. At present, few studies have been conducted centering on depression and anxiety in AF patients. Our aim in this systematic review is to use the relevant literature to (1) describe the prevalence of depression and anxiety in AF patients, (2) assess the impact that depression and anxiety have on illness perception in patients with AF, (3) provide evidence to support a hypothetical connection between the pathophy...

  6. How is depression experienced around the world? A systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroz, E E; Ritchey, M; Bass, J K; Kohrt, B A; Augustinavicius, J; Michalopoulos, L; Burkey, M D; Bolton, P

    2017-06-01

    To date global research on depression has used assessment tools based on research and clinical experience drawn from Western populations (i.e., in North American, European and Australian). There may be features of depression in non-Western populations which are not captured in current diagnostic criteria or measurement tools, as well as criteria for depression that are not relevant in other regions. We investigated this possibility through a systematic review of qualitative studies of depression worldwide. Nine online databases were searched for records that used qualitative methods to study depression. Initial searches were conducted between August 2012 and December 2012; an updated search was repeated in June of 2015 to include relevant literature published between December 30, 2012 and May 30, 2015. No date limits were set for inclusion of articles. A total of 16,130 records were identified and 138 met full inclusion criteria. Included studies were published between 1976 and 2015. These 138 studies represented data on 170 different study populations (some reported on multiple samples) and 77 different nationalities/ethnicities. Variation in results by geographical region, gender, and study context were examined to determine the consistency of descriptions across populations. Fisher's exact tests were used to compare frequencies of features across region, gender and context. Seven of the 15 features with the highest relative frequency form part of the DSM-5 diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, many of the other features with relatively high frequencies across the studies are associated features in the DSM, but are not prioritized as diagnostic criteria and therefore not included in standard instruments. The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria of problems with concentration and psychomotor agitation or slowing were infrequently mentioned. This research suggests that the DSM model and standard instruments currently based on the DSM may not adequately

  7. Problematic smartphone use: A conceptual overview and systematic review of relations with anxiety and depression psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhai, Jon D; Dvorak, Robert D; Levine, Jason C; Hall, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    Research literature on problematic smartphone use, or smartphone addiction, has proliferated. However, relationships with existing categories of psychopathology are not well defined. We discuss the concept of problematic smartphone use, including possible causal pathways to such use. We conducted a systematic review of the relationship between problematic use with psychopathology. Using scholarly bibliographic databases, we screened 117 total citations, resulting in 23 peer-reviewer papers examining statistical relations between standardized measures of problematic smartphone use/use severity and the severity of psychopathology. Most papers examined problematic use in relation to depression, anxiety, chronic stress and/or low self-esteem. Across this literature, without statistically adjusting for other relevant variables, depression severity was consistently related to problematic smartphone use, demonstrating at least medium effect sizes. Anxiety was also consistently related to problem use, but with small effect sizes. Stress was somewhat consistently related, with small to medium effects. Self-esteem was inconsistently related, with small to medium effects when found. Statistically adjusting for other relevant variables yielded similar but somewhat smaller effects. We only included correlational studies in our systematic review, but address the few relevant experimental studies also. We discuss causal explanations for relationships between problem smartphone use and psychopathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. User Acceptance of Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Theresia; Stein, Janine; Löbner, Margrit; Kersting, Anette; Luck-Sikorski, Claudia; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2017-09-13

    Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (cCBT) has been proven to be effective in depression care. Moreover, cCBT packages are becoming increasingly popular. A central aspect concerning the take-up and success of any treatment is its user acceptance. The aim of this study was to update and expand on earlier work on user acceptance of cCBT for depression. This paper systematically reviewed quantitative and qualitative studies regarding the user acceptance of cCBT for depression. The initial search was conducted in January 2016 and involved the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO. Studies were retained if they described the explicit examination of the user acceptance, experiences, or satisfaction related to a cCBT intervention, if they reported depression as a primary outcome, and if they were published in German or English from July 2007 onward. A total of 1736 studies were identified, of which 29 studies were eligible for review. User acceptance was operationalized and analyzed very heterogeneously. Eight studies reported a very high level of acceptance, 17 indicated a high level of acceptance, and one study showed a moderate level of acceptance. Two qualitative studies considered the positive and negative aspects concerning the user acceptance of cCBT. However, a substantial proportion of reviewed studies revealed several methodical shortcomings. In general, people experience cCBT for depression as predominantly positive, which supports the potential role of these innovative treatments. However, methodological challenges do exist in terms of defining user acceptance, clear operationalization of concepts, and measurement. ©Theresia Rost, Janine Stein, Margrit Löbner, Anette Kersting, Claudia Luck-Sikorski, Steffi G Riedel-Heller. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 13.09.2017.

  9. Biological and Psychosocial Predictors of Postpartum Depression: Systematic Review and Call for Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner Stapleton, Lynlee R.; Guardino, Christine M.; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer; Schetter, Christine Dunkel

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) adversely affects the health and well being of many new mothers, their infants, and their families. A comprehensive understanding of biopsychosocial precursors to PPD is needed to solidify the current evidence base for best practices in translation. We conducted a systematic review of research published from 2000 through 2013 on biological and psychosocial factors associated with PPD and postpartum depressive symptoms. Two hundred fourteen publications based on 199 investigations of 151,651 women in the first postpartum year met inclusion criteria. The biological and psychosocial literatures are largely distinct, and few studies provide integrative analyses. The strongest PPD risk predictors among biological processes are hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal dysregulation, inflammatory processes, and genetic vulnerabilities. Among psychosocial factors, the strongest predictors are severe life events, some forms of chronic strain, relationship quality, and support from partner and mother. Fully integrated biopsychosocial investigations with large samples are needed to advance our knowledge of PPD etiology. PMID:25822344

  10. Game-based digital interventions for depression therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Theng, Yin-Leng; Foo, Schubert

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the existing literature on game-based digital interventions for depression systematically and examine their effectiveness through a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Database searching was conducted using specific search terms and inclusion criteria. A standard meta-analysis was also conducted of available RCT studies with a random effects model. The standard mean difference (Cohen's d) was used to calculate the effect size of each study. Nineteen studies were included in the review, and 10 RCTs (eight studies) were included in the meta-analysis. Four types of game interventions-psycho-education and training, virtual reality exposure therapy, exercising, and entertainment-were identified, with various types of support delivered and populations targeted. The meta-analysis revealed a moderate effect size of the game interventions for depression therapy at posttreatment (d=-0.47 [95% CI -0.69 to -0.24]). A subgroup analysis showed that interventions based on psycho-education and training had a smaller effect than those based on the other forms, and that self-help interventions yielded better outcomes than supported interventions. A higher effect was achieved when a waiting list was used as the control. The review and meta-analysis support the effectiveness of game-based digital interventions for depression. More large-scale, high-quality RCT studies with sufficient long-term data for treatment evaluation are needed.

  11. Measurement properties of depression questionnaires in patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Susan E M; Adriaanse, Marcel C; van der Zwaan, Lennart; Bosmans, Judith E; van Marwijk, Harm W J; van Tulder, Maurits W; Terwee, Caroline B

    2018-06-01

    To conduct a systematic review on measurement properties of questionnaires measuring depressive symptoms in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. A systematic review of the literature in MEDLINE, EMbase and PsycINFO was performed. Full text, original articles, published in any language up to October 2016 were included. Eligibility for inclusion was independently assessed by three reviewers who worked in pairs. Methodological quality of the studies was evaluated by two independent reviewers using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. Quality of the questionnaires was rated per measurement property, based on the number and quality of the included studies and the reported results. Of 6286 unique hits, 21 studies met our criteria evaluating nine different questionnaires in multiple settings and languages. The methodological quality of the included studies was variable for the different measurement properties: 9/15 studies scored 'good' or 'excellent' on internal consistency, 2/5 on reliability, 0/1 on content validity, 10/10 on structural validity, 8/11 on hypothesis testing, 1/5 on cross-cultural validity, and 4/9 on criterion validity. For the CES-D, there was strong evidence for good internal consistency, structural validity, and construct validity; moderate evidence for good criterion validity; and limited evidence for good cross-cultural validity. The PHQ-9 and WHO-5 also performed well on several measurement properties. However, the evidence for structural validity of the PHQ-9 was inconclusive. The WHO-5 was less extensively researched and originally not developed to measure depression. Currently, the CES-D is best supported for measuring depressive symptoms in diabetes patients.

  12. The effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic pain with depression: A systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziyi; Zhao, Ling; Xie, Xianze; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Yutong; Wang, Xing; Du, Jiarong; Wang, Ziwen; Zhou, Mengyuan; Li, Ying; Zhou, Siyuan

    2017-11-01

    Chronic pain is a major public health problem and 30% to 45% of sufferers experience severe depression. Acupuncture is often used to treat both depression and a range of pain disorders. We aim to conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for patients experiencing chronic pain with depression. To identify relevant RCTs, the following databases will be searched electronically from their inception to July 1, 2017: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Chinese medical databases, and others. Manual retrieval will also be conducted. RCTs that evaluated acupuncture as the sole or adjunct treatment for patients with chronic pain and depression will be included. The primary outcomes will be based on a visual analog pain measurement scale and the Hamilton Depression Scale. The secondary outcomes will include scores on a numerical rating scale, verbal rating scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The study selection, data extraction, and study quality evaluation will be performed independently by 2 researchers. If the data permit, meta-analysis will be performed using RevMan V5.3 statistical software. If the data are not appropriate for meta-analysis, descriptive analysis or subgroup analysis will be conducted. The methodological quality of the included trials will be assessed using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture checklist. This study will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence of acupuncture for chronic pain with depression from several scales including visual analog pain measurement scale, the Hamilton Depression Scale, a numerical rating scale, verbal rating scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The conclusion of our study will provide

  13. What are the barriers and facilitators to implementing Collaborative Care for depression? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Emily; Ohlsen, Sally; Ricketts, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Collaborative Care is an evidence-based approach to the management of depression within primary care services recommended within NICE Guidance. However, uptake within the UK has been limited. This review aims to investigate the barriers and facilitators to implementing Collaborative Care. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to uncover what barriers and facilitators have been reported by previous research into Collaborative Care for depression in primary care. The review identified barriers and facilitators to successful implementation of Collaborative Care for depression in 18 studies across a range of settings. A framework analysis was applied using the Collaborative Care definition. The most commonly reported barriers related to the multi-professional approach, such as staff and organisational attitudes to integration, and poor inter-professional communication. Facilitators to successful implementation particularly focussed on improving inter-professional communication through standardised care pathways and case managers with clear role boundaries and key underpinning personal qualities. Not all papers were independent title and abstract screened by multiple reviewers thus limiting the reliability of the selected studies. There are many different frameworks for assessing the quality of qualitative research and little consensus as to which is most appropriate in what circumstances. The use of a quality threshold led to the exclusion of six papers that could have included further information on barriers and facilitators. Although the evidence base for Collaborative Care is strong, and the population within primary care with depression is large, the preferred way to implement the approach has not been identified. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recognition and management of perinatal depression and anxiety by general practitioners: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Elizabeth; Shakespeare, Judy; Elias, Fatin; Ayers, Susan

    2017-02-01

    Perinatal anxiety and depression are widespread, with up to 20% of women affected during pregnancy and after birth. In the UK, management of perinatal mental health falls under the remit of general practitioners (GPs). We reviewed the literature on GPs' routine recognition, diagnosis and management of anxiety and depression in the perinatal period. A systematic search of Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science was conducted. Studies were eligible if they reported quantitative measures of GPs' or Family Physicians' assessment, recognition and management of anxiety or depression in pregnancy or post-partum. Thirteen papers, reporting 10 studies, were identified from the United States, Australia, UK, Netherlands and Canada. All reported on depression; two included anxiety disorders. Reported awareness and ability to diagnose perinatal depression among GPs was high. GPs knew about and used screening tools in the UK but less so in US settings. Antidepressants were the first line of treatment, with various SSRIs considered safest. Counseling by GPs and referrals to specialists were common in the post-natal period, less so in pregnancy. Treatment choices were determined by resources, attitudes, knowledge and training. Data on GPs' awareness and management of perinatal depression were sparse and unlikely to be generalizable. Future directions for research are proposed; such as exploring the management of anxiety disorders which are largely missing from the literature, and understanding more about barriers to disclosure and recognition in primary care. More standardized training could help to improve recognition and management practices. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Post-partum depressive symptoms and medically assisted conception: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, F; Letranchant, A; Cazas, O; Sutter-Dallay, A L; Falissard, B; Hardy, P

    2015-11-01

    Does medically assisted conception increase the risk of post-partum depressive symptoms? Our literature review and meta-analysis showed no increased risk of post-partum depressive symptoms in women after medically assisted conception. Women who conceive with medically assisted conception, which can be considered as a stressful life event, could face an increased risk of depressive symptoms. However, no previous meta-analysis has been performed on the association between medically assisted conception and post-partum depressive symptoms. A systematic review with electronic searches of PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and PsycINFO databases up to December 2014 was conducted to identify articles evaluating post-partum depressive symptoms in women who had benefited from medically assisted conception compared with those with a spontaneous pregnancy. Meta-analyses were also performed on clinically significant post-partum depressive symptoms according to PRISMA guidelines. From 569 references, 492 were excluded on title, 42 on abstract and 17 others on full-text. Therefore, 18 studies were included in the review and 8 in the meta-analysis (2451 women) on clinically significant post-partum depressive symptoms after medically assisted conception compared with a spontaneous pregnancy. A sensitivity meta-analysis on assisted reproductive technologies and spontaneous pregnancy (6 studies, 1773 women) was also performed. The quality of the studies included in the meta-analyses was evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Statement for observational research. The data were pooled using RevMan software by the Cochrane Collaboration. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed from the results of the χ(2) and I(2) statistics. Biases were assessed with funnel plots and Egger's test. A fixed effects model was used for the meta-analyses because of the low level of heterogeneity between the studies. The systematic review of studies examining

  16. Vitamin D and depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing studies with and without biological flaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedding, Simon

    2014-04-11

    Efficacy of Vitamin D supplements in depression is controversial, awaiting further literature analysis. Biological flaws in primary studies is a possible reason meta-analyses of Vitamin D have failed to demonstrate efficacy. This systematic review and meta-analysis of Vitamin D and depression compared studies with and without biological flaws. The systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The literature search was undertaken through four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies were critically appraised for methodological quality and biological flaws, in relation to the hypothesis and study design. Meta-analyses were performed for studies according to the presence of biological flaws. The 15 RCTs identified provide a more comprehensive evidence-base than previous systematic reviews; methodological quality of studies was generally good and methodology was diverse. A meta-analysis of all studies without flaws demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in depression with Vitamin D supplements (+0.78 CI +0.24, +1.27). Studies with biological flaws were mainly inconclusive, with the meta-analysis demonstrating a statistically significant worsening in depression by taking Vitamin D supplements (-1.1 CI -0.7, -1.5). Vitamin D supplementation (≥800 I.U. daily) was somewhat favorable in the management of depression in studies that demonstrate a change in vitamin levels, and the effect size was comparable to that of anti-depressant medication.

  17. Vitamin D and Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Comparing Studies with and without Biological Flaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Spedding

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of Vitamin D supplements in depression is controversial, awaiting further literature analysis. Biological flaws in primary studies is a possible reason meta-analyses of Vitamin D have failed to demonstrate efficacy. This systematic review and meta-analysis of Vitamin D and depression compared studies with and without biological flaws. The systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines. The literature search was undertaken through four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Studies were critically appraised for methodological quality and biological flaws, in relation to the hypothesis and study design. Meta-analyses were performed for studies according to the presence of biological flaws. The 15 RCTs identified provide a more comprehensive evidence-base than previous systematic reviews; methodological quality of studies was generally good and methodology was diverse. A meta-analysis of all studies without flaws demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in depression with Vitamin D supplements (+0.78 CI +0.24, +1.27. Studies with biological flaws were mainly inconclusive, with the meta-analysis demonstrating a statistically significant worsening in depression by taking Vitamin D supplements (−1.1 CI −0.7, −1.5. Vitamin D supplementation (≥800 I.U. daily was somewhat favorable in the management of depression in studies that demonstrate a change in vitamin levels, and the effect size was comparable to that of anti-depressant medication.

  18. Treatment of cannabis use among people with psychotic or depressive disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Amanda L; Hides, Leanne; Lubman, Dan I

    2010-03-01

    This article systematically reviews the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for pharmacologic and psychological approaches to the treatment of cannabis use among individuals with psychotic or depressive disorders. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed and PsychINFO databases from inception to December 2008. Individual searches in cannabis use (search terms: marijuana, cannabis, marijuana abuse, cannabis abuse, marijuana usage, cannabis usage), mental disorders (search terms: mood disorders, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, anxiety, depressive disorder, depression, psychotic disorders, psychosis, mental disorders), and pharmacotherapy (search terms: medication, drug therapy, pharmacotherapy, psychopharmacology, clinical trials, drug trial, treatment trial) were conducted and limited to humans, adolescents and adults. A search combining the individual cannabis use, mental disorder and pharmacotherapy searches produced 1,713 articles (PubMed = 1,398; PsychINFO = 315). Combining the cannabis use and mental disorder searches while limiting them to English articles and RCTs produced a total of 286 articles (PubMed = 228; PsychINFO = 58). From this literature, there were 7 RCTs conducted among mental health clients that reported cannabis use outcomes using pharmacologic or psychological interventions. While few RCTs have been conducted, there is evidence that pharmacologic and psychological interventions are effective for reducing cannabis use in the short-term among people with psychotic disorders or depression. Although it is difficult to make evidence-based treatment recommendations due to the paucity of research in this area, available studies indicate that effectively treating the mental health disorder with standard pharmacotherapy may be associated with a reduction in cannabis use and that longer or more intensive psychological interventions rather than brief interventions may be required, particularly among heavier

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy in the continuation and maintenance treatment of depression: Systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Alby; Phutane, Vivek H; Clarke, Sandy; Prudic, Joan

    2018-05-01

    Acute course of electroconvulsive therapy is effective in inducing remission from depression, but recurrence rate is unacceptably high following termination of electroconvulsive therapy despite continued pharmacotherapy. Continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy have been studied for their efficacy in preventing relapse and recurrence of depression. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the efficacy of continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in preventing relapse and recurrence of depression in comparison to antidepressant pharmacotherapy alone. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, clinicaltrials.gov and Cochrane register of controlled trials from the database inception to December 2016 without restriction on language or publication status for randomized trials of continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy. Two independent Cochrane reviewers extracted the data in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The risk of bias was assessed using four domains of the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool. Outcomes were pooled using random effect model. The primary outcome was relapse or recurrence of depression. Five studies involving 436 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Analysis of the pooled data showed that continuation electroconvulsive therapy and maintenance electroconvulsive therapy, both with pharmacotherapy, were associated with significantly fewer relapses and recurrences than pharmacotherapy alone at 6 months and 1 year after a successful acute course of electroconvulsive therapy (risk ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = [0.41, 0.98], p = 0.04, risk ratio = 0.46, 95% confidence interval = [0.21, 0.98], p = 0.05, respectively). There was insufficient data to perform a meta-analysis of stand

  20. A systematic review of help-seeking interventions for depression, anxiety and general psychological distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulliver Amelia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and anxiety are treatable disorders, yet many people do not seek professional help. Interventions designed to improve help-seeking attitudes and increase help-seeking intentions and behaviour have been evaluated in recent times. However, there have been no systematic reviews of the efficacy or effectiveness of these interventions in promoting help-seeking. Therefore, this paper reports a systematic review of published randomised controlled trials targeting help-seeking attitudes, intentions or behaviours for depression, anxiety, and general psychological distress. Methods Studies were identified through searches of PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database in November 2011. Studies were included if they included a randomised controlled trial of at least one intervention targeting help-seeking for depression or anxiety or general psychological distress, and contained extractable data on help-seeking attitudes or intentions or behaviour. Studies were excluded if they focused on problems or conditions other than the target (e.g., substance use, eating disorder. Results Six published studies of randomised controlled trials investigating eight different interventions for help-seeking were identified. The majority of trials targeted young adults. Mental health literacy content was effective (d = .12 to .53 in improving help-seeking attitudes in the majority of studies at post-intervention, but had no effect on help-seeking behaviour (d = −.01, .02. There was less evidence for other intervention types such as efforts to destigmatise or provide help-seeking source information. Conclusions Mental health literacy interventions are a promising method for promoting positive help-seeking attitudes, but there is no evidence that it leads to help-seeking behaviour. Further research investigating the effects of interventions on attitudes, intentions, and behaviour is required.

  1. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of depression on subsequent smoking cessation in patients with coronary heart disease: 1990 to 2013.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Smoking cessation is crucial for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), yet depression may impede cessation success. We systematically reviewed the prospective association between depression and subsequent smoking cessation in individuals with CHD to quantify this effect.

  2. The impact of indicated prevention and early intervention on co-morbid eating disorder and depressive symptoms: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Paxton, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Depressive and eating disorder symptoms are highly comorbid. To date, however, little is known regarding the efficacy of existing programs in decreasing concurrent eating disorder and depressive symptoms. We conducted a systematic review of selective and indicated controlled prevention and early intervention programs that assessed both eating disorder and depressive symptoms. We identified a total of 26 studies. The large majority of identified interventions (92%) were successful in decreasing eating disorder symptoms. However fewer than half (42%) were successful in decreasing both eating disorder and depressive symptoms. Intervention and participant characteristics did not predict success in decreasing depressive symptoms. Indicated prevention and early intervention programs targeting eating disorder symptoms are limited in their success in decreasing concurrent depressive symptoms. Further efforts to develop more efficient interventions that are successful in decreasing both eating disorder and depressive symptoms are warranted.

  3. Development and impact of computerised decision support systems for clinical management of depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triñanes, Yolanda; Atienza, Gerardo; Louro-González, Arturo; de-las-Heras-Liñero, Elena; Alvarez-Ariza, María; Palao, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    One of the proposals for improving clinical practice is to introduce computerised decision support systems (CDSS) and integrate these with electronic medical records. Accordingly, this study sought to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of CDSS in the management of depression. A search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo, in order to do this. The quality of quantitative studies was assessed using the SIGN method, and qualitative studies using the CASPe checklist. Seven studies were identified (3 randomised clinical trials, 3 non-randomised trials, and one qualitative study). The CDSS assessed incorporated content drawn from guidelines and other evidence-based products. In general, the CDSS had a positive impact on different aspects, such as the screening and diagnosis, treatment, improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, and referral of patients. The use of CDSS could thus serve to optimise care of depression in various scenarios by providing recommendations based on the best evidence available and facilitating decision-making in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of depression pharmacotherapy in fertility treatment on conception, birth, and neonatal health: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akioyamen, Leo E; Minhas, Hersimren; Holloway, Alison C; Taylor, Valerie H; Akioyamen, Noel O; Sherifali, Diana

    2016-05-01

    While antidepressant medications are currently used during conception, gestation and post-partum, considerable uncertainty exists regarding the benefits and harms conferred to mothers and their offspring. A significant body of evidence has focused on antidepressant use during pregnancy and post-partum. However, it is difficult to know if this translates to specific populations. Women receiving treatment for infertility are especially vulnerable to symptoms of depression and adverse perinatal outcomes. This systematic review aimed to determine the effects of antidepressants taken during the perinatal period by women receiving fertility treatment on conception, birth, and long-term maternal and child health outcomes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, ProQuest Dissertation & Theses, and Pubmed databases from January 1950 to November 2015. Articles were screened for inclusion independently by two reviewers. Studies were included if they enrolled women of reproductive age exposed to pharmacotherapy for depression and infertility at any point during the perinatal period. A total of 8587 unique citations, and 83 full-text articles were reviewed. Of these, two randomized controlled trials and two retrospective chart reviews were included in the narrative synthesis. While most studies reported on assisted reproduction processes and birth outcomes, none examined long-term impacts on maternal-child health. The few included studies did not find that antidepressant use by women receiving fertility therapy impacted gamete quality or pregnancy success. Currently, no studies address whether pharmacotherapy for the treatment of depression in women undergoing assisted reproduction affects their health or that of their offspring long-term. It appears that much like antidepressant use in fertile women, there are risks associated with both antidepressant use and untreated depression. Decisions regarding the treatment of depression should be made

  5. Indicators of patients with major depressive disorder in need of highly specialized care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Krugten, Frédérique C W; Kaddouri, Meriam; Goorden, Maartje; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Bockting, Claudi L H; Peeters, Frenk P M L; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) that cannot be managed by secondary mental health services and who require highly specialized mental healthcare could enhance need-based patient stratification. This, in turn, may reduce the number of treatment steps needed to achieve and sustain an adequate treatment response. The development of a valid tool to identify patients with MDD in need of highly specialized care is hampered by the lack of a comprehensive understanding of indicators that distinguish patients with and without a need for highly specialized MDD care. The aim of this study, therefore, was to systematically review studies on indicators of patients with MDD likely in need of highly specialized care. A structured literature search was performed on the PubMed and PsycINFO databases following PRISMA guidelines. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and determined the quality of the identified studies. Three reviewers independently executed data extraction by using a pre-piloted, standardized extraction form. The resulting indicators were grouped by topical similarity, creating a concise summary of the findings. The systematic search of all databases yielded a total of 7,360 references, of which sixteen were eligible for inclusion. The sixteen papers yielded a total of 48 unique indicators. Overall, a more pronounced depression severity, a younger age of onset, a history of prior poor treatment response, psychiatric comorbidity, somatic comorbidity, childhood trauma, psychosocial impairment, older age, and a socioeconomically disadvantaged status were found to be associated with proxies of need for highly specialized MDD care. Several indicators are associated with the need for highly specialized MDD care. These indicators provide easily measurable factors that may serve as a starting point for the development of a valid tool to identify patients with MDD in need of highly specialized care.

  6. Adjunctive Nutraceuticals for Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Murphy, Jenifer; Mischoulon, David; Papakostas, George I; Fava, Maurizio; Berk, Michael; Ng, Chee H

    2016-06-01

    There is burgeoning interest in augmentation strategies for improving inadequate response to antidepressants. The adjunctive use of standardized pharmaceutical-grade nutrients, known as nutraceuticals, has the potential to modulate several neurochemical pathways implicated in depression. While many studies have been conducted in this area, to date no specialized systematic review (or meta-analysis) has been conducted. A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science was conducted up to December 2015 for clinical trials using adjunctive nutrients for depression. Where sufficient data were available, a random-effects model analyzed the standard mean difference between treatment and placebo in the change from baseline to endpoint, combining the effect size data. Funnel plot and heterogeneity analyses were also performed. Primarily positive results were found for replicated studies testing S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), methylfolate, omega-3 (primarily EPA or ethyl-EPA), and vitamin D, with positive isolated studies for creatine, folinic acid, and an amino acid combination. Mixed results were found for zinc, folic acid, vitamin C, and tryptophan, with nonsignificant results for inositol. No major adverse effects were noted in the studies (aside from minor digestive disturbance). A meta-analysis of adjunctive omega-3 versus placebo revealed a significant and moderate to strong effect in favor of omega-3. Conversely, a meta-analysis of folic acid revealed a nonsignificant difference from placebo. Marked study heterogeneity was found in a Higgins test for both omega-3 and folic acid studies; funnel plots also revealed asymmetry (reflecting potential study bias). Current evidence supports adjunctive use of SAMe, methylfolate, omega-3, and vitamin D with antidepressants to reduce depressive symptoms.

  7. Depression and cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y; Li, F; Liu, Y F; Zhao, J P; Leng, M M; Chen, L

    2017-08-01

    To assess the associations between depression and incident cancer risk. Systematic review and meta-analysis. The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Risk ratios (RRs) were used to measure effect size. A random-effects model was applied to synthesize the associations between depression and cancer risk. A forest plot was produced to visually assess RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity across studies was assessed using the I-squared statistic. A funnel plot was generated to assess potential publication bias, and Egger's regression was applied to test the symmetry of the funnel plot. In total, 1,469,179 participants and 89,716 incident cases of cancer from 25 studies were included. Depression was significantly associated with overall cancer risk (RR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.09-1.22) and with liver cancer (RR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.01-1.43) and lung cancer (RR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.04-1.72). Subgroup analysis of studies in North America resulted in a significant summary relative risk (RR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15-1.48). No significant associations were found for breast, prostate, or colorectal/colon cancer. The average Newcastle Ottawa score was 7.56 for all included studies. Our findings showed a small and positive association between depression and the overall occurrence risk of cancer, as well as liver cancer and lung cancer risks. However, multinational and larger sample studies are required to further research and support these associations. Moreover, confounding factors such as cigarette smoking and alcohol use/abuse should be considered in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychosocial Interventions for Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in Individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela C. Pascoe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common amongst individuals with chronic kidney disease and are known to affect quality of life adversely. Psychosocial interventions have been shown to decrease depressive and anxiety symptoms in various chronic diseases, but few studies have examined their efficacy in people with chronic kidney disease and no meta-analysis has been published. Thus, the aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of psychosocial interventions on depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as quality of life in individuals diagnosed with chronic kidney disease and/or their carers.Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we included published randomized controlled trials comparing psychosocial interventions versus usual care for impacting depressive and anxiety symptoms and quality of life.Results: Eight studies were included in the systematic review and six of these were subjected to meta-analysis. Psychosocial interventions were associated with a medium effect size for reduction in depressive symptoms and a small effect size for improved quality of life in the in individuals with chronic-kidney-disease and their carers. Some evidence suggested a reduction in anxiety.Conclusion: Psychosocial interventions appear to reduce depressive symptoms and improve quality of life in patients with chronic-kidney-disease and their carers and to have some beneficial impact on anxiety. However, the small number of identified studies indicates a need for further research in this field.

  9. The effect of exercise in clinically depressed adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Nordentoft, Merete; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2011-01-01

    these, the estimated beneficial effect of exercise was more modest (SMD, -0.19; 95% CI, -0.70 to 0.31) than the pooled result for all 13 studies, with no strong evidence of benefit. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a short-term effect of exercise on depression: on average, depression scores 0......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of exercise in adults with clinical depression. DATA SOURCES: The databases CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched (1806-2008) using medical subject headings (Me......SH) and text word terms depression, depressive disorder and exercise, aerobic, non-aerobic, physical activity, physical fitness, walk*, jog*, run*, bicycling, swim*, strength, and resistance. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized trials including adults with clinical depression according to any diagnostic system were...

  10. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  11. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety in Medical and Surgical Inpatients: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Molavi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The objective of the present study was to perform a systematic review of studies that investigated the prevalence of anxiety and depression in medical inpatients. "nMethod: A search was conducted in Pubmed Medline, ISI Web of Science, PsychINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Irandoc, IranPsych, IranMedex, and dissertations. In the next step, the original studies which reported the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression in medical inpatients were included and then evaluated. These evaluations included two parts. The first part was the qualitative evaluation of the articles, which was carried out using a checklist. The second part was data extraction, performed with two researchers for each document. "nResults: Thirty nine studies (13 articles and 26 dissertations were finally included. Only in seven studies, diagnostic interview was used to diagnose patients with anxiety and depression. Results of the qualitative evaluation of articles showed that a high percentage of them lacked the appropriate methodology. The maximum and minimum prevalence of depression in the reviewed studies was 91.7% and 17% respectively. The maximum and minimum prevalence of anxiety in the reviewed articles was 78.33% and 6% respectively. The prevalence of depression and anxiety in all studies which had reported prevalence according to sex was higher in females. Meta-analysis with Random effect model indicates the heterogeneity of studies, so we just perform meta- analysis in two groups of patients, chronic renal failure patients and patients with ischemic heart disease. The combined estimation of the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic renal failure according to this meta-analysis was 55.91 (confidence interval=37.14-74.69 and 46.72 (confidence interval=20.31-73.13 respectively. The combined estimation of the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with ischemic heart disease was 52.54 (confidence interval=42.82-62.26 and 30

  12. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) for bipolar depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondé, Clément; Amad, Ali; Nieto, Isabel; Brunoni, André Russowsky; Neufeld, Nicholas H; Bellivier, Frank; Poulet, Emmanuel; Geoffroy, Pierre-Alexis

    2017-08-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and recurrent brain disorder that can manifest in manic or depressive episodes. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic modality for patients experiencing bipolar depression, for which standard treatments are often inefficient. While several studies have been conducted in this patient group, there has been no systematic review or meta-analysis that specifically examines bipolar depression. We aimed to address this gap in the literature and evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of tDCS in patients fulfilling DSM-IV-TR criteria for BD I, II, or BD not otherwise specified (NOS). We systematically searched the literature from April 2002 to November 2016 to identify relevant publications for inclusion in our systematic review and meta-analysis. Effect sizes for depression rating-scale scores were expressed as the standardized mean difference (SMD) before and after tDCS. Thirteen of 382 identified studies met eligibility criteria for our systematic review. The meta-analysis included 46 patients from 7 studies with depression rating-scale scores pre- and post-tDCS. Parameters of tDCS procedures were heterogeneous. Depression scores decreased significantly with a medium effect size after acute-phase of treatment (SMD 0.71 [0.25-1.18], z=3.00, p=0.003) and at the furthest endpoint (SMD 1.27 [0.57-1.97], z=3.57, p=0.0004). Six cases of affective switching under tDCS treatment protocols were observed. Depressive symptoms respond to tDCS in patients with BD. Additional studies, and particularly randomized controlled trials, are needed to clarify the effectiveness of tDCS in bipolar depression, the frequency of tDCS-emergent hypomania/mania, and which tDCS modalities are most efficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of psychosocial methods on depressed, aggressive and apathetic behaviors of people with dementia: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Francke, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review seeks to establish the extent of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of 13 psychosocial methods for reducing depressed, aggressive or apathetic behaviors in people with dementia. METHODS: The guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration were followed. Using a

  14. The effects of psychosocial methods on depressed, aggressive and apathetic behaviors of people with dementia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; van Weert, J.C.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review seeks to establish the extent of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of 13 psychosocial methods for reducing depressed, aggressive or apathetic behaviors in people with dementia. METHODS: The guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration were followed. Using a

  15. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Cnossen, Maryse C.; Olff, Miranda; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This review examined pre- and post-injury prevalence of, and risk factors for, anxiety disorders and depressive disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI), based on evidence from structured diagnostic interviews. A systematic literature search was conducted in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central,

  16. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Postpartum Depression: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postpartum depression (PPD does great harm to women following childbirth. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the efficacy and safety of CHM for the treatment of PPD. Methods. Published or ongoing registered trials were searched for from the inception of the various databases to December 31, 2015. Data extraction and methodology assessment were conducted independently by two researchers. RevMan 5.3 software was used to analyze the data. Results. Forty-seven registered clinical trials (RCTs were identified and reviewed. The results showed CHM alone or in combination with routine treatments could reduce HAMD score, EPDS score, incidence of adverse events, TESS, and SERS. CHM combined with routine treatment was more effective in increasing serum estradiol levels and reducing progesterone levels than routine treatment alone. Meanwhile, pooled data revealed that MRLQS combined with routine treatments or MRLQS plus MSHS combined with routine treatments were more effective than other therapeutic methods in TCM. MRLQS plus MSHS alone was found to be an effective alternative when compared to routine treatments. Conclusions. This review suggested that CHM was safe and effective in the treatment of PPD. However, this could not be proven conclusively. To ensure evidence-based clinical practice, more rigorously designed trials are warranted.

  17. Online and social networking interventions for the treatment of depression in young people: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Simon M; Goodall, Joanne; Hetrick, Sarah E; Parker, Alexandra G; Gilbertson, Tamsyn; Amminger, G Paul; Davey, Christopher G; McGorry, Patrick D; Gleeson, John; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario

    2014-09-16

    Major depression accounts for the greatest burden of all diseases globally. The peak onset of depression occurs between adolescence and young adulthood, and for many individuals, depression displays a relapse-remitting and increasingly severe course. Given this, the development of cost-effective, acceptable, and population-focused interventions for depression is critical. A number of online interventions (both prevention and acute phase) have been tested in young people with promising results. As these interventions differ in content, clinician input, and modality, it is important to identify key features (or unhelpful functions) associated with treatment outcomes. A systematic review of the research literature was undertaken. The review was designed to focus on two aspects of online intervention: (1) standard approaches evaluating online intervention content in randomized controlled designs (Section 1), and (2) second-generation online interventions and services using social networking (eg, social networking sites and online support groups) in any type of research design (Section 2). Two specific literature searches were undertaken. There was no date range specified. The Section 1 search, which focused on randomized controlled trials, included only young people (12-25 years) and yielded 101 study abstracts, of which 15 met the review inclusion criteria. The Section 2 search, which included all study design types and was not restricted in terms of age, yielded 358 abstracts, of which 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Information about the studies and their findings were extracted and tabulated for review. The 15 studies identified in Section 1 described 10 trials testing eight different online interventions, all of which were based on a cognitive behavioral framework. All but one of the eight identified studies reported positive results; however, only five of the 15 studies used blinded interviewer administered outcomes with most trials using self-report data

  18. Parental factors associated with depression and anxiety in young people: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Marie Bee Hui; Pilkington, Pamela Doreen; Ryan, Siobhan Mary; Jorm, Anthony Francis

    2014-03-01

    There is a burgeoning and varied literature examining the associations between parental factors and depression or anxiety disorders in young people. However, there is hitherto no systematic review of this complex literature with a focus on the 12-18 years age range, when the first onset for these disorders peaks. Furthermore, to facilitate the application of the evidence in prevention, a focus on modifiable factors is required. Employing the PRISMA method, we conducted a systematic review of parental factors associated with depression and anxiety disorders in young people which parents can potentially modify. We identified 181 articles altogether, with 140 examining depression, 17 examining anxiety problems, and 24 examining both outcomes. Stouffer's method of combining p values was used to determine whether associations between variables were reliable, and meta-analyses were conducted to estimate the mean effect sizes of associations between each parental factor and outcome. Limitations include sacrificing micro-level detail for a macro-level synthesis of the literature, not systematically reviewing moderators and mediators, the lack of generalizability across cultures and to younger or adult children, and the inability to conduct a meta-analysis on all included studies. Parental factors with a sound evidence base indicating increased risk for both depression and anxiety include less warmth, more inter-parental conflict, over-involvement, and aversiveness; and for depression additionally, they include less autonomy granting and monitoring. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The effect of exercise in clinically depressed adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Nordentoft, Merete; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2011-01-01

    SH) and text word terms depression, depressive disorder and exercise, aerobic, non-aerobic, physical activity, physical fitness, walk*, jog*, run*, bicycling, swim*, strength, and resistance. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized trials including adults with clinical depression according to any diagnostic system were......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of exercise in adults with clinical depression. DATA SOURCES: The databases CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched (1806-2008) using medical subject headings (Me...... with depression (P = .002). No other characteristics were related to between-study heterogeneity. Pooled analysis of 5 trials with long-term follow-up (ie, that examined outcomes beyond the end of the intervention) suggested no long-term benefit (SMD, -0.01; 95% CI, -0.28 to 0.26), with no strong evidence...

  20. Enablers and barriers to implementing collaborative care for anxiety and depression: a systematic qualitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, Gritt; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2016-12-28

    Collaborative care is an increasingly popular approach for improving quality of care for people with mental health problems through an intensified and structured collaboration between primary care providers and health professionals with specialized psychiatric expertise. Trials have shown significant positive effects for patients suffering from depression, but since collaborative care is a complex intervention, it is important to understand the factors which affect its implementation. We present a qualitative systematic review of the enablers and barriers to implementing collaborative care for patients with anxiety and depression. We developed a comprehensive search strategy in cooperation with a research librarian and performed a search in five databases (EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, ProQuest, and CINAHL). All authors independently screened titles and abstracts and reviewed full-text articles. Studies were included if they were published in English and based on the original qualitative data on the implementation of a collaborative care intervention targeted at depression or anxiety in an adult patient population in a high-income country. Our subsequent analysis employed the normalization process theory (NPT). We included 17 studies in our review of which 11 were conducted in the USA, five in the UK, and one in Canada. We identified several barriers and enablers within the four major analytical dimensions of NPT. Securing buy-in among primary care providers was found to be critical but sometimes difficult. Enablers included physician champions, reimbursement for extra work, and feedback on the effectiveness of collaborative care. The social and professional skills of the care managers seemed critical for integrating collaborative care in the primary health care clinic. Day-to-day implementation was also found to be facilitated by the care managers being located in the clinic since this supports regular face-to-face interactions between physicians and care managers

  1. Faith-adapted psychological therapies for depression and anxiety: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Naomi; Heywood-Everett, Suzanne; Siddiqi, Najma; Wright, Judy; Meredith, Jodi; McMillan, Dean

    2015-05-01

    Incorporating faith (religious or spiritual) perspectives into psychological treatments has attracted significant interest in recent years. However, previous suggestion that good psychiatric care should include spiritual components has provoked controversy. To try to address ongoing uncertainty in this field we present a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of faith-based adaptations of bona fide psychological therapies for depression or anxiety. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials were performed. The literature search yielded 2274 citations of which 16 studies were eligible for inclusion. All studies used cognitive or cognitive behavioural models as the basis for their faith-adapted treatment (F-CBT). We identified statistically significant benefits of using F-CBT. However, quality assessment using the Cochrane risk of bias tool revealed methodological limitations that reduce the apparent strength of these findings. Whilst the effect sizes identified here were statistically significant, there were relatively a few relevant RCTs available, and those included were typically small and susceptible to significant biases. Biases associated with researcher or therapist allegiance were identified as a particular concern. Despite some suggestion that faith-adapted CBT may out-perform both standard CBT and control conditions (waiting list or "treatment as usual"), the effect sizes identified in this meta-analysis must be considered in the light of the substantial methodological limitations that affect the primary research data. Before firm recommendations about the value of faith-adapted treatments can be made, further large-scale, rigorously performed trials are required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining the relationship between anxiety and depression and exacerbations of COPD which result in hospital admission: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooler A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alison Pooler,1,2 Roger Beech21School of Nursing and Midwifery, Clinical Education Centre, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK; 2Health Services Research, Research Institute of Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK Objectives: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are the third largest cause of emergency hospital admissions in the UK. This systematic literature review explored the relationship between the hospitalization rates and the COPD comorbidities, anxiety, and depression.Methods: The Centre for Research Dissemination's framework for systematic reviews was followed using search terms relating to COPD, anxiety, depression, and hospital admission. Papers identified were assessed for relevance and quality, using a suitable Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool and Mixed Methods Assessment Tool.Results: Twenty quantitative studies indicated that anxiety and depression led to a statistically significant increase in the likelihood of COPD patients being hospitalized. These comorbidities also led to an increased length of stay and a greater risk of mortality postdischarge. Other significant factors included lower Body-Mass Index, Airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise scores, female gender, lower socioeconomic status, poorer patient perceived quality of life, increased severity of lung function, and less improvement in dyspnea from admission to discharge. It was also highlighted that only 27%–33% of those with depression were being treated for it. Four qualitative studies revealed that patients saw anxiety and depression as a major factor that affected their ability to cope with and self-manage their condition.Implications: Findings from the systematic review have highlighted a need for better recognition and treatment of anxiety and depression amongst individuals with COPD. Ongoing research will develop and test strategies for promoting better management

  3. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Its Associations with Depression and Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Linda F.; Kroenke, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Background Fatigue is an important symptom in cancer and has been shown to be associated with psychological distress. Objectives This review assesses evidence regarding associations of CRF with depression and anxiety. Methods Database searches yielded 59 studies reporting correlation coefficients or odds ratios. Results Combined sample size was 12,103. Average correlation of fatigue with depression, weighted by sample size, was 0.56 and for anxiety, 0.46. Thirty-one instruments were used to assess fatigue, suggesting a lack of consensus on measurement. Conclusion This review confirms the association of fatigue with depression and anxiety. Directionality needs to be better delineated in longitudinal studies. PMID:19855028

  4. Understanding in vivo modelling of depression in non-human animals: a systematic review protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannach-Brown, Alexandra; Liao, Jing; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    experimental model(s) to induce or mimic a depressive-like phenotype. Data that will be extracted include the model or method of induction; species and gender of the animals used; the behavioural, anatomical, electrophysiological, neurochemical or genetic outcome measure(s) used; risk of bias......The aim of this study is to systematically collect all published preclinical non-human animal literature on depression to provide an unbiased overview of existing knowledge. A systematic search will be carried out in PubMed and Embase. Studies will be included if they use non-human animal......-analysis of the preclinical studies modelling depression-like behaviours and phenotypes in animals....

  5. Can exercise or physical activity help improve postnatal depression and weight loss? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saligheh, Maryam; Hackett, Daniel; Boyce, Philip; Cobley, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    Despite exercise or physical activity (PA) being effective on depression and weight management generally, its effectiveness remains uncertain during postpartum. This systematic review aimed to determine the efficacy of exercise or PA interventions on postnatal depression (PND) and weight loss, with a subsequent aim to identify more effective intervention approaches. Using PRISMA guidelines, data searches conducted across six databases. Nine studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on identified studies (some with high-quality RCT designs), there was inconsistency as to whether exercise or PA simultaneously reduced PND symptoms and assisted weight loss (or related body composition indices). Two (22.2%) identified changes in both outcomes with small effect sizes. Four studies (44.4%) reported changes in one outcome, typically PND with variable effect sizes, while three studies (33.3%) reported no effect. Studies implemented different exercise/PA modalities (commonly walking) and incorporated various support strategies to assist intervention participation and adherence. Studies identified as most likely to associate with PND and/or weight loss changes were those with supervision (1-1, group), structure (weekly frequency, scheduled durations and moderate intensity), which adhered to specific exercise/PA guidelines over an extended postpartum period (e.g. 12 weeks +) and were supplemented by several psycho-social support strategies (e.g. educational information, exercise/PA advice, and counselling). Future studies need to carefully address prior study methodological weaknesses (e.g. study design, inclusion criteria, measurement, reporting, assessing confounding factors), further examine proposed more beneficial exercise/PA intervention approaches, and consider how exercise/PA could be best delivered in practice to benefit women's postpartum health.

  6. Treatment of depressive disorders in primary care - protocol of a multiple treatment systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde Klaus

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several systematic reviews have summarized the evidence for specific treatments of primary care patients suffering from depression. However, it is not possible to answer the question how the available treatment options compare with each other as review methods differ. We aim to systematically review and compare the available evidence for the effectiveness of pharmacological, psychological, and combined treatments for patients with depressive disorders in primary care. Methods/Design To be included, studies have to be randomized trials comparing antidepressant medication (tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, hypericum extracts, other agents and/or psychological therapies (e.g. interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, behavioural therapy, short dynamically-oriented psychotherapy with another active therapy, placebo or sham intervention, routine care or no treatment in primary care patients in the acute phase of a depressive episode. Main outcome measure is response after completion of acute phase treatment. Eligible studies will be identified from available systematic reviews, from searches in electronic databases (Medline, Embase and Central, trial registers, and citation tracking. Two reviewers will independently extract study data and assess the risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's corresponding tool. Meta-analyses (random effects model, inverse variance weighting will be performed for direct comparisons of single interventions and for groups of similar interventions (e.g. SSRIs vs. tricyclics and defined time-windows (up to 3 months and above. If possible, a global analysis of the relative effectiveness of treatments will be estimated from all available direct and indirect evidence that is present in a network of treatments and comparisons. Discussion Practitioners do not only want to know whether there is evidence that a specific treatment is more effective than

  7. Cortisol as a predictor of psychological therapy response in depressive disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susanne; Strawbridge, Rebecca; Vives, Andres Herane; Cleare, Anthony J

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with depressive disorders demonstrate resistance to psychological therapy. A frequent finding is hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis alterations. As cortisol is known to modulate cognitive processes, those patients may be less likely to profit from psychological therapy. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on cortisol as a predictor of psychological therapy response. The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched. Records were included if they looked at patients with any depressive disorder engaging in psychological therapy, with a pre-treatment cortisol and a post-treatment symptom measure. Eight articles satisfied our selection criteria. The higher the cortisol levels before starting psychological therapy, the more symptoms patients with depression experienced at the end of treatment and/or the smaller their symptom change. Our findings suggest that patients with depression with elevated HPA functioning are less responsive to psychological therapy. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  8. Internet-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of depression in people living in developing countries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Pablo; Rojas, Graciela; Martínez, Vania; Lara, María Asunción; Pérez, J Carola

    2018-07-01

    Internet-based interventions for depression may be a valuable resource to reduce the treatment gap for those living in developing countries. However, evidence comes mainly from developed countries. This systematic review summarized the evidence on preventive or therapeutic Internet-based interventions for depression for people who reside in developing countries. CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed, SciELO Citation Indexes, the Journal of Medical Internet Research, and the Telemedicine and e-Health journal, were searched up to June 2017, to identify feasibility or effectiveness studies of preventive or therapeutic Internet-based interventions for depression, with or without human support. Studies included subjects residing in developing countries, and were published in English or Spanish. Study protocols were included. Risk of bias and/or quality of the reporting of the studies included was assessed. Five feasibility studies, aimed at the prevention of depression, and a study protocol were included in this systematic review. Reports came mostly from the Americas (n = 4). Internet-based interventions aimed at the prevention of depression presented low levels of human support, were useful and acceptable to their users, and require further design refinements to improve their use and retention. No gray literature was searched or included in this systematic review. Searches were limited to English and Spanish languages. Internet-based interventions aimed at the prevention of depression in people who reside in developing countries are in an early phase of development, limiting the generalizability of the results. Future studies must employ persuasive designs to improve user retention, incorporating larger samples and a control group to conclusively determine feasibility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for post-partum depression (PPD): a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crescenzo, Franco; Perelli, Federica; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of postpartum depression with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been claimed to be both efficacious and well tolerated, but no recent systematic reviews have been conducted. A qualitative systematic review of randomized clinical trials on women with postpartum depression comparing SSRIs to placebo and/or other treatments was performed. A comprehensive literature search of online databases, the bibliographies of published articles and grey literature were conducted. Data on efficacy, acceptability and tolerability were extracted and the quality of the trials was assessed. Six randomised clinical trials, comprising 595 patients, met quality criteria for inclusion in the analysis. Cognitive-behavioural intervention, psychosocial community-based intervention, psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, a second-generation tricyclic antidepressant and placebo were used as comparisons. All studies demonstrated higher response and remission rates among those treated with SSRIs and greater mean changes on depression scales, although findings were not always statistically significant. Dropout rates were high in three of the trials but similar among treatment and comparison groups. In general, SSRIs were well tolerated and trial quality was good. There are few trials, patients included in the trials were not representative of all patients with postpartum depression, dropout rates in three trials were high, and long-term efficacy and tolerability were assessed in only two trials. SSRIs appear to be efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of postpartum depression, but the available evidence fails to demonstrate a clear superiority over other treatments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased risk for abnormal depression scores in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokras, Anuja; Clifton, Shari; Futterweit, Walter; Wild, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and depression both have a high prevalence in reproductive-aged women. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of abnormal depression scores in women who meet currently recognized definitions of PCOS compared with women in a well-defined control group. The search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE Classic plus EMBASE, PsycINFO, Current Contents-Clinical Medicine and Current Contents-Life Sciences and Web of Science. Cochrane software Review Manager 5.0.24 was used to construct forest plots comparing risk of abnormal depression scores in those in the PCOS and control groups. Studies with well-defined criteria of women with PCOS and control groups of women without PCOS, with demographic information including age and body mass index (BMI), were included. Of 752 screened articles, 17 met the selection criteria for systematic review and 10 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Data were abstracted independently by three reviewers. All studies were cross-sectional and most used the Rotterdam criteria for the diagnosis of PCOS (n=10). The odds ratio (OR) for abnormal depression scores was 4.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.96-5.5, Pwomen with PCOS (n=522) compared with those in the control groups (n=475). A subanalysis showed that the odds for abnormal depression scores was independent of BMI (OR 4.09, 95% CI 2.62-6.41). Several validated tools were used to screen for depression; the common tool used was the Beck Depression Inventory. The results of our study suggest the need to screen all women with PCOS for depression using validated screening tools. Women with PCOS are at an increased risk for abnormal depression scores independent of BMI.

  11. Definitions and factors associated with subthreshold depressive conditions: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rodr?guez, Mar Rivas; Nuevo, Roberto; Chatterji, Somnath; Ayuso-Mateos, Jos? Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Subthreshold depressive disorders (minor and subthrehold depression) have been defined in a wide range of forms, varying on the number of symptoms and duration required. Disability associated with these conditions has also been reported. Our aim was to review the different definitions and to determine factors associated with these conditions in order to clarify the nosological implications of these disorders. Methods: A Medline search was conducted of the published lit...

  12. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enggaard, Helle

    Title: Systematic review a method to promote nursing students skills in Evidence Based Practice Background: Department of nursing educate students to practice Evidence Based Practice (EBP), where clinical decisions is based on the best available evidence, patient preference, clinical experience...... and resources available. In order to incorporate evidence in clinical decisions, nursing students need to learn how to transfer knowledge in order to utilize evidence in clinical decisions. The method of systematic review can be one approach to achieve this in nursing education. Method: As an associate lecturer...... I have taken a Comprehensive Systematic Review Training course provide by Center of Clinical Guidelines in Denmark and Jonna Briggs Institute (JBI) and practice in developing a systematic review on how patients with ischemic heart disease experiences peer support. This insight and experience...

  13. Risk factors of suicide and depression among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander youth: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Laura C.; Ung, Tien; Park, Rebecca; Kwon, Simona C.; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    Suicide has become an increasing public health challenge, with growing incidence among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) youth. Using an ecological framework, the purpose of this systematic review was to explicate risk and protective factors for depression or suicide among AA and NHPI youth from available peer reviewed research. The ecological framework provides a useful blueprint for translating social determinants of health to explain the experience of depression and suicidal behaviors among AA and NHPI youth. Sixty-six studies were extracted from PsychInfo, Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science. Policy and practice recommendations are offered in light of relevant themes that emerged. Further research and data disaggregation is needed to develop and strengthen population health strategies, interventions, and policies that address the underlying social conditions and cultural contexts of mental health disparities associated with depression and suicide among AA and NHPI youth. PMID:25981098

  14. Risk Factors of Suicide and Depression among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Youth: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Laura C; Ung, Tien; Park, Rebecca; Kwon, Simona C; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-05-01

    Suicide has become an increasing public health challenge, with growing incidence among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) youth. Using an ecological framework, the purpose of this systematic review was to explicate risk and protective factors for depression or suicide among AA and NHPI youth from available peer reviewed research. The ecological framework provides a useful blueprint for translating social determinants of health to explain the experience of depression and suicidal behaviors among AA and NHPI youth. Sixty-six studies were extracted from PsychInfo, Ovid Med-line, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science. Policy and practice recommendations are offered in light of relevant themes that emerged. Further research and data disaggregation is needed to develop and strengthen population health strategies, interventions, and policies that address the underlying social conditions and cultural contexts of mental health disparities associated with depression and suicide among AA and NHPI youth.

  15. Collaborative care to improve the management of depressive disorders: a community guide systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Anilkrishna B; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Byard, Guthrie J; Zometa, Carlos S; Hahn, Robert A; McKnight-Eily, Lela R; Chapman, Daniel P; Abraido-Lanza, Ana F; Pearson, Jane L; Anderson, Clinton W; Gelenberg, Alan J; Hennessy, Kevin D; Duffy, Farifteh F; Vernon-Smiley, Mary E; Nease, Donald E; Williams, Samantha P

    2012-05-01

    To improve the quality of depression management, collaborative care models have been developed from the Chronic Care Model over the past 20 years. Collaborative care is a multicomponent, healthcare system-level intervention that uses case managers to link primary care providers, patients, and mental health specialists. In addition to case management support, primary care providers receive consultation and decision support from mental health specialists (i.e., psychiatrists and psychologists). This collaboration is designed to (1) improve routine screening and diagnosis of depressive disorders; (2) increase provider use of evidence-based protocols for the proactive management of diagnosed depressive disorders; and (3) improve clinical and community support for active client/patient engagement in treatment goal-setting and self-management. A team of subject matter experts in mental health, representing various agencies and institutions, conceptualized and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on collaborative care for improving the management of depressive disorders. This team worked under the guidance of the Community Preventive Services Task Force, a nonfederal, independent, volunteer body of public health and prevention experts. Community Guide systematic review methods were used to identify, evaluate, and analyze available evidence. An earlier systematic review with 37 RCTs of collaborative care studies published through 2004 found evidence of effectiveness of these models in improving depression outcomes. An additional 32 studies of collaborative care models conducted between 2004 and 2009 were found for this current review and analyzed. The results from the meta-analyses suggest robust evidence of effectiveness of collaborative care in improving depression symptoms (standardized mean difference [SMD]=0.34); adherence to treatment (OR=2.22); response to treatment (OR=1.78); remission of symptoms (OR=1.74); recovery from symptoms (OR=1.75); quality of

  16. The effects of psychosocial methods on depressed, aggressive and apathetic behaviors of people with dementia: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Verkaik, R.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Francke, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review seeks to establish the extent of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of 13 psychosocial methods for reducing depressed, aggressive or apathetic behaviors in people with dementia. METHODS: The guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration were followed. Using a predefined protocol, ten electronic databases were searched, studies selected, relevant data extracted and the methodological quality of the studies assessed. With a Best Evidence Synthesis the result...

  17. Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, M.; Jokela, M.; Madsen, I. E.; Magnusson Hanson, L. L.; Lallukka, T.; Nyberg, S. T.; Alfredsson, L.; Batty, D.; Bjorner, J. B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Ferrie, J. E.; Heikkilä, K.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies. Results We identi...

  18. How do people of South Asian origin understand and experience depression? A protocol for a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Roisin; Trivedi, Daksha; Sharma, Shivani

    2016-08-30

    Individuals from Black and Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups are less likely to receive a diagnosis and to engage with treatment for depression. This review aims to draw on international literature to summarise what is known about how people specifically of South Asian origin, migrants and non-migrants, understand and experience depressive symptoms. The resulting evidence base will further inform practices aimed at encouraging help-seeking behaviour and treatment uptake. A systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative literature conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, electronic searches will be conducted across 16 databases. Study quality will be assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP). Data will be extracted independently by 2 reviewers. Ethical approval is not required. A comprehensive evidence base of how people from South Asian backgrounds conceptualise and experience depression will better inform the design and delivery of mental health initiatives and advance directions for future research. Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, and disseminated through existing networks for professionals, researchers, patients and the public. CRD42015026120. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. The effect of psychotherapeutic interventions on positive and negative affect in depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumparis, Nikolaos; Karyotaki, Eirini; Kleiboer, Annet; Hofmann, Stefan G; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-09-15

    Depression is a mental disorder characterized by high and dysregulated negative affect in addition to diminished positive affect. To our knowledge, there has been no systematic review of the impact of psychotherapeutic interventions on these affective dimensions. Two comprehensive literature searches for all randomized controlled trials of psychotherapy in adults with depression were performed. The first from 1996 to December 31, 2014 and the second from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. The primary outcome was the mean score of positive and negative affect. Depressive symptoms were measured to be included as a predictor in the meta-regression analyses. Ten studies with 793 adults with depression were included. All studies assessed positive and negative affect. Psychotherapeutic interventions resulted in significantly increased positive affect (g=0.41; 95% CI: 0.16-0.66 p=0.001), and significantly decreased negative affect (g=0.32; 95% CI: 0.15-0.78, p=0.001) in depressed adults. Because of the small number and substantial heterogeneity of the existing studies the meta-regression analyses produced conflicting results. As a consequence, we were unable to sufficiently demonstrate whether NA and depressive symptoms are in fact correlated or not. Given the small number and heterogeneity of the included studies, the findings should be considered with caution. Psychotherapeutic interventions demonstrate low to moderate effects in enhancing positive and reducing negative affect in depressed adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Income inequality and depression: a systematic review and meta‐analysis of the association and a scoping review of mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Burns, Jonathan K.; Dhingra, Monisha; Tarver, Leslie; Kohrt, Brandon A.; Lund, Crick

    2018-01-01

    Most countries have witnessed a dramatic increase of income inequality in the past three decades. This paper addresses the question of whether income inequality is associated with the population prevalence of depression and, if so, the potential mechanisms and pathways which may explain this association. Our systematic review included 26 studies, mostly from high‐income countries. Nearly two‐thirds of all studies and five out of six longitudinal studies reported a statistically significant positive relationship between income inequality and risk of depression; only one study reported a statistically significant negative relationship. Twelve studies were included in a meta‐analysis with dichotomized inequality groupings. The pooled risk ratio was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.07‐1.31), demonstrating greater risk of depression in populations with higher income inequality relative to populations with lower inequality. Multiple studies reported subgroup effects, including greater impacts of income inequality among women and low‐income populations. We propose an ecological framework, with mechanisms operating at the national level (the neo‐material hypothesis), neighbourhood level (the social capital and the social comparison hypotheses) and individual level (psychological stress and social defeat hypotheses) to explain this association. We conclude that policy makers should actively promote actions to reduce income inequality, such as progressive taxation policies and a basic universal income. Mental health professionals should champion such policies, as well as promote the delivery of interventions which target the pathways and proximal determinants, such as building life skills in adolescents and provision of psychological therapies and packages of care with demonstrated effectiveness for settings of poverty and high income inequality. PMID:29352539

  1. Income inequality and depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association and a scoping review of mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Burns, Jonathan K; Dhingra, Monisha; Tarver, Leslie; Kohrt, Brandon A; Lund, Crick

    2018-02-01

    Most countries have witnessed a dramatic increase of income inequality in the past three decades. This paper addresses the question of whether income inequality is associated with the population prevalence of depression and, if so, the potential mechanisms and pathways which may explain this association. Our systematic review included 26 studies, mostly from high-income countries. Nearly two-thirds of all studies and five out of six longitudinal studies reported a statistically significant positive relationship between income inequality and risk of depression; only one study reported a statistically significant negative relationship. Twelve studies were included in a meta-analysis with dichotomized inequality groupings. The pooled risk ratio was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.07-1.31), demonstrating greater risk of depression in populations with higher income inequality relative to populations with lower inequality. Multiple studies reported subgroup effects, including greater impacts of income inequality among women and low-income populations. We propose an ecological framework, with mechanisms operating at the national level (the neo-material hypothesis), neighbourhood level (the social capital and the social comparison hypotheses) and individual level (psychological stress and social defeat hypotheses) to explain this association. We conclude that policy makers should actively promote actions to reduce income inequality, such as progressive taxation policies and a basic universal income. Mental health professionals should champion such policies, as well as promote the delivery of interventions which target the pathways and proximal determinants, such as building life skills in adolescents and provision of psychological therapies and packages of care with demonstrated effectiveness for settings of poverty and high income inequality. © 2018 World Psychiatric Association.

  2. A systematic review on the role of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinares, María; Rosa, Adriane R; Franco, Carolina; Goikolea, José Manuel; Fountoulakis, Kostas; Siamouli, Melina; Gonda, Xenia; Frangou, Sophia; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-03-01

    Despite the high morbidity and mortality associated with bipolar depression, the optimal treatment for this phase is still a matter of debate. The aim of the current review was to provide updated evidence about the efficacy and tolerability of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. A comprehensive review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the use of anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar depression up to June 2011 was conducted by means of the PubMed-Medline database. Eligibility criteria included active comparator-controlled or placebo-controlled randomized studies involving monotherapy or combination therapy. A total of 18 RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Studies supported the efficacy of divalproex as monotherapy in acute bipolar depression but small sample size was a common methodological limitation. Findings were inconclusive for lamotrigine and carbamazepine although overall lamotrigine may have a beneficial but modest effect. Negative results were found for levetiracetam and gabapentin but the evidence base on these agents is scant. All anticonvulsants were generally well tolerated. No double-blind RCTs were found for the use of other anticonvulsants such as oxcarbazepine, licarbazepine, zonisamide, retigabine, pregabalin, tiagabine, felbamate and vigabatrine in the acute treatment of bipolar depression. To sum up, taking into consideration the efficacy and tolerability profiles of anticonvulsants, current evidence supports the use of divalproex and lamotrigine in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. However, available data for most other anticonvulsants are inconclusive and further RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed before drawing firm conclusions.

  3. Overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression in older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F C L; Gregory, J D

    2018-05-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a well-researched phenomenon in working age adults with depression. However, the relevance and importance of OGM in older adult depression is not well established. The aim of this review was to synthesise existing literature on OGM and depressive symptoms in older adults under the framework of the Capture and Rumination, Functional Avoidance and Impaired Executive Control (CaR-FA-X) model. Literature searches were conducted using PsychINFO, PubMed and Web of Knowledge. Eighteen articles were reviewed. OGM is elevated in healthy older adults compared to adults of working age, and further elevated in older adults with depression. Evidence supports the role of impaired executive function as a mechanism for OGM in older adults with depression, but no studies measured other components of the CaR-FA-X model (i.e. functional avoidance and rumination). OGM is prevalent in older adults and more so for those with depression; however, there is no clear understanding of the underpinning mechanisms. It is recommended that future research looks at the role of functional avoidance and rumination, and at the use of memory specificity interventions being developed in the working age adult literature.

  4. Psychological, pharmacological, and combined smoking cessation interventions for smokers with current depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Secades-Villa

    Full Text Available We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis (ID: CRD42016051017 of smoking cessation interventions for patients with current depression. We examined the effectiveness of smoking cessation treatments in improving abstinence rates and depressive symptoms. The following electronic databases were used for potentially eligible studies: PUBMED, PSYCINFO, DIALNET and WEB OF KNOWLEDGE. The search terms used were: smoking cessation, depressive disorder, depression, mood, depressive, depressed, smoking, smokers, nicotine, nicotine dependence, and tobacco cigarette smoking. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality assessment tool (EPHPP. Of the 6,584 studies identified, 20 were eligible and included in the review. Trial designs of studies were 16 randomized controlled trials and 4 secondary studies. Studies included three types of intervention: psychological (6/30%, pharmacological (6/30% or combined (8/40%. Four trials comprised special populations of smokers. Four studies received a strong methodological quality, 7 were scored as moderate and 9 studies received a weak methodological rating. Analyses of effectiveness showed that smoking cessation interventions appear to increase short-term and long-term smoking abstinence in individuals with current depression. Subgroup analyses revealed stronger effects among studies that provided pharmacological treatments than in studies using psychological treatments. However, the evidence is weak due to the small number of studies. Smoking abstinence appears to be associated with an improvement in depressive symptoms. Heterogeneity in protocols in similar types of treatment also prevent firm conclusions being drawn on the effectiveness of any particular treatment model to optimally manage abstinence among depressed smokers. Further research is required to strengthen the evidence base.

  5. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Depression among PLHIV in Ethiopia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadele Amare

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is a substantial contributor to the global burden of disease and affects people in all communities across the globe. Depression is the most common psychiatric problem associated with HIV/AIDS and half of all PLWHIV with depression go underdiagnosed and untreated. Psychiatric complications of HIVAIDS delay mental health services in less affluent countries. However, there is lack of study with regard to the pooled estimation prevalence of depression in PLWHIV in Ethiopia. Objectives. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to summarize the most current available evidence from 2010 to March 2017 among adult PLWHIV in Ethiopia. Methods. The team explored multiple databases searching methods including MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Advance Scholar, and Google Scholar to find studies published with the data on the prevalence of depression among PLWHIV. We searched 150 research articles; of these 143 articles were excluded. Subsequently, thirteen articles were used for synthesis prevalence and four studies were included in the synthesis effect of sex on depression among PLWHIV. Results. The total of pooled estimated prevalence of depression in PLWHIV was 36.65. Estimated prevalence of depression in three studies by using CES-D was 31.19% and in six studies by using PHQ-9 was 37.91%. The remaining four studies used a single tool: Kessler-6 Scale (15.5%, HADS (41.2%, HDSQ (43.9%, and BDI (55.8%. Factors such as age, marital status, living alone, poor medication adherence, poor social support, clinical stages II and III of HIV, stigma, income, and occupation were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions and Recommendation. The pooled estimate prevalence of depression among PLWHIV was higher than that in the general population. It is better to offer special attention to these populations.

  6. Depression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salte, Kim; Titlestad, Ingrid; Halling, Anders

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with depression have significantly increased mortality from somatic disease. The purpose of this article was to review studies that investigate if there is a prognostic association with depression as co-morbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD......). We chose the following outcomes: mortality, suicide behaviour, risk of COPD exacerbation, use of primary care and prescription data. METHODS: A literature review was performed on 16 December 2014 in PubMed, Embase, OVID Medline and Cochrane for cohort studies. Only studies with mortality...... was a combined retro- and prospective study. There was a tendency for studies with more patients and higher methodological quality to show a positive correlation. Sixteen of the studies showed that depression was associated with increased mortality (relative risk (RR): 1.02-3.6) and more COPD exacerbations (RR...

  7. Prevalence of depression and anxiety among undergraduate university students in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    January, James; Madhombiro, Munyaradzi; Chipamaunga, Shalote; Ray, Sunanda; Chingono, Alfred; Abas, Melanie

    2018-04-10

    Depression and anxiety symptoms are reported to be common among university students in many regions of the world and impact on quality of life and academic attainment. The extent of the problem of depression and anxiety among students in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is largely unknown. This paper details methods for a systematic review that will be conducted to explore the prevalence, antecedents, consequences, and treatments for depression and anxiety among undergraduate university students in LMICs. Studies reporting primary data on common mental disorders among students in universities and colleges within LMICs will be included. Quality assessment of retrieved articles will be conducted using four Joanna Briggs critical appraisal checklists for prevalence, randomized control/pseudo-randomized trials, descriptive case series, and comparable cohort/case control. Meta-analysis of the prevalence of depression and anxiety will be conducted using a random effects model which will generate pooled prevalence with their respective 95% confidence intervals. The results from this systematic review will help in informing and guiding healthcare practitioners, planners, and policymakers on the burden of common mental disorders in university students in LMICs and of appropriate and feasible interventions aimed at reducing the burden of psychological morbidity among them. The results will also point to gaps in research and help set priorities for future enquiries. PROSPERO CRD42017064148.

  8. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle; Chauhan, Usha; Greveson, Kay

    2017-01-01

    of evidence is needed and the aim of this article was to systematically review the evidence of IBD advice lines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A broad systematic literature search was performed to identify relevant studies addressing the effect of advice lines. The process of selection of the retrieved studies...... was undertaken in two phases. In phase one, all abstracts were review by two independent reviewers. In phase two, the full text of all included studies were independently reviewed by two reviewers. The included studies underwent quality assessment and data synthesis. RESULTS: Ten published studies and 10...... congress abstracts were included in the review. The studies were heterogeneous both in scientific quality and in the focus of the study. No rigorous evidence was found to support that advice lines improve disease activity in IBD and correspondingly no studies reported worsening in disease activity. Advice...

  9. Evidence-based treatment strategies for treatment-resistant bipolar depression: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sienaert, P.; Lambrichts, L.; Dols, A.; De Fruyt, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment resistance in bipolar depression is a common clinical problem that constitutes a major challenge for the treating clinician as there is a paucity of treatment options. The objective of this paper was to review the evidence for treatment options in treatment-resistant bipolar

  10. Psychomotor Retardation in Depression: A Systematic Review of Diagnostic, Pathophysiologic, and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamila Bennabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychomotor retardation is a central feature of depression which includes motor and cognitive impairments. Effective management may be useful to improve the classification of depressive subtypes and treatment selection, as well as prediction of outcome in patients with depression. The aim of this paper was to review the current status of knowledge regarding psychomotor retardation in depression, in order to clarify its role in the diagnostic management of mood disorders. Retardation modifies all the actions of the individual, including motility, mental activity, and speech. Objective assessments can highlight the diagnostic importance of psychomotor retardation, especially in melancholic and bipolar depression. Psychomotor retardation is also related to depression severity and therapeutic change and could be considered a good criterion for the prediction of therapeutic effect. The neurobiological process underlying the inhibition of activity includes functional deficits in the prefrontal cortex and abnormalities in dopamine neurotransmission. Future investigations of psychomotor retardation should help improve the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying mood disorders and contribute to improving their therapeutic management.

  11. Systematic review of depression, anxiety, and other indicators of psychological distress among U.S. and Canadian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Thomas, Matthew R; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2006-04-01

    To systematically review articles reporting on depression, anxiety, and burnout among U.S. and Canadian medical students. Medline and PubMed were searched to identify peer-reviewed English-language studies published between January 1980 and May 2005 reporting on depression, anxiety, and burnout among U.S. and Canadian medical students. Searches used combinations of the Medical Subject Heading terms medical student and depression, depressive disorder major, depressive disorder, professional burnout, mental health, depersonalization, distress, anxiety, or emotional exhaustion. Reference lists of retrieved articles were inspected to identify relevant additional articles. Demographic information, instruments used, prevalence data on student distress, and statistically significant associations were abstracted. The search identified 40 articles on medical student psychological distress (i.e., depression, anxiety, burnout, and related mental health problems) that met the authors' criteria. No studies of burnout among medical students were identified. The studies suggest a high prevalence of depression and anxiety among medical students, with levels of overall psychological distress consistently higher than in the general population and age-matched peers by the later years of training. Overall, the studies suggest psychological distress may be higher among female students. Limited data were available regarding the causes of student distress and its impact on academic performance, dropout rates, and professional development. Medical school is a time of significant psychological distress for physicians-in-training. Currently available information is insufficient to draw firm conclusions on the causes and consequences of student distress. Large, prospective, multicenter studies are needed to identify personal and training-related features that influence depression, anxiety, and burnout among students and explore relationships between distress and competency.

  12. Impact of physical exercise on quality of life of older adults with depression or Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Boscarino Tavares

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physical exercise has been associated with improvement of quality of live (QoL, but its effect among the elderly with depression and Alzheimer's disease (AD is still unclear. This systematic review evaluated randomized and controlled studies about the effect of physical exercise on QoL of older individuals with a clinical diagnosis of depression and AD.METHODS:We searched PubMed, ISI, SciELO and Scopus from December 2011 to June 2013 using the following keywords: physical exercise, quality of life, elderly, depression, Alzheimer's disease. Only six studies met inclusion criteria: two examined patients with AD and four, patients with depression.RESULTS: The studies used different methods to prescribe exercise and evaluate QoL, but all had high quality methods. Findings of most studies with individuals with depression suggested that exercise training improved QoL, but studies with patients with AD had divergent results.CONCLUSIONS: Although different methods were used, results suggested that physical exercise is an effective non-pharmacological intervention to improve the QoL of elderly individuals with depression and AD. Future studies should investigate the effect of other factors, such as the use of specific scales for the elderly, controlled exercise prescriptions and type of control groups.

  13. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β levels in late-life depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Kenia Kelly Fiaux; Silva, Kelly P.; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F.; Butters, Meryl A.; Diniz, Breno S.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate differences in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of Aβ peptides in older adults with late-life depression compared to non-depressed older controls. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature using PubMed, Web of science and Scopus databases with no search limits for publication dates or languages. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed quality. Six hundred references were retrieved, and we included 12 studies in the meta-analysis after eligibility screening. Older adults with late-life depression (LLD) had a higher plasma Aβ40:Aβ42 ratio compared to non-depressed participants (SMD= 1.10, CI95% [0.28; 1.96], p=0.01), and marginally significant reduction of CSF Aβ42 levels (SMD= −1.12, CI95% [−2.47; 0.22], p=0.1). The present results evidence that older adults with depression have significant differences in Aβ metabolism, in the same direction observed in individuals with AD. These differences in the Aβ metabolism may help identify a subgroup of subjects with LLD at higher risk of developing AD. PMID:26343592

  14. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the longitudinal relationship between eating pathology and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccio, Francis; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Ong, Deborah; Krug, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Undertake a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative synthesis of longitudinal studies that assessed the direction of effects between eating pathology and depression. A second aim was to use meta-regression to account for heterogeneity in terms of study-level effect modifiers. A systematic review was conducted on 42 studies that assessed the longitudinal relationship between eating pathology and depression. Of these 42 studies, multilevel random-effects meta-analyses were conducted on 30 eligible studies. Meta-analysis results showed that eating pathology was a risk factor for depression (rm  = 0.13) and that depression was a risk factor for eating pathology (rm  = 0.16). Meta-regression analyses showed that these effects were significantly stronger for studies that operationalized eating pathology as an eating disorder diagnosis versus eating pathology symptoms, and for studies that operationalized the respective outcome measure as a categorical variable (e.g., a diagnosis of a disorder or where symptoms were "present"/"absent") versus a continuous measure. Results also showed that in relation to eating pathology type, the effect of an eating disorder diagnosis and bulimic symptoms on depression was significantly stronger for younger participants. Eating pathology and depression are concurrent risk factors for each other, suggesting that future research would benefit from identifying factors that are etiological to the development of both constructs. Llevar a cabo un meta-análisis para proporcionar una síntesis cuantitativa de los estudios longitudinales que evaluaron la dirección de los efectos entre la alimentación patológica y la depresión. Un segundo objetivo fue utilizar la meta-regresión para dar cuenta de la heterogeneidad en términos de modificadores del efecto a nivel de estudio. MÉTODO: Una revisión sistemática se llevó a cabo en 42 estudios que evaluaron la relación longitudinal entre la alimentación patológica y la depresión. De

  15. Changes in brain connectivity related to the treatment of depression measured through fMRI: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudayol-Ferré, Esteve; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel; González-Garrido, Andrés A.; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental illness that presents alterations in brain connectivity in the Default Mode Network (DMN), the Affective Network (AN) and other cortical-limbic networks, and the Cognitive Control Network (CCN), among others. In recent years the interest in the possible effect of the different antidepressant treatments on functional connectivity has increased substantially. The goal of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the studies on the relationship between the treatment of depression and brain connectivity. Nineteen studies were found in a systematic review on this topic. In all of them, there was improvement of the clinical symptoms after antidepressant treatment. In 18 out of the 19 studies, clinical improvement was associated to changes in brain connectivity. It seems that both DMN and the connectivity between cortical and limbic structures consistently changes after antidepressant treatment. However, the current evidence does not allow us to assure that the treatment of depression leads to changes in the CCN. In this regard, some papers report a positive correlation between changes in brain connectivity and improvement of depressive symptomatology, particularly when they measure cortical-limbic connectivity, whereas the changes in DMN do not significantly correlate with clinical improvement. Finally, some papers suggest that changes in connectivity after antidepressant treatment might be partly related to the mechanisms of action of the treatment administered. This effect has been observed in two studies with stimulation treatment (one with rTMS and one with ECT), and in two papers that administered three different pharmacological treatments. Our review allows us to make a series of recommendations that might guide future researchers exploring the effect of anti-depression treatments on brain connectivity. PMID:26578927

  16. Cognitive behaviour therapy and inflammation: A systematic review of its relationship and the potential implications for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2017-06-01

    There is growing evidence confirming increased inflammation in a subset of adults with depression. The impact of this relationship has mostly been considered in biologically based interventions; however, it also has potential implications for psychological therapies. Cognitive behaviour therapy is the most commonly used psychological intervention for the treatment of depression with theories around its efficacy primarily based on psychological mechanisms. However, cognitive behaviour therapy may have an effect on, and its efficacy influenced by, physiological processes associated with depression. Accordingly, the purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between cognitive behaviour therapy and inflammation. Studies examining the anti-inflammatory effects of cognitive behaviour therapy in people with depression and other medical conditions (e.g. cancer, diabetes and heart disease) were examined. In addition, the relationship between change in inflammatory markers and change in depressive symptoms following cognitive behaviour therapy, and the influence of pre-treatment inflammation on cognitive behaviour therapy treatment response were reviewed. A total of 23 studies investigating the anti-inflammatory effects of cognitive behaviour therapy were identified. In 14 of these studies, at least one reduction in an inflammatory marker was reported, increases were identified in three studies and no change was found in six studies. Three studies examined the relationship between change in inflammation and change in depressive symptoms following cognitive behaviour therapy. In two of these studies, change in depressive symptoms was associated with a change in at least one inflammatory marker. Finally, three studies examined the influence of pre-treatment inflammation on treatment outcome from cognitive behaviour therapy, and all indicated a poorer treatment response in people with higher premorbid inflammation. Preliminary evidence suggests

  17. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lødrup, Anders Bergh; Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in getting off acid-suppressive medication and partly explain the increase in long-term use of PPI. A number of studies addressing this issue have been published recently. The authors aimed to systematically review the existing evidence of clinically relevant symptoms caused by acid rebound following PPI...

  18. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Troels Dreier; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Palshof, Jesper Andreas

    2016-01-01

    to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. Method: In this paper, we describe the incidence as well as characteristics associated with BM based on a systematic review of the current literature, following the PRISMA guidelines. Results: We show that the incidence of BM in CRC patients ranges from 0.6 to 3...

  19. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for the treatment of depressive disorders in primary care: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grochtdreis

    Full Text Available For the treatment of depressive disorders, the framework of collaborative care has been recommended, which showed improved outcomes in the primary care sector. Yet, an earlier literature review did not find sufficient evidence to draw robust conclusions on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care.To systematically review studies on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care, compared with usual care for the treatment of patients with depressive disorders in primary care.A systematic literature search in major databases was conducted. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Methodological quality of the articles was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC list. To ensure comparability across studies, cost data were inflated to the year 2012 using country-specific gross domestic product inflation rates, and were adjusted to international dollars using purchasing power parities (PPP.In total, 19 cost-effectiveness analyses were reviewed. The included studies had sample sizes between n = 65 to n = 1,801, and time horizons between six to 24 months. Between 42% and 89% of the CHEC quality criteria were fulfilled, and in only one study no risk of bias was identified. A societal perspective was used by five studies. Incremental costs per depression-free day ranged from dominance to US$PPP 64.89, and incremental costs per QALY from dominance to US$PPP 874,562.Despite our review improved the comparability of study results, cost-effectiveness of collaborative care compared with usual care for the treatment of patients with depressive disorders in primary care is ambiguous depending on willingness to pay. A still considerable uncertainty, due to inconsistent methodological quality and results among included studies, suggests further cost-effectiveness analyses using QALYs as effect measures and a time horizon of at least 1 year.

  20. Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Failed Antidepressant Treatment Response in Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, and Subthreshold Depression in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Santaguida, Pasqualina; Keshavarz, Homa; Jaworska, Natalia; Levine, Mitchell; Beyene, Joseph; Raina, Parminder

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review critically evaluated clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for treating adults with major depressive disorder, dysthymia, or subthreshold or minor depression for recommendations following inadequate response to first-line treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Searches for CPGs (January 2004 to November 2014) in English included 7 bibliographic databases and grey literature sources using CPG and depression as the keywords. Two raters selected CPGs on depression with a national scope. Data extraction included definitions of adequate response and recommended treatment options. Two raters assessed quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. From 46,908 citations, 3167 were screened at full text. From these 21 CPG were applicable to adults in primary care and outpatient settings. Five CPGs consider patients with dysthymia or subthreshold or minor depression. None provides recommendations for those who do not respond to first-line SSRI treatment. For adults with MDD, most CPGs do not define an "inadequate response" or provide specific suggestions regarding how to choose alternative medications when switching to an alternative antidepressant. There is variability between CPGs in recommending combination strategies. AGREE II ratings for stakeholder involvement in CPG development, editorial independence, and rigor of development are domains in which depression guidelines are often less robust. About half of patients with depression require second-line treatment to achieve remission. Consistency and clarity in guidelines for second-line treatment of depression are therefore important for clinicians but lacking in most current guidelines. This may reflect a paucity of primary studies upon which to base conclusions.

  1. Cross-National Differences in Psychosocial Factors of Perinatal Depression: A Systematic Review of India and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegata, Mizuki; Ohashi, Yukiko; Lazarus, Anisha; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2017-12-04

    Perinatal depression is prevalent worldwide. However, there are few available studies that discuss the different cultural factors affecting perinatal depression within Asian countries. This study aims to compare the literature regarding related factors relating to perinatal depression in India and Japan, and to synthesize the evidence common to both countries in addition to the country-specific evidence. We conducted a systematic review using several databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, Pubmed, Ovid, SCOPUS, IndMED, and ICHUSI). Keywords were "antenatal depression" or "postpartum depression", and "India" or "Japan". Both Japanese and English language papers were reviewed. The identified evidence was compared between the two countries, as well as with non-Asian countries based on previous reports. In total, 15 articles on India and 35 on Japan were reviewed. Although several factors were shared between the two countries as well as with other non-Asian countries (vulnerable personality, being abused, age, marital conflict, and lower socio-demographic status), some differing factors were identified between India and Japan and non-Asian countries; India: poor socioeconomic status, living only with the husband, pregnancy not welcomed by the husband, a female baby, and poor relationship with in-laws; Japan: infertility treatment, conflict with work-life balance, poor relationships with biological mother or in-laws, and concerns about social relations with the other mother's friends. To conclude, involving the family and community may be important for implementing both global standardized and culture-specific interventions. In India, treatment involving the in-laws may be effective because large family structure is a significant predictor of perinatal depression. In Japan, a family/community approach involving not only the mother's family of origin but also the working environment is essential.

  2. Imaging genetics paradigms in depression research: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lícia P; Köhler, Cristiano A; Stubbs, Brendon; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Morris, Gerwyn; de Freitas, Bárbara P; Thompson, Trevor; Fernandes, Brisa S; Brunoni, André R; Maes, Michael; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Carvalho, André F

    2018-05-17

    Imaging genetics studies involving participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) have expanded. Nevertheless, findings have been inconsistent. Thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of imaging genetics studies that enrolled MDD participants across major databases through June 30th, 2017. Sixty-five studies met eligibility criteria (N = 4034 MDD participants and 3293 controls), and there was substantial between-study variability in the methodological quality of included studies. However, few replicated findings emerged from this literature with only 22 studies providing data for meta-analyses (882 participants with MDD and 616 controls). Total hippocampal volumes did not significantly vary in MDD participants or controls carrying either the BDNF Val66Met 'Met' (386 participants with MDD and 376 controls) or the 5-HTTLPR short 'S' (310 participants with MDD and 230 controls) risk alleles compared to non-carriers. Heterogeneity across studies was explored through meta-regression and subgroup analyses. Gender distribution, the use of medications, segmentation methods used to measure the hippocampus, and age emerged as potential sources of heterogeneity across studies that assessed the association of 5-HTTLPR short 'S' alleles and hippocampal volumes. Our data also suggest that the methodological quality of included studies, publication year, and the inclusion of brain volume as a covariate contributed to the heterogeneity of studies that assessed the association of the BDNF Val66Met 'Met' risk allele and hippocampal volumes. In exploratory voxel-wise meta-analyses, MDD participants carrying the 5-HTTLPR short 'S' allele had white matter microstructural abnormalities predominantly in the corpus callosum, while carriers of the BDNF Val66Met 'Met' allele had larger gray matter volumes and hyperactivation of the right middle frontal gyrus compared to non-carriers. In conclusion, few replicated findings emerged from imaging genetics studies that

  3. Combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in the treatment of chronic depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic depression represents a substantial portion of depressive disorders and is associated with severe consequences. This review examined whether the combination of pharmacological treatments and psychotherapy is associated with higher effectiveness than pharmacotherapy alone via meta-analysis; and identified possible treatment effect modifiers via meta-regression-analysis. Methods A systematic search was conducted in the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, BIOSIS, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. Primary efficacy outcome was a response to treatment; primary acceptance outcome was dropping out of the study. Only randomized controlled trials were considered. Results We identified 8 studies with a total of 9 relevant comparisons. Our analysis revealed small, but statistically not significant effects of combined therapies on outcomes directly related to depression (BR = 1.20) with substantial heterogeneity between studies (I² = 67%). Three treatment effect modifiers were identified: target disorders, the type of psychotherapy and the type of pharmacotherapy. Small but statistically significant effects of combined therapies on quality of life (SMD = 0.18) were revealed. No differences in acceptance rates and the long-term effects between combined treatments and pure pharmacological interventions were observed. Conclusions This systematic review could not provide clear evidence for the combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. However, due to the small amount of primary studies further research is needed for a conclusive decision. PMID:22694751

  4. Probiotic supplementation can positively affect anxiety and depressive symptoms: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbaglou, Meysam; Katz, Joel; de Souza, Russell J; Stearns, Jennifer C; Motamed, Mehras; Ritvo, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal microbiota, consisting of microbial communities in the gastrointestinal tract, play an important role in digestive, metabolic, and immune functioning. Preclinical studies on rodents have linked behavioral and neurochemical changes in the central nervous system with deficits or alterations in these bacterial communities. Moreover, probiotic supplementation in rodents has been shown to markedly change behavior, with correlated changes in central neurochemistry. While such studies have documented behavioral and mood-related supplementation effects, the significance of these effects in humans, especially in relation to anxiety and depression symptoms, are relatively unknown. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to systematically evaluate current literature on the impact of probiotic supplementation on anxiety and depression symptoms in humans. To this end, multiple databases, including Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched for randomized controlled trials published between January 1990 and January 2016. Search results led to a total of 10 randomized controlled trials (4 in clinically diagnosed and 6 in non-clinical samples) that provided limited support for the use of some probiotics in reducing human anxiety and depression. Despite methodological limitations of the included trials and the complex nature of gut-brain interactions, results suggest the detection of apparent psychological benefits from probiotic supplementation. Nevertheless a better understanding of developmental, modulatory, and metagenomic influences on the GI microbiota, specifically as they relate to mood and mental health, represent strong priorities for future research in this area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akioyamen, Leo E; Genest, Jacques; Shan, Shubham D; Inibhunu, Happy; Chu, Anna; Tu, Jack V

    2018-06-01

    Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a common genetic disease predisposing affected individuals to a high risk of cardiovascular disease. Yet, considerable uncertainty exists regarding its impact on psychosocial wellbeing. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between FH and symptoms of anxiety and depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQL). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and PubMed for peer-reviewed literature published in English between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 2018. Quantitative and qualitative studies were eligible if they included patients with confirmed FH and evaluated its association with symptoms of anxiety or depression, or HRQL. We performed a narrative synthesis of studies, including thematic analysis of qualitative studies, and where data permitted, random-effects meta-analysis reporting standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals. We found 10 eligible studies measuring HRQL, depression and anxiety. Random-effects meta-analysis of 4 (n = 4293) and 5 studies (n = 5098), respectively, showed that patients with FH had slightly lower symptoms of anxiety (SMD: -0.29 [95% CI: -0.53, -0.04]) and mental HRQL (SMD: -0.10 [95% -0.20, -0.00]) relative to general population controls. No significant differences existed in depressive symptoms (SMD: 0.04 [95% CI: -0.12, 0.19]) or physical HRQL scores (SMD: 0.02 [95% CI: -0.09, 0.12]). Our systematic review suggests that patients with FH may report small but measurable differences in anxiety symptoms and mental HRQL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Associations Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Nonresponsive Feeding Styles and Practices in Mothers of Young Children: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Mesa, Tatiana; Greaney, Mary L; Wallington, Sherrie F; Wright, Julie A

    2017-05-26

    Childhood obesity is a significant global public health problem due to increasing rates worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that nonresponsive parental feeding styles and practices are important influences on children's eating behaviors and weight status, especially during early childhood. Therefore, understanding parental factors that may influence nonresponsive parental feeding styles and practices is significant for the development of interventions to prevent childhood obesity. The objectives of this systematic review were to (1) identify and review existing research examining the associations between maternal depressive symptoms and use of nonresponsive feeding styles and practices among mothers of young children (2-8 years of age), (2) highlight the limitations of reviewed studies, and (3) generate suggestions for future research. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols) guidelines, six electronic academic databases were searched for peer-reviewed, full-text papers published in English between January 2000 and June 2016. Only studies with mothers 18+ years old of normally developing children between 2 and 8 years of age were included. Of the 297 citations identified, 35 full-text papers were retrieved and 8 were reviewed. The reviewed studies provided mixed evidence for associations between maternal depressive symptoms and nonresponsive feeding styles and practices. Two out of three studies reported positive associations with nonresponsive feeding styles, in that mothers with elevated depressive symptoms were more likely than mothers without those symptoms to exhibit uninvolved and permissive or indulgent feeding styles. Furthermore, results of reviewed studies provide good evidence for association between maternal depressive symptoms and instrumental feeding (3 of 3 reviewed studies) and nonresponsive family mealtime practices (3/3), but mixed evidence for pressuring children to eat (3/6) and emotional

  7. School-based depression and anxiety prevention programs for young people: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Perry, Yael; Calear, Alison L; Newby, Jill M; Christensen, Helen

    2017-02-01

    Depression and anxiety often emerge for the first time during youth. The school environment provides an ideal context to deliver prevention programs, with potential to offset the trajectory towards disorder. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of randomised-controlled trials of psychological programs, designed to prevent depression and/or anxiety in children and adolescents delivered in school settings. Medline, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for articles published until February 2015. Eighty-one unique studies comprising 31,794 school students met inclusion criteria. Small effect sizes for both depression (g=0.23) and anxiety (g=0.20) prevention programs immediately post-intervention were detected. Small effects were evident after 12-month follow-up for both depression (g=0.11) and anxiety (g=0.13). Overall, the quality of the included studies was poor, and heterogeneity was moderate. Subgroup analyses suggested that universal depression prevention programs had smaller effect sizes at post-test relative to targeted programs. For anxiety, effect sizes were comparable for universal and targeted programs. There was some evidence that externally-delivered interventions were superior to those delivered by school staff for depression, but not anxiety. Meta-regression confirmed that targeted programs predicted larger effect sizes for the prevention of depression. These results suggest that the refinement of school-based prevention programs have the potential to reduce mental health burden and advance public health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Web-Based Interventions Supporting Adolescents and Young People With Depressive Symptoms: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Maritta; Anttila, Katriina; Anttila, Minna; Lahti, Mari

    2017-12-08

    Although previous studies on information and communication technology (ICT)-based intervention on mental health among adolescents with depressive symptoms have already been combined in a number of systematic reviews, coherent information is still missing about interventions used, participants' engagement of these interventions, and how these interventions work. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials to describe the effectiveness of Web-based interventions to support adolescents with depression or depressive symptoms, anxiety, and stress. We also explored the content of the interventions, as there has previously been a lack of coherent understanding of the detailed content of the Web-based interventions for these purposes. We included parallel randomized controlled trials targeted at adolescents, or young people in the age range of 10 and 24 years, with symptoms or diagnoses of depression and anxiety. The interventions were from original studies aimed to support mental health among adolescents, and they were delivered via Web-based information and communication technology. Out of 2087 records identified, 27 papers (22 studies) met the inclusion criteria. On the basis of a narrative analysis of 22 studies, a variety of Web-based interventions were found; the most commonly used intervention was based on cognitive behavioral therapy. Meta-analysis was further conducted with 15 studies (4979 participants). At the end of the intervention, a statistically significant improvement was found in the intervention group (10 studies) regarding depressive symptoms (P=.02, median 1.68, 95% CI 3.11-0.25) and after 6 months (3 studies; P=.01, median 1.78, 95% CI 3.20-0.37). Anxiety symptoms (8 studies; Pstress scores. However, adolescents in the intervention group left the study early more often, both in short-term studies (11 studies; P=.007, median 1.31, 95% CI 1.08-1.58) and mid-term studies (3 studies; P=.02, median 1.65, 95% CI 1.09-2.49). We did not find

  9. Interventions for postnatal depression assessing the mother–infant relationship and child developmental outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsivos ZL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zoe-Lydia Tsivos,1 Rachel Calam,1 Matthew R Sanders,1,2 Anja Wittkowski1 1School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 2Parenting and Family Support Center, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Abstract: Postnatal depression (PND has negative effects on maternal well-being as well as implications for the mother–infant relationship, subsequent infant development, and family functioning. There is growing evidence demonstrating that PND impacts on a mother’s ability to interact with sensitivity and responsiveness as a caregiver, which may have implications for the infant’s development of self-regulatory skills, making the infant more vulnerable to later psychopathology. Given the possible intergenerational transmission of risk to the infant, the mother–infant relationship is a focus for treatment and research. However, few studies have assessed the effect of treatment on the mother–infant relationship and child developmental outcomes. The main aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review and investigate effect sizes of interventions for PND, which assess the quality of the mother–infant dyad relationship and/or child outcomes in addition to maternal mood. Nineteen studies were selected for review, and their methodological quality was evaluated, where possible, effect sizes across maternal mood, quality of dyadic relationship, and child developmental outcomes were calculated. Finally, clinical implications in the treatment of PND are highlighted and recommendations made for further research. Keywords: postnatal depression, infant development, intervention, dyad, mother–infant relationship, systematic review

  10. Long Term Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Gokdag

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to conduct systematic review the articles on long term effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy for treatment of major depressive disorder. Articles in English and Turkish published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (January were searched in national and international databases. The articles that did not include follow-up studies were excluded. Although the main aim of this study is to evaluate permanent effect of the cognitive behavioral group therapy, 21 articles that met the criteria were examined also in terms of some other variables such as research method, therapy characteristics and post test results. The findings of the articles revealed that cognitive-behavioral group therapy is effective for major depressive disorder and post therapy gains are maintained for a long time. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 23-38

  11. Measurement properties of tools used to assess depression in adults with and without autism spectrum conditions: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, S A; Bradley, L; Bowen, E; Wigham, S; Rodgers, J

    2018-01-23

    Depression is the most commonly experienced mental health condition in adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, it is unclear what tools are currently being used to assess depression in ASC, or whether tools need to be adapted for this group. This systematic review therefore aimed to identify tools used to assess depression in adults with and without ASC, and then evaluate these tools for their appropriateness and measurement properties. Medline, PsychINFO and Web of Knowledge were searched for studies of depression in: (a) adults with ASC, without co-morbid intellectual disability; and (b) adults from the general population without co-morbid conditions. Articles examining the measurement properties of these tools were then searched for using a methodological filter in PubMed, and the quality of the evidence was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Twelve articles were identified which utilized three tools to assess depression in adults with ASC, but only one article which assessed the measurement properties of one of these tools was identified and thus evaluated. Sixty-four articles were identified which utilized five tools to assess depression in general population adults, and fourteen articles had assessed the measurement properties of these tools. Overall, two tools were found to be robust in their measurement properties in the general population-the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9). Crucially only one study was identified from the COSMIN search, which showed weak evidence in support of the measurement properties of the BDI-II in an ASC sample. Implications for effective measurement of depression in ASC are discussed. Autism Res 2018. © 2018 The Authors Autism Research published by International Society for Autism Research and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Depression is the most common mental health problem experienced by adults with autism. However, the current study found very limited evidence

  12. [Effects of Aromatherapy on Menopausal Symptoms, Perceived Stress and Depression in Middle-aged Women: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shinmi; Song, Ji Ah; Kim, Mi Eun; Hur, Myung Haeng

    2016-10-01

    This study was a systematic review to evaluate the effects of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms, perceived stress and depression in middle aged-women. Eight databases were searched from their inception September 8, 2015. Two reviewers independently performed the selection of the studies, data abstraction and validations. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane criteria. For analysis of the data, a meta-analysis of the studies was performed. From the electronic databases, 73 articles were selected, and 19 removed due to duplication. After two reviewers read the abstracts of 54 studies, 34 studies were selected. Complete papers for 34 original articles were read and, 12 studies which met selection criteria were reviewed and the effects of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms, stress and depression analyzed using meta-analysis with RevMan. In the 2 studies which included Randomized Controlled Trials testing of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms and comparison of control and placebo groups were done. Aromatherapy massage was favorably effective in reducing the menopausal symptoms compared to the control group (n=118, MD=-6.33; 95% CI -11.51 to -1.15), and compared to the placebo group (n=117, MD=-4.14; 95% CI -7.63 to -0.64). Also aromatherapy was effective in reducing stress (n=72, SMD=-0.64; 95% CI -1.12 to -0.17) and depression (n=158, MD=-5.63; 95% CI -10.04 to -1.22). There is limited evidence suggesting that aromatherapy for middle-aged women may be effective in controlling menopausal symptoms, perceived stress and depression.

  13. Systematic review of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis and its relationship to interferonβ treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba Palé, Leila; León Caballero, Jordi; Samsó Buxareu, Berta; Salgado Serrano, Purificación; Pérez Solà, Víctor

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease considered the major cause of neurological disability in young adults worldwide. While depression is considered a determinant factor of impaired quality of life and poorer prognosis among patients with multiple sclerosis, it is very often dismissed and undertreated by physicians. Depression has been related to treatment with some immunomodulatory drugs, such as IFNβ. Data from patients who committed suicide during the pivotal study of interferon used as a disease modifying treatment in multiple sclerosis support this association. Moreover, there is plenty of evidence of neuropsychiatric toxicity caused by the use of IFNα as a treatment for other medical conditions. Although this link still remains relatively unknown, the presence of warnings regarding the possible relationship between depression and IFNβ led to restriction in medical indications in these patients. The purpose of this paper is to try to understand the reasons for an increased prevalence in depression in multiple sclerosis and to examine the impact that IFNβ treatment has on their mood. We performed a literature search on MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases applying PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. Studies were included if the participants were diagnosed with MS and prescribed IFNβ as the main treatment. We excluded non-english and full-text non available papers, as well as the articles where mental health was assessed exclusively as a feature of quality of life. The sample includes articles from 1980 to 2014, although filtration by year of publication was not applied and contains data from IFNβ-1a and IFNβ-1b. The Cochrane Collaboration Tool assessing risk of bias was used to determine the quality of the studies. Ten studies met full criteria for inclusion and final data extraction. The articles have heterogeneity regarding the samples, the methodology used and the expression of the results. Only three studies support the evidence of a

  14. Depression and risk of mortality in people with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur E P van Dooren

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between depression and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in people with diabetes by systematically reviewing the literature and carrying out a meta-analysis of relevant longitudinal studies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: PUBMED and PSYCINFO were searched for articles assessing mortality risk associated with depression in diabetes up until August 16, 2012. The pooled hazard ratios were calculated using random-effects models. RESULTS: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria, which were pooled in an overall all-cause mortality estimate, and five in a cardiovascular mortality estimate. After adjustment for demographic variables and micro- and macrovascular complications, depression was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.29-1.66, and cardiovascular mortality (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.11-1.73. Heterogeneity across studies was high for all-cause mortality and relatively low for cardiovascular mortality, with an I-squared of respectively 78.6% and 39.6%. Subgroup analyses showed that the association between depression and mortality not significantly change when excluding three articles presenting odds ratios, yet this decreased heterogeneity substantially (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.39-1.61, I-squared = 15.1%. A comparison between type 1 and type 2 diabetes could not be undertaken, as only one study reported on type 1 diabetes specifically. CONCLUSIONS: Depression is associated with an almost 1.5-fold increased risk of mortality in people with diabetes. Research should focus on both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes of death associated with depression, and determine the underlying behavioral and physiological mechanisms that may explain this association.

  15. Computerised therapies for anxiety and depression in children and young people: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennant, Mary E; Loucas, Christina E; Whittington, Craig; Creswell, Cathy; Fonagy, Peter; Fuggle, Peter; Kelvin, Raphael; Naqvi, Sabrina; Stockton, Sarah; Kendall, Tim

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of children and young people (CYP) experience anxiety and/or depression before adulthood, but treatment is sometimes unavailable or inadequate. Self-help interventions may have a role in augmenting treatment and this work aimed to systematically review the evidence for computerised anxiety and depression interventions in CYP aged 5-25 years old. Databases were searched for randomised controlled trials and 27 studies were identified. For young people (12-25 years) with risk of diagnosed anxiety disorders or depression, computerised CBT (cCBT) had positive effects for symptoms of anxiety (SMD -0.77, 95% CI -1.45 to -0.09, k = 6, N = 220) and depression (SMD -0.62, 95% CI -1.13 to -0.11, k = 7, N = 279). In a general population study of young people, there were small positive effects for anxiety (SMD -0.15, 95% CI -0.26 to -0.03; N = 1273) and depression (SMD -0.15, 95% CI -0.26 to -0.03; N = 1280). There was uncertainty around the effectiveness of cCBT in children (5-11 years). Evidence for other computerised interventions was sparse and inconclusive. Computerised CBT has potential for treating and preventing anxiety and depression in clinical and general populations of young people. Further program development and research is required to extend its use and establish its benefit in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cross-National Differences in Psychosocial Factors of Perinatal Depression: A Systematic Review of India and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yukiko; Lazarus, Anisha; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent worldwide. However, there are few available studies that discuss the different cultural factors affecting perinatal depression within Asian countries. This study aims to compare the literature regarding related factors relating to perinatal depression in India and Japan, and to synthesize the evidence common to both countries in addition to the country-specific evidence. We conducted a systematic review using several databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, Pubmed, Ovid, SCOPUS, IndMED, and ICHUSI). Keywords were “antenatal depression” or “postpartum depression”, and “India” or “Japan”. Both Japanese and English language papers were reviewed. The identified evidence was compared between the two countries, as well as with non-Asian countries based on previous reports. In total, 15 articles on India and 35 on Japan were reviewed. Although several factors were shared between the two countries as well as with other non-Asian countries (vulnerable personality, being abused, age, marital conflict, and lower socio-demographic status), some differing factors were identified between India and Japan and non-Asian countries; India: poor socioeconomic status, living only with the husband, pregnancy not welcomed by the husband, a female baby, and poor relationship with in-laws; Japan: infertility treatment, conflict with work–life balance, poor relationships with biological mother or in-laws, and concerns about social relations with the other mother’s friends. To conclude, involving the family and community may be important for implementing both global standardized and culture-specific interventions. In India, treatment involving the in-laws may be effective because large family structure is a significant predictor of perinatal depression. In Japan, a family/community approach involving not only the mother’s family of origin but also the working environment is essential. PMID:29207561

  17. Cross-National Differences in Psychosocial Factors of Perinatal Depression: A Systematic Review of India and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuki Takegata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal depression is prevalent worldwide. However, there are few available studies that discuss the different cultural factors affecting perinatal depression within Asian countries. This study aims to compare the literature regarding related factors relating to perinatal depression in India and Japan, and to synthesize the evidence common to both countries in addition to the country-specific evidence. We conducted a systematic review using several databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, Pubmed, Ovid, SCOPUS, IndMED, and ICHUSI. Keywords were “antenatal depression” or “postpartum depression”, and “India” or “Japan”. Both Japanese and English language papers were reviewed. The identified evidence was compared between the two countries, as well as with non-Asian countries based on previous reports. In total, 15 articles on India and 35 on Japan were reviewed. Although several factors were shared between the two countries as well as with other non-Asian countries (vulnerable personality, being abused, age, marital conflict, and lower socio-demographic status, some differing factors were identified between India and Japan and non-Asian countries; India: poor socioeconomic status, living only with the husband, pregnancy not welcomed by the husband, a female baby, and poor relationship with in-laws; Japan: infertility treatment, conflict with work–life balance, poor relationships with biological mother or in-laws, and concerns about social relations with the other mother’s friends. To conclude, involving the family and community may be important for implementing both global standardized and culture-specific interventions. In India, treatment involving the in-laws may be effective because large family structure is a significant predictor of perinatal depression. In Japan, a family/community approach involving not only the mother’s family of origin but also the working environment is essential.

  18. Dropout Prevalence and Associated Factors in Randomized Clinical Trials of Adolescents Treated for Depression: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohden, Adriane Isabel; Benchaya, Mariana Canellas; Camargo, Roger Santos; Moreira, Taís de Campos; Barros, Helena M T; Ferigolo, Maristela

    2017-05-01

    Depression currently affects 350 million people, and its prevalence among adolescents is 4% to 8%. Adolescents who abandon antidepressant treatment or drop out of clinical trials are less likely to recover or experience a remission of symptoms because they are not being followed up by a medical team. The objective of this study was to analyze the dropout rates of randomized clinical trials of depressed adolescents receiving treatment with antidepressant drugs and the factors associated with nonadherence by summarizing this information in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Articles were retrieved from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Clinical Trial, PsycINFO, and Web of Science using the MeSH terms "depressive disorder," "randomized trials," and "adolescents." The evaluation of study quality was performed by using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the Jadad scale. The final sample included 50 articles, of which 44 presented dropout rates. The overall dropout prevalence was 23% (95% CI, 20-27; P dropout prevalence, respectively (33% [95% CI, 27-39], 45% [95% CI, 31-64], and 15% [95% CI, 13-17]). The adverse effects most associated with dropout were attempted suicide followed by mania, skin rash, and headache. Problems relating to clinical trials and family arbitration were also related with dropout. Serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor treatment, adolescent age >16 years, and receiving medication were the only factors demonstrating a higher association with dropout rates. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were linked to the lowest prevalence, probably due to fewer perceived problems with related adverse effects and higher efficacy in adolescents. Cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with pharmacotherapy produced a lower nonadherence prevalence; this approach can be an alternative to avoid dropouts and relapse. Prospero identifier: CRD42014013475. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Placebo response of non-pharmacological and pharmacological trials in major depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Russowsky Brunoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although meta-analyses have shown that placebo responses are large in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD trials; the placebo response of devices such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has not been systematically assessed. We proposed to assess placebo responses in two categories of MDD trials: pharmacological (antidepressant drugs and non-pharmacological (device- rTMS trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature from April 2002 to April 2008, searching MEDLINE, Cochrane, Scielo and CRISP electronic databases and reference lists from retrieved studies and conference abstracts. We used the keywords placebo and depression and escitalopram for pharmacological studies; and transcranial magnetic stimulation and depression and sham for non-pharmacological studies. All randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel articles on major depressive disorder were included. Forty-one studies met our inclusion criteria - 29 in the rTMS arm and 12 in the escitalopram arm. We extracted the mean and standard values of depression scores in the placebo group of each study. Then, we calculated the pooled effect size for escitalopram and rTMS arm separately, using Cohen's d as the measure of effect size. We found that placebo response are large for both escitalopram (Cohen's d - random-effects model - 1.48; 95%C.I. 1.26 to 1.6 and rTMS studies (0.82; 95%C.I. 0.63 to 1. Exploratory analyses show that sham response is associated with refractoriness and with the use of rTMS as an add-on therapy, but not with age, gender and sham method utilized. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We confirmed that placebo response in MDD is large regardless of the intervention and is associated with depression refractoriness and treatment combination (add-on rTMS studies. The magnitude of the placebo response seems to be related with study population and study design rather than the intervention

  20. Depression screening and patient outcomes in cardiovascular care : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Whooley, Mary A.; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Mitchell, Alex J.; Zuidersma, Marij; Eze-Nliam, Chete; Lima, Bruno B.; Smith, Cheri G.; Soderlund, Karl; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2008-01-01

    Context Several practice guidelines recommend that depression be evaluated and treated in patients with cardiovascular disease, but the potential benefits of this are unclear. Objective To evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in patients with cardiovascular disease by assessing (

  1. The co-existence of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms in the perinatal period: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Andee; Xuereb, Rita Borg; Carrick-Sen, Debbie; Sultana, Roberta; Rankin, Judith

    2016-05-01

    to identify and appraise the current international evidence regarding the presence and prevalence of the co-existence of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms in the antenatal and post partum period. using a list of keywords, Medline, CINHAL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Web of Science and the Index of Theses and Conference Proceedings (Jan 1960 - Jan 2015) were systematically searched. Experts in the field were contacted to locate papers that were in progress or in press. Reference lists from relevant review articles were searched. Inclusion criteria included full papers published in English reporting concurrent depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms in pregnant and post partum women. A validated data extraction review tool was used. 3424 citations were identified. Three studies met the full inclusion criteria. All reported findings in the postnatal period. No antenatal studies were identified. The prevalence of triple co-morbidity was relatively low ranging from 2% to 3%. triple co-morbidity does occur, although the prevalence appears to be low. Due to the presentation of complex symptoms, women with triple co-morbidity are likely to be difficult to identify, diagnose and treat. Clinical staff should be aware of the potential of complex symptomatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Helplessness: a systematic translational review of theory and evidence for its relevance to understanding and treating depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Christopher R; Azzinnari, Damiano; Spinelli, Simona; Seifritz, Erich; Tegethoff, Marion; Meinlschmidt, Gunther

    2011-12-01

    Helplessness is a major concept in depression and a major theme in preclinical and clinical depression research. For example, in rodents and humans, the learned helplessness (LH) effect describes a specific deficit in behaviour to control aversive stimuli that is induced by prior exposure to uncontrollable aversive stimuli. The LH effect is objective and valid in that the cause of the behavioural deficit, namely uncontrollability, is clear; furthermore, the deficit induced is underlain by emotional, motivational and cognitive processes that are relevant to depression psychopathology. As a further example, helplessness, hopelessness, external locus of control and causal attribution are inter-related and major themes in psychological theories (primarily cognitive theories) of depression. Despite this broad interest in helplessness, it can be argued that its potential usefulness as a scientific and clinical concept has so far not been investigated optimally, including with respect to its application in research aimed at development of improved anti-depressant pharmacotherapy. The first aim of this review was to describe and integrate the psychological evidence and the neurobiological evidence for the LH effect in rodents and healthy humans and for helplessness in depressed patients. The second aim was to conduct three systematic reviews, namely of rodent studies of the LH effect, rodent studies of effects of psychopharmacological agents on the LH effect, and human studies of efficacy of pharmacotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic treatment on helplessness in depressed patients. With respect to the first aim, the major findings are: the specificity of the LH effect in otherwise non-manipulated rodents and healthy humans has been under-estimated, and the LH effect is a specific learned aversive uncontrollability (LAU) effect. There is theoretical and empirical support for a model in which a specific LAU effect induced by a life event of major emotional significance can

  3. The effect of an elective cesarean section on maternal request on peripartum anxiety and depression in women with childbirth fear: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Olieman, Renske M; Siemonsma, Femke; Bartens, Margaux A; Niegel, Susan; Scheele, Fedde; Honig, Adriaan

    2017-01-01

    Background Obstetricians are often reluctant to grant requests for an elective cesarean section (ECS) due to childbirth fear. To date, it is unknown if an ECS on request improves mental well-being in the mother in the peripartum period and if possible beneficial effects on anxiety and depression could outweigh the increased risk of complications associated with a surgical delivery. A systematic review was conducted to explore the effect of ECS on request on peripartum anxiety and depression. ...

  4. Prognostic factors for return to work after depression-related work disability: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Jenni; Joensuu, Matti; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Ahola, Kirsi; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimäki, Mika; Virtanen, Marianna

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge about factors influencing return to work (RTW) after depression-related absence is highly relevant, but the evidence is scattered. We performed a systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases up to February 1, 2016 to retrieve cohort studies on the association between various predictive factors and return to work among employees with depression for review and meta-analysis. We also analyzed unpublished data from the Finnish Public Sector study. Most-adjusted estimates were pooled using fixed effects meta-analysis. Eleven published studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria, representing 22 358 person-observations from five different countries. With the additional unpublished data from the 14 101 person-observations from the Finnish Public Sector study, the total number of person-observations was 36 459. The pooled estimates were derived from 2 to 5 studies, with the number of observations ranging from 260 to 26 348. Older age (pooled relative risk [RR] 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.87), somatic comorbidity (RR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.77-0.83), psychiatric comorbidity (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.83-0.88) and more severe depression (RR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98) were associated with a lower rate of return to work, and personality trait conscientiousness with higher (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10) return to work. While older age and clinical factors predicted slower return, significant heterogeneity was observed between the studies. There is a dearth of observational studies on the predictors of RTW after depression. Future research should pay attention to quality aspects and particularly focus on the role of workplace and labor market factors as well as individual and clinical characteristics on RTW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Madsen, Ida Eh; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Lallukka, Tea; Nyberg, Solja T; Alfredsson, Lars; Batty, G David; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Ferrie, Jane E; Heikkilä, Katriina; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Lahelma, Eero; Nielsen, Martin L; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rahkonen, Ossi; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Schupp, Jürgen; Shipley, Martin J; Siegrist, Johannes; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Wagner, Gert G; Wang, Jian Li; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Westerlund, Hugo; Kivimäki, Mika

    2018-05-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies. Results We identified ten published cohort studies and included unpublished individual-participant data from 18 studies. In the majority of cohorts, long working hours was defined as working ≥55 hours per week. In multivariable-adjusted meta-analyses of 189 729 participants from 35 countries [96 275 men, 93 454 women, follow-up ranging from 1-5 years, 21 747 new-onset cases), there was an overall association of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.25] between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms, with significant evidence of heterogeneity (I 2 =45.1%, P=0.004). A moderate association between working hours and depressive symptoms was found in Asian countries (1.50, 95% CI 1.13-2.01), a weaker association in Europe (1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), and no association in North America (0.97, 95% CI 0.70-1.34) or Australia (0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.29). Differences by other characteristics were small. Conclusions This observational evidence suggests a moderate association between long working hours and onset of depressive symptoms in Asia and a small association in Europe.

  6. Prevalence of Depression among University Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Sarokhani; Ali Delpisheh; Yousef Veisani; Mohamad Taher Sarokhani; Rohollah Esmaeli Manesh; Kourosh Sayehmiri

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Depression is one of the four major diseases in the world and is the most common cause of disability from diseases. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of depression among Iranian university students using meta-analysis method. Materials and Methods. Keyword depression was searched in electronic databases such as PubMed, Scopus, MAGIran, Medlib, and SID. Data was analyzed using meta-analysis (random-effects model). Heterogeneity of studies was assessed using ...

  7. Psychological Distress, Anxiety, and Depression of Cancer-Affected BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Johanna; Wochnowski, Christina; Bosse, Kristin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Schäffeler, Norbert; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the intermediate- and long-term psychological consequences of genetic testing for cancer patients has led to encouraging research, but a clear consensus of the psychosocial impact and clinical routine for cancer-affected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is still missing. We performed a systematic review of intermediate- and long-term studies investigating the psychological impact like psychological distress, anxiety, and depression in cancer-affected BRCA mutation carriers compared to unaffected mutation carriers. This review included the screening of 1243 studies. Eight intermediate- and long-term studies focusing on distress, anxiety, and depression symptoms among cancer-affected mutation carriers at least six months after the disclosure of genetic testing results were included. Studies reported a great variety of designs, methods, and patient outcomes. We found evidence indicating that cancer-affected mutation carriers experienced a negative effect in relation to psychological well-being in terms of an increase in symptoms of distress, anxiety, and depression in the first months after test disclosure. In the intermediate- and long-term, no significant clinical relevant symptoms occurred. However, none of the included studies used specific measurements, which can clearly identify psychological burdens of cancer-affected mutation carriers. We concluded that current well-implemented distress screening instruments are not sufficient for precisely identifying the psychological burden of genetic testing. Therefore, future studies should implement coping strategies, specific personality structures, the impact of genetic testing, supportive care needs and disease management behaviour to clearly screen for the possible intermediate- and long-term psychological impact of a positive test disclosure.

  8. Treatment of depression with Chai Hu Shu Gan San: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 42 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Xu, Xia; Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuanyuan

    2018-02-17

    Depression is a common mental disorder. Chai Hu Shu Gan San, a traditional Chinese medicine, is used to treat depression empirically. We present a systematic review and meta-analysis of the therapeutic efficacy and safety of Chai Hu Shu Gan San in treating depression. Several databases, including PubMed, China National Knowledge Internet, Wanfang, Chongqing VIP, and the Cochrane library, were systematically searched from their date of foundation to January 1, 2017. In this review, wehave included randomized control trials that compared Chai Hu Shu Gan San (or its combination with a regular Western medicine) with a regular Western medicine alone for the treatment of depression. Two investigators independently extracted and analyzed the data using RevMan 5.2.0 software. Mean difference (with a 95% confidence interval) was used as efficacy indices for outcomes. We included 42 studies involving 3234 patients with depression in 15 different types of diseases. Meta analyses showed better effect of Chai Hu Shu Gan San than fluoxetine for pure depression (MD = - 1.59, from - 2.82 to - 0.37, 4 trials, I 2  = 26%), for post-stroke depression (MD = - 4.20, from - 6.20 to - 2.19, 7 trials, I 2  = 96%), and for postpartum depression (MD = - 4.10, from - 7.48 to - 0.72 7 trials, I 2  = 86%). None of the articles reported severe adverse events of oral administration of Chai Hu Shu Gan San. Furthermore, any adverse effects of using Chai Hu Shu Gan San alone were fewer than those of regular Western medicines. This review found that Chai Hu Shu Gan San has some advantages in treating depression, especially post-stroke depression and post-partum depression. A meticulously designed and conducted randomized control trial is needed for further evaluation.

  9. A systematic review of studies of depression prevalence in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed K; Kelly, Shona J; Adams, Clive E; Glazebrook, Cris

    2013-03-01

    Depression is a common health problem, ranking third after cardiac and respiratory diseases as a major cause of disability. There is evidence to suggest that university students are at higher risk of depression, despite being a socially advantaged population, but the reported rates have shown wide variability across settings. To explore the prevalence of depression in university students. PubMed, PsycINFO, BioMed Central and Medline were searched to identify studies published between 1990 and 2010 reporting on depression prevalence among university students. Searches used a combination of the terms depression, depressive symptoms, depressive disorders, prevalence, university students, college students, undergraduate students, adolescents and/or young adults. Studies were evaluated with a quality rating. Twenty-four articles were identified that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reported prevalence rates ranged from 10% to 85% with a weighted mean prevalence of 30.6%. The results suggest that university students experience rates of depression that are substantially higher than those found in the general population. Study quality has not improved since 1990. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ketamine administration in depressive disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Guillaume; Loundou, Anderson; Rabu, Corentin; Macgregor, Alexandra; Lançon, Christophe; Brittner, Marie; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Richieri, Raphaelle; Courtet, Philippe; Abbar, Mocrane; Roger, Matthieu; Leboyer, Marion; Boyer, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Ketamine's efficacy in depressive disorders has been established in several controlled trials. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not ketamine administration significantly improves depressive symptomatology in depression and more specifically in major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar depression, resistant depression (non-ECT studies), and as an anesthetic agent in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for resistant depression (ECT studies). Secondary outcomes were the duration of ketamine's effect, the efficacy on suicidal ideations, the existence of a dose effect, and the safety/tolerance of the treatment. Studies were included if they met the following criteria (without any language or date restriction): design: randomized controlled trials, intervention: ketamine administration, participants: diagnosis of depression, and evaluation of severity based on a validated scale. We calculated standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for each study. We used fixed and random effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. We included nine non-ECT studies in our quantitative analysis (192 patients with major depressive disorder and 34 patients with bipolar depression). Overall, depression scores were significantly decreased in the ketamine groups compared to those in the control groups (SMD = -0.99; 95 % CI -1.23, -0.75; p depression (SMD = -1.34; 95 % CI -1.94, -0.75), and in drug-free patients as well as patients under medication. Four ECT trials (118 patients) were included in our quantitative analysis. One hundred and three patients were diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 15 with bipolar depression. Overall, depression scores were significantly improved in the 58 patients receiving ketamine in ECT anesthesia induction compared to the 60 patients (SMD = -0.56; 95 % CI -1.10, -0.02; p = 0.04; I2 = 52.4 %). The duration of ketamine's effects was assessed in only two non

  11. The Effect of Mindfulness-Based Therapy on Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Adult Cancer Patients and Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piet, Jacob; Wurtzen, Hanne; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The use of mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) in oncology settings has become increasingly popular, and research in the field has rapidly expanded. The objective was by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the current evidence for the effect of MBT on symptoms of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients and…

  12. Immigrant women's experiences of postpartum depression in Canada: a protocol for systematic review using a narrative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Gina M A; Morgan, Myfanwy; O'Mahony, Joyce; Chiu, Yvonne; Kocay, Deb; Alexandre, Mirande; Forgeron, Joan; Young, Marilyn

    2013-08-21

    Literature documents that immigrant women in Canada have a higher prevalence of postpartum depression symptomatology than Canadian-born women. There exists a need to synthesize information on the contextual factors and social determinants of health that influence immigrant women's reception of and behavior in accessing existing mental health services. Our research question is: what are the ethnoculturally defined patterns of help-seeking behaviors and decision-making and other predictive factors for therapeutic mental health care access and outcomes with respect to postpartum depression for immigrant women in Canada? Our synthesis incorporates a systematic review using narrative synthesis of reports (peer- and non-peer reviewed) of empirical research and aims to provide stakeholders with perspectives on postpartum mental health care services as experienced by immigrant women. To reach this goal we are using integrated knowledge translation, thus partnering with key stakeholders throughout the planning, implementation and dissemination stages to ensure topic relevancy and impact on future practice and policy. The search and selection strategies draw upon established systematic review methodologies as outlined by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and also incorporate guidelines for selection and appraisal of gray literature. Two search phases (a database and a gray literature phase) will identify literature for screening and final selection based on an inclusion/exclusion checklist. Quality appraisal will be performed using the tools produced by the Centre for Evidence Based Management. The narrative synthesis will be informed by Popay et al. (2006) framework using identified tools for each of its four elements. The integrated knowledge translation plan will ensure key messages are delivered in an audience-specific manner to optimize their impact on policy and practice change throughout health service, public health, immigration and community sectors. The

  13. Immigrant women’s experiences of postpartum depression in Canada: a protocol for systematic review using a narrative synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Literature documents that immigrant women in Canada have a higher prevalence of postpartum depression symptomatology than Canadian-born women. There exists a need to synthesize information on the contextual factors and social determinants of health that influence immigrant women’s reception of and behavior in accessing existing mental health services. Our research question is: what are the ethnoculturally defined patterns of help-seeking behaviors and decision-making and other predictive factors for therapeutic mental health care access and outcomes with respect to postpartum depression for immigrant women in Canada? Methods/design Our synthesis incorporates a systematic review using narrative synthesis of reports (peer- and non-peer reviewed) of empirical research and aims to provide stakeholders with perspectives on postpartum mental health care services as experienced by immigrant women. To reach this goal we are using integrated knowledge translation, thus partnering with key stakeholders throughout the planning, implementation and dissemination stages to ensure topic relevancy and impact on future practice and policy. The search and selection strategies draw upon established systematic review methodologies as outlined by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and also incorporate guidelines for selection and appraisal of gray literature. Two search phases (a database and a gray literature phase) will identify literature for screening and final selection based on an inclusion/exclusion checklist. Quality appraisal will be performed using the tools produced by the Centre for Evidence Based Management. The narrative synthesis will be informed by Popay et al. (2006) framework using identified tools for each of its four elements. The integrated knowledge translation plan will ensure key messages are delivered in an audience-specific manner to optimize their impact on policy and practice change throughout health service, public health, immigration and

  14. Prevalence of Depression among University Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Sarokhani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Depression is one of the four major diseases in the world and is the most common cause of disability from diseases. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of depression among Iranian university students using meta-analysis method. Materials and Methods. Keyword depression was searched in electronic databases such as PubMed, Scopus, MAGIran, Medlib, and SID. Data was analyzed using meta-analysis (random-effects model. Heterogeneity of studies was assessed using the I2 index. Data was analyzed using STATA software Ver.10. Results. In 35 studies conducted in Iran from 1995 to 2012 with sample size of 9743, prevalence of depression in the university students was estimated to be 33% (95% CI: 32–34. The prevalence of depression among boys was estimated to be 28% (95% CI: 26–30, among girls 23% (95% CI: 22–24, single students 39% (95% CI: 37–41, and married students 20% (95% CI: 17–24. Metaregression model showed that the trend of depression among Iranian students was flat. Conclusions. On the whole, depression is common in university students with no preponderance between males and females and in single students is higher than married ones.

  15. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Brief Versus Ultrabrief Right Unilateral Electroconvulsive Therapy for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor, Phern-Chern; Bautovich, Alison; Wang, Min-Jung; Martin, Donel; Harvey, Samuel B; Loo, Colleen

    2015-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective depression treatment, but it has potential cognitive side effects. Ultrabrief pulse (UBP) right unilateral (RUL) ECT is an increasingly used treatment option that can potentially combine efficacy with lesser cognitive side effects. However, current trials are underpowered or have conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative efficacy and cognitive effects of brief pulse (BP) and UBP RUL ECT. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, DARE, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched with the search terms ECT, electroconvulsive therapy, electroconvulsive shock, electroconvulsive shock therapy, electrical stimulation, electroconvulsive combined with brief, ultra*, pulse, and trial in English, all fields including title, abstract, subject heading, and full text up to June 20, 2013, for studies comparing BP and UBP RUL ECT in depressed patients that reported formalized mood ratings for depression. Six studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising a total of 689 patients. Efficacy, cognitive, response, and remission outcomes were extracted from each publication or obtained directly from authors. BP RUL ECT was significantly more efficacious in treating depression than UBP RUL ECT (standardized mean difference = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08–0.41; P = .004) but showed significantly more cognitive side effects in all cognitive domains examined (global cognition, anterograde learning and recall, retrograde memory) (P < .01). The mean number of treatment sessions given was 8.7 for BP ECT and 9.6 for UBP ECT (P < .001). UBP had a lower remission rate (OR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51–0.99; P = .045), with a number needed to treat of 12.1. BP compared with UBP RUL ECT was slightly more efficacious in treating depression and required fewer treatment sessions, but led to greater cognitive side effects. The decision of whether to use BP or UBP RUL ECT should be made on an

  16. Clinical efficacy and economic evaluation of online cognitive behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Elayne; Kinsella, Stephen; Semkovska, Maria

    2018-02-01

    Leading cause of disability worldwide, depression is the most prevalent mental disorder with growing societal costs. As mental health services demand often outweighs provision, accessible treatment options are needed. Our systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the clinical efficacy and economic evidence for the use of online cognitive behavioral therapy (oCBT) as an accessible treatment solution for depression. Areas covered: Electronic databases were searched for controlled trials published between 2006 and 2016. Of the reviewed 3,324 studies, 29 met the criteria for inclusion in the efficacy meta-analysis. The systematic review identified five oCBT economic evaluations. Therapist-supported oCBT was equivalent to face-to-face CBT at improving depressive symptoms and superior to treatment-as-usual, waitlist control, and attention control. Depression severity, number of sessions, or support did not affect efficacy. From a healthcare provider perspective, oCBT tended to show greater costs with greater benefits in the short term, relative to comparator treatments. Expert commentary: Although efficacious, further economic evidence is required to support the provision of oCBT as a cost-effective treatment for depression. Economic evaluations that incorporate a societal perspective will better account for direct and indirect treatment costs. Nevertheless, oCBT shows promise of effectively improving depressive symptoms, considering limited mental healthcare resources.

  17. Characteristics of effective collaborative care for treatment of depression: a systematic review and meta-regression of 74 randomised controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Coventry

    Full Text Available Collaborative care is a complex intervention based on chronic disease management models and is effective in the management of depression. However, there is still uncertainty about which components of collaborative care are effective. We used meta-regression to identify factors in collaborative care associated with improvement in patient outcomes (depressive symptoms and the process of care (use of anti-depressant medication.Systematic review with meta-regression. The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials registers were searched from inception to 9th February 2012. An update was run in the CENTRAL trials database on 29th December 2013. Inclusion criteria were: randomised controlled trials of collaborative care for adults ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of depression or mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. Random effects meta-regression was used to estimate regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (CIs between study level covariates and depressive symptoms and relative risk (95% CI and anti-depressant use. The association between anti-depressant use and improvement in depression was also explored. Seventy four trials were identified (85 comparisons, across 21,345 participants. Collaborative care that included psychological interventions predicted improvement in depression (β coefficient -0.11, 95% CI -0.20 to -0.01, p = 0.03. Systematic identification of patients (relative risk 1.43, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.81, p = 0.004 and the presence of a chronic physical condition (relative risk 1.32, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.65, p = 0.02 predicted use of anti-depressant medication.Trials of collaborative care that included psychological treatment, with or without anti-depressant medication, appeared to improve depression more than those without psychological treatment. Trials that used systematic methods to identify patients with depression and also trials that included patients with a chronic physical

  18. Screening for Postpartum Depression in Well-Baby Care Settings: : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Angarath; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Haasnoot-Smallegange, Riet M.E.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Postpartum depression (PPD) is a mental health problem frequently experienced by mothers in the first year postpartum. Early detection and treatment can help to reduce its negative effect on the development of the newborn child. Well-baby care (WBC) is a promising screening setting for

  19. Cognitive impairment in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Bo Jacob; Knorr, Ulla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether cognitive impairment is prevalent in the remitted state of unipolar disorder. AIM: To evaluate whether cognitive function is impaired in the remitted state in patients with unipolar depression compared with healthy control individuals, and to investigate the asso...

  20. Objective cognitive performance associated with electroconvulsive therapy for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semkovska, Maria

    2010-09-15

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most acutely effective treatment for depression, but is limited by cognitive side effects. However, research on their persistence, severity, and pattern is inconsistent. We aimed to quantify ECT-associated cognitive changes, specify their pattern, and determine progression.

  1. Effective Treatments of Late-Life Depression in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokwon; Moon, Sung Seek; Pitner, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify effective treatment to manage the depression of older residents. Methods: Using Klein and Bloom's criteria, we analyzed the number of subjects, designs and methodologies, residential types, intervention types and duration of treatment, standardized measures, and findings. Data searches were…

  2. Adherence to Self-Care Interventions for Depression or Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simco, Russell; McCusker, Jane; Sewitch, Maida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to synthesise and describe adherence to intervention in published studies of supported self-care for depression or anxiety, and to identify participant characteristics associated with higher adherence. Methods: We searched the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCINFO for the period from January…

  3. Stress, burnout and depression : A systematic review on DNA methylation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakusic, Jelena; Schaufeli, Wilmar; Claes, Stephan; Godderis, Lode

    2017-01-01

    Despite that burnout presents a serious burden for modern society, there are no diagnostic criteria. Additional difficulty is the differential diagnosis with depression. Consequently, there is a need to dispose of a burnout biomarker. Epigenetic studies suggest that DNA methylation is a possible

  4. Switching antidepressants after a first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in major depressive disorder: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Huyser, Jochanan; Swinkels, Jan A.; Schene, Aart H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently used as a first antidepressant for major depressive disorder but have response rates of 50% to 60% in daily practice. For patients with insufficient response to SSRIs, switching is often applied. This article aims to

  5. Screening for Postpartum Depression in Well-Baby Care Settings : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee-van den Berg, Angarath I.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; IJzerman, Maarten J; Haasnoot-Smallegange, Riet M. E.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    Introduction Postpartum depression (PPD) is a mental health problem frequently experienced by mothers in the first year postpartum. Early detection and treatment can help to reduce its negative effect on the development of the newborn child. Well-baby care (WBC) is a promising screening setting for

  6. The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale: A systematic review and reliability generalization meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, Jose A; Martín-Vivar, María; Sandin, Bonifacio; San Luis, Concepción; Pineda, David

    2017-08-15

    Anxiety and depression are among the most common mental disorders during childhood and adolescence. Among the instruments for the brief screening assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression, the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) is one of the more widely used. Previous studies have demonstrated the reliability of the RCADS for different assessment settings and different versions. The aims of this study were to examine the mean reliability of the RCADS and the influence of the moderators on the RCADS reliability. We searched in EBSCO, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and NCBI databases and other articles manually from lists of references of extracted articles. A total of 146 studies were included in our meta-analysis. The RCADS showed robust internal consistency reliability in different assessment settings, countries, and languages. We only found that reliability of the RCADS was significantly moderated by the version of RCADS. However, these differences in reliability between different versions of the RCADS were slight and can be due to the number of items. We did not examine factor structure, factorial invariance across gender, age, or country, and test-retest reliability of the RCADS. The RCADS is a reliable instrument for cross-cultural use, with the advantage of providing more information with a low number of items in the assessment of both anxiety and depression symptoms in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. INFLUENCE OF PERSONALITY ON THE OUTCOME OF TREATMENT IN DEPRESSION : SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton-Howes, Giles; Tyrer, Peter; Johnson, Tony; Mulder, Roger; Kool, Simone; Dekker, Jack; Schoevers, Robert

    There continues to be debate about the influence of personality disorder on the outcome of depressive disorders and is relative interactions with treatment. To determine whether personality disorder, both generically and in terms of individual clusters, leads to a worse outcome in patients with

  8. Depression as a risk factor for poor prognosis among patients with acute coronary syndrome: systematic review and recommendations: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Judith H; Froelicher, Erika S; Blumenthal, James A; Carney, Robert M; Doering, Lynn V; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Freedland, Kenneth E; Jaffe, Allan S; Leifheit-Limson, Erica C; Sheps, David S; Vaccarino, Viola; Wulsin, Lawson

    2014-03-25

    Although prospective studies, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses have documented an association between depression and increased morbidity and mortality in a variety of cardiac populations, depression has not yet achieved formal recognition as a risk factor for poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome by the American Heart Association and other health organizations. The purpose of this scientific statement is to review available evidence and recommend whether depression should be elevated to the status of a risk factor for patients with acute coronary syndrome. Writing group members were approved by the American Heart Association's Scientific Statement and Manuscript Oversight Committees. A systematic literature review on depression and adverse medical outcomes after acute coronary syndrome was conducted that included all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality, and composite outcomes for mortality and nonfatal events. The review assessed the strength, consistency, independence, and generalizability of the published studies. A total of 53 individual studies (32 reported on associations with all-cause mortality, 12 on cardiac mortality, and 22 on composite outcomes) and 4 meta-analyses met inclusion criteria. There was heterogeneity across studies in terms of the demographic composition of study samples, definition and measurement of depression, length of follow-up, and covariates included in the multivariable models. Despite limitations in some individual studies, our review identified generally consistent associations between depression and adverse outcomes. Despite the heterogeneity of published studies included in this review, the preponderance of evidence supports the recommendation that the American Heart Association should elevate depression to the status of a risk factor for adverse medical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

  9. Positive postpartum depression screening practices and subsequent mental health treatment for low-income women in Western countries: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansotte, Elinor; Payne, Shirley I; Babich, Suzanne M

    2017-01-01

    Left undiagnosed and/or untreated, the short-and long-term sequelae of postpartum depression may negatively impact both mother and child. In Western countries, access to mental health care is influenced by socioeconomic factors. The objective of this systematic literature review is to compile factors that hinder and improve access to postpartum depression treatment in low-income women after a positive screen for postpartum depression. The key question of focus is: what are the characteristics associated with access to mental health treatment for low-income women with a positive postpartum depression screen in Western countries? A PRISMA-based systematic literature review was conducted of studies published in English before February 2016 that looked at treatment for postpartum depression in low-income women who had been identified with the condition. PubMed and EBSCO databases were searched using MESH and key terms and found 100 articles that met the selection criteria. After review by two independent researchers, 18 studies with 17 unique populations were included in the literature review. Two independent abstractors searched the included articles for themes surrounding impediments and advantages for low-income women identified with postpartum depression in obtaining mental health treatment. Characteristics of successful mental health treatment included studies that employed the use of a home visitor and those that separated outcomes for women with previous mental health treatment. Themes that emerged as treatment obstacles included cultural barriers, physical barriers, systemic health care barriers, and social barriers. This review will help to better inform screening and treatment priorities for those in the medical field who may encounter women experiencing postpartum depression and are not aware of the various barriers to care specific to low-income women. This review will also help policymakers identify specific obstacles that are not addressed in postpartum

  10. Huperzine A for treatment of cognitive impairment in major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, F K Helen; H Ng, Chee; Wang, Ying; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-04-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors have been shown to be effective in treating cognitive impairment in animal models and in human subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Huperzine A (HupA), a Traditional Chinese Medicine derived from a genus of clubmosses known as Huperzineserrata, is a powerful AChE inhibitor that has been used as an adjunctive treatment for MDD, but no meta-analysis on HupA augmentation for MDD has yet been reported. Conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTS) about HupA augmentation in the treatment of MDD to evaluate its efficacy and safety. Two evaluators independently searched nine English-language and Chinese-language databases, selected relevant studies that met pre-determined inclusion criteria, extracted data about outcome and safety, and conducted quality assessments and data synthesis. Three low-quality RCTs (pooled n=238) from China were identified that compared monotherapy antidepressant treatment for depression versus combined treatment with antidepressants and HupA. Participants in the studies ranged from 16 to 60 years of age. The average duration of adjunctive antidepressant and HupA treatment in the studies was only 6.7 weeks. All three studies were open label and non-blinded, so their overall quality was judged as poor. Meta-analysis of the pooled sample found no significant difference in the improvement in depressive symptoms between the two groups (weighted mean difference: -1.90 (95%CI: -4.23, 0.44), p=0.11). However, the adjunctive HupA group did have significantly greater improvement than the antidepressant only group in cognitive functioning (as assessed by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised) and in quality of life. There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse drug reactions between groups. The data available on the effectiveness and safety of adjunctive treatment using HupA in patients with MDD who are receiving

  11. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette Hedeager; Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW OBJECTIVE/QUESTION: The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD). Specifically, the review question is: What is the effectiveness of expanded CR compared to standard CR in adult...

  12. Incidence, prevalence and clinical correlates of antidepressant-emergent mania in bipolar depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Anastasia, Annalisa; Novello, Stefano; Fusco, Andrea; Solmi, Marco; Monaco, Francesco; Veronese, Nicola; De Berardis, Domenico; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    Treatment-emergent mania (TEM) represents a common phenomenon inconsistently reported across primary studies, warranting further assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines were conducted. Major electronic databases were searched from inception to May 2017 to assess the incidence and prevalence rates and clinical features associated with manic switch among bipolar depressed patients receiving antidepressants, using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Overall, 10 098 depressed patients with bipolar disorder (BD) across 51 studies/arms were included in the quantitative analysis. The cumulative incidence of cases (TEM + ) among 4767 patients with BD over 15 retrospective studies was 30.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.6-45.0%, I 2  = 97.9%). The cumulative incidence of TEM + among 1929 patients with BD over 12 prospective open studies was 14.4% (95% CI 7.4-26.1%, I 2  = 93.7%). The cumulative incidence of TEM + among 1316 patients with BD over 20 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was 11.8% (95% CI 8.4-16.34%, I 2  = 73.46%). The pooled prevalence of TEM + among 2086 patients with BD over four cross-sectional studies was 30.9% (95% CI 18.1-47.4%, I 2  = 95.6%). Overall, concurrent lithium therapy predicted the lowest TEM rates. Inconsistent operational definitions of TEM were recorded, and the lack of information about age, sex, co-occurring anxiety, and other clinically relevant moderators precluded further stratification of the results. Rates of TEM vary primarily depending on study setting, which is concordant with the high degree of heterogeneity of the included records. Forthcoming RCT studies should adopt consistent operational definitions of TEM and broaden the number of moderators, in order to contribute most effectively to the identification of clear-cut sub-phenotypes of

  13. Magnetic Seizure Therapy for Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cretaz, Eric; Brunoni, Andr? R.; Lafer, Beny

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) is a novel, experimental therapeutic intervention, which combines therapeutic aspects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation, in order to achieve the efficacy of the former with the safety of the latter. MST might prove to be a valuable tool in the treatment of mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Our aim is to r...

  14. Model-Based Economic Evaluation of Treatments for Depression: A Systematic Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolovos, Spyros; Bosmans, Judith E.; Riper, Heleen

    2017-01-01

    eligible if they used a health economic model with quality-adjusted life-years or disability-adjusted life-years as an outcome measure. Data related to various methodological characteristics were extracted from the included studies. The available modelling techniques were evaluated based on 11 predefined......, and DES models in seven.ConclusionThere were substantial methodological differences between the studies. Since the individual history of each patient is important for the prognosis of depression, DES and ISM simulation methods may be more appropriate than the others for a pragmatic representation...

  15. Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Depression in Adolescents and Young Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Chi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mindfulness as a positive mental health intervention approach has been increasingly applied to address depression in young people. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR in the treatment of depression among adolescents and young adults.Methods: Electronic databases and references in articles were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating MBSR and reporting outcomes for depressive symptoms among young people aged 12 to 25 years were included. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment were conducted by two reviewers independently. Hedges’ g with a 95% confidence interval was calculated to represent intervention effect.Results: Eighteen RCTs featuring 2,042 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Relative to the control groups (e.g., no treatment, treatment as usual, or active control, MBSR had moderate effects in reducing depressive symptoms at the end of intervention (Hedges’ g = −0.45. No statistically significant effects were found in follow-up (Hedges’ g = −0.24 due to a lack of statistical power. Meta-regression found that the average treatment effect might be moderated by control condition, treatment duration, and participants’ baseline depression.Conclusion: MBSR had moderate effects in reducing depression in young people at posttest. Future research is needed to assess the follow-up effects of MBSR on depressive symptoms among adolescents and young adults.

  16. Cognitive impairment in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Bo Jacob; Knorr, Ulla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether cognitive impairment is prevalent in the remitted state of unipolar disorder. AIM: To evaluate whether cognitive function is impaired in the remitted state in patients with unipolar depression compared with healthy control individuals, and to investigate...... were prevalent including non-stringent definition of remission and non-correction for multiple testing. Only few studies investigated the association between cognition and prior course of illness and the results were divergent. LIMITATIONS: Stringent criteria were used in the assessment of eligibility...... of studies. The studies were first and foremost selected according to the criteria for remission used. CONCLUSION: Cognitive dysfunction seems to be present in individuals suffering from unipolar disorder in the remitted state. We recommend that future studies should focus on disentangling the state...

  17. The role of traditional confinement practices in determining postpartum depression in women in Chinese cultures: a systematic review of the English language evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Josephine; Fisher, Jane

    2009-08-01

    The Chinese postpartum custom of "confinement" or "doing-the-month" involves formalised social support and recognition of the status of motherhood and has been presumed in anthropological literature to protect mothers of newborns from postpartum depression. The aim of this review was to examine systematically the evidence about the relationship between confinement practices and postpartum depression in Chinese cultures. A systematic search of the English-language literature. Sixteen studies met inclusion criteria. It was found that the role of confinement in postpartum depression is complex: eight studies concluded that it had a protective role; four that it increased risk of postpartum mood disturbance and four studies had inconclusive findings. Aspects of the confinement practice that could contribute to or fail to protect against postpartum depression include the generally diminished social support in contemporary society, conflict with a mother-in-law and the tension experienced by modern women as they work to balance traditional with contemporary values. Methodological differences limit meaningful comparisons between the reviewed studies and generalizations from them. There is little consistent evidence that confinement practices reduce postpartum depression in Chinese cultures. Specific components of confinement practices might reduce psychological distress in Chinese mothers of newborns, but these cannot be discerned from the existing evidence. Confinement cannot be presumed to be available to, welcomed by or effective for all Chinese women or to be a substitute for health service provision.

  18. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, H; Kirkeskov, L; Hanskov, Dorte Jessing Agerby

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: This review suggests that COPD occurs more often among construction workers than among workers who are not exposed to construction dust. It is not possible to draw any conclusions on specific subgroups as most studies analysed construction workers as one united group. In addition, no potential...

  19. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, John Thomas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Lippert, Solvej

    2016-01-01

    trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized...

  20. Critical Analysis of the Efficacy of Meditation Therapies for Acute and Subacute Phase Treatment of Depressive Disorders: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Felipe A.; Walsh, Roger N.; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Christensen, Scott; Cahn, B. Rael

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, the application of meditative practices to the treatment of depressive disorders has met with increasing clinical and scientific interest, due to a lower side-effect burden, potential reduction of polypharmacy, as well as theoretical considerations that such interventions may target some of the cognitive roots of depression. We aimed to determine the state of the evidence supporting this application. Methods Randomized, controlled trials of techniques meeting the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) definition of meditation, for participants suffering from clinically diagnosed depressive disorders, not currently in remission, were selected. Meditation therapies were separated into praxis (i.e. how they were applied) components, and trial outcomes were reviewed. Results Eighteen studies meeting inclusionary criteria were identified, encompassing seven distinct techniques and 1173 patients, with Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy comprising the largest proportion. Studies including patients suffering from acute major depressive episodes (N = 10 studies), and those with residual subacute clinical symptoms despite initial treatment (N = 8), demonstrated moderate to large reductions in depression symptoms within group, and relative to control groups. There was significant heterogeneity of techniques and trial designs. Conclusions A substantial body of evidence indicates that meditation therapies may have salutary effects on patients suffering from clinical depressive disorders during the acute and subacute phases of treatment. Due to methodological deficiences and trial heterogeneity, large-scale, randomized controlled trials with well-described comparator interventions and measures of expectation are needed to clarify the role of meditation in the depression treatment armamentarium. PMID:25591492

  1. Effect of anti-inflammatory treatment on depression, depressive symptoms and side effects: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Karl Ole

    2014-01-01

    of pharmacological anti-inflammatory treatment in adults with depressive symptoms including adults who fulfill criteria for depression. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Pooled standard mean difference (SMD) and Odds Ratios (OR) were calculated. Main Outcome Measures...... depressive symptoms (SMD=-0.34; 95%-CI: -0.57 to -0.11; I2=90%) compared to placebo. This effect was observed both in studies including patients with depression (SMD=-0.54; 95%-CI: -1.08 to -0.01; I2=68%) and depressive symptoms (SMD=-0.27; 95%-CI: -0.53 to -0.01; I2=93%). The heterogeneity of the studies...... was not explained by differences in inclusion of clinical depression versus depressive symptoms or NSAIDs versus cytokine inhibitors. Sub-analyses particularly emphasized antidepressant properties for the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in general (SMD=-0.29; 95%-CI: -0.49 to -0.08; I2=73%), on remission (OR=7...

  2. The prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A lot of empirical studies have been conducted to evaluate the prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis in order to evaluate the prevalence and odds ratios of depression and anxiety in Chinese adults with cancer compared with those without. Methods The three most comprehensive computerized Chinese academic databases-CNKI, Wangfang and Vip databases-were systematically screened through September 2012. PubMed and Web of Science (SCIE) were also searched from their inception until September 2012 without language restrictions, and an internet search was also used. Case–control studies assessing the prevalence of depression and anxiety among Chinese adults with cancer were analyzed. Study selection and appraisal were conducted independently by three authors. The non-weighted prevalence, pooled random-effects estimates of odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were all calculated. Results Seventeen eligible studies with a total of 3497 subjects were included. The prevalence of depression and anxiety were significantly higher in adults with cancer compared with those without (Depression: 54.90% vs. 17.50%, OR = 7.85, 95% CI = 5.56-11.07, P = 0.000; Anxiety: 49.69% vs. 18.37%, OR = 6.46, 95% CI = 4.36-9.55, P = 0.000), the same situation was also observed in subgroup of control groups, assessment methods and cancer types. Although no difference of depression was observed in studies utilizing clinical diagnosis compared with self-report, the OR of anxiety in adults with cancer compared with those without was higher in studies utilizing clinical diagnosis (OR = 8.42, 95% CI = 4.83-14.70) than self-reports (OR = 5.83, 95% CI = 3.64-9.34). The ORs of depression and anxiety in cancer patients compared with disease group (Depression: OR = 6.03, 95% CI = 4.23-8.61; Anxiety: OR = 4.40, 95% CI = 3.05-6.36) were lower than in those

  3. Preventing the development of depression at work: a systematic review and meta-analysis of universal interventions in the workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a major public health problem among working-age adults. The workplace is potentially an important location for interventions aimed at preventing the development of depression, but to date, the mental health impact of universal interventions in the workplace has been unclear. Method A systematic search was conducted in relevant databases to identify randomized controlled trials of workplace interventions aimed at universal prevention of depression. The quality of studies was assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. A meta-analysis was performed using results from studies of adequate methodological quality, with pooled effect size estimates obtained from a random effects model. Results Nine workplace-based randomized controlled trials (RCT) were identified. The majority of the included studies utilized cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques. The overall standardized mean difference (SMD) between the intervention and control groups was 0.16 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07, 0.24, P = 0.0002), indicating a small positive effect. A separate analysis using only CBT-based interventions yielded a significant SMD of 0.12 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.22, P = 0.01). Conclusions There is good quality evidence that universally delivered workplace mental health interventions can reduce the level of depression symptoms among workers. There is more evidence for the effectiveness of CBT-based programs than other interventions. Evidence-based workplace interventions should be a key component of efforts to prevent the development of depression among adults. PMID:24886246

  4. Depression drug treatment outcomes in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Marian S; Matthews, Annette; Phillipi, Carrie; Romm, Jillian; Peterson, Kim; Thakurta, Sujata; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the comparative benefits and harms in both mother and child of antidepressant treatment for depression in pregnant or postpartum women. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov (inception to July 2013), manufacturers, and reference lists. Two reviewers independently selected studies of pregnant women with depression comparing antidepressants with each other, placebo or no treatment, or nondrug treatments. Studies making comparisons among women taking antidepressants for any reason and those not taking antidepressants (depression status unknown) were used to fill gaps in the evidence. Dual study data extraction and quality assessment were used. Six randomized controlled trials and 15 observational studies provided evidence. Low-strength evidence suggested neonates of pregnant women with depression taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors had higher risk of respiratory distress than did neonates of untreated women (13.9% compared with 7.8%; Pdepression status unknown) suggested future research should focus on congenital anomalies and autism spectrum and attention deficit disorders in the child. In postpartum depression, low-strength evidence suggested symptom response was not improved when sertraline was added to psychotherapy or when cognitive-behavioral therapy was added to paroxetine. Evidence was insufficient for other outcomes, including depression symptoms, functional capacity, breastfeeding, and infant and child development. A serious limitation is the lack of study populations of exclusively depressed pregnant and postpartum women. Evidence about the comparative benefits and harms of pharmacologic treatment of depression in pregnant and postpartum women was largely inadequate to allow informed decisions about treatment. Considering the prevalence of depression, filling this gap is essential.

  5. Effectiveness of the management of major depressive episodes/disorder in adults with comorbid chronic physical diseases: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Pablo; Castro, Ariel; Alonso, Diego; Vöhringer, Paul A; Rojas, Graciela

    2017-07-20

    Depression is a global-scale public health problem, and a significant association has been established between depression and chronic physical diseases. This growing comorbidity poses a challenge to healthcare systems. We aim to assess the effectiveness of the management of major depressive episodes/disorder in adults with comorbid chronic physical diseases. We will conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Two databases MEDLINE and Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews and CENTRAL), as well as the reference lists of the included articles, will be searched for studies either in English or Spanish with published results within the 2005-2015 period. Studies must fulfil the following conditions: (1) participants aged 18 years or older, diagnosed as having a major depressive episodes/disorder according to standardised criteria and chronic physical diseases; (2)interventions (be it pharmacological, psychological, psychosocial or a combination) must be compared with control conditions (other 'active' intervention, treatment as usual, waiting list or placebo); (3)and must report reduction in depressive symptoms after treatment, response to treatment, remission of major depressive episodes/disorder and significant improvement in quality of life. Data extraction, risk of bias evaluation, results summarisation and quality of the evidence (GRADE) will be performed as recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration. A qualitative synthesis and a random effects meta-analysis will be carried out. Effect sizes will be calculated (relative risk and Cohen's d), I 2 and Q statistics will be employed to study heterogeneity and publication bias analysis will be performed. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression will be carried out. Results are expected to be published in specialised peer-reviewed journals (preferred topics: Mental Health, Psychology, Psychiatry and/or Systematic Reviews) and dissemination activities will be targeted to

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors versus placebo in patients with major depressive disorder. A systematic review with meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Katakam, Kiran Kumar; Schou, Anne

    2017-01-01

    -term effects. Conclusions: SSRIs might have statistically significant effects on depressive symptoms, but all trials were at high risk of bias and the clinical significance seems questionable. SSRIs significantly increase the risk of both serious and non-serious adverse events. The potential small beneficial......Background: The evidence on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for major depressive disorder is unclear. Methods: Our objective was to conduct a systematic review assessing the effects of SSRIs versus placebo, 'active' placebo, or no intervention in adult participants with major...... depressive disorder. We searched for eligible randomised clinical trials in The Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycLIT, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index Expanded, clinical trial registers of Europe and USA, websites of pharmaceutical companies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  7. The effects of maternal depression, anxiety, and perceived stress during pregnancy on preterm birth: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Aleksandra; Bogossian, Fiona; Pritchard, Margo; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-09-01

    Experiencing psychological distress such as depression, anxiety, and/or perceived stress during pregnancy may increase the risk for adverse birth outcomes, including preterm birth. Clarifying the association between exposure and outcome may improve the understanding of risk factors for prematurity and guide future clinical and research practices. The aims of the present review were to outline the evidence on the risk of preterm associated with antenatal depression, anxiety, and stress. Four electronic database searches were conducted to identify quantitative population-based, multi-centre, cohort studies and randomised-controlled trial studies focusing on the association between antenatal depression, anxiety, and stress, and preterm birth published in English between 1980 and 2013. Of 1469 electronically retrieved articles, 39 peer-reviewed studies met the final selection criteria and were included in this review following the PRISMA and MOOSE review guidelines. Information was extracted on study characteristics; depression, anxiety and perceived stress were examined as separate and combined exposures. There is strong evidence that antenatal distress during the pregnancy increases the likelihood of preterm birth. Complex paths of significant interactions between depression, anxiety and stress, risk factors and preterm birth were indicated in both direct and indirect ways. The effects of pregnancy distress were associated with spontaneous but not with medically indicated preterm birth. Health practitioners engaged in providing perinatal care to women, such as obstetricians, midwives, nurses, and mental health specialists need to provide appropriate support to women experiencing psychological distress in order to improve outcomes for both mothers and infants. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Process evaluations of task sharing interventions for perinatal depression in low and middle income countries (LMIC): a systematic review and qualitative meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munodawafa, Memory; Mall, Sumaya; Lund, Crick; Schneider, Marguerite

    2018-03-23

    Perinatal depression is common in low and middle income countries (LAMICs). Task sharing interventions have been implemented to treat perinatal depression in these settings, as a way of dealing with staff shortages. Task sharing allows lay health workers to provide services for less complex cases while being trained and supervised by specialists. Randomized controlled trials suggest that these interventions can be effective but there is limited qualitative information exploring barriers and facilitators to their implementation. This systematic review aims to systematically review current qualitative evidence of process evaluations of task sharing interventions for perinatal depression in LAMICs in relation to the United Kingdom (UK) Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for conducting process evaluations. We searched Medline/ PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Web of science for studies from LAMICS using search terms under the broad categories of: (a) "maternal depression'" (b) "intervention" (c) "lay counsellor" OR "community health worker" OR "non-specialist" and (d) "LAMICs". Abstracts were independently reviewed for inclusion by two authors. Full text articles were screened and data for included articles were extracted using a standard data extraction sheet. Qualitative synthesis of qualitative evidence was conducted. 8420 articles were identified from initial searches. Of these, 26 full text articles were screened for eligibility with only three studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Main findings revealed that participants identified the following crucial factors: contextual factors included physical location, accessibility and cultural norms. Implementation factors included acceptability of the intervention and characteristics of the personnel. Mechanisms included counsellor factors such as motivating and facilitating trust; intervention factors such as use of stories and visual aids, and understandability of the content; and participant

  9. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehatzadeh, Shayan; Tu, Hong Anh; Palimaka, Stefan; Yap, Belinda; O'Reilly, Daria; Bowen, Jim; Higgins, Caroline; Holubowich, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depression. Objective This analysis examined the antidepressant efficacy of rTMS in patients with treatment-resistant unipolar depression. Methods A literature search was performed for RCTs published from January 1, 1994, to November 20, 2014. The search was updated on March 1, 2015. Two independent reviewers evaluated the abstracts for inclusion, reviewed full texts of eligible studies, and abstracted data. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary estimates. The primary outcome was changes in depression scores measured by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and we considered, a priori, the mean difference of 3.5 points to be a clinically important treatment effect. Remission and response to the treatment were secondary outcomes, and we calculated number needed to treat on the basis of these outcomes. We examined the possibility of publication bias by constructing funnel plots and by Begg's and Egger's tests. A meta-regression was undertaken to examine the effect of specific rTMS technical parameters on the treatment effects. Results Twenty-three RCTs compared rTMS with sham, and six RCTs compared rTMS with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Trials of rTMS versus sham showed a statistically significant improvement in depression scores with rTMS (weighted mean difference [WMD] 2.31, 95% CI 1.19–3.43; P transcranial magnetic stimulation had a small short-term effect for improving depression in comparison with sham, but follow-up studies did not show that the small effect will continue for longer periods. PMID:27099642

  10. Pathogenetic and Therapeutic Applications of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α in Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Up to now, the exact pathogenesis of MDD remains poorly understood. Recent research has begun to reveal that the pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, play an integral role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. On the base of several observations: it is found that subsets of MDD patients have enhanced plasma levels TNF-α; antidepressant treatments had linked with the decline of TNF-α; central administration of TNF-α gives rise to sickness behavior which shares features with depression; and a blockade of it can ameliorate depressive symptomatology in animal models and clinical trials. In this review article, we focus on recent evidence linking TNF-α and MDD looking at data from animal and clinical studies, illustrating the pathophysiological role, susceptibility and its therapeutic application in depression. We conclude by discussing future directions for research, in particular the opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics that target TNF-α. This will be very important for designing preventative strategies and for the identification of new drug targets and preventative strategies.

  11. Pathogenetic and Therapeutic Applications of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ke; Zhang, Hongxiu; Baloch, Zulqarnain

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Up to now, the exact pathogenesis of MDD remains poorly understood. Recent research has begun to reveal that the pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), play an integral role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. On the base of several observations: it is found that subsets of MDD patients have enhanced plasma levels TNF-α; antidepressant treatments had linked with the decline of TNF-α; central administration of TNF-α gives rise to sickness behavior which shares features with depression; and a blockade of it can ameliorate depressive symptomatology in animal models and clinical trials. In this review article, we focus on recent evidence linking TNF-α and MDD looking at data from animal and clinical studies, illustrating the pathophysiological role, susceptibility and its therapeutic application in depression. We conclude by discussing future directions for research, in particular the opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics that target TNF-α. This will be very important for designing preventative strategies and for the identification of new drug targets and preventative strategies. PMID:27187381

  12. The effect of an elective cesarean section on maternal request on peripartum anxiety and depression in women with childbirth fear: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olieman, Renske M; Siemonsma, Femke; Bartens, Margaux A; Garthus-Niegel, Susan; Scheele, Fedde; Honig, Adriaan

    2017-06-19

    Obstetricians are often reluctant to grant requests for an elective cesarean section (ECS) due to childbirth fear. To date, it is unknown if an ECS on request improves mental well-being in the mother in the peripartum period and if possible beneficial effects on anxiety and depression could outweigh the increased risk of complications associated with a surgical delivery. A systematic review was conducted to explore the effect of ECS on request on peripartum anxiety and depression. We searched on PubMed, PsychoInfo and Embase. Studies were included with primary data on anxiety and/or depression postpartum in women with childbirth fear who had requested an ECS. After full-text evaluation of 65 papers and quality analysis of four papers, three papers were included. Of one paper additional and yet unpublished data were provided. Studies varied in outcome measures, hence no meta-analysis was performed. Women who requested an ECS had higher antepartum depression and anxiety levels but no different postpartum depression levels than women who delivered vaginally. One study of good quality examined the effect of vaginal delivery in women preferring ECS: These women had significantly higher symptom levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression than women with normal vaginal delivery. The prospect of an ECS does not lower antepartum anxiety and/or depression levels in women requesting an ECS. If women resolutely persist in wishing an ECS despite adequate counselling and/or psychiatric treatment, the risk of developing depressive and PTSD symptoms in case of vaginal delivery should be taken into account, and an ECS may be considered as a valid alternative.

  13. The role of depression, anxiety, stress and adherence to treatment in dialysis patients’ health-related quality of life: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llana, Helena; Remor, Eduardo; Del Peso, Gloria; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been widely studied in the field of dialysis patients. However, there are few studies that include relationships of psychosocial variables and adherence to treatment with HRQOL. The aim of this review is to systematically synthesise available information on the role that psychological variables (depression, anxiety and stress) and adherence to treatment have on HRQOL of dialysis patients through a systematic narrative review. We selected studies that included and related, in their results psychological variables (at least one of the following: depression, anxiety or perceived stress), adherence to treatment and HRQOL in adults on dialysis due to advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD). The studies included had to incorporate standardised instruments into their assessment protocol. We searched the MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases from January 2002 to August 2012. Thirty-eight studies were included in this review and we assessed their methodological quality. The review revealed that 100% of the studies identified a negative association between indicators of anxiety, depression and stress and HRQL, indicating that these variables are risk factors for quality of life. Adherence to treatment was associated with psychological factors and HRQOL in 8% (N=3) of the studies included and has been demonstrated to be a protective factor for quality of life in 66% of studies (2 of 3) that included this variable. Considering the effect of these variables on HRQOL, it is important to screen for early indicators of anxiety, stress and depression or difficulties in complying with treatment in the ACKD population on dialysis. This will allow preventive interventions to be carried out before HRQOL deteriorates.

  14. Efficacy of home-based non-pharmacological interventions for treating depression: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhato, Kanokporn; Lotrakul, Manote; Dellow, Alan; Ittasakul, Pichai; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2017-07-12

    To systematically review and compare the efficacy of all available home-based non-pharmacological treatments of depression. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Medline, Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched since inceptions to 7 August 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy of home-based non-pharmacological interventions with usual care of patients with depression were included in the review. Depression symptom scores and disease remission rates at the end of treatment. Seventeen studies were included in the review. Home-based non-pharmacological interventions were categorised as (1) home-based psychological intervention, (2) home-based exercise intervention, (3) combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention and (4) complementary medicine. Complementary medicine approaches were excluded from the meta-analysis due to heterogeneity. The standardised mean differences of post-treatment depression symptom scores between usual care groups and home-based psychological intervention, home-based exercise intervention and combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention were âˆ'0.57 (95% CI âˆ'0.84 to âˆ'0.31), âˆ'1.03 (95% CI âˆ'2.89 to 0.82) and âˆ'0.78 (95% CI âˆ'1.09 to âˆ'0.47), respectively. These results suggest that only home-based psychological intervention and combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention could significantly decrease depression scores. Compared with usual care groups, the disease remission rate was also significantly higher for home-based psychological intervention (pooled risk ratio=1.53; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.98) and combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention (pooled risk ratio=3.47; 95% CI 2.11 to 5.70). Of all the studied interventions, combined home-based psychological intervention with

  15. Effects of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, J C; Hansen, J L; Simonsen, S; Simonsen, E; Gluud, C

    2012-07-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetime at tremendous suffering and cost. Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy are treatment options, but their effects have only been limitedly compared in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology we compared the benefits and harm of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, PsycInfo, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Continuous outcome measures were assessed by mean difference and dichotomous outcomes by odds ratio. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included seven trials randomizing 741 participants. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis of the four trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed no significant difference between the two interventions [mean difference -1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.35 to 0.32]. Meta-analysis of the five trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Beck Depression Inventory showed comparable results (mean difference -1.29, 95% CI -2.73 to 0.14). Trial sequential analysis indicated that more data are needed to definitively settle the question of a differential effect. None of the included trial reported on adverse events. Randomized trials with low risk of bias and low risk of random errors are needed, although the effects of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy do not seem to differ significantly regarding depressive symptoms. Future trials should report on adverse events.

  16. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  17. Cognitive biases in processing infant emotion by women with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder in pregnancy or after birth: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rebecca; Ayers, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal psychological problems such as post-natal depression are associated with poor mother-baby interaction, but the reason for this is not clear. One explanation is that mothers with negative mood have biased processing of infant emotion. This review aimed to synthesise research on processing of infant emotion by pregnant or post-natal women with anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Systematic searches were carried out on 11 electronic databases using terms related to negative affect, childbirth and perception of emotion. Fourteen studies were identified which looked at the effect of depression, anxiety and PTSD on interpretation of infant emotional expressions (k = 10), or reaction times when asked to ignore emotional expressions (k = 4). Results suggest mothers with depression and anxiety are more likely to identify negative emotions (i.e., sadness) and less accurate at identifying positive emotions (i.e., happiness) in infant faces. Additionally, women with depression may disengage faster from positive and negative infant emotional expressions. Very few studies examined PTSD (k = 2), but results suggest biases towards specific infant emotions may be influenced by characteristics of the traumatic event. The implications of this research for mother-infant interaction are explored.

  18. Depression and anxiety predict health-related quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blakemore A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy Blakemore,1,2 Chris Dickens,3 Else Guthrie,2 Peter Bower,1 Evangelos Kontopantelis,1 Cara Afzal,2 Peter A Coventry4 1National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research, Centre for Primary Care, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, 2Department of Psychiatry, Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK; 3Institute of Health Service Research, University of Exeter Medical School and Peninsula Collaboration for Leadership in Health Research and Care, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; 4Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Greater Manchester and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Background: The causal association between depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review of prospective cohort studies that measured depression, anxiety, and HRQoL in COPD. Methods: Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL], British Nursing Index and Archive, PsycINFO and Cochrane database were searched from inception to June 18, 2013. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they: used a nonexperimental prospective cohort design; included patients with a diagnosis of COPD confirmed by spirometry; and used validated measures of depression, anxiety, and HRQoL. Data were extracted and pooled using random effects models. Results: Six studies were included in the systematic review; of these, three were included in the meta-analysis for depression and two were included for the meta-analysis for anxiety. Depression was significantly correlated with HRQoL at 1-year follow-up (pooled r=0.48, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.57, P<0.001. Anxiety was also significantly correlated with HRQoL at 1-year follow-up (pooled r=0.36, 95

  19. Diagnostic performance of major depression disorder case-finding instruments used among mothers of young children in the United States: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owora, Arthur H; Carabin, Hélène; Reese, Jessica; Garwe, Tabitha

    2016-09-01

    Growing recognition of the interrelated negative outcomes associated with major depression disorder (MDD) among mothers and their children has led to renewed public health interest in the early identification and treatment of maternal MDD. Healthcare providers, however, remain unsure of the validity of existing case-finding instruments. We conducted a systematic review to identify the most valid maternal MDD case-finding instrument used in the United States. We identified articles reporting the sensitivity and specificity of MDD case-finding instruments based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) by systematically searching through three electronic bibliographic databases, PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE, from 1994 to 2014. Study eligibility and quality were evaluated using the Standards for the Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy studies and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines respectively. Overall, we retrieved 996 unduplicated articles and selected 74 for full-text review. Of these, 14 articles examining 21 different instruments were included in the systematic review. The 10 item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Postpartum Depression Screening Scale had the most stable (lowest variation) and highest diagnostic performance during the antepartum and postpartum periods (sensitivity range: 0.63-0.94 and 0.67-0.95; specificity range: 0.83-0.98 and 0.68-0.97 respectively). Greater variation in diagnostic performance was observed among studies with higher MDD prevalence. Factors that explain greater variation in instrument diagnostic performance in study populations with higher MDD prevalence were not examined. Findings suggest that the diagnostic performance of maternal MDD case-finding instruments is peripartum period-specific. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Systematic reviews of randomised clinical trials examining the effects of psychotherapeutic interventions versus "no intervention" for acute major depressive disorder and a randomised trial examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based treatment for acute major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2014-01-01

    systematic reviews with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses using The Cochrane Collaboration methodology examining the effects of cognitive therapy and psycho-dynamic therapy for major depressive disorder. We developed a thorough treatment protocol for a randomised trial with low risks of bias...... therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder. The first systematic review included five randomised trials examining the effects of psychodynamic therapy versus "no intervention' for major depressive disorder. Altogether the five trials randomised 365 participants who in each...... this result. The second systematic review included 12 randomised trials examining the effects of cognitive therapy versus "no intervention" for major depressive disorder. Altogether a total of 669 participants were randomised. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that cognitive therapy...

  1. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in patients receiving disability benefits: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanil Ebrahim

    Full Text Available To systematically summarize the randomized trial evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT in patients with depression in receipt of disability benefits in comparison to those not receiving disability benefits.All relevant RCTs from a database of randomized controlled and comparative studies examining the effects of psychotherapy for adult depression (http://www.evidencebasedpsychotherapies.org, electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCINFO, AMED, CINAHL and CENTRAL to June 2011, and bibliographies of all relevant articles. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTION: Adult patients with major depression, randomly assigned to CBT versus minimal/no treatment or care-as-usual.Three teams of reviewers, independently and in duplicate, completed title and abstract screening, full text review and data extraction. We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis to summarize data.Of 92 eligible trials, 70 provided author contact information; of these 56 (80% were successfully contacted to establish if they captured receipt of benefits as a baseline characteristic; 8 recorded benefit status, and 3 enrolled some patients in receipt of benefits, of which 2 provided individual patient data. Including both patients receiving and not receiving disability benefits, 2 trials (227 patients suggested a possible reduction in depression with CBT, as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, mean difference [MD] (95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.61 (-5.28, 0.07, p = 0.06; minimally important difference of 5. The effect appeared larger, though not significantly, in those in receipt of benefits (34 patients versus not receiving benefits (193 patients; MD (95% CI = -4.46 (-12.21, 3.30, p = 0.26.Our data does not support the hypothesis that CBT has smaller effects in depressed patients receiving disability benefits versus other patients. Given that the confidence interval is wide, a

  2. Psychological and support interventions to reduce levels of stress, anxiety or depression on women's subsequent pregnancy with a history of miscarriage: an empty systematic review.

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    San Lazaro Campillo, Indra; Meaney, Sarah; McNamara, Karen; O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2017-09-07

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of interventions to reduce stress in pregnant women with a history of miscarriage. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). A total of 13 medical, psychological and social electronic databases were searched from January 1995 to April 2016 including PUBMED, CENTRAL, Web of Science and EMBASE. This review focused on women in their subsequent pregnancy following miscarriage. All published RCTs which assessed the effect of non-medical interventions such as counselling or support interventions on psychological and mental health outcomes such as stress, anxiety or depression when compared with a control group were included. Stress, anxiety or depression had to be measured at least preintervention and postintervention. This systematic review found no RCT which met our initial inclusion criteria. Of the 4140 titles screened, 17 RCTs were identified. All of them were excluded. One RCT, which implemented a caring-based intervention, included pregnant women in their subsequent pregnancy; however, miscarriage was analysed as a composite variable among other pregnancy losses such as stillbirth and neonatal death. Levels of perceived stress were measured by four RCTs. Different types of non-medical interventions, time of follow-up and small sample sizes were found. Cohort studies and RCTs in non-pregnant women suggest that support and psychological interventions may improve pregnant women's psychological well-being after miscarriage. This improvement may reduce adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in subsequent pregnancies. However, this review found no RCTs which met our criteria. There is a need for targeted RCTs that can provide reliable and conclusive results to determine effective interventions for this vulnerable group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  3. The oral health of people with anxiety and depressive disorders - a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisely, Steve; Sawyer, Emily; Siskind, Dan; Lalloo, Ratilal

    2016-08-01

    Many psychological disorders are associated with comorbid physical illness. There are less data on dental disease in common psychological disorders such as depression and anxiety in spite of risk factors in this population of diet, lifestyle or antidepressant-induced dry mouth. We undertook a systematic search for studies of the oral health of people with common psychological disorders including depression, anxiety and dental phobia. We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE and article bibliographies. Results were compared with the general population. Outcomes included partial or total tooth-loss, periodontal disease, and dental decay measured through standardized measures such as the mean number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) or surfaces (DMFS). There were 19 papers on depression and/or anxiety, and seven on dental phobia/anxiety (total n=26). These covered 334,503 subjects. All the psychiatric diagnoses were associated with increased dental decay on both DMFT and DMFS scores, as well as greater tooth loss (OR=1.22; 95%CI=1.14-1.30). There was no association with periodontal disease, except for panic disorder. Cross-sectional design of included studies, heterogeneity in some results, insufficient studies to test for publication bias. The increased focus on the physical health of psychiatric patients should encompass oral health including closer collaboration between dental and medical practitioners. Possible interventions include oral health assessment using standard checklists that can be completed by non-dental personnel, help with oral hygiene, management of iatrogenic dry mouth, and early dental referral. Mental health clinicians should also be aware of the oral consequences of inappropriate diet and psychotropic medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents: A systematic review and network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyu; Hetrick, Sarah E; Cuijpers, Pim; Qin, Bin; Barth, Jürgen; Whittington, Craig J; Cohen, David; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Liu, Yiyun; Michael, Kurt D; Zhang, Yuqing; Weisz, John R; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses of psychotherapies for child and adolescent depression were limited because of the small number of trials with direct comparisons between two treatments. A network meta-analysis, a novel approach that integrates direct and indirect evidence from randomized controlled studies, was undertaken to investigate the comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents. Systematic searches resulted in 52 studies (total N=3805) of nine psychotherapies and four control conditions. We assessed the efficacy at post-treatment and at follow-up, as well as the acceptability (all-cause discontinuation) of psychotherapies and control conditions. At post-treatment, only interpersonal therapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were significantly more effective than most control conditions (standardized mean differences, SMDs ranged from −0.47 to −0.96). Also, IPT and CBT were more beneficial than play therapy. Only psychodynamic therapy and play therapy were not significantly superior to waitlist. At follow-up, IPT and CBT were significantly more effective than most control conditions (SMDs ranged from −0.26 to −1.05), although only IPT retained this superiority at both short-term and long-term follow-up. In addition, IPT and CBT were more beneficial than problem-solving therapy. Waitlist was significantly inferior to other control conditions. With regard to acceptability, IPT and problem-solving therapy had significantly fewer all-cause discontinuations than cognitive therapy and CBT (ORs ranged from 0.06 to 0.33). These data suggest that IPT and CBT should be considered as the best available psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents. However, several alternative psychotherapies are understudied in this age group. Waitlist may inflate the effect of psychotherapies, so that psychological placebo or treatment-as-usual may be preferable as a control condition in psychotherapy

  5. Systematic review on randomized controlled trials of coronary heart disease complicated with depression treated with Chinese herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Lu; Chen, Zhuo; Luo, Jing; Shang, Qing-Hua; Xu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This systemic review evaluated the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated with depression. All databases were retrieved till September 30, 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CHMs with placebo or conventional Western medicine were retrieved. Data extraction, analyses and quality assessment were performed according to the Cochrane standards. RevMan 5.3 was used to synthesize the results. Thirteen RCTs enrolling 1,095 patients were included. Subgroup analysis was used to assess data. In reducing the degree of depression, CHMs showed no statistic difference in the 4th week [mean difference (MD)=-1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI)-2.38 to 0.26; n=501; I(2)=73%], but it was associated with a statistically significant difference in the 8th week (MD=-1.00; 95% CI-1.64 to-0.36; n=436; I(2)=48%). Meanwhile, the combination therapy (CHMs together with antidepressants) showed significant statistic differences both in the 4th week (MD=-1.99; 95% CI-3.80 to-0.18; n=90) and in the 8th week (MD=-5.61; 95% CI-6.26 to-4.97; n=242; I(2)=87%). In CHD-related clinical evaluation, 3 trials reported the intervention group was superior to the control group. Four trials showed adverse events in the intervention group was less than that in the control group. CHMs showed potentially benefits on patients with CHD complicated with depression. Moreover, the effect of CHMs may be similar to or better than antidepressant in certain fields but with less side effects. However, because of small sample size and potential bias of most trials, this result should be interpreted with caution. More rigorous trials with larger sample size and higher quality are warranted to give high quality of evidence to support the use of CHMs for CHD complicated with depression.

  6. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs associated with bipolar disorder (BD is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo- controlled trials (RCTs or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI. Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS (SMD −0.74, 95% CI −1.20 to −0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652. Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979 experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS scores (SMD −1.08, 95% CI −1.35 to −0.81, p < 0.001 vs. placebo (n = 678. Publication and measurement biases and relative paucity of studies. Overall, SGAs appear to offer favorable improvements in MADRS and YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable

  7. Changes in interpersonal problems in the psychotherapeutic treatment of depression as measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarquhar, Tara; Luyten, Patrick; Fonagy, Peter

    2018-01-15

    Interpersonal problems are commonly reported by depressed patients, but the effect of psychotherapeutic treatment on them remains unclear. This paper reviews the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions for depression on interpersonal problems as measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP). An electronic database search identified articles reporting IIP outcome scores for individual adult psychotherapy for depression. A systematic review and, where possible, meta-analysis was conducted. Twenty-eight studies met inclusion criteria, 10 of which could be included in a meta-analysis investigating changes in the IIP after brief psychotherapy. Reasons for exclusion from the meta-analysis were too few participants with a diagnosis of depression (n=13), IIP means and SDs unobtainable (n=3) and long-term therapy (n=2). A large effect size (g=0.74, 95% CI=0.56-0.93) was found for improvement in IIP scores after brief treatment. Paucity of IIP reporting and treatment type variability mean results are preliminary. Heterogeneity for improvement in IIP after brief psychotherapy was high (I 2 =75%). Despite being central to theories of depression, interpersonal problems are infrequently included in outcome studies. Brief psychotherapy was associated with moderate to large effect sizes in reduction in interpersonal problems. Of the dimensions underlying interpersonal behaviour, the dominance dimension may be more amenable to change than the affiliation dimension. Yet, high pre-treatment affiliation appeared to be associated with better outcomes than low affiliation, supporting the theory that more affiliative patients may develop a better therapeutic relationship with the therapist and consequently respond more positively than more hostile patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; Kakar, Ron; Berk, Michael; Kessing, Lars V; Vinberg, Maj; Baune, Bernhard T; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Brietzke, Elisa; Goldstein, Benjamin I; McIntyre, Roger S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the risk, pathophysiology, and progression of mood disorders and, as such, has become a target of interest in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the objective of the current qualitative and quantitative review was to determine the overall antidepressant effect of adjunctive anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression. Completed and ongoing clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents for BD published prior to 15 May 15 2015 were identified through searching the PubMed, Embase, PsychINFO, and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the antidepressant effect of adjunctive mechanistically diverse anti-inflammatory agents were pooled to determine standard mean differences (SMDs) compared with standard therapy alone. Ten RCTs were identified for qualitative review. Eight RCTs (n = 312) assessing adjunctive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n = 53), omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n = 140), N-acetylcysteine (n = 76), and pioglitazone (n = 44) in the treatment of BD met the inclusion criteria for quantitative analysis. The overall effect size of adjunctive anti-inflammatory agents on depressive symptoms was -0.40 (95% confidence interval -0.14 to -0.65, p = 0.002), indicative of a moderate and statistically significant antidepressant effect. The heterogeneity of the pooled sample was low (I² = 14%, p = 0.32). No manic/hypomanic induction or significant treatment-emergent adverse events were reported. Overall, a moderate antidepressant effect was observed for adjunctive anti-inflammatory agents compared with conventional therapy alone in the treatment of bipolar depression. The small number of studies, diversity of agents, and small sample sizes limited interpretation of the current analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Psychological interventions for the treatment of depression, anxiety, alcohol misuse or anger in armed forces veterans and their families: systematic review and meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Luke; Watkins, Ed; Farrand, Paul

    2017-06-15

    Evidence highlights a high prevalence of common mental health disorders in armed forces veterans and their families, with depression, anxiety, alcohol misuse and anger being more common than PTSD. This paper presents a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify existing randomised controlled trial (RCT) research testing the effectiveness of psychological interventions for these difficulties in armed forces veterans and their family members. Electronic databases (CENTRAL, PsycInfo, MEDLINE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Register of Clinical Trials, EMBASE and ASSIA) will be searched to identify suitable studies for inclusion in the review supplemented by forward and backward reference checking, grey literature searches and contact with subject authors. Research including armed forces veterans and their family members will be included in the review with research including serving personnel or individuals under the age of 18 being excluded. Few RCTs examining the treatment of depression, anxiety, alcohol misuse or anger exist in armed forces veterans to date. The primary outcome will be symptomatic change following intervention for these difficulties. The secondary outcomes will include methodological aspects of interest such as discharge type and recruitment setting if data permits. In the event that the number of studies identified is too low to undertake a meta-analysis, a narrative review will be conducted. Quality assessment will be undertaken using the Cochrane Collaboration Tool and Cochran's Q statistic calculated to test for heterogeneity as suggested by the Cochrane handbook. The review will examine the findings of existing intervention research for depression, anxiety, alcohol misuse or anger in armed forces veterans and their families, along with any effect sizes that may exist. PROSPERO CRD42016036676.

  10. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression in Adult and Youth Populations: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Laura E.; Soril, Lesley J. J.; Coward, Stephanie; Lorenzetti, Diane L.; MacKean, Gail; Clement, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Between 30% and 60% of individuals with major depressive disorder will have treatment-resistant depression (TRD): depression that does not subside with pharmaceutical treatment. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging treatment for TRD. Objective: To establish the efficacy and optimal protocol for rTMS among adults and youth with TRD. Data Sources: Two systematic reviews were conducted: one to determine the efficacy of rTMS for adults with TRD and another to determine the effectiveness of rTMS for youth with TRD. For adults, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Health Technology Assessment Database were searched from inception until January 10, 2014 with no language restrictions. Terms aimed at capturing the target diagnosis, such as depression and depressive disorder, were combined with terms describing the technology, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and rTMS. Results were limited to studies involving human participants and designed as a randomized controlled trial. For youth, the search was altered to include youth only (aged 13–25 years) and all study designs. When possible, meta-analysis of response and remission rates was conducted. Study Selection: Seventy-three articles were included in this review: 70 on adult and 3 on youth populations. Results: Meta-analysis comparing rTMS and sham in adults found statistically significant results favoring rTMS for response (RR: 2.35 [95% CI, 1.70–3.25]) and remission (RR: 2.24 [95% CI, 1.53–3.27]). No statistically significant differences were found when comparing high- and low-frequency, unilateral and bilateral, low- and high-intensity rTMS or rTMS and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). While meta-analysis of results from the youth literature was not possible, the limited evidence base suggests that rTMS may be effective for treating TRD in youth. Conclusions: The evidence

  11. The effect of technology-based interventions on pain, depression, and quality of life in patients with cancer: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, Stephen O; Ju, Woong; Elfiky, Aymen; Kvedar, Joseph C; Jethwani, Kamal

    2015-03-13

    The burden of cancer is increasing; projections over the next 2 decades suggest that the annual cases of cancer will rise from 14 million in 2012 to 22 million. However, cancer patients in the 21st century are living longer due to the availability of novel therapeutic regimens, which has prompted a growing focus on maintaining patients' health-related quality of life. Telehealth is increasingly being used to connect with patients outside of traditional clinical settings, and early work has shown its importance in improving quality of life and other clinical outcomes in cancer care. The aim of this study was to systematically assess the literature for the effect of supportive telehealth interventions on pain, depression, and quality of life in cancer patients via a systematic review of clinical trials. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, CINAHL, and PsycINFO in July 2013 and updated the literature search again in January 2015 for prospective randomized trials evaluating the effect of telehealth interventions in cancer care with pain, depression, and quality of life as main outcomes. Two of the authors independently reviewed and extracted data from eligible randomized controlled trials, based on pre-determined selection criteria. Methodological quality of studies was assessed by the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Of the 4929 articles retrieved from databases and relevant bibliographies, a total of 20 RCTs were included in the final review. The studies were largely heterogeneous in the type and duration of the intervention as well as in outcome assessments. A majority of the studies were telephone-based interventions that remotely connected patients with their health care provider or health coach. The intervention times ranged from 1 week to 12 months. In general, most of the studies had low risk of bias across the domains of the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool, but most of the studies had insufficient information about the allocation

  12. Effect of exercise versus cognitive behavioural therapy or no intervention on anxiety, depression, fitness and quality of life in adults with previous methamphetamine dependency: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Linzette; Stander, Jessica; Ebrahim, Wardah; Eksteen, Stephanie; Meaden, Orissa Anna; Ras, Ané; Wessels, Annemarie

    2018-01-16

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive psychostimulant used by approximately 52 million people worldwide. Chronic MA abuse leads to detrimental physiological and neurological changes, as well as increases in anxiety and depression, and decreases in overall fitness and quality of life. Exercise has been reported to possibly reverse physiological and neurological damage caused by previous MA use, and to reduce anxiety and depression in this population. The aim of this systematic review was to identify, clinically appraise and synthesise the available evidence for the effectiveness of exercise, compared to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), standard care or no intervention, on decreasing anxiety and depression and improving fitness and quality of life in previous MA users. Seven computerised databases were searched from inception to May 2017, namely Scopus, Cochrane Library, PubMed/MEDLINE, PEDro, CINAHL, and ScienceDirect. Search terms included exercise, methamphetamine, fitness measures, depression, anxiety and quality of life. Randomised and non-randomised controlled- or clinical trials and pilot studies, published in English, were considered for inclusion. Methodological quality was critically appraised according to the PEDro scale. Heterogeneity across studies regarding control groups and assessment intervals rendered meta analyses inappropriate for this review and results were thus described narratively using text and tables. Two hundred and fifty-one titles were identified following the initial search, and 14 potentially-relevant titles were selected and the abstracts reviewed. Three studies (two randomised controlled trials and one quasi-experimental pilot) were included, with an average PEDro score of 6.66. Exercise resulted in significantly lower depression and anxiety scores versus CBT (p = 0.001). Balance also significantly improved following exercise versus standard care (p exercise is effective in reducing anxiety and depression and

  13. Effects of exercise training on quality of life, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and emotional well-being in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, M M P; van Dooren, F E P; Pop, V J M; Pouwer, F

    2013-06-01

    Psychological problems are relatively common in people with type 2 diabetes. It is unclear whether exercise training exerts an effect on quality of life, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and emotional well-being in people with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to assess the effects of exercise training on these outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched. The review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of at least 4 weeks' duration in people with type 2 diabetes that evaluated the effect of exercise training on quality of life, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and/or emotional well-being compared with usual care. Of 1,261 retrieved articles, 20 RCTs were included with a total of 1,719 participants. Quality of life was assessed in 16 studies. Between-group comparisons showed no significant results for aerobic training with the exception of one study, and mixed results for resistance and combined training. Symptoms of depression were assessed in four studies. In only one study did the intervention decrease symptoms of depression. Emotional well-being was evaluated in four studies, which also showed conflicting results. Symptoms of anxiety were evaluated in one study, which showed a significant improvement. The effects of exercise training on psychological outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes are conflicting. Therefore, there is a need for further high-quality RCTs in order to gain greater insight into the role of exercise training in people with type 2 diabetes.

  14. eHealth interventions for the prevention of depression and anxiety in the general population: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deady, M; Choi, I; Calvo, R A; Glozier, N; Christensen, H; Harvey, S B

    2017-08-29

    Anxiety and depression are associated with a range of adverse outcomes and represent a large global burden to individuals and health care systems. Prevention programs are an important way to avert a proportion of the burden associated with such conditions both at a clinical and subclinical level. eHealth interventions provide an opportunity to offer accessible, acceptable, easily disseminated globally low-cost interventions on a wide scale. However, the efficacy of these programs remains unclear. The aim of this study is to review and evaluate the effects of eHealth prevention interventions for anxiety and depression. A systematic search was conducted on four relevant databases to identify randomized controlled trials of eHealth interventions aimed at the prevention of anxiety and depression in the general population published between 2000 and January 2016. The quality of studies was assessed and a meta-analysis was performed using pooled effect size estimates obtained from a random effects model. Ten trials were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. All studies were of sufficient quality and utilized cognitive behavioural techniques. At post-treatment, the overall mean difference between the intervention and control groups was 0.25 (95% confidence internal: 0.09, 0.41; p = 0.003) for depression outcome studies and 0.31 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.52; p = 0.004) for anxiety outcome studies, indicating a small but positive effect of the eHealth interventions. The effect sizes for universal and indicated/selective interventions were similar (0.29 and 0.25 respectively). However, there was inadequate evidence to suggest that such interventions have an effect on long-term disorder incidence rates. Evidence suggests that eHealth prevention interventions for anxiety and depression are associated with small but positive effects on symptom reduction. However, there is inadequate evidence on the medium to long-term effect of such interventions, and importantly, on

  15. Effects of exercise programs on depressive symptoms, quality of life, and self-esteem in older people: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Hi; Han, Kuem Sun; Kang, Chang-Bum

    2014-11-01

    This study attempted to show evidence of exercise programs as intervention to decrease depressive symptoms and to improve quality of life and self-esteem in older people. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Electronic databases of KoreaMed, Korea Scientific and Technological Intelligence Center, Korean Society of Nursing Science, Korean Academy of Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing, Ovid-Medline and Embase were searched up to May 25th, 2012 for relevant articles. We searched studies of randomized controlled trials involving exercise programs administered to participants aged 65 years or over. Of 461 publications identified, 18 met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. Quality assessment of the studies utilized Cochrane's Risk of Bias. Exercise therapy in older people was effective, as evidenced by a decrease in depressive symptoms [standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.36; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.64, -0.08], and improvements in quality of life (SMD 0.86; 95% CI 0.11, 1.62) and self-esteem (SMD 0.49; 95% CI 0.09, 0.88). The changes were significant statistically, with no heterogeneity. Exercise programs in older people are effective in improving depressive symptoms, quality of life and self-esteem. Development and efficient use of tailored exercise programs for elderly people is a prudent strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative Benefits and Harms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Initial Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Gary N; Gartlehner, Gerald; Gaynes, Bradley N; Amick, Halle R; Forneris, Catherine; Morgan, Laura C; Coker-Schwimmer, Emmanuel; Boland, Erin; Lux, Linda J; Gaylord, Susan; Bann, Carla; Pierl, Christiane Barbara; Lohr, Kathleen N

    2017-12-01

    To report the comparative benefits and harms of exercise and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments with second-generation antidepressants (SGA) for major depressive disorder (MDD). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Outpatient clinics. Adults, aged 18 years and older, with MDD receiving an initial treatment attempt with SGA. Any CAM or exercise intervention compared with an SGA. Treatment response, remission, change in depression rating, adverse events, treatment discontinuation, and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events. We found 22 randomized controlled trials for direct comparisons and 127 trials for network meta-analyses, including trials of acupuncture, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosyl methionine, St. John's wort, and exercise. For most treatment comparisons, we found no differences between treatment groups for response and remission. However, the risk of bias of these studies led us to conclude that the strength of evidence for these findings was either low or insufficient. The risk of treatment harms and treatment discontinuation attributed to adverse events was higher for selective serotonin receptor inhibitors than for St. John's wort. Although we found little difference in the comparative efficacy of most CAM therapies or exercise and SGAs, the overall poor quality of the available evidence base tempers any conclusions that we might draw from those trials. Future trials should incorporate patient-oriented outcomes, treatment expectancy, depressive severity, and harms assessments into their designs; antidepressants should be administered over their full dosage ranges; and larger trials using methods to reduce sampling bias are needed.

  17. Systematic review of the information and communication technology features of web- and mobile-based psychoeducational interventions for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Danyang; Lustria, Mia Liza A; Hendrickse, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    To examine the information and communication technology (ICT) features of psychoeducational interventions for depression delivered via the Internet or via mobile technology. Web- and mobile-based psychoeducational intervention studies published from 2004 to 2014 were selected and reviewed by two independent coders. A total of 55 unique studies satisfied the selection criteria. The review revealed a diverse range of ICTs used to support the psychoeducational programs. Most interventions used websites as their main mode of delivery and reported greater use of communication tools compared to effective approaches like tailoring or interactive technologies games, videos, and self-monitoring tools. Many of the studies relied on medium levels of clinician involvement and only a few were entirely self-guided. Programs that reported higher levels of clinician involvement also reported using more communication tools, and reported greater compliance to treatment. Future experimental studies may help unpack the effects of technology features and reveal new ways to automate aspects of clinician input. There is a need to further examine ways ICTs can be optimized to reduce the burden on clinicians whilst enhancing the delivery of proven effective therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics and heterogeneity of schizoaffective disorder compared with unipolar depression and schizophrenia - a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Lena; Pagel, Tobias; Franklin, Jeremy; Baethge, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Comparisons of illness characteristics between patients with schizoaffective disorder (SAD) patients and unipolar depression (UD) are rare, even though UD is one of the most important differential diagnoses of SAD. Also, the variability of illness characteristics (heterogeneity) has not been compared. We compared illness characteristics and their heterogeneity among SAD, UD, and - as another important differential diagnosis - schizophrenia (S). In order to reduce sampling bias we systematically searched for studies simultaneously comparing samples of patients with SAD, UD, and S. Using random effects and Mantel-Haenszel models we estimated and compared demographic, illness course and psychopathology parameters, using pooled standard deviations as a measurement of heterogeneity. Out of 155 articles found by an earlier meta-analysis, 765 screened in Medline, 2738 screened in EMBASE, and 855 screened in PsycINFO we selected 24 studies, covering 3714 patients diagnosed according to RDC, DSM-III, DSM-IIIR, DSM-IV, or ICD-10. In almost all key characteristics, samples with schizoaffective disorders fell between unipolar depression and schizophrenia, with a tendency towards schizophrenia. On average, UD patients were significantly older at illness onset (33.0 years, SAD: 25.2, S: 23.4), more often women (59% vs. 57% vs. 39%) and more often married (53% vs. 39% vs. 27%). Their psychopathology was also less severe, as measured by BPRS, GAS, and HAMD. In demographic and clinical variables heterogeneity was roughly 5% larger in UD than in SAD, and samples of patients with schizophrenia had the lowest pooled heterogeneity. A similar picture emerged in a sensitivity analysis with coefficient of variation as the measurement of heterogeneity. Relative to bipolar disorder there are fewer studies including unipolar patients. No studies based on DSM-5 could be included. Regarding unipolar affective disorder this study confirms what we have shown for bipolar disorders in earlier

  19. Omitted Data in Randomized Controlled Trials for Anxiety and Depression: A Systematic Review of the Inclusion of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Nicholas C.; Mirabito, Lucas A.; LeMaire, Kelly; Livingston, Nicholas A.; Flentje, Annesa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The current study examined the frequency with which randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of behavioral and psychological interventions for anxiety and depression include data pertaining to participant sexual orientation and non-binary gender identities. Method Using systematic review methodology, the databases PubMed and PsycINFO were searched to identify RCTs published in 2004, 2009, and 2014. Random selections of 400 articles per database per year (2400 articles in total) were considered for inclusion in the review. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were read and coded by the research team to identify whether the trial reported data pertaining to participant sexual orientation and non-binary gender identities. Additional trial characteristics were also identified and indexed in our database (e.g., sample size, funding source etc.). Results Of the 232 articles meeting inclusion criteria, only one reported participants’ sexual orientation and zero articles included non-binary gender identities. A total of 52,769 participants were represented in the trials, 93 of which were conducted in the U.S. and 43 acknowledged the National Institutes of Health as a source of funding. Conclusions Despite known mental health disparities on the basis of sexual orientation and non-binary gender identification, researchers evaluating interventions for anxiety and depression are not reporting on these important demographic characteristics. Reporting practices must change in order to ensure that our interventions generalize to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons. PMID:27845517

  20. The effect of adding psychodynamic therapy to antidepressants in patients with major depressive disorder. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Psychodynamic therapy may be a treatment option for depression, but the effects have only been limitedly assessed in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology, we compared the benefits and harms of psychodynamic therapy versus 'no intervention' or sham for major depressive disorder. We accepted any co-intervention, including antidepressants, as long as it was delivered similarly in both intervention groups. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, Psyc Info, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Two authors independently extracted data. We evaluated risk of bias to control for systematic errors. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included five trials randomizing a total of 365 participants who all received antidepressants as co-intervention. All trials had high risk of bias. Four trials assessed 'interpersonal psychotherapy' and one trial 'short psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy'. Meta-analysis showed that psychodynamic therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference -3.01 (95% confidence interval -3.98 to -2.03; Ptherapy to antidepressants might benefit depressed patients, but the possible treatment effect measured on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression is small. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Arts Therapies for Anxiety, Depression, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Boehm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. However, only a few trials assess the effects of arts therapies. Material and Methods. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and Google Scholar from their start date to January 2012. We handsearched reference lists and contacted experts. All randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized trials, and controlled clinical trials of art interventions in breast cancer patients were included. Data were extracted and risk of bias was assessed. Meta-analyses were performed using standardized mean differences. Results. Thirteen trials with a total of 606 patients were included. Arts therapies comprised music therapy interventions, various types of art therapy, and dance/movement therapies. The methodological quality ranged from poor to high quality with the majority scoring 3 of 4 points on the Jadad scale. Results suggest that arts therapies seem to positively affect patients’ anxiety (standardized mean difference: −1.10; 95%, confidence interval: −1.40 to −0.80 but not depression or quality of life. No conclusion could be drawn regarding the effects of arts therapy on pain, functional assessment, coping, and mood states. Discussion. Our review indicates that arts interventions may have beneficial effects on anxiety in patients with breast cancer.

  2. Interaction between early-life stress and FKBP5 gene variants in major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingzhong; Shelton, Richard C; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2018-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction contributes to the risks of psychiatric disorders. Interactions between FKBP5 gene variants and early-life stress may enhance the risk not only for mood disorder, but also for a number of other behavioral phenotypes. The aim of the present study was to review and conduct a meta-analysis on the results from published studies examining interaction between FKBP5 gene variants and early-life stress and their associations with stress-related disorders such as major depression and PTSD. A literature search was conducted using PsychINFO and PubMed databases until May 2017. A total of 14 studies with a pooled total of 15109 participants met the inclusion criteria, the results of which were combined and a meta-analysis was performed using the differences in correlations as the effect measure. Based on literature, rs1360780, rs3800373, and rs9470080 SNPs were selected within the FKBP5 gene and systematic review was conducted. Based on the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software, no publication bias was detected. Sensitivity analysis and credibility of meta-analysis results also indicated that the analyses were stable. The meta-analysis showed that individuals who carry T allele of rs1360780, C-allele of rs3800373 or T-allele of rs9470080 exposed to early-life trauma had higher risks for depression or PTSD. The effects of ethnicity, age, sex, and different stress measures were not examined due to limited sample size. These results provide strong evidence of interactions between FKBP5 genotypes and early-life stress, which could pose a significant risk factor for stress-associated disorders such as major depression and PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High prevalence of moderate and severe depressive and anxiety symptoms in polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Laura G; Lee, Iris; Sammel, Mary D; Dokras, Anuja

    2017-05-01

    Do women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased prevalence of moderate and severe depressive and anxiety symptoms compared with control women, and do these symptoms correlate with age, BMI, testosterone, hirsutism or insulin resistance (IR)? Women with PCOS have significantly increased odds of moderate and severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, independent of obesity, and the symptoms are weakly associated with age, BMI, elevated testosterone, hirsutism and IR. Previous studies have reported that women with PCOS have an increased prevalence of mild depressive and anxiety symptoms or an increase in mean depression and anxiety scores, although these scores are usually within the normal range. Thus, it is therefore not clear whether these findings are clinically significant. The prevalence of moderate and severe depressive and anxiety symptoms, which require follow-up and would benefit from treatment, is not known in this population. A comprehensive systematic review (SR) was performed up to January 2016 and included 30 cross-sectional studies, representing 3050 subjects with PCOS and 3858 controls, from 10 different countries. The meta-analysis (MA) on depressive symptoms included 18 studies and the MA on anxiety symptoms included 9 studies. A separate SR identified 15 studies for the meta-regression examining the associations with PCOS-related symptoms or comorbidities. All studies included adult women with PCOS, defined by the National Institutes of Health or Rotterdam criteria, and a control group without PCOS. Ovid, Embase, PsychInfo and Cochrane were searched up to January 2016. Included studies used a validated screening tool to compare the prevalence or mean scores of depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. Random effects MA was used to estimate the pooled odds ratio (OR) of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Sensitivity analyses of methodological characteristics and a meta-regression of the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) to evaluate

  4. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of candidate treatments for cognitive impairment in depression and methodological challenges in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K. W.; Ott, C. V.; Petersen, Jeff Zarp

    2016-01-01

    to reduced depression severity), and/or insufficient details on how the allocation sequence was generated or how blinding was maintained. Several promising treatments were identified, including vortioxetine, erythropoietin, transcranial direct current stimulation and cognitive remediation. However, several...

  5. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF NON-INVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION THERAPIES AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Augusto Negreiros Parente Capela Sampaio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD and cardiovascular diseases are intimately associated. Depression is an independent risk factor for mortality in cardiovascular samples. Neuroendocrine dysfunctions in MDD are related to an overactive hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and increased sympathetic activity. Novel intervention strategies for MDD include the non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. In fact, although these techniques have being increasingly used as a treatment for MDD, their cardiovascular effects were not sufficiently investigated, which would be important considering the dyad MDD/cardiovascular disorders. We investigated this issue through a systematic review for published articles from the first date available to May 2012 in MEDLINE and other databases, looking for main risk factors and surrogate markers for cardiovascular disease such as: cortisol, heart rate variability, alcohol, smoking, obesity, hypertension, glucose. We identified 37 articles (981 subjects according to our eligibility criteria. Our main findings were that NIBS techniques might be effective strategies for down-regulating HPA activity and regulating food, alcohol and cigarette consumption. NIBS’s effects on HRV and blood pressure presented mixed findings, with studies suggesting that HRV values can decrease or remain unchanged after NIBS, while one study found that rTMS increased blood pressure levels. Also, a single study showed that glucose levels decrease after tDCS. However, most studies tested the acute effects after one single session of rTMS/tDCS; therefore further studies are necessary to investigate whether NIBS modifies cardiovascular risk factors in the long-term. In fact, considering the burden of cardiac disease, further trials in cardiovascular, depressed and nondepressed samples using NIBS should be performed.

  6. Objective measures of sleep duration and continuity in major depressive disorder with comorbid hypersomnolence: a primary investigation with contiguous systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Cook, Jesse D; Goldstein, Michael R

    2017-06-01

    Hypersomnolence plays an important role in the presentation, treatment and course of mood disorders. However, there has been relatively little research that examines objective measures of sleep duration and continuity in patients with depression and hypersomnolence, despite the use of these factors in sleep medicine nosological systems. This study compared total sleep time and efficiency measured by naturalistic actigraphic recordings followed by ad libitum polysomnography (PSG; without prescribed wake time) in 22 patients with major depressive disorder and co-occurring hypersomnolence against age- and sex-matched healthy sleeper controls. The major depressive disorder and co-occurring hypersomnolence group demonstrated significantly longer sleep duration compared with healthy sleeper controls quantified by sleep diaries, actigraphy and ad libitum PSG. No between-group differences in sleep efficiency (SE), latency to sleep or wake after sleep onset were observed when assessed using objective measures. To further contextualize these findings within the broader scientific literature, a systematic review was performed to identify other comparable investigations. A meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated patients with mood disorders and co-occurring hypersomnolence have significantly greater sleep duration and similar SE compared with healthy controls when assessed using ad libitum PSG. These results suggest current sleep medicine nosology that distinguishes hypersomnia associated with psychiatric disorders primarily as a construct characterized by low SE and increased time in bed may not be accurate. Future studies that establish the biological bases hypersomnolence in mood disorders, as well as clarify the accuracy of nosological thresholds to define excessive sleep duration, are needed to refine the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  7. Risk of metabolic syndrome and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon; Mitchell, Alex J; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are highly predictive of cardiovascular diseases. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, comparing subjects with different disorders and taking into account demographic variables and psychotropic medication use. The secondary aim was to compare the MetS prevalence in persons with any of the selected disorders versus matched general population controls. The pooled MetS prevalence in people with severe mental illness was 32.6% (95% CI: 30.8%-34.4%; N = 198; n = 52,678). Relative risk meta-analyses established that there was no significant difference in MetS prevalence in studies directly comparing schizophrenia versus bipolar disorder, and in those directly comparing bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder. Only two studies directly compared people with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, precluding meta-analytic calculations. Older age and a higher body mass index were significant moderators in the final demographic regression model (z = -3.6, p = 0.0003, r(2)  = 0.19). People treated with all individual antipsychotic medications had a significantly (ppeople with severe mental illness had a significantly increased risk for MetS (RR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.35-1.86; p<0.001) and all its components, except for hypertension (p = 0.07). These data suggest that the risk for MetS is similarly elevated in the diagnostic subgroups of severe mental illness. Routine screening and multidisciplinary management of medical and behavioral conditions is needed in these patients. Risks of individual antipsychotics should be considered when making treatment choices. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  8. Interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelmann, Hanno; Franklin, Jeremy; Bußhoff, Jana; Baethge, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a common diagnosis in clinical practice but its nosological status has been subject to debate ever since it was conceptualized. Although it is key that diagnostic reliability is sufficient, schizoaffective disorder has been reported to have low interrater reliability. Evidence based on systematic review and meta-analysis methods, however, is lacking. Using a highly sensitive literature search in Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo we identified studies measuring the interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder in comparison to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar disorder. Out of 4126 records screened we included 25 studies reporting on 7912 patients diagnosed by different raters. The interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder was moderate (meta-analytic estimate of Cohen's kappa 0.57 [95% CI: 0.41-0.73]), and substantially lower than that of its main differential diagnoses (difference in kappa between 0.22 and 0.19). Although there was considerable heterogeneity, analyses revealed that the interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder was consistently lower in the overwhelming majority of studies. The results remained robust in subgroup and sensitivity analyses (e.g., diagnostic manual used) as well as in meta-regressions (e.g., publication year) and analyses of publication bias. Clinically, the results highlight the particular importance of diagnostic re-evaluation in patients diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder. They also quantify a widely held clinical impression of lower interrater reliability and agree with earlier meta-analysis reporting low test-retest reliability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Computer-delivered and web-based interventions to improve depression, anxiety, and psychological well-being of university students: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E Bethan; Morriss, Richard; Glazebrook, Cris

    2014-05-16

    Depression and anxiety are common mental health difficulties experienced by university students and can impair academic and social functioning. Students are limited in seeking help from professionals. As university students are highly connected to digital technologies, Web-based and computer-delivered interventions could be used to improve students' mental health. The effectiveness of these intervention types requires investigation to identify whether these are viable prevention strategies for university students. The intent of the study was to systematically review and analyze trials of Web-based and computer-delivered interventions to improve depression, anxiety, psychological distress, and stress in university students. Several databases were searched using keywords relating to higher education students, mental health, and eHealth interventions. The eligibility criteria for studies included in the review were: (1) the study aimed to improve symptoms relating to depression, anxiety, psychological distress, and stress, (2) the study involved computer-delivered or Web-based interventions accessed via computer, laptop, or tablet, (3) the study was a randomized controlled trial, and (4) the study was trialed on higher education students. Trials were reviewed and outcome data analyzed through random effects meta-analyses for each outcome and each type of trial arm comparison. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was used to assess study quality. A total of 17 trials were identified, in which seven were the same three interventions on separate samples; 14 reported sufficient information for meta-analysis. The majority (n=13) were website-delivered and nine interventions were based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). A total of 1795 participants were randomized and 1480 analyzed. Risk of bias was considered moderate, as many publications did not sufficiently report their methods and seven explicitly conducted completers' analyses. In comparison to the inactive

  10. Perceived job insecurity, unemployment and depressive symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T J; von dem Knesebeck, O

    2016-05-01

    It was shown that both job insecurity and unemployment are strongly and consistently associated with depressive symptoms. It is, however, less clear whether perceived job insecurity and unemployment constitute a comparable risk for the onset of depressive symptoms. A meta-analysis was conducted to explore this issue. In December 2014, relevant records were identified through the databases MEDLINE, Embase and PsychINFO. Articles were included if they had been published in the last 10 years and contained a quantitative analysis on the prospective link between job insecurity and unemployment with depressive symptoms. In 20 cohort studies within 15 articles, job insecurity and unemployment were significantly related to a higher risk of depressive symptoms, with the odds ratio (OR) being modestly higher for job insecurity (1.29, 95% CI 1.06-1.57) than for unemployment (1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.28). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the effects were strongest in studies that examined younger respondents (unemployment ORs were higher in shorter time lags (under 1 year), while ORs for job insecurity were increased in longer exposure-outcome intervals (3-4 years). Specifically for unemployment, ORs were highest in studies that did not control for potential health selection effects and that ascertained enduring unemployment. A statistically significant publication bias was found for studies on unemployment, but not for job insecurity. The analyses revealed that both perceived job insecurity and unemployment constitute significant risks of increased depressive symptoms in prospective observational studies. By comparing both stressors, job insecurity can pose a comparable (and even modestly increased) risk of subsequent depressive symptoms.

  11. Dhat syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Marc; Foulon, Hubert; Valdés, Manuel; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Martín-Santos, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Dhat syndrome is a widely recognized clinical condition often seen on the Indian subcontinent that is characterized by a preoccupation with semen loss in urine and other symptoms such as fatigue or depressed mood. Although it has been considered to be a culture-bound syndrome, it may also be regarded as a distinct manifestation of depression or another medical illness. The purpose of this paper was to carry out a systematic review on Dhat syndrome. A review of the literature published up until February 2012 was conducted using the key words [Dhat syndrome] or [semen-loss anxiety] or [semen-loss syndrome]. We included only original studies. The majority of studies reported patients from the Indian subcontinent. There was a high degree of heterogeneity among the studies. Dhat was a common condition in young people from certain cultures and origins. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were common, including fatigue, sleepiness, and sexual dysfunction. Good clinical engagement, social support, and sexual education were useful in some cases. Given the high rate of comorbid depressive symptoms, antidepressant has been used. In an increasingly globalized world, clinicians must be able to properly diagnose and treat patients from other cultures, who may report symptoms that are influenced by their beliefs, culture, or place of origin. Dhat may be a common manifestation of a depressive or anxiety disorder in certain cultures. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of this condition, to clarify its nosologic status, and to offer appropriate treatment to affected individuals. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. O exercício físico no tratamento da depressão em idosos: revisão sistemática Physical exercise in the treatment of depression in the elderly: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Moraes

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Revisar a literatura quanto (I ao possível efeito protetor do exercício físico sobre a incidência de depressão e (II à eficácia do exercício físico como intervenção no tratamento da depressão. MÉTODO: Revisão sistemática de artigos em inglês e português nas bases ISI, PubMed, SciELO e LILACS de janeiro de 1993 a maio de 2006, utilizando conjuntamente os termos "depressão", "idosos" e "exercício". Artigos que avaliaram o efeito do exercício em idosos com doenças clínicas ou que utilizaram escalas para depressão somente para um diagnóstico inicial foram excluídos. RESULTADOS: Do total de 155 artigos, 22 atenderam aos critérios de inclusão, e oito foram acrescentados com busca manual. Os artigos de corte transversal (n = 8 utilizaram somente questionários de auto-avaliação para medir os níveis de atividade física. Os artigos longitudinais (n = 22 utilizaram também pedômetro digital, consumo direto de oxigênio e o exercício físico como intervenção metodológica. Os estudos que atenderam ao objetivo I apontaram para uma relação inversamente proporcional entre atividade física e alterações nos níveis de depressão. Os trabalhos que utilizaram o exercício como intervenção terapêutica na depressão encontraram resultados divergentes e apontaram para a interferência de fatores fisiológicos e psicológicos nessa relação. CONCLUSÃO: O papel do exercício e da atividade física no tratamento da depressão direciona-se para duas vertentes: a depressão promove redução da prática de atividades físicas; a atividade física pode ser um coadjuvante na prevenção e no tratamento da depressão no idoso.OBJECTIVES: To review the literature on the (I possible protective effect of physical activity on the incidence of depression, and (II on the efficacy of physical exercise as a therapeutic intervention in depression. METHODS: Systematic review of ISI, PubMed, LILACS and SciELO articles in English

  13. Economic evidence for the clinical management of major depressive disorder: a systematic review and quality appraisal of economic evaluations alongside randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyotaki, E; Tordrup, D; Buntrock, C; Bertollini, R; Cuijpers, P

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this systematic review of economic evaluations alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was to provide a comprehensive overview of the evidence concerning cost-effectiveness analyses of common treatment options for major depression. An existing database was used to identify studies reporting cost-effectiveness results from RCTs. This database has been developed by a systematic literature search in the bibliographic databases of PubMed, PsychINFO, Embase and Cochrane library from database inception to December 2014. We evaluated the quality of economic evaluations using a 10-item short version of the Drummond checklist. Results were synthesised narratively. The risk of bias of the included RCTs was assessed, based on the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Fourteen RCTs were included from the 5580 articles screened on titles and abstracts. The methodological quality of the health economic evaluations was relatively high and the majority of the included RCTs had low risk of bias in most of Cochrane items except blinding of participants and personnel. Cognitive behavioural therapy was examined in seven trials as part of a variety of treatment protocols and seems cost-effective compared with pharmacotherapy in the long-term. However cost-effectiveness results for the combination of psychotherapy with pharmacotherapy are conflicting and should be interpreted with caution due to limited comparability between the examined trials. For several treatments, only a single economic evaluation was reported as part of a clinical trial. This was the case for comparisons between different classes of antidepressants, for several types of psychotherapy (behavioural activation, occupational therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, short-term psychotherapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, rational emotive behavioural therapy, solution focused therapy), and for transcranial magnetic stimulation v. electroconvulsive therapy. The limited evidence base for these interventions

  14. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.; Hetrick, S.E.; Cuijpers, P.; Qin, B.; Barth, J.; Whittington, C.J.; Cohen, D.; del Giovane, C.; Liu, Y.; Micheal, K.D.; Zhang, Y.; Weisz, J.R.; Xie, P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses of psychotherapies for child and adolescent depression were limited because of the small number of trials with direct comparisons between two treatments. A network meta-analysis, a novel approach that integrates direct and indirect evidence from randomized controlled studies,

  15. Swaddling: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sleuwen, Bregje E.; Engelberts, Adèle C.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Kuis, Wietse; Schulpen, Tom W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Swaddling was an almost universal child-care practice before the 18th century. It is still tradition in certain parts of the Middle East and is gaining popularity in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands to curb excessive crying. We have systematically reviewed all articles on

  16. Swaddling : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sleuwen, Bregje E.; Engelberts, Adele C.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; Kuis, Wietse; Schulpen, Tom W. J.; L'Hoir, Monique P.

    2007-01-01

    Swaddling was an almost universal child-care practice before the 18th century. It is still tradition in certain parts of the Middle East and is gaining popularity in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands to curb excessive crying. We have systematically reviewed all articles on

  17. The Effect of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Prevention of Relapse in Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piet, Jacob; Hougaard, Esben

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based clinical intervention program designed to reduce relapse or recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) by means of systematic training in mindfulness meditation combined with cognitive-behavioral methods. Objective: By means...

  18. The effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for prevention of relapse in recurrent major depressive disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piet, Jacob; Hougaard, Esben

    Background: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based clinical intervention program designed to reduce relapse or recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) by means of systematic training in mindfulness meditation combined with cognitive-behavioral methods. Objective: By means...

  19. Quality of systematic reviews in pediatric oncology - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundh, Andreas; Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L.; Jørgensen, Anders W.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To ensure evidence-based decision making in pediatric oncology systematic reviews are necessary. The objective of our study was to evaluate the methodological quality of all currently existing systematic reviews in pediatric oncology. Methods: We identified eligible systematic reviews

  20. Bitemporal v. high-dose right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolshus, E; Jelovac, A; McLoughlin, D M

    2017-02-01

    Brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most acutely effective treatment for severe depression though concerns persist about cognitive side-effects. While bitemporal electrode placement is the most commonly used form worldwide, right unilateral ECT causes less cognitive side-effects though historically it has been deemed less effective. Several randomized trials have now compared high-dose (>5× seizure threshold) unilateral ECT with moderate-dose (1.0-2.5× seizure threshold) bitemporal ECT to investigate if it is as effective as bitemporal ECT but still has less cognitive side-effects. We aimed to systematically review these trials and meta-analyse clinical and cognitive outcomes where appropriate. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and EMBASE for randomized trials comparing these forms of ECT using the terms 'electroconvulsive' OR 'electroshock' AND 'trial'. Seven trials (n = 792) met inclusion criteria. Bitemporal ECT did not differ from high-dose unilateral ECT on depression rating change scores [Hedges's g = -0.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.17 to 0.11], remission (RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.93-1.20), or relapse at 12 months (RR 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.23). There was an advantage for unilateral ECT on reorientation time after individual ECT sessions (mean difference in minutes = -8.28, 95% CI -12.86 to -3.70) and retrograde autobiographical memory (Hedges's g = -0.46, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04) after completing an ECT course. There were no differences for general cognition, category fluency and delayed visual and verbal memory. High-dose unilateral ECT does not differ from moderate-dose bitemporal ECT in antidepressant efficacy but has some cognitive advantages.

  1. Homework in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Systematic Review of Adherence Assessment in Anxiety and Depression (2011-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Brownfield, Nicole R; Mosely, Livia; Usatoff, Alexsandra S; Flighty, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Treatment adherence has posed a substantial challenge not only for patients but also for the health profession for many decades. The last 5 years has witnessed significant attention toward adherence with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) homework for anxiety and depressive disorders, and adherence assessment methods have diversified. However, there remains a large component of the adherence process not assessed in CBT, with patient effort, engagement, and the known role for treatment appraisals and beliefs necessitating the pursuit of improved adherence assessment methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Internet-delivered transdiagnostic and tailored cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Păsărelu, Costina Ruxandra; Andersson, Gerhard; Bergman Nordgren, Lise; Dobrean, Anca

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety and depressive disorders are often comorbid. Transdiagnostic and tailored treatments seem to be promising approaches in dealing with comorbidity. Although several primary studies have examined the effects of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) for anxiety and depression, no meta-analysis including different types of iCBT that address comorbidity has been conducted so far. We conducted systematic searches in databases up to 1 July 2016. Only randomized trials comparing transdiagnostic/tailored iCBT for adult anxiety and/or depression with control groups were included. Nineteen randomized trials with a total of 2952 participants that met inclusion criteria were analyzed. The quality of the studies was high, however the blinding criteria were not fulfilled. The uncontrolled effect size (Hedges' g) of transdiagnostic/tailored iCBT on anxiety and depression outcomes was large and medium for quality of life. The controlled effect size for iCBT on anxiety and depression outcomes was medium to large (anxiety: g = .82, 95% CI: .58-1.05, depression: g = .79, 95% CI: .59-1.00) and medium on quality of life (g = .56, 95% CI: .37-.73). Heterogeneity was small (quality of life) to moderate (anxiety, depression). There was a large effect on generic outcome measures and a moderate effect on comorbidities. When compared to disorder-specific treatments there were no differences on anxiety and quality of life outcomes, however there were differences in depression outcomes. Transdiagnostic and tailored iCBT are effective interventions for anxiety disorders and depression. Future studies should investigate mechanisms of change and develop outcome measures for these interventions.

  3. An overview of systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathy A; Weeks, Susan Mace

    2014-12-01

    Systematic review is an invaluable tool for the practicing clinician. A well-designed systematic review represents the latest and most complete information available on a particular topic or intervention. This article highlights the key elements of systematic review, what it is and is not, and provides an overview of several reputable organizations supporting the methodological development and conduct of systematic review. Important aspects for evaluating the quality of a systematic review are also included. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Beyond the Trial: Systematic Review of Real-World Uptake and Engagement With Digital Self-Help Interventions for Depression, Low Mood, or Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Theresa; Bavin, Lynda; Lucassen, Mathijs; Stasiak, Karolina; Hopkins, Sarah; Merry, Sally

    2018-06-06

    Digital self-help interventions (including online or computerized programs and apps) for common mental health issues have been shown to be appealing, engaging, and efficacious in randomized controlled trials. They show potential for improving access to therapy and improving population mental health. However, their use in the real world, ie, as implemented (disseminated) outside of research settings, may differ from that reported in trials, and implementation data are seldom reported. This study aimed to review peer-reviewed articles reporting user uptake and/or ongoing use, retention, or completion data (hereafter usage data or, for brevity, engagement) from implemented pure self-help (unguided) digital interventions for depression, anxiety, or the enhancement of mood. We conducted a systematic search of the Scopus, Embase, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO databases for studies reporting user uptake and/or usage data from implemented digital self-help interventions for the treatment or prevention of depression or anxiety, or the enhancement of mood, from 2002 to 2017. Additionally, we screened the reference lists of included articles, citations of these articles, and the titles of articles published in Internet Interventions, Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), and JMIR Mental Health since their inception. We extracted data indicating the number of registrations or downloads and usage of interventions. After the removal of duplicates, 970 papers were identified, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria. Hand searching identified 1 additional article. The included articles reported on 7 publicly available interventions. There was little consistency in the measures reported. The number of registrants or downloads ranged widely, from 8 to over 40,000 per month. From 21% to 88% of users engaged in at least minimal use (eg, used the intervention at least once or completed one module or assessment), whereas 7-42% engaged in moderate use (completing between 40% and 60% of

  5. Enhanced care for depression : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, A.J.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: The purpose of this study is to review recent evidence of the effects of enhanced depression care, focusing (1) on symptomatic, functional and economic outcomes and (2) across different countries, (3) ethnic groups and (4) settings. Recent findings: Collaborative care is currently

  6. Systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnard, K. D.; Lloyd, C. E.; Skinner, T. C.

    2007-01-01

    mixed results, with one study reporting quality of life benefits and one reporting no evidence of quality of life benefits. Conclusions: There is conflicting evidence reported in the various studies on the quality of life benefits of CSII in Type 1 diabetes. Existing research is flawed, making......Aim: To review systematically the published literature addressing whether continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides any quality of life benefits to people with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Electronic databases and published references were searched and a consultation with two...

  7. Economic and Health Predictors of National Postpartum Depression Prevalence: A Systematic Review, Meta-analysis, and Meta-Regression of 291 Studies from 56 Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hahn-Holbrook

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPostpartum depression (PPD poses a major global public health challenge. PPD is the most common complication associated with childbirth and exerts harmful effects on children. Although hundreds of PPD studies have been published, we lack accurate global or national PPD prevalence estimates and have no clear account of why PPD appears to vary so dramatically between nations. Accordingly, we conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the global and national prevalence of PPD and a meta-regression to identify economic, health, social, or policy factors associated with national PPD prevalence.MethodsWe conducted a systematic review of all papers reporting PPD prevalence using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. PPD prevalence and methods were extracted from each study. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate global and national PPD prevalence. To test for country level predictors, we drew on data from UNICEF, WHO, and the World Bank. Random effects meta-regression was used to test national predictors of PPD prevalence.Findings291 studies of 296284 women from 56 countries were identified. The global pooled prevalence of PPD was 17.7% (95% confidence interval: 16.6–18.8%, with significant heterogeneity across nations (Q = 16,823, p = 0.000, I2 = 98%, ranging from 3% (2–5% in Singapore to 38% (35–41% in Chile. Nations with significantly higher rates of income inequality (R2 = 41%, maternal mortality (R2 = 19%, infant mortality (R2 = 16%, or women of childbearing age working ≥40 h a week (R2 = 31% have higher rates of PPD. Together, these factors explain 73% of the national variation in PPD prevalence.InterpretationThe global prevalence of PPD is greater than previously thought and varies dramatically by nation. Disparities in wealth inequality and maternal-child-health factors explain much of the national variation in PPD prevalence.

  8. Psychological Treatment of Depression in People Aged 65 Years and Over: A Systematic Review of Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Jonsson

    Full Text Available Depression in elderly people is a major public health concern. As response to antidepressants is often unsatisfactory in this age group, there is a need for evidence-based non-pharmacological treatment options. Our objectives were twofold: firstly, to synthesize published trials evaluating efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of psychological treatment of depression in the elderly and secondly, to assess the quality of evidence.The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAL, Scopus, and PsycINFO were searched up to 23 May 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of psychological treatment for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms in people aged 65 years and over. Two reviewers independently assessed relevant studies for risk of bias. Where appropriate, the results were synthesized in meta-analyses. The quality of the evidence was graded according to GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation.Twenty-two relevant RCTs were identified, eight of which were excluded from the synthesis due to a high risk of bias. Of the remaining trials, six evaluated problem-solving therapy (PST, five evaluated other forms of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT, and three evaluated life review/reminiscence therapy. In frail elderly with depressive symptoms, the evidence supported the efficacy of PST, with large but heterogeneous effect sizes compared with treatment as usual. The results for life-review/reminiscence therapy and CBT were also promising, but because of the limited number of trials the quality of evidence was rated as very low. Safety data were not reported in any included trial. The only identified cost-effectiveness study estimated an incremental cost per additional point reduction in Beck Depression Inventory II score for CBT compared with talking control and treatment as usual.Psychological treatment is a feasible option for frail elderly with depressive symptoms. However, important questions

  9. Telerheumatology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, John A; Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Glover, Janis; Fraenkel, Liana

    2017-10-01

    To identify and summarize the published and gray literature on the use of telemedicine for the diagnosis and management of inflammatory and/or autoimmune rheumatic disease. We performed a registered systematic search (CRD42015025382) for studies using MEDLINE (1946 to July 2015), Embase (1974 to July 2015), Web of Science (1900 to July 2015), and Scopus (1946 to July 2015) databases. We included studies that demonstrated the use of telemedicine for diagnosis and/or management of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic disease. Following data extraction, we performed a descriptive analysis. Our literature search identified 1,468 potentially eligible studies. Of these studies, 20 were ultimately included in this review. Studies varied significantly in publication type, quality of evidence, and the reporting of methods. Most demonstrated a high risk of bias. Rheumatoid arthritis was the most commonly studied rheumatic disease (42% of patients). Studies demonstrated conflicting results regarding the effectiveness of telemedicine (18 found it effective, 1 found it effective but possibly harmful, and 1 found it ineffective). A limited number of studies included some component of a cost analysis (n = 6; 16% of patients); all of these found telemedicine to be cost-effective. Studies identified by this systematic review generally found telemedicine to be effective for the diagnosis and management of autoimmune/inflammatory rheumatic disease; however, there is limited evidence to support this conclusion. Further studies are needed to determine the best uses of telemedicine for the diagnosis and management of these conditions. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Are bidirectional associations of obesity and depression already apparent in childhood and adolescence as based on high-quality studies? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlig, Y; Antel, J; Föcker, M; Hebebrand, J

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate bidirectional associations of obesity and depression in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies with initial assessments in childhood or adolescence. The clarification of these relationships may support the development of innovative interventions, e.g. based on nutrition and mental health. A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE. Main inclusion criteria were (i) assessment of subjects obesity and depression. Three out of eight longitudinal studies reported associations between obesity and subsequent depression in female children and adolescents only, and three out of nine studies obtained evidence in favour of the other direction with two studies revealing significant results only for female and one only for male children and adolescents. Evidence is mixed, and secure conclusions are hampered by the methodological variance of the included studies. Relationships are seemingly more readily detectable in female children adolescents and in the cross-sectional compared with the longitudinal analyses. Possibly, the joint development of obesity and depression in predisposed subjects accounts for the latter discrepancy. © 2015 World Obesity.

  11. Gynecomastia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Anders; Lewin, Richard; Rufolo, Guglielmo; Elander, Anna; Santanelli di Pompeo, Fabio; Selvaggi, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Gynecomastia is a common medical problem presenting in nearly a third of the male population. Treatment for gynecomastia can be either pharmacological or surgical. Patients with gynecomastia often experience affected quality-of-life. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze the quality of evidence of the current literature in relation to different treatment modalities and Quality-of-Life in patients with gynecomastia. A systematic search of the literature was performed in PubMed, Medline, Scopus, The Cochrane Library, and SveMed+ in accordance with the PRISMA statement. All searches were undertaken between September-November 2014. The PICOS (patients, intervention, comparator, outcomes, and study design) approach was used to specify inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was graded according to MINORS. Quality of evidence was rated according to GRADE. Data from the included studies were extracted based on study characteristics, participants specifics, type of intervention/treatment, and type of outcome measures into data extraction forms. A total of 134 abstracts were identified in the literature search. Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria, 14 concerning treatment and three concerning Quality-of-Life. All studies were non-randomised with a high risk of bias and very low quality of evidence according to GRADE. Several different surgical methods have been described with good results, minimal scars, and various levels of complications. Traditional surgical excision of glandular tissue combined with liposuction provides most consistent results and a low rate of complications. Pubertal gynecomastia may safely be managed by pharmacological anti-oestrogen treatment.

  12. Iridology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    1999-02-01

    Iridologists claim to be able to diagnose medical conditions through abnormalities of pigmentation in the iris. This technique is popular in many countries. Therefore it is relevant to ask whether it is valid. To systematically review all interpretable tests of the validity of iridology as a diagnostic tool. DATA SOURCE AND EXTRACTION: Three independent literature searches were performed to identify all blinded tests. Data were extracted in a predefined, standardized fashion. Four case control studies were found. The majority of these investigations suggests that iridology is not a valid diagnostic method. The validity of iridology as a diagnostic tool is not supported by scientific evaluations. Patients and therapists should be discouraged from using this method.

  13. Mindfulness-Based Baduanjin Exercise for Depression and Anxiety in People with Physical or Mental Illnesses: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liye Zou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: we used a quantitative method to systematically synthesize the emerging literature and critically evaluate the effects of Baduanjin on depression and anxiety in people with physical or mental illnesses. Additionally, we determined if the number of total Baduanjin training sessions is associated with decreased anxiety and depression levels. Methods: both English and Chinese databases were searched for potential studies published between January 1982 and October 2017. The eligible randomized controlled trials were considered for meta-analysis. Effect size (Hedge’s g was computed for the pooled effects while the random-effect model was set. For moderator analysis; Subgroup meta-analysis for categorical variables and meta-regression for continuous variables were performed. Results: the aggregated result has shown a significant benefit in favour of Baduanjin on anxiety (Hedge’s g = −0.99; CI −1.63 to −0.74 and depression (Hedge’s g = −1.07; CI −1.3 to −0.83. For continuous potential moderators; meta-regression indicated a significant effect for total hours in Baduanjin practice (β = −0.0053; 95% CI −0.009 to −0.0014; p = 0.008. With regard to depression; meta-regression indicated a significant effect for total sessions of Baduanjin practice (β = −0.0023; 95% CI −0.006 to −0.0004; p = 0.028. Conclusions: the encouraging findings indicate the efficacy of Baduanjin exercise in reducing depression and anxiety symptoms in people with physical or mental illnesses. However; the results should be interpreted with caution because of existing methodological limitations (e.g., high risk of bias; Baduanjin combined with other behavioral interventions; and heterogeneity of control groups.

  14. Apathy and depressive symptoms in older people and incident myocardial infarction, stroke, and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurelings, Lisa Sm; van Dalen, Jan Willem; Ter Riet, Gerben; Moll van Charante, Eric P; Richard, Edo; van Gool, Willem A

    2018-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that apathy symptoms independently of depressive symptoms measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals. To study whether apathy and depressive symptoms in older people are associated with future CVD, stroke, and mortality using individual patient-data meta-analysis. Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo databases up to September 3, 2013, were systematically searched without language restrictions. We sought prospective studies with older (mean age ≥65 years) community-dwelling populations in which the GDS was employed and subsequent stroke and/or CVD were recorded to provide individual participant data. Apathy symptoms were defined as the three apathy-related subitems of the GDS, with depressive symptoms the remaining items. We used myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and all-cause mortality as main outcomes. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and MI/stroke history. An adaptation of the Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to evaluate bias. Hazard ratios were calculated using one-stage random-effect Cox regression models. Of the 52 eligible studies, 21 (40.4%) were included, comprising 47,625 older people (mean age [standard deviation] 74 [7.4] years), over a median follow-up of 8.8 years. Participants with apathy symptoms had a 21% higher risk of MI (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.36), a 37% higher risk of stroke (95% CI 1.18-1.59), and a 47% higher risk of all-cause mortality (95% CI 1.38-1.56). Participants with depressive symptoms had a comparably higher risk of stroke (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.18-1.56) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35-1.53), but not of MI (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.91-1.29). Associations for isolated apathy and isolated depressive symptoms were comparable. Sensitivity analyses according to risk of bias yielded similar results. Our findings stress the clinical importance of recognizing apathy independently of depressive symptoms, and could help

  15. Web-Based Tools and Mobile Applications To Mitigate Burnout, Depression, and Suicidality Among Healthcare Students and Professionals: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospos, Sarah; Young, Ilanit Tal; Downs, Nancy; Iglewicz, Alana; Depp, Colin; Chen, James Y; Newton, Isabel; Lee, Kelly; Light, Gregory A; Zisook, Sidney

    2018-02-01

    Being a healthcare professional can be a uniquely rewarding calling. However, the demands of training and practice can lead to chronic distress and serious psychological, interpersonal, and personal health burdens. Although higher burnout, depression, and suicide rates have been reported in healthcare professionals, only a minority receive treatment. Concerns regarding confidentiality, stigma, potential career implications, and cost and time constraints are cited as key barriers. Web-based and mobile applications have been shown to mitigate stress, burnout, depression, and suicidal ideation among several populations and may circumvent these barriers. Here, we reviewed published data on such resources and selected a small sample that readily can be used by healthcare providers. We searched PubMed for articles evaluating stress, burnout, depression, and suicide prevention or intervention for healthcare students or providers and identified five categories of programs with significant effectiveness: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (online), meditation, mindfulness, breathing, and relaxation techniques. Using these categories, we searched for Web-based (through Google and beacon.anu.edu.au -a wellness resource website) and mobile applications (Apple and mobile. va.gov/appstore ) for stress, burnout, depression, and suicide prevention and identified 36 resources to further evaluate based on relevance, applicability to healthcare providers (confidentiality, convenience, and cost), and the strength of findings supporting their effectiveness. We selected seven resources under five general categories designed to foster wellness and reduce burnout, depression, and suicide risk among healthcare workers: breathing (Breath2Relax), meditation (Headspace, guided meditation audios), Web-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MoodGYM, Stress Gym), and suicide prevention apps (Stay Alive, Virtual Hope Box). This list serves as a starting point to enhance coping with stressors as a

  16. Systematic Reviews in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSilvestro, Kevin J; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Spindler, Kurt P; Freedman, Kevin B

    2016-02-01

    The number of systematic reviews published in the orthopaedic literature has increased, and these reviews can help guide clinical decision making. However, the quality of these reviews can affect the reader's ability to use the data to arrive at accurate conclusions and make clinical decisions. To evaluate the methodological and reporting quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the sports medicine literature to determine whether such reviews should be used to guide treatment decisions. The hypothesis was that many systematic reviews in the orthopaedic sports medicine literature may not follow the appropriate reporting guidelines or methodological criteria recommended for systematic reviews. Systematic review. All clinical sports medicine systematic reviews and meta-analyses from 2009 to 2013 published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine (AJSM), The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS), Arthroscopy, Sports Health, and Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy (KSSTA) were reviewed and evaluated for level of evidence according to the guidelines from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, for reporting quality according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement, and for methodological quality according to the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Analysis was performed by year and journal of publication, and the levels of evidence included in the systematic reviews were also analyzed. A total of 200 systematic reviews and meta-analyses were identified over the study period. Of these, 53% included evidence levels 4 and 5 in their analyses, with just 32% including evidence levels 1 and 2 only. There were significant differences in the proportion of articles with high levels of evidence (P Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in orthopaedics sports medicine literature relied on evidence levels 4 and 5 in 53% of studies over the 5-year study period. Overall, PRISMA and

  17. Aromatherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2000-01-01

    Aromatherapy is becoming increasingly popular; however there are few clear indications for its use. To systematically review the literature on aromatherapy in order to discover whether any clinical indication may be recommended for its use, computerised literature searches were performed to retrieve all randomised controlled trials of aromatherapy from the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, British Nursing Index, CISCOM, and AMED. The methodological quality of the trials was assessed using the Jadad score. All trials were evaluated independently by both authors and data were extracted in a pre-defined, standardised fashion. Twelve trials were located: six of them had no independent replication; six related to the relaxing effects of aromatherapy combined with massage. These studies suggest that aromatherapy massage has a mild, transient anxiolytic effect. Based on a critical assessment of the six studies relating to relaxation, the effects of aromatherapy are probably not strong enough for it to be considered for the treatment of anxiety. The hypothesis that it is effective for any other indication is not supported by the findings of rigorous clinical trials. PMID:10962794

  18. A systematic review of the effectiveness of self-management interventions in people with multiple sclerosis at improving depression, anxiety and quality of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kidd

    Full Text Available Self-management interventions have become increasingly popular in the management of long-term health conditions; however, little is known about their impact on psychological well-being in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS.To examine the effectiveness of self-management interventions on improving depression, anxiety and health related quality of life in people with MS.A structured literature search was conducted for the years 2000 to 2016. The review process followed the PRISMA guidelines, and is registered with PROSPERO (no. CRD42016033925.The review identified 10 RCT trials that fulfilled selection criteria and quality appraisal. Self-management interventions improved health-related quality of life in 6 out of 7 studies, with some evidence of improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms.Although the results are promising more robust evaluation is required in order to determine the effectiveness of self-management interventions on depression, anxiety and quality of life in people with MS. Evaluation of the data was impeded by a number of methodological issues including incomplete content and delivery information for the intervention and the exclusion of participants representing the disease spectrum. Recommendations are made for service development and research quality improvement.

  19. Preventing postpartum depression: A meta-analytic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockol, Laura E.; Epperson, C. Neill; Barber, Jacques P.

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of a wide range of preventive interventions designed to reduce the severity of postpartum depressive symptoms or decrease the prevalence of postpartum depressive episodes. A systematic review identified 37 randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials in which an intervention was compared to a control condition. Differences between treatment and control conditions in the level of depressive symptoms and prevalence of depressive episodes by 6 months postpartum were assessed in separate analyses. Depressive symptoms were significantly lower at post-treatment in intervention conditions, with an overall effect size in the small range after exclusion of outliers (Hedges' g = 0.18). There was a 27% reduction in the prevalence of depressive episodes in intervention conditions by 6 months postpartum after removal of outliers and correction for publication bias. Later timing of the postpartum assessment was associated with smaller differences between intervention and control conditions in both analyses. Among studies that assessed depressive symptoms using the EPDS, higher levels of depressive symptoms at pre-treatment were associated with smaller differences in depressive symptoms by 6 months postpartum. These findings suggest that interventions designed to prevent postpartum depression effectively reduce levels of postpartum depressive symptoms and decrease risk for postpartum depressive episodes. PMID:24211712

  20. Apathy and depressive symptoms in older people and incident myocardial infarction, stroke, and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurelings LSM

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lisa SM Eurelings,1,* Jan Willem van Dalen,1,* Gerben ter Riet,2 Eric P Moll van Charante,2 Edo Richard,1,3 Willem A van Gool1 On behalf of the ICARA Study Group 1Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of General Practice, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Department of Neurology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous findings suggest that apathy symptoms independently of depressive symptoms measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD in older individuals.Aims: To study whether apathy and depressive symptoms in older people are associated with future CVD, stroke, and mortality using individual patient-data meta-analysis.Methods: Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo databases up to September 3, 2013, were systematically searched without language restrictions. We sought prospective studies with older (mean age ≥65 years community-dwelling populations in which the GDS was employed and subsequent stroke and/or CVD were recorded to provide individual participant data. Apathy symptoms were defined as the three apathy-related subitems of the GDS, with depressive symptoms the remaining items. We used myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality as main outcomes. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and MI/stroke history. An adaptation of the Newcastle–Ottawa scale was used to evaluate bias. Hazard ratios were calculated using one-stage random-effect Cox regression models.Results: Of the 52 eligible studies, 21 (40.4% were included, comprising 47,625 older people (mean age [standard deviation] 74 [7.4] years, over a median follow-up of 8.8 years. Participants with apathy symptoms had a 21% higher risk of MI (95% confidence

  1. Impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Simone R; Heijink, Richard; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A

    2011-07-01

    Evaluating the impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or COPD. Systematic Pubmed search for studies reporting the impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures. Included were studies that contained two or more components of Wagner's chronic care model and were published between January 2007 and December 2009. Thirty-one papers were selected, describing disease management programs for patients with diabetes (n=14), depression (n=4), heart failure (n=8), and COPD (n=5). Twenty-one studies reported incremental healthcare costs per patient per year, of which 13 showed cost-savings. Incremental costs ranged between -$16,996 and $3305 per patient per year. Substantial variation was found between studies in terms of study design, number and combination of components of disease management programs, interventions within components, and characteristics of economic evaluations. Although it is widely believed that disease management programs reduce healthcare expenditures, the present study shows that evidence for this claim is still inconclusive. Nevertheless disease management programs are increasingly implemented in healthcare systems worldwide. To support well-considered decision-making in this field, well-designed economic evaluations should be stimulated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Test-retest reliability of schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelmann, Hanno; Franklin, Jeremy; Bußhoff, Jana; Baethge, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a frequent diagnosis, and its reliability is subject to ongoing discussion. We compared the diagnostic reliability of schizoaffective disorder with its main differential diagnoses. We systematically searched Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo for all studies on the test-retest reliability of the diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder as compared with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression. We used meta-analytic methods to describe and compare Cohen's kappa as well as positive and negative agreement. In addition, multiple pre-specified and post hoc subgroup and sensitivity analyses were carried out. Out of 4,415 studies screened, 49 studies were included. Test-retest reliability of schizoaffective disorder was consistently lower than that of schizophrenia (in 39 out of 42 studies), bipolar disorder (27/33), and unipolar depression (29/35). The mean difference in kappa between schizoaffective disorder and the other diagnoses was approximately 0.2, and mean Cohen's kappa for schizoaffective disorder was 0.50 (95% confidence interval: 0.40-0.59). While findings were unequivocal and homogeneous for schizoaffective disorder's diagnostic reliability relative to its three main differential diagnoses (dichotomous: smaller versus larger), heterogeneity was substantial for continuous measures, even after subgroup and sensitivity analyses. In clinical practice and research, schizoaffective disorder's comparatively low diagnostic reliability should lead to increased efforts to correctly diagnose the disorder. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Systematic Review Workshop (August 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal for this workshop is to receive scientific input regarding approaches for different steps within a systematic review, such as evaluating individual studies, synthesizing evidence within a particular discipline, etc.

  4. Are child and adolescent responses to placebo higher in major depression than in anxiety disorders? A systematic review of placebo-controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cohen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous report, we hypothesized that responses to placebo were high in child and adolescent depression because of specific psychopathological factors associated with youth major depression. The purpose of this study was to compare the placebo response rates in pharmacological trials for major depressive disorder (MDD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD and other anxiety disorders (AD-non-OCD. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reviewed the literature relevant to the use of psychotropic medication in children and adolescents with internalized disorders, restricting our review to double-blind studies including a placebo arm. Placebo response rates were pooled and compared according to diagnosis (MDD vs. OCD vs. AD-non-OCD, age (adolescent vs. child, and date of publication. From 1972 to 2007, we found 23 trials that evaluated the efficacy of psychotropic medication (mainly non-tricyclic antidepressants involving youth with MDD, 7 pertaining to youth with OCD, and 10 pertaining to youth with other anxiety disorders (N = 2533 patients in placebo arms. As hypothesized, the placebo response rate was significantly higher in studies on MDD, than in those examining OCD and AD-non-OCD (49.6% [range: 17-90%] vs. 31% [range: 4-41%] vs. 39.6% [range: 9-53], respectively, ANOVA F = 7.1, p = 0.002. Children showed a higher stable placebo response within all three diagnoses than adolescents, though this difference was not significant. Finally, no significant effects were found with respect to the year of publication. CONCLUSION: MDD in children and adolescents appears to be more responsive to placebo than other internalized conditions, which highlights differential psychopathology.

  5. The Bidirectional Relationship between Diabetes and Depression: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Abdallah; Abunaser, Rnad; Khassawneh, Adi; Alfaqih, Mahmoud; Khasawneh, Aws; Abdo, Nour

    2018-05-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem worldwide. Depression is a serious mental condition that decreases mental and physical functioning and reduces the quality of life. Several lines of evidence suggest a bidirectional relationship between diabetes and depression: diabetes patients are twice as likely to experience depression than nondiabetic individuals. In contrast, depression increases the risk of diabetes and interferes with its daily self-management. Diabetes patients with depression have poor glycemic control, reduced quality of life, and an increased risk of diabetes complications, consequently having an increased mortality rate. Conflicting evidence exists on the potential role of factors that may account for or modulate the relationship between diabetes and depression. Therefore, this review aims to highlight the most notable body of literature that dissects the various facets of the bidirectional relationship between diabetes and depression. A focused discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying this relationship is also provided. We systematically reviewed the relevant literature in the PubMed database, using the keywords "Diabetes AND Depression". After exclusion of duplicate and irrelevant material, literature eligible for inclusion in this review was based on meta-analysis studies, clinical trials with large sample sizes (n≥1,000), randomized clinical trials, and comprehensive national and cross-country clinical studies. The evidence we present in this review supports the pressing need for long, outcome-oriented, randomized clinical trials to determine whether the identification and treatment of patients with these comorbid conditions will improve their medical outcomes and quality of life.

  6. Magnitude da depressão pós-parto no Brasil: uma revisão sistemática The extent of post-partum depression in Brazil: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Lobato

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: realizar uma revisão sistemática dos estudos sobre a magnitude da depressão pós-parto (DPP no Brasil. MÉTODOS: a busca e seleção da literatura baseouse em artigos publicados em periódicos nacionais e internacionais, nas bases de dados eletrônicas Lilacs, SciELO e Medline. RESULTADOS: foram selecionados 14 estudos, sendo que 13 deles reportavam a prevalência de DPP e apenas um estudo de seguimento com limitada casuística (n=21 trazia estimativa da incidência do agravo (42,8%. A grande heterogeneidade em relação à população de estudo, método diagnóstico utilizado e período pós-parto focalizado dificultou a obtenção de uma estimativa agregada da prevalência de DPP no Brasil. Contudo, estudos conduzidos em unidades básicas de saúde, no âmbito da Estratégia de Saúde da Família ou em populações carentes apontaram uma prevalência entre 30 e 40% de DPP, enquanto pesquisas que incluíram amostras de base populacional e populações de unidades hospitalares terciárias revelaram uma prevalência de cerca de 20%. CONCLUSÕES: embora novos estudos sejam necessários para melhor caracterizar as peculiaridades que envolvem a magnitude da DPP no Brasil, as evidências disponíveis justificam uma atenção prioritária para os agravos à saúde mental materna no âmbito da saúde pública no país.OBJECTIVES: to carry out a systematic review of studies of the extent of post-partum depression (PPD in Brazil. METHODS: articles were searched for and selected from national and international periodicals included in the Lilacs, SciELO and Medline electronic databases. RESULTS: fourteen studies were selected, thirteen of which reported the prevalence of PPD and one, which followed up a limited number of cases (n=21 estimated the incidence of the disorder at 42.8%. The wide range of different populations studied, diagnostic methods used, and post-partum period monitored made it difficult to obtain an aggregate estimate for

  7. Neurobiology of anxious depression: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Niciu, Mark J; Mathews, Daniel C; Richards, Erica M; Zarate, Carlos A

    2013-04-01

    Anxious depression is a common, distinct clinical subtype of major depressive disorder (MDD). This review summarizes current neurobiological knowledge regarding anxious depression. Peer-reviewed articles, published January 1970 through September 2012, were identified via PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, using the following key words: anxious depression electroencephalography (EEG), anxious depression functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anxious depression genetics, anxious depression neurobiology, and anxious melancholia neurobiology. Despite a general dearth of neurobiological research, the results suggest that anxious depression-when defined either syndromally or dimensionally-has distinct neurobiological findings that separate it from nonanxious depression. Structural neuroimaging, EEG, genetics, and neuropsychiatric studies revealed differences in subjects with anxious depression compared to other groups. Endocrine differences between individuals with anxious depression and those with nonanxious depression have also been noted, as evidenced by abnormal responses elicited by exogenous stimulation of the system. Despite these findings, heterogeneity in the definition of anxious depression complicates the results. Because exploring the neurobiology of this depressive subtype is important for improving diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, enrichment strategies to decrease heterogeneity within the field should be employed for future research. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The difficulties of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Martin J; Lindenmayer, David B

    2017-10-01

    The need for robust evidence to support conservation actions has driven the adoption of systematic approaches to research synthesis in ecology. However, applying systematic review to complex or open questions remains challenging, and this task is becoming more difficult as the quantity of scientific literature increases. We drew on the science of linguistics for guidance as to why the process of identifying and sorting information during systematic review remains so labor intensive, and to provide potential solutions. Several linguistic properties of peer-reviewed corpora-including nonrandom selection of review topics, small-world properties of semantic networks, and spatiotemporal variation in word meaning-greatly increase the effort needed to complete the systematic review process. Conversely, the resolution of these semantic complexities is a common motivation for narrative reviews, but this process is rarely enacted with the rigor applied during linguistic analysis. Therefore, linguistics provides a unifying framework for understanding some key challenges of systematic review and highlights 2 useful directions for future research. First, in cases where semantic complexity generates barriers to synthesis, ecologists should consider drawing on existing methods-such as natural language processing or the construction of research thesauri and ontologies-that provide tools for mapping and resolving that complexity. These tools could help individual researchers classify research material in a more robust manner and provide valuable guidance for future researchers on that topic. Second, a linguistic perspective highlights that scientific writing is a rich resource worthy of detailed study, an observation that can sometimes be lost during the search for data during systematic review or meta-analysis. For example, mapping semantic networks can reveal redundancy and complementarity among scientific concepts, leading to new insights and research questions. Consequently

  9. Group cognitive behavioural therapy for postnatal depression: a systematic review of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, M D; Scope, A; Sutcliffe, P A; Booth, A; Slade, P; Parry, G; Saxon, D; Kalthenthaler, E

    2010-09-01

    Postnatal depression (PND) describes a wide range of distressing symptoms that can occur in women following childbirth. There is substantial evidence to support the use of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in the treatment of depression, and psychological therapies are recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence as a first-line treatment for PND. However, access is limited owing to expense, waiting lists and availability of therapists. Group CBT may, therefore, offer a solution to these problems by reducing therapist time and increasing the number of available places for treatment. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of group CBT compared with currently used packages of care for women with PND. Seventeen electronic bibliographic databases were searched (for example MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, PsycINFO, etc.), covering biomedical, health-related, science, social science and grey literature (including current research). Databases were searched from 1950 to January 2008. In addition, the reference lists of relevant articles were checked and various health services' related resources were consulted via the internet. The study population included women in the postpartum period (up to 1 year), meeting the criteria of a standardised PND diagnosis using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, or scoring above cut-off on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). No exclusion was made on the basis of the standardised depression screening/case finding instrument of standardised clinical assessment tool used to define PND. All full papers were read by two reviewers (AS and DS) who made independent decisions regarding inclusion or exclusion, and consensus, where possible, was obtained by meeting to compare decisions. In the event of disagreement, a third reviewer (EK) read the paper and made the decision. All data from included quantitative

  10. [Iridology: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Léia Fortes; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2008-09-01

    This study is a literature review about Iridology/Irisdiagnose in the period from 1970 to 2005. The objective was to identify the worldwide scientific publications (articles) in this field and the opinions about the method. Twenty-five articles were found, four of them from Brazilian authors. About the category, 1 was literature review, 12 research studies and 12 updates, historical reviews or editorials. The countries that have contributed more with the studies were Brazil and Russia. Fifteen of those are in favor of the method and 10 are against it. In conclusion, it is necessary to develop more studies inside the methodological rigor, once Iridology brings hope to preventive medicine.

  11. Quality of systematic reviews in pediatric oncology--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, Andreas; Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L; Jørgensen, Anders W; van Dalen, Elvira C; Kremer, Leontien C M

    2009-12-01

    To ensure evidence-based decision making in pediatric oncology systematic reviews are necessary. The objective of our study was to evaluate the methodological quality of all currently existing systematic reviews in pediatric oncology. We identified eligible systematic reviews through a systematic search of the literature. Data on clinical and methodological characteristics of the included systematic reviews were extracted. The methodological quality of the included systematic reviews was assessed using the overview quality assessment questionnaire, a validated 10-item quality assessment tool. We compared the methodological quality of systematic reviews published in regular journals with that of Cochrane systematic reviews. We included 117 systematic reviews, 99 systematic reviews published in regular journals and 18 Cochrane systematic reviews. The average methodological quality of systematic reviews was low for all ten items, but the quality of Cochrane systematic reviews was significantly higher than systematic reviews published in regular journals. On a 1-7 scale, the median overall quality score for all systematic reviews was 2 (range 1-7), with a score of 1 (range 1-7) for systematic reviews in regular journals compared to 6 (range 3-7) in Cochrane systematic reviews (pmethodological flaws leading to a high risk of bias. While Cochrane systematic reviews were of higher methodological quality than systematic reviews in regular journals, some of them also had methodological problems. Therefore, the methodology of each individual systematic review should be scrutinized before accepting its results.

  12. Methodology of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares-Espinós, E; Hernández, V; Domínguez-Escrig, J L; Fernández-Pello, S; Hevia, V; Mayor, J; Padilla-Fernández, B; Ribal, M J

    2018-05-03

    The objective of evidence-based medicine is to employ the best scientific information available to apply to clinical practice. Understanding and interpreting the scientific evidence involves understanding the available levels of evidence, where systematic reviews and meta-analyses of clinical trials are at the top of the levels-of-evidence pyramid. The review process should be well developed and planned to reduce biases and eliminate irrelevant and low-quality studies. The steps for implementing a systematic review include (i) correctly formulating the clinical question to answer (PICO), (ii) developing a protocol (inclusion and exclusion criteria), (iii) performing a detailed and broad literature search and (iv) screening the abstracts of the studies identified in the search and subsequently of the selected complete texts (PRISMA). Once the studies have been selected, we need to (v) extract the necessary data into a form designed in the protocol to summarise the included studies, (vi) assess the biases of each study, identifying the quality of the available evidence, and (vii) develop tables and text that synthesise the evidence. A systematic review involves a critical and reproducible summary of the results of the available publications on a particular topic or clinical question. To improve scientific writing, the methodology is shown in a structured manner to implement a systematic review. Copyright © 2018 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of Sex Differences in Depression and Prognosis in Persons With Myocardial Infarction: A MINDMAPS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Frank; McGee, Hannah; Conroy, Ronán; Conradi, Henk Jan; Meijer, Anna; Steeds, Richard; Sato, Hiroshi; Stewart, Donna E; Parakh, Kapil; Carney, Robert; Freedland, Kenneth; Anselmino, Matteo; Pelletier, Roxanne; Bos, Elisabeth H; de Jonge, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Using combined individual patient data from prospective studies, we explored sex differences in depression and prognosis post-myocardial infarction (MI) and determined whether disease indices could account for found differences. Individual patient data analysis of 10,175 MI patients who completed diagnostic interviews or depression questionnaires from 16 prospective studies from the MINDMAPS study was conducted. Multilevel logistic and Cox regression models were used to determine sex differences in prevalence of depression and sex-specific effects of depression on subsequent outcomes. Combined interview and questionnaire data from observational studies showed that 36% (635/1760) of women and 29% (1575/5526) of men reported elevated levels of depression (age-adjusted odds ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60-0.77). The risk for all-cause mortality associated with depression was higher in men (hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.30-1.47) than in women (hazard ratio = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.31; sex by depression interaction: p < .001). Low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was associated with higher depression scores in men only (sex by LVEF interaction: B = 0.294, 95% CI = 0.090-0.498), which attenuated the sex difference in the association between depression and prognosis. The prevalence of depression post-MI was higher in women than in men, but the association between depression and cardiac prognosis was worse for men. LVEF was associated with depression in men only and accounted for the increased risk of all-cause mortality in depressed men versus women, suggesting that depression in men post-MI may, in part, reflect cardiovascular disease severity.

  14. Achalasia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfino, John E; Gawron, Andrew J

    2015-05-12

    Achalasia significantly affects patients' quality of life and can be difficult to diagnose and treat. To review the diagnosis and management of achalasia, with a focus on phenotypic classification pertinent to therapeutic outcomes. Literature review and MEDLINE search of articles from January 2004 to February 2015. A total of 93 articles were included in the final literature review addressing facets of achalasia epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Nine randomized controlled trials focusing on endoscopic or surgical therapy for achalasia were included (734 total patients). A diagnosis of achalasia should be considered when patients present with dysphagia, chest pain, and refractory reflux symptoms after an endoscopy does not reveal a mechanical obstruction or an inflammatory cause of esophageal symptoms. Manometry should be performed if achalasia is suspected. Randomized controlled trials support treatments focused on disrupting the lower esophageal sphincter with pneumatic dilation (70%-90% effective) or laparoscopic myotomy (88%-95% effective). Patients with achalasia have a variable prognosis after endoscopic or surgical myotomy based on subtypes, with type II (absent peristalsis with abnormal pan-esophageal high-pressure patterns) having a very favorable outcome (96%) and type I (absent peristalsis without abnormal pressure) having an intermediate prognosis (81%) that is inversely associated with the degree of esophageal dilatation. In contrast, type III (absent peristalsis with distal esophageal spastic contractions) is a spastic variant with less favorable outcomes (66%) after treatment of the lower esophageal sphincter. Achalasia should be considered when dysphagia is present and not explained by an obstruction or inflammatory process. Responses to treatment vary based on which achalasia subtype is present.

  15. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinheiro Araldi

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women.

  16. Depression and Social Identity: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruwys, Tegan; Haslam, S Alexander; Dingle, Genevieve A; Haslam, Catherine; Jetten, Jolanda

    2014-08-01

    Social relationships play a key role in depression. This is apparent in its etiology, symptomatology, and effective treatment. However, there has been little consensus about the best way to conceptualize the link between depression and social relationships. Furthermore, the extensive social-psychological literature on the nature of social relationships, and in particular, research on social identity, has not been integrated with depression research. This review presents evidence that social connectedness is key to understanding the development and resolution of clinical depression. The social identity approach is then used as a basis for conceptualizing the role of social relationships in depression, operationalized in terms of six central hypotheses. Research relevant to these hypotheses is then reviewed. Finally, we present an agenda for future research to advance theoretical and empirical understanding of the link between social identity and depression, and to translate the insights of this approach into clinical practice. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  17. A systematic review of systematic reviews of homeopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    2002-01-01

    Homeopathy remains one of the most controversial subjects in therapeutics. This article is an attempt to clarify its effectiveness based on recent systematic reviews. Electronic databases were searched for systematic reviews/meta-analysis on the subject. Seventeen articles fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Six of them related to re-analyses of one landmark meta-analysis. Collectively they implied that the overall positive result of this meta-analysis is not supported by a critical analysis of the data. Eleven independent systematic reviews were located. Collectively they failed to provide strong evidence in favour of homeopathy. In particular, there was no condition which responds convincingly better to homeopathic treatment than to placebo or other control interventions. Similarly, there was no homeopathic remedy that was demonstrated to yield clinical effects that are convincingly different from placebo. It is concluded that the best clinical evidence for homeopathy available to date does not warrant positive recommendations for its use in clinical practice. PMID:12492603

  18. Systematic reviews of randomised clinical trials examining the effects of psychotherapeutic interventions versus "no intervention" for acute major depressive disorder and a randomised trial examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based treatment for acute major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2014-10-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy and psychodynamic therapy may be effective treatment options for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. The two modern forms of psychotherapy, "third wave" cognitive therapy and mentalization-based treatment, have both gained some ground as treatments of psychiatric disorders. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for major depressive disorder. We performed two systematic reviews with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses using The Cochrane Collaboration methodology examining the effects of cognitive therapy and psycho-dynamic therapy for major depressive disorder. We developed a thorough treatment protocol for a randomised trial with low risks of bias (systematic error) and low risks of random errors ("play of chance") examining the effects of third wave' cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based treatment for major depressive disorder. We conducted a randomised trial according to good clinical practice examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder. The first systematic review included five randomised trials examining the effects of psychodynamic therapy versus "no intervention' for major depressive disorder. Altogether the five trials randomised 365 participants who in each trial received similar antidepressants as co-interventions. All trials had high risk of bias. Four trials assessed "interpersonal psychotherapy" and one trial "short psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy". Both of these interventions are different forms of psychodynamic therapy. Meta-analysis showed that psychodynamic therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) compared with "no intervention" (mean difference -3.01 (95

  19. Quality of systematic reviews in pediatric oncology--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L; Jørgensen, Anders W

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To ensure evidence-based decision making in pediatric oncology systematic reviews are necessary. The objective of our study was to evaluate the methodological quality of all currently existing systematic reviews in pediatric oncology. METHODS: We identified eligible systematic reviews...... through a systematic search of the literature. Data on clinical and methodological characteristics of the included systematic reviews were extracted. The methodological quality of the included systematic reviews was assessed using the overview quality assessment questionnaire, a validated 10-item quality...... assessment tool. We compared the methodological quality of systematic reviews published in regular journals with that of Cochrane systematic reviews. RESULTS: We included 117 systematic reviews, 99 systematic reviews published in regular journals and 18 Cochrane systematic reviews. The average methodological...

  20. A review of depression research in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C G

    2014-08-01

    Depression is a debilitating illness and has become a leading cause of morbidity globally. We aim to summarise the evidence available in regard to the prevalence, type of assessment tools used and treatment options for depression in Malaysia. Two hundred and forty seven articles related to depression were found in a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. Fifty seven articles were selected and reviewed on the basis of clinical relevance and future research implications. Findings were summarised, categorised and presented according to prevalence of depression, depression in women, depression in clinical condition, assessment tools, and treatment of depression. The prevalence of depression in Malaysia was estimated to be between 8 and 12%. The figures were higher among women of low socio-economic background or those with comorbid medical condition. The common assessment tools used in Malaysia include Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). They were translated into the Malay language and their psychometric properties were established. Both pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy were commonly used in Malaysia, and were highly recommended in local clinical practice guidelines. There are discrepancies in the reported rates of depression in Malaysia and this needs to be addressed. There were lack of studies looking into the depression among subgroups in Malaysia especially in the male population. There were several instruments available for assessment of depression in Malaysia but their suitability for the local setting need further research. Both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy were recommended in the local treatment guideline in Malaysia. With the emergence of generic medication, we need to compare their clinical efficacy and tolerability

  1. The Hopelessness Theory of Depression: A Quarter Century in Review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Richard T.; Kleiman, Evan M.; Nestor, Bridget A.; Cheek, Shayna M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the formulation of the hopelessness theory of depression (Abramson, Metalsky, & Alloy, 1989) a quarter century ago, it has garnered considerable interest. The current paper presents a systematic review of this theory including its subsequent elaborations (Rose and Abramson’s [1992] developmental elaboration, Abela and Sarin’s [2002] weakest-link approach, Panzarella, Alloy, and Whitehouse’s [2006] expansion of the hopelessness theory, and the hopelessness theory of suicide [Abramson et ...

  2. Uterine transplantation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Ejzenberg

    Full Text Available Up to 15% of the reproductive population is infertile, and 3 to 5% of these cases are caused by uterine dysfunction. This abnormality generally leads women to consider surrogacy or adoption. Uterine transplantation, although still experimental, may be an option in these cases. This systematic review will outline the recommendations, surgical aspects, immunosuppressive drugs and reproductive aspects related to experimental uterine transplantation in women.

  3. Associação entre depressão materna e diferenças de gênero no comportamento de crianças: uma revisão sistemática Association between maternal depression and gender differences in child behavior: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Loosli

    2010-01-01

    different manifestations for boys and girls. The objective of the present study was to identify and analyze articles published in indexed journals that address the association between maternal depression and gender differences in relation to child behavior. The review was conducted on the electronic databases MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, LILACS, SciELO, and Index Psi, using the keywords maternal depression and gender and maternal depression and child sex, and was restricted to articles published in the last 5 years (2004 to 2009. Twenty one empirical articles were identified and systematically analyzed. There was a predominance of prospective longitudinal studies, employing non-clinical samples, without a confirmed diagnosis of maternal depression, which was analyzed in combination with others context variables. Data collection procedures were performed using a variety of measures and informants. Longitudinal and cross-sectional studies confirmed the negative impact of maternal depression on child variables, pointing to the presence of differences between genders, as follows: during school-age years, externalizing and conduct problems for boys and internalizing and depressive problems for girls; during preschool age, predominance of externalizing problems for boys; during adolescence, internalizing problems for girls. These results suggest the need for different intervention strategies aimed at boys and girls who have been exposed to maternal depression, focusing on developmental tasks and with special attention to both genders during school age and to girls during adolescence.

  4. Comparing the Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Treatment of Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beppe Micallef-Trigona

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is the longest standing psychiatric treatment available and has unequivocal benefit in severe depression. However this treatment comes with a number of side effects such as memory impairment. On the other hand, Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a relatively new form of treatment which has been shown to be efficacious in patients suffering from a number of psychopathologies, including severe depression, with few reported side effects. Due to its potential therapeutic efficacy and lack of side effects, rTMS has gained traction in the treatment of depression, with a number of authors keen to see it take over from ECT. However, it is not clear whether rTMS represents a therapeutic alternative to ECT. This meta-analysis will therefore compare the “gold standard” treatment for severe depression, with the relatively new but promising rTMS. A literature search will be performed with the intention to include all randomised clinical trials. The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in the antidepressant efficacy between the two types of treatment modalities. Statistical analysis of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS scores will be performed.

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors versus placebo in patients with major depressive disorder. A systematic review with meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Katakam, Kiran Kumar; Schou, Anne

    2017-01-01

    depressive disorder. We searched for eligible randomised clinical trials in The Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycLIT, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index Expanded, clinical trial registers of Europe and USA, websites of pharmaceutical companies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  6. Effects of exercise training on quality of life, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and emotional well-being in type 2 diabetes mellitus : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, M.M.P.; van Dooren, F.E.; Pop, V.J.M.; Pouwer, F.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Psychological problems are relatively common in people with type 2 diabetes. It is unclear whether exercise training exerts an effect on quality of life, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and emotional well-being in people with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to

  7. Serum BDNF concentrations as peripheral manifestations of depression : evidence from a systematic review and meta-analyses on 179 associations (N=9484)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M. L.; Spinhoven, P.; Polak, M.; Bus, B. A. A.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Elzinga, B. M.

    Meta-analyses, published in 2008-2010, have confirmed abnormally low serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in depressed patients and normalization of this by antidepressant treatment. These findings are believed to reflect peripheral manifestations of the neurotrophin

  8. Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of Sex Differences in Depression and Prognosis in Persons With Myocardial Infarction: A MINDMAPS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, F.; McGee, H.; Conroy, R.; Conradi, H.J.; Meijer, E.; Steeds, A; Sato, H.; Stewart, D.; Parakh, K.; Carney, R.; Freedland, F.; Anselmino, M.; Pelletier, R.; Bos, E.; de Jonge, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Using combined individual patient data from prospective studies, we explored sex differences in depression and prognosis post-myocardial infarction (MI) and determined whether disease indices could account for found differences. Methods: Individual patient data analysis of 10,175 MI

  9. Identifying depression post-stroke in patients with aphasia : A systematic review of the reliability, validity and feasibility of available instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Mariska J; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and critically appraise the evidence for instruments assessing depression in stroke patients with aphasia. METHODS: The PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Psych Info and Cochrane databases were searched from inception until May 2015. RESULTS: Of the 383 titles found in the

  10. Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of Sex Differences in Depression and Prognosis in Persons With Myocardial Infarction : A MINDMAPS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, Frank; Mcgee, Hannah; Conroy, Ronn; Conradi, Henk Jan; Meijer, Anna; Steeds, Richard; Sato, Hiroshi; Stewart, Donna E.; Parakh, Kapil; Carney, Robert; Freedland, Kenneth; Anselmino, Matteo; Pelletier, Roxanne; Bos, Elisabeth H.; de Jonge, Peter

    Objective: Using combined individual patient data from prospective studies, we explored sex differences in depression and prognosis post-myocardial infarction (MI) and determined whether disease indices could account for found differences. Methods: Individual patient data analysis of 10,175 MI

  11. Personal resource questionnaire: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalbeh, Loai I; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2013-09-01

    Social support is a key nursing variable. No review has yet systematically assessed the effectiveness of the personal resource questionnaire (PRQ) as a measure of perceived social support. This article reviewed nine previous studies that used the PRQ (Brandt & Weinert, 1981). Completed studies were identified through searches of indexes that included PubMed, the Cumulative Index for Nursing and EBSCO host, and Ovid. Studies that reported PRQ scores, sample descriptions, and sample sizes and that tested the relationship between the PRQ and study variables were included in the present review. Three other studies were included that did not report on PRQ correlations with other health variables. The included studies addressed a variety of health problems and different population in different settings. Cronbach's alphas for the included studies ranged from .87 to .93, supporting the internal consistency of the PRQ. Hypothesized relationships between the PRQ and study variables including health promotion behavior, self-care behavior, self-efficacy, self-esteem, stress, depression, loneliness, pain, and disability were supported, providing positive evidence for PRQ construct validity. Included studies used the PRQ to address disparate populations in terms of age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and educational background. This review found the PRQ to be a reliable and valid tool for measuring perceived social support across a wide range of populations. Further studies are necessary to examine the relationship between social support and selected demographics among populations with different cultural backgrounds.

  12. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the treatment of depression: Systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meron, Daniel; Hedger, Nicholas; Garner, Matthew; Baldwin, David S

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a potential alternative treatment option for major depressive episodes (MDE). We address the efficacy and safety of tDCS in MDE. The outcome measures were Hedges' g for continuous depression ratings, and categorical response and remission rates. A random effects model indicated that tDCS was superior to sham tDCS (k=11, N=393, g=0.30, 95% CI=[0.04, 0.57], p=0.027). Adjunctive antidepressant medication and cognitive control training negatively impacted on the treatment effect. The pooled log odds ratios (LOR) for response and remission were positive, but statistically non-significant (response: k=9, LOR=0.36, 95% CI[-0.16, 0.88], p=0.176, remission: k=9, LOR=0.25, 95% CI [-0.42, 0.91], p=0.468). We estimated that for a study to detect the pooled continuous effect (g=0.30) at 80% power (alpha=0.05), a total N of at least 346 would be required (with the total N required to detect the upper and lower bound being 49 and 12,693, respectively). tDCS may be efficacious for treatment of MDE. The data do not support the use of tDCS in treatment-resistant depression, or as an add-on augmentation treatment. Larger studies over longer treatment periods are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary neural leprosy: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Garbino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors proposed a systematic review on the current concepts of primary neural leprosy by consulting the following online databases: MEDLINE, Lilacs/SciELO, and Embase. Selected studies were classified based on the degree of recommendation and levels of scientific evidence according to the “Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine”. The following aspects were reviewed: cutaneous clinical and laboratorial investigations, i.e. skin clinical exam, smears, and biopsy, and Mitsuda's reaction; neurological investigation (anamnesis, electromyography and nerve biopsy; serological investigation and molecular testing, i.e. serological testing for the detection of the phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-I and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR; and treatment (classification criteria for the definition of specific treatment, steroid treatment, and cure criteria.

  14. Depression, Anxiety, and Cardiovascular Disease in Chinese: A Review for a Bigger Picture

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong-Fei Pan; Ruiwei Meng; Na Liu; An Pan

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression and anxiety contribute substantially to the current disease burden worldwide as well as in China. Both depression and anxiety are highly prevalent among patients with CVD. We systematically reviewed the literature to disentangle the role of depression and anxiety disorders in the onset and prognosis of CVD with an emphasis on cohort studies conducted in the Chinese population. Despite the lack of large-scale prospective studies in China, the availab...

  15. Systematic Review Methodology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Margaret; Smith, Calvin D.; Carbone, Angela; Slade, Susan; Baik, Chi; Hughes-Warrington, Marnie; Neumann, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic review methodology can be distinguished from narrative reviews of the literature through its emphasis on transparent, structured and comprehensive approaches to searching the literature and its requirement for formal synthesis of research findings. There appears to be relatively little use of the systematic review methodology within the…

  16. Systematic Review about Personal Growth Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Pinto Pizarro de Freitas

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to realize a systematic review of publications about personal growth initiative. A literature review was realized in Bireme, Index Psi, LILACS, PePSIC, Pubmed - Publisher's Medlme, Wiley Online Library, PsycINFO, OneFile, SciVerse ScienceDirect, ERIC, Emerald Journals, PsycARTICLES - American Psychological Association, Directory of Open Access Journals - DOAJ, SAGE Journals, SpringerLink, PLoS, IngentaConnect, IEEE Journals & Magazines and SciELO databases. The literature review was performed from December of 2014 to January of 2015, without stipulating date limits for the publication of the articles. It was found 53 studies, excluded seven, and analyzed 46 researches. The studies aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of personal growth initiative scale and personal growth initiative scale II. The relations of personal initiative growth and others constructs were also evaluated. Furthermore the studies investigated the impact of interventions to promote personal growth initiative. Results of these studies showed that personal growth initiative was positively related to levels of well-being, selfesteem and others positive dimensions, and negatively to anxiety, depression and others negative factors.

  17. EMDR beyond PTSD: A Systematic Literature Review

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    Alicia Valiente-Gómez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR is a psychotherapeutic approach that has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD through several randomized controlled trials (RCT. Solid evidence shows that traumatic events can contribute to the onset of severe mental disorders and can worsen their prognosis. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the most important findings from RCT conducted in the treatment of comorbid traumatic events in psychosis, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and chronic back pain.Methods: Using PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus, we conducted a systematic literature search of RCT studies published up to December 2016 that used EMDR therapy in the mentioned psychiatric conditions.Results: RCT are still scarce in these comorbid conditions but the available evidence suggests that EMDR therapy improves trauma-associated symptoms and has a minor effect on the primary disorders by reaching partial symptomatic improvement.Conclusions: EMDR therapy could be a useful psychotherapy to treat trauma-associated symptoms in patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Preliminary evidence also suggests that EMDR therapy might be useful to improve psychotic or affective symptoms and could be an add-on treatment in chronic pain conditions.

  18. Is investigator background related to outcome in head to head trials of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana A Cristea

    Full Text Available The influence of factors related to the background of investigators conducting trials comparing psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy has remained largely unstudied. Specializations emphasizing biological determinants of mental disorders, like psychiatry, might favor pharmacotherapy, while others stressing psychosocial factors, like psychology, could promote psychotherapy. Yet financial conflict of interest (COI could be a confounding factor as authors with a medical specialization might receive more sponsoring from the pharmaceutical industry.We conducted a meta-analysis with subgroup and meta-regression analysis examining whether the specialization and affiliation of trial authors were associated to outcomes in the direct comparison of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the acute treatment of depression. Meta-regression analysis also included trial risk of bias and author conflict of interest in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry.We included 45 trials. In half, the first author was psychologist. The last author was psychiatrist/MD in half of the trials, and a psychologist or statistician/other technical in the rest. Most lead authors had medical affiliations. Subgroup analysis indicated that studies with last authors statisticians favored pharmacotherapy. Univariate analysis showed a negative relationship between the presence of statisticians and outcomes favoring psychotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that trials including authors with financial COI reported findings more favorable to pharmacotherapy.We report the first detailed overview of the background of authors conducting head to head trials for depression. Trials co-authored by statisticians appear to subtly favor pharmacotherapy. Receiving funding from the industry is more closely related to finding better outcomes for the industry's elective treatment than are factors related to authors' background.For a minority of authors we could not retrieve background information

  19. Aromatherapy for health care: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Choi, Jiae; Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-03-01

    Aromatherapy is the therapeutic use of essential oil from herbs, flowers, and other plants. The aim of this overview was to provide an overview of systematic reviews evaluating the effectiveness of aromatherapy. We searched 12 electronic databases and our departmental files without restrictions of time or language. The methodological quality of all systematic reviews was evaluated independently by two authors. Of 201 potentially relevant publications, 10 met our inclusion criteria. Most of the systematic reviews were of poor methodological quality. The clinical subject areas were hypertension, depression, anxiety, pain relief, and dementia. For none of the conditions was the evidence convincing. Several SRs of aromatherapy have recently been published. Due to a number of caveats, the evidence is not sufficiently convincing that aromatherapy is an effective therapy for any condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving the uptake of systematic reviews: a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and relevance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wallace, John

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the barriers, facilitators and interventions that impact on systematic review uptake. The objective of this study was to identify how uptake of systematic reviews can be improved.

  1. Bereavement care interventions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feudtner Chris

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite abundant bereavement care options, consensus is lacking regarding optimal care for bereaved persons. Methods We conducted a systematic review, searching MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, EBMR, and other databases using the terms (bereaved or bereavement and (grief combined with (intervention or support or counselling or therapy and (controlled or trial or design. We also searched citations in published reports for additional pertinent studies. Eligible studies had to evaluate whether the treatment of bereaved individuals reduced bereavement-related symptoms. Data from the studies was abstracted independently by two reviewers. Results 74 eligible studies evaluated diverse treatments designed to ameliorate a variety of outcomes associated with bereavement. Among studies utilizing a structured therapeutic relationship, eight featured pharmacotherapy (4 included an untreated control group, 39 featured support groups or counselling (23 included a control group, and 25 studies featured cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic, psychoanalytical, or interpersonal therapies (17 included a control group. Seven studies employed systems-oriented interventions (all had control groups. Other than efficacy for pharmacological treatment of bereavement-related depression, we could identify no consistent pattern of treatment benefit among the other forms of interventions. Conclusions Due to a paucity of reports on controlled clinical trails, no rigorous evidence-based recommendation regarding the treatment of bereaved persons is currently possible except for the pharmacologic treatment of depression. We postulate the following five factors as impeding scientific progress regarding bereavement care interventions: 1 excessive theoretical heterogeneity, 2 stultifying between-study variation, 3 inadequate reporting of intervention procedures, 4 few published replication studies, and 5 methodological flaws of study design.

  2. Mental Pain and Suicide: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Carrozzino, Danilo; Marchetti, Daniela; Andreasson, Kate; Fulcheri, Mario; Bech, Per

    2016-01-01

    Background Mental pain, defined as a subjective experience characterized by perception of strong negative feelings and changes in the self and its function, is no less real than other types of grief. Mental pain has been considered to be a distinct entity from depression. We have performed a systematic review analyzing the relationship between mental pain and suicide by providing a qualitative data synthesis of the studies. Methods We have conducted, in accordance with PRISMA guide...

  3. How to write a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Quatman, Carmen E; Manring, M M; Siston, Robert A; Flanigan, David C

    2014-11-01

    The role of evidence-based medicine in sports medicine and orthopaedic surgery is rapidly growing. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are also proliferating in the medical literature. To provide the outline necessary for a practitioner to properly understand and/or conduct a systematic review for publication in a sports medicine journal. Review. The steps of a successful systematic review include the following: identification of an unanswered answerable question; explicit definitions of the investigation's participant(s), intervention(s), comparison(s), and outcome(s); utilization of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines and PROSPERO registration; thorough systematic data extraction; and appropriate grading of the evidence and strength of the recommendations. An outline to understand and conduct a systematic review is provided, and the difference between meta-analyses and systematic reviews is described. The steps necessary to perform a systematic review are fully explained, including the study purpose, search methodology, data extraction, reporting of results, identification of bias, and reporting of the study's main findings. Systematic reviews or meta-analyses critically appraise and formally synthesize the best existing evidence to provide a statement of conclusion that answers specific clinical questions. Readers and reviewers, however, must recognize that the quality and strength of recommendations in a review are only as strong as the quality of studies that it analyzes. Thus, great care must be used in the interpretation of bias and extrapolation of the review's findings to translation to clinical practice. Without advanced education on the topic, the reader may follow the steps discussed herein to perform a systematic review. © 2013 The Author(s).

  4. Systematic review of catatonia treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelzer ACM

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anne CM Pelzer,1 Frank MMA van der Heijden,2 Erik den Boer3 1Department of Psychiatry, Reinier van Arkel, ‘s-Hertogenbosch, 2Department of Psychiatry, Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venlo, 3Department of Psychiatry, GGzE, Eindhoven, the Netherlands Objective: To investigate the evidence-based treatment of catatonia in adults. The secondary aim is to develop a treatment protocol. Materials and methods: A systematic review of published treatment articles (case series, cohort or randomized controlled studies which examined the effects of particular interventions for catatonia and/or catatonic symptoms in adult populations and used valid outcome measures was performed. The articles for this review were selected by searching the electronic databases of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO. Results: Thirty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Lorazepam and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT proved to be the most investigated treatment interventions. The response percentages in Western studies varied between 66% and 100% for studies with lorazepam, while in Asian and Indian studies, they were 0% and 100%. For ECT, the response percentages are 59%–100%. There does not seem to be evidence for the use of antipsychotics in catatonic patients without any underlying psychotic disorder. Conclusion: Lorazepam and ECT are effective treatments for which clinical evidence is found in the literature. It is not possible to develop a treatment protocol because the evidence for catatonia management on the basis of the articles reviewed is limited. Stringent treatment studies on catatonia are warranted. Keywords: review, catatonia, therapeutics, electroconvulsive therapy, benzodiazepines, lorazepam, ECT

  5. Loneliness in psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Michelle H; Gleeson, John F M; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Penn, David L

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the review is to understand the relationships between loneliness and related psychological and social factors in individuals with psychosis. Loneliness is poorly understood in people with psychosis. Given the myriad of social challenges facing individuals with psychosis, these findings can inform psychosocial interventions that specifically target loneliness in this vulnerable group. We adhered to the PRISMA guidelines and systematically reviewed empirical studies that measured loneliness either as a main outcome or as an associated variable in individuals with psychosis. A total of ten studies examining loneliness in people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder were examined. Heterogeneity in the assessment of loneliness was found, and there were contradictory findings on the relationship between loneliness and psychotic symptomatology. In individuals with psychosis, loneliness may be influenced by psychological and social factors such as increased depression, psychosis, and anxiety, poor social support, poor quality of life, more severe internalised stigma and perceived discrimination, and low self-esteem. The relationship between loneliness and psychosis remains poorly understood due to a lack of rigorous studies. Although having strong social relationships is crucial to facilitate recovery from serious mental illness, psychosocial interventions that specifically target loneliness in individuals with psychosis are lacking and sorely needed. Interventions targeting loneliness in those with psychosis will also need to account for additional barriers associated with psychosis (e.g., social skill deficits, impoverished social networks, and negative symptoms).

  6. Biofeedback for psychiatric disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Poppy L A; David, Anthony S

    2014-06-01

    Biofeedback potentially provides non-invasive, effective psychophysiological interventions for psychiatric disorders. The encompassing purpose of this review was to establish how biofeedback interventions have been used to treat select psychiatric disorders [anxiety, autistic spectrum disorders, depression, dissociation, eating disorders, schizophrenia and psychoses] to date and provide a useful reference for consultation by clinicians and researchers planning to administer a biofeedback treatment. A systematic search of EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and WOK databases and hand searches in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, and Journal of Neurotherapy, identified 227 articles; 63 of which are included within this review. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback constituted the most investigated modality (31.7%). Anxiety disorders were the most commonly treated (68.3%). Multi-modal biofeedback appeared most effective in significantly ameliorating symptoms, suggesting that targeting more than one physiological modality for bio-regulation increases therapeutic efficacy. Overall, 80.9% of articles reported some level of clinical amelioration related to biofeedback exposure, 65.0% to a statistically significant (p biofeedback interventions within mainstream psychiatry.

  7. Dissemination bias in systematic reviews of animal research: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina F Mueller

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews of preclinical studies, in vivo animal experiments in particular, can influence clinical research and thus even clinical care. Dissemination bias, selective dissemination of positive or significant results, is one of the major threats to validity in systematic reviews also in the realm of animal studies. We conducted a systematic review to determine the number of published systematic reviews of animal studies until present, to investigate their methodological features especially with respect to assessment of dissemination bias, and to investigate the citation of preclinical systematic reviews on clinical research.Eligible studies for this systematic review constitute systematic reviews that summarize in vivo animal experiments whose results could be interpreted as applicable to clinical care. We systematically searched Ovid Medline, Embase, ToxNet, and ScienceDirect from 1st January 2009 to 9th January 2013 for eligible systematic reviews without language restrictions. Furthermore we included articles from two previous systematic reviews by Peters et al. and Korevaar et al.The literature search and screening process resulted in 512 included full text articles. We found an increasing number of published preclinical systematic reviews over time. The methodological quality of preclinical systematic reviews was low. The majority of preclinical systematic reviews did not assess methodological quality of the included studies (71%, nor did they assess heterogeneity (81% or dissemination bias (87%. Statistics quantifying the importance of clinical research citing systematic reviews of animal studies showed that clinical studies referred to the preclinical research mainly to justify their study or a future study (76%.Preclinical systematic reviews may have an influence on clinical research but their methodological quality frequently remains low. Therefore, systematic reviews of animal research should be critically appraised before

  8. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of electroconvulsive therapy versus repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depression: A systematic review and multiple-treatments meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Li-Bo; Liu, Yi-Yun; Fan, Song-Hua; Xie, Peng

    2017-03-01

    The effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and bilateral, left prefrontal, and right prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on major depressive disorder (MDD) have not been adequately addressed by previous studies. Here, a multiple-treatments meta-analysis, which incorporates evidence from direct and indirect comparisons from a network of trials, was performed to assess the efficacy and acceptability of these four treatment modalities on MDD. The literature was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on ECT, bilateral rTMS, and unilateral rTMS for treating MDD up to May 2016. The main outcome measures were response and drop-out rates. Data were obtained from 25 studies consisting of 1288 individuals with MDD. ECT was non-significantly more efficacious than B-rTMS, R-rTMS, and L-rTMS. Left prefrontal rTMS was non -significantly less efficacious than all other treatment modalities. In terms of acceptability, R-rTMS was non-significantly better tolerated than ECT, B-rTMS, and L-rTMS. ECT was the most efficacious treatment with the cumulative probabilities of being the most efficacious treatment being: ECT (65%), B-rTMS (25%), R-rTMS (8%), and L-rTMS (2%). R-rTMS was the best-tolerated treatment with the cumulative probabilities of being the best-tolerated treatment being: R-rTMS (52%), B-rTMS (17%), L-rTMS (16%), and ECT (14%). Coherence analysis detected no statistically significant incoherence in any comparisons of direct with indirect evidence for the response rate and drop-out rate. ECT was the most efficacious, but least tolerated, treatment, while R-rTMS was the best tolerated treatment for MDD. B-rTMS appears to have the most favorable balance between efficacy and acceptability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurologic involvement in scleroderma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Tiago Nardi; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Lapa, Aline Tamires; Marques-Neto, João Francisco; Appenzeller, Simone

    2013-12-01

    To perform a systematic review of neurologic involvement in Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Localized Scleroderma (LS), describing clinical features, neuroimaging, and treatment. We performed a literature search in PubMed using the following MeSH terms, scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, localized scleroderma, localized scleroderma "en coup de sabre", Parry-Romberg syndrome, cognitive impairment, memory, seizures, epilepsy, headache, depression, anxiety, mood disorders, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D), SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), neuropsychiatric, psychosis, neurologic involvement, neuropathy, peripheral nerves, cranial nerves, carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome, mononeuropathy, polyneuropathy, radiculopathy, myelopathy, autonomic nervous system, nervous system, electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Patients with other connective tissue disease knowingly responsible for nervous system involvement were excluded from the analyses. A total of 182 case reports/studies addressing SSc and 50 referring to LS were identified. SSc patients totalized 9506, while data on 224 LS patients were available. In LS, seizures (41.58%) and headache (18.81%) predominated. Nonetheless, descriptions of varied cranial nerve involvement and hemiparesis were made. Central nervous system involvement in SSc was characterized by headache (23.73%), seizures (13.56%) and cognitive impairment (8.47%). Depression and anxiety were frequently observed (73.15% and 23.95%, respectively). Myopathy (51.8%), trigeminal neuropathy (16.52%), peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy (14.25%), and carpal tunnel syndrome (6.56%) were the most frequent peripheral nervous system involvement in SSc. Autonomic neuropathy involving cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems was regularly described

  10. Cognitive insight: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, L S C; Sabbe, B G C; Oldenburg, J F E

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive insight is the ability to re-evaluate thoughts and beliefs in order to make thoughtful conclusions. It differs from clinical insight, as it focuses on more general metacognitive processes. Therefore, it could be relevant to diverse disorders and non-clinical subjects. There is a growing body of research on cognitive insight in individuals with and without psychosis. This review has summarised the current state of the art regarding this topic. We conclude that while cognitive insight in its current form seems valid for use in individuals with psychosis, it is less so for individuals without psychosis. Additionally, higher cognitive insight not always leads to better psychological functioning. For instance, higher levels of self-reflection are often associated with depressive mood. We therefore recommend the sub-components of cognitive insight to be studied separately. Also, it is unclear what position cognitive insight takes within the spectrum of metacognitive processes and how it relates to other self-related concepts that have been defined previously in literature. Combining future and past research on cognitive insight and its analogue concepts will help in the formation of a uniform definition that fits all subjects discussed here. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Sedentary behavior and physical activity levels in people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a global systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Firth, Joseph; Schuch, Felipe B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Mugisha, James; Hallgren, Mats; Probst, Michel; Ward, Philip B; Gaughran, Fiona; De Hert, Marc; Carvalho, André F; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-10-01

    People with severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder) die up to 15 years prematurely due to chronic somatic comorbidities. Sedentary behavior and low physical activity are independent yet modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease and premature mortality in these people. A comprehensive meta-analysis exploring these risk factors is lacking in this vulnerable population. We conducted a meta-analysis investigating sedentary behavior and physical activity levels and their correlates in people with severe mental illness. Major electronic databases were searched from inception up to April 2017 for articles measuring sedentary behavior and/or physical activity with a self-report questionnaire or an objective measure (e.g., accelerometer). Random effects meta-analyses and meta-regression analyses were conducted. Sixty-nine studies were included (N=35,682; 39.5% male; mean age 43.0 years). People with severe mental illness spent on average 476.0 min per day (95% CI: 407.3-545.4) being sedentary during waking hours, and were significantly more sedentary than age- and gender-matched healthy controls (p=0.003). Their mean amount of moderate or vigorous physical activity was 38.4 min per day (95% CI: 32.0-44.8), being significantly lower than that of healthy controls (p=0.002 for moderate activity, pphysical activity guidelines (odds ratio = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.0, pphysical activity levels and non-compliance with physical activity guidelines were associated with male gender, being single, unemployment, fewer years of education, higher body mass index, longer illness duration, antidepressant and antipsychotic medication use, lower cardiorespiratory fitness and a diagnosis of schizophrenia. People with bipolar disorder were the most physically active, yet spent most time being sedentary. Geographical differences were detected, and inpatients were more active than outpatients and those living in the community. Given the

  12. Occupational skin cancer: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Suellen Sena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To analyze the epidemiological profile, risk factors in the workplace environment and prevention methods for professionals at risk of skin cancer. Method: A systematic review of articles on occupational skin cancer, published in the Lilacs, Scielo, Medline and Cochrane Library from January 1st, 2008, to December 31st, 2013, was performed. The search included the following terms: “neoplasias cutâneas” (DeCS, “exposição ocupacional” (DeCS, “epidemiologia” (DeCS as well as the keyword “prevenção”, and their equivalents in English. Results: After analyzing the titles and summaries of articles, the search strategy resulted in 83 references, of which 22 articles met the eligibility criteria. Discussion: We found that sun exposure is the main occupational risk factor for skin cancer, causing outdoor workers to be the most vulnerable to developing occupational skin cancer. Professionals with low levels of education and European descent are at increased risk of developing this cancer. Conclusion: Outdoor workers are more vulnerable to developing occupational skin cancer, estimating that professionals with low level of education and European descent are at increased risk of developing this cancer. Therefore, companies need to invest more in the health of workers by providing protective equipment and thus preventing occupational skin cancer.

  13. Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Thomas; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When conducting systematic reviews, it is essential to perform a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies relevant to the specific research question. The Cochrane Collaborations Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) guidelines...... of musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible...... if they indexed RCTs, were in English and used in more than three of the systematic reviews. Relative recall was calculated as the number of studies identified by the literature search divided by the number of eligible studies i.e. included studies in the individual systematic reviews. Finally, cumulative median...

  14. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mota Borges Bottino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS. The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Daily use of three or more hours of Internet, web camera, text messages, posting personal information and harassing others online were associated with cyberbullying. Cybervictims and cyberbullies had more emotional and psychosomatic problems, social difficulties and did not feel safe and cared for in school. Cyberbullying was associated with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, substance use, ideation and suicide attempts. Health professionals should be aware of the violent nature of interactions occurring in the virtual environment and its harm to the mental health of adolescents.

  15. Cyberbullying and adolescent mental health: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Sara Mota Borges; Bottino, Cássio M C; Regina, Caroline Gomez; Correia, Aline Villa Lobo; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva

    2015-03-01

    Cyberbullying is a new form of violence that is expressed through electronic media and has given rise to concern for parents, educators and researchers. In this paper, an association between cyberbullying and adolescent mental health will be assessed through a systematic review of two databases: PubMed and Virtual Health Library (BVS). The prevalence of cyberbullying ranged from 6.5% to 35.4%. Previous or current experiences of traditional bullying were associated with victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Daily use of three or more hours of Internet, web camera, text messages, posting personal information and harassing others online were associated with cyberbullying. Cybervictims and cyberbullies had more emotional and psychosomatic problems, social difficulties and did not feel safe and cared for in school. Cyberbullying was associated with moderate to severe depressive symptoms, substance use, ideation and suicide attempts. Health professionals should be aware of the violent nature of interactions occurring in the virtual environment and its harm to the mental health of adolescents.

  16. The Emergence of Systematic Review in Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Martin L; Betts, Kellyn; Beck, Nancy B; Cogliano, Vincent; Dickersin, Kay; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Freeman, James; Gray, George; Hartung, Thomas; McPartland, Jennifer; Rooney, Andrew A; Scherer, Roberta W; Verloo, Didier; Hoffmann, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    The Evidence-based Toxicology Collaboration hosted a workshop on "The Emergence of Systematic Review and Related Evidence-based Approaches in Toxicology," on November 21, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland. The workshop featured speakers from agencies and organizations applying systematic review approaches to questions in toxicology, speakers with experience in conducting systematic reviews in medicine and healthcare, and stakeholders in industry, government, academia, and non-governmental organizations. Based on the workshop presentations and discussion, here we address the state of systematic review methods in toxicology, historical antecedents in both medicine and toxicology, challenges to the translation of systematic review from medicine to toxicology, and thoughts on the way forward. We conclude with a recommendation that as various agencies and organizations adapt systematic review methods, they continue to work together to ensure that there is a harmonized process for how the basic elements of systematic review methods are applied in toxicology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology.

  17. Comparison of search strategies in systematic reviews of adverse effects to other systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Su; Loke, Yoon K; Zorzela, Liliane

    2014-06-01

    Research indicates that the methods used to identify data for systematic reviews of adverse effects may need to differ from other systematic reviews. To compare search methods in systematic reviews of adverse effects with other reviews. The search methodologies in 849 systematic reviews of adverse effects were compared with other reviews. Poor reporting of search strategies is apparent in both systematic reviews of adverse effects and other types of systematic reviews. Systematic reviews of adverse effects are less likely to restrict their searches to MEDLINE or include only randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The use of other databases is largely dependent on the topic area and the year the review was conducted, with more databases searched in more recent reviews. Adverse effects search terms are used by 72% of reviews and despite recommendations only two reviews report using floating subheadings. The poor reporting of search strategies in systematic reviews is universal, as is the dominance of searching MEDLINE. However, reviews of adverse effects are more likely to include a range of study designs (not just RCTs) and search beyond MEDLINE. © 2014 Crown Copyright.

  18. [Episodic autobiographical memory in depression: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemogne, C; Piolino, P; Jouvent, R; Allilaire, J-F; Fossati, P

    2006-10-01

    Autobiographical memory and personal identity (self) are linked by a reciprocal relationship. Autobiographical memory is critical for both grounding and changing the self. Individuals' current self-views, beliefs, and goals influence their recollections of the past. According to Tulving, episodic memory is characterized by autonoetic consciousness, which is associated with a sense of the self in the past (emotions and goals) and mental reliving of an experience. Its close relationship with self and emotion strongly involves episodic autobiographical memory in the psychopathology of depression. However, due to methodological and conceptual issues, little attention has been paid to episodic autobiographical memory in depression. Since the seminal work of Williams et al. 15 years ago, there is now growing interest around this issue. We reviewed the evidence for three major features of autobiographical memory functioning in depression: an increase in general memory retrieval (overgenerality), a mood-congruent memory effect and the high occurrence of intrusive memories of stressful events. Although it was first observed among suicidal patients, overgenerality is actually associated with both depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Overgenerality is not associated with anxious disorders other than post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or borderline personality disorder. Most of controlled studies carried out on autobiographical memory in depression rely on the Williams' Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT). When presented with positive and negative cue words and asked to retrieve specific personal events, depressed patients (unlike matched controls) are less specific in their memories. They tend to recall repeated events (categorical overgeneral memories) rather than single episodes (specific memories). Overgenerality in depression is: 1) more evident with positive than with negative events (mood-congruent memory effect); 2) related to

  19. Advancing Systematic Review Workshop (December 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA hosted an event to examine the systematic review process for development and applications of methods for different types of evidence (epidemiology, animal toxicology, and mechanistic). The presentations are also available.

  20. Systematic reviews in the field of nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Systematic reviews are valuable tools for staying abreast of evolving nutrition and aging -related topics, formulating dietary guidelines, establishing nutrient reference intakes, formulating clinical practice guidance, evaluating health claims, and setting research agendas. Basic steps of conductin...

  1. Building Research Capacity for Systematic Reviews | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... is addressing this gap, summarizing the best available primary research on digital ... Systematic reviews are used to appraise relevant research and synthesize ... The health sciences field uses them widely to inform studies and evaluate ...

  2. Systematic reviews in pain research: methodology refined

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McQuay, H. J; Kalso, Eija; Moore, R. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    "Presents invited papers from the 6th IASP Research Symposium, Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses in Pain, held in Spain in September 2006, organized by the International Collaboration on Evidence...

  3. Assessing harmful effects in systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolacott Nerys F

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Balanced decisions about health care interventions require reliable evidence on harms as well as benefits. Most systematic reviews focus on efficacy and randomised trials, for which the methodology is well established. Methods to systematically review harmful effects are less well developed and there are few sources of guidance for researchers. We present our own recent experience of conducting systematic reviews of harmful effects and make suggestions for future practice and further research. Methods We described and compared the methods used in three systematic reviews. Our evaluation focused on the review question, study designs and quality assessment. Results One review question focused on providing information on specific harmful effects to furnish an economic model, the other two addressed much broader questions. All three reviews included randomised and observational data, although each defined the inclusion criteria differently. Standard methods were used to assess study quality. Various practical problems were encountered in applying the study design inclusion criteria and assessing quality, mainly because of poor study design, inadequate reporting and the limitations of existing tools. All three reviews generated a large volume of work that did not yield much useful information for health care decision makers. The key areas for improvement we identified were focusing the review question and developing methods for quality assessment of studies of harmful effects. Conclusions Systematic reviews of harmful effects are more likely to yield information pertinent to clinical decision-making if they address a focused question. This will enable clear decisions to be made about the type of research to include in the review. The methodology for assessing the quality of harmful effects data in systematic reviews requires further development.

  4. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A primer on systematic reviews in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; de Vries, Rob B M; Stephens, Martin L; Beck, Nancy B; Dirven, Hubert A A M; Fowle, John R; Goodman, Julie E; Hartung, Thomas; Kimber, Ian; Lalu, Manoj M; Thayer, Kristina; Whaley, Paul; Wikoff, Daniele; Tsaioun, Katya

    2017-07-01

    Systematic reviews, pioneered in the clinical field, provide a transparent, methodologically rigorous and reproducible means of summarizing the available evidence on a precisely framed research question. Having matured to a well-established approach in many research fields, systematic reviews are receiving increasing attention as a potential tool for answering toxicological questions. In the larger framework of evidence-based toxicology, the advantages and obstacles of, as well as the approaches for, adapting and adopting systematic reviews to toxicology are still being explored. To provide the toxicology community with a starting point for conducting or understanding systematic reviews, we herein summarized available guidance documents from various fields of application. We have elaborated on the systematic review process by breaking it down into ten steps, starting with planning the project, framing the question, and writing and publishing the protocol, and concluding with interpretation and reporting. In addition, we have identified the specific methodological challenges of toxicological questions and have summarized how these can be addressed. Ultimately, this primer is intended to stimulate scientific discussions of the identified issues to fuel the development of toxicology-specific methodology and to encourage the application of systematic review methodology to toxicological issues.

  6. Conflicts of interest and spin in reviews of psychological therapies: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Klaus; von der Osten-Sacken, Jan; Stoffers-Winterling, Jutta; Reiss, Neele; Barth, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore conflicts of interest (COI) and their reporting in systematic reviews of psychological therapies, and to evaluate spin in the conclusions of the reviews. Methods MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched for systematic reviews published between 2010 and 2013 that assessed effects of psychological therapies for anxiety, depressive or personality disorders, and included at least one randomised controlled trial. Required COI disclosure by journal, disclosed COI by review authors, and the inclusion of own primary studies by review authors were extracted. Researcher allegiance, that is, that researchers concluded favourably about the interventions they have studied, as well as spin, that is, differences between results and conclusions of the reviews, were rated by 2 independent raters. Results 936 references were retrieved, 95 reviews fulfilled eligibility criteria. 59 compared psychological therapies with other forms of psychological therapies, and 36 psychological therapies with pharmacological interventions. Financial, non-financial, and personal COI were disclosed in 22, 4 and 1 review, respectively. 2 of 86 own primary studies of review authors included in 34 reviews were disclosed by review authors. In 15 of the reviews, authors showed an allegiance effect to the evaluated psychological therapy that was never disclosed. Spin in review conclusions was found in 27 of 95 reviews. Reviews with a conclusion in favour of psychological therapies (vs pharmacological interventions) were at high risk for a spin in conclusions (OR=8.31 (1.41 to 49.05)). Spin was related in trend to the inclusion of own primary studies in the systematic review (OR=2.08 (CI 0.83 to 5.18) p=0.11) and researcher allegiance (OR=2.63 (0.84 to 8.16) p=0.16). Conclusions Non-financial COI, especially the inclusion of own primary studies into reviews and researcher allegiance, are frequently seen in systematic reviews of psychological therapies and need more transparency and

  7. A Systematic Method for Search Term Selection in Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jenna; Davis, Jacqueline; Mazerolle, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    The wide variety of readily available electronic media grants anyone the freedom to retrieve published references from almost any area of research around the world. Despite this privilege, keeping up with primary research evidence is almost impossible because of the increase in professional publishing across disciplines. Systematic reviews are a…

  8. A Systematic Review of Psychosocial Interventions to Cancer Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the effect of psychosocial interventions on improving QoL, depression and anxiety of cancer caregivers.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of psychosocial interventions among adult cancer caregivers published from 2011 to 2016. PsycINFO, PubMed, Proquest, Cochrane Library, Embase, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI and EBSCO, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and WANFANG were searched. Inclusion criteria were: randomized controlled trails (RCTs; psychosocial intervention to cancer caregivers; psychosocial health indicators including quality of life, depression or anxiety.Results: 21 studies out of 4,666 identified abstracts met inclusion criteria, including 19 RCTs. The intervention modes fell into the following nine categories: family connect intervention, self-determination theory-based intervention (SDT, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, emotion-focused therapy (EFT, comprehensive health enhancement support system (CHESS, FOCUS programme, existential behavioral therapy (EBT, telephone interpersonal counseling (TIP-C, problem-solving intervention (COPE.Conclusion: paired-intervention targeting self-care and interpersonal connections of caregivers and symptom management of patients is effective in improving quality of life and alleviating depression of cancer caregivers while music therapy is helpful for reducing anxiety of cancer caregivers.

  9. "Assessing the methodological quality of systematic reviews in radiation oncology: A systematic review".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Haroon; Muhammed, Taaha; Yu, Jennifer; Taguchi, Kelsi; Samargandi, Osama A; Howard, A Fuchsia; Lo, Andrea C; Olson, Robert; Goddard, Karen

    2017-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the methodological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in Radiation Oncology. A systematic literature search was conducted for all eligible systematic reviews and meta-analyses in Radiation Oncology from 1966 to 2015. Methodological characteristics were abstracted from all works that satisfied the inclusion criteria and quality was assessed using the critical appraisal tool, AMSTAR. Regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with a higher score of quality. Following exclusion based on a priori criteria, 410 studies (157 systematic reviews and 253 meta-analyses) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses were found to be of fair to good quality while systematic reviews were found to be of less than fair quality. Factors associated with higher scores of quality in the multivariable analysis were including primary studies consisting of randomized control trials, performing a meta-analysis, and applying a recommended guideline related to establishing a systematic review protocol and/or reporting. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses may introduce a high risk of bias if applied to inform decision-making based on AMSTAR. We recommend that decision-makers in Radiation Oncology scrutinize the methodological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses prior to assessing their utility to inform evidence-based medicine and researchers adhere to methodological standards outlined in validated guidelines when embarking on a systematic review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of body image in prenatal and postpartum depression: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marushka L; Ertel, Karen A; Dole, Nancy; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    Maternal depression increases risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, and recent evidence suggests that body image may play an important role in depression. This systematic review identifies studies of body image and perinatal depression with the goal of elucidating the complex role that body image plays in prenatal and postpartum depression, improving measurement, and informing next steps in research. We conducted a literature search of the PubMed database (1996-2014) for English language studies of (1) depression, (2) body image, and (3) pregnancy or postpartum. In total, 19 studies matched these criteria. Cross-sectional studies consistently found a positive association between body image dissatisfaction and perinatal depression. Prospective cohort studies found that body image dissatisfaction predicted incident prenatal and postpartum depression; findings were consistent across different aspects of body image and various pregnancy and postpartum time periods. Prospective studies that examined the reverse association found that depression influenced the onset of some aspects of body image dissatisfaction during pregnancy, but few evaluated the postpartum onset of body image dissatisfaction. The majority of studies found that body image dissatisfaction is consistently but weakly associated with the onset of prenatal and postpartum depression. Findings were less consistent for the association between perinatal depression and subsequent body image dissatisfaction. While published studies provide a foundation for understanding these issues, methodologically rigorous studies that capture the perinatal variation in depression and body image via instruments validated in pregnant women, consistently adjust for important confounders, and include ethnically diverse populations will further elucidate this association.

  11. Headache and pregnancy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, A; Delaruelle, Z; Ivanova, T A; Khan, S; Ornello, R; Raffaelli, B; Terrin, A; Reuter, U; Mitsikostas, D D

    2017-10-19

    This systematic review summarizes the existing data on headache and pregnancy with a scope on clinical headache phenotypes, treatment of headaches in pregnancy and effects of headache medications on the child during pregnancy and breastfeeding, headache related complications, and diagnostics of headache in pregnancy. Headache during pregnancy can be both primary and secondary, and in the last case can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. The most common secondary headaches are stroke, cerebral venous thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary tumor, choriocarcinoma, eclampsia, preeclampsia, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Migraine is a risk factor for pregnancy complications, particularly vascular events. Data regarding other primary headache conditions are still scarce. Early diagnostics of the disease manifested by headache is important for mother and fetus life. It is especially important to identify "red flag symptoms" suggesting that headache is a symptom of a serious disease. In order to exclude a secondary headache additional studies can be necessary: electroencephalography, ultrasound of the vessels of the head and neck, brain MRI and MR angiography with contrast ophthalmoscopy and lumbar puncture. During pregnancy and breastfeeding the preferred therapeutic strategy for the treatment of primary headaches should always be a non-pharmacological one. Treatment should not be postponed as an undermanaged headache can lead to stress, sleep deprivation, depression and poor nutritional intake that in turn can have negative consequences for both mother and baby. Therefore, if non-pharmacological interventions seem inadequate, a well-considered choice should be made concerning the use of medication, taking into account all the benefits and possible risks.

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jessica S.

    2017-01-01

    Depression is common in individuals with intellectual disabilities, but evidence regarding treatment for this population is lacking. Through a systematic literature review of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with individuals with intellectual disabilities, a total of six studies were identified that used pretest-post-test nonequivalent control…

  13. Contribution of systematic reviews to management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Carly N; Possingham, Hugh P; Fuller, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reviews comprehensively summarize evidence about the effectiveness of conservation interventions. We investigated the contribution to management decisions made by this growing body of literature. We identified 43 systematic reviews of conservation evidence, 23 of which drew some concrete conclusions relevant to management. Most reviews addressed conservation interventions relevant to policy decisions; only 35% considered practical on-the-ground management interventions. The majority of reviews covered only a small fraction of the geographic and taxonomic breadth they aimed to address (median = 13% of relevant countries and 16% of relevant taxa). The likelihood that reviews contained at least some implications for management tended to increase as geographic coverage increased and to decline as taxonomic breadth increased. These results suggest the breadth of a systematic review requires careful consideration. Reviews identified a mean of 312 relevant primary studies but excluded 88% of these because of deficiencies in design or a failure to meet other inclusion criteria. Reviews summarized on average 284 data sets and 112 years of research activity, yet the likelihood that their results had at least some implications for management did not increase as the amount of primary research summarized increased. In some cases, conclusions were elusive despite the inclusion of hundreds of data sets and years of cumulative research activity. Systematic reviews are an important part of the conservation decision making tool kit, although we believe the benefits of systematic reviews could be significantly enhanced by increasing the number of reviews focused on questions of direct relevance to on-the-ground managers; defining a more focused geographic and taxonomic breadth that better reflects available data; including a broader range of evidence types; and appraising the cost-effectiveness of interventions. © 2013 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley

  14. Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

  15. Online Peer-to-Peer Support for Young People With Mental Health Problems: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Kathina; Farrer, Louise; Gulliver, Amelia; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescence and early adulthood are critical periods for the development of mental disorders. Online peer-to-peer communication is popular among young people and may improve mental health by providing social support. Previous systematic reviews have targeted Internet support groups for adults with mental health problems, including depression. However, there have been no systematic reviews examining the effectiveness of online peer-to-peer support in improving the mental health of a...

  16. Systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeflang, Mariska M G; Deeks, Jonathan J; Gatsonis, Constantine

    2008-01-01

    More and more systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy studies are being published, but they can be methodologically challenging. In this paper, the authors present some of the recent developments in the methodology for conducting systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy studies....... Restrictive electronic search filters are discouraged, as is the use of summary quality scores. Methods for meta-analysis should take into account the paired nature of the estimates and their dependence on threshold. Authors of these reviews are advised to use the hierarchical summary receiver...

  17. A Youth Suicide Prevention Plan for Canada: A Systematic Review of Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kathryn; Rhodes, Anne E; Duda, Stephanie; Cheung, Amy H; Manassis, Katharina; Links, Paul; Mushquash, Christopher; Braunberger, Peter; Newton, Amanda S; Kutcher, Stanley; Bridge, Jeffrey A; Santos, Robert G; Manion, Ian G; Mclennan, John D; Bagnell, Alexa; Lipman, Ellen; Rice, Maureen; Szatmari, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We conducted an expedited knowledge synthesis (EKS) to facilitate evidence-informed decision making concerning youth suicide prevention, specifically school-based strategies and nonschool-based interventions designed to prevent repeat attempts. Systematic review of review methods were applied. Inclusion criteria were as follows: systematic review or meta-analysis; prevention in youth 0 to 24 years; peer-reviewed English literature. Review quality was determined with AMSTAR (a measurement tool to assess systematic reviews). Nominal group methods quantified consensus on recommendations derived from the findings. No included review addressing school-based prevention (n = 7) reported decreased suicide death rates based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled cohort studies (CCSs), but reduced suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, and proxy measures of suicide risk were reported (based on RCTs and CCSs). Included reviews addressing prevention of repeat suicide attempts (n = 14) found the following: emergency department transition programs may reduce suicide deaths, hospitalizations, and treatment nonadherence (based on RCTs and CCSs); training primary care providers in depression treatment may reduce repeated attempts (based on one RCT); antidepressants may increase short-term suicide risk in some patients (based on RCTs and meta-analyses); this increase is offset by overall population-based reductions in suicide associated with antidepressant treatment of youth depression (based on observational studies); and prevention with psychosocial interventions requires further evaluation. No review addressed sex or gender differences systematically, Aboriginal youth as a special population, harm, or cost-effectiveness. Consensus on 6 recommendations ranged from 73% to 100%. Our EKS facilitates decision maker access to what is known about effective youth suicide prevention interventions. A national research-to-practice network that links researchers and decision

  18. Usefulness of systematic review search strategies in finding child health systematic reviews in MEDLINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boluyt, Nicole; Tjosvold, Lisa; Lefebvre, Carol; Klassen, Terry P.; Offringa, Martin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity and precision of existing search strategies for retrieving child health systematic reviews in MEDLINE using PubMed. DESIGN: Filter (diagnostic) accuracy study. We identified existing search strategies for systematic reviews, combined them with a filter that

  19. Systematic review of reviews of risk factors for intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Systematic reviews of systematic reviews identify good quality reviews of earlier studies of medical conditions. This article describes a systematic review of systematic reviews performed to investigate factors that might influence the risk of rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. It exemplifies the technique of this type of research and reports the finding of a specific study. The annual incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage resulting from the rupture of intracranial aneurysms is estimated to be nine per 100,000. A large proportion of people who have this bleed, will die or remain dependent on the care of others for some time. Reliable knowledge about the risks of subarachnoid haemorrhage in different populations will help in planning, screening and prevention strategies and in predicting the prognosis of individual patients. If the necessary data were available in the identified reviews, an estimate for the numerical relationship between a particular characteristic and the risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage was included in this report. The identification of eligible systematic reviews relied mainly on the two major bibliographic databases of the biomedical literature: PubMed and EMBASE. These were searched in 2006, using specially designed search strategies. Approximately 2,000 records were retrieved and each of these was checked carefully against the eligibility criteria for this systematic review. These criteria required that the report be a systematic review of studies assessing the risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in patients known to have an unruptured intracranial aneurysm or of studies that had investigated the characteristics of people who experienced a subarachnoid haemorrhage without previously being known to have an unruptured aneurysm. Reports which included more than one systematic review were eligible and each of these reviews was potentially eligible. The quality of each systematic review was assessed. In this review, 16 separate reports were

  20. Using text mining for study identification in systematic reviews: a systematic review of current approaches

    OpenAIRE

    O?Mara-Eves, Alison; Thomas, James; McNaught, John; Miwa, Makoto; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Background The large and growing number of published studies, and their increasing rate of publication, makes the task of identifying relevant studies in an unbiased way for inclusion in systematic reviews both complex and time consuming. Text mining has been offered as a potential solution: through automating some of the screening process, reviewer time can be saved. The evidence base around the use of text mining for screening has not yet been pulled together systematically; this systematic...

  1. Pharmacological interventions to treat phlebitis: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a systematic review for evaluating effective pharmacological actions for the treatment of phlebitis stemming from infusion therapy. The studies reviewed were categorized according to the type of therapeutic approach proposed by the author and by the level of evidence presented. The review found that topical nitroglycerin and notoginseny were more effective in the reduction of the inflammatory process when compared with other proposed alternatives. Nevertheless, the development of research related to possible alternatives for the treatment of phlebitis is important.

  2. Presentation of Depression in Autism and Asperger Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mary E.; Barnard, Louise; Pearson, Joanne; Hasan, Reem; O'Brien, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Depression is common in autism and Asperger syndrome, but despite this, there has been little research into this issue. This review considers the current literature on the prevalence, presentation, treatment and assessment of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome. There are diagnostic difficulties when considering depression in autism and…

  3. The quality of systematic reviews about interventions for refractive error can be improved: a review of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Ng, Sueko Matsumura; Chuck, Roy S; Li, Tianjing

    2017-09-05

    Systematic reviews should inform American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) Preferred Practice Pattern® (PPP) guidelines. The quality of systematic reviews related to the forthcoming Preferred Practice Pattern® guideline (PPP) Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery is unknown. We sought to identify reliable systematic reviews to assist the AAO Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery PPP. Systematic reviews were eligible if they evaluated the effectiveness or safety of interventions included in the 2012 PPP Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery. To identify potentially eligible systematic reviews, we searched the Cochrane Eyes and Vision United States Satellite database of systematic reviews. Two authors identified eligible reviews and abstracted information about the characteristics and quality of the reviews independently using the Systematic Review Data Repository. We classified systematic reviews as "reliable" when they (1) defined criteria for the selection of studies, (2) conducted comprehensive literature searches for eligible studies, (3) assessed the methodological quality (risk of bias) of the included studies, (4) used appropriate methods for meta-analyses (which we assessed only when meta-analyses were reported), (5) presented conclusions that were supported by the evidence provided in the review. We identified 124 systematic reviews related to refractive error; 39 met our eligibility criteria, of which we classified 11 to be reliable. Systematic reviews classified as unreliable did not define the criteria for selecting studies (5; 13%), did not assess methodological rigor (10; 26%), did not conduct comprehensive searches (17; 44%), or used inappropriate quantitative methods (3; 8%). The 11 reliable reviews were published between 2002 and 2016. They included 0 to 23 studies (median = 9) and analyzed 0 to 4696 participants (median = 666). Seven reliable reviews (64%) assessed surgical interventions. Most systematic reviews of interventions for

  4. Exercise for mental illness: a systematic review of inpatient studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Robert; Happell, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    A substantial body of evidence supports the role of exercise interventions for people with a mental illness. However, much of this literature is conducted using outpatient and community-based populations. We undertook a systematic review examining the effect of exercise interventions on the health of people hospitalized with depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or anxiety disorders. Eight studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies show positive health outcomes from short-term and long-term interventions for people hospitalized due to depression. Although positive, the evidence for inpatients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or anxiety disorders is substantially less. There is an urgent need to address the paucity of literature in this area, in particular the optimal dose and delivery of exercise for people hospitalized as a result of mental illness. Standardization of reporting exercise programme variables, the assessment of mental illness, and the reporting of adverse events must accompany future studies. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Herbal medications for surgical patients: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Ana Paula Nappi; Ayala, Ana Patricia; Lopes, Luciane C; Bergamaschi, Cristiane C; Guimarães, Caio; Grossi, Mariana Del; Righesso, Leonardo A R; Agarwal, Arnav; El Dib, Regina

    2017-07-26

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) affect approximately 80% of surgical patients and is associated with increased length of hospital stay and systemic costs. Preoperative and postoperative pain, anxiety and depression are also commonly reported. Recent evidence regarding their safety and effectiveness has not been synthesised. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medications for the treatment and prevention of anxiety, depression, pain and PONV in patients undergoing laparoscopic, obstetrical/gynaecological and cardiovascular surgical procedures. The following electronic databases will be searched up to 1 October 2016 without language or publication status restrictions: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and LILACS. Randomised clinical trials enrolling adult surgical patients undergoing laparoscopic, obstetrical/gynaecological and cardiovascular surgeries and managed with herbal medication versus a control group (placebo, no intervention or active control) prophylactically or therapeutically will be considered eligible. Outcomes of interest will include the following: anxiety, depression, pain, nausea and vomiting. A team of reviewers will complete title and abstract screening and full-text screening for identified hits independently and in duplicate. Data extraction, risk of bias assessments and evaluation of the overall quality of evidence for each relevant outcome reported will be conducted independently and in duplicate using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation classification system. Dichotomous data will be summarised as risk ratios; continuous data will be summarised as standard average differences with 95% CIs. This is one of the first efforts to systematically summarise existing evidence evaluating the use of herbal medications in laparoscopic, obstetrical/gynaecological and cardiovascular surgical patients. The findings of this review will be disseminated

  6. The evidence base for psychological interventions for rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, Louise; Barley, Elizabeth; Galloway, James; Georgopoulou, Sofia; Sturt, Jackie

    2018-06-01

    Psychological interventions are an important but often overlooked adjunctive treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Findings from systematic reviews of psychological interventions for this patient group are conflicting. A systematic review of reviews can explain inconsistencies between studies and provide a clearer understanding of the effects of interventions. To: 1) determine the effectiveness of psychological interventions in improving biopsychosocial outcomes for adults with rheumatoid arthritis, 2) determine the relationship between the intensity of the psychological interventions (number of sessions, duration of sessions, duration of intervention) on outcomes, and 3) assess the impact of comparator group (usual care, education only) on outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of reviews using the following inclusion criteria: 1) randomised controlled trials of psychological interventions (including cognitive behavioural therapy, supportive counselling, psychotherapy, self-regulatory techniques, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and disclosure therapy) provided as an adjunct to medication, 2) included rheumatoid arthritis patients aged ≥ 18 years, 3) reported findings for at least 1 of the primary outcomes: pain, fatigue, psychological status, functional disability and disease activity and 4) were published in English between January 2000 and March 2015 (updated January 2018). We searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Reference lists were searched for additional reviews. Study selection and 50% of the quality assessments were performed by two independent reviewers. Methodological quality was measured using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews checklist. Data extraction was conducted by one reviewer using a predesigned data extraction form. Eight systematic reviews met inclusion criteria (one review was excluded due to

  7. Roles for librarians in systematic reviews: a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Angela J.; Eldredge, Jonathan D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective What roles do librarians and information professionals play in conducting systematic reviews? Librarians are increasingly called upon to be involved in systematic reviews, but no study has considered all the roles librarians can perform. This inventory of existing and emerging roles aids in defining librarians’ systematic reviews services. Methods For this scoping review, the authors conducted controlled vocabulary and text-word searches in the PubMed; Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts; and CINAHL databases. We separately searched for articles published in the Journal of the European Association for Health Information and Libraries, Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, the Journal of the Canadian Heath Libraries Association, and Hypothesis. We also text-word searched Medical Library Association annual meeting poster and paper abstracts. Results We identified 18 different roles filled by librarians and other information professionals in conducting systematic reviews from 310 different articles, book chapters, and presented papers and posters. Some roles were well known such as searching, source selection, and teaching. Other less documented roles included planning, question formulation, and peer review. We summarize these different roles and provide an accompanying bibliography of references for in-depth descriptions of these roles. Conclusion Librarians play central roles in systematic review teams, including roles that go beyond searching. This scoping review should encourage librarians who are fulfilling roles that are not captured here to document their roles in journal articles and poster and paper presentations. PMID:29339933

  8. Conducting systematic reviews of economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomersall, Judith Streak; Jadotte, Yuri Tertilus; Xue, Yifan; Lockwood, Suzi; Riddle, Dru; Preda, Alin

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, a working group was established to review and enhance the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidance for conducting systematic review of evidence from economic evaluations addressing a question(s) about health intervention cost-effectiveness. The objective is to present the outcomes of the working group. The group conducted three activities to inform the new guidance: review of literature on the utility/futility of systematic reviews of economic evaluations and consideration of its implications for updating the existing methodology; assessment of the critical appraisal tool in the existing guidance against criteria that promotes validity in economic evaluation research and two other commonly used tools; and a workshop. The debate in the literature on the limitations/value of systematic review of economic evidence cautions that systematic reviews of economic evaluation evidence are unlikely to generate one size fits all answers to questions about the cost-effectiveness of interventions and their comparators. Informed by this finding, the working group adjusted the framing of the objectives definition in the existing JBI methodology. The shift is away from defining the objective as to determine one cost-effectiveness measure toward summarizing study estimates of cost-effectiveness and informed by consideration of the included study characteristics (patient, setting, intervention component, etc.), identifying conditions conducive to lowering costs and maximizing health benefits. The existing critical appraisal tool was included in the new guidance. The new guidance includes the recommendation that a tool designed specifically for the purpose of appraising model-based studies be used together with the generic appraisal tool for economic evaluations assessment to evaluate model-based evaluations. The guidance produced by the group offers reviewers guidance for each step of the systematic review process, which are the same steps followed in JBI reviews of other

  9. Antidepressants for depression in patients with dementia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Christine

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the literature investigating the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for treating depression in individuals with dementia. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases from inception to May 2013 for studies in English that evaluated the treatment of depression in patients with dementia. All relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses were identified using the search terms "dementia" or "Alzheimer's disease," and "depression" or "major depressive disorder." Reference lists from retrieved articles and practice guidelines were also searched for relevant literature. Only randomized, placebo-controlled trials and meta-analyses that compared an antidepressant with placebo for the treatment of depression in patients with dementia were included. In this systematic review, 10 RCTs and 3 meta-analyses were identified that examined the efficacy and safety of antidepressants compared with placebo in treating depression in patients with dementia. The majority of the RCTs consisted of a small sample size, and the antidepressants studied were not routinely used in practice. The evidence for antidepressants in the treatment of depression in patients with dementia is inconclusive. The accumulation of evidence suggests nonpharmacologic approaches and watchful waiting be attempted for the first 8 to 12 weeks in a patient who presents with both mild-to-moderate depression and dementia. In cases of severe depression, or depression not managed through nonpharmacologic means, a trial of an antidepressant may be initiated. However, further well-designed trials are needed to support these recommendations.

  10. Methodology in conducting a systematic review of systematic reviews of healthcare interventions

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Valerie

    2011-02-03

    Abstract Background Hundreds of studies of maternity care interventions have been published, too many for most people involved in providing maternity care to identify and consider when making decisions. It became apparent that systematic reviews of individual studies were required to appraise, summarise and bring together existing studies in a single place. However, decision makers are increasingly faced by a plethora of such reviews and these are likely to be of variable quality and scope, with more than one review of important topics. Systematic reviews (or overviews) of reviews are a logical and appropriate next step, allowing the findings of separate reviews to be compared and contrasted, providing clinical decision makers with the evidence they need. Methods The methods used to identify and appraise published and unpublished reviews systematically, drawing on our experiences and good practice in the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews are described. The process of identifying and appraising all published reviews allows researchers to describe the quality of this evidence base, summarise and compare the review\\'s conclusions and discuss the strength of these conclusions. Results Methodological challenges and possible solutions are described within the context of (i) sources, (ii) study selection, (iii) quality assessment (i.e. the extent of searching undertaken for the reviews, description of study selection and inclusion criteria, comparability of included studies, assessment of publication bias and assessment of heterogeneity), (iv) presentation of results, and (v) implications for practice and research. Conclusion Conducting a systematic review of reviews highlights the usefulness of bringing together a summary of reviews in one place, where there is more than one review on an important topic. The methods described here should help clinicians to review and appraise published reviews systematically, and aid evidence-based clinical decision-making.

  11. The Hopelessness Theory of Depression: A Quarter Century in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Kleiman, Evan M; Nestor, Bridget A; Cheek, Shayna M

    2015-12-01

    Since the formulation of the hopelessness theory of depression (Abramson, Metalsky, & Alloy, 1989) a quarter century ago, it has garnered considerable interest. The current paper presents a systematic review of this theory including its subsequent elaborations (Rose and Abramson's [1992] developmental elaboration, Abela and Sarin's [2002] weakest-link approach, Panzarella, Alloy, and Whitehouse's [2006] expansion of the hopelessness theory, and the hopelessness theory of suicide [Abramson et al., 2000]), followed by recommendations for future study. Although empirical support was consistently found for several major components of the hopelessness theory, further work is required assessing this theory in relation to clinically significant phenomena. Among the most significant hindrances to advancement in this area is the frequent conceptual confusion between the hopelessness theory and the reformulated learned helplessness theory.

  12. The Hopelessness Theory of Depression: A Quarter Century in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T.; Kleiman, Evan M.; Nestor, Bridget A.; Cheek, Shayna M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the formulation of the hopelessness theory of depression (Abramson, Metalsky, & Alloy, 1989) a quarter century ago, it has garnered considerable interest. The current paper presents a systematic review of this theory including its subsequent elaborations (Rose and Abramson’s [1992] developmental elaboration, Abela and Sarin’s [2002] weakest-link approach, Panzarella, Alloy, and Whitehouse’s [2006] expansion of the hopelessness theory, and the hopelessness theory of suicide [Abramson et al., 2000]), followed by recommendations for future study. Although empirical support was consistently found for several major components of the hopelessness theory, further work is required assessing this theory in relation to clinically significant phenomena. Among the most significant hindrances to advancement in this area is the frequent conceptual confusion between the hopelessness theory and the reformulated learned helplessness theory. PMID:26709338

  13. Factors contributing to chronic ankle instability: a protocol for a systematic review of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cassandra; Schabrun, Siobhan; Romero, Rick; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Marshall, Paul

    2016-06-07

    Ankle sprains are a significant clinical problem. Researchers have identified a multitude of factors contributing to the presence of recurrent ankle sprains including deficits in balance, postural control, kinematics, muscle activity, strength, range of motion, ligament laxity and bone/joint characteristics. Unfortunately, the literature examining the presence of these factors in chronic ankle instability (CAI) is conflicting. As a result, researchers have attempted to integrate this evidence using systematic reviews to reach conclusions; however, readers are now faced with an increasing number of systematic review findings that are also conflicting. The overall aim of this review is to critically appraise the methodological quality of previous systematic reviews and pool this evidence to identify contributing factors to CAI. A systematic review will be conducted on systematic reviews that investigate the presence of various deficits identified in CAI. Databases will be searched using pre-determined search terms. Reviews will then be assessed for inclusion based on the set eligibility criteria. Two independent reviewers will assess the articles for inclusion before evaluating the methodological quality and presence of bias of the included studies; any disagreements will be resolved by discussion between reviewers to reach consensus or by a third reviewer. Data concerning the specific research question, search strategy, inclusion/exclusion criteria, population, method and outcomes will be extracted. Findings will be analysed with respect to the methodological quality of the included reviews. It is expected that this review will clarify the cause of contradicting findings in the literature and facilitate future research directions. PROSPERO CRD42016032592 .

  14. Postpartum electroconvulsive therapy: a systematic review and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, Florence; Rotenberg, Samuel; Cazas, Odile; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression can have devastating consequences on the mother and child. Prompt treatment is challenging. Whereas electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be an effective treatment modality in severe depression and brings about rapid clinical improvement, little is known about ECT during the postpartum period. We systematically reviewed the literature on the use of ECT during the postpartum period using PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge and PsycINFO databases until September 2014, using the search terms "electroconvulsive therapy" or "ECT" and "postpartum". Then, we described the successful treatment with ECT and the joint mother-baby hospitalization of a woman with severe depression. Eight case reports and 8 studies were identified. All of the studies reported that ECT is effective in the postpartum period. It is well tolerated, provides a fast response and allows for breastfeeding. In addition, our case report showed the benefits of the hospitalization of the mother-baby unit. Combined ECT and joint mother-baby hospitalization could be a valuable treatment by targeting both the mother-infant relationship and the maternal depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Melatonin as a treatment for mood disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crescenzo, F; Lennox, A; Gibson, J C; Cordey, J H; Stockton, S; Cowen, P J; Quested, D J

    2017-12-01

    Melatonin has been widely studied in the treatment of sleep disorders and evidence is accumulating on a possible role for melatonin influencing mood. Our aim was to determine the efficacy and acceptability of melatonin for mood disorders. We conducted a comprehensive systematic review of randomized clinical trials on patients with mood disorders, comparing melatonin to placebo. Eight clinical trials were included; one study in bipolar, three in unipolar depression and four in seasonal affective disorder. We have only a small study on patients with bipolar disorder, while we have more studies testing melatonin as an augmentation strategy for depressive episodes in major depressive disorder and seasonal affective disorder. The acceptability and tolerability were good. We analyzed data from three trials on depressive episodes and found that the evidence for an effect of melatonin in improving mood symptoms is not significant (SMD = 0.37; 95% CI [-0.05, 0.37]; P = 0.09). The small sample size and the differences in methodology of the trials suggest that our results are based on data deriving from investigations occurring early in this field of study. There is no evidence for an effect of melatonin on mood disorders, but the results are not conclusive and justify further research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Systemic mastocytosis - A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.L.; Hasselbalch, H.C.; Kristensen, T.K.

    2012-01-01

    of the cell has been described and its fascinating biology has only recently been depicted. We here give a review of systemic mastocytosis in regards to cell biology, diagnostic approaches and clinical practice. METHODS: A search was made in PubMed in August 2011 entering the keywords: mastocytosis, (systemic...

  17. Female desistance: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodermond, E.; Kruttschnitt, C.; Slotboom, A.; Bijleveld, C.C.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether, and if so how, male-based theories of desistance also apply to female offenders, this article reviews 44 studies on female desistance. Where available, gender differences in desistance are considered. Having children and supportive relationships is found to be important for

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of psychological predictors of successful assisted reproductive technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Purewal, S.; Chapman, S. C. E.; van den Akker, O. B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to perform an updated investigation of the effects of depression and anxiety on pregnancy outcomes following assisted reproductive technologies. A bibliographic search was performed using PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Science Direct databases. Data retrieved were analysed using a random effects model to estimate standardised mean differences. Results Of the 22 included studies, 18 investigated depression, 15 state anxiety, and sev...

  19. Internet interventions for chronic pain including headache: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Buhrman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health problem and behavioral based treatments have been shown to be effective. However, the availability of these kinds of treatments is scarce and internet-based treatments have been shown to be promising in this area. The objective of the present systematic review is to evaluate internet-based interventions for persons with chronic pain. The specific aims are to do an updated review with a broad inclusion of different chronic pain diagnoses and to assess disability and pain and also measures of catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. A systematic search identified 891 studies and 22 trials were selected as eligible for review. Two of the selected trials included children/youth and five included individuals with chronic headache and/or migraine. The most frequently measured domain reflected in the primary outcomes was interference/disability, followed by catastrophizing. Result across the studies showed a number of beneficial effects. Twelve trials reported significant effects on disability/interference outcomes and pain intensity. Positive effects were also found on psychological variable such as catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. Several studies (n = 12 were assessed to have an unclear level of risk bias. The attrition levels ranged from 4% to 54% where the headache trials had the highest drop-out levels. However, findings suggest that internet-based treatments based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT are efficacious measured with different outcome variables. Results are in line with trials in clinical settings. Meta-analytic statistics were calculated for interference/disability, pain intensity, catastrophizing and mood ratings. Results showed that the effect size for interference/disability was Hedge's g = −0.39, for pain intensity Hedge's g = −0.33, for catastrophizing Hedge's g = −0.49 and for mood variables (depression Hedge's g = −0.26.

  20. Stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews: a protocol for a systematic review of methods, outcomes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Pauline; Struthers, Caroline; Synnot, Anneliese; Nunn, Jack; Hill, Sophie; Goodare, Heather; Watts, Chris; Morley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Researchers are expected to actively involve stakeholders (including patients, the public, health professionals, and others) in their research. Although researchers increasingly recognise that this is good practice, there is limited practical guidance about how to involve stakeholders. Systematic reviews are a research method in which international literature is brought together, using carefully designed and rigorous methods to answer a specified question about healthcare. We want to investigate how researchers have involved stakeholders in systematic reviews, and how involvement has potentially affected the quality and impact of reviews. We plan to bring this information together by searching and reviewing the literature for reports of stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews. This paper describes in detail the methods that we plan to use to do this. After carrying out comprehensive searches for literature, we will: 1. Provide an overview of identified reports, describing key information such as types of stakeholders involved, and how. 2. Pick out reports of involvement which include detailed descriptions of how researchers involved people in a systematic review and summarise the methods they used. We will consider who was involved, how people were recruited, and how the involvement was organised and managed. 3. Bring together any reports which have explored the effect, or impact, of involving stakeholders in a systematic review. We will assess the quality of these reports, and summarise their findings. Once completed, our review will be used to produce training resources aimed at helping researchers to improve ways of involving stakeholders in systematic reviews. Background There is an expectation for stakeholders (including patients, the public, health professionals, and others) to be involved in research. Researchers are increasingly recognising that it is good practice to involve stakeholders in systematic reviews. There is currently a lack of evidence

  1. Menopause and illness course in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perich, Tania; Ussher, Jane; Meade, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    Menopause may be a time of increased mood symptoms for some women. This systematic review aimed to examine the severity of symptoms and prevalence of mood changes in women with bipolar disorder during peri-menopause and post-menopause. A systematic review was undertaken in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The two primary outcomes assessed were relapse rates and symptom severity during menopause. Databases searched were MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 1980 until December 2016. Nine studies, including a total of 273 participants diagnosed with bipolar disorder and who reported menopause, were included in the narrative synthesis. Menopause was reported to be associated with increased symptoms overall, and with depression in particular (range of 46%-91%). The collection of self-reported retrospective data was the most commonly used method to record menopause status. The impact of menopause on illness course for women with bipolar disorder is largely under-explored. Preliminary evidence suggests that it may be associated with increased bipolar symptoms. Further work is needed to explore how menopause may interact with bipolar disorder over time and the nature of these symptom changes, and if and how menopause may differ from other reproductive stages. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dental insurance: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garla, Bharath Kumar; Satish, G; Divya, K T

    2014-12-01

    To review uses of finance in dentistry. A search of 25 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Insurance has come of ages and has become the mainstay of payment in many developed countries. So much so that all the alternative forms of payment which originated as an alternative to fee for service now depend on insurance at one point or the other. Fee for service is still the major form of payment in many developing countries including India. It is preferred in many instances since the payment is made immediately.

  3. Systematic reviews and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugwell, Peter; Robinson, Vivian; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Santesso, Nancy

    2006-08-01

    Proven effective interventions exist that would enable all countries to meet the Millennium Development Goals. However, uptake and use of these interventions in the poorest populations is at least 50% less than in the richest populations within each country. Also, we have recently shown that community effectiveness of interventions is lower for the poorest populations due to a "staircase" effect of lower coverage/access, worse diagnostic accuracy, less provider compliance and less consumer adherence. We propose an evidence-based framework for equity-oriented knowledge translation to enhance community effectiveness and health equity. This framework is represented as a cascade of steps to assess and prioritize barriers and thus choose effective knowledge translation interventions that are tailored for relevant audiences (public, patient, practitioner, policy-maker, press and private sector), as well as the evaluation, monitoring and sharing of these strategies. We have used two examples of effective interventions (insecticide-treated bednets to prevent malaria and childhood immunization) to illustrate how this framework can provide a systematic method for decision-makers to ensure the application of evidence-based knowledge in disadvantaged populations. Future work to empirically validate and evaluate the usefulness of this framework is needed. We invite researchers and implementers to use the cascade for equity-oriented knowledge translation as a guide when planning implementation strategies for proven effective interventions. We also encourage policy-makers and health-care managers to use this framework when deciding how effective interventions can be implemented in their own settings.

  4. Nuts and oxidation: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Mònica Bulló; Patricia López-Uriarte; Patricia Casas-Agustench; Nancy Babio; Jordi Salas-Salvadó

    2009-01-01

    Nuts and oxidation: a systematic review In recent years, nuts have received special attention because of their potential role in preventing cardiovascular disease. Because nuts are very rich in total fat that can potentially be oxidized and their skins contain several antioxidants, studies have been conducted to evaluate the potential effect of nut consumption on oxidative stress. This review evaluates the in vitro and in vivo studies conducted in animals or humans to analyze the effect of...

  5. Tranexamic acid in epistaxis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhieh, Y; Fox, H

    2016-12-01

    The role of tranexamic acid in the management of epistaxis remains unclear. There is uncertainty about its safety and about the contraindications for its use. We performed a systematic review of the use of systemic and topical tranexamic acid in epistaxis and a comparative review of its use in other specialties. This review assesses and summarises the existing evidence for the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid in the management of epistaxis. Systematic review. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for 'epistaxis' and equivalent MESH terms, combined with the Boolean operator 'OR' and 'tranexamic acid'. The Cochrane library and society guidelines were reviewed for evidence regarding the use of tranexamic acid in other specialties. All five relevant RCTs were included in the review and were evaluated according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews. Three RCTS pertained to spontaneous epistaxis; of these, one trial found no benefit of oral tranexamic acid in acute epistaxis, one trial found no significant benefit of topical tranexamic acid, but the largest of the trials showed significant benefit of topical tranexamic acid in acute epistaxis management. Two RCTs examined oral tranexamic acid for prophylaxis of recurrent epistaxes in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia; both showed significant reduction in severity and frequency. Tranexamic acid, as a WHO 'essential medicine', is a powerful, readily available tool, the use of which in epistaxis has been limited by uncertainty over its efficacy and its safety profile. This systematic review summarises the existing evidence and extrapolates from the wealth of data for other specialties to address the clinical question - does TXA have a role in epistaxis management? © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Infusion phlebitis assessment measures: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Ray-Barruel, Gillian; Polit, Denise F; Murfield, Jenny E; Rickard, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Phlebitis is a common and painful complication of peripheral intravenous cannulation. The aim of this review was to identify the measures used in infusion phlebitis assessment and evaluate evidence regarding their reliability, validity, responsiveness and feasibility. Method We conducted a systematic literature review of the Cochrane library, Ovid MEDLINE and EBSCO CINAHL until September 2013. All English-language studies (randomized controlled trials, prospecti...

  7. Customer Journeys: A Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Følstad, Asbjørn; Kvale, Knut

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – Customer journeys has become an increasingly important topic in service management and design. The study reviews customer journey terminology and approaches within the research literature prior to 2013, mainly from the fields of design, management, and marketing. Design/methodology/approach - The study was conducted as a systematic literature review. Searches in Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, ACM Digital Library, and ScienceDirect identified 45 papers for analysis. The pa...

  8. Can Communicating Personalised Disease Risk Promote Healthy Behaviour Change? A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, David P; Cameron, Elaine; Benton, Jack S; Deaton, Christi; Harvie, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    The assessment and communication of disease risk that is personalised to the individual is widespread in healthcare contexts. Despite several systematic reviews of RCTs, it is unclear under what circumstances that personalised risk estimates promotes change in four key health-related behaviours: smoking, physical activity, diet and alcohol consumption. The present research aims to systematically identify, evaluate and synthesise the findings of existing systematic reviews. This systematic review of systematic reviews followed published guidance. A search of four databases and two-stage screening procedure with good reliability identified nine eligible systematic reviews. The nine reviews each included between three and 15 primary studies, containing 36 unique studies. Methods of personalising risk feedback included imaging/visual feedback, genetic testing, and numerical estimation from risk algorithms. The reviews were generally high quality. For a broad range of methods of estimating and communicating risk, the reviews found no evidence that risk information had strong or consistent effects on health-related behaviours. The most promising effects came from interventions using visual or imaging techniques and with smoking cessation and dietary behaviour as outcomes, but with inconsistent results. Few interventions explicitly used theory, few targeted self-efficacy or response efficacy, and a limited range of Behaviour Change Techniques were used. Presenting risk information on its own, even when highly personalised, does not produce strong effects on health-related behaviours or changes which are sustained. Future research in this area should build on the existing knowledge base about increasing the effects of risk communication on behaviour.

  9. Conservative treatment of sciatica : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroomen, PCAJ; de Krom, MCTFM; Slofstra, PD; Knottnerus, JA

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with sciatica (often caused by disc herniations) are managed conservatively at first. The natural course seems to be favorable. The additional value of many conservative therapies remains controversial. Because a systematic review of the conservative treatment of sciatica is lacking,

  10. Pancreatectomy for metastatic disease: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adler, H

    2014-04-01

    Tumours rarely metastasise to the pancreas. While surgical resection of such metastases is believed to confer a survival benefit, there is limited data to support such management. We present a systematic review of case series of pancreatic metastasectomy and analysis of survival outcomes.

  11. Cognition in Childhood Dystonia : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Maraike A; Eggink, Hendriekje; Tijssen, M.A.; Spikman, Jacoba

    Background and aim: Cognitive impairments have